WorldWideScience

Sample records for surfactant layer rigidity

  1. Effects of silicon surfactant in rigid polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The rigid polyurethane foams (RPUFs have been fabricated from high functional crude 4,4’-di-phenylmethane diisocyanate (CMDI and polypropylene glycols (PPGs for a wide range of surfactant concentration with an environmently friendly blowing agent (HFC 365mfc. Cream time, gel time, and tack-free time increased with the addition of surfactant. Foam density decreased rapidly to a minimum at 0.5 pphp (part per hundred polyol surfactant due to the increased blowing efficiency with surfactant. Surface tension rapidly decreased to an asymptotic value at 2 pphp surfactant. In accordance with this, cell size decreased and closed cell content increased rapidly to constant values at low surfactant concentrations (<1 pphp. The decrease of cell size was accompanied by the decrease of thermal conductivity to give a linear relatiohship between the two implying that the series model of heat transfer is applicable.

  2. Bending elasticity of charged surfactant layers: the effect of mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, L Magnus

    2006-08-01

    Expressions have been derived from which the spontaneous curvature (H(0)), bending rigidity (k(c)), and saddle-splay constant (k(c)) of mixed monolayers and bilayers may be calculated from molecular and solution properties as well as experimentally available quantities such as the macroscopic hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfacial tension. Three different cases of binary surfactant mixtures have been treated in detail: (i) mixtures of an ionic and a nonionic surfactant, (ii) mixtures of two oppositely charged surfactants, and (iii) mixtures of two ionic surfactants with identical headgroups but different tail volumes. It is demonstrated that k(c)H(0), k(c), and k(c) for mixtures of surfactants with flexible tails may be subdivided into one contribution that is due to bending properties of an infinitely thin surface as calculated from the Poisson-Boltzmann mean field theory and one contribution appearing as a result of the surfactant film having a finite thickness with the surface of charge located somewhat outside the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. As a matter of fact, the picture becomes completely different as finite layer thickness effects are taken into account, and as a result, the spontaneous curvature is extensively lowered whereas the bending rigidity is raised. Furthermore, an additional contribution to k(c) is present for surfactant mixtures but is absent for k(c)H(0) and k(c). This contribution appears as a consequence of the minimization of the free energy with respect to the composition of a surfactant layer that is open in the thermodynamic sense and must always be negative (i.e., k(c) is generally found to be brought down by the process of mixing two or more surfactants). The magnitude of the reduction of k(c) increases with increasing asymmetry between two surfactants with respect to headgroup charge number and tail volume. As a consequence, the bending rigidity assumes the lowest values for layers formed in mixtures of two oppositely charged

  3. Structure and Dynamics of Nonionic Surfactant Aggregates in Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan, Régis; Veron, Emmanuel; Le Forestier, Lydie; Ogawa, Makoto; Cadars, Sylvian

    2017-09-26

    The aggregation of surfactants on solid surfaces as they are adsorbed from solution is the basis of numerous technological applications such as colloidal stabilization, ore flotation, and floor cleaning. The understanding of both the structure and the dynamics of surfactant aggregates applies to the development of alternative ways of preparing hybrid layered materials. For this purpose, we study the adsorption of the triethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether (C10E3) nonionic surfactant onto a synthetic montmorillonite (Mt), an aluminosilicate clay mineral for organoclay preparation with important applications in materials sciences, catalysis, wastewater treatment, or as drug delivery. The aggregation mechanisms follow those observed in an analogous natural Mt, with the condensation of C10E3 in a bilayer arrangement once the surfactant self-assembles in a lamellar phase beyond the critical micelle concentration, underlining the importance of the surfactant state in solution. Solid-state (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) and high magnetic field combined with(1)H-(13)C correlation experiments and different types of (13)C NMR experiments selectively probes mobile or rigid moieties of C10E3 in three different aggregate organizations: (i) a lateral monolayer, (ii) a lateral bilayer, and (iii) a normal bilayer. High-resolution (1)H{(27)Al} CP-(1)H-(1)H spin diffusion experiments shed light on the proximities and dynamics of the different fragments and fractions of the intercalated surfactant molecules with respect to the Mt surface. (23)Na and (1)H NMR measurements combined with complementary NMR data, at both molecular and nanometer scales, precisely pointed out the location of the C10E3 ethylene oxide hydrophilic group in close contact with the Mt surface interacting through ion-dipole or van der Waals interactions.

  4. A minimal length rigid helical peptide motif allows rational design of modular surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Varenik, Maxim; Bloch, Daniel Nir; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Jacoby, Guy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Beck, Roy; Miller, Yifat; Regev, Oren; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Extensive work has been invested in the design of bio-inspired peptide emulsifiers. Yet, none of the formulated surfactants were based on the utilization of the robust conformation and self-assembly tendencies presented by the hydrophobins, which exhibited highest surface activity among all known proteins. Here we show that a minimalist design scheme could be employed to fabricate rigid helical peptides to mimic the rigid conformation and the helical amphipathic organization. These designer building blocks, containing natural non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), form superhelical assemblies as confirmed by crystallography and microscopy. The peptide sequence is amenable to structural modularity and provides the highest stable emulsions reported so far for peptide and protein emulsifiers. Moreover, we establish the ability of short peptides to perform the dual functions of emulsifiers and thickeners, a feature that typically requires synergistic effects of surfactants and polysaccharides. This work provides a different paradigm for the molecular engineering of bioemulsifiers.

  5. Compression analysis of rectangular elastic layers bonded between rigid plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang-Chuan Tsai [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei (China). Dept. of Construction Engineering

    2005-06-01

    An elastic layer bonded between two rigid plates has higher compression stiffness than the elastic layer without bonding. While the finite element method can be applied to calculate the stiffness, the compression stiffness of bonded rectangular layers derived through a theoretical approach in this paper provides a convenient way for parametric study. Based on two kinematics assumptions, the governing equation for the mean pressure is derived from the equilibrium equations. Using the approximate shear boundary condition, the mean pressure is solved and the compression stiffness of the bonded rectangular layer is then established in an explicit single-series form. Through the solved pressure, the horizontal displacements are derived from the corresponding equilibrium equations, from which the shear stress on the bonding surface can be found. It is found that the effect of the rectangular aspect on the compression stiffness is significant only when Poisson's ratio is near 0.5. For the smaller Poisson's ratio, the compression stiffness of the rectangular layer can be approximated by the formula for the infinite-strip layer of the same shape factor. (author)

  6. Modification of nano-sized layered double hydroxides by long-chain organic aliphatic surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    RAMASAMY ANBARASAN; SEUNG SOON IM; WANDUC LEE

    2008-01-01

    The inter-layer anion of layered double hydroxides (LDH) with a hydrotalcite (HT)-like structure was ion-exchanged with various organic surfactants, particularly with long chain aliphatic surfactants. After the ion-exchange process, the basal spacing of the LDH was increased and the increase of the basal spacing depended on various factors, such as the intercalation capacity functionality and orientation capability of the surfactant. Of the employed surfactants, stearic acid intercalated LDH ...

  7. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered double hydroxides—XRD study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Anbarasan; W D Lee; S S Im

    2005-04-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) with brucite like structure was modified with various anionic surfactants containing sulfonate, carboxyl, phosphonate and sulfate end group through ion-exchange method. XRD reports indicated that the sulfonate group containing surfactants led to an adsorption process whereas the sulfate, carboxyl and phosphonate group containing surfactant led to an intercalation process. This can be evidenced from the change in basal spacing of LDH. The presence of anionic surfactants in the LDH was supported by FTIR spectroscopy. The FTIR spectrum indicated that complete removal of carbonate anion from the inter layer space of LDH is very difficult. The phosphonate intercalated HT showed less thermal stability than pristine LDH.

  8. Frictionless contact of a rigid punch indenting a transversely isotropic elastic layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Patra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the study of frictionless contact between a rigid punch and a transversely isotropic elastic layer. The rigid punch is assumed to be axially symmetric and is being pressed towards the layer by an applied concentrated load. The layer is resting on a rigid base and is assumed to be ufficiently thick in comparison with the amount of indentation by the rigid punch. The relationship between the applied load $P$ and the contact area is obtained by solving the mathematically formulated problem through use of Hankel transform of different order. Effect of indentation on the distribution of normal stress at the surface as well as the relationship between the applied load and the area of contact have been shown graphically.

  9. Light-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles using a rigid, photoresponsive surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youju; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2012-09-01

    We report a new strategy for shape control over the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a photoresponsive surfactant based on a modified seed growth method. Owing to photoresponsive properties of the azo group, the designed surfactant, N1,N3,N5-tris[(4'-azobenzene-4-sulphonic acid)phenyl]benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide, exhibits a distinctive molecular configuration under light leading to different growth processes of AuNPs. As a result, the blackberry-like, spherical AuNPs and multilayered Au plates were successfully prepared in high yield under visible and UV light. The size and morphological control of Au nanocrystals are described and the synthesized Au nanocrystals are evaluated for SERS applications.We report a new strategy for shape control over the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a photoresponsive surfactant based on a modified seed growth method. Owing to photoresponsive properties of the azo group, the designed surfactant, N1,N3,N5-tris[(4'-azobenzene-4-sulphonic acid)phenyl]benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide, exhibits a distinctive molecular configuration under light leading to different growth processes of AuNPs. As a result, the blackberry-like, spherical AuNPs and multilayered Au plates were successfully prepared in high yield under visible and UV light. The size and morphological control of Au nanocrystals are described and the synthesized Au nanocrystals are evaluated for SERS applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The UV-vis spectra, representative field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images and size distributions of Au seeds (18 nm) and spherical AuNPs (50 nm), photograph images of AuNPs solution and TEM images of blackberry-like AuNPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31717f

  10. Stress Analysis in Polymeric Coating Layer Deposited on Rigid Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Soon Lee [Korea University of Technology and Education, School of Mechatronics Engineering, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents an analysis of thermal stress induced along the interface between a polymeric coating layer and a steel substrate as a result of uniform temperature change. The epoxy layer is assumed to be a linear viscoelastic material and to be theromorheologically simple. The viscoelastic boundary element method is employed to investigate the behavior of interface stresses. The numerical results exhibit relaxation of interface stresses and large stress gradients, which are observed in the vicinity of the free surface. Since the exceedingly large stresses cannot be borne by the polymeric coating layer, local cracking or delamination can occur at the interface corner.

  11. Modification of nano-sized layered double hydroxides by long-chain organic aliphatic surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMASAMY ANBARASAN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The inter-layer anion of layered double hydroxides (LDH with a hydrotalcite (HT-like structure was ion-exchanged with various organic surfactants, particularly with long chain aliphatic surfactants. After the ion-exchange process, the basal spacing of the LDH was increased and the increase of the basal spacing depended on various factors, such as the intercalation capacity functionality and orientation capability of the surfactant. Of the employed surfactants, stearic acid intercalated LDH showed the highest increase of the basal spacing, which was confirmed by XRD analysis. FTIR results supported the interaction of the surfactants with the LDH. In addition, an increase in the thermal stability of the dodecanedioic acid intercalated HT was evidenced by the TGA method.

  12. Approximate analysis of rigid plate loading on elastic multi-layered systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maina, JW

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Games software is well known for its capability to compute responses for uniformly distributed load acting on the surface of a multi-layered linear elastic system. In this study a method was developed to approximate rigid plate loading to be used...

  13. Three-dimensional low symmetry mesoporous silica structures templated from tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shaodian; Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E; Liu, Zheng; Lu, Qingyi; Shi, Yifeng; Yan, Yan; Yu, Chengzhong; Liu, Weichang; Cai, Ya; Terasaki, Osamu; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2005-05-11

    Two kinds of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials (FDU-11, FDU-13) with novel three-dimensional (3-D) tetragonal and orthorhombic structures were synthesized by using tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant [(CH(3))(3)NCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)N(CH(3))(2)CH(2)(CH(2))(11)OC(6)H(4)C(6)H(4)O(CH(2))(11)CH(2)N(CH(3))(2)CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)N(CH(3))(3).4Br] (C(3-12-12)(-)(3)) as a template under alkaline conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) show that mesoporous silica FDU-11 has primitive tetragonal P4/mmm structure with cell parameters a = b = 8.46 nm, c = 5.22 nm, and c/a ratio = 0.617. N(2) sorption isotherms show that calcined FDU-11 has a high BET surface area of approximately 1490 m(2)/g, a uniform pore size of approximately 2.72 nm, and a pore volume of approximately 1.88 cm(3)/g. Mesoporous silica FDU-13 has primitive orthorhombic Pmmm structure. The cell parameters are a = 9.81, b = 5.67, and c = 3.66 nm. N(2) sorption isotherms show that calcined FDU-13 has a high BET surface area of 1210 m(2)/g, a uniform mesopore size of approximately 1.76 nm, and a large pore volume of approximately 1.83 cm(3)/g. Such low symmetries for 3-D mesostructures (tetragonal and orthorhombic system) have not been observed before even in amphiphilic liquid crystals, which maybe resulted from an oblate aggregation of the bolaform surfactant and its strong electrostatic interaction with inorganic precursor. A probable mechanism has been proposed for the formation of such a 3-D low symmetrical mesostructure. These results will further extend the synthesis of mesoporous materials and may open up new opportunities for their new applications in catalysis, separation, and nanoscience.

  14. Surfactant and gravity dependent instability of two-layer Couette flows and its nonlinear saturation

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    A horizontal flow of two immiscible fluid layers with different densities, viscosities and thicknesses, subject to vertical gravitational forces and with an insoluble surfactant present at the interface, is investigated. The base Couette flow is driven by the horizontal motion of the channel walls. Linear and nonlinear stages of the (inertialess) surfactant and gravity dependent long-wave instability are studied using the lubrication approximation, which leads to a system of coupled nonlinear evolution equations for the interface and surfactant disturbances. The linear stability is determined by an eigenvalue problem for the normal modes. The growth rates and the amplitudes of disturbances of the interface, surfactant, velocities, and pressures are found analytically. For each wavenumber, there are two active normal modes. For each mode, the instability threshold conditions in terms of the system parameters are determined. In particular, it transpires that for certain parametric ranges, even arbitrarily stron...

  15. Optimization of layered double hydroxide stability and adsorption capacity for anionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Natasja; Ham, Louis G.J. van der; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Haan, André B. de

    2007-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents, layered double hydroxide (LDH) proved to be an interesting material for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) which is the main contamina

  16. Optimization of layered double hydroxide stability and adsorption capacity for anionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Natasja; Ham, van der Louis G.J.; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Haan, de André B.

    2007-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents (Schouten et al. 2007), layered double hydroxide (LDH) proved to be an interesting material for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) whic

  17. Effect of EDTA with and without surfactants or ultrasonics on removal of smear layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Jeen-Nee; Kuah, Hong-Guan; Chen, Nah-Nah

    2007-04-01

    This study compared the in vitro efficacy of Smear Clear (Sybron Endo, CA), a 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution with surfactants, to 17% EDTA, with and without the use of ultrasonics, in removal of the smear layer. Seventy-five extracted teeth, randomly distributed into 5 test groups, were prepared by using ProFile rotary instruments (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and subjected to different final irrigating regimes; group A, 1% sodium hypochlorite; group B, 17% EDTA; group C, 17% EDTA with ultrasonics; group D, Smear Clear; and group E, Smear Clear with ultrasonics. Samples were examined under the scanning electron microscope and scored for debris and smear layer removal. Statistical analysis showed that groups D and E did not perform significantly better than groups B and C. Group C performed significantly better than group B. Addition of surfactants to EDTA in Smear Clear did not result in better smear layer removal. The use of ultrasonics with 17% EDTA improved smear layer removal.

  18. Hamiltonian Particle-Mesh Method for Two-Layer Shallow-Water Equations Subject to the Rigid-Lid Approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, C.J.; Frank, J.E.; Reich, S.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a particle-mesh method for two-layer shallow-water equations subject to the rigid-lid approximation. The method is based on the recently proposed Hamiltonian particle-mesh (HPM) method and the interpretation of the rigid-lid approximation as a set of holonomic constraints. The suggested s

  19. Influence of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface wave in an inhomogeneous layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shishir Gupta; Rehena Sultana; Santimoy Kundu

    2015-02-01

    The present work illustrates a theoretical study on the effect of rigid boundary for the propagation of torsional surface wave in an inhomogeneous crustal layer over an inhomogeneous half space. It is believed that the inhomogeneity in the half space arises due to hyperbolic variation in shear modulus and density whereas the layer has linear variation in shear modulus and density. The dispersion equation has been obtained in a closed form by using Whittaker’s function, which shows the variation of phase velocity with corresponding wave number. Numerical results show the dispersion equations, which are discussed and presented by means of graphs. Results in some special cases are also compared with existing solutions available from analytical methods, which show a close resemblance. It is also observed that, for a layer over a homogeneous half space, the velocity of torsional waves does not coincide with that of Love waves in the presence of the rigid boundary, whereas it does at the free boundary. Graphical user interface (GUI) software has been developed using MATLAB 7.5 to generalize the effect of various parameter discussed.

  20. Measure Guideline: Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This measure guideline provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ inches and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  1. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  2. Optimization of layered double hydroxide stability and adsorption capacity for anionic surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents, layered double hydroxide (LDH) proved to be an interesting material for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) which is the main contaminant in rinsing water. The main research question was to identify the effect of process parameters of the LDH synthesis on the stability of the LDH structure and the adsorption capacity of LAS. LDH w...

  3. Convective instability in a ferrofluid layer with temperature-modulated rigid boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jitender [Department of Mathematics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Bajaj, Renu, E-mail: sonumaths@gmail.com, E-mail: rbajaj@pu.ac.in [Department of Mathematics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Under terrestrial as well as gravity-free conditions, a time-periodic modulation in temperatures of two horizontal rigid planes containing an initially quiescent ferrofluid layer induces time-periodic oscillations in the fluid layer at the onset of instability. This results in a series of patterns of time-periodically oscillating magnetoconvective rolls, along the vertical. The onset of instability in the ferrofluid layer is either a harmonic response or a subharmonic response depending upon the modulation. The instability is found to be significantly affected by the application of magnetic field across the ferrofluid layer. Under modulation, subcritical instabilities are found to occur in the form of subharmonic response. Also, the onset of instability in the ferrofluid layer when it is driven solely by the magnetic forces alone is found to heavily depend upon the frequency of modulation, the effect being greatest for the low-frequency modulation and negligible for the case of high-frequency modulation. The gravity-free limit is also evaluated as a function of the magnetic susceptibility, under modulation. To carry out this extensive study, the classical Floquet theory is utilized.

  4. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping, E-mail: lishuping@njnu.edu.cn; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. - Highlights: • Surfactants could be used to modify the dispersing state of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • Surfactants have great effect on the morphology of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • MTX/LDHs with good monodisperse degree are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  5. Crystal chemistry of layered structures formed by linear rigid silyl-capped molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lumpi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization behavior of methylthio- or methylsulfonyl-containing spacer extended Z,Z-bis-ene–yne molecules capped with trimethylsilyl groups obtained by (tandem thiophene ring fragmentation and of two non-spacer extended analogs were investigated. The rigid and linear molecules generally crystallized in layers whereby the flexibility of the layer interfaces formed by the silyl groups leads to a remarkably rich crystal chemistry. The molecules with benzene and thiophene spacers both crystallized with C2/c symmetry and can be considered as merotypes. Increasing the steric bulk of the core by introduction of ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT gave a structure incommensurately modulated in the [010] direction. Further increase of steric demand in the case of a dimethoxythiophene restored periodicity along [010] but resulted in a doubling of the c vector. Two different polytypes were observed, which feature geometrically different layer interfaces (non-OD, order–disorder, polytypes, one with a high stacking fault probability. Oxidation of the methylthio groups of the benzene-based molecule to methylsulfonyl groups led to three polymorphs (two temperature-dependent, which were analyzed by Hirshfeld surface de/di fingerprint plots. The analogously oxidized EDOT-based molecule crystallized as systematic twins owing to its OD polytypism. Shortening of the backbone by removal of the aryl core resulted in an enantiomorphic structure and a further shortening by removal of a methylthio-ene fragment again in a systematically twinned OD polytype.

  6. Stability of an unsupported multi-layer surfactant laden liquid curtain under gravity

    KAUST Repository

    Henry, D.

    2015-11-07

    The industrial process of curtain coating has long been an important method in coating applications, by which a thin liquid curtain is formed to impinge upon a moving substrate, due to its highly lucrative advantage of being able to coat multiple layers simultaneously. We investigate the linear stability of an unsupported two-layer liquid curtain, which has insoluble surfactants in both liquids, which are widely used in industry to increase the stability of the curtain. We formulate the governing equations, simplified by making a thin film approximation, from which we obtain equations describing the steady-state profiles. We then examine the response of the curtain to small perturbations about this steady state to identify conditions under which the curtain is unstable, finding the addition of surfactants stabilizes the curtain. Our results are then compared to experimental data, showing a favourable trend and thereby extending the works of Brown (J Fluid Mech 10:297–305, 1960) and Dyson et al. (J Eng Math 64:237–250, 2009).

  7. Parametric excitation of oscillatory Marangoni instability in a heated liquid layer covered by insoluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikishev, Alexander B.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous research reported in the two last IMA conferences. While in our previous works the driving modulation was a modulation of the temperature gradient, here the temperature gradient is fixed in the whole liquid layer and the liquid is vertically vibrated with some fixed driving frequency. Two kinds of waves can be generated in this system. The first kind of waves are transverse (capillary-gravity) waves. The second kind of waves are longitudinal (Marangoni) waves caused by the dependence of the surface tension on the temperature and the surfactant concentration. A linear analysis with arbitrary wave numbers is performed. Two different heating regimes were considered. Multiple instability regions depending on the heating conditions are analyzed. Among three possible modes of the system's response to external forcing, the most "dangerous" one is the subharmonic instability mode.

  8. The study of The study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers The study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interface liquid-gas interfacethe influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interfaceThe study of the influence of temperature on surfactants – polyethylene glycol layers on liquid-gas interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryk Boloshaan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface tension of compositions consisting of nonionic polyethylene glycol and surface active substances of different nature and influence of temperatures on properties of their adsorption layers were studied. To be taken into account the basics of classical chemical thermodynamics and colloidal chemistry, the thermodynamic parameters were determined for the adsorption of glycol, cetyl pyridinium bromide, Tween- 80 and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Adsorption speed was valuated By Kinetic curves of a liquid /gas interfaces. As a surfactants were taken the anionic surfactant – sodium dodecylsulphate, cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium bromide and nonionic Tween-80. The reason of using nonionic polyethyleneglycol as polymer is that the polymer is not toxic, biodegradable and it has no harm to the human body. That is why they are largely used in food industry, pharmaceutics, cosmetics and household chemical products.

  9. Thermal Transport across Surfactant Layers on Gold Nanorods in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuewang; Ni, Yuxiang; Zhu, Jie; Burrows, Nathan D; Murphy, Catherine J; Dumitrica, Traian; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-04-27

    Ultrafast transient absorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the thermal transport between aqueous solutions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)- or polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized gold nanorods (GNRs). The transient absorption measurement data are interpreted with a multiscale heat diffusion model, which incorporates the interfacial thermal conductances predicted by molecular dynamics. According to our observations, the effective thermal conductance of the GNR/PEG/water system is higher than that of the GNR/CTAB/water system with a surfactant layer of the same length. We attribute the enhancement of thermal transport to the larger thermal conductance at the GNR/PEG interface as compared with that at the GNR/CTAB interface, in addition to the water penetration into the hydrophilic PEG layer. Our results highlight the role of the GNR/polymer thermal interfaces in designing biological and composite-based heat transfer applications of GNRs, and the importance of multiscale analysis in interpreting transient absorption data in systems consisting of low interfacial thermal conductances.

  10. Spectral-element simulations of long-term fault slip: Effect of low-rigidity layers on earthquake-cycle dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Y. Kaneko; J.-P. Ampuero; N. Lapusta

    2011-01-01

      Spectral element modeling of spontaneous earthquake cycles is presented Source properties of repeating earthquakes are affected by damaged fault zones Near-surface low-rigidity layers do not lead...

  11. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  12. Effect of Textured Surfactant Brushes on Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposite Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    melt processing a mixture of stearylammonium-exchanged montmorillonite, maleic anhydride -modified polypropylene oligomer, and homopolypropylene (29–31...molecular weights was performed using both the XMASS (Bruker) and Polymerix (Sierra Analytics) software packages. Surfactant nomenclature and...properties are recorded in table 1. The nomenclature used is such that for any surfactant it provides information about its approximate molecular weight

  13. Microstructure-based calculations and experimental results for sound absorbing porous layers of randomly packed rigid spherical beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Tomasz G.

    2014-07-01

    Acoustics of stiff porous media with open porosity can be very effectively modelled using the so-called Johnson-Champoux-Allard-Pride-Lafarge model for sound absorbing porous media with rigid frame. It is an advanced semi-phenomenological model with eight parameters, namely, the total porosity, the viscous permeability and its thermal analogue, the tortuosity, two characteristic lengths (one specific for viscous forces, the other for thermal effects), and finally, viscous and thermal tortuosities at the frequency limit of 0 Hz. Most of these parameters can be measured directly, however, to this end specific equipment is required different for various parameters. Moreover, some parameters are difficult to determine. This is one of several reasons for the so-called multiscale approach, where the parameters are computed from specific finite-element analyses based on some realistic geometric representations of the actual microstructure of porous material. Such approach is presented and validated for layers made up of loosely packed small identical rigid spheres. The sound absorption of such layers was measured experimentally in the impedance tube using the so-called two-microphone transfer function method. The layers are characterised by open porosity and semi-regular microstructure: the identical spheres are loosely packed by random pouring and mixing under the gravity force inside the impedance tubes of various size. Therefore, the regular sphere packings were used to generate Representative Volume Elements suitable for calculations at the micro-scale level. These packings involve only one, two, or four spheres so that the three-dimensional finite-element calculations specific for viscous, thermal, and tortuous effects are feasible. In the proposed geometric packings, the spheres were slightly shifted in order to achieve the correct value of total porosity which was precisely estimated for the layers tested experimentally. Finally, in this paper some results based on

  14. 2D sandbox experiments of surfactant foams for mobility control and enhanced LNAPL recovery in layered soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longpré-Girard, Mélanie; Martel, Richard; Robert, Thomas; Lefebvre, René; Lauzon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The ability of surfactant foam to enhance mobility control and LNAPL recovery in a heterogeneous porous media was investigated through sandbox experiments with p-xylene used as LNAPL. A layered heterogeneous porous media was represented in a 2D sandbox filled with two layers of coarse and medium silica sand. Based on previous tests, the surfactant solution used was Ammonyx Lo at a concentration of 0.1% (w/w). The sandbox experimental program included tracer tests done under both uncontaminated and contaminated conditions, foam injection under uncontaminated conditions and surfactant solution and foam injection under contaminated conditions. Tracer tests indicated that the permeability contrast between sand layers was increased by LNAPL contamination. Foam injection under uncontaminated conditions presented a S-shaped front that indicated a better mobility control than the piston-shaped front obtained during tracer tests. During foam injection, complete sweep of the sandbox was achieved with 1.8 pore volume (PV) compared to 2.8 PV during tracer injection, thus indicating better mobility control with foam. Pre-flush of the contaminated sandbox with surfactant solution initiated p-xylene mobilization but no free phase was recovered at the effluent. A negligible p-xylene residual saturation was reached following foam injection in the contaminated sandbox. However, mass balance indicated a total recovery of only 48% of the initial p-xylene, thus indicating an underestimation of the recovery by volatilization. Recovery by volatilization was corrected, which gave the following proportions of LNAPL recovery mechanisms: 19% by mobilization, 16% by dissolution and 65% by volatilization. Results show the potential efficiency of foam remediation of LNAPL source zones in heterogeneous porous media. Still, further developments are needed prior to field scale application, which could benefit from in situ foam production that would simplify on-site operations.

  15. Quasi-total absorption peak by use of a backed rigid frame porous layer with circular periodic inclusions embedded

    CERN Document Server

    Groby, Jean-Philippe; Duclos, Aroune; Boeckx, Laurens; Lauriks, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic properties of a porous sheet of medium resistivity backed by a rigid plate in which are embedded a periodic set of circular inclusions is investigated. Such a structure behaves like a multi-component diffraction gratings. Numerical results show that this structure presents a quasi-total absorption peak below the essential spectrum, i.e. below the frequence of the fundamental quarter-wavelength resonance of the porous sheet in absence of inclusions. This result is explained either by the excitation of a complex trapped mode, or by the increase of viscous loss associated with a larger velocity gradient inside the layer at the modified quarter-wavelength resonance frequency. When more than one inclusion per spatial period are considered, additional quasi-total frequency peak are observed. The numerical results as calculated with the help of the mode-matching method described in the paper agree those as calculated with the help of a Finite Element method.

  16. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Fluorine-Free Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complexes for the Fabrication of Self-Healing Superhydrophobic Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengchun; An, Ni; Li, Yang; Sun, Junqi

    2016-11-29

    Fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films are of significance for practical applications because of their extended service life and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation process. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-1-octadecylamine (ODA) complexes (PSS-ODA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)-sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) (PAH-SDS) complexes. The wettability of the LbL-assembled PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films depends on the film structure and can be tailored by changing the NaCl concentration in aqueous dispersions of PSS-ODA complexes and the number of film deposition cycles. The freshly prepared PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS film with micro- and nanoscaled hierarchical structures is hydrophilic and gradually changes to superhydrophobic in air because the polyelectrolyte-complexed ODA and SDS surfactants tend to migrate to the film surface to cover the film with hydrophobic alkyl chains to lower its surface energy. The large amount of ODA and SDS surfactants loaded in the superhydrophobic PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films and the autonomic migration of these surfactants to the film surface endow the resultant superhydrophobic films with an excellent self-healing ability to restore the damaged superhydrophobicity. The self-healing superhydrophobic PSS-ODA/PAH-SDS films are mechanically robust and can be deposited on various flat and nonflat substrates. The LbL assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes provides a new way for the fabrication of fluorine-free self-healing superhydrophobic films with satisfactory mechanical stability, enhanced reliability, and extended service life.

  17. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface.

  18. Non-stationary axially symmetric goal of thermo-elasticity for a fixed rigid circular multi-layer plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlyakhin Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers axially symmetric goal of thermos–elasticity for a fixed rigid circular multi-layer isotropic plate with non–stationary heat flows on its front faces. The mathematical model is presented in the form of a not self–adjoint system that includes differential motion equations and a linear equation of the thermal-elastic state in a three-dimensional model. A new closed solution in an unconnected setting is built by the method of finite integral transformation. At the same time, a standardization procedure is conducted at each stage of the solution, which allows to implement an appropriate conversion algorithm. The calculated ratios provide an opportunity to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the associated temperature and mechanical fields and also to examine stress–strain behaviour of the multi–layer systems both under the local thermal shock, which is observed, for example, in the interaction with the laser beam and in the case of uneven unsteady surface heating, which is frequent during the operation of protective construction structures.

  19. Surfactant-modified flowerlike layered double hydroxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles for preconcentration of phthalate esters from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuangliu; Wang, Peifang; Tang, Zhi; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Yaqi; Wu, Fengchang; Wang, Hao; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P

    2015-10-02

    A novel type of layered, flowerlike magnetic double hydroxide (MLDH) nanoparticles modified by surfactants has been successfully synthesized and was applied as an effective sorbent for pre-concentration of several phthalate ester pollutants (PAEs) from water prior to quantification. The MLDH was obtained via a simple ultrasound-assisted method by using silica coated Fe3O4 as the core and anisotropic Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Mg-Al LDH) nanocrystals as the shell to which analytes were absorbed. Orientation and dimensionality hierarchical structure as well as the large expandable interlayer free space and positive charge of the Mg-Al LDH shell make it easier to form anionic surfactant micelles on its surface via self-assembly. Due to its high adsorption area, compared with non-mesoporous nano solid-phase extraction agents, mesoporous channel shell and reduction diffusion path, MLDH exhibited high extraction efficiency of organic target residues. Under optimized conditions, with a total of 30mg of adsorbant added to from samples containing 400mL water from the environment recoveries of DPP, DBP, DCP and DOP were consistent with ranges of 69-101%, 79-101%, 86-102% and 63-100%, respectively. Standard deviations of recoveries ranged from 1 to 7%, respectively and the method was sensitive with limits of detection of 12.3, 18.7, 36.5 and 15.6ngL(-1). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of use of surfactant-modified MLDH nanoparticles and its application as adsorbent to pre-concentration of PAEs from environmental water samples prior to instrumental analyses.

  20. Coriolis effect on thermal convection in a couple-stress fluid-saturated rotating rigid porous layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivakumara, I.S.; Devaraju, N. [Bangalore University, UGC-Centre for Advanced studies in Fluid Mechanics, Department of Mathematics, Bangalore (India); Sureshkumar, S. [Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Tumkur (India)

    2011-04-15

    Both linear and weakly nonlinear stability analyses are performed to study thermal convection in a rotating couple-stress fluid-saturated rigid porous layer. In the case of linear stability analysis, conditions for the occurrence of possible bifurcations are obtained. It is shown that Hopf bifurcation is possible due to Coriolis force, and it occurs at a lower value of the Rayleigh number at which the simple bifurcation occurs. In contrast to the nonrotating case, it is found that the couple-stress parameter plays a dual role in deciding the stability characteristics of the system, depending on the strength of rotation. Nonlinear stability analysis is carried out by constructing a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using truncated representation of Fourier series. Sub-critical finite amplitude steady motions occur depending on the choice of physical parameters but at higher rotation rates oscillatory convection is found to be the preferred mode of instability. Besides, the stability of steady bifurcating equilibrium solution is discussed using modified perturbation theory. Heat transfer is calculated in terms of Nusselt number. Also, the transient behavior of the Nusselt number is investigated by solving the nonlinear differential equations numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method. It is noted that increase in the value of Taylor number and the couple-stress parameter is to dampen the oscillations of Nusselt number and thereby to decrease the heat transfer. (orig.)

  1. Kinetic analysis of anionic surfactant adsorption from aqueous solution onto activated carbon and layered double hydroxide with the zero length column method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Natasja; Ham, Louis G.J. van der; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Haan, André B. de

    2009-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean-up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents, layered double hydroxide (LDH) and granular activated carbon (GAC) proved to be interesting materials for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate

  2. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF HYDROTHERMAL GROWTH OF CRYSTALS AS A DOUBLE DIFFUSIVE MAGNETOCONVECTION PROBLEM IN A COMPOSITE LAYER BOUNDED BY RIGID WALLS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sumithra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hydrothermal growth of crystals is mathematically modeled as the onset of double diffusive magnetoconvection in a two-layer system comprising an incompressible two component, electrically conducting fluid saturated porous layer over which lies a layer of the same fluid in the presence a vertical magnetic field. Both the upper boundary of the fluid layer and the lower boundary of the porous layer are rigid and insulating to both heat and mass. At the interface the velocity, shear stress, normal stress, heat, heat flux,mass and mass flux are assumed to be continuous conducive for Darcy-Brinkman model. The resulting eigenvalue problem is solved by regular perturbation technique. The critical Rayleigh number, which is thecriterion for stability of the system is obtained. The effects of different physical parameters on the onset of double diffusive magnetoconvection are investigated in detail which enables to control convection during the growth of crystals in order to obtain pure crystals.

  3. Hybrid Layered Crystal Comprising Polyoxometalate and Surfactant Synthesized from Reduced Mo-Blue Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Mikurube

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid layered crystal containing polyoxomolybdate was successfully synthesized from reduced Mo-blue species as starting material. The hybrid crystal, [C5H5N(C16H33]2[β-H2Mo8O26]·2C2H5OH (C16py-H2Mo8, was obtained as a single phase by the gradual oxidation of hexadecylpyridinium-Mo-blue (C16py-Mo-blue hybrid. The X-ray structure analysis revealed that C16py-H2Mo8 comprised β-type octamolybdate anion with two protons (β-H2Mo8. The β-H2Mo8 anions and ethanol molecules of crystallization formed two-dimensional anionic layers. The pyridine rings of C16py did not attend to form the two-dimensional inorganic layers, and the interdigitated C16py bilayers were sandwiched by the β-H2Mo8 anionic layers with periodicity of 18.2 Å. These C16py-H2Mo8 hybrid layered crystals possibly work as a new class of proton conductor.

  4. Work-function oscillations during the surfactant induced layer-by-layer growth of copper on oxygen precovered Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Wolter, H.; Wandelt, K.

    1994-04-01

    In the present work the Cu-film growth on a clean and an oxygen precovered Ru(0001) surface, as monitored with dynamical work function measurements (ΔΦ measurements) during the Cu evaporation using a special Kelvin-probe is compared. For Cu adsorption on the clean surface the observed temperature dependence of the ΔΦ measurements is understood in terms of a change of the growth structure of the Cu films from layer-by-layer growth up to ~ 3 ML at ~ 600 K to a 3D-growth mode at ~ 400 K. In turn, as recently reported, in the case of Cu adsorption on the oxygen-precovered surface at ~ 400 K remarkable ΔΦ oscillations are observed, which could be resolved over many periods clearly indicating a layer-wise growth of high quality at this temperature. Furthermore, in the present paper we report on new and detailed results about the dependence of the ΔΦ oscillations on the oxygen precoverage as well as the Cu deposition rate.

  5. Surfactant-free synthesis of sub-stoichiometry tungsten oxide nanoparticles and their use as anode buffer layers in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brütsch, Lennart; Czolk, Jens; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Colsmann, Alexander; Feldmann, Claus

    2017-07-01

    A surfactant-free synthesis of small-sized tungsten trioxide is presented. Nanoparticles with an average size of 4.6 ± 1.5 nm are prepared via hot-injection techniques in ethanol. Due to the reducing properties of ethanol, a sub-stoichiometry composition WO3-x (x∼0.4) is obtained. The partial reduction of W+VI to W+V becomes visible in the bluish color of suspensions and powder samples and in optical spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The nanoparticles are further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Due to their small size, their high colloidal stability and the absence of surfactants, layers from the as-prepared WO3-x nanoparticles are ideally suited to form anode buffer layers in organic solar cells. Exemplary solar cells show good power conversion efficiency of 6.3%.

  6. Linking the Presence of Surfactant Associated Bacteria on the Sea Surface and in the Near Surface Layer of the Ocean to Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Bryan; Dean, Cayla; Kurata, Naoko; Soloviev, Alex; Tartar, Aurelien; Shivji, Mahmood; Perrie, William; Lehner, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Several genera of bacteria residing on the sea surface and in the near-surface layer of the ocean have been found to be involved in the production and decay of surfactants. Under low wind speed conditions, these surfactants can suppress short gravity capillary waves at the sea surface and form natural sea slicks. These features can be observed with both airborne and satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR). We have developed a new method for sampling the sea surface microlayer that has reduced contamination from the boat and during lab handling of samples. Using this new method, a series of experiments have been conducted to establish a connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the upper layer of the ocean and sea slicks. DNA analysis of in situ samples taken during a RADARSAT-2 satellite overpass in the Straits of Florida during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill showed a higher abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial genera in the slick area as compared to the non-slick area. These genera were found to be more abundant in the subsurface water samples collected as compared to samples taken from the sea surface. The experiment was repeated in the Straits of Florida in September 2013 and was coordinated with TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. The observations suggest that the surfactants contributing to sea slick formation are produced by marine bacteria in the organic matter-rich water column and move to the sea surface by diffusion or advection. Thus, within a range of wind-wave conditions, the organic materials present in the water column (such as dissolved oil spills) can be monitored with SAR satellite imagery. In situ sampling was also performed in the Gulf of Mexico in December 2013 during RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. Areas near natural oil seeps identified from archived TerraSAR-X imagery were targeted for in situ sampling. A number of samples from this location have been analyzed to determine the

  7. Influence of yielding base and rigid base on propagation of Rayleigh-type wave in a viscoelastic layer of Voigt type

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SAHA; A CHATTOPADHYAY; K C MISTRI; A K SINGH

    2017-09-01

    The present study aims to study the propagation of Rayleigh-type wave in a layer, composed of isotropic viscoelastic material of Voigt type, with the effect of yielding base and rigid base in two distinct cases.With the aid of an analytical treatment, closed-form expressions of phase velocity and damped velocity for both the cases are deduced. As a special case of the problem it is found that obtained results are in good agreement with the established standard results existing in the literature. It is established through the study that volume viscoelastic and shear-viscoelastic material parameter and yielding parameter have significant effect on phaseand damped velocities of Rayleigh-type wave in both the cases. Numerical calculations and graphical illustration have been carried out for both the considered cases in the presence and the absence of viscoelasticity. Acomparative study has been performed to analyse the effect of layer with yielding base, traction-free base and rigid base on the phase and damped velocities of Rayleigh-type wave.

  8. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  9. Fabrication of micro pneumatic valves with double-layer elastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) membranes in rigid poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanshi; He, Qiaohong; Hu, Xianqiao; Chen, Hengwu

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method to fabricate a normally open micro pneumatic valve in rigid poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chips. The control and fluid substrates of the valve were prepared with PMMA sheets via hot embossing. After both control and fluid substrates were silanized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and treated with glow discharge plasma, each of them was irreversibly bonded to a plasma-treated PDMS membrane, forming a control half or a fluid half. Relying on the native adhesive force of the PDMS membrane, the control half and fluid half were then reversibly sealed to form a full microchip with the four-layer structure of PMMA-PDMA ṡ  ṡ  ṡ PDMS-PMMA. The irreversible bonding between rigid PMMA substrate and elastic PDMS membrane in combination with the reversible sealing between the control half and fluid half not only eases the difficulties in chip bonding, but also allows the control half and fluid half to be replaced individually in routine analyses. The performance of the developed micro pneumatic valves was characterized, and potential applications of the valves in droplet generation and micro flow injection analysis were demonstrated.

  10. Viscous effects on the acoustics and stability of a shear layer over a non-rigid wall

    CERN Document Server

    Khamis, Doran

    2016-01-01

    The effect of viscosity and thermal conduction on the acoustics in a shear layer above an impedance wall is investigated numerically and asymptotically by solving the linearised compressible Navier-Stokes equations (LNSE). Viscothermal effects are found to be as important as shear, and therefore including only shear by solving the linearised Euler equations (LEE) is questionable. In particular, the damping rate of upstream propagating waves is found to be underpredicted by the LEE, and dramatically so in certain instances. The effects of viscosity on stability are also found to be important. Short wavelength disturbances are stabilised by viscosity, greatly altering the characteristic wavelength and maximum growth rate of instability. For the parameters considered here (chosen to be typical of aeroacoustic situations), the Reynolds number below which the flow stabilizes ranges from $10^5$ to $10^7$. By assuming a thin but nonzero-thickness boundary layer, asymptotic analysis leads to a system of boundary laye...

  11. Hydrogen-surfactant-mediated epitaxy of Ge1- x Sn x layer and its effects on crystalline quality and photoluminescence property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Osamu; Fujinami, Shunsuke; Asano, Takanori; Koyama, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Masashi; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Kishida, Hideo; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2017-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen-surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of Ge1- x Sn x layer on Ge(001) substrate on crystalline quality and photoluminescence (PL) property has been investigated. The effect of irradiation of atomic hydrogen (H) generated by dissociating molecular hydrogen (H2) were examined during the MBE growth. H irradiation significantly improves the surface morphology with the enhancement of the two-dimensional growth of the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer. Enhanced diffuse scattering is observed in the X-ray diffraction profile, indicating a high density of point defects. In the PL spectrum of the H2-irradiated Ge1- x Sn x layer, two components are observed, suggesting the radiative recombination with both indirect and direct transitions, while one component related to the direct transition is observable in the H-irradiated sample. The postdeposition annealing in nitrogen ambient at as low as 220 °C decreases the PL intensity of the H-irradiated Ge1- x Sn x layer, although the intensity is recovered after annealing at 300 °C, suggesting the annihilation of point defects in the Ge1- x Sn x layer.

  12. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  13. 高应力软岩巷道预留刚隙柔层支护技术%Technology of Rigid Gap Flexible Layer Support in High Stress Soft Rock Roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗吉安; 王连国; 侯化强; 卢小雨

    2012-01-01

    High stress soft rock is a kind of engineering soft rock that has low intensity and strong theology in high stress area. The de- formation characteristics demonstrated by boring in soft rock are very different from in hard rock. Rigid gap flexible layer support plays an important role in releasing roadway deformation energy effectively and controlling roadway deformation in the support of soft rock roadway in high stress area. The mechanism of rigid gap flexible layer support is researched in depth by analyzing the coupling relation- ship between rigid and flexible layers and interaction of support and surrounding rock in rigid gap flexible layer support. According to a- bove, the choice of materials and parameters in rigid gap flexible layer support is discussed in detail at last, which provides a reasona- ble design method reference for rigid gap flexible layer support of soft rock roadway in high stress area.%高应力软岩是一种在高应力环境下强度低、流变性强的的工程软岩体。在这些岩体中掘进巷道显示出来的变形特征与硬岩巷道截然不同。预留刚隙柔层支护在高应力软岩巷道支护工作中起到了有效释放巷道变形能量和控制巷道变形的作用。通过剖析预留刚隙柔层支护中的刚、柔层耦合关系以及耦合支护与围岩的相互作用,对预留刚隙柔层的支护机理做了深入的研究。据此,最后对预留刚隙柔层支护中材料及参数的选择方法给予详细的论述,为高应力软岩硐室的预留刚隙柔层支护提供了合理的设计方法参考。

  14. Switchable Surfactants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yingxin Liu; Philip G. Jessop; Michael Cunningham; Charles A. Eckert; Charles L. Liotta

    2006-01-01

    .... We report that long-chain alkyl amidine compounds can be reversibly transformed into charged surfactants by exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, thereby stabilizing water/alkane emulsions...

  15. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant

  16. Mechanical and thermodynamic properties of surfactant aggregates at the solid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Yakov I; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Brown, Scott C; Singh, Pankaj K; Moudgil, Brij M

    2004-02-01

    Surfactants are widely used to stabilize colloidal systems in a variety of industrial applications through the formation of self-assembled aggregates at the solid-liquid interface. Previous studies have reported that the control of surfactant-mediated slurry stability can be achieved through the manipulation of surfactant chain length and concentration. However, a fundamental understanding of the mechanical and energetic properties of these aggregates, which may aid in the molecular-level design of these systems, is still lacking. In this study, experimentally measured force/distance curves between an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and self-assembled surfactant aggregates on mica or silica substrates at concentrations higher than the bulk critical micelle concentration (CMC) were used to determine their mechanical and thermodynamic properties. The experimental curves were fitted to a model which describes the interaction between a hard sphere (tip) and a soft substrate (surfactant structures) based on a modified Hertz theory for the case of a thin elastic layer on a rigid substrate. The calculated mechanical properties were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those reported for rubber-like materials (e.g., polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)). By integrating the force/distance curves, the energy required for breaking the surface aggregates was also calculated. These values are close to those reported for bulk-micelle formation.

  17. MODELING OF THE REAL SYSTEM «STRUCTURE-FOUNDATION-BEDDING» THROUGH THE EMPLOYMENT OF A MODEL OF A TWO-LAYER BEAM OF VARIABLE RIGIDITY RESTING ON THE ELASTIC BEDDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreev Vladimir Igorevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the authors provide the results of analysis of a real construction facility performed with the help of a model of a two-layer beam of variable rigidity resting on the elastic bedding. The bottom layer of a two-layer beam simulates the foundation, the upper payer stands for the structure, and the weight of each layer is taken into consideration. The characteristics of the upper layer change alongside its length. Analytical and numerical methods of calculation were applied to solve this problem. The analytical solution is based on the method of initial parameters and backed by the practical data extracted from "Frame and Towerlike Buildings: Mattress Foundation Design Manual". According to the above manual, whenever the length-to-width ratio of a building exceeds 1.5, one-dimensional pattern composed of a composite beam resting on the elastic bedding may be used. The beam is divided into several sections, and deflection of each section is identified. It is equal to the settlements of the bedding surface. The rigidity change alongside the length of each section is assumed to be permanent, i.e. the beam is considered as the one that demonstrates its piecewise-constant rigidity. The following conclusion can be made on the basis of the calculations performed by the authors: the calculation of the «structure-foundation-bedding» system may require a simplified model representing composite beams and plates resting on the elastic bedding. More accurate models, such as sets of finite elements, are recommend for use in conjunction with simplified ones.

  18. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Jelen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have strictly anaerobic conditions. This review gives an overview on anaerobic biodegradation processes, the methods for testing anaerobic biodegradability, and the anaerobic biodegradability of different detergent surfactant types (anionic, nonionic, cationic, amphoteric surfactants.

  19. Surfactant Effects on Microemulsion-Based Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Tojo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the surfactant on the size, polydispersity, type of size distribution and structure of nanoparticles synthesized in microemulsions has been studied by computer simulation. The model simulates the surfactant by means of two parameters: the intermicellar exchange parameter, kex, related to dimer life time, and film flexibility parameter, f, related to interdroplet channel size. One can conclude that an increase in surfactant flexibility leads to bigger and polydisperse nanoparticle sizes. In addition, at high concentrations, the same reaction gives rise to a unimodal distribution using a flexible surfactant, and a bimodal distribution using a rigid one. In relation to bimetallic nanoparticles, if the nanoparticle is composed of two metals with a moderate difference in reduction potentials, increasing the surfactant flexibility modifies the nanoparticle structure, giving rise to a transition from a nanoalloy (using a rigid film to a core-shell structure (using a flexible one.

  20. On affine rigidity

    CERN Document Server

    Gortler, Steven J; Liu, Ligang; Thurston, Dylan P

    2010-01-01

    We study the properties of affine rigidity of a hypergraph and prove a variety of fundamental results. First, we show that affine rigidity is a generic property (i.e., depends only on the hypergraph, not the particular embedding). Then we prove that a graph is generically neighborhood affinely rigid in d-dimensional space if it is (d+1)-vertex-connected. We also show neighborhood affine rigidity of a graph implies universal rigidity of its squared graph. Our results, and affine rigidity more generally, have natural applications in point registration and localization, as well as connections to manifold learning.

  1. On affine rigidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Gortler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the properties of affine rigidity of a hypergraph and prove a variety of fundamental results. First, we show that affine rigidity is a generic property (i.e., depends only on the hypergraph, not the particular embedding. Then we prove that a graph is generically neighborhood affinely rigid in d-dimensional space if it is (d+1-vertex-connected. We also show neighborhood affine rigidity of a graph implies universal rigidity of its squared graph.  Our results, and affine rigidity more generally, have natural applications in point registration and localization, as well as connections to manifold learning.

  2. Silicone antifoam performance enhancement by nonionic surfactants in potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiano, Steven P; Fey, Kenneth C

    2003-01-01

    The ability of a silicone antifoam to retard foaming in a liquor prepared from potatoes is enhanced by the addition of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. The enhancement is non-linear for surfactant concentration, with all 12 surfactants tested possessing a concentration at which foam heights strongly diminish, referred to as the surfactant critical antifoaming concentration (SCAFC). SCAFCs vary between surfactants, with lower values indicating better mass efficiency of antifoaming enhancement. SCAFCs decrease with degree of ethoxylation and decrease with the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance for ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. Surfactant addition produces a mixed water-surface layer containing surfactant and surface-active components in the potato medium. Surface tension reduction does not correlate well with antifoam performance enhancement. A model is proposed where surfactant adsorption promotes desorption of surface-active potato medium components from the water surface. At the SCAFC, desorption is not complete, yet the rate of bubble rupture is sufficiently enhanced to provide excellent foam control.

  3. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  4. Effect of Rigid Boundary on Propagation of Torsional Surface Waves in Porous Elastic Layer%多孔弹性层的刚性边界对扭转表面波传播的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S·古普塔; A·卡托帕德亚; D·K·玛里; 吴承平

    2011-01-01

    根据介质的力学性能,正如Cowin及Nunziato一样,导出多孔弹性层覆盖在多孔弹性半空间上时,研究其刚性边界对扭转表面波传播的影响.导出了速度方程并对其结果进行了讨论.发现介质中可能存在两类扭转表面波阵面,而Dey等(Tamkang Journal of Science and Engineering,2003,6(4):241-249.)给出的没有刚性边界面时,存在3类扭转表面波阵面.研究还揭示,多孔弹性层中Love波也可能随同扭转表面波一起存在.值得注意的是,刚性边界面多孔弹性层中Love波的相速度,不同于自由边界面多孔弹性层中的相速度.实际观察到扭转波的色散性,以及速度随着振荡频率的增大而减小.%The effect of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface waves in a porous elastic layer over a porous elastic half space was presented using the mechanics of the medium as derived by Cowin and Nunziato. The velocity equation was derived and the results were discussed. It is observed that there may be two torsional surface wave fronts in the medium whereas there exists three wave fronts of torsional surface waves in the absence of rigid boundary plane given by Dey et al( Tamkang Journal of Science and Engineering, 2003, 6(4 ): 241-249. ). The results also reveals that in the porous layer, the Love wave is also available along with the torsional surface waves. It is remarkable that phase speed of Love wave in a porous layer with rigid surface is different from that in a porous layer with a free surface. The torsional waves are observed to be dispersive in nature, and the velocity decreases as the frequency of oscillation increases.

  5. Influence of the adsorption layers of surfactants on the extraction behaviour of heavy metals. Liquid-liquid extraction; Einfluss von Tensidadsorptionsschichten auf das Extraktionsverhalten von Schwermetallen. T. 1. Fluessig/fluessig-Extraktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raatz, S.; Haertel, G. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltverfahrenstechnik

    1998-05-01

    Depending on the type of the head group (anionic, cationic and nonionic) as well as the structure the adsorption layers of surfactants on the liquid/liquid interface have an essential influence on the extraction behavior and the mass transfer of heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Pb, Cr). By choosing the right type and concentration of surfactant it should therefore be possible to accelerate the mass transfer thus improving the extraction rate (e.g. sodium dodecylsulfonate), or even to prevent a mass transfer almost completely (e.g. i-octylphenyl ethoxylate). The purpose of this paper is to control the selectivity of the mass-transfer accompanied by reaction beyond fluid interfaces with the help of surfactants as well as to clarify the effective mechanisms. (orig.) [Deutsch] Tensidadsorptionsschichten haben in Abhaengigkeit von der Art ihrer Kopfgruppierung (anionisch, kationisch und nichtionisch), Struktur und Konzentration einen wesentlichen Einfluss auf das Extraktionsverhalten bzw. den Stoffuebergang von Schwermetallen (Cd, Zn, Pb, Cr) ueber die Fluessig/fluessig-Phasengrenze. Mit der richtigen Wahl eines Tensids (Art, Konzentration) ist es daher moeglich, den Stofftransport zu beschleunigen und den Extraktionsgrad bedeutend zu verbessern (z.B. Na-Dodecylsulfonat) oder auch den Stofftransport nahezu zu unterbinden (z.B. i-Octylphenylethoxylat) oder auch den Stofftransport nahezu zu unterbinden (z.B. i-Octylphenylethoxylat). Das Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es, die Selektivitaet der reaktiven Stoffuebertragung ueber fluide Phasengrenzen durch entsprechend gewaehlte Adsorptionsschichten gezielt zu steuern und die dabei wirkenden Mechanismen aufzuklaeren. (orig.)

  6. Hydrocarbon chain conformation in an intercalated surfactant monolayer and bilayer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N V Venkataraman; S Vasudevan

    2001-10-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium (CTA) ions have been confined within galleries of layered CdPS3 at two different grafting densities. Low grafting densities are obtained on direct intercalation of CTA ions into CdPS3 to give Cd0.93PS3(CTA)0.14. Intercalation occurs with a lattice expansion of 4.8 Å with the interlamellar surfactant ion lying flat forming a monolayer. Intercalation at higher grafting densities was effected by a two-step ion-exchange process to give Cd0.83PS3(CTA)0.34, with a lattice expansion of 26.5 Å. At higher grafting densities the interlamellar surfactant ions adopt a tilted bilayer structure. 13C NMR and orientation-dependent IR vibrational spectroscopy on single crystals have been used to probe the conformation and orientation of the methylene ‘tail’ of the intercalated surfactant in the two phases. In the monolayer phase, the confined methylene chain adopts an essentially all-trans conformation with most of the trans chain aligned parallel to the gallery walls. On lowering the temperature, molecular plane aligns parallel, so that the methylene chain lies flat, rigid and aligned to the confining surface. In the bilayer phase, most bonds in the methylene chain are in trans conformation. It is possible to identify specific conformational sequences containing a gauche bond, in the interior and termini of the intercalated methylene. These high energy conformers disappear on cooling leaving all fifteen methylene units of the intercalated cetyl trimethyl ammonium ion in trans conformational registry at 40 K.

  7. Rigid monomial ideals

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Timothy B P

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the class of rigid monomial ideals. We give a characterization of the minimal free resolutions of certain classes of these ideals. Specifically, we show that the ideals in a particular subclass of rigid monomial ideals are lattice-linear and thus their minimal resolution can be constructed as a poset resolution. We then use this result to give a description of the minimal free resolution of a larger class of rigid monomial ideals by using $\\mathcal{L}(n)$, the lattice of all lcm-lattices of monomial ideals with $n$ generators. By fixing a stratum in $\\mathcal{L}(n)$ where all ideals have the same total Betti numbers we show that rigidity is a property which is upward closed in $\\mathcal{L}(n)$. Furthermore, the minimal resolution of all rigid ideals contained in a fixed stratum is shown to be isomorphic to the constructed minimal resolution.

  8. Micellization properties of cardanol as a renewable co-surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Antonella; Guernelli, Susanna; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Zappacosta, Romina; Genovese, Damiano; De Crescentini, Lucia; Riela, Serena

    2015-09-21

    With the aim to improve the features of surfactant solutions in terms of sustainability and renewability we propose the use of hydrogenated natural and sustainable plant-derived cardanol as an additive to commercial surfactants. In the present study we demonstrated that its addition, in amounts as high as 10%, to commercial surfactants of different charge does not significantly affect surfactant properties. Conversely, the presence of hydrogenated cardanol can strongly affect spectrophotometric determination of CMC if preferential interactions with the dyes used take place. This latter evidence may be profitably exploited in surfactant manufacturing by considering that the concurrent presence of a rigid organic molecule such as Orange OT and 10% hydrogenated cardanol decreases the CMC of CTAB up to 65 times.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  11. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  12. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  13. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  14. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Erich Jelen; Ute Merrettig-Bruns

    2009-01-01

    Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have str...

  15. HOMOLOGY RIGIDITY OF GRASSMANNIANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Duan Haibao

    2009-01-01

    Applying the theory of GrSbner basis to the Schubert presentation for the cohomology of Grassmannians [2], we extend the homology rigidity results known for the classical Grassmaniaas to the exceptional cases.

  16. [Hygienic assessment of biologically rigid linear alkylbenzene sulfonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, V V; Ryzhkova, O A

    2010-01-01

    It has been found that there are both biologically rigid and biologically soft homologues in the homologous series of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LABS). It is shown that absorption of LABS molecules from aqueous to activated sludge phase may serve as a determinant that should be used to refer a homologue to as rigid or soft surfactants. The biodegradability, detergency, and toxicity of LABS were ascertained to be related to the size of molecular alkyl molecular substitute. It has established that the fractional compositions of linear alkobenzenes should be changed for the synthesis of LABS that have the maximum detergency, a high biodegradability rate, and a low toxicity.

  17. Calculations of critical micelle concentration by dissipative particle dynamics simulations: the role of chain rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-09-05

    Micelle formation in surfactant solutions is a self-assembly process governed by complex interplay of solvent-mediated interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which are commonly called heads and tails. However, the head-tail repulsion is not the only factor affecting the micelle formation. For the first time, we present a systematic study of the effect of chain rigidity on critical micelle concentration and micelle size, which is performed with the dissipative particle dynamics simulation method. Rigidity of the coarse-grained surfactant molecule was controlled by the harmonic bonds set between the second-neighbor beads. Compared to flexible molecules with the nearest-neighbor bonds being the only type of bonded interactions, rigid molecules exhibited a lower critical micelle concentration and formed larger and better-defined micelles. By varying the strength of head-tail repulsion and the chain rigidity, we constructed two-dimensional diagrams presenting how the critical micelle concentration and aggregation number depend on these parameters. We found that the solutions of flexible and rigid molecules that exhibited approximately the same critical micelle concentration could differ substantially in the micelle size and shape depending on the chain rigidity. With the increase of surfactant concentration, primary micelles of more rigid molecules were found less keen to agglomeration and formation of nonspherical aggregates characteristic of flexible molecules.

  18. Rigidity and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Asia; Whiteley, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This book contains recent contributions to the fields of rigidity and symmetry with two primary focuses: to present the mathematically rigorous treatment of rigidity of structures, and to explore the interaction of geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. Overall, the book shows how researchers from diverse backgrounds explore connections among the various discrete structures with symmetry as the unifying theme.  Contributions present recent trends and advances in discrete geometry, particularly in the theory of polytopes. The rapid development of abstract polytope theory has resulted in a rich theory featuring an attractive interplay of methods and tools from discrete geometry, group theory, classical geometry, hyperbolic geometry and topology.  The volume will also be a valuable source as an introduction to the ideas of both combinatorial and geometric rigidity theory and its applications, incorporating the surprising impact of symmetry. It will appeal to students at both the advanced undergraduate and gradu...

  19. Rigidity of melting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  20. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape-changing inte......Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape...

  1. Surface Shear Rheology of Saponin Adsorption Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golemanov, K.; Tcholakova, S.; Denkov, N.; Pelan, E.; Stoyanov, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial

  2. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  3. On Multifractal Rigidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meson, Alejandro M., E-mail: meson@iflysib.unlp.edu.ar; Vericat, Fernando, E-mail: vericat@iflysib.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET-UNLP, Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB) (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    We analyze when a multifractal spectrum can be used to recover the potential. This phenomenon is known as multifractal rigidity. We prove that for a certain class of potentials the multifractal spectrum of local entropies uniquely determines their equilibrium states. This leads to a classification which identifies two systems up to a change of variables.

  4. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  5. Electoral Stability and Rigidity

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Some argue that political stability is best served through a two-party system. This study refutes this. The author mathematically defines the stability and rigidity of electoral systems comprised of any quantity of electors and parties. In fact, stability is a function of the quantity of electors - i.e., the number of occupied seats at the table. As the number of electors increases, the properties of an electorate are increasingly well resolved, and well described by those of an electorate that is least excessive -- that is to say an electorate that is closest to equilibrium. Further, electoral rigidity is a function of the quantity of parties and their probabilities of representation. An absolutely rigid system admits no fluctuations -- whatever happens to one elector will happen to all electors. As the quantity of parties increases so does the number of party lines, and with it the quantity of alternatives with which to respond to an external stimulus. Rigidity is significant in a social system that places ...

  6. Interfacial mechanisms for stability of surfactant-laden films

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamla, M Saad; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; Tajuelo, Javier; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Thin liquid films are central to everyday life. They are ubiquitous in modern technology (pharmaceuticals, coatings), consumer products (foams, emulsions) and also serve vital biological functions (tear film of the eye, pulmonary surfactants in the lung). A common feature in all these examples is the presence of surface-active molecules at the air-liquid interface. Though they form only molecularly-thin layers, these surfactants produce complex surface stresses on the free surface, which have important consequences for the dynamics and stability of the underlying thin liquid film. Here we conduct simple thinning experiments to explore the fundamental mechanisms that allow the surfactant molecules to slow the gravity-driven drainage of the underlying film. We present a simple model that works for both soluble and insoluble surfactant systems. We show that surfactants with finite surface rheology influence bulk flow through viscoelastic interfacial stresses, while surfactants with inviscid surfaces achieve stab...

  7. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  8. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  9. POLYMERIC SURFACTANT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.M. Saville; J.W. White

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric surfactants are amongst the most widespread of all polymers. In nature, proteins and polysaccharides cause self organization as a result of this surfactancy; in industry, polymeric surfactants play key roles in the food, explosives and surface coatings sectors. The generation of useful nano- and micro-structures in films and emulsions as a result of polymer amphiphilicity and the application of mechanical stress is discussed. The use of X-ray and neutron small angle scattering and reflectivity to measure these structures and their dynamic properties will be described. New results on linear and dendritic polymer surfactants are presented.

  10. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  11. Surfactant Sector Needs Urgent Readjustment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hongzhou

    2007-01-01

    @@ Surfactant industrial system has been basically established After 50 years' development, China has already established a surfactant industrial system with a relatively complete product portfolio and can produce 4714 varieties of surfactants in cationic,anionic, nonionic and amphoteric categories.

  12. Obituary--rigid contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan

    2010-10-01

    Scleral and corneal rigid lenses represented 100 per cent of the contact lens market immediately prior to the invention of soft lenses in the mid-1960s. In the United Kingdom today, rigid lenses comprise 2 per cent of all new lens fits. Low rates of rigid lens fitting are also apparent in 27 other countries which have recently been surveyed. Thus, the 1998 prediction of the author that rigid lenses--also referred to as 'rigid gas permeable' (RGP) lenses or 'gas permeable' (GP) lenses--would be obsolete by the year 2010 has essentially turned out to be correct. In this obituary, the author offers 10 reasons for the demise of rigid lens fitting: initial rigid lens discomfort; intractable rigid lens-induced corneal and lid pathology; extensive soft lens advertising; superior soft lens fitting logistics; lack of rigid lens training opportunities; redundancy of the rigid lens 'problem solver' function; improved soft toric and bifocal/varifocal lenses; limited uptake of orthokeratology; lack of investment in rigid lenses; and the emergence of aberration control soft lenses. Rigid lenses are now being fitted by a minority of practitioners with specialist skills/training. Certainly, rigid lenses can no longer be considered as a mainstream form of contact lens correction. May their dear souls (bulk properties) rest in peace.

  13. Warped product rigidity

    CERN Document Server

    He, Chenxu; Wylie, William

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the space of solutions to an overdetermined linear system involving the Hessian of functions. We show that if the solution space has dimension greater than one, then the underlying manifold has a very rigid warped product structure. This warped product structure will be used to study warped product Einstein structures in our paper "The space of virtual solutions to the warped product Einstein equation".

  14. EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON Ni-TiN NANOCOMPOSITE COATINGS PREPARED BY ULTRASONIC ELECTRODEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Fafeng; JIA Zhenyuan; WU Menghua; LI Zhi

    2008-01-01

    Ni-TiN nanocomposite coatings were prepared by ultrasonic electrodeposition, and the effects of the surfactants on the coatings were investigated and the microstructure and micro rigidity of the coatings were characterized. Samples were also submitted to corrosion tests in 3% NaCl solution. The results showed that the surfactants had great effects on Ni-TiN nanocomposite coatings. The composite coatings prepared by ultrasonic electrodeposition with the surfactants were better than that of the coatings prepared without surfactants. The favorable properties of Ni-TiN nanocomposite coatings were prepared with the mixing of the non-ion and positive ion surfactants. The concentration of the mixing was 80 mg/L, and the ratio of the non-ion and positive ion surfactants was 1: 2.

  15. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of

  16. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  17. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo. Re

  18. 液层厚度比对环形腔内双层液体的热毛细对流稳定性的影响%Influence of liquid layer depth ratio on stability of thermocapillary flow in annular two-layer system with upper rigid wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫东鸣

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the liquid layer depth ratio on the stability of two-layer system with upper rigid walls at the microgravity condition,a linear stability analysis of thermocapillary flow in the annular immiscible two-layer system of 5cSt silicone oil and HT-70 was carried out using Implicity Restarted Arnoldi Method (IRAM).Critical values of Marangoni number,wave number and phase velocity were obtained at different liquid layer depth ratios,different aspect ratios of the cavity and different radius rations.The thermofluid wave pattern at the liquid-liquid interface near the critical Marangoni number was also exhibited.%为了了解微重力条件下、水平温度梯度作用时,上部为固壁的环形腔内双层流体系统中液层厚度比对流动稳定性的影响,采用隐式重启 Arnoldi方法(IRAM)对环形池内5cSt 硅油/HT-70双层流体的热对流过程进行了线性稳定性分析,获得了不同液层厚度比下系统流动的临界 Marangoni 数、临界波数、临界相速度,并通过计算特征向量,得到了临界 Marangoni数附近液-液界面的热流体波形态。

  19. Surfactants in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of th

  1. Study of conformation and dynamic of surfactant molecules in graphite oxide via NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, X.Q. [Jiangsu Second Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China); Ma, L.G. [Nanjing Xiaozhuang University, School of Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-08-15

    The conformation and dynamic of surfactant in graphite oxide (GO) was investigated by solid-state {sup 13}C magic-angle-spinning NMR and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra. The conformation ordering of the alkyl chains in the confined system shows strong dependence on its orientation. While the alkyl chains parallel to the GO layer in lateral monolayer arrangement are in gauche conformation in addition to a small amount of all-trans conformation, those with orientation radiating away from the GO in paraffin bilayer arrangement is in all-trans conformation in addition to some gauche conformation even though high-order diffraction peaks appears. NMR results suggest that the least mobile segment is located at the GO-surfactant interface corresponding to the N-methylene group. Further from it, the mobility of the alkyl chain increases. The terminal methyl and N-methyl carbon groups have the highest mobile. The chains in all-trans conformational state are characterized as more rigid than chains with gauche conformation; each segment of the confined alkyl chains with the lateral monolayer arrangement exhibits less mobility as compared to that with the paraffin bilayer arrangement. (orig.)

  2. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  3. Comparative Study of Asphalt Layer Temperature Field of Combined Type Pavement and Asphalt Pavement with Semi -Rigid Base Course%复合式路面与半刚性基层沥青路面的沥青层温度场对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐

    2012-01-01

    The comparative Study of asphalt layer temperature field of combined type pavement and asphalt pavement with semi -rigid base course could provide support for design and construction of asphalt layer of com- bined type pavement or "change white to black" pavement (paving asphalt surface on old cement concrete pave- ment). Taking the asphalt layer as 2 -3 layers with not totally same thickness and material, each layer is studied and analyzed one after one. The result shows that the temperature field of asphalt layer of the two pavement struc- ture is very similar and the design and construction of asphalt layer of combined type pavement affected by tempera- ture could take that of asphalt pavement with semi - rigid base course as a reference.%通过对复合式路面与半刚性基层沥青路面的沥青层温度场对比研究,可为复合式路面或"白改黑"路面(旧水泥混凝土路面加铺沥青面层)沥青层的设计及施工提供技术支持。将沥青层看作是厚度和材料不全相同的2~3层,然后逐层研究分析,结果表明两种路面结构沥青层的温度场非常相似,认为温度作用下复合式路面沥青层的设计及施工经验可借鉴半刚性基层沥青路面。

  4. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  5. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  6. Stochastic finite element applications in rigid pavement performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attoh-Okine, Nii O.

    1999-05-01

    Rigid pavement structures have uncertainties and variability in their structural layers and components. These variations and uncertainties are seldomly included in performance assessment and evaluation in pavement systems. This paper proposes to use Stochastic Finite Element Method (SFEM) in rigid pavement faulting and load transfer efficiency. The SFEM uses random parameters, as stochastic process namely random fields. These random fields are characterized, quantitatively by spatial functions of statistical moment like the mean, variance and covariance.

  7. Torsional Rigidity of Minimal Submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    We prove explicit upper bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of minimal submanifolds $P^m$ in ambient Riemannian manifolds $N^n$ with a pole $p$. The upper bounds are given in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped...... for the torsional rigidity are actually attained and give conditions under which the geometric average of the stochastic mean exit time for Brownian motion at infinity is finite....

  8. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  9. Rigid Quasilocal Frames

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I examine in detail the properties of rigid quasilocal frames (RQF), which have been proposed as a geometrically natural way to define spatially extended reference frames in general relativity. I also explore their usefulness, in particular, as a tool for constructing completely general conservation laws that do not rely on the presence of spacetime symmetries and include both matter and gravitational contributions without the need for any ad hoc structures such as pseudotensors. In doing so, I show how the RQF approach affords a deeper understanding of the nature of gravitational fluxes via the equivalence principle. Finally, I apply the RQF formalism to explore Ehrenfest's rotating disk paradox, a generalization of Archimedes' law to curved spacetime, tidal interactions for Earth's and Jupiter's moons, and more.

  10. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    to convey particular information (e.g., big-isurgent, loud-is-up). The second work presents a large-scale analysis of 340 Sci-Fi movies that identifies instances of shape-changing interfaces. Results from the analysis reveals emergent behavioral patterns of shape change, namely Reconfiguration......Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape......-changing interfaces can reconfigure their shape dynamically, providing users with new affordances and output modalities. This thesis contributes to both the field of deformable interfaces and shape-changing interfaces through empirical research. In the area of deformable interfaces, this thesis presents two studies...

  11. Coupled Transport of PAH and Surfactants in Natural Aquifer Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, J.; Grathwohl, P.

    1998-03-01

    Surfactants in aqueous solution adsorb onto mineral surfaces and form micelles above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) due to their physico-chemical properties. Hydrophobic organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have a high affinity for the adsorbed surfactant layers (monomers, hemimicelles and admicelles) and to the micelles in the mobile aqueous phase. The transport of PAHs is controlled by the concentration of the surfactant and the partition coefficients, of the PAHs between water and admicelles (adsolubilization: K adm) and water and micelles (solubilization: K mic), respectively. These partition coefficients were measured in laboratory batch and column experiments using phenanthrene as a chemical probe for the PAHs, a non-ionic surfactant (Terrasurf G50), natural aquifer sand (River Neckar Alluvium: RNA) and its petrographic subcomponents. The sorption of the surfactant can be described by a linear isotherm for concentrations below the CMC and a sorption maximum above the CMC, which both depend on the grain size and the surfactant accessible internal surface area of the particles. K adm was found to be higher than K mic. Both depend on the surfactant's properties, such as alkyl chain length, polar headgroup or ethoxylation. In column experiments an increasing retardation of phenanthrene was observed up to the CMC followed by a facilitated transport at surfactant concentration several times the CMC.

  12. International rigid contact lens prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Helland, Magne; Itoi, Motozumi; Jones, Deborah; Nichols, Jason J; van der Worp, Eef; Woods, Craig A

    2010-06-01

    Rigid lenses have been fitted less since the introduction of soft lenses nearly 40 years ago. Data that we have gathered from annual contact lens fitting surveys conducted in Australia, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the UK and the USA between 2000 and 2008 facilitate an accurate characterization of the pattern of the decline of rigid lens fitting during the first decade of this century. There is a trend for rigid lenses to be utilized primarily for refitting those patients who are already successful rigid lens wearers-most typically older females being refit with higher Dk materials. Rigid lenses are generally fitted on a full-time basis (four or more days of wear per week) without a planned replacement schedule. Orthokeratology is especially popular in the Netherlands, but is seldom prescribed in the other countries surveyed.

  13. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review for Rigid Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    Rigid Foam is a chemical delay foam used to completely encapsulate an object or to block access to an area. Prior studies have indicated that the final foam product is essentially non-toxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize the current chemical and toxicological data available on the components of Rigid Foam and to update the information available on the toxicity of the final Rigid Foam product. Since the possibility exists for a partial deployment of Rigid Foam where only one of the components is released, this study also examined the toxicity of its chemical constituents. Rigid Foam is composed of an {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} Component. The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} component is primarily a polymeric isocyanate and the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} component is a mixture of polyols. In addition to the primary constituents, dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are present as blowing agents along with catalysts and silicone surfactants necessary for foaming. The pre-deployed {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} components are stored in separate vessels and are brought together in static mixing nozzles for dispersal. The results of this evaluation indicate that a completely deployed Rigid Foam under normal conditions is essentially non-toxic as determined previously. However, in the event of a partial deployment or deployment of an individual component directly at an unprotected individual, the degree of hazard is increased due to the toxic and corrosive nature of the individual constituents. The health hazard would depend on the properties of the material to which the person was exposed.

  14. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  15. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, Ruben; Rojas, Efrain

    2010-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We show thus that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  16. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  17. Synthesis of organic rectorite with novel Gemini surfactants for copper removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guocheng; Han, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Xiaoying, E-mail: xyw@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Shijie, E-mail: sjliu@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Department of Paper and Bioprocess Engineering, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States); Sun, Runcang [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); China Beijing Key Laboratory of Lignocellulosic Chemistry, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Three Gemini surfactants showed stronger rapid intercalation capacity into rectorite and behaved better on Cu{sup 2+} removal than two single-chain surfactants, which were positive to their increasing amount and chain length. - Highlights: • Modification of rectorite (REC) with several surfactants was performed in 1 h. • The arrangement of Gemini surfactants in REC layers was discussed. • All ORECs displayed better adsorption capacities on Cu{sup 2+} than pure REC. • Gemini-REC behaved better than single-chain surfactant modified REC on Cu{sup 2+} removal. • The adsorption capacity was positive to the amount and chain length of surfactant. - Abstract: Three novel Gemini surfactants were used to prepare organic rectorite (OREC) under microwave irradiation, in comparison with single-chain surfactant ester quaternary ammonium salt (EQAS) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The structure and morphology of OREC were characterized by XRD, BET, FT-IR, TEM and TGA. The removal of Cu{sup 2+} on OREC from aqueous solution was performed. The results reveal that Gemini surfactants modified REC had larger interlayer distance and higher surface area than single-chain surfactants EQAS and CTAB, and the increasing amount or chain length of Gemini surfactants led to larger layer spacing and higher adsorption capacities. The adsorption behavior of Gemini surfactant modified REC can be better described by Freundlich adsorption isotherm model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 15.16 mg g{sup −1}. The desorption and regeneration experiments indicate good reuse property of Gemini modified REC adsorbent. Therefore, this study may widen the utilization of Gemini surfactants modified layered silicates.

  18. Sorption of Nitrobenzene to Anionic Surfactant Modified Layered Double Hydroxides%阴离子表面活性剂改性水滑石吸附硝基苯的特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏燕; 朱润良; 陶奇; 刘汉阳

    2013-01-01

    以阴离子表面活性剂十二烷基硫酸钠(sodium dodecyl sulfate,SDS)为改性剂,采用共沉淀法在不同表面活性剂浓度,0.5 ~2.0理论阴离子交换容量(theoretical anion exchange capacity,TAEC)条件下制备了有机水滑石LDH-DS,并用XRD、FT-IR表征了样品的结构特征.结果表明十二烷基硫酸根成功插层进入LDH层间,d003底面间距由0.80 nm增大至3.98 nm.同时研究了LDH-DS对硝基苯的吸附性能,表明有机水滑石对硝基苯的等温吸附曲线符合线型方程(R2>0.99),吸附过程主要为分配作用.随着样品中SDS负载量的增加,LDH-DS对硝基苯的吸附系数Kd相应增强,但有机碳标化的吸附系数Koc值基本保持恒定.吸附热力学实验显示吸附过程为吸热反应,熵增大是吸附过程的驱动力.%Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) modified MgAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized at different surfactant concentrations (0.5-2.0 TAEC) by the co-precipitation method. The LDH-DS samples obtained were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results showed that SDS was successfully intercalated into the interlayer of the LDH , and the basal spacing was expanded from 0. 80 nm to 3. 98 nm. The intercalated SDS was considered consistent with a paraffin bilayers arrangement. The sorption of nitrobenzene on LDH-DS was examined, and the results showed that linear model could fit the sorption isotherms well (R2 >0. 99) , which implied a partitioning sorption process. The sorption coefficient of nitrobenzene (Kd) on LDH-DS was positively related to the DS loading amount, but the organic carbon content normalized sorption coefficient of nitrobenzene (Koo) was shown to remain relatively constant. The sorption thermodynamics results showed that the sorption of nitrobenzene on LDH-DS was an endothermic process, and the increase of entropy was the driving force for the sorption process.

  19. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  20. Moving liquid surfactant as a way of assessing the properties of surfactant, liquids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, A O; Titov, O P; Titov, M O; Karbainov, A N, E-mail: fibrilla45@mail.ru [RUSSIA. GOU VPO East Siberian State Technological University (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    In the study of surface phenomena of the main and only instrumentally-defined parameters are surface tension and wetting angle, including in the field of nanotechnology. These indicators were introduced more than 200 years ago, and any new inventions in this field was no more. The university developed a new method and device for determining the surface activity. The basis of the method and device is the use of video cameras to record the droplet size and changes on the surface of the liquid layer of known thickness from the impact of drops of surfactant (surfactant). Committed changes are then processed using computer software and calculated parameters, which can be characterized by a surfactant and surface properties, which is fluid and very liquid. Determine the surface tension or contact angle is not necessary. Measures of surface activity using the method and device are: 1. The amount of fluid that can move one kilogram of surfactant. The value of this index varies from tens of nanometers to hundreds of thousands of units. The indicator can be converted to energy units, joules. 2. The amount of fluid confined by a surface per unit time is calculated based on the first indicator, complements the characterization of surfactant and may be an indicator of surface characteristics and fluid. 3. Propagation speed of the capillary and microwaves. This indicator complements the first two.

  1. Akinetic rigid syndrome: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Praveen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Akinetic-rigid syndromes can be caused by diverse etiologies. It is vital to separate idiopathic Parkinson′s disease from other neurodegenerative diseases and causes of secondary parkinsonism as it has significant therapeutic implications. However even specialists may misdiagnose nonidiopathic parkinsonism as Parkinson′s disease in a quarter of cases. Often the history may be nonspecific and all investigations may be normal. The diagnosis may thus rest entirely on clinical features. The etiological diagnosis of Akinetic rigid syndrome has critical therapeutic and prognostic implications. Therefore we will review the various etiologies of akinetic rigid syndrome and highlight critical clinical features to aid in differential diagnosis.

  2. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes.

  3. Behavior of cationic surfactants and short-chain alcohols in mixed surface layers at water-air and polymer-water interfaces with regard to polymer wettability II. Wettability of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2010-10-15

    The wettability of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) mixtures with short-chain alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol, as well as for 1-hexadecylpyridinium bromide (CPyB) with the same alcohols, was studied on the basis of advancing contact-angle measurements by the sessile drop method over a wide range of alcohol and cationic surfactant concentrations where they can be present in solution in monomeric or aggregated form. It should be noted that the contact angles for aqueous solution mixtures of cationic surfactants with propanol on PTFE surfaces were measured earlier and presented in our previous paper. From the obtained contact-angle values the relationships between cos theta and surface tension of the solutions (gamma(LV)) and that between adhesion tension and gamma(LV) were considered. The relationship between the cos theta and the reciprocal of gamma(LV) was also discussed. From these relationships the critical surface tension of PTFE and PMMA wetting and the correlation between the adsorption of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures at water-air and polymer-water interfaces were deduced. On the basis of the contact angles and components and parameters of the surface tension of surfactants, alcohols, and polymers also the Gibbs and Guggenheim-Adam isotherm of adsorption and the effective concentration of alcohols and surfactants at polymer-water interfaces were calculated. Next, the work of adhesion of solution to polymer surface with regard to the surface monolayer composition was discussed. The analysis of the contact angles with regard to adsorption of surfactants and alcohols at polymer-water and water-air interfaces allowed us to conclude that the PTFE wetting depends only on the contribution of the acid-base interactions to the surface tension of aqueous solutions of cationic surfactant and alcohol mixtures, and the adhesion work of solution to its

  4. Sizing up surfactant synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling involving a lysophospholipid. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, research from the Shimizu lab (Harayama et al., 2014) demonstrates the highly selective enzymatic behavior of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. The authors present an enzymatic model for phosphatidylcholine molecular species diversification that impacts surfactant formation.

  5. Skeletal Rigidity of Phylogenetic Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Howard; Li, Brian; Risteski, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by geometric origami and the straight skeleton construction, we outline a map between spaces of phylogenetic trees and spaces of planar polygons. The limitations of this map is studied through explicit examples, culminating in proving a structural rigidity result.

  6. Wage rigidity and job creation

    OpenAIRE

    Haefke, Christian; Sonntag, Marcus; Rens, Thijs van

    2013-01-01

    Recent research in macroeconomics emphasizes the role of wage rigidity in accounting for the volatility of unemployment fluctuations. We use worker-level data from the CPS to measure the sensitivity of wages of newly hired workers to changes in aggregate labor market conditions. The wage of new hires, unlike the aggregate wage, is volatile and responds almost one-to-one to changes in labor productivity. We conclude that there is little evidence for wage rigidity in the data.

  7. Predicting for thermodynamic instabilities in water/oil/surfactant microemulsions: A mesoscopic modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvail, Magali, E-mail: magali.duvail@icsm.fr; Zemb, Thomas; Dufrêche, Jean-François [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-Université Montpellier 2-ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bâtiment 426, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Arleth, Lise [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2014-04-28

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of flexible and rigid nonionic water/oil/surfactant microemulsions have been investigated using a two level-cut Gaussian random field method based on the Helfrich formalism. Ternary stability diagrams and scattering spectra have been calculated for different surfactant rigidities and spontaneous curvatures. A more important contribution of the Gaussian elastic constants compared to the bending one is observed on the ternary stability diagrams. Furthermore, influence of the spontaneous curvature of the surfactant points out a displacement of the instability domains which corresponds to the difference between the spontaneous and effective curvatures. We enlighten that a continuous transition from a connected water in oil droplets to a frustrated locally lamellar (oil in water in oil droplets) microstructure is found to occur when increasing the temperature for an oil-rich microemulsion. This continuous transition translated in a shift in the scattering functions, points out that the phase inversion phenomenon occurs by a coalescence of the water droplets.

  8. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Sung; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Koehle, Maura; Krumm, Christoph; Ren, Limin; Damen, Jonathan N.; Shete, Meera H.; Lee, Han Seung; Zuo, Xiaobing; Lee, Byeongdu; Fan, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Lobo, Raul F.; Tsapatsis, Michael; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2016-11-23

    An important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant comprised of coupled molecular structures (i.e. hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e. hard water), which disrupt surfactant function and require extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. Here we show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel-Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. These alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water while simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water.

  9. Field cracking performance of airfield rigid pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mehta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses cracking in airport pavements as studied in Construction Cycle 6 of testing carried out at the National Airport Pavement Testing Facility by the Federal Aviation Administration. Pavements of three different flexural strengths as well as two different subgrades, a soft bituminous layer and a more rigid layer known as econocrete, were tested. In addition to this, cracking near two types of isolated transition joints, a reinforced edge joint and a thickened edge joint, was considered. The pavement sections were tested using a moving load simulating that of an aircraft. It has been determined that the degree of cracking was reduced as the flexural strength of the pavement was increased and that fewer cracks formed over the econocrete base than over the bituminous base. In addition, the thickened edge transition joint was more effective in preventing cracking at the edges compared to the reinforced edge joint.

  10. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  11. Rigid multibody system dynamics with uncertain rigid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr; Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS (France)

    2012-03-15

    This paper is devoted to the construction of a probabilistic model of uncertain rigid bodies for multibody system dynamics. We first construct a stochastic model of an uncertain rigid body by replacing the mass, the center of mass, and the tensor of inertia by random variables. The prior probability distributions of the stochastic model are constructed using the maximum entropy principle under the constraints defined by the available information. The generators of independent realizations corresponding to the prior probability distribution of these random quantities are further developed. Then several uncertain rigid bodies can be linked to each other in order to calculate the random response of a multibody dynamical system. An application is proposed to illustrate the theoretical development.

  12. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. I. GLYCOLIPIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirog T. Р.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to surface-active glycolipids. The general characteristics, the physiological role of the rhamnolipids, trehalose lipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and their traditional producers — the representatives of the genera Pseudozyma, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Candida are given. The detailed analysis of the chemical structure, the stages of the biosynthesis and the regulation of some low molecular glycolipids are done. The own experimental data concerning the synthesis intensification, the physiological role and the practical use of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants, which are a complex of the glyco-, phospho-, amino- and neutral lipids (glycolipids of all strains are presented by trehalose mycolates are summarized. It was found that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants have protective, antimicrobial and antiadhesive properties. It was shown that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants preparation of cultural liquid intensified the degradation of oil in water due to the activation of the natural petroleum-oxidizing microflora.

  13. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. II. LIPOPEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The classification and the chemical structure of the lipopeptides and their producers (bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas are given. The role of the lipopeptides in cells motility, biofilm formation, metal binding and xenobiotics degradation and their action on the cells of pro- and eukaryotes is summarized. The stages of the nonribosomal lipopeptides synthesis and the role of two-component (GacA/GacS, ComA/ComP and the quorum system regulation of this process are shown. The potential of lactic acid bacteria and marine microorganisms as alternative surfactants producers (glycolipids, lipopeptides, phospholipids and fatty acids, glycolipopeptides are discussed. Their productivity and advantages over traditional producers are given as well. The properties of surfactants synthesized by lactic acid bacteria (the reduction of the surface tension, the critical micelle concentration, the stability in a wide range of pH, the temperature, the biological activity are summarized. Surfactants of nonpathogenic probiotic bacteria could be used as effective antimicrobial agents and antiadhesive and marine producers which able to synthesize unique metabolites that are not produced by other microorganisms.

  14. Mathematical Modelling of Surfactant Self-assembly at Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We present a mathematical model to describe the distribution of surfactant pairs in a multilayer structure beneath an adsorbed monolayer. A mesoscopic model comprising a set of ordinary differential equations that couple the rearrangement of surfactant within the multilayer to the surface adsorption kinetics is first derived. This model is then extended to the macroscopic scale by taking the continuum limit that exploits the typically large number of surfactant layers, which results in a novel third-order partial differential equation. The model is generalized to allow for the presence of two adsorbing boundaries, which results in an implicit free-boundary problem. The system predicts physically observed features in multilayer systems such as the initial formation of smaller lamellar structures and the typical number of layers that form in equilibrium.

  15. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  16. Rigidly foldable origami gadgets and tessellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas A; Lang, Robert J; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L

    2015-09-01

    Rigidly foldable origami allows for motion where all deflection occurs at the crease lines and facilitates the application of origami in materials other than paper. In this paper, we use a recently discovered method for determining rigid foldability to identify existing flat-foldable rigidly foldable tessellations, which are also categorized. We introduce rigidly foldable origami gadgets which may be used to modify existing tessellations or to create new tessellations. Several modified and new rigidly foldable tessellations are presented.

  17. Rigidly foldable origami gadgets and tessellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas A.; Lang, Robert J.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Rigidly foldable origami allows for motion where all deflection occurs at the crease lines and facilitates the application of origami in materials other than paper. In this paper, we use a recently discovered method for determining rigid foldability to identify existing flat-foldable rigidly foldable tessellations, which are also categorized. We introduce rigidly foldable origami gadgets which may be used to modify existing tessellations or to create new tessellations. Several modified and new rigidly foldable tessellations are presented. PMID:26473037

  18. Dynamic surface tension of surfactant TA: experiments and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, D R; Ingenito, E P; Kamm, R D; Johnson, M

    1994-12-01

    A bubble surfactometer was used to measure the surface tension of an aqueous suspension of surfactant TA as a function of bubble area over a range of cycling rates and surfactant bulk concentrations. Results of the surface tension-interfacial area loops exhibited a rich variety of phenomena, the character of which varied systematically with frequency and bulk concentration. A model was developed to interpret and explain these data and for use in describing the dynamics of surface layers under more general circumstances. Surfactant was modeled as a single component with surface tension taken to depend on only the interfacial surfactant concentration. Two distinct mechanisms were considered for the exchange of surfactant between the bulk phase and interface. The first is described by a simple kinetic relationship for adsorption and desorption that pertains only when the interfacial concentration is below its maximum equilibrium value. The second mechanism is "squeeze-out" by which surfactant molecules are expelled from an interface compressed past a maximum packing state. The model provided good agreement with experimental measurements for cycling rates from 1 to 100 cycles/min and for bulk concentrations between 0.0073 and 7.3 mg/ml.

  19. Barrier or carrier? Pulmonary surfactant and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    To consider the lung as a target for drug delivery and to optimise strategies directed at the pulmonary route, it is essential to consider the role of pulmonary surfactant, a thin lipid-protein film lining the respiratory surface of mammalian lungs. Membrane-based surfactant multilayers are essential for reducing the surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface to minimise the work of breathing. Different components of surfactant are also responsible for facilitating the removal of potentially pathological entities such as microorganisms, allergens or environmental pollutants and particles. Upon inhalation, drugs or nanoparticles first contact the surfactant layer, and these interactions critically affect their lifetime and fate in the airways. This review summarises the current knowledge on the possible role and effects of the pulmonary surfactant system in drug delivery strategies. It also summarises the evidence that suggests that pulmonary surfactant is far from being an insuperable barrier and could be used as an efficient shuttle for delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds deep into the lung and the organism.

  20. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Irina Moater

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ion-selective electrode method and surface tension. High affinity isotherms which are typical of an anionic surfactant - protein bonding, exhibit an initial increase steep followed by a slow growth region and then a vertical growth above a certain concentration. This isotherm is typical of ionic surfactant to protein binding. Often the high affinity initial bond appears at very low concentrations of surfactant and therefore in some protein-surfactant systems, the exact shape of the isotherm in this region may be missing. The surfactant - protein binding is influenced by a number of variables such as the nature and chain length of surfactant, pH, ionic strength, temperature, nature of this protein and additives.

  1. A Study of Surfactant-Induced Growth of Ag on Ag (111)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Li-Li; HU Juan-Mei; WU Feng-Min

    2008-01-01

    A new growth model is introduced to describe surfactant-induced growth of Ag on Ag (111) with realistic physical parameters. In this model, the A-S exchange mechanism is considered for the first time. Using the Monte Carlo simulations, the influence of exchange mechanism, surface temperature T, the exchange barrier Eex, and the coverage of surfactant θM on the growth mode and morphology during multilayer film growth of Ag/Ag (111) are studied in detail. Both the referenced value of surfactant coverage and the method to obtain perfect layer-by-layer film in surfactant-induced Ag/Ag (111) system are provided. Our simulation results are consistent with many experimental observations for surfactant-induced growth of Ag on Ag (111).

  2. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  3. Water repellency induced by pulmonary surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B A

    1982-04-01

    1. Pure cotton fabric was partially carboxylated to produce a tough, porous, hydrophilic sub-phase to stimulate the epithelial membrane of the alveolar wall from a permeability standpoint. 2. Two of the predominant pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE), were found to inhibit wetting of this synthetic membrane and of human cutaneous epithelium as manifest by a large contact angle. 3. When treated with DPL at physiological concentrations, the porous synthetic membrane was found to support a head of saline well in excess of systolic pulmonary artery pressure with no penetration and could do so for periods well in excess of 1 hr; untreated control samples allowed almost immediate fluid filtration. 4. Filtration could be initiated in the DPL-treated membranes by wetting the reverse side, confirming that the threshold pressure for fluid penetration was afforded by capillarity and, hence, by water repellency induced by the surfactant. 5. Water repellency induced by the amphoteric surfactants occurring naturally in the lung is discussed as a possible factor contributing to the pressure threshold to be exceeded for alveolar oedema to form. 6. Evidence is reviewed and several advantages discussed for the implied concept of an essentially dry lining to the alveolus with a discontinuous liquid layer largely confined to convex corners which could slowly resolve any oedema by surface forces.

  4. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2008-01-01

    , Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members of flexible word classes are characterized by their vague semantics, which in the case of nouns means that values for the semantic features Shape...

  5. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that in addition to the major flexible lexical categories in Hengeveld’s classification of parts of speech systems (Contentive, Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members...

  6. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  7. Rigid coupling is also flexible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Spring-loaded coupling is rigid under light loads and swivels under higher loads. Break-out point can be set at any desired value by selecting appropriate preload springs. Coupling requires no cushions or elastomeric joints that limit temperature range.

  8. WATER-BLOWN POLYURETHANE RIGID FOAMS MODIFIED BY CHEMICAL PLASTICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ming; XU Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Water-blown polyurethane rigid foams are getting more and more attention, because the traditional blowing agent HCFC141b has already been abolished to prevent the ozone layer from destruction. However, the polyurethane rigid foams blown by water have serious defects, i.e. friability and resulting lower adhesion strength. Thus, the purpose of this study is to resolve the problems by chemical plastication. The maleate was added to polyol-premix containing water or to polyisocyanate,with both of which maleate does not react. To prove the reaction when polyol-premix and polyisocyanate were mixed, the model composite was synthesized and analyzed by IR, NMR and ESI (MS). Furthermore, a series of water-blown polyurethane rigid foams added different amount maleate were successfully prepared. By testing impact strength and adhesion strength of the foams, the actual effect of adding maleate was obtained.

  9. Development of probabilistic rigid pavement design methodologies for military airfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak, M. W.; Uzan, J.; Johnson, M.

    1983-12-01

    The current Corps of Engineers design procedures for rigid airfield pavements is based on the Westergaard free edge stress slab theory, and a proposed procedure is based on the multilayer elastic theory. These two design procedures have been expanded to airfield pavement designs expressed in probabilistic and reliability terms. Further developments were required in these procedures to make the analysis more practicable. Two major investigations were conducted: (1) Evaluation and use of the composite modulus of elasticity for layers beneath the rigid pavement, and (2) Evaluation of the maximum tensile stress at the bottom of the slab for different aircraft types. Derivations obtained from the investigation of the composite modulus and maximum tensile stress are reported and are included in computer programs for probabilistic/reliability analysis of rigid pavements. The approximate closed form (Taylor series expansion) is utilized. Example runs of the computer program are presented.

  10. Structure of DNA-Cationic Surfactant Complexes at Hydrophobically Modified and Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces as Revealed by Neutron Reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna; Campbell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the structure and composition of mixed DNA-cationic surfactant adsorption layers on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces. We have focused on the effects of the bulk concentrations, the surfactant chain length, and the type solid surface on the interfacial...... layer structure (the location, coverage, and conformation the e DNA and surfactant molecules). Neutron reflectometry is the technique of choice for revealing the surface layer structure by means of selective deuteration. We start by studying the interfacial complexation of DNA...... with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on hydrophobic surfaces, where we show that DNA molecules are located on top of a self-assembled surfactant monolayer, with the thickness of the DNA layer and the surfactant DNA ratio determined by the surface coverage of the underlying...

  11. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-guo; YIN Hong

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, αAEO9 =0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC),effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Гmax) and minimum area per molecule at the air/solution interface (Amin) were determined for both individual surfactants and their mixtures. The significant deviations from ideal behavior (attractive interactions) of the nonionic/ionic surfactant mixtures were determined. Mixtures of both AEO9/SDS and AEO9/CTAB exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction efficiency and mixed micelle formation, but neither exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction effectiveness.

  12. Spontaneous surface self-assembly in protein-surfactant mixtures: interactions between hydrophobin and ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P

    2014-05-01

    The synergistic interactions between certain ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the protein hydrophobin result in spontaneous self-assembly at the air-water interface to form layered surface structures. The surface structures are characterized using neutron reflectivity. The formation of the layered surface structures is promoted by the hydrophobic interaction between the polysorbate alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the globular hydrophobin and the interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and hydrophilic regions of the protein. The range of the ethoxylated polysorbate concentrations over which the surface ordering occurs is a maximum for the more hydrophobic surfactant polyoxyethylene(8) sorbitan monostearate. The structures at the air-water interface are accompanied by a profound change in the wetting properties of the solution on hydrophobic substrates. In the absence of the polysorbate surfactant, hydrophobin wets a hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate mixtures where multilayer formation occurs result in a significant dewetting of hydrophobic surfaces. The spontaneous surface self-assembly for hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures and the changes in surface wetting properties provide a different insight into protein-surfactant interactions and potential for manipulating surface and interfacial properties and protein surface behavior.

  13. Interactive Perception of Rigid and Non-Rigid Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Willimon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the concept of interactive perception, in which sensing guides manipulation, in the context of extracting and classifying unknown objects within a cluttered environment. In the proposed approach, a pile of objects lies on a flat background, and the goal of the robot is to isolate, interact with, and classify each object so that its properties can be obtained. The algorithm considers each object to be classified using color, shape, and flexibility. The approach works with a variety of objects relevant to service robot applications, including both rigid objects such as bottles, cans, and pliers as well as non‐rigid objects such as soft toy animals, socks, and shoes. Experiments on a number of different piles of objects demonstrate the ability of efficiently isolating and classifying each item through interaction.

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  16. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  17. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing

  18. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Elisa; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension of the unique mechanical and rheological properties of surfactant layers is crucial for the diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases, either by analyzing the contribution of surfactant impairment to the pathophysiology or by improving the formulations in surfactant replacement therapies. Finally, a short review is also included on the most relevant experimental techniques currently employed to evaluate lung surfactant mechanics, rheology, and inhibition and reactivation processes.

  19. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer.

  20. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval.

  1. Rigid subsets of symplectic manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Entov, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We show that there is an hierarchy of intersection rigidity properties of sets in a closed symplectic manifold: some sets cannot be displaced by symplectomorphisms from more sets than the others. We also find new examples of rigidity of intersections involving, in particular, specific fibers of moment maps of Hamiltonian torus actions, monotone Lagrangian submanifolds (following the previous work of P.Albers) as well as certain, possibly singular, sets defined in terms of Poisson-commutative subalgebras of smooth functions. In addition, we get some geometric obstructions to semi-simplicity of the quantum homology of symplectic manifolds. The proofs are based on the Floer-theoretical machinery of partial symplectic quasi-states.

  2. Rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, S.; Munakata, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1985-01-01

    Using data from neutron monitors and muon telescopes at surface and underground stations, the average rigidity spectrum of Forbush decreases (Fds) during the period of 1978-1982 were obtained. Thirty eight Ed-events are classified into two groups Hard Fd and Soft Fd according to size of Fd at Sakashita station. It is found that a spectral form of fractional-power type (P to the-gamma sub 1 (P+P sub c) to the -gamma sub2) is more suitable for the present purpose than that of power-exponential type or of power type with an upper limiting rigidity. The best fitted spectrum of fractional-power type is expressed by gamma sub1 = 0.37, gamma sub2 = 0.89 and P subc = 10 GV for Hard Fd and gamma sub1 = 0.77, gamma sub2 = 1.02 and P sub c - 14GV for Soft Fd.

  3. Rigid body dynamics of mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    The second volume of Rigid Body Dynamics of Mechanisms covers applications via a systematic method for deriving model equations of planar and spatial mechanisms. The necessary theoretical foundations have been laid in the first volume that introduces the theoretical mechanical aspects of mechatronic systems. Here the focus is on the application of the modeling methodology to various examples of rigid-body mechanisms, simple planar ones as well as more challenging spatial problems. A rich variety of joint models, active constraints, plus active and passive force elements is treated. The book is intended for self-study by working engineers and students concerned with the control of mechanical systems, i.e. robotics, mechatronics, vehicles, and machine tools. The examples included are a likely source from which to choose models for university lectures.

  4. Measurement of cytotoxicity and irritancy potential of sugar-based surfactants on skin-related 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Miao, Yong; Vigneron, Pascale; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Pezron, Isabelle; Egles, Christophe; Vayssade, Muriel

    2017-04-01

    Sugar-based surfactants present surface-active properties and relatively low cytotoxicity. They are often considered as safe alternatives to currently used surfactants in cosmetic industries. In this study, four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or a maltose headgroup through an amide linkage, were synthesized and compared to two standard surfactants. The cytotoxic and irritant effects of surfactants were evaluated using two biologically relevant models: 3D dermal model (mouse fibroblasts embedded in collagen gel) and reconstituted human epidermis (RHE, multi-layered human keratinocytes). Results show that three synthesized surfactants possess lower cytotoxicity compared to standard surfactants as demonstrated in the 3D dermal model. Moreover, the IC50s of surfactants against the 3D dermal model are higher than IC50s obtained with the 2D dermal model (monolayer mouse fibroblasts). Both synthesized and standard surfactants show no irritant effects after 48h of topical application on RHE. Throughout the study, we demonstrate the difficulty to link the physico-chemical properties of surfactants and their cytotoxicity in complex models. More importantly, our data suggest that, prior to in vivo tests, a complete understanding of surfactant cytotoxicity or irritancy potential requires a combination of cellular and tissue models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants*

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, α AEO9=0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γ CMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γ max) and minimum area per...

  6. Surfactant enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, J.H.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    Surfactant-enhanced waterflooding is a novel EOR method aimed to improve the volumetric sweep efficiencies in reservoirs. The technique depends upon the ability to induce phase changes in surfactant solutions by mixing with surfactants of opposite charge or with salts of appropriate type. One surfactant or salt solution is injected into the reservoir. It is followed later by injection of another surfactant or salt solution. The sequence of injections is arranged so that the two solutions do not mix until they are into the permeable regions well away from the well bore. When they mix at this point, by design they form a precipitate or gel-like coacervate phase, plugging this permeable region, forcing flow through less permeable regions of the reservoir, improving sweep efficiency. The selectivity of the plugging process is demonstrated by achieving permeability reductions in the high permeable regions of Berea sandstone cores. Strategies were set to obtain a better control over the plug placement and the stability of plugs. A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the potential increases in oil production of model systems. Furthermore, the hardness tolerance of anionic surfactant solutions is shown to be enhanced by addition of monovalent electrolyte or nonionic surfactants. 34 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  8. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  9. Study on Pulmonary Surfactant of Sudden Death of Infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To find the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (S IDS) from changes of pulmonurry surfactant. Methods By means of thin-layer ckromatography technique, surfactant in whole lung specimens of 10 infants with SIDS and 10 control infants without SIDS (dead of nonrespiratory diseases ) were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Eleven components in pulmonary surfactant were examined qualitatively, including lysophosphatidylcholine , sphingomyelin , phosphatidylcholine , phosphatidylserine , phosphatidylinositol , phos phatidylethanolamine , phosphatidylglycerol , diphosphatidylylycerol , phosphatidic acid, cholesterol and neutral lipids. Quantitative examination showed that the amount of surfactant of whole lung specimens in sudden death group [-(8.9±1.0) rng/g wet lung weight] was significantly less than that in control group [-(12. 6±1.4) mg/g uet lung weight, P<0. 01]. Qualitative variance showed that the percentages of phosphatidylcholine (49. 4 % ± 2. 0 % ) and phosphatidylylycerol ( 2. 6 % ± 0. 7 % ) decreased markedly in sudden death group compared with those in control group (61.5 % ± 3. 0 % and 4.3 % ±1. 5%, P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion Before death there is serions defect on metabolism of pulmonary surfactant in sudden death infants, with the amount decreasing and the ratio of its components being disturbed, which is one of the important pathogenies of SIDS.

  10. Study on Pulmonary Surfactant of Sudden Death of Infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To find the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (S IDS) from changes of pulmonurry surfactant. Methods By means of thin-layer ckromatography technique, surfactant in whole lung specimens of 10 infants with SIDS and 10 control infants without SIDS (dead of nonrespiratory diseases ) were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Eleven components in pulmonary surfactant were examined qualitatively, including lysophosphatidylcholine , sphingomyelin , phosphatidylcholine , phosphatidylserine , phosphatidylinositol , phos phatidylethanolamine , phosphatidylglycerol , diphosphatidylylycerol , phosphatidic acid, cholesterol and neutral lipids. Quantitative examination showed that the amount of surfactant of whole lung specimens in sudden death group [-(8.9±1.0) rng/g wet lung weight] was significantly less than that in control group [-(12. 6±1.4) mg/g uet lung weight, P<0. 01]. Qualitative variance showed that the percentages of phosphatidylcholine (49. 4 % ± 2. 0 % ) and phosphatidylylycerol ( 2. 6 % ± 0. 7 % ) decreased markedly in sudden death group compared with those in control group (61.5 % ± 3. 0 % and 4.3 % ±1. 5%, P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion Before death there is serions defect on metabolism of pulmonary surfactant in sudden death infants, with the amount decreasing and the ratio of its components being disturbed, which is one of the important pathogenies of SIDS.

  11. Simple Riemannian surfaces are scattering rigid

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Haomin

    2015-01-01

    Scattering rigidity of a Riemannian manifold allows one to tell the metric of a manifold with boundary by looking at the directions of geodesics at the boundary. Lens rigidity allows one to tell the metric of a manifold with boundary from the same information plus the length of geodesics. There are a variety of results about lens rigidity but very little is known for scattering rigidity. We will discuss the subtle difference between these two types of rigidities and prove that they are equiva...

  12. Hierarchical Structure from the Self-Assembly of Giant Gemini Surfactants in Condensed State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    In the past a few years, a new class of amphiphiles with both asymmetrical shapes and interactions named ``shape amphiphiles'' has been significantly intensified. Recently, a new kind of shape amphiphiles called ``Giant Gemini Surfactants'' consisting of two hydrophilic carboxylic acid-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (APOSS) heads and two hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) tails covalently linked via rigid spacers (p-phenylene versus biphenylene) has been successful behavior of giant gemini surfactants. We currently continue to investigate the spacer effects on the self-assembly behaviors of giant gemini surfactants in condensed state by utilizing DCS, SAXS and TEM. Preliminary results showed that giant gemini surfactants with different spacers have diverse phase behaviors. As we use the same 3.2k PS chains, the giant gemini surfactant with p-phenylene spacer showed double gyroid morphology, while the one with biphenylene spacer revealed cylindrical morphology. This study expands the scope of giant gemini surfactants and contributes a lot to the basic physical principles in self-assembly behavior.

  13. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant metabol

  14. Electrochemical Oscillations Induced by Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟俊红; 贺占博

    2003-01-01

    A new type of electrochemical oscillation induced by surfactant was observed in experiments. The electrochemical system is a Daniell cell with a copper rod in CuSO4 aqueous and an aluminum rod in Al(NO3)3 aqueous as electrodes. The surfactants are CTAB, TX-100, SLS. The addition of trace surfactant solution by a micro-syringe made the original monotonously changing electrochemical system produce obvious periodic phenomena. At the mean time, the copper ion selective electrode and Hg2SO4 reference electrode were used to monitor the copper electrode reaction and determine its rate constant k of first order reaction. According to the experimental results of electrode reaction kinetics, the possible mechanism was found to be the polarization induced from the directional adsorption of trace surfactant on the electrode surface. That is the electrochemical oscillations.

  15. Geometry, rigidity, and group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Farb, Benson; Zimmer, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The study of group actions is more than a hundred years old but remains to this day a vibrant and widely studied topic in a variety of mathematic fields. A central development in the last fifty years is the phenomenon of rigidity, whereby one can classify actions of certain groups, such as lattices in semi-simple Lie groups. This provides a way to classify all possible symmetries of important spaces and all spaces admitting given symmetries. Paradigmatic results can be found in the seminal work of George Mostow, Gergory Margulis, and Robert J. Zimmer, among others.The p

  16. Wage rigidity and job creation

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Haefke; Marcus Sonntag; Thijs van Rens

    2007-01-01

    Recent research in macroeconomics emphasizes the role of wage rigidity in accounting for the volatility of unemployment fluctuations. We use worker-level data from the CPS to measure the sensitivity of wages of newly hired workers to changes in aggregate labor market conditions. The wage of new hires, unlike the aggregate wage, is volatile and responds almost one-to-one to changes in labor productivity. We conclude that there is little evidence for wage stickiness in the data. We also show, h...

  17. Wage Rigidity and Job Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Haefke, Christian; Sonntag, Marcus; Rens, Thijs van

    2012-01-01

    Recent research in macroeconomics emphasizes the role of wage rigidity in accounting for the volatility of unemployment fluctuations. We use worker-level data from the CPS to measure the sensitivity of wages of newly hired workers to changes in aggregate labor market conditions. The wage of new hires, unlike the aggregate wage, is volatile and responds almost one-to-one to changes in labor productivity. We conclude that there is little evidence for wage stickiness in the data. We also show, h...

  18. Wage Rigidity and Job Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Haefke; Marcus Sonntag; Thijs van Rens

    2012-01-01

    Recent research in macroeconomics emphasizes the role of wage rigidity in ac- counting for the volatility of unemployment fluctuations. We use worker-level data from the CPS to measure the sensitivity of wages of newly hired workers to changes in aggregate labor market conditions. The wage of new hires, unlike the aggregate wage, is volatile and responds almost one-to-one to changes in labor productivity. We conclude that there is little evidence for wage stickiness in the data. We also show,...

  19. Persurf, a New Method to Improve Surfactant Delivery: A Study in Surfactant Depleted Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC) can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf) and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I.) a more homogenous pulmonary di...

  20. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing

  1. Toxicology evaluation and hazard review for non-CFC containing rigid foams BKC 44317 and last-a-foam MSL-02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich, K.A.; Archuleta, M.M.

    1996-06-01

    New pour-in-place, low density, rigid polyurethane foam kits have been developed to mechanically stabilize damaged explosive ordnance. Although earlier foam systems used chlorofluorocarbons as blowing agents, the current versions rely on carbon dioxide generated by the reaction of isocynates with water. In addition, these kits were developed to manually generate small quantifies of rigid foam in the field with minimal or no protective equipment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize available hazard information for the components of these rigid foam kits and to provide recommendations for personal protective equipment to be used while performing the manual combination of the components. As with most rigid foam systems, these kits consist of two parts, one a mixture of isocyanates; the other, a combination of polyols, surfactants, and amine catalysts. Once completely deployed, the rigid foam is non-toxic. The components, however, have some important health effects which must be considered when establishing handling procedures.

  2. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  3. Fabrication of novel microstructures based on orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules in a TMAH solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Prem; Sato, K.; Gosalvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Hida, H.; Shikida, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules on the silicon surface during etching in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is investigated. Triton X-100 (C14H22O(C2H4O)n, n = 9-10) and 25 wt% TMAH are used as surfactant and main etchant, respectively. The crystallographic planes affected by the surfactant molecules are determined by analyzing the etching behavior of different mask patterns on Si{1 0 0} wafers and silicon hemispheres in pure and surfactant-added TMAH. Taken together, the shapes of the etched profiles and the analysis of the hemispherical etch rates confirm that thick and dense adsorbed surfactant layers are typically formed on both the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces. In addition, the results indicate that the adsorbed surfactant layer behaves as a permeable mask, partially slowing down the etch rate of the affected surface orientation/s and thus enforcing their appearance on the etching front. The peculiar etching properties of surfactant-added and surfactant-free TMAH are then utilized for the fabrication of advanced micromechanical structures with new shapes on Si{1 0 0} wafers and polydimethylsiloxane based on complex Si{1 0 0} molds.

  4. Structure of the SDS/1-dodecanol surfactant mixture on a graphite surface: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Hector

    2010-05-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 1-dodecanol molecules on a graphite surface were carried out at low and high concentration to investigate the formation of aggregates on the solid plate. The simulations showed that at low concentration the surfactants were well adsorbed on the surface by forming layers structures or a hemicylinder aggregate for a slightly higher surfactant concentration whereas at the highest concentration the surfactants formed monolayer-like structures localized away from the graphite surface with a water bin between the monolayer and the graphite plate. Therefore, we obtained different arrays of those observed in recent simulations of pure SDS adsorbed on graphite at the same concentration reported in the literature. The unexpected water layer between the 1-dodecanol and the graphite surface, at the highest concentration, was explained in terms of the Hamaker constants. The present results suggest that the formation of aggregates on solid surfaces is a combined effect not only of the surfactant-surfactant and the surfactant-wall interactions but also of the surfactant concentration.

  5. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  6. Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Somasundaran

    2008-09-20

    /conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

  7. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing

  8. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing

  9. Effect of surfactants on shear-induced gelation and gel morphology of soft strawberry-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Delong; Arosio, Paolo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-06-07

    The role of surfactant type in the aggregation and gelation of strawberry-like particles induced by intense shear without any electrolyte addition is investigated. The particles are composed of a rubbery core, partially covered by a plastic shell, and well stabilized by fixed (sulfate) charges in the end group of the polymer chains originating from the initiator. In the absence of any surfactant, after the system passes through a microchannel at a Peclet number equal to 220 and a particle volume fraction equal to 0.15, not only shear-induced gelation but also partial coalescence among the particles occurs. The same shear-induced aggregation/gelation process has been carried out in the presence of an ionic (sulfonate) surfactant or a nonionic (Tween 20) steric surfactant. It is found that for both surfactants shear-induced gelation does occur at low surfactant surface density but the conversion of the primary particles to the clusters constituting the gel decreases as the surfactant surface density increases. When the surfactant surface density increases above certain critical values, shear-induced gelation and eventually even aggregation do not occur any longer. For the sulfonate surfactant, this was explained in the literature by the non-DLVO, short-range repulsive hydration forces generated by the adsorbed surfactant layer. In this work, it is shown that the steric repulsion generated by the adsorbed Tween 20 layer can also protect particles from aggregation under intense shear. Moreover, the nonionic steric surfactant can also protect the strawberry-like particles from coalescence. This implies a decrease in the fractal dimension of the clusters constituting the gel from 2.76 to 2.45, which cannot be achieved using the ionic sulfonate surfactant.

  10. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  11. Surfactant-thermal method to synthesize a new Zn(II)-trimesic MOF with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Gao, Junkuo, E-mail: jkgao@zstu.edu.cn [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wang, Jiangpeng; Qian, Xuefeng [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Song, Ruijing; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Qian, Guodong, E-mail: gdqian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-03-15

    A surfactant-thermal method was used to prepare a new zinc-1,3,5-benzentricarboxylate-based metal-organic framework (ZJU-100) with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} (RuBpy) complex by using surfactant PEG 400 as reaction medium. The RuBpy molecules were encapsulated between the 2-D sheets in ZJU-100. ZJU-100 showed bathochromic shift in the steady-state emission spectrum and increased emission lifetimes relative to RuBpy molecules. The extended lifetime is attributed to the reduced nonradiative decay rate due to the stabilization of RuBpy within the rigid MOF framework. These results represent the first example of MOF with confined complex synthesized by surfactant, indicating that the surfactant-thermal method could offer exciting opportunities for preparing new MOFs host/guest materials with novel structures and interesting luminescent properties. - Graphical abstract: A surfactant-thermal method was used to prepare a new zinc-1,3,5-benzentricarboxylate-based metal-organic framework (ZJU-100) with confined Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} (RuBpy) complex by using surfactant PEG 400 as reaction medium. - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal-organic framework host/guest materials. • RuBpy molecules were encapsulated between the 2-D sheets of MOFs. • Extended lifetime is observed due to the stabilization of RuBpy within the rigid MOF framework.

  12. Thermodynamically consistent description of the hydrodynamics of free surfaces covered by insoluble surfactants of high concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.; Plapp, Mathis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose several models that describe the dynamics of liquid films which are covered by a high concentration layer of insoluble surfactant. First, we briefly review the 'classical' hydrodynamic form of the coupled evolution equations for the film height and surfactant concentration that are well established for small concentrations. Then we re-formulate the basic model as a gradient dynamics based on an underlying free energy functional that accounts for wettability and capill...

  13. FACTORS INFLUENCING BENDING RIGIDITY OF SUBMERGED VEGETATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Long-hua; YANG Xiao-li

    2011-01-01

    The bending rigidity of submerged vegetation is closely related with vegetative drag force.This work aims at determining the effects of flow conditions and characteristics of vegetation on the bending rigidity of submerged vegetation.Based on the dimensional analysis method,the factors influencing the bending rigidity of individual submerged vegetation were analyzed.The relationship between the relative bending rigidity and its influencing factors was investigated by experimental observation,and a relative bending rigidity expression for submerged vegetation was obtained by means of multiple linear regression method.The results show that the submerged vegetation has three states under different inflow conditions,and the each critical relative bending rigidity of individual submerged vegetation was determined for the different states of submerged vegetation.

  14. Rigid Ideals and Radicals of Ore Extensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chan Yong Hong; Tai Keun Kwak; S. Tariq Rizvi

    2005-01-01

    For an endomorphism σ of a ring R, Krempa called σ a rigid endomorphism if aσ(a) = 0 implies a= 0 for a ∈ R. A ring R is called rigid if there exists a rigid endomorphism of R. In this paper, we extend the σ-rigid property of a ring R to an ideal of R. For a σ-ideal Ⅰ of a ring R, we call Ⅰ a σ-rigid ideal if aσ(a) ∈Ⅰ implies a ∈Ⅰ for a ∈ R. We characterize σ-rigid ideals and study related properties. The connections of the prime radical and the upper nil radical of R with the prime radical and the upper nil radical of the Ore extension R[x; σ, δ], respectively, are also investigated.

  15. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Merse E

    2012-01-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks.

  16. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  17. Lessons from the biophysics of interfaces: Lung surfactant and tear fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantamaki, A.; Telenius, J.; Koivuniemi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the biophysical properties and functions of tear fluid and lung surfactant - two similar fluids covering the epithelium of two distinctive organs. Both fluids form a layer-like structure that essentially comprise of an aqueous layer next to th...

  18. Surfactant-free exfoliation of graphite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Karen B; Sendecki, Anne; Liu, Haitao

    2014-03-14

    We report an ultrasound exfoliation of graphite in a weakly basic solution to produce multi-layer graphene dispersion. A unique feature of this process is that no surfactant was added to stabilize the exfoliated graphene in water. The concentration of the graphene dispersion prepared by this approach can be up to 0.02 mg mL(-1) and it was stable at room temperature for several months.

  19. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Scamehorn, J.F. [Inst. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  20. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  1. Surfactant enhanced removal of PCE in a nominally two-dimensional, saturated, stratified porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. C.; Hofstee, C.; Dane, J. H.; Hill, W. E.

    1998-10-01

    Although surfactant enhanced remediation of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) by pump-and-treat technology has been studied extensively in the laboratory with one-dimensional columns, very few multi-dimensional investigations have been reported. In this study we focus on the removal of perchloroethylene (PCE) from a two-dimensional, saturated porous medium containing a low permeability sand layer situated in an otherwise high permeability sand. A PCE spill was applied at the surface of the porous medium and allowed to redistribute until static equilibrium was achieved. The porous medium was then flushed with various surfactant and co-solvent formulations injected at the PCE source location and extracted at the bottom of the porous medium using a configuration similar to that of Abdul and Ang [Abdul, S.A., Ang, C.C., 1994. In situ surfactant washing of polychlorinated biphenyls and oils from a contaminated field site: Phase II. Pilot study. Ground Water 32, 727-734]. Effluent samples were analyzed for dissolved PCE concentrations. Volumetric water and PCE content values were determined at a number of locations by means of dual-energy gamma radiation measurements. Once surfactant flushing had started, PCE moved as a distinct separate phase ahead of the surfactant front. Most of this downward moving PCE accumulated on top of the low permeability sand layer. Some PCE, however, passed quickly through this layer and subsequently through the high permeability sand below it. Movement of some of the PCE into and through the low permeability sand layer was attributed to local heterogeneities combined with reduced interfacial tensions associated with the surfactant formulation. Clean-up of PCE in most of the high permeability sand was considered to be effective. PCE accumulated on top of the fine layer, however, posed a significant challenge to remediation and required several pumping configurations and surfactant/co-solvent formulations before most of it was removed.

  2. Effects of Concentration and Conformation of Surfactants on Phase Separation of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁银权; 邹宪武; 刘昊阳

    2004-01-01

    The effects of surfactants on the phase separation of surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated by using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. The phase separation speed and equilibrium configuration are dependent on the surfactant concentration and conformation. The equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface remains constant. With the increasing surfactant concentration, the equilibrium configuration crosses over from the disperse phase to the bicontinuous one. The crossover concentration is estimated. The conformation of the surfactant has little effect on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface,while it affects the equilibrium configuration after phase separation.

  3. Complex Formation Between Polyelectrolytes and Ionic Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between polyelectrolyte and ionic surfactant is of great importance in different areas of chemistry and biology. In this paper we present a theory of polyelectrolyte ionic-surfactant solutions. The new theory successfully explains the cooperative transition observed experimentally, in which the condensed counterions are replaced by ionic-surfactants. The transition is found to occur at surfactant densities much lower than those for a similar transition in non-ionic polymer-sur...

  4. High Efficient Loading of Hydrophobic Molecules in Layer-by-Layer Assembled Microgel Films with the Assistance of Surfactant Micelles%表面活性剂胶束实现疏水分子在聚合物微凝胶层层组装膜中的高效负载

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈栋栋; 王林; 孙俊奇

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer(LbL) assembly enables the fabrication of various kinds of functional films by sequential deposition of building blocks of polyelectrolytes,biomacromolecules,oligo-charged dyes,colloids,nanoparticles,polymeric complexes and so forth.However,water-insoluble organic species without necessary functional groups are difficult to be incorporated into multilayer films by conventional LbL assembly method.The present work aims to develop a facile method for efficient loading of hydrophobic molecules into LbL assembled films.To do so,PAH-D microgels,which are chemically cross-linked poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH) and dextran,are LbL assembled with hyaluronic sodium(HA) to produce PAH-D/HA microgel films.Sodium dodecylsulfate(SDS) micelles are used as carriers to incorporate hydrophobic molecules of pyrene and spiropyran.The negatively charged SDS micelles loaded with hydrophobic molecules are successfully incorporated into the PAH-D/HA microgel films by a post-diffusion process,which produces transparent PAH-D microgel films with a large number of loaded pyrene and spiropyran molecules.Fluorescence emission spectra support that the hydrophobic molecules in PAH-D/HA films locate in the hydrophobic cores of SDS micelles.Stable loading of SDS micelles into PAH-D/HA films is achieved because of the strong electrostatic interaction between SDS micelles and protonated amine groups of PAH-D microgels.The high loading capacity of PAH-D/HA films toward SDS micelles encapsulated with hydrophobic molecules originates from the high swellability of the PAH-D/HA films and the abundance of unpaired amine groups in the PAH-D layers for binding of SDS micelles.The amount of hydrophobic molecules loaded into PAH-D/HA microgel films can be conveniently controlled by varying the deposition cycles of PAH-D/HA films and the concentration of hydrophobic molecules encapsulated in SDS micelles.The spiropyran-loaded PAH-D/HA microgel films show reversible

  5. Some more Non-arithmetic Rigid groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lubotzky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    In "Non arithmetic super rigid groups: counter examples to Platonov's conjecture" Bass and Lubotzky gave a counter example to Platonov's conjecture by presenting an example of a linear group with super-rigidity which is not an arithmetic lattice. In this note, a much richer class of such groups is presented with a somewhat simpler proof.

  6. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the cati

  7. Surfactant analysis in oil-containing fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronsveld, J.; Faber, M.J. (Koninklijke Shell Exploratie en Produktie Laboratorium, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    The total surfactant concentration in aqueous phase samples can be analysed with a potentiometric titration. In enhanced oil recovery research, however, the surfactant is produced not only in aqueous phase samples but also in oleic phase samples. The oleic constituents in the oliec phase samples interfere in the surfactant analysis and, therefore, the titration method has been adapted. (orig.).

  8. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on

  9. Parametric analysis of surfactant-aided imbibition in fractured carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibhatla, B; Mohanty, K K

    2008-01-15

    Many carbonate oil reservoirs are oil-wet and fractured; waterflood recovery is very low. Dilute surfactant solution injection into the fractures can improve oil production from the matrix by altering the wettability of the rock to a water-wetting state. A 2D, two-phase, multicomponent, finite-volume, fully-implicit numerical simulator calibrated with our laboratory results is used to assess the sensitivity of the process to wettability alteration, IFT reduction, oil viscosity, surfactant diffusivity, matrix block dimensions, and permeability heterogeneity. Capillarity drives the oil production at the early stage, but gravity is the major driving force afterwards. Surfactants which alter the wettability to a water-wet regime give higher recovery rates for higher IFT systems. Surfactants which cannot alter wettability give higher recovery for lower IFT systems. As the wettability alteration increases the rate of oil recovery increases. Recovery rate decreases with permeability significantly for a low tension system, but only mildly for high tension systems. Increasing the block dimensions and increasing oil viscosity decreases the rate of oil recovery and is in accordance with the scaling group for a gravity driven process. Heterogeneous layers in a porous medium can increase or decrease the rate of oil recovery depending on the permeability and the aspect ratio of the matrix block.

  10. Lung surfactant: Function and composition in the context of development and respiratory physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex with a unique phospholipid and protein composition. Its specific function is to reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface. The underlying Young-Laplace equation, applying to the surface of any geometrical structure, is the more important the smaller its radii are. It therefore applies to the alveoli and bronchioli of mature lungs, as well as to the tubules and saccules of immature lungs. Surfactant comprises 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC), of which dipalmitoyl-PC, palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC together are 75%. Anionic phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol are about 10% each, whereas surfactant proteins SP-A to -D comprise 2-5%. Maturation of the surfactant system is not essentially due to increased synthesis but to decreased turnover of specific components. Molecular differences correlate with resting respiratory rate (RR), where PC16:0/16:0 is the lower the higher RR is. PC16:0/14:0 is increased during alveolar formation, and decreases immune reactions that might impair alveolar development. In rigid bird lungs, with air-capillaries rather than alveoli, and no surface area changes during the respiratory cycle, PC16:0/16:0 is highest and PC16:0/14:0 absent. As there is no need for a surface-associated surfactant reservoir, SP-C is absent in birds as well. Airflow is lowest and particle sedimentation highest in the extrapulmonary air-sacs, rather than in the gas-exchange area. Consequently, SP-A and -D for particle opsonization are absent in bird surfactant. In essence, comparative analysis is consistent with the concept that surfactant is adapted to the physiologic needs of a given vertebrate species at a given developmental stage.

  11. Controlling elastic waves with small phononic crystals containing rigid inclusions

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-05-01

    We show that a two-dimensional elastic phononic crystal comprising rigid cylinders in a solid matrix possesses a large complete band gap below a cut-off frequency. A mechanical model reveals that the band gap is induced by negative effective mass density, which is affirmed by an effective medium theory based on field averaging. We demonstrate, by two examples, that such elastic phononic crystals can be utilized to design small devices to control low-frequency elastic waves. One example is a waveguide made of a two-layer anisotropic elastic phononic crystal, which can guide and bend elastic waves with wavelengths much larger than the size of the waveguide. The other example is the enhanced elastic transmission of a single-layer elastic phononic crystal loaded with solid inclusions. The effective mass density and reciprocal of the modulus of the single-layer elastic phononic crystal are simultaneously near zero. © CopyrightEPLA, 2014.

  12. Are better conductors more rigid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Jeong, Hawoong; Orland, Henri; Yi, Juyeon

    2006-10-01

    The variation of the bending stiffness of various materials is studied from the point of view of the electronic band characteristics. As far as the electronically generated bending stiffness κe (which we refer to as electro-stiffness) is concerned, the relevant factors are the orbital overlap t, the gap width u between the valence band and the conduction band, and the electron filling fraction γ. A perturbative calculation leads to the approximate expression κe ~ t2/√u2 + t2. This shows that materials with a large overlap and narrow band gap should be stiffer. The electro-stiffness also depends on the electron filling-fraction. We find that κe(γ) <= κe(1/2). These kinds of behavior are confirmed by numerical calculations. In addition, we study the variation in the projected length of flexible molecules under a voltage bias. The nonlinear variation of the bending rigidity is shown to give rise to a length contraction or dilation, depending on the voltage bias.

  13. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  14. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  15. Hydrophobic, electrostatic, and dynamic polymer forces at silicone surfaces modified with long-chain bolaform surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-05-06

    Surfactant self-assembly on surfaces is an effective way to tailor the complex forces at and between hydrophobic-water interfaces. Here, the range of structures and forces that are possible at surfactant-adsorbed hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated: certain long-chain bolaform surfactants-containing a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mid-block domain and two cationic α, ω-quarternary ammonium end-groups-readily adsorb onto thin PDMS films and form dynamically fluctuating nanostructures. Through measurements with the surface forces apparatus (SFA), it is found that these soft protruding nanostructures display polymer-like exploration behavior at the PDMS surface and give rise to a long-ranged, temperature- and rate-dependent attractive bridging force (not due to viscous forces) on approach to a hydrophilic bare mica surface. Coulombic interactions between the cationic surfactant end-groups and negatively-charged mica result in a rate-dependent polymer bridging force during separation as the hydrophobic surfactant mid-blocks are pulled out from the PDMS interface, yielding strong adhesion energies. Thus, (i) the versatile array of surfactant structures that may form at hydrophobic surfaces is highlighted, (ii) the need to consider the interaction dynamics of such self-assembled polymer layers is emphasized, and (iii) it is shown that long-chain surfactants can promote robust adhesion in aqueous solutions.

  16. Physical properties of botanical surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lillian Espíndola; Schiedeck, Gustavo

    2017-08-24

    Some vegetal species have saponins in their composition with great potential to be used as natural surfactants in organic crops. This work aims to evaluate some surfactants physical properties of Quillaja brasiliensis and Agave angustifolia, based on different methods of preparation and concentration. The vegetal samples were prepared by drying and grinding, frozen and after chopped or used fresh and chopped. The neutral bar soap was used as a positive control. The drying and grinding of samples were the preparation method that resulted in higher foam column height in both species but Q. brasiliensis was superior to A. angustifolia in all comparisons and foam index was 2756 and 1017 respectively. Critical micelle concentration of Q. brasiliensis was 0.39% with the superficial tension of 54.40mNm(-1) while neutral bar soap was 0.15% with 34.96mNm(-1). Aspects such as genetic characteristics of the species, environmental conditions, and analytical methods make it difficult to compare the results with other studies, but Q. brasiliensis powder has potential to be explored as a natural surfactant in organic farming. Not only the surfactants physical properties of botanical saponins should be taken into account but also its effect on insects and diseases control when decided using them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of Ovalbumin with Ionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xia; YAN Hui; GUO Rong

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of ovalbumin (OVA) with one anionic surfactant,sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS),and two cationic surfactants,dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB),in water have been studied through fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopies and transmission electronic microscopy,combined with the measurement of conductivity.OVA can increase the critical micelle concentrations (cmc) of SDS and CTAB but has little effect on that of DTAB.The interaction between surfactant monomer and OVA is greater than that between surfactant micelles and OVA.Moreover,SDS can make OVA unfolded while cationic surfactants cannot.

  18. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  19. Influence of phase separation for surfactant driven pattern formation during ion beam erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsaess, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Vetter, Ulrich; Bobes, Omar; Pape, Andre; Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Broetzmann, Marc [II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We will present results on metal surfactant driven self-organized pattern formation on surfaces by ion beam erosion, with a focus on the role of phase separation for the initial steps of pattern formation. Si substrates were irradiated with 5 keV Xe ions at normal incidence and ion fluences up to 5.10{sup 17} Xe/cm{sup 2} under continuous deposition of surfactant atoms. In the absence of such surfactants uniform flat surfaces are obtained, while in the presence of Fe and Mo surfactants pronounced patterns like dots, combinations of dots and ripples with wavelengths around 100 nm are generated. The surfactant coverage and deposition direction determine the pattern type and the pattern orientation, respectively. A critical steady-state coverage for onset of dot formation and onset of ripple formation is in the range of 10{sup 15} and 5.10{sup 15} Xe/cm{sup 2}. The steady-state surface region consists of a thin amorphous metal silicide layer with high metal concentration in the ripple and dot regions. Pattern formation is explained by ion induced diffusion and phase separation of the initially flat amorphous silicide layer and subsequent ion beam erosion with composition dependent sputter yield. To investigate the role of initial phase separation we additionally compare the pattern formation for different other metal surfactants.

  20. Anomalous thickness variation of the foam films stabilized by weak non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xuan; Wang, Liguang; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Nguyen, Anh V

    2009-09-15

    The constant thickness (H) of metastable free films of various non-ionic surfactant solutions was measured at surfactant concentrations less than the critical micelle concentrations or solubility limits with fixed 5x10(-5) M sodium chloride (NaCl) serving as the background electrolyte. The surfactants include n-pentanol, n-octanol, methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC), polypropylene glycol (PPG-400), tetraethylene glycol monooctyl ether (C(8)E(4)), and tetraethylene glycol monodecyl ether (C(10)E(4)). H was interferometrically measured. For each surfactant in this study, the H-versus-surfactant-concentration curve finds a peak at a concentration around 5x10(-6)-1x10(-5) M and a valley at a higher concentration. The measured H values were compared to those predicted from the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which considers solely the contribution from electrostatic double-layer repulsion with van der Waals attraction being neglected in the present work. In determining the double-layer repulsion, the ionic strength was determined from the electrolytic conductivity measurement of the film-forming solutions and the surface potential was estimated from the zeta-potential measurement of air bubbles. It was found that the DLVO theory failed to explain the thickness variance with surfactant concentration, implying that additional non-DLVO attractive forces might be required to explain the experimental results. Finally, the possible origins of these attractive forces were discussed.

  1. Impact of the degree of ethoxylation of the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactant on the surface self-assembly of hydrophobin-ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P; Skoda, Maximilian W A

    2014-08-19

    Neutron reflectivity measurements have been used to study the surface adsorption of the polyethylene sorbitan monostearate surfactant, with degrees of ethoxylation varying from 3 to 20 ethylene oxide groups, with the globular protein hydrophobin. The surface interaction between the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the hydrophobin results in self-assembly at the air-solution interface in the form of a well-defined layered surface structure. The surface interaction arises from a combination of the hydrophobic interaction between the surfactant alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the hydrophobin, and the hydrophilic interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and the hydrophilic regions on the surface of the hydrophobin. The results presented show that varying the degree of ethoxylation of the polysorbate surfactant changes the interaction between the surfactant and the hydrophobin and the packing, and hence the evolution in the resulting surface structure. The optimal degree of ethoxylation for multilayer formation is over a broad range, from of order 6 to 17 ethylene oxide groups, and for degrees of ethoxylation of 3 and 20 only monolayer adsorption of either the surfactant or the hydrophobin is observed.

  2. Binary coalescence of gas bubbles in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr-Auster, N; Gunde, R; Mäder, R; Windhab, Erich J

    2009-05-15

    The coalescence behavior of air bubbles in a dilute aqueous surfactant solution of a polyglycerol fatty acid ester (PGE), a commercial non-ionic surfactant, is investigated in a binary coalescence experiment. The focus is on the influence of the ionic strength of the solution on the rate of coalescence. Results are compared with the adsorption kinetics and surface shear/dilatational rheological properties of the surfactant. Experiments show that the coalescence frequency is significantly lower at low ionic strength, and that bubble stability increases with increasing aging time. Stabilization occurs via surfactant adsorption and a resulting electrostatic and/or steric repulsive force. The electrostatic force presumably originates from small amounts of anionic fatty acid soaps, which are residues from the industrial synthesis. The steric force can be related to the adsorption of visco-elastic layers of PGE at the air-water interface.

  3. Thermodynamically consistent description of the hydrodynamics of free surfaces covered by insoluble surfactants of high concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Thiele, Uwe; Plapp, Mathis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose several models that describe the dynamics of liquid films which are covered by a high concentration layer of insoluble surfactant. First, we briefly review the 'classical' hydrodynamic form of the coupled evolution equations for the film height and surfactant concentration that are well established for small concentrations. Then we re-formulate the basic model as a gradient dynamics based on an underlying free energy functional that accounts for wettability and capillarity. Based on this re-formulation in the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we propose extensions of the basic hydrodynamic model that account for (i) nonlinear equations of state, (ii) surfactant-dependent wettability, (iii) surfactant phase transitions, and (iv) substrate-mediated condensation. In passing, we discuss important differences to most of the models found in the literature.

  4. Rigid, Conjugated Macrocycles for High Performance Organic Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boyuan; Trinh, M Tuan; Fowler, Brandon; Ball, Melissa; Xu, Qizhi; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael L; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin; Zhong, Yu

    2016-12-21

    Organic photodetectors (OPDs) are attractive for their high optical absorption coefficient, broad wavelength tunability, and compatibility with lightweight and flexible devices. Here we describe a new molecular design that enables high performance organic photodetectors. We use a rigid, conjugated macrocycle as the electron acceptor in devices to obtain high photocurrent and low dark current. We make a direct comparison between the devices made with the macrocyclic acceptor and an acyclic control molecule; we find that the superior performance of the macrocycle originates from its rigid, conjugated, and cyclic structure. The macrocycle's rigid structure reduces the number of charged defects originating from deformed sp(2) carbons and covalent defects from photo/thermoactivation. With this molecular design, we are able to suppress dark current density while retaining high responsivity in an ultrasensitive nonfullerene OPD. Importantly, we achieve a detectivity of ∼10(14) Jones at near zero bias voltage. This is without the need for extra carrier blocking layers commonly employed in fullerene-based devices. Our devices are comparable to the best fullerene-based photodetectors, and the sensitivity at low working voltages (<0.1 V) is a record for nonfullerene OPDs.

  5. A comparison of neighbor search algorithms for large rigid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemova, Svetlana; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2011-10-01

    Fast determination of neighboring atoms is an essential step in molecular dynamics simulations or Monte Carlo computations, and there exists a variety of algorithms to efficiently compute neighbor lists. However, most of these algorithms are general, and not specifically designed for a given type of application. As a result, although their average performance is satisfactory, they might be inappropriate in some specific application domains. In this article, we study the case of detecting neighbors between large rigid molecules, which has applications in, e.g., rigid body molecular docking, Monte Carlo simulations of molecular self-assembly or diffusion, and rigid body molecular dynamics simulations. More precisely, we compare the traditional grid-based algorithm to a series of hierarchy-based algorithms that use bounding volumes to rapidly eliminate large groups of irrelevant pairs of atoms during the neighbor search. We compare the performance of these algorithms based on several parameters: the size of the molecules, the average distance between them, the cutoff distance, as well as the type of bounding volume used in the culling hierarchy (AABB, OBB, wrapped, or layered spheres). We demonstrate that for relatively large systems (> 100,000 atoms) the algorithm based on the hierarchy of wrapped spheres shows the best results and the traditional grid-based algorithm gives the worst timings. For small systems, however, the grid-based algorithm and the one based on the wrapped sphere hierarchy are beneficial. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. An anionic surfactant for EOR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagir, Muhammad; Tan, Isa M.; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    This work is to investigate the new anionic surfactants for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) application. Sulfonated anionic surfactant was produced by attaching SO3 to an ethoxylated alcohol to increase the performance of the surfactant. Methallyl chloride and ethoxylated alcohol was reacted followed by the reaction with sodium bisulfite to produce anionic sulfonated surfactant in 80.3 % yield. The sulfonation reaction parameters such as reactants mole ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst amount were optimized. The generation and stability of foam from the synthesized surfactant is also tested and results are reported. The synthesized novel surfactant was further investigated for the effect on the CO2 mobility in porous media and the findings are presented here. This in house developed surfactant has a great potential for CO2- EOR applications.

  7. Surfactant-driven flow transitions in evaporating droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    An evaporating droplet is a dynamic system in which flow is spontaneously generated to minimize the surface energy, dragging particles to the borders and ultimately resulting in the so-called "coffee-stain effect". The situation becomes more complex at the droplet's surface, where surface tension gradients of different nature can compete with each other yielding different scenarios. With careful experiments and with the aid of 3D particle tracking techniques, we are able to show that different types of surfactants turn the droplet's surface either rigid or elastic, which alters the evaporating fluid flow, either enhancing the classical coffee-stain effect or leading to a total flow inversion. Our measurements lead to unprecedented and detailed measurements of the surface tension difference along an evaporating droplet's surface with good temporal and spatial resolution.

  8. Thickness-Dependent Surfactant Behavior in Trilayer Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Shull, Kenneth; Wang, Jin

    2010-03-01

    The ability for thin liquid films to wet and remain thermodynamically stable on top of one another is a fundamental challenge in developing high quality paints, coatings, adhesives, and other industrial products. Since intermolecular interactions and interfacial energies dominate in the film thickness regime from tens to hundreds of nanometers, it is desirable to tune these long-range and short-range forces in a simple, controllable manner. Starting from an unstable model homopolymer bilayer (poly(styrene)/poly(4-vinylpyridine)), we demonstrate that sandwiching an additional homopolymer layer (poly(4-bromostyrene)) between the two layers can provide needed surfactancy. As the thickness of this center layer is increased, the full trilayer transitions from unstable (thin) to stable (moderate) to unstable (thick). We experimentally show using x-ray standing waves generated via total external reflection (TER-XSW), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) that this behavior can be directly attributed to the autophobic dewetting phenomenon, in which the surfactant layer is thin enough to remain stable but thick enough to shield the neighboring layers, highlighting a general approach to stabilizing multilayer systems.

  9. DNA-surfactant complexes: self-assembly properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Ma, Chao; Göstl, Robert; Herrmann, Andreas

    2017-08-14

    Over the last few years, DNA-surfactant complexes have gained traction as unique and powerful materials for potential applications ranging from optoelectronics to biomedicine because they self-assemble with outstanding flexibility spanning packing modes from ordered lamellar, hexagonal and cubic structures to disordered isotropic phases. These materials consist of a DNA backbone from which the surfactants protrude as non-covalently bound side chains. Their formation is electrostatically driven and they form bulk films, lyotropic as well as thermotropic liquid crystals and hydrogels. This structural versatility and their easy-to-tune properties render them ideal candidates for assembly in bulk films, for example granting directional conductivity along the DNA backbone, for dye dispersion minimizing fluorescence quenching allowing applications in lasing and nonlinear optics or as electron blocking and hole transporting layers, such as in LEDs or photovoltaic cells, owing to their extraordinary dielectric properties. However, they do not only act as host materials but also function as a chromophore itself. They can be employed within electrochromic DNA-surfactant liquid crystal displays exhibiting remarkable absorptivity in the visible range whose volatility can be controlled by the external temperature. Concomitantly, applications in the biological field based on DNA-surfactant bulk films, liquid crystals and hydrogels are rendered possible by their excellent gene and drug delivery capabilities. Beyond the mere exploitation of their material properties, DNA-surfactant complexes proved outstandingly useful for synthetic chemistry purposes when employed as scaffolds for DNA-templated reactions, nucleic acid modifications or polymerizations. These promising examples are by far not exhaustive but foreshadow their potential applications in yet unexplored fields. Here, we will give an insight into the peculiarities and perspectives of each material and are confident to

  10. Stabilization of emulsions using polymeric surfactants based on inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Th F; Vandamme, A; Levecke, B; Booten, K; Stevens, C V

    2004-05-20

    The use of polymeric surfactants for stabilization of emulsions is described. A brief account of general classification and description of polymeric surfactants is given. This is followed by a description of the adsorption and conformation of polymeric surfactants at interfaces. The theoretical approaches for studying polymer adsorption are briefly described. This is followed by a section on the experimental techniques that can be applied to study adsorption and conformation of polymers at the interface. Examples are given to illustrate the experimental techniques. A section is devoted to the interaction between droplets containing adsorbed polymer layers (steric stabilization). The last section gives results on oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions stabilised with a novel graft copolymeric surfactant based on inulin that has been modified by introducing alkyl groups. Two oils were used, namely Isopar M (isoparaffinic oil) and cyclomethicone. Emulsions prepared using the inulin-based surfactant have large droplets, but this could be significantly reduced by addition of a cosurfactant in the oil phase, namely Span 20. The stability of the emulsions was investigated in water, in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) NaCl and in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). These emulsions were stable for more than 1 year up to 50 degrees C in NaCl concentrations up to 2 mol dm(-3) and 1 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). This high stability in high electrolyte concentrations could be attributed to the nature of the hydrophilic (stabilizing) polyfructose chain. This was confirmed using cloud point measurements, which showed high hydration of the polyfructose chain in such high electrolyte concentrations. This ensured the long-term physical stability resulting from the strong steric repulsion between the polyfructose chains.

  11. Algorithms for Graph Rigidity and Scene Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Alex Rune; Jordán, Tibor

    2003-01-01

    We investigate algorithmic questions and structural problems concerning graph families defined by `edge-counts'. Motivated by recent developments in the unique realization problem of graphs, we give an efficient algorithm to compute the rigid, redundantly rigid, M-connected, and globally rigid...... by showing that 2d-connected bipartite graphs are d-tight. We give a new algorithm for finding a maximal d-sharp subgraph. We also answer a question of Imai and show that finding a maximum size d-sharp subgraph is NP-hard....

  12. Synthesis of Mesoporous Titania with Surfactant and its Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Benkacem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A mesoporous titania was obtained by gelation from Ti-alkoxide in acidic solutions with addition of surfactant cetyltrimetylammonium bromide (CH3(CH215N(CH33Br using a sol-gel process. The effects of surfactant concentration on synthesis of mesoporous titania were studied. The structural characterisation was studied by differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction. Studies by X-ray diffraction showed that crystallisation of TiO2 powder occurs at 200°C, above 200°C we obtained a mixture of two forms-Anatase and rutile. The textural characterisation by nitrogen adsorption-desorption allowed us to observe the variation of the surface area, porous volume and pore diameters according to temperature and [CTAB]/[Ti-alkoxide] molar ratio. The analysis of the results shows that addition of surfactant residue increases considerably its pore diameters. The deposit thin layers has been realized with a sol prepared with the destabilization of colloidal solutions process. Scanning electron-spectroscopy observation for thermally treated (at 400 and 600°C samples, showed homogeneous layers without cracking.

  13. Oxygen mass transfer and hydrodynamic behaviour in wastewater: determination of local impact of surfactants by visualization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Mélanie; Dietrich, Nicolas; Grace, John R; Hébrard, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    Powerful techniques, based on the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique, are deployed to locally visualize and quantify the impact of surfactants in wastewaters on hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer. Bubble diameter, aspect ratio, rise velocity, contamination angle, as well as flux, flux density, liquid side mass transfer and diffusion coefficients of transferred oxygen are determined based on these techniques applied in the wake of rising bubbles of diameter 1 mm and through planar gas/liquid interfaces. The initial experiments were performed in demineralized water containing small amounts of surfactant. Different concentrations of surfactant were added to finally reach the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). Bubbles have classically been found to be more spherical with a reduced rise velocity in the presence of surfactants up to the CMC. Above the CMC, these hydrodynamic characteristics were found to be almost constant, although the oxygen mass transfer decreased due to the presence of surfactants. Experimental results were markedly lower than predicted by the well-known Frössling equation with rigid surfaces. This is believed to be caused by a barrier of surfactants hindering the oxygen mass transfer at the interface. Similar hindrance of oxygen mass transfer applies to waters from sewage plants (filtered raw water and treated water), making accurate design of aeration tanks difficult.

  14. Soap opera : polymer-surfactant interactions on thin film surfaces /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, B. H. (Byram H.); Johal, M. S. (Malkiat S.); Wang, H. L. (Hsing-Lin); Robinson, J. M. (Jeanne M.)

    2001-01-01

    Surfactants are macromolecules with unique properties. They commonly contain a polar head group with a nonpolar hydrocarbon chain. These properties allow surfactants to solubilize greases and other nonpolar molecules. One particular way that this is accomplished is through the formation of micelles. Micelles are formed at the critical micelle concentration (cmc), which varies depending upon the nature of the surfactant and also the media in which the surfactant resides. These micelles can take a variety of shapes, but are generally characterized by surrounding the grease with the nonpolar hydrocarbon chains, exposing only the polarized head groups to the media, usually water. This property of easy solubilization has made surfactants a very attractive industrial agent, They are used most conventionally as industrial cleaning agents and detergents. However, they also have lesser-known applications in conjunction with polymers and other macromolecular mixtures, often creating a system with novel properties, such as increased solubilization and smoother mixture consistency. A recently developed field has investigated the self-assembly of polymers and polyelectrolytes onto thin film surfaces. There are many reasons for studying this process, such as for second harmonic generation purposes and bioassays. In this study, the interaction between the anionic polyelectrolyte poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) and two surfactants of opposite charge, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Dodecyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (DTAB), in their assembly onto thin film surfaces was investigated. The kinetics of adsorbance onto the thin films was examined, followed by construction of 10-bilayer films using an alternating layer of the cationic polyelectrolyte poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) to provide the electrostatic means for the PAZO/surfactant combination to assemble onto the thin film. The kinetics of adsorption is being

  15. Focal rigidity of flat tori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Kwakkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Given a closed Riemannian manifold (M, g, i.e. compact and boundaryless, there is a partition of its tangent bundle TM = ∪iΣi called the focal decomposition of TM. The sets Σi are closely associated to focusing of geodesics of (M, g, i.e. to the situation where there are exactly i geodesic arcs of the same length joining points p and q in M. In this note, we study the topological structure of the focal decomposition of a closed Riemannian manifold and its relation with the metric structure of the manifold. Our main result is that flat n-tori, n > 2, are focally rigid in the sense that if two flat tori are focally equivalent then the tori are isometric up to rescaling. The case n = 2 was considered before by F. Kwakkel.Dada uma variedade Riemanniana (M, g fechada, isto é, compacta e sem bordo, existe uma partição de seu fibrado tangente TM = ∪iΣi chamada decomposição focal de TM. Os conjuntos Σi estão intimamente associados ao modo como focalizam as geodésicas de (M,g, isto é, à situação em que existem exatamente i arcos de geodésica de mesmo comprimento unindo pontos p e q em M. Nesta nota, estudamos a estrutura topológica da decomposição focal de uma variedade Riemanniana fechada e sua relação com a estrutura métrica de M. Nosso principal resultado é que n-toros planos, n > 2, são focalmente rigidos, isto é, se dois toros planos são focalmente equivalentes, então os dois toros são isométricos módulo mudança de escala. O caso n = 2 foi considerado anteriormente por F. Kwakkel.

  16. Analysis of Switched-Rigid Floating Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar R. Marur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In explicit finite element simulations, a technique called deformable-to-rigid (D2R switching is used routinely to reduce the computation time. Using the D2R option, the deformable parts in the model can be switched to rigid and reverted back to deformable when needed during the analysis. The time of activation of D2R however influences the overall dynamics of the system being analyzed. In this paper, a theoretical basis for the selection of time of rigid switching based on system energy is established. A floating oscillator problem is investigated for this purpose and closed-form analytical expressions are derived for different phases in rigid switching. The analytical expressions are validated by comparing the theoretical results with numerical computations.

  17. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  18. Public policies targeting labour market rigidities

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Claudia ŞERBAN

    2013-01-01

    Labour market rigidity becomes an issue of increasing importance under conditions of shocks associated with the economic crisis due to the need to increase the adaptability and responsiveness to them. Thus, labour market policies must be directed towards mitigating rigidities caused by institutional or demographic factors or certain mismatch between demand and supply of education qualifications. This paper highlights the major role of the active labour market policies tar...

  19. Using Elimination Theory to construct Rigid Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhinav; Patankar, Vijay M; N, Jayalal Sarma M

    2009-01-01

    The rigidity of a matrix A for target rank r is the minimum number of entries of A that must be changed to ensure that the rank of the altered matrix is at most r. Since its introduction by Valiant (1977), rigidity and similar rank-robustness functions of matrices have found numerous applications in circuit complexity, communication complexity, and learning complexity. Almost all nxn matrices over an infinite field have a rigidity of (n-r)^2. It is a long-standing open question to construct infinite families of explicit matrices even with superlinear rigidity when r=Omega(n). In this paper, we construct an infinite family of complex matrices with the largest possible, i.e., (n-r)^2, rigidity. The entries of an nxn matrix in this family are distinct primitive roots of unity of orders roughly exp(n^4 log n). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first family of concrete (but not entirely explicit) matrices having maximal rigidity and a succinct algebraic description. Our construction is based on elimination...

  20. Tuning Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Interactions: Modification of Poly(ethylenimine) with Propylene Oxide and Blocks of Ethylene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Li, P; Batchelor, S N; Tucker, I M; Burley, A W

    2016-02-02

    Significantly enhanced adsorption at the air-water interface arises in polyelectrolyte/ionic surfactant mixtures, such as poly(ethylenimine)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (PEI/SDS), down to relatively low surfactant concentrations due to a strong surface interaction between the polyelectrolyte and surfactant. In the region of charge neutralization this can result in precipitation or coacervation and give rise to undesirable properties in many applications. Ethoxylation of the PEI can avoid precipitation, but can also considerably weaken the interaction. Localization of the ethoxylation can overcome these shortcomings. Further manipulation of the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be achieved by selective ethoxylation and propoxylation of the PEI amine groups. Neutron reflectivity and surface tension data are presented here which show how the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be manipulated by tuning the PEI structure. Using deuterium labeled surfactant and polymer the neutron reflectivity measurements provide details of the surface composition and structure of the adsorbed layer. The general pattern of behavior is that at low surfactant concentrations there is enhanced surfactant adsorption due to the strong surface interaction; whereas around the region of the SDS critical micellar concentration, cmc, the surface is partially depleted of surfactant in favor bulk aggregate structures. The results presented here show how these characteristic features of the adsorption are affected by the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation. Increasing the degree of propoxylation enhances the surfactant adsorption, whereas varying the degree of ethoxylation has a less pronounced effect. In the region of surfactant surface depletion increasing both the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation result in an increased surface depletion.

  1. Surfactants in tribology, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture and use of almost every consumer and industrial product rely on application of advanced knowledge in surface science and tribology. These two disciplines are of critical importance in major economic sectors, such as mining, agriculture, manufacturing (including metals, plastics, wood, computers, MEMS, NEMS, appliances), construction, transportation, and medical instruments, transplants, and diagnostic devices. An up-to-date reference with contributions by experts in surface science and tribology, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 3 discusses some of the underlying tribological a

  2. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Somasundaran

    2005-04-30

    The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in

  3. Plastic Damage Model to Evaluate the Fracture Size of Semi-Rigid Base Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple supported beam model has been presented to simulate the response of semi-rigid pavement structure, which are consistent of the upper layer, middle layer, bottom layer, base and sub base course, during the cycle vehicle loading. This mechanics model coupled with plastic-damage mechanics model could simulate the limit broken of the pavement structure in condition that soil base layer losing bearing capacity gradually. In the meanwhile, numerical calculations based on preceding mechanics model, using the FEM software ABAQUS, have been used to define the broken size of beam. The results indicated that: when the size of simple supported beam expanded to 10 m, brittle damage could happen immediately, Just the standard vehicle loading (about 0.7 Mpa has been implement once. Objective of this study is to provide a physical and rather concrete explanation for the style and concept of the semi-rigid pavement brittle broken.

  4. Surfactant inhibition in acute respiratory failure : consequences for exogenous surfactant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Eijking (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is characterized by immaturity of the lung, resulting in relative or absolute absence of pulmonary surfactant. Worldwide, neonates suffering from RDS have been treated successfully with exogenous surfactant preparations. Currently, exogeno

  5. A new nano-engineered hierarchical membrane for concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from oil-in-water nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Detao; Liu, Zhaoyang; Bai, Hongwei; Sun, Darren Delai; Song, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    Surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions pose a severe threat to both the environment and human health. Recent development of membrane filtration technology has enabled efficient oil removal from oil/water nanoemulsion, however, the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil remains unsolved because the existing filtration membranes still suffer from low surfactant removal rate and serious surfactant-induced fouling issue. In this study, to realize the concurrent removal of surfactant and oil from nanoemulsion, a novel hierarchically-structured membrane is designed with a nanostructured selective layer on top of a microstructured support layer. The physical and chemical properties of the overall membrane, including wettability, surface roughness, electric charge, thickness and structures, are delicately tailored through a nano-engineered fabrication process, that is, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet assisted phase inversion coupled with surface functionalization. Compared with the membrane fabricated by conventional phase inversion, this novel membrane has four times higher water flux, significantly higher rejections of both oil (~99.9%) and surfactant (as high as 93.5%), and two thirds lower fouling ratio when treating surfactant stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion. Due to its excellent performances and facile fabrication process, this nano-engineered membrane is expected to have wide practical applications in the oil/water separation fields of environmental protection and water purification.

  6. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  7. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  8. Effect of surfactants on the properties of hydrotalcites prepared by the reverse micelle method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgado, Patricia H., E-mail: h.holgado@usal.es; Holgado, María J., E-mail: holgado@usal.es; San Román, María S., E-mail: sanroman@usal.es; Rives, Vicente, E-mail: vrives@usal.es

    2015-02-01

    Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-type structure have been prepared by the reverse micelles method. The layer cations were Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in all cases and the interlayer anion was carbonate. We have studied the effect of the surfactant used (with linear chains of different lengths, or cyclic) and the effect of the pH on the properties of the solids formed. These have been characterized by element chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature-programmed reduction, FT-IR and Vis–UV spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy. It has been found that the samples prepared at pH 9 are more crystalline than those prepared at pH 11 and their crystallite sizes are always larger than for samples prepared by the conventional precipitation method. Surfactants with cyclic organic chains lead to a larger crystallite size, probably because the water pool vesicle where the crystallite grows is larger due to sterical hindrance of the organic chains. - Graphical abstract: Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-type structure with Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} cations in the layers have been prepared by the reverse micelles method. Different surfactants were used at different pH synthesis. Samples prepared at pH 9 are higher crystalline than those prepared at pH 11. Surfactants with cyclic organic chains lead to a larger crystallite size. - Highlights: • Hydrotalcites were prepared by the micelles reverse method. • Straight alkyl or cyclic chain surfactants were used. • All hydrotalcites are well crystallized at pH = 9 and 11. • The crystallite size depends on the linear/cyclic nature of the surfactant chain.

  9. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  10. Using biologically soft surfactants for dust suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, N.G.; Kolodiichak, V.K.; Motrii, A.E.; Severin, V.D.

    1982-07-01

    This article discusses environmental aspects of using surfactants in coal mines for dust suppression. Surfactants for underground black coal mines in the USSR are divided into three classes: so-called soft surfactants with a decomposition period from 1 to 3 days, hard surfactants with decomposition exceeding a month and an intermediary group. The decomposition process is analyzed; the role played by fermentation is stressed. Environmental effects of surfactant decomposition are evaluated. Selected surfactants tested in Soviet laboratories are described. The results of experimental use of diethanolamide as a surfactant for water injection in coal seams are evaluated. Wetting time amounts to 1 s when a 0.2% concentration is used. When surfactant concentration in water is reduced to 0.05% wetting time does not change; when concentration decreases to 0.025% wetting time increases to 3 s. Surfactant efficiency is investigated under operational conditions in a Donbass mine. Specifications of the working face, mining system and air pollution caused by a shearer loader are discussed. When diethanolamide is used dust suppression efficiency ranges from 86.4 to 90.4%. During the tests diethanolamide concentration in water was 0.05%.

  11. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  12. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform distri

  13. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  14. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform distri

  15. Bending rigidity of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kang; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Fa; Zeng, Fan; Tang, Bi-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Due to the presence of a sizeable direct band gap, three-atom-thick transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers have been suggested as important candidates for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices recently. The in-plane elasticity of TMDC monolayers has been investigated extensively, however, little is known about their bending rigidity. Here, we have determined bending rigidities of single-layer MX2 (M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se) by fitting the energetics of single wall nanotubes from first-principles to the Helfrich Hamiltonian for the configurational energy of membranes. This parameter-free approach can avoid the controversy induced by ambiguous definition of the thickness of monolayers, which are required in the empirical determination of bending rigidity using classical shell theory. The obtained direction-dependent bending rigidities of single-layer MoS2 are 9.10 and 9.61 eV along the armchair and zigzag directions, which are larger than that estimated using shell theory but similar to the previous analytic formula based on an empirical potential. Moreover, the relative magnitude of bending rigidities for different TMDCs are found to be MoS2  elastic modulus of monolayers and the structural relaxation of nanotubes.

  16. Thermodynamic Studies of Aqueous m-s-m Gemini Surfactant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettig, S. D.; Verrall, R. E.

    2001-03-15

    The specific conductance, surface tension, and apparent molar volume properties of aqueous solutions of two series of m-s-m gemini surfactants-one having a constant spacer s(=3) with m=8, 10, 12, and 16 and the other having a constant alkyl chain length m(=12) with variable spacer length 2bolaform cation. Poor agreement was obtained with the first method, while good agreement was obtained with the second. The observed variation in the volume change due to micelle formation, DeltaV(φ,M), is consistent with variations in the head group area and critical micelle concentrations and can be rationalized in terms of the location of the spacer-either at the micelle/water interface, or in the micelle interior. Results obtained for the 12-φ-12 surfactant indicate that rigidity of the spacer has no measurable effect on the micellization process for such a short spacerlength. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  18. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... PACKAGINGS IBC Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic...

  19. The rigidity transition in random graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kasiviswanathan, Shiva Prasad; Theran, Louis

    2010-01-01

    As we add rigid bars between points in the plane, at what point is there a giant (linear-sized) rigid component, which can be rotated and translated, but which has no internal flexibility? If the points are generic, this depends only on the combinatorics of the graph formed by the bars. We show that if this graph is an Erdos-Renyi random graph G(n,c/n), then there exists a sharp threshold for a giant rigid component to emerge. For c c_2, w.h.p. there is a giant rigid component. The constant c_2 \\approx 3.588 is the threshold for 2-orientability, discovered independently by Fernholz and Ramachandran and Cain, Sanders, and Wormald in SODA'07. We also give quantitative bounds on the size of the giant rigid component when it emerges, proving that it spans a (1-o(1))-fraction of the vertices in the (3+2)-core. Informally, the (3+2)-core is maximal induced subgraph obtained by starting from the 3-core and then inductively adding vertices with 2 neighbors in the graph obtained so far.

  20. Flexible implementation of rigid solar cell technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollowell, Andrew E.

    2010-08-01

    As a source of clean, remote energy, photovoltaic (PV) systems are an important area of research. The majority of solar cells are rigid materials with negligible flexibility. Flexible PV systems possess many advantages, such as being transportable and incorporable on diverse structures. Amorphous silicon and organic PV systems are flexible; however, they lack the efficiency and lifetime of rigid cells. There is also a need for PV systems that are light weight, especially in space and flight applications. We propose a solution to this problem by arranging rigid cells onto a flexible substrate creating efficient, light weight, and flexible devices. To date, we have created a working prototype of our design using the 1.1cm x 1cm Emcore cells. We have achieved a better power to weight ratio than commercially available PowerFilm{reg_sign}, which uses thin film silicon yielding .034W/gram. We have also tested our concept with other types of cells and verified that our methods are able to be adapted to any rigid solar cell technology. This allows us to use the highest efficiency devices despite their physical characteristics. Depending on the cell size we use, we can rival the curvature of most available flexible PV devices. We have shown how the benefits of rigid solar cells can be integrated into flexible applications, allowing performance that surpasses alternative technologies.

  1. Rigidity loss in disordered network materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    Weakly jammed sphere packings show a very peculiar elasticity, with a ratio of compression modulus to shear modulus that diverges as the number of contacts approaches the minimum required for rigidity. Creating artificial isotropic network materials with this property is a challenge: so far, the least elaborate way to generate them is to actually simulate weakly compressed repulsive spheres. The next steps in designing such networks hinge upon a solid understanding of what properties of the sphere-packing derived network are essential for its elasticity. We elucidate the topological aspects of this question by comparing the rigidity transition in these networks to that in other random spring network models, including the common bond-diluted triangular net and a self-stress-free variant of that. We use the pebble game algorithm for identifying rigid clusters in mechanical networks to demonstrate that the marginally rigid state in sphere packings is perfectly isostatic everywhere, and the addition or removal of a single bond creates a globally stressed or globally floppy network, respectively. By contrast, the other classes of random network random networks show a more localized response to addition and removal of bonds, and, correspondingly, a more gradual rigidity transition.

  2. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  3. Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow transition in lung surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The lining of normal lungs is covered by surfactants, because otherwise the surface tension of the aqueous layer would be too large to allow breathing. A lack of functioning surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition in both premature infants and adults, and a major cause of death in the US and world-wide. We use a home-built Brewster angle microscope on an optically accessible deep channel viscometer to simultaneously observe the mesoscale structures of DPPC, the primary constituent of lung surfactant, on water surface and measure the interfacial velocity field. The measured interfacial velocity is compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. Results show that DPPC monolayer behaves i) purely elastically at low surface pressures on water, ii) viscoelastically at modest surface pressures, exhibiting non-zero surface shear viscosity that is independent of the shear rate and flow inertia, and iii) at surface pressures approaching film collapse, DPPC loses its fluid characteristics, and a Newtonian surface model no longer captures its hydrodynamics.

  4. Surfactant-mediated epitaxy of thin germanium films on SiGe(001) virtual substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bugiel, E.; Wietler, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the impact of a surfactant on the growth mode and strain relaxation of thin Ge films on Si0.21Ge0.79 virtual substrates grown by surfactant mediated epitaxy on Si(001) wafers. Ge epitaxy without surfactant results in island formation after deposition of only 5 nm Ge. A certain part of the strain in the Ge islands is relaxed via interfacial misfit dislocations, which are located within the core part of the islands. We discuss the possibilities for the occurrence of three-dimensional growth at low Ge layer thickness. The use of Sb as a surfactant suppresses three-dimensional islanding and enables the growth of smooth pseudomorphically strained Ge films on Si0.21Ge0.79(001) virtual substrates up to a thickness of 10 nm. At thicknesses higher than 20 nm, the films relax via the formation of a misfit dislocation network at the Ge/ Si1-xGex interface. The surface roughness of up to 30 nm thick layers is below 1.6 nm. Our experimental results corroborate the calculated thickness for plastic relaxation of Ge on Si1-xGex. The effect of the surfactant on the growth of the virtual substrate and on the subsequent growth of Ge on Si0.21Ge0.79 is discussed.

  5. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  6. Torsional rigidity of submanifolds with controlled geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado, Ana; Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We prove explicit upper and lower bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of submanifolds ^m$ with controlled radial mean curvature in ambient Riemannian manifolds ^n$ with a pole $ and with sectional curvatures bounded from above and from below, respectively. These bounds are given...... in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped product model spaces. Our main results are obtained using methods from previously established isoperimetric inequalities, as found in e.g. [MP4] and [MP5]. As in [MP4] we also characterize the geometry...... of those situations in which the bounds for the torsional rigidity are actually attained and study the behavior at infinity of the so-called geometric average of the mean exit time for Brownian motion....

  7. Measuring the Acceleration of a Rigid Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Martin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods to measure the six-degree-of-freedom acceleration of a point on a rigid body are presented. The first, referred to as the periphery scheme, makes use of three clusters of accelerometers mounted orthogonal to each other and coincident with the axes of the point. One of the clusters consists of the three accelerometers attached to a cube-shaped triaxial angular rate sensor (ARS. The second method, called the compact cube scheme, uses a single 3-accelerometer/ARS cluster that may be mounted anywhere on the rigid body. During impact tests with an instrumented rigid body, both methods produced measurements that were highly correlated near the time of peak acceleration. Whereas the compact cube scheme was more economical and easier to implement, the periphery scheme produced results that were less disrupted by instrument signal errors and noisy environments.

  8. Nonionic surfactants with linear and branched hydrocarbon tails: compositional analysis, phase behavior, and film properties in bicontinuous microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christian; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Allgaier, Jürgen; Prast, Hartmut

    2007-06-05

    and exhibit in most cases visibly lower phase inversion temperatures. Both the efficiency and temperature behavior mainly can be explained on the basis of increased bulkiness of the branched structures compared to the fully linear version. The phase behavior results are largely confirmed by the SANS investigations. Those results show that the fully linear surfactant exhibits the most rigid interfacial film. In additional experiments this surfactant was compared with its monodisperse analogue. According to the phase diagrams, the surfactant having the polydisperse hydrophilic moiety is drastically more efficient although the film stiffnesses are almost identical.

  9. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  10. SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

    2004-01-31

    Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

  11. On Saturnian cosmic ray cutoff rigidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, H. H.

    1980-03-01

    It has been determined that Saturn possesses a relatively pure dipolar magnetic field through magnetometer measurements made by Ness et al. (1979, private comm.) and Smith et al. (1979). The paper briefly outlines the dipole geomagnetic cutoff theory and demonstrates the scaling required for its applicability to energetic particle measurements in the vicinity of Saturn. Since the cutoff rigidity is a function of viewing direction, the effective cutoff rigidity must be determined as an integration over the finite viewing angle of a physical detector.

  12. Generic Rigidity Matroids with Dilworth Truncations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanigawa, Shin-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the linear matroid that defines generic rigidity of $d$-dimensional body-rod-bar frameworks (i.e., structures consisting of disjoint bodies and rods mutually linked by bars) can be obtained from the union of ${d+1 \\choose 2}$ graphic matroids by applying variants of Dilworth truncation $n_r$ times, where $n_r$ denotes the number of rods. This leads to an alternative proof of Tay's combinatorial characterizations of generic rigidity of rod-bar frameworks and that of identified body-hinge frameworks.

  13. Rigidity Constraints for Large Mesh Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhao; Xin-Guo Liu; Qun-Sheng Peng; Hu-Jun Bao

    2009-01-01

    It is a challenging problem of surface-based deformation to avoid apparent volumetric distortions around largely deformed areas. In this paper, we propose a new rigidity constraint for gradient domain mesh deformation to address this problem. Intuitively the proposed constraint can be regarded as several small cubes defined by the mesh vertices through mean value coordinates. The user interactively specifies the cubes in the regions which are prone to volumetric distortions, and the rigidity constraints could make the mesh behave like a solid object during deformation. The experimental results demonstrate that our constraint is intuitive, easy to use and very effective.

  14. Rigid origami vertices: conditions and forcing sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Abel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an intrinsic necessary and sufficient condition for single-vertex origami crease patterns to be able to fold rigidly.  We classify such patterns in the case where the creases are pre-assigned to be mountains and valleys as well as in the unassigned case.  We also illustrate the utility of this result by applying it to the new concept of minimal forcing sets for rigid origami models, which are the smallest collection of creases that, when folded, will force all the other creases to fold in a prescribed way.

  15. Thin structured rigid body for acoustic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, T. A.; Smith, J. D.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Rance, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a thin acoustic metamaterial absorber, comprised of only rigid metal and air, that gives rise to near unity absorption of airborne sound on resonance. This simple, easily fabricated, robust structure comprising a perforated metal plate separated from a rigid wall by a deeply subwavelength channel of air is an ideal candidate for a sound absorbing panel. The strong absorption in the system is attributed to the thermo-viscous losses arising from a sound wave guided between the plate and the wall, defining the subwavelength channel.

  16. Structured fluids polymers, colloids, surfactants

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, the study of liquids containing polymers, surfactants, or colloidal particles has developed from a loose assembly of facts into a coherent discipline with substantial predictive power. These liquids expand our conception of what condensed matter can do. Such structured-fluid phenomena dominate the physical environment within living cells. This book teaches how to think of these fluids from a unified point of view showing the far-reaching effects ofthermal fluctuations in producing forces and motions. Keeping mathematics to a minimum, the book seeks the simplest expl

  17. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  18. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  19. Metathesis depolymerization for removable surfactant templates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wheeler, David Roger; Rahimian, Kamayar; McElhanon, James Ross (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Long, Timothy Michael; Jamison, Gregory Marks; Loy, Douglas Anson (Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM); Kline, Steven R. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Simmons, Blake Alexander (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Current methodologies for the production of meso- and nanoporous materials include the use of a surfactant to produce a self-assembled template around which the material is formed. However, post-production surfactant removal often requires centrifugation, calcination, and/or solvent washing which can damage the initially formed material architecture(s). Surfactants that can be disassembled into easily removable fragments following material preparation would minimize processing damage to the material structure, facilitating formation of templated hybrid architectures. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of novel cationic and anionic surfactants with regularly spaced unsaturation in their hydrophobic hydrocarbon tails and the first application of ring closing metathesis depolymerization to surfactant degradation resulting in the mild, facile decomposition of these new compounds to produce relatively volatile nonsurface active remnants.

  20. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Surfactant Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being increasingly applied in the oil industry and several different technologies have emerged during, the last decades in order to optimize oil recovery after conventional recovery methods have been applied. Surfactant flooding is an EOR technique in which the phase...... both for complex surfactant systems as well as for oil and brine systems. It is widely accepted that an increase in oil recovery can be obtained through flooding, whether it is simple waterflooding, waterflooding where the salinity has been modified by the addition or removal of specific ions (socalled...... “smart” waterflooding) or surfactant flooding. High pressure experiments have been carried out in this work on a surfactant system (surfactant/ oil/ brine) and on oil/ seawater systems (oil/ brine). The high pressure experiments were carried out on a DBR JEFRI PVT cell, where a glass window allows...

  1. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars.

  3. Surfactant-induced structures in the heteroepitaxial growth of Co on Cu(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, S.; Kraemer, T.; Rath, C.; Hammer, L.; Heinz, K. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany)). E-mail: kheinz@fkp.physik.uni-erlangen.de; Prieto, J.E.; Miranda, R. [Dpto. Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-11-05

    The growth of Co on Cu(111) with Pb as a surfactant is found to be accompanied by a considerable surface reconstruction of (4x4) symmetry induced by the surfactant. Its crystallography was investigated by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) for an initial and later stage of growth with deposition of 1.3 monolayer (ML) and 7 ML Co, respectively. In the low coverage case the surface reconstruction is rather similar to that of Pb/Cu investigated earlier. It extends deep into the substrate with simultaneous minimization of the Pb layer buckling. The structure seems to be controlled by dominating fcc-stacking characteristic of this early stage of growth. With further cobalt deposition the type of reconstruction changes. For the 7 ML Co film it is restricted to the Pb and top Co layer only with the buckling of the surfactant layer considerably increased. We discuss that this may be attributed to the slightly different lattice parameters of Cu and Co, though the influences of the different stacking involved cannot be ruled out. The top film layer is always reconstructed during the whole growth which might be responsible for the easy exchange processes which take place during the growth and are essential for the layer-by-layer growth as found earlier. (author)

  4. Delayed Equation for Charged Rigid Nonrelativistic Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, A A

    2002-01-01

    Simple expression for self-force acting on radiating rigid charged ball is derived (Sommerfeld ball). It is shown that appropriate delayed equation of motion has solutions in general differ from that for Sommerfeld sphere - there are no "radiationless" solutions, but there are oscillating without damping solutions though self-force has nonzero value.

  5. Rigid body dynamics on the Poisson torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Peter H.

    2008-11-01

    The theory of rigid body motion with emphasis on the modifications introduced by a Cardan suspension is outlined. The configuration space is no longer SO(3) but a 3-torus; the equivalent of the Poisson sphere, after separation of an angular variable, is a Poisson torus. Iso-energy surfaces and their bifurcations are discussed. A universal Poincaré section method is proposed.

  6. Viscoelasticity of suspensions of long, rigid rods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, Jan K.G.; Briels, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    A microscopic theory for the viscoelastic behaviour of suspensions of rigid rods with excluded volume interactions is presented, which is valid in the asymptotic limit of very long and thin rods. Stresses arising from translational and rotational Brownian motion and direct interactions are calculate

  7. The rigid orthogonal Procrustes rotation problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Berge, JMF

    2006-01-01

    The problem of rotating a matrix orthogonally to a best least squares fit with another matrix of the same order has a closed-form solution based on a singular value decomposition. The optimal rotation matrix is not necessarily rigid, but may also involve a reflection. In some applications, only rigi

  8. Rigid rod anchored to infinite membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Qiu, Feng; Zhang, Hongdong; Yang, Yuliang

    2005-08-15

    We investigate the shape deformation of an infinite membrane anchored by a rigid rod. The density profile of the rod is calculated by the self-consistent-field theory and the shape of the membrane is predicted by the Helfrich membrane elasticity theory [W. Helfrich, Z. Naturforsch. 28c, 693 (1973)]. It is found that the membrane bends away from the rigid rod when the interaction between the rod and the membrane is repulsive or weakly attractive (adsorption). However, the pulled height of the membrane at first increases and then decreases with the increase of the adsorption strength. Compared to a Gaussian chain with the same length, the rigid rod covers much larger area of the membrane, whereas exerts less local entropic pressure on the membrane. An evident gap is found between the membrane and the rigid rod because the membrane's curvature has to be continuous. These behaviors are compared with that of the flexible-polymer-anchored membranes studied by previous Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical analysis. It is straightforward to extend this method to more complicated and real biological systems, such as infinite membrane/multiple chains, protein inclusion, or systems with phase separation.

  9. Quantification of the UPDRS Rigidity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, S K; Denington, A A; Gauthier, M J; Gillard, D M; Prochazka, A

    2001-03-01

    In the clinical setting, parkinsonian rigidity is assessed using subjective rating scales such as that of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System (UPDRS). However, such scales are susceptible to problems of sensitivity and reliability. Here, we evaluate the reliability and validity of a device designed to quantify parkinsonian rigidity at the elbow and the wrist. The method essentially quantifies the clinical examination and employs small sensors to monitor forces and angular displacements imposed by the clinician onto the limb segment distal to the joint being evaluated. Force and displacement data are used to calculate elastic and viscous stiffnesses and their vectorial sum, mechanical impedance. Interexaminer agreement of measures of mechanical impedance in subjects with Parkinson's disease was comparable to that of clinical UPDRS scores. Examiners tended to overrate rigidity on the UPDRS scale during reinforcement manoeuvres. Mechanical impedance was nonlinearly related to UPDRS ratings of rigidity at the elbow and wrist; characterization of such relationships allows interpretation of impedance measurements in terms of the clinical rating scales.

  10. Geometric integrators for stochastic rigid body dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Tretyakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-05

    Geometric integrators play an important role in simulating dynamical systems on long time intervals with high accuracy. We will illustrate geometric integration ideas within the stochastic context, mostly on examples of stochastic thermostats for rigid body dynamics. The talk will be mainly based on joint recent work with Rusland Davidchak and Tom Ouldridge.

  11. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  12. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  13. Rigid Spine Syndrome among Children in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Koul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rigidity of the spine is common in adults but is rarely observed in children. The aim of this study was to report on rigid spine syndrome (RSS among children in Oman. Methods: Data on children diagnosed with RSS were collected consecutively at presentation between 1996 and 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A diagnosis of RSS was based on the patient’s history, clinical examination, biochemical investigations, electrophysiological findings, neuro-imaging and muscle biopsy. Atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, particularly the erector spinae, was the diagnostic feature; this was noted using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Children with disease onset in the paraspinal muscles were labelled as having primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy. Secondary RSS was classified as RSS due to the late involvement of other muscle diseases. Results: Over the 18-year period, 12 children were included in the study, with a maleto- female ratio of 9:3. A total of 10 children were found to have primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy syndrome while two had secondary RSS. Onset of the disease ranged from birth to 18 months of age. A family history was noted, with two siblings from one family and three siblings from another (n = 5. On examination, children with primary RSS had typical features of severe spine rigidity at onset, with the rest of the neurological examination being normal. Conclusion: RSS is a rare disease with only 12 reported cases found at SQUH during the study period. Cases of primary RSS should be differentiated from the secondary type.

  14. Studying luminescent characteristics of the specific surfactants in various regions of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, V.; Darecki, M.; Gutowska, D.; Makuch, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Strzałkowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Piskozub, J.

    2012-04-01

    The sea surface layer is the interface between the atmosphere and marine environment, where there are a variety of physical, biological and chemical processes that contribute to accumulation and exchange of surface-active-agents (surfactants). At the same time the dynamic properties of the water surface (surface wave spectrum) and fluxes (especially in gas exchange and production of marine aerosol) and even the apparent and real optical properties of seawater are affected by the surfactants gathered on the sea surface. Moreover, the presence of the surface film may restrict the supply of light energy into the depths of the sea. The study was conducted in different regions of the Baltic Sea which also assessed the impact of external environment (estuaries, vicinity of the ports and shipping routs) on the marine environment. The primary scientific objectives were: - to investigate the variability of luminescent properties of surfactants and organic matter contained in the surface film and layer of the sea from the results of spectrophotometric studies. - to find any special surfactants (characterized by luminescent properties) occurring in certain regions of the Baltic. The practical aim was to answer the question whether and to what extent changes in luminescence properties of organic matter contained in the film and the layer depend on the biological activity of the basin and how they affect the water leaving radiance remotely measured over the surface of the sea.

  15. Variation in performance of surfactant loading and resulting nitrate removal among four selected natural zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huade; Bestland, Erick; Zhu, Chuanyu; Zhu, Honglin; Albertsdottir, Dora; Hutson, John; Simmons, Craig T; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Tao, Xian; Ellis, Amanda V

    2010-11-15

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) have the capacity to target various types of water contaminants at relatively low cost and thus are being increasingly considered for use in improving water quality. It is important to know the surfactant loading performance of a zeolite before it is put into application. In this work we compare the loading capacity of a surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br), onto four natural zeolites obtained from specific locations in the USA, Croatia, China, and Australia. The surfactant loading is examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We then compare the resulting SMZs performance in removing nitrate from water. Results show that TGA is useful to determine the HDTMA loading capacity on natural zeolites. It is also useful to distinguish between a HDTMA bi-layer and a HDTMA mono-layer on the SMZ surface, which has not been previously reported in the literature. TGA results infer that HDTMA (bi-layer) loading decreases in the order of US zeolite>Croatian zeolite>Chinese zeolite>Australian zeolite. This order of loading explains variation in performance of nitrate removal between the four SMZs. The SMZs remove 8-18 times more nitrate than the raw zeolites. SMZs prepared from the selected US and Croatian zeolites were more efficient in nitrate removal than the two zeolites commercially obtained from Australia and China.

  16. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  17. Surfactant-soil interactions during surfactant-amended remediation of contaminated soils by hydrophobic organic compounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Shonali; Tansel, Berrin; Ussawarujikulchai, Achara

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic molecules that reduce aqueous surface tension and increase the solubility of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). Surfactant-amended remediation of HOC-contaminated soils and aquifers has received significant attention as an effective treatment strategy - similar in concept to using soaps and detergents as washing agents to remove grease from soiled fabrics. The proposed mechanisms involved in surfactant-amended remediation include: lowering of interfacial tension, surfactant solubilization of HOCs, and the phase transfer of HOC from soil-sorbed to pseudo-aqueous phase. However, as with any proposed chemical countermeasures, there is a concern regarding the fate of the added surfactant. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding nonionic micelle-forming surfactant sorption onto soil, and serves as an introduction to research on that topic. Surfactant sorption onto soil appears to increase with increasing surfactant concentration until the onset of micellization. Sorbed-phase surfactant may account for the majority of added surfactant in surfactant-amended remediation applications, and this may result in increased HOC partitioning onto soil until HOC solubilization by micellar phase surfactant successfully competes with increased HOC sorption on surfactant-modified soil. This review provides discussion of equilibrium partitioning theory to account for the distribution of HOCs between soil, aqueous phase, sorbed surfactant, and micellar surfactant phases, as well as recently developed models for surfactant sorption onto soil. HOC partitioning is characterized by apparent soil-water distribution coefficients in the presence of surfactant.

  18. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  19. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Birkun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia.

  20. Plastic masters-rigid templates for soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Salil P; Freeman, Dennis M; Voldman, Joel

    2009-06-07

    We demonstrate a simple process for the fabrication of rigid plastic master molds for soft lithography directly from (poly)dimethysiloxane devices. Plastics masters (PMs) provide a cost-effective alternative to silicon-based masters and can be easily replicated without the need for cleanroom facilities. We have successfully demonstrated the use of plastics micromolding to generate both single and dual-layer plastic structures, and have characterized the fidelity of the molding process. Using the PM fabrication technique, world-to-chip connections can be integrated directly into the master enabling devices with robust, well-aligned fluidic ports directly after molding. PMs provide an easy technique for the fabrication of microfluidic devices and a simple route for the scaling-up of fabrication of robust masters for soft lithography.

  1. Fibrillar Organic Phases And Their Roles In Rigid Biological Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Park, John J.; Mayer, George

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby to clarify how those composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for the large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of such composites, extending to large deformations must consider such interpenetrating phases.

  2. 基于氟碳表面活性剂插层水滑石的聚酰亚胺纳米复合材料的制备与性能%Preparation and Properties of Nanocomposites Based on Polyimide and Polyfluorinated Surfactant-pillared Layered Double Hydroxide†

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭海泉; 马晓野; 金日哲; 康传清; 邱雪鹏; 高连勋

    2016-01-01

    Layered double hydroxide was modified with polyfluorinated surfactant via anion-exchange intercalation procedure. The nature of the interlayer anions, the morphology and the thermal stability of the fluorinated LDH( LDH-FS) were investigated by infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. The interlayer space was expanded from 0. 76 nm to 2. 52 nm and the microenvironments with polyfluorinate phase were formed. LDH-FS based polyimide(PI) nanocomposites were prepared by the in situ polymerization and characterized. LDH-FS was well dispersed in the polyimide matrix. The gas barred, mechnical and dielectric properties of the LDH-FS / PI nanocomposites were synthetically effected by the exfoliated inorganic nanolayers and polyfluorocarbon chain.%以氟碳表面活性剂全氟辛基磺酸钾为插层剂,通过离子交换制备插层水滑石,并以其为填料,通过原位插层聚合方法,制备了水滑石/氟碳表面活性剂/聚酰亚胺纳米复合材料.用 X 射线衍射、红外光谱和热失重等方法分析插层水滑石结构.结果表明,全氟辛基磺酸钾插层水滑石后,水滑石的层间距由0.76 nm 增加到2.52 nm,在水滑石层间构建了氟碳链的微环境.这种氟化水滑石可剥离分散于聚酰亚胺基体中,改善了纳米复合材料的气体阻隔性能、介电性能和机械性能.这种影响不仅体现无机纳米片层的杂化效果,而且展示出氟碳链的特点.

  3. The two-body problem of a pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Vereshchagin, M.; Gózdziewski, K.;

    2012-01-01

    n this paper we consider the two-body problem of a spherical pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere. Due to the rotational and "re-labelling" symmetries, the system is shown to possess conservation of angular momentum and circulation. We follow a reduction procedure similar to that undertaken...... in the study of the two-body problem of a rigid body and a sphere so that the computed reduced non-canonical Hamiltonian takes a similar form. We then consider relative equilibria and show that the notions of locally central and planar equilibria coincide. Finally, we show that Riemann's theorem on pseudo......-rigid bodies has an extension to this system for planar relative equilibria....

  4. Antiplane SH-deformations near a surface rigid foundation above a subsurface rigid circular tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, V. W.; Manoogian, M. E.; Chen, S.

    2002-06-01

    The problem on the dynamic response of a rigid embedded foundation in the presence of an underground rigid tunnel and subjected to excitation of incident anti-plane SH waves is analyzed. By using the exact analytical solution for the two-dimensional SH-wave propagation in and around both the surface rigid foundation and subsurface rigid tunnel, those aspects of the resulting ground motions that are of special interest and importance for seismic resistant design in earthquake analyses have been examined. The computed amplitudes of the resulting periodic ground motions display a very complicated wave-interference between the surface foundation and underground tunnel that lead to observed standing wave patterns, together with abrupt changes in the wave amplitudes and large amplification of the incident motions.

  5. On the Rigidity in Bending of a Sandwich with Thick CFRP Facings and Thin Soft Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprino, G.; Iaccarino, P.; Langella, A.; Lamboglia, A.

    2009-06-01

    Flexure tests in three-point bending were performed in the elastic domain on sandwich specimens whose facings were made of T800H/3900-2 laminates, and the core by a soft rubbery layer. The contribution of the shear and flexural deformations to the overall deflection was varied by varying the slenderness ratio. The rigidities yielded by the load-displacement curve were corrected for the indentation occurring at the points of load introduction, using an experimentally determined calibration curve. Due to the thinness of the sandwich, indentation negligibly affected the precision of the results, with the apparent rigidities differing from the actual ones by less than 2%. By an analytical formula previously developed for sandwich structures, a prediction of the rigidities in flexure was attempted, adopting elastic constants available in the literature. The correlation with the data points was poor, with the theoretical results largely overestimating the actual rigidities. However, the reliability of the closed-form formula was supported by finite element analysis, carried out modelling the facings by 2D plate elements, and the core by 3D brick elements. Through the formula, the core shear modulus was individuated as responsible of the discrepancies observed. Assuming a suitable value for this parameter, both the analytic solution and the finite element models were able to match with accuracy the rigidities measured.

  6. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  7. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  8. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  10. Surfactant-directed polypyrrole/CNT nanocables: synthesis, characterization, and enhanced electrical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Rongming; Zhu, Tao; Liu, Zhongfan

    2004-07-19

    We describe here a new approach to the synthesis of size-controllable polypyrrole/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocables by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization directed by the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or the nonionic surfactant polyethylene glycol mono-p-nonylphenyl ether (Opi-10). When carbon nanotubes are dispersed in a solution containing a certain concentration of CTAB or Opi-10, the surfactant molecules are adsorbed and arranged regularly on the CNT surfaces. On addition of pyrrole, some of the monomer is adsorbed at the surface of CNTs and/or wedged between the arranged CTAB or Opi-10 molecules. When ammonium persulfate (APS) is added, pyrrole is polymerized in situ at the surfaces of the CNTs (core layer) and ultimately forms the outer shell of the nanocables. Such polypyrrole/CNT nanocables show enhanced electrical properties; a negative temperature coefficient of resistance at 77-300 K and a negative magnetoresistance at 10-200 K were observed.

  11. Simulating Surfactant Spreading: Impact of a Physically Motivated Equation of State

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Dina; Daniels, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    For more than two decades, a single model for the spreading of a surfactant-driven thin liquid film has dominated the applied mathematics literature on the subject. Recently, through the use of fluorescently-tagged lipids, it has become possible to make direct, quantitative comparisons between experiments and models. These comparisons have revealed two important discrepancies between simulations and experiments: the spatial distribution of the surfactant layer, and the timescale over which spreading occurs. In this paper, we present numerical simulations that demonstrate the impact of the particular choice of the equation of state (EoS) relating the surfactant concentration to the surface tension. Previous choices of the model EoS have been an ad-hoc decreasing function. Here, we instead propose an empirically-motivated equation of state; this provides a route to resolving some discrepancies and raises new issues to be pursued in future experiments. In addition, we test the influence of the choice of initial ...

  12. Effect of Cationic and Anionic Surfactants on the Application of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles in Paper Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Barhoum, Ahmed; Abou-Zaied, Ragab Esmail; Rehan, Mohamed; Dufour, Thierry; Hill, Gavin; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Modification of calcium carbonate particles with surfactant significantly improves the properties of the calcium carbonate coating on paper. Unmodified and CTAB and oleate-modified calcium carbonate nanoparticles were prepared using the wet carbonation technique for paper coating. CTAB (cationic surfactant) and sodium oleate (anionic surfactant) were used to modify the size, morphology, and surface properties of the precipitated nanoparticles. The obtained particles were characterized by XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, TGA and TEM. Coating colors were formulated from the prepared unmodified and modified calcium carbonates and examined by creating a thin coating layer on reference paper. The effect of calcium carbonate particle size and surface modification on paper properties, such as coating thickness, coating weight, surface roughness, air permeability, brightness, whiteness, opacity, and hydrophobicity, were investigated and compared with GCC calcium carbonate-coated papers. The obtai...

  13. Room temperature direct band gap emission characteristics of surfactant mediated grown compressively strained Ge films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Ajit K.; Grimm, Andreas; Bar, R.; Schmidt, Jan; Wietler, Tobias; Joerg Osten, H.; Ray, Samit K.

    2016-10-01

    Compressively strained Ge films have been grown on relaxed Si0.45Ge0.55 virtual substrates using molecular beam epitaxy in the presence of Sb as a surfactant. Structural characterization has shown that films grown in the presence of surfactant exhibit very smooth surfaces with a relatively higher strain value in comparison to those grown without any surfactant. The variation of strain with increasing Ge layer thickness was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The strain is found to be reduced with increasing film thickness due to the onset of island nucleation following Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism. No phonon assisted direct band gap photoluminescence from compressively strained Ge films grown on relaxed Si0.45Ge0.55 has been achieved up to room temperature. Excitation power and temperature dependent photoluminescence have been studied in details to investigate the origin of different emission sub-bands.

  14. Selection and evaluation of adsorbents for the removal of anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Natasja; van der Ham, Louis G J; Euverink, Gert-Jan W; de Haan, André B

    2007-10-01

    Low-cost adsorbents were tested to remove anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water to allow re-use of water. Adsorbents were selected corresponding to the different surfactant adsorption mechanisms. Equilibrium adsorption studies of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) show that ionic interaction results in a high maximum adsorption capacity on positively charged adsorbents of 0.6-1.7 gLAS/g. Non-ionic interactions, such as hydrophobic interactions of LAS with non-ionic resins or activated carbons, result in a lower adsorption capacity of 0.02-0.6 gLAS/g. Negatively charged materials, such as cation exchange resins or bentonite clay, have negligible adsorption capacities for LAS. Similar results are obtained for alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS). Cost comparison of different adsorbents shows that an inorganic anion exchange material (layered double hydroxide) and activated carbons are the most cost-effective materials in terms of the amount of surfactant adsorbed per dollar worth of adsorbent.

  15. Rigid palm oil-based polyurethane foam reinforced with diamine-modified montmorillonite nanoclay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziq Dzulkifli, Mohd; Yazid Yahya, Mohd; Majid, Rohah A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents work on organically-modified montmorillonite (MMT) nanoclay embedded in rigid palm oil-based polyurethane (PU) foam. MMT was modified with organic surfactant diamino propane (DAP). PU foam was fabricated in closed mold, and the amount of DAP-MMT was varied in each foam formulation. The obtained foam was tested for its microstructure and morphology. Appearance of peaks from infra-red spectra corresponding to N-H, C=O, and C-N confirms the formation of PU networks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed fine, closed-cellular structure at low clay loading; increasing DAP-MMT content induced larger cell sizes with blowholes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates fully-exfoliated clays at 1 wt. % and partial-exfoliation at 3 wt. % clay loading, suggesting clumping of clays as DAP-MMT content increased.

  16. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C4E1, C8E3 and C12E5) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s(-1) the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  17. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  18. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed.

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.A. [Surbec Environmental, Norman, OK (United States); Sabatini, D.A.; Harwell, J.H. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction was investigated for use with surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation. A surfactant liquid-liquid extraction model (SLLEM) was developed for batch equilibrium conditions based on contaminant partitioning between micellar, water, and solvent phases. The accuracy of this fundamental model was corroborated with experimental results (using naphthalene and phenanthrene as contaminants and squalane as the extracting solvent). The SLLEM model was then expanded to nonequilibrium conditions. The effectiveness of this nonequilibrium model was corroborated with experimental results from continuous flow hollow fiber membrane systems. The validated models were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects of surfactants on the removal of the contaminants in liquid-liquid extraction systems. In addition, liquid-liquid extraction is compared to air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the impact of surfactants on liquid-liquid extraction processes, and the significance of these impacts on the optimization of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconia Nanocrystallites by Cationic Surfactant and Anionic Surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Study on nanomaterials has attracted great interests in recent years. In this article,zirconia nanocrystallites of different structures have been successfully synthesized via hydrothermal methods with cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDS), respectively. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-TG), X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses are used for their structure characteristics. The results show that the cationic surfactant has a distinctive direction effect on the formation of zirconia nanocrystallites, while the anionic surfactant has a self-assembly synergistic effect on them. The sample synthesized with the cationic surfactant presents good dispersion with the main phase of tetragonal zirconia, and the average nanocryst al size is around 15nm after calcination at 500 ℃. While the sample synthesized with the anionic surfactant exhibits a worm-like mesoporous structure with pure tetragonal phase after calcination at 500 ℃ and with good thermal stability.

  1. Studies on the electrocapillary curves of anionic surfactants in presence of non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembi, R; Goyal, R N; Malik, W U

    1976-09-01

    Polyoxyethylated non-ionic surfactants such as Tween 20, Tween 40, Nonidet P40 and Nonex 501 have been supposed to be associated with cationic characteristics. Studies on the effect of these surfactants on the electrocapillary curves of the anionic surfactants Aerosol IB, Manaxol OT and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), show that the electrocapillary maxima shift towards positive potentials. The order of adsorption of the anionic surfactants is SLS > Manaxol OT > Aerosol IB while the shift in maxima is in the order Aerosol IB ~ Manaxol OT > SLS which confirms association of cationic characteristics with the micelles of these non-ionic surfactants. The magnitude of the shift in electrocapillary maxima is Nonex 501 > Nonidet P40 > Tween 20 > Tween 40 which may be the order of magnitude of the positive charge carried by these non-ionic surfactants.

  2. Natural oil nanoemulsions as cores for layer-by-layer encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, M; Para, G; Simon, C; Warszyński, P

    2013-01-01

    In this study, emulsions of three different natural oils were prepared using spontaneous emulsification technique. The effect of three emulsifiers, AOT, lecithin and cholesterol on emulsion properties was studied. Their influence on interfacial tension at oil/water interface was evaluated by the pendant drop shape analysis method. Then, the mean droplet size, zeta potential and stability of emulsions were investigated in relation with the type of oil, surfactant, oil-to-ethanol ratio and surfactant concentration. We found that in the case of linseed oil, fine emulsion droplets are formed without any surfactant due to its low oil/water interfacial tension. A hydrophobic dye (Coumarin 6) was encapsulated within oil cores and its presence was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained emulsions can be used alone or as the cores for layer-by-layer encapsulation, which was demonstrated by enclosing droplets within first layer of synthetic polycation poly(allyamine hydrochloride) (PAH).

  3. Synthesis of novel quaternary ammonium surfactants containing adamantane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wei Guo; Xing Zhong; Hua Zhu; Li Juan Feng; Ying De Cui

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel quaternary ammonium surfactants containing adamantane were designed and synthesized from 1-adamantanecarboxylic acid.The structures of target surfactants were confirmed by 1H NMR,elements analysis and FTIR.Surface properties of these surfactants were investigated.Due to the lipophilicity of adamantane,the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and C20 values of the synthesized quaternary ammonium surfactants are lower than that of conventional quaternary ammonium surfactants.

  4. Development of laser ruler in rigid laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ok; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Choon; Lee, Byung-Joo; Wang, Soo-Geun; Ro, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Gye-Rok; Shin, Bum-Joo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new device that provides a simple, noninvasive method of measuring accurate lesion size while using an endoscope. We developed a rigid laryngoscope with a built-in laser-ruler using a one-light emitting diode and an acrylic plate. The invention incorporates a built-in laser diode that projects an auto-parallel beam into the optical path of the rigid laryngoscope to form two spots in the field of view. While the interspot distance remains consistent despite changes in focal plane, magnification, or viewing angle of the laryngoscope, projection to an uneven surface introduces certain variations in the shape, and size of the spots, and the distance between the two spots. The device enables a laryngologist to easily measure the distance between landmarks, as well as the change in real size, and the progressive change of vocal fold lesions in an outpatient setting.

  5. Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menno, Dominik Francesco; Balleer, Almut; Hristov, Nikolay

    This paper investigates how financial market imperfections and the frequency of price adjustment interact. Based on new firm-level evidence for Germany, we document that financially constrained firms adjust prices more often than their unconstrained counterparts, both upwards and downwards. We show...... that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest...... that tighter financial constraints are associated with higher nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions...

  6. Rigid cohomology over Laurent series fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lazda, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors develop a new theory of p-adic cohomology for varieties over Laurent series fields in positive characteristic, based on Berthelot's theory of rigid cohomology. Many major fundamental properties of these cohomology groups are proven, such as finite dimensionality and cohomological descent, as well as interpretations in terms of Monsky-Washnitzer cohomology and Le Stum's overconvergent site. Applications of this new theory to arithmetic questions, such as l-independence and the weight monodromy conjecture, are also discussed. The construction of these cohomology groups, analogous to the Galois representations associated to varieties over local fields in mixed characteristic, fills a major gap in the study of arithmetic cohomology theories over function fields. By extending the scope of existing methods, the results presented here also serve as a first step towards a more general theory of p-adic cohomology over non-perfect ground fields. Rigid Cohomology over Laurent Series Fields...

  7. Adaptive Control of Rigid Body Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thawar T. Arif

    2008-01-01

    The minimal controller synthesis (MCS) is an extension of the hyperstable model reference adaptive control algorithm. The aim of minimal controller synthesis is to achieve excellent closed-loop control despite the presence of plant parameter variations, external disturbances, dynamic coupling within the plant and plant nonlinearities. The minimal controller synthesis algorithm was successfully applied to the problem of decentralized adaptive schemes. The decentralized minimal controller synthesis adaptive control strategy for controlling the attitude of a rigid body satellite is adopted in this paper. A model reference adaptive control strategy which uses one single three-axis slew is proposed for the purpose of controlling the attitude of a rigid body satellite. The simulation results are excellent and show that the controlled system is robust against disturbances.

  8. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold's generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of Type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. As examples, we consider all connected and simply-connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly-solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  9. Lectures on formal and rigid geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    A first version of this work appeared in 2005 as a Preprint of the Collaborative Research Center "Geometrical Structures in Mathematics" at the University of Münster. Its aim was to offer a concise and self-contained 'lecture-style' introduction to the theory of classical rigid geometry established by John Tate, together with the formal algebraic geometry approach launched by Michel Raynaud. These Lectures are now viewed commonly as an ideal means of learning advanced rigid geometry, regardless of the reader's level of background. Despite its parsimonious style, the presentation illustrates a number of key facts even more extensively than any other previous work. This Lecture Notes Volume is a revised and slightly expanded version of the original preprint and has been published at the suggestion of several experts in the field.

  10. Improvements in permeation and fouling resistance of PVC ultrafiltration membranes via addition of Tetronic-1107 and Triton X-100 as two non-ionic and hydrophilic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiee, Hesamoddin; Seyedi, S Mojtaba; Rabiei, Hossein; Alvandifar, Negar

    2016-09-01

    Two non-ionic and hydrophilic surfactant additives, Tetronic-1107 and Triton X-100, were added to poly(vinyl chloride)/NMP polymeric solution to prepare ultrafiltration membranes via immersion precipitation. Surfactants at three different weight percentages up to 6 wt% were added, and the fabricated membranes were characterized and their performance for water treatment in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a foulant was assessed. The scanning electron microscopy images indicated remarkable changes in morphology due to higher thermodynamic instability after surfactant addition. The membranes are more porous with more macro-voids in the sub-layer. Plus, the membranes become more hydrophilic. Water flux increases for the modified membranes by nearly two times and the ability of membranes for flux recovery increases from 66% to over 83%. BSA rejection reduces slightly with the addition of surfactants, however this parameter is still almost over 90% for the membranes with the highest amount of surfactants.

  11. Design of Overlays for Rigid Airport Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Renture, A., and Mindess , S. 1986. "The Effect of Concrete Strength on Crack Patterns," Cement and Concrete Research,_ Vol 16, Pergamon Press Ltd...34 Miscellaneous Paper S-74-30, US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Miss. 22. Harr, M. E. 1977 . Mechanics of Particulate Media...of Civil -. Engineers, New York. 33. Hutchinson, R., and Vedros, P. 1977 . "Performance of Heavy-Load Port- land Cement Concrete (Rigid) Airfield

  12. Criteria for Hull-Machinery Rigidity Compatibility,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    articulated double-reduction gear design permits a * greater variety of arrangements with essentially the same rotating parts by rolling the pinion and...Additional intercostal girders are to be fitted within the double bottom to ensure the satisfactory distribution of the weight and the rigidity of the...and 124 arranged to distribute the loads effectively into the adjacent structure. Extra intercostal girders, effect- ively attached, are to be fitted

  13. Rigidity of contractions on Hilbert spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Eisner, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behaviour of contractive operators and strongly continuous semigroups on separable Hilbert spaces using the notion of rigidity. In particular, we show that a "typical" contraction $T$ contains the unit circle times the identity operator in the strong limit set of its powers, while $T^{n_j}$ converges weakly to zero along a sequence $\\{n_j\\}$ with density one. The continuous analogue is presented for isometric ang unitary $C_0$-(semi)groups.

  14. Effectiveness of transverse grooves in rigid pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, G. F.; Bryden, J. E.

    1982-10-01

    Transverse grooves were installed at 11 intersection approaches on worn rigid pavement to reduce a high rate of wet road accidents. In most cases, accident reductions were experienced only at intersections with multiple negative operational characteristics, including higher approach speeds, limited sight distances, and frequent vehicle stopping for turns or stop signs. Intersections with no more than one negative characteristic generally did not benefit from grooving.

  15. Molecular-thermodynamic theory of micellization of multicomponent surfactant mixtures: 2. pH-sensitive surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsipe, Arthur; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-05-22

    In article 1 of this series, we developed a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theory to model the micellization of mixtures containing an arbitrary number of conventional (pH-insensitive) surfactants. In this article, we extend the MT theory to model mixtures containing a pH-sensitive surfactant. The MT theory was validated by examining mixtures containing both a pH-sensitive surfactant and a conventional surfactant, which effectively behave like ternary surfactant mixtures. We first compared the predicted micellar titration data to experimental micellar titration data that we obtained for varying compositions of mixed micelles containing the pH-sensitive surfactant dodecyldimethylamine oxide (C12DAO) mixed with either a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, C12TAB), a nonionic surfactant (dodecyl octa(ethylene oxide), C12E8), or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant. The MT theory accurately modeled the titration behavior of C12DAO mixed with C12E8. However, C12DAO was observed to interact more favorably with SDS and with C12TAB than was predicted by the MT theory. We also compared predictions to data from the literature for mixtures of C12DAO and SDS. Although the pH values of solutions with no added acid were modeled with only qualitative accuracy, the MT theory resulted in quantitatively accurate predictions of solution pH for mixtures containing added acid. In addition, the predicted degree of counterion binding yielded a lower bound to the experimentally measured value. Finally, we predicted the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of solutions of two pH-sensitive surfactants, tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DAO) and hexadecyldimethyl betaine (C16Bet), at varying solution pH and surfactant composition. However, at the pH values considered, the pH sensitivity of C16Bet could be neglected, and it was equivalently modeled as a zwitterionic surfactant. The cmc's predicted using the MT theory agreed well with the experimental

  16. Effects of Interactions Among Surfactants,Water and Oil on Equilibrium Configuration of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yin-quan; SUN Zhi-bo; XIE Yun; ZOU Xian-wu

    2004-01-01

    The distribution and configuration of surfactants at interface in surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. There exists a certain equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface for the systems with certain interactions among surfactant, water and oil. The interface length and equilibrium morphology of the systems are dependent on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface and the total amount of surfactants. The interaction strengths among surfactant, water and oil determine the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface. Three typical configurations of surfactants at interface have been observed: ① surfactant molecules are perpendicular to the interface and arranged closely; ② perpendicular to the interface and arranged at interval of two particles; ③ lie down in the interface partly.

  17. Engineering New Layered Solids from Exfoliated Inorganics: a Periodically Alternating Hydrotalcite - Montmorillonite Layered Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Rajesh; Gupta, Amit; Vasudevan, Sukumaran

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets obtained by exfoliating inorganic layered crystals have emerged as a new class of materials with unique attributes. One of the critical challenges is to develop robust and versatile methods for creating new nanostructures from these 2D-nanosheets. Here we report the delamination of layered materials that belonging to two different classes - the cationic clay, montmorillonite, and the anionic clay, hydrotalcite - by intercalation of appropriate ionic surfactants followed by dispersion in a non-polar solvent. The solids are delaminated to single layers of atomic thickness with the ionic surfactants remaining tethered to the inorganic and consequently the nanosheets are electrically neutral. We then show that when dispersions of the two solids are mixed the exfoliated sheets self-assemble as a new layered solid with periodically alternating hydrotalcite and montmorillonite layers. The procedure outlined here is easily extended to other layered solids for creating new superstructures from 2D-nanosheets by self-assembly.

  18. Surfactant solutions and porous substrates: spreading and imbibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, Victor M

    2004-11-29

    ) 589]. Cylindrical capillaries are used as a model of porous media for theoretical treatment of the problem. It is shown that if an averaged pore size of the porous medium is below a critical value, then the permeability of the porous medium is not influenced by the presence of surfactants at any concentration: the imbibition front moves exactly in the same way as in the case of the imbibition of the pure water. The critical radius is determined by the adsorption of the surfactant molecules on the inner surface of the pores. If an averaged pore size is bigger than the critical value, then the permeability increases with surfactant concentration. These theoretical conclusions are in agreement with experimental observations. In Section 5, the spreading of surfactant solutions over hydrophobic surfaces is considered from both theoretical and experimental points of view [V.M. Starov, S.R. Kosvintsev, M.G. Velarde, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227 (2000) 185]. Water droplets do not wet a virgin solid hydrophobic substrate. It is shown that the transfer of surfactant molecules from the water droplet onto the hydrophobic surface changes the wetting characteristics in front of the drop on the three-phase contact line. The surfactant molecules increase the solid-vapor interfacial tension and hydrophilise the initially hydrophobic solid substrate just in front of the spreading drop. This process causes water drops to spread over time. The time of evolution of the spreading of a water droplet is predicted and compared with experimental observations. The assumption that surfactant transfer from the drop surface onto the solid hydrophobic substrate controls the rate of spreading is confirmed by experimental observations. In Section 6, the process of the spontaneous spreading of a droplet of a polar liquid over solid substrate is analyzed in the case when amphiphilic molecules (or their amphiphilic fragments) of the substrate surface layer are capable of overturning, resulting in a

  19. Rigid geometry of curves and their Jacobians

    CERN Document Server

    Lütkebohmert, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the most important aspects of rigid geometry, namely its applications to the study of smooth algebraic curves, of their Jacobians, and of abelian varieties - all of them defined over a complete non-archimedean valued field. The text starts with a survey of the foundation of rigid geometry, and then focuses on a detailed treatment of the applications. In the case of curves with split rational reduction there is a complete analogue to the fascinating theory of Riemann surfaces. In the case of proper smooth group varieties the uniformization and the construction of abelian varieties are treated in detail. Rigid geometry was established by John Tate and was enriched by a formal algebraic approach launched by Michel Raynaud. It has proved as a means to illustrate the geometric ideas behind the abstract methods of formal algebraic geometry as used by Mumford and Faltings. This book should be of great use to students wishing to enter this field, as well as those already working in it.

  20. Origin of Rigidity in Dry Granular Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumantra; Bi, Dapeng; Zhang, Jie; Behringer, R. P.; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2013-08-01

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a nonuniform density pattern. In this work, we focus on the emergence of shear rigidity in a class of solids where this paradigm is challenged. Dry granular materials have no energetically or entropically preferred density modulations. We show that, in contrast to traditional solids, the emergence of shear rigidity in these granular solids is a collective process, which is controlled solely by boundary forces, the constraints of force and torque balance, and the positivity of the contact forces. We develop a theoretical framework based on these constraints, which connects rigidity to broken translational symmetry in the space of forces, not positions of grains. We apply our theory to experimentally generated shear-jammed states and show that these states are indeed characterized by a persistent, non-uniform density modulation in force space, which emerges at the shear-jamming transition.

  1. Pulling rigid bodies through granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Ryan; Dressaire, Emilie

    2016-11-01

    The need for anchoring systems in granular materials such as sand is present in the marine transportation industry, e.g. to layout moorings, keep vessels and docks fixed in bodies of water, build oil rigs, etc. The holding power of an anchor is associated with the force exerted by the granular media. Empirical evidence indicates that the holding power depends on the size and shape of the anchoring structure. In this model study, we use a two-dimensional geometry in which a rigid body is pulled through a granular media at constant velocity to determine the drag and lift forces exerted by a granular medium on a moving object. The method allows measuring the drag force and recording the trajectory of the rigid object through the sand. We systematically vary the size and geometry of the rigid body, the properties of the granular medium and the extraction speed. For different initial positions of a cylindrical object pulled horizontally through the medium, we record large variations in magnitude of the drag and a significant lift force that pulls the object out of the sand.

  2. DGP cosmology from rigid geodetic brane gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, Rubén; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications provided by an effective geometrical action describing a codimension-one rigid brane embedded in a 5D fixed Minkowski spacetime, i.e., allowing for a term added to the geodetic brane action which depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume. In the geodetic brane gravity action we accommodate the rigidity of the brane through a linear term in the extrinsic curvature swept out by the brane. We study the resulting geodetic type equation of motion. Within a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker framework, we obtain a generalized Friedmann equation describing the associated cosmological evolution which in turn allowed us to illustrate explicitly the linkage between the geodetic brane theory and the rigidity content of this sort of branelike universes. We observe that, when the radiation-like energy contribution from the extra dimension is vanishing, this effective model leads to a self-(non-self)-accelerated expansion of the universe in dependence on the nature of the rigidi...

  3. Degradation of surfactant-modified montmorillonites in HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madejova, Jana, E-mail: jana.madejova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Palkova, Helena, E-mail: helena.palkova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Jankovic, Lubos, E-mail: lubos.jankovic@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of surfactant size on the extent of montmorillonites decomposition in HCl was investigated. Na-SAz montmorillonite and tetraalkylammonium salts of alkyl-chains length increasing from methyl- Me{sub 4}N to pentyl- Pe{sub 4}N were used for organo-montmorillonites preparation. Decreasing intensity of d{sub 001} diffraction proved destruction of montmorillonite structure connected with gradual surfactant release. A shift of the SiO stretching band to 1097 cm{sup -1} confirmed formation of amorphous silica phase. A new band near 7315 cm{sup -1} corresponding to SiOH overtone revealed creation of protonated silica. This band was observed in the spectra of all acid-treated samples, also in those with minor decomposition of the structure. The size of the cations significantly affected decomposition of montmorillonites in HCl. The less stable were Na-SAz and Me{sub 4}N-SAz in which the content of octahedral atoms dropped to {approx}5% of their original values upon 8 h treatments. Et{sub 4}N-SAz and Pr{sub 4}N-SAz were slightly more resistant mainly at short times. Bu{sub 4}N-SAz and Pe{sub 4}N-SAz showed the least structural modifications, only 50% and 35% of octahedral atoms, respectively, were released into solution within 8 h treatments. This observation proves that bulky alkylammonium cations covering the inner and outer surfaces of montmorillonite prevent effectively the access of protons to the layers protecting the mineral from degradation in the acid. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid materials were prepared from montmorillonite and alkylammonium cations with short alkyl chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of surfactant on organo-montmorillonites dissolution in HCl was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With increasing size of cation the extent of montmorillonite decomposition decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulky surfactants prevent the access of protons to the layers and thus protect montmorillonite from

  4. Aggregation of sulfosuccinate surfactants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magid, L.J.; Daus, K.A.; Butler, P.D.; Quincy, R.B.

    1983-12-22

    The aggregation of sodium di-n-alkyl sulfosuccinates in water (H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O at 45/sup 0/C) has been investigated. A self-consistent picture of the dependence of sodium ion binding on surfactant concentration is obtained from emf measurements, conductimetry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The concentration dependence of the micellar agregation number for the sulfosuccinates and related double-tailed surfactants depends markedly on surfactant solubility. A sphere-to-disk transition in micellar shape, which might have been expected as a precursor to formation of a lamellar mesophase, was not observed as the surfactant concentration was increased. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  5. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  6. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  7. Synthesis and Monolayer Behaviors of Succinic Acid-Type Gemini Surfactants Containing Semifluoroalkyl Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Nagase, Youhei; Oida, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel succinic acid-type gemini surfactants containing semifluoroalkyl groups, dl- and meso-2,3-bis[Rf-(CH2)n]-succinic acids (Rf = C4F9, C6F13, C8F17; n = 2, 9), were successfully synthesized, and the effects of Rf, methylene chain length (n), and stereochemistry on their monolayer behaviors were studied. Critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of dl- and meso-2,3-bis[C4F9(CH2)9]-succinic acids were one order of magnitude smaller than that of the corresponding 1+1 type surfactant, C4F9(CH2)9COOH. From surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements, the lift-off areas of the geminis were found to decrease in the order C4F9 ≥ C6F13 > C8F17, regardless of methylene chain length and stereochemistry. The zero-pressure molecular areas of the geminis were twice those of the corresponding 1+1 type surfactants. Based on Gibbs compression modulus analysis, it was clarified that 2,3-bis[C8F17(CH2)n]-succinic gemini with short methylene chains (n = 2) would form more rigid monolayers than those having long methylene chains (n = 9). Unlike for 2,3-bis(alkyl)-succinic acids, the effects of stereochemistry on the monolayer behavior of semifluoroalkylated geminis were small.

  8. Investigation of a polyether trisiloxane surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to their adaptability and high efficiency compared to traditional carbon based surfactants, silicone surfactants are a success in many different applications, from pesticides to cosmetics, polyurethane foam, textile and car care products. In spite of those numerous applications, no analytical method existed for their trace determination in environmental samples and no data have been available regarding their environmental occurrence and fate. An analytical method for the trace ana...

  9. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to l...

  10. Evaluation of Surfactant Effects on Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khalessi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: One of the standard therapies in neonates with severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is surfactant administration in early course of therapy that cause reduction in mortality, pneumothorax and need to mechanical ventilation. In this study that was carried out in Aliasghar Hospital NICU in 1994-1995 & 2001-2002, the goal was to compare two groups of neonates with severe RDS that had been ventilated in the first 24 hours but one group had received surfactant and the other group (7 years ago was deprived of this substance. Materials & Methods: In our study, 36 neonates that received surfactant and 52 neonates with only mechanical ventilation therapy were compared. Data collected and analyzed using SPSS.Results: We found that mortality in patients with surfactant administration was significantly lower compared to the second group who did not receive surfactant. There were not any significant differences in incidences of HIV, pneumothorax, sepsis, and PDA and also course of hospitalization and need to ventilation between two groups. Conclusion: As a result, all of these findings reflect obligatory surfactant administration in sever RDS in NICU under observation of an educated expert.

  11. Nonlinear water waves with soluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Gary; Dowling, David; Schultz, William

    1998-11-01

    The hydrodynamic effects of surfactants have fascinated scientists for generations. This presentation describes an experimental investigation into the influence of a soluble surfactant on nonlinear capillary-gravity waves in the frequency range from 12 to 20 Hz. Waves were generated in a plexiglass wave tank (254 cm long, 30.5 cm wide, and 18 cm deep) with a triangular plunger wave maker. The tank was filled with carbon- and particulate-filtered water into which the soluble surfactant Triton-X-100® was added in known amounts. Wave slope was measured nonintrusively with a digital camera running at 225 fps by monitoring the position of light beams which passed up through the bottom of the tank, out through the wavy surface, and onto a white screen. Wave slope data were reduced to determine wave damping and the frequency content of the wave train. Both were influenced by the presence of the surfactant. Interestingly, a subharmonic wave occurring at one-sixth the paddle-driving frequency was found only when surfactant was present and the paddle was driven at amplitudes high enough to produce nonlinear waves in clean water. Although the origins of this subharmonic wave remain unclear, it appears to be a genuine manifestation of the combined effects of the surfactant and nonlinearity.

  12. Performance of some surfactants as wetting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, M.N.; El-Shanny, O.A.A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI), Cairo (Egypt). Evaluation and Analysis Dept.

    2005-12-01

    The wetting power of anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and nonionic surfactants: polyoxyethelene(14)monolaurate [La(EO){sub 14}] and polyoxyethelene(14)monoeleate [OI(EO){sub 14}] has been studied to determine their performance as wetting agents. The study reveals that the nonionic compound with a long hydrophobic chain exhibits higher wettability than the shorter one when used at very low cocentrations (below CMC) and the reverse is shown with high concentrations (above CMC). the wetting power of the investigated surfactants increases as the CMC values increases. In case of the nonionic compounds and at surfactant concentrations equal their CMC values, OI(EO){sub 14} shows a higher wetting power than La(EO){sub 14} while is possesses a lower HLB value. The anionic surfactant shows an optimum wetting in comparison with the tested nonionic one. The wettability of all the investigated samples increases as the surface tension of their solutions increases to the allowed limit that can be reached in the presence of surfactant. (orig.)

  13. Spinodal Decomposition in Mixtures Containing Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenekvitz, J.

    1998-03-01

    Spinodal decomposition in mixtures containing two immiscible liquids (A and B) plus surfactant was investigated using a recently developed (J. Melenkevitz and S. H. Javadpour, J. Chem. Phys., 107, 623 (1997).) 3-component Ginzburg-Landau model. The time dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations governing the evolution of structure were numerically integrated in 2-dimensions. We found the growth rate of the average domain size, R(t), decreased with increasing surfactant concentration over a wide range of relative amounts of A and B. This can be attributed to the surfactant accumulating at the growing interface between the immiscible liquids, which leads to a reduction in the surface tension. At late times, the growth rate was noticeably altered when thermal fluctuations were added to the numerical simulations. In this case, power law behavior was observed for R(t) at late times, R(t) ~ t^α, with the exponent α decreasing as the amount of surfactant increased. The dynamics at early times were determined by linearizing the TDGL equations about a uniformly mixed state. The growth rate at ealry times was found to be strongly dependent on the model parameters describing the surfactant miscibility in A and B and the surfactant strength. Comparison with recent measurements on SBR / PB mixtures with added PB-SBR diblock copolymer will also be presented.

  14. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  15. Conductometric study of sodium dodecyl sulfate - nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100, Tween 20, Tween 60, Tween 80 or Tween 85 mixed micelles in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirin Dejan M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is concerned with the determination of the critical micelle concentration (cmc of mixed micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate with one of five nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Tween 20, Tween 60, Tween 80 or Tween 85 from conductance measurements. Based on the calculated values of the β parameters we have noticed that SDS-nonionic surfactants mostly showed strong synergistic effect. It was found that nonionic surfactants with mainly longer and more hydrophobic tail show stronger interactions with hydrophobic part of SDS, thus expressing stronger synergism. In SDS-Tween 80 binary system the strongest synergistic effect was noticed. SDS-Tween 85 micellar system showed antagonistic effect, most probably because the presence of the double bond in its three hydrophobic tails (three C18 tails makes it sterically rigid.

  16. Comparison of DPPC and DPPG environments in pulmonary surfactant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Michael R; Temple, Sara; Stewart, June; Keough, Kevin M W

    2007-07-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance was used to monitor lipid acyl-chain orientational order in suspensions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) containing Ca(2+) and the lung surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-B separately and together. To distinguish between protein-lipid interactions involving the PC and PG lipid headgroups and to examine whether such interactions might influence spatial distribution of lipids within the bilayer, acyl chains on either the DPPC or the DPPG component of the mixture were deuterated. The lipid components of the resulting mixtures were thus either DPPC-d(62)/DPPG (7:3) or DPPC/DPPG-d(62) (7:3), respectively. SP-A had little effect on DPPC-d(62) chain order but did narrow the temperature range over which DPPG-d(62) ordered at the liquid-crystal-to-gel transition. No segregation of lipid components was seen for temperatures above or below the transition. Near the transition, though, there was evidence that SP-A promoted preferential depletion of DPPG from liquid crystalline domains in the temperature range over which gel and liquid crystal domains coexist. SP-B lowered average chain order of both lipids both above and below the main transition. The perturbations of chain order by SP-A and SP-B together were smaller than by SP-B alone. This reduction in perturbation of the lipids by the additional presence of SP-A likely indicated a strong interaction between SP-A and SP-B. The competitive lipid-lipid, lipid-protein, and protein-protein interactions suggested by these observations presumably facilitate the reorganization of surfactant material inherent in the transformation from lamellar bodies to a functional surfactant layer.

  17. Surfactant enhanced recovery of tetrachloroethylene from a porous medium containing low permeability lenses. 1. Experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, T P; Pennell, K D; Abriola, L M; Dane, J H

    2001-04-01

    A matrix of batch, column and two-dimensional (2-D) box experiments was conducted to investigate the coupled effects of rate-limited solubilization and layering on the entrapment and subsequent recovery of a representative dense NAPL, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), during surfactant flushing. Batch experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium solubilization capacity of the surfactant, polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), and to measure fluid viscosity, density and interfacial tension. Results of one-dimensional column studies indicated that micellar solubilization of residual PCE was rate-limited at Darcy velocities ranging from 0.8 to 8.2 cm/h and during periods of flow interruption. Effluent concentration data were used to develop effective mass transfer coefficient (Ke) expressions that were dependent upon the Darcy velocity and duration of flow interruption. To simulate subsurface heterogeneity, 2-D boxes were packed with layers of F-70 Ottawa sand and Wurtsmith aquifer material within 20-30 mesh Ottawa sand. A 4% Tween 80 solution was then flushed through PCE-contaminated boxes at several flow velocities, with periods of flow interruption. Effluent concentration data and visual observations indicated that both rate-limited solubilization and pooling of PCE above the fine layers reduced PCE recovery to levels below those anticipated from batch and column measurements. These experimental results demonstrate the potential impact of both mass transfer limitations and subsurface layering on the recovery of PCE during surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation.

  18. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  19. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  20. Antiplane SH-deformations near a surface rigid foundation above a subsurface rigid circular tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The problem on the dynamic response of a rigid embedded foundation in the presence of an underground rigidtunnel and subjected to excitation of incident anti-plane SH waves is analyzed. By using the exact analytical solution for thetwo-dimensional SH-wave propagation in and around both the surface rigid foundation and subsurface rigid tunnel, thoseaspects of the resulting ground motions that are of special interest and importance for seismic resistant design in earthquakeanalyses have been examined. The computed amplitudes of the resulting periodic ground motions display a very complicatedwave-interference between the surface foundation and underground tunnel that lead to observed standing wave patterns,together with abrupt changes in the wave amplitudes and large amplification of the incident motions.

  1. Rigid-only versus combined rigid and flexible percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cracco, Cecilia M; knoll, thomas; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2017-01-01

    . Appraisal of reliable outcomes of such PNL techniques would better guide intraoperative choices and optimize surgical results. Therefore our objective was to systematically review relevant literature comparing the outcomes of rigid-only PNL and combined flexible PNLs (adding flexible nephroscopy and......INTRODUCTION: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is usually performed worldwide with a rigid-only antegrade approach. Daily practice suggests that adding flexible nephroscopy and/or ureteroscopy to conventional rigid PNL might improve its efficacy and safety, but available evidence is weak....../or flexible ureteroscopy) for the treatment of large and/or complex upper urinary tract calculi, with regard to efficacy and safety. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Ovid MedLine (R), PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched in August 2016 to identify relevant studies. Article selection was performed...

  2. Critical interaction strength for surfactant-induced mesomorphic structures in polymer-surfactant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruokolainen, J.; Torkkeli, M.; Serimaa, R.; Vahvaselka, S.; Saariaho, M.; ten Brinke, G.; Ikkala, O.; Vahvaselkä, Sakari

    1996-01-01

    The critical interaction strength to induce mesomorphic structures in flexible polymers by complexing with surfactants is determined by using surfactants with different hydrogen-bonding strengths;. Two essential requirements have to be satisfied: (i) the association has to be strong enough, otherwis

  3. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1998-01-01

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV a

  4. Surfactant Enhanced Electroremediation of Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘鹏; 杨建刚; 等

    2003-01-01

    Removal of hydrophobic organic contaminants(HOCs) form soil of low permeability by electroremediation was investigated by using phenanthrene and kaolinite as a model system.Tween 80 was added into the purging solution in order to enhance the solubility of phenanthrene.The effects of pH on the adsorption of phenanthrene and Tween 80 on kaolinite and the magnitude of ζ-potential of kaolinite were examined,respectively.The effects of electric field strength indicated by electric current on the electroremediation behavior,including the pH of purging solution,the conductivity,phenanthrene concentration and flow rate of effluent,were experimentally investigated,repectively,In case of an electric field of 25mA applied for 72 hours,over 90% of phenanthrene was removed from 424g(dry mass)of kaolinite at an energy consumption of 0.148kW.h.The experimental results described in present study show that the addition of surfactant into purging solution greatly enhances the removel of HOCs by electroremediation.

  5. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  6. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  7. Equilibrium and dynamic interfacial properties of protein/ionic-liquid-type surfactant solutions at the decane/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chong; Lei, Jinmei; Zhang, Lu; Du, Feng-Pei

    2014-11-25

    The interfacial behavior of β-casein and lysozyme solutions has been investigated in the presence of an ionic liquid-type imidazolium surfactant ([C16mim]Br) at the decane/water interface. The dynamic dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions are investigated by the oscillating drop method and interfacial tension relaxation method. The interfacial tension isotherms for the mixed adsorption layers indicate that the increased addition of [C16mim]Br to a pure protein changes the properties of the complex formed at the decane/water interface. Whereas the interfacial tension data of the protein/surfactant mixed layers do not clearly show differences with changing bulk composition, the dilational rheology provides undoubted evidence that the structure and, in particular, the dynamics of the adsorbed layers depend on the bulk surfactant concentration. The experiment data for β-casein/[C16mim]Br solutions indicate that at higher bulk [C16mim]Br concentrations, β-casein in the interfacial layer is subject to conformational changes, where it gives space to [C16mim]Br molecules in the form of coadsorb rather than replacement; in contrast, in lysozyme/[C16mim]Br solutions some lysozyme molecules desorb from the interface due to the competitive adsorption of free [C16mim]Br molecules. Experimental results related to the interfacial dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions show that the dilational modulus turns out to be more sensitive to the conformation of protein/surfactant mixture at the liquid interface than the interfacial tension.

  8. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes.

  9. Selection of surfactant in remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by comparison of surfactant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yueming; Chen, Tao; Li, Linhui; Wang, Guanzhu

    2014-01-01

    With an aim to select the most appropriate surfactant for remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, the performance of nonionic surfactants Tween80, TX-100, and Brij35 and one anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in enhancement of DDT water solubility and desorption of DDT from contaminated soil and their adsorption onto soil and ecotoxicities were investigated in this study. Tween80 had the highest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT among the four experimental surfactants. The adsorption loss of surfactants onto soil followed the order of TX-100 > Tween80 > Brij35 > SDBS. The ecotoxicity of Tween80 to ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was lowest. The overall performance considering about the above four aspects suggested that Tween80 should be selected for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, because Tween80 had the greatest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT, less adsorption loss onto soil, and the lowest ecotoxicity in this experiment.

  10. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc and surface tension (γ of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies on cloud point (for nonionic surfactants, biodegradation potential and some other properties of surfactants are evaluated .

  11. Characterization of low density rigid urethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, F.N.

    1978-10-01

    The chemical and mechanical properties of a low density, rigid polyurethane foam material taken from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) after 13 years of storage were measured. Chemical analyses confirmed the composition to be Bendix Rigifoam 6003-1.5, a pentaerythritol/epsilon-caprolactone/tolyene diisocyanate polyurethane foam. Comparison of data from testing thermal and mechanical characteristics with data from a currently manufactured foam of identical composition indicates no degradation of properties had occurred. This information gives added confidence to the stockpile lifetime integrity of the Rigifoam 6003-2 foam system designated for use in other programs.

  12. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  13. Rigid Body Mechanics Mathematics, Physics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Heard, William B

    2005-01-01

    This textbook is a modern, concise and focused treatment of the mathematical techniques, physical theories and applications of rigid body mechanics, bridging the gap between the geometric and more classical approaches to the topic. It emphasizes the fundamentals of the subject, stresses the importance of notation, integrates the modern geometric view of mechanics and offers a wide variety of examples -- ranging from molecular dynamics to mechanics of robots and planetary rotational dynamics. The author has unified his presentation such that applied mathematicians, mechanical and astro-aerodyna

  14. Diffraction of sound by nearly rigid barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The diffraction of sound by barriers with surfaces of large, but finite, acoustic impedance was analyzed. Idealized source-barrier-receiver configurations in which the barriers may be considered as semi-infinite wedges are discussed. Particular attention is given to situations in which the source and receiver are at large distances from the tip of the wedge. The expression for the acoustic pressure in this limiting case is compared with the results of Pierce's analysis of diffraction by a rigid wedge. An expression for the insertion loss of a finite impedance barrier is compared with insertion loss formulas which are used extensively in selecting or designing barriers for noise control.

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  16. The use of surfactant in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael; Saute, Milton; Medalion, Benjamin; Bakal, Llana; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2008-12-15

    Lung transplantation impairs surfactant activity, which may contribute to primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Prompted by studies in animals and a few reports in humans, this study sought to determine if the administration of surfactant during transplantation serves as an effective preventive measure. An open, randomized, controlled prospective design was used. Forty-two patients scheduled for single (n=38) or double (n=4) lung transplantation at a major tertiary medical center were randomly assigned to receive, or not, intraoperative surfactant treatment. In the treated group, bovine surfactant was administered at a dose of 20 mg phospholipids/kg through bronchoscope after the establishment of bronchial anastomosis. The groups were compared for oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2), chest X-ray findings, PGD grade, and outcome. Compared with the untreated group, the patients who received surfactant were characterized by better postoperative oxygenation mean PaO2/FiO2 (418.8+/-123.8 vs. 277.9+/-165 mm Hg, P=0.004), better chest radiograph score, a lower PGD grade (0.66 vs. 1.86, P=0.005), fewer cases of severe PGD (1 patient vs. 12, P<0.05), earlier extubation (by 2.2 hr; 95% CI 1.1-4.3 hr, P=0.027), shorter intensive care unit stay (by 2.3 days; 95% CI 1.47-3.74 days, P=0.001), and better vital capacity at 1 month (61% vs. 50%, P=0.022). One treated and 2 untreated patients died during the first postoperative month. Surfactant instillation during lung transplantation improves oxygenation, prevents PGD, shortens intubation time, and enhances early posttransplantation recovery. Further, larger studies are needed to assess whether surfactant should be used routinely in lung transplantation.

  17. THE PROGRAM OF NON-RIGID PAVEMENT COMPUTER-AIDED CALCULATION УКРРДО 15

    OpenAIRE

    MUSIIENKO I.

    2016-01-01

    A program for computer-aided calculation of non-rigid road coating UKRRDO 15 is considered in the given article. The program interface, a set of input data and the results of calculations are considered in detail. Calculations are performed for three strength criteria: permissible elastic deflection, shear strength of subsoil and monolithic layers resistance of tensile bending.

  18. THE PROGRAM OF NON-RIGID PAVEMENT COMPUTER-AIDED CALCULATION УКРРДО 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Musiienko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A program for computer-aided calculation of non-rigid road coating UKRRDO 15 is considered in the given article. The program interface, a set of input data and the results of calculations are considered in detail. Calculations are performed for three strength criteria: permissible elastic deflection, shear strength of subsoil and monolithic layers resistance of tensile bending.

  19. THE DURABILITY OF THE REHABILITATION OF RIGID ROAD STRUCTURES ACCORDING TO TRAFFIC VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavris Ovidiu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative study of effort and strain state of a rigid road structure (concrete cement pavement, rehabilitated (reinforced in two ways: - full milling of the concrete slabs followed by a reinforcement with layers of crushed stone and asphalt concrete. - cracking the concrete slabs and covering them with layers of crushed stone and asphalt concrete. The purpose of this article is to present and compare the two modes of intervention on cement concrete road structures, so that the rehabilitated system will behave properly in service. This study also offers design engineers an image and potential solutions for intervention when dealing with these types of structures.

  20. Effect of non-ionic surfactants on interfacial rheological properties of water/oil systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Lakatos, I. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary))

    1989-10-01

    The interfacial rheological properties of characteristic Hungarian oil/water systems are discussed. It is shown that there are differences of several orders of magnitude in interfacial viscosities and in majority of cases the boundary layers have non-Newtonian flow behaviour. The study of tenside solutions proved that ethoxylated nonylphenols significantly reduce both the interfacial viscosity and the non-Newtonian character. The shorter the ethoxy chain in the monomer molecule, the greater the effect of nonionic surfactants. The concentration also enhances the effect and the phenomena can be explained by formation of closely packed adsorption layer between the phases. The results may contribute to elucidation of displacement mechanism, spontaneous emulsification, coalescence of dispersed systems etc. in presence of nonionic surfactants. (orig.).

  1. Radon Sub-slab Suctioning System Integrated in Insulating Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2013-01-01

    consisted of a rigid insulation material. The new solution integrates the capillary-breaking layer and a pressure reduction zone,denoted the radon–suctioning layer, in one element. The new solution introduces the radonsuctioning layer as a horizontal grid of air ducts with low pressure to catch air...

  2. Public policies targeting labour market rigidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Claudia ŞERBAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Labour market rigidity becomes an issue of increasing importance under conditions of shocks associated with the economic crisis due to the need to increase the adaptability and responsiveness to them. Thus, labour market policies must be directed towards mitigating rigidities caused by institutional or demographic factors or certain mismatch between demand and supply of education qualifications. This paper highlights the major role of the active labour market policies targeting the increase of labour flexibility, stressing the importance and impact on the ability to adapt quickly and effectively to macroeconomic shocks. Located on a declining trend in the years preceding the crisis, spending on labour market policies increased in 2009 in all the Member States of the European Union. Spending differences are significant between countries, Romania being at the lowest end of the European Union. This requires special attention because the increased adaptability of workers through training, as active measure, is of major importance considering the increased speed of changes in the labour market.

  3. Understanding rigid body motion in arbitrary dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Leyvraz, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Why would anyone wish to generalize the already unappetizing subject of rigid body motion to an arbitrary number of dimensions? At first sight, the subject seems to be both repellent and superfluous. The author will try to argue that an approach involving no specifically three-dimensional constructs is actually easier to grasp than the traditional one and might thus be generally useful to understand rigid body motion both in three dimensions and in the general case. Specific differences between the viewpoint suggested here and the usual one include the following: here angular velocities are systematically treated as antisymmetric matrices, a symmetric tensor $I$ quite different from the moment of inertia tensor plays a central role, whereas the latter is shown to be a far more complex object, namely a tensor of rank four. A straightforward way to define it is given. The Euler equation is derived and the use of Noether's theorem to obtain conserved quantities is illustrated. Finally the equation of motion for ...

  4. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  5. Glycerol in micellar confinement with tunable rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannert, Michael; Müller, Allyn; Gouirand, Emmanuel; Talluto, Vincenzo; Rosenstihl, Markus; Walther, Thomas; Stühn, Bernd; Blochowicz, Thomas; Vogel, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the glassy dynamics of glycerol in the confinement of a microemulsion system, which is stable on cooling down to the glass transition of its components. By changing the composition, we vary the viscosity of the matrix, while keeping the confining geometry intact, as is demonstrated by small angle X-ray scattering. By means of 2H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry, and triplet solvation dynamics we, thus, probe the dynamics of glycerol in confinements of varying rigidity. 2H NMR results show that, at higher temperatures, the dynamics of confined glycerol is unchanged compared to bulk behavior, while the reorientation of glycerol molecules becomes significantly faster than in the bulk in the deeply supercooled regime. However, comparison of different 2H NMR findings with data from calorimetry and solvation dynamics reveals that this acceleration is not due to the changed structural relaxation of glycerol, but rather due to the rotational motion of essentially rigid glycerol droplets or of aggregates of such droplets in a more fluid matrix. Thus, independent of the matrix mobility, the glycerol dynamics remains unchanged except for the smallest droplets, where an increase of Tg and, thus, a slowdown of the structural relaxation is observed even in a fluid matrix.

  6. Shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present a minimal model of rigidity and plastic failure in solids whose rigidity emerges directly as a result of applied stresses. Examples include shear-jamming (SJ) in dry grains and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense non-Brownian suspensions. Both SJ and DST states are examples of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures that have evolved to support the load that created them. These are strongly-interacting systems where the interactions arise primarily from the strict constraints of force and torque balance at the local and global scales. Our model is based on a reciprocal-space picture that strictly enforces the local and global constraints, and is, therefore, best suited to capturing the strong correlations in these non-equilibrium systems. The reciprocal space is a tiling whose edges represent contact forces, and whose faces represent grains. A separation of scale between force fluctuations and displacements of grains is used to represent the positional disorder as quenched randomness on variables in the reciprocal space. Comparing theoretical results to experiments, we will argue that the packing fraction controls the strength of the quenched disorder. Sumantra Sarkar et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 068301 (2013)

  7. Optimized imaging using non-rigid registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkels, Benjamin, E-mail: berkels@aices.rwth-aachen.de [Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Binev, Peter, E-mail: binev@math.sc.edu [Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Mathematics, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Blom, Douglas A., E-mail: doug.blom@sc.edu [NanoCenter, 1212 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Dahmen, Wolfgang, E-mail: dahmen@igpm.rwth-aachen.de [Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Institut für Geometrie und Praktische Mathematik, RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Sharpley, Robert C., E-mail: rcsharpley@gmail.com [Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Mathematics, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Vogt, Thomas, E-mail: tvogt@mailbox.sc.edu [Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute, 1523 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); NanoCenter, 1212 Greene Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 631 Sumter Street, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The extraordinary improvements of modern imaging devices offer access to data with unprecedented information content. However, widely used image processing methodologies fall far short of exploiting the full breadth of information offered by numerous types of scanning probe, optical, and electron microscopies. In many applications, it is necessary to keep measurement intensities below a desired threshold. We propose a methodology for extracting an increased level of information by processing a series of data sets suffering, in particular, from high degree of spatial uncertainty caused by complex multiscale motion during the acquisition process. An important role is played by a non-rigid pixel-wise registration method that can cope with low signal-to-noise ratios. This is accompanied by formulating objective quality measures which replace human intervention and visual inspection in the processing chain. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of siliceous zeolite material exhibits the above-mentioned obstructions and therefore serves as orientation and a test of our procedures. - Highlights: • Developed a new process for extracting more information from a series of STEM images. • An objective non-rigid registration process copes with distortions. • Images of zeolite Y show retrieval of all information available from the data set. • Quantitative measures of registration quality were implemented. • Applicable to any serially acquired data, e.g. STM, AFM, STXM, etc.

  8. Effect of surfactants on surface activity and rheological properties of type I collagen at air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezwoń, Aleksandra; Góral, Ilona; Frączyk, Tomasz; Wojciechowski, Kamil

    2016-12-01

    We describe the effect of three synthetic surfactants (anionic - sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and nonionic - Triton X-100 (TX-100)) on surface properties of the type I calf skin collagen at the air/water interface in acidic solutions (pH 1.8). The protein concentration was fixed at 5×10(-6)molL(-1) and the surfactant concentration was varied in the range 5×10(-6)molL(-1)-1×10(-4)molL(-1), producing the protein/surfactant mixtures with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20. An Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) method was used to determine the dynamic surface tension and surface dilatational moduli of the mixed adsorption layers. Two spectroscopic techniques: UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorimetry allowed us to determine the effect of the surfactants on the protein structure. The thermodynamic characteristic of the mixtures was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Modification of the collagen structure by SDS at low surfactant/protein ratios has a positive effect on the mixture's surface activity with only minor deterioration of the rheological properties of the adsorbed layers. The collagen/CTAB mixtures do not show that pronounced improvement in surface activity, while rheological properties are significantly deteriorated. The mixtures with non-ionic TX-100 do not show any synergistic effects in surface activity.

  9. INTERACTION BETWEEN SURFACTANT AND COLLAGEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of collagen fibres (made from Beef Achilles tendons )with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS),sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS),cetylpyridinium bromide(CPB)and Igepal CA-720 were studied.Sorptions isotherms of all ionic surfactants under different reaction conditions were found out.At suitable conditions S-isotherms were obtained,while under isoeletric conditions isotherms were logaritmic.Igepal had no sorption.The interaction of surfactants with collagen is connected with its mass changes. Changes depend on reaction conditions,namely pH and ionic strenght of reaction solution.Degree of swelling(αm)was used for the description of these changes.At pH=3,in absence SDBS and under low ionic strenghts,a high swelling was attained.An addition of SDBS to reaction mixture led to vigerous deswelling and when the bound amount of SDBS reached about 1 mmol.g-1 αm became independent on a futher bound SDBS.With higher ionic strenghts αm was independent on the equilibrium bound amount of SDBS.Under isoeletric conditions changes of αm were markedly smaller than in acid region and had the opposite character.%研究了十二烷基硫酸钠(SDS)、二十烷基苯磺酸钠(SDBS)、溴化十六烷基吡啶翁(CPB)和Igepal CA-720等表面活性剂与胶原(来源于牛跟腱)间的相互作用.发现了不同的反应条件下,上述离子性表面活性剂的吸附等温线,得到了适当条件下的吸附等温线,同时发现在等电条件下等温线呈对数关系,Igepal没有吸附.表面活性剂与胶原的作用情况与其质量的变化是相互关联的,这种变化取决于反应条件,即pH值和反应溶液中的离子强度,胶原的膨胀程度(am)被用来描述这种变化.在pH3.0,无SDBS存在且在低的离子强度下,胶原得到了大的膨胀:加入SDBS将会导致强烈的消肿作用,并且当胶原对SDBS的结合量达到1mmol/g时,am的值将不再随SDBS结合量的进一步增加而变化.在高的离子

  10. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS.

  11. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  12. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-MartInez, Alfredo [Departamento de Investigacion en PolImeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Maldonado, Amir [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1626, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2007-06-20

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions.

  13. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  14. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  15. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  16. Syntheses of surfactants from oleochemical epoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwel Siegfried

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants were obtained in good yields (up to 100% under mild conditions (70°C, methanol or mixtures of methanol and water by ring-opening of terminal epoxides with aminopolyols, derived from glucose. Reaction of N-methyl glucamine with epoxides from even-numbered C4-C18 alpha-olefins or from terminal unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters leads to linear products, while corresponding reactions with N-dodecyl glucamine or glucamine yield surfactants with different Y-structures. Products obtained by conversion of omega-epoxy fatty acid methyl esters were saponificated with NaOH or hydrolyzed enzymatically to sodium salts or free acids respectively, which are amphoteric surfactants. Studies of the surfactants at different pH-values demonstrate different surface active properties in aqueous solutions. Critical micelle concentrations (c.m.c. in a range between 2 and 500mg/l and surface tensions of 25-40mN/m were measured for several of the synthesized sugar-based surfactants. The ring-opening products are rather poor foamers, whereas some of the corresponding hydrobromides show good foaming properties.

  17. Parkinson's disease rigidity: relation to brain connectivity and motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin eBaradaran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1 To determine the brain connectivity pattern associated with clinical rigidity scores in Parkinson's disease (PD and 2 to determine the relation between clinically-assessed rigidity and quantitative metrics of motor performance.Background: Rigidity, the resistance to passive movement, is exacerbated in PD by asking the subject to move the contralateral limb, implying that rigidity involves a distributed brain network. Rigidity mainly affects subjects when they attempt to move; yet the relation between clinical rigidity scores and quantitative aspects of motor performance are unknown.Methods: Ten clinically diagnosed PD patients (off medication and ten controls were recruited to perform an fMRI squeeze-bulb tracking task that included both visually guided and internally guided features. The direct functional connectivity between anatomically defined regions of interest was assessed with Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs. Tracking performance was assessed by fitting Linear Dynamical System (LDS models to the motor performance, and was compared to the clinical rigidity scores. A cross-validated Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO regression method was used to determine the brain connectivity network that best predicted clinical rigidity scores.Results: The damping ratio of the LDS models significantly correlated with clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-4. An fMRI connectivity network in subcortical and primary and premotor cortical regions accurately predicted clinical rigidity scores (p < 10-5. Conclusions: A widely distributed cortical/subcortical network is associated with rigidity observed in PD patients, which reinforces the importance of altered functional connectivity in the pathophysiology of PD. PD subjects with higher rigidity scores tend to have less overshoot in their tracking performance, and damping ratio may represent a robust, quantitative marker of the motoric effects of increasing rigidity.

  18. Interaction of Fluorocarbon Containing Hydrophobically Modified Polyelectrolyte with Nonionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHOU,Hui(周晖); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of fluorocarbon containing hydrophobically modified polyelectrolyte (FMPAANa) with two kinds of nonionic surfactants (hydrogenated and fluorinated) in a semidilute (0.5 wt% ) aqueous solution had been studied by rheological measurements. Association behavior was found in both systems. The hydrophobic interaction of FMPAANa with fluorinated surfactant (FC171) is much stronger than that with hydrogenated surfactant (NP7.5) at low surfactant concentrations. The interaction is strengthened by surfactants being added for the density of active junctions increased. Whereas distinct phenomena for FC171 and NP7. 5 start to be found as the surfactants added over their respective certain concentration. The interaction of polyelectrolyte with fluorinated surfactant increases dramatical ly while that with hydrogenated surfactant decreases.

  19. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  20. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Voisin, D

    2002-01-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each po...

  1. Adsorption layer properties of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides at interfaces between water and different alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucic, N; Kovalchuk, N M; Aksenenko, E V; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2013-11-15

    We measured the interfacial tensions of aqueous solutions against different oil phases using drop profile analysis tensiometry (PAT-1, Sinterface Technologies, Germany) for decyl- and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TAB and C12TAB) in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH7). The following alkanes were used as oil phases: hexane, heptane, octane, nonane, decane, dodecane and tetradecane. The obtained equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms were fitted by the Frumkin Ionic Compressibility model (FIC). The surfactants adsorb at the water/oil interface in competition with the oil molecules. At high surfactant surface coverage this competitive adsorption is manifested in two ways. First, for short chain surfactants, the oil molecules are embedded into the adsorption layer. Second, for long chain surfactants, the short alkane chains of the oil molecules are squeezed out from the adsorption layer due to strong mutual interaction between surfactants' chains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Corrosion inhibition performance of a ionic liquid surfactant Br

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LIU

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the novel green organic mercury-substituting inhibitors, the ionic liquid surfactant 1-methyl-3-dodecyl imidazole bromide ( Br is synthesized with N-methyl imidazole and 1-bromodecane as raw materials. The corrosion inhibition of Br for zinc in zinc-manganese batteries is investigated using electrochemical methods and weight loss methods. The results show that corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of the concentration of Br, and when the concentration is higher than 8×10-3 mol/L, the inhibition efficiency tends to be stable. The polarization curve shows that Br belongs to mixed-type corrosion inhibitor. The thermodynamic parameters show that Br is spontaneously adsorbed on the zinc surface, forming a monomolecular adsorption layer, which fits with Langmuir adsorption isotherm with physical and chemical adsorption mechanism.

  3. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  4. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  5. BIOSYNTHESIS OF SURFACTANTS ON INDUSTRIAL WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirog T. P.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The literature and own experimental data on the synthesis of microbial surfactants of different chemical nature (rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, manozylerythritollipids, lipopeptides at various waste (vegetable oil and fat, sugar, dairy industry, agriculture, forestry, biodiesel, as well as waste — fried vegetable oils are presented. Most suitable substrates for the synthesis of microbial surfactants are oil containing waste that, unlike, for example, lignocellulose, whey, technical glycerol do not require pre-treatment and purification. Replacing traditional substrates for the biosynthesis of surfactant with industrial waste will help to reduce the cost of technology by several times, dispose of unwanted waste, solve the problem of storage or disposal of large amounts of waste from the food industry, agricultural sector and companies that produce biodiesel, which spent large amount of energy and money for such needs

  6. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant.

  7. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengwu Wang; Xiaoyi Zhang; Jiwei Hu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies o...

  8. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-07

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering.

  9. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  10. Dynamic Study of Gemini Surfactant and Single-chain Surfactant at Air/Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jian CHEN; Gui Ying XU; Shi Ling YUAN; Hai Ying SUN

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation are used to study the properties of gemini surfactant of ethyl-α,ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (C12C2C12) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) at the air/water interface, respectively. In the two systems,the surfactant concentrations are both 28 wt. %, and other conditions are also the same. After reaching the thermodynamic equilibrium, the concentration profiles, the radial distributions functions (RDF) and the mean squared displacement (MSD) are investigated. Theresults reveal that the surface activity of C12C2C12 suffactant is higher than DTAB surfactant.

  11. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  12. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Gopi; J Indira; S Nithiya; L Kavitha; U Kamachi Mudali; K Kanimozhi

    2013-10-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through a microwave coupled hydrothermal method using CTAB as a template. A successful synthesis of nanosized HAP spheres, rods and fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant. The concentration of the surfactant was tuned in such a way that the desired HAP nanostructures were obtained. The resultant powders were sintered at 900 °C in order to obtain phase pure HAP particles. The results obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have substantiated the formation of nanosized HAP spheres and fibres.

  13. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  14. Weak rigidity in almost-thermodynamic material schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Olmo, V.; Olivert, J.

    1985-06-01

    To avoid the restrictions that the Born rigidity supposes for the motions in relativity, the definition of a weakly rigid almost-thermodynamic material scheme is proposed. From it the relativistic incompressibility condition given by Ferrando and Olivert is obtained. Moreover, it is proved that, for the weakly rigid irrotational and geodesic almost-thermodynamic material schemes, the scalar curvature of the Landau manifolds is constant along the streamlines.

  15. Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells by Tissue Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    alignment by second harmonic generation imaging (SHG) and used it as a surrogate marker for tissue rigidity. In agreement with previous publications6–8,44,45...AD ____________ __ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0133 TITLE: Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells by Tissue Rigidity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Adam J...CONTRACT NUMBER Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity W81XWH-13-1-0133 Sb. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  16. Dual Quaternion Variational Integrator for Rigid Body Dynamic Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    XU, JIAFENG; Halse, Karl Henning

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a symplectic dual quaternion variational integrator(DQVI) for simulating single rigid body motion in all six degrees of freedom. Dual quaternion is used to represent rigid body kinematics and one-step Lie group variational integrator is used to conserve the geometric structure, energy and momentum of the system during the simulation. The combination of these two becomes the first Lie group variational integrator for rigid body simulation without decoupling translations and rotati...

  17. Rigid curves on $\\bar M_{0,n}$ and arithmetic breaks

    CERN Document Server

    Castravet, Ana-Maria

    2011-01-01

    A result of Keel and McKernan states that a hypothetical counterexample to the F-conjecture must come from rigid curves on $\\bar {M}_{0,n}$ that intersect the interior. We exhibit several ways of constructing rigid curves. In all our examples, a reduction mod p argument shows that the classes of the rigid curves that we construct can be decomposed as sums of F-curves.

  18. VESICLE-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS - EFFECTS OF ADDED SURFACTANTS ON THE GEL TO LIQUID-CRYSTAL TRANSITION FOR 2 VESICULAR SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, M.J; Briggs, B.; Cullis, P.M.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.; Kacperska, A.

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of both cationic and anionic surfactants with vesicles formed by dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DOAB) and by sodium didodecylphosphate (DDP) have been probed using differential scanning microcalorimetry. The scans show that the surfactants are incorporated into the vesicle bilayer

  19. Vesicle-Surfactant Interactions : Effects of Added Surfactants on the Gel to Liquid-crystal Transition for Two Vesicular Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, Michael J.; Briggs, Barbara; Cullis, Paul M.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Kacperska, Anna

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of both cationic and anionic surfactants with vesicles formed by dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DOAB) and by sodium didodecylphosphate (DDP) have been probed using differential scanning microcalorimetry. The scans show that the surfactants are incorporated into the vesicle bilayer

  20. Synthesis and Properties of Novel Cationic Maleic Diester Polymerizable Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three new cationic polymerizable surfactants are synthesized by the reaction of alkylmaleic hemiester with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. Their structures are confirmed by 1H NMR, IR and elements analysis. The values of CMC and gCMC of these surfactants have been measured. One can obtain nearly monodisperse polystyrene latex by emulsion polymerization using the polymerizable surfactant.

  1. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism in preterm infants studied with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM OF THE STUDIES 1. To develop and use a novel method to study surfactant metabolism in preterm and older infants. (chapters 3 and 4). 2. To study endogenous surfactant synthesis in relation to prenatal glucocorticosteroids. (chapters 5 and 6). 3. To study the influence of surfactant

  2. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  3. Secondary oil recovery process. [two separate surfactant slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgatter, W.S.

    1969-01-14

    Oil recovery by two separate surfactant slugs is greater than for either one alone. One slug contains a surfactant(s) in either oil or water. The other slug contains surfactant(s) in thickened water. The surfactants are sodium petroleum sulfonate (Promor SS20), polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate (Tween 85), lauric acid diethanolamide (Trepoline L), and sodium tridecyl sulfate polyglycol ether (Trepenol S30T). The thickener is carboxymethyl cellulose (Hercules CMC 70-S Medium thickener) or polyvinyl alcohol (Du Pont Elvanol 50-42). Consolidated sandstone cores were flooded with water, followed with Hawes crude, and finally salt water (5 percent sodium chloride) which recovered about 67 percent of the crude. A maximum of 27.5 percent of the residual oil was recovered by surfactant(s) in oil or water followed by fresh water, then surfactant(s) plus thickener in water followed by fresh water. Either surfactant slug may be injected first. Individually, each of the surfactant slugs can recover from about 3 to 11 percent less residual oil than their total recovery when used consecutively.

  4. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism in preterm infants studied with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM OF THE STUDIES 1. To develop and use a novel method to study surfactant metabolism in preterm and older infants. (chapters 3 and 4). 2. To study endogenous surfactant synthesis in relation to prenatal glucocorticosteroids. (chapters 5 and 6). 3. To study the influence of surfactant t

  5. Skin delivery of antioxidant surfactants based on gallic acid and hydroxytyrosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Lucas, Ricardo; Barba, Clara; Marti, Meritxell; Rubio, Laia; Comelles, Francesc; Morales, Juan Carlos; Coderch, Luisa; Parra, José Luís

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study has been to investigate the dermal absorption profile of the antioxidant compounds gallic acid and hydroxytyrosol as well as their derivatives, hexanoate (hexyl gallate and hydroxytyrosol hexanoate) and octanoate (octyl gallate and octanoate derivative) alkyl esters (antioxidant surfactants). Previously, the scavenging capacity of these compounds, expressed as efficient dose ED50, has also determined. The percutaneous absorption of these compounds was obtained by an in vitro methodology using porcine skin biopsies on Franz static diffusion cells. The antiradical activity of compounds was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical method. The percutaneous penetration results show the presence of antioxidants in all layers of the skin. The content of the cutaneously absorbed compound is higher for the antioxidant surfactants (ester derivatives). This particular behaviour could be due to the higher hydrophobicity of these compounds and the presence of surface activity in the antioxidant surfactants. These new antioxidant surfactants display optimum properties, which may be useful in the preparation of emulsified systems in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations because of their suitable surface activity and because they can protect the skin from oxidative damage. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Biogenic amine – surfactant interactions at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Li, P X

    2015-07-01

    The strong interaction between polyamines and anionic surfactants results in pronounced adsorption at the air-water interface and can lead to the formation of layered surface structures. The transition from monolayer adsorption to more complex surface structures depends upon solution pH, and the structure and molecular weight of the polyamine. The effects of manipulating the polyamine molecular weight and structure on the adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate at the air-water interface are investigated using neutron reflectivity and surface tension, for the biogenic amines putrescine, spermidine and spermine. The results show how changing the number of amine groups and the spacing between the amine groups impacts upon the surface adsorption. At lower pH, 3-7, and for the higher molecular weight polyamines, spermidine and spermine, ordered multilayer structures are observed. For putrescine at all pH and for spermidine and spermine at high pH, monolayer adsorption with enhanced surfactant adsorption compared to the pure surfactant is observed. The data for the biogenic amines, when compared with similar data for the polyamines ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine, indicate that the spacing between amines groups is more optimal for the formation of ordered surface multilayer structures.

  7. Discrete Time Crystals: Rigidity, Criticality, and Realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N. Y.; Potter, A. C.; Potirniche, I.-D.; Vishwanath, A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite being forbidden in equilibrium, spontaneous breaking of time translation symmetry can occur in periodically driven, Floquet systems with discrete time-translation symmetry. The period of the resulting discrete time crystal is quantized to an integer multiple of the drive period, arising from a combination of collective synchronization and many body localization. Here, we consider a simple model for a one-dimensional discrete time crystal which explicitly reveals the rigidity of the emergent oscillations as the drive is varied. We numerically map out its phase diagram and compute the properties of the dynamical phase transition where the time crystal melts into a trivial Floquet insulator. Moreover, we demonstrate that the model can be realized with current experimental technologies and propose a blueprint based upon a one dimensional chain of trapped ions. Using experimental parameters (featuring long-range interactions), we identify the phase boundaries of the ion-time-crystal and propose a measurable signature of the symmetry breaking phase transition.

  8. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBBS,MICHAEL L.; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; CHU,TZE YAO

    1999-11-08

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam that contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  9. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  10. Discrete Time Crystals: Rigidity, Criticality, and Realizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Potter, A C; Potirniche, I-D; Vishwanath, A

    2017-01-20

    Despite being forbidden in equilibrium, spontaneous breaking of time translation symmetry can occur in periodically driven, Floquet systems with discrete time-translation symmetry. The period of the resulting discrete time crystal is quantized to an integer multiple of the drive period, arising from a combination of collective synchronization and many body localization. Here, we consider a simple model for a one-dimensional discrete time crystal which explicitly reveals the rigidity of the emergent oscillations as the drive is varied. We numerically map out its phase diagram and compute the properties of the dynamical phase transition where the time crystal melts into a trivial Floquet insulator. Moreover, we demonstrate that the model can be realized with current experimental technologies and propose a blueprint based upon a one dimensional chain of trapped ions. Using experimental parameters (featuring long-range interactions), we identify the phase boundaries of the ion-time-crystal and propose a measurable signature of the symmetry breaking phase transition.

  11. Rigidity of marginally outer trapped 2-spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    In a matter-filled spacetime, perhaps with positive cosmological constant, a stable marginally outer trapped 2-sphere must satisfy a certain area inequality. Namely, as discussed in the paper, its area must be bounded above by $4\\pi/c$, where $c > 0$ is a lower bound on a natural energy-momentum term. We then consider the rigidity that results for stable, or weakly outermost, marginally outer trapped 2-spheres that achieve this upper bound on the area. In particular, we prove a splitting result for 3-dimensional initial data sets analogous to a result of Bray, Brendle and Neves [10] concerning area minimizing 2-spheres in Riemannian 3-manifolds with positive scalar curvature. We further show that these initial data sets locally embed as spacelike hypersurfaces into the Nariai spacetime. Connections to the Vaidya spacetime and dynamical horizons are also discussed.

  12. Foam inflated rigidized structures for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. M.; Warner, M. J.; Blair, M.

    1993-11-01

    Large lightweight stowable structures that can be deployed in space without astronaut extra vehicular activity are vital to expanding space exploration and utilization. To meet this challenge Foam Inflated Rigidized (FIR) structures have been developed by Thiokol Corporation on the Air Forces's Gossamer Baggie Torus program. In this paper the development, proof of concept demonstration of an eight foot diameter octagonal torus, and design application of this technology for structural elements to stabilize the solar collector of a solar thermal rocket are discussed. A FIR structure uses foam to inflate and pre-stress a resin impregnated fabric skin. The predeployed foam used was a solvent swelled polymer that foams immediately when exposed to vacuum due to rapid solvent loss. This property allows a very simple deployment mechanism to be used in erecting these structures. Once inflated, the skin resin is cured using the available ultraviolet radiation. By using high strength and stiffness fiber materials a stiff, strong lightweight structure was produced.

  13. Non-rigid precession of magnetic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lander, S K

    2016-01-01

    Stars are, generically, rotating and magnetised objects with a misalignment between their magnetic and rotation axes. Since a magnetic field induces a permanent distortion to its host, it provides effective rigidity even to a fluid star, leading to bulk stellar motion which resembles free precession. This bulk motion is however accompanied by induced interior velocity and magnetic field perturbations, which are oscillatory on the precession timescale. Extending previous work, we show that these quantities are described by a set of second-order perturbation equations featuring cross-terms scaling with the product of the magnetic and centrifugal distortions to the star. For the case of a background toroidal field, we reduce these to a set of differential equations in radial functions, and find a method for their solution. The resulting magnetic-field and velocity perturbations show complex multipolar structure and are strongest towards the centre of the star.

  14. On real structures on rigid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, Vik S [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kharlamov, V M [Institut de Recherche Matematique Avanee Universite Louis Pasteur et CNRS 7 rue Rene Descartes (France)

    2002-02-28

    We construct examples of rigid surfaces (that is, surfaces whose deformation class consists of a unique surface) with a particular behaviour with respect to real structures. In one example the surface has no real structure. In another it has a unique real structure, which is not maximal with respect to the Smith-Thom inequality. These examples give negative answers to the following problems: the existence of real surfaces in each deformation class of complex surfaces, and the existence of maximal real surfaces in every complex deformation class that contains real surfaces. Moreover, we prove that there are no real surfaces among surfaces of general type with p{sub g}=q=0 and K{sup 2}=9. These surfaces also provide new counterexamples to the 'Dif = Def' problem.

  15. Water dynamics in rigid ionomer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, N. C.; Etampawala, T. N.; Shrestha, U. M.; Aryal, D.; Tyagi, M.; Diallo, S. O.; Mamontov, E.; Cornelius, C. J.; Perahia, D.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of water within ionic polymer networks formed by sulfonated poly(phenylene) (SPP), as revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS), is presented. These polymers are distinguished from other ionic macromolecules by their rigidity and therefore in their network structure. QENS measurements as a function of temperature as the fraction of ionic groups and humidity were varied have shown that the polymer molecules are immobile while absorbed water molecules remain dynamic. The water molecules occupy multiple sites, either bound or loosely constrained, and bounce between the two. With increasing temperature and hydration levels, the system becomes more dynamic. Water molecules remain mobile even at subzero temperatures, illustrating the applicability of the SPP membrane for selective transport over a broad temperature range.

  16. Observational properties of rigidly rotating dust configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Ilyas, Batyr; Yang, Jinye

    2016-01-01

    We study the observational properties of a class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations describing stationary, axially symmetric, rigidly rotating dust. We ask the question whether such solutions can describe astrophysical rotating dark matter clouds and we probe the possibility that they may constitute an alternative to supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies. We show that light emission from accretion disks in this space-time has several differences with respect to the emission of light from accretion disks around black holes. The shape of the iron K{\\alpha} line in the reflection spectrum of accretion disks can potentially distinguish this class of solution from the Kerr metric, but this may not be possible with current X-ray missions.

  17. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  18. Acoustic propagation in a rigid torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustic propagation in a rigid torus is analyzed using a Green's function method. Three types of surface elements are developed; a flat quadrilateral element used in modeling polygonal cavities, a curved conical element appropriate for surfaces with one curvature, and a toroidal element developed for such doubly curved surfaces as the torus. Curved elements are necessary since the acoustic pressure is sensitive to slope discontinuities between consecutive surface elements especially near cavity resonances. The acoustic characteristics of the torus are compared to those of a bend of square cross section for a frequency range that includes the transverse acoustic resonance. Two equivalences between the different sections are tested; the first conserves curvature and cross-sectional dimension while the second matches transverse resonance and duct volume. The second equivalence accurately matches the acoustic characteristics of the torus up to the cutoff frequency corresponding to a mode with two circumferential waves.

  19. How to Attain an Ultralow Interfacial Tension and a Three-Phase Behavior with a Surfactant Formulation for Enhanced Oil Recovery: A Review. Part 2. Performance Improvement Trends from Winsor's Premise to Currently Proposed Inter- and Intra-Molecular Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salager, Jean-Louis; Forgiarini, Ana M; Márquez, Laura; Manchego, Lisbeth; Bullón, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    The minimum interfacial tension occurrence along a formulation scan at the so-called optimum formulation is discussed to be related to the interfacial curvature. The attained minimum tension is inversely proportional to the domain size of the bicontinuous microemulsion and to the interfacial layer rigidity, but no accurate prediction is available. The data from a very simple ternary system made of pure products accurately follows the correlation for optimum formulation, and exhibit a linear relationship between the performance index as the logarithm of the minimum tension at optimum, and the formulation variables. This relation is probably too simple when the number of variables is increased as in practical cases. The review of published data for more realistic systems proposed for enhanced oil recovery over the past 30 years indicates a general guidelines following Winsor's basic studies concerning the surfactant-oil-water interfacial interactions. It is well known that the major performance benefits are achieved by blending amphiphilic species at the interface as intermolecular or intramolecular mixtures, sometimes in extremely complex formulations. The complexity is such that a good knowledge of the possible trends and an experienced practical know-how to avoid trial and error are important for the practitioner in enhanced oil recovery.

  20. RIGID-PLASTIC/RIGID-VISCOPLASTIC FEM BASED ON LINEAR PROGRAMMING-THEORETICAL MODELING AND APPLICATION FOR PLANE-STRAIN PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new rigid-plastic/rigid-viscoplastic (RP/RVP) FEM based on linear programming (LP) for plane-strain metal forming simulation is proposed. Compared with the traditional RP/RVP FEM based on iteration solution, it has some remarkable advantages, such as it's free of convergence problem and its convenience in contact, incompressibility constraint and rigid zone treatment. Two solution examples are provided to validate its accuracy and efficiency.

  1. Application of Surfactant Micellar Solutions as Extractants and Mobile Phases for TLC-Determination of Purine Bases and Doping Agents in Biological Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Victorovna Yedamenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Separation of caffeine and its metabolites (theophylline and theobromine and doping agents (spironolactone, propranolol, and ephedrine and determination of caffeine in serum sample and propranolol and ephedrine in urine were studied on normal-phase thin layers (“Sorbfil-UV-254”. Aqueous organic solvents and aqueous micellar surfactant solutions were compared as the mobile phases for separation. The acceptable separation of purine bases and doping agents was achieved by micellar Thin Layer Chromatography and normal-phase Thin Layer Chromatography. Anionic surfactant solution with added 1-propanol was the best eluent as for caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine separation, as for doping agents. The best characteristics of caffeine extraction from serum, and propranolol and ephedrine from urine were achieved when micellar eluent based on non-ionic Tween-80 surfactant was used. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i1.632

  2. Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants: automatic vertical alignment of nematic liquid crystal for the remote-controllable optical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Lee, Sang-A; Kang, Dong-Gue; Park, Minwook; Choi, Yu-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2015-03-25

    Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants (abbreviated as CELAnD-OH) were specifically designed and synthesized for the automatic vertical alignment (VA) layer of nematic (N) liquid crystal (LC), which can be applied for the fabrication of remote-controllable optical devices. Without the conventional polymer-based LC alignment process, a perfect VA layer was automatically constructed by directly adding the 0.1 wt % CELA1D-OH in the N-LC media. The programmed CELA1D-OH giant surfactants in the N-LC media gradually diffused onto the substrates of LC cell and self-assembled to the expanded monolayer structure, which can provide enough empty spaces for N-LC molecules to crawl into the empty zones for the construction of VA layer. On the other hand, the CELA3D-OH giant surfactants forming the condensed monolayer structure on the substrates exhibited a planar alignment (PA) rather than a VA. Upon tuning the wavelength of light, the N-LC alignments were reversibly switched between VA and PA in the remote-controllable LC optical devices. Based on the experimental results, it was realized that understanding the interactions between N-LC molecules and amphiphilic giant surfactants is critical to design the suitable materials for the automatic LC alignment.

  3. Studies of Rigid Rotor-Rigid Surface Scattering in Dynamical Lie Algebraic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Yan; DING Shi-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical Lie algebraic method is used for the description of statistical mechanics of rotationally inelastic molecule-surface scattering. It can give the time-evolution operators about the low power of a+ and a by solving a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. For considering the contribution of the high power of a+ and a, we use the Magnus formula. Thus, with the time-evolution operators we can get the statistical average values of the measurable quantities in terms of the density operator formalism in statistical mechanics. The method is applied to the scattering of N2 (rigid rotor) by a flat, rigid surface to illustrate its general procedure. The results demonstrate that the method is useful for describing the statistical dynamics of gas-surface scattering.

  4. Thermodynamics of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100-cationic surfactants mixtures at the cloud point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batigoec, Cigdem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Akbas, Halide, E-mail: hakbas34@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Boz, Mesut [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Non-ionic surfactants are used as emulsifier and solubilizate in such as textile, detergent and cosmetic. > Non-ionic surfactants occur phase separation at temperature as named the cloud point in solution. > Dimeric surfactants have attracted increasing attention due to their superior surface activity. > The positive values of {Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0} indicate that the process proceeds nonspontaneous. - Abstract: This study investigates the effects of gemini and conventional cationic surfactants on the cloud point (CP) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solutions. Instead of visual observation, a spectrophotometer was used for measurement of the cloud point temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of these mixtures were calculated at different cationic surfactant concentrations. The gemini surfactants of the alkanediyl-{alpha}-{omega}-bis (alkyldimethylammonium) dibromide type, on the one hand, with different alkyl groups containing m carbon atoms and an ethanediyl spacer, referred to as 'm-2-m' (m = 10, 12, and 16) and, on the other hand, with -C{sub 16} alkyl groups and different spacers containing s carbon atoms, referred to as '16-s-16' (s = 6 and 10) were synthesized, purified and characterized. Additions of the cationic surfactants to the TX-100 solution increased the cloud point temperature of the TX-100 solution. It was accepted that the solubility of non-ionic surfactant containing polyoxyethylene (POE) hydrophilic chain was a maximum at the cloud point so that the thermodynamic parameters were calculated at this temperature. The results showed that the standard Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0}), the enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub cp}{sup 0}) and the entropy ({Delta}S{sub cp}{sup 0}) of the clouding phenomenon were found positive in all cases. The standard free energy ({Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0}) increased with increasing hydrophobic alkyl chain for both gemini and conventional cationic

  5. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...

  6. Titration procedure for low ethoxylated nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschmann, N. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst., Lehrstuhl fuer Analytische Chemie, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Huelskoetter, F. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst., Lehrstuhl fuer Analytische Chemie, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    Highly lipophilic surfactants are frequently used as emulsifiers for preparing oil-in-water emulsions (e.g. coolants lubricants). Typical surfactants used for this purpose are low ethoxylated alcohols and ethoxylated alkylphenols. Due to the low degree of ethoxylation they cannot be analysed by conventional methods. The method described in this article is based on the introduction of an anionic group into the molecule by a derivatization reaction. The reaction product can be determined by conventional titration methods for anionic surfactants without any modification. The use of the new method for other nonionic surfactants like sorbitan esters, (ethoxylated) fatty acid amides or glycerol fatty acid partial esters is also described as well as the sample preparation for coolants lubricants. (orig.) [Deutsch] Lipophile Tenside werden haeufig zur Herstellung von Oel-in-Wasser-Emulsionen verwandt, wie sie beispielsweise in Kuehlschmiermitteln eingesetzt werden. Typische Vertreter dieser Tenside sind niedrig ethoxylierte Fettalkohole und Alkylphenole. Wegen ihres geringen Ethoxylierungsgrades koennen sie mit den konventionellen Methoden nicht analytisch bestimmt werden. Die hier beschriebene Analysenmethode beruht auf der Derivatisierung der Ethoxylate zu entsprechenden anionischen Tensiden (Ethersulfate). Diese koennen ohne weiteres mit den etablierten Titrationsverfahren bestimmt werden. Die Anwendung dieses neuen Verfahrens auf die Bestimmung anderer nichtionischer Tenside - Sorbitanester, (ethoxylierte) Fettsaeureamide und Partialglyceride - wird ebenso beschrieben wie die Probenvorbereitung fuer die Analyse von Kuehlschmiermitteln. (orig.)

  7. Mitoxantrone-Surfactant Interactions: A Physicochemical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Enache

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitoxantrone is a synthetic anticancer drug used clinically in the treatment of different types of cancer. It was developed as a doxorubicin analogue in a program to find drugs with improved antitumor activity and decreased cardiotoxicity compared with the anthracyclines. As the cell membrane is the first barrier encountered by anticancer drugs before reaching the DNA sites inside the cells and as surfactant micelles are known as simple model systems for biological membranes, the drugs-surfactant interaction has been the subject of great research interest. Further, quantitative understanding of the interactions of drugs with biomimicking structures like surfactant micelles may provide helpful information for the control of physicochemical properties and bioactivities of encapsulated drugs in order to design better delivery systems with possible biomedical applications. The present review describes the physicochemical aspects of the interactions between the anticancer drug mitoxantrone and different surfactants. Mitoxantrone-micelle binding constants, partitions coefficient of the drug between aqueous and micellar phases and the corresponding Gibbs free energy for the above processes, and the probable location of drug molecules in the micelles are discussed.

  8. Photosensitive surfactants: micellization and interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  9. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...

  10. Photosensitive surfactants: Micellization and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  11. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd...

  12. Topological transformation of a surfactant bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant lamellar phases are often complicated by the formation of multilamellar (onions) under shear, which can originate simply by shaking the sample. A systematic study has been performed on the C10E3-D2O system in which different bilayer structures under a steady shear flow were investigated...

  13. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  14. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  15. Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy and Noninvasive Respiratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs, Angela

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) caused by surfactant deficiency is major cause for neonatal mortality and short- and long-term morbidity of preterm infants. Continuous positive airway pressure and other modes of noninvasive respiratory support and intubation and positive pressure ventilation with surfactant therapy are efficient therapies for RDS. Because continuous positive airway pressure can fail in severe surfactant deficiency, and because traditional surfactant therapy requires intubation and positive pressure ventilation, this entails a risk of lung injury. Several strategies to combine noninvasive respiratory therapy with minimally invasive surfactant therapy have been described. Available data suggest that those strategies may improve outcome of premature infants with RDS.

  16. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  17. Palm oil based surfactant products for petroleum industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permadi, P.; Fitria, R.; Hambali, E.

    2017-05-01

    In petroleum production process, many problems causing reduced production are found. These include limited oil recovery, wax deposit, asphaltene deposit, sludge deposit, and emulsion problem. Petroleum-based surfactant has been used to overcome these problems. Therefore, innovation to solve these problems using surfactant containing natural materials deserves to be developed. Palm oil-based surfactant is one of the potential alternatives for this. Various types of derivative products of palm oil-based surfactant have been developed by SBRC IPB to be used in handling problems including surfactant flooding, well stimulation, asphaltene dissolver, well cleaning, and wax removal found in oil and gas industry.

  18. Surfactant Sensors in Biotechnology; Part 1 – Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Sak-Bosnar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on electrochemical surfactant sensors is given with special attention to papers published since 1993. The importance of surfactants in modern biotechnology is stressed out. Electrochemical sensors are usually divided according to the measured physical quantity to potentiometric, amperometric, conductometric and impedimetric surfactant sensors. The last ones are very few. Potentiometric surfactant sensors are the most numerous due to their simplicity and versatility. They can be used either as end-point titration sensors or as direct EMF measurement sensors, in batch or flow-through mode. Some amperometric surfactant sensors are true biosensors that use microorganisms or living cells.

  19. Dimeric Surfactants: Promising Ingredients of Cosmetics and Toiletries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. shampoo, lotions, creams, conditioners etc. These surfactants possess extremely unique surface properties viz. lower surface tension, unique micellization, low critical micelle concentration (CMC and antimicrobial activity, higher solubilization etc. Dimerics enhance the performances of cosmetics in an extraordinary manner and provide eco-friendly preparations for human epidermis.

  20. Integrated power and attitude control of a rigid satellite with onboard magnetic bearing suspended rigid flywheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonkyu

    2003-10-01

    A system of differential equations governing the translational and rotational motion of a system model consisting of a rigid satellite and multiple MB suspended rigid flywheels in general configuration is developed. Flywheel modules are contained in a housing rigidly mounted on the satellite and floated by an active MB suspension system, therefore each flywheel module has six degrees of freedom (DOF) as well as the satellite module. Equations of motion for the satellite and flywheels are naturally coupled and the satellite rotational motion and translational motion are coupled. A nonlinear state feedback tracking control law, which is globally asymptotically stable, is developed following a Lyapunov stability theory for integrated power and attitude control using the MB suspended flywheels. The stability, robustness, and tracking and disturbance rejection performance of the present control law with respect to initial attitude error, system modeling error, an imbalance disturbance, is demonstrated by case studies. The satellite departure motion equation derived from the definition of the angular velocity error and the system dynamics equations is presented. Application study of existing power tracking algorithm with this control law shows perfect power tracking for both power charging from and power delivery to the satellite operations and the power tracking can be performed simultaneously with and independent of the attitude control function.

  1. Emulsion of aqueous-based nonspherical droplets in aqueous solutions by single-chain surfactants: templated assembly by nonamphiphilic lyotropic liquid crystals in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Nisha; Shetye, Gauri S; Bandyopadhyay, Debjyoti; Gobalasingham, Nemal; Seo, JinAm; Wang, Jo-Han; Theiler, Barbara; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2012-07-24

    Single-chain surfactants usually emulsify and stabilize oily substances into droplets in an aqueous solution. Here, we report a coassembly system, in which single types of anionic or non-ionic surfactants emulsify a class of water-soluble nonamphiphilic organic salts with fused aromatic rings in aqueous solutions. The nonamphiphilic organic salts are in turn promoted to form droplets of water-based liquid crystals (chromonic liquid crystals) encapsulated by single-chain surfactants. The droplets, stabilized against coalescence by encapsulated in a layer (or layers) of single chain surfactants, are of both nonspherical tactoid (elongated ellipsoid with pointy ends) and spherical shapes. The tactoids have an average long axis of ∼9 μm and a short axis of ∼3.5 μm with the liquid crystal aligning parallel to the droplet surface. The spherical droplets are 5-10 μm in diameter and have the liquid crystal aligning perpendicular to the droplet surface and a point defect in the center. Cationic and zwitterionic surfactants studied in this work did not promote the organic salt to form droplets. These results illustrate the complex interplay of self-association and thermodynamic incompatibility of molecules in water, which can cause new assembly behavior, including potential formation of vesicles or other assemblies, from surfactants that usually form only micelles. These unprecedented tactoidal shaped droplets also provide potential for the fabrication of new soft organic microcapsules.

  2. Phase diagrams of DNA-photosensitive surfactant complexes: effect of ionic strength and surfactant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Titov, Evgenii; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-10-28

    Realization of all-optically controlled and efficient DNA compaction is the major motivation in the study of interactions between DNA and photosensitive surfactants. In this article, using recently published approach of phase diagram construction [Y. Zakrevskyy, P. Cywinski, M. Cywinska, J. Paasche, N. Lomadze, O. Reich, H.-G. Löhmannsroben, and S. Santer, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044907 (2014)], a strategy for substantial reduction of compaction agent concentration and simultaneous maintaining the light-induced decompaction efficiency is proposed. The role of ionic strength (NaCl concentration), as a very important environmental parameter, and surfactant structure (spacer length) on the changes of positions of phase transitions is investigated. Increase of ionic strength leads to increase of the surfactant concentration needed to compact DNA molecule. However, elongation of the spacer results to substantial reduction of this concentration. DNA compaction by surfactants with longer tails starts to take place in diluted solutions at charge ratios Z phase diagrams for different DNA-photosensitive surfactant systems allowed explanation and proposal of a strategy to overcome previously reported limitations of the light-induced decompaction for complexes with increasing surfactant hydrophobicity.

  3. Synthesis and properties evaluation of sulfobetaine surfactant with double hydroxyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Ze; Li, Sisi; Wang, Chengwen

    2017-09-01

    A series of sulfobetaine surfactants {N-[(3-alkoxy-2-hydroxyl)propoxy] ethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-hydroxyl)propyl sulfonate} ammonium chloride were synthesized with raw materials containing linear saturated alcohol, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, sodium 3-chloro-2-hydroxyl propane sulfonic acid and epichlorohydrin. The molecule structures of sulfobetaine surfactants were characterized by FTIR, 1HNMR and elemental analysis. Surface tension measurements can provide us information about the surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), pC20, Γmax and Amin. The pC20 values of sulfobetaine surfactants increase with the hydrophobic chain length increasing. Amin values of the surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 14. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension (γCMC) values of the sulfobetaine surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 16. The lipophilicity of surfactant was enhanced with the increase of the carbon chain, however, the ability of anti-hard water was weakened. The minimum oil/water interfacial tension of four kinds of sulfobetaine surfactants is 10-2-10-3 mN/m magnitude, which indicates that the synthesized bis-hydroxy sulfobetaine surfactants have a great ability to reduce interfacial tension in the surfactant flooding system. The surface tension (γCMC) values of synthesized surfactants were lower compared with conventional anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfonate.

  4. Dynamics of rigid microparticles at the interface of co-flowing immiscible liquids in a microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K S; Banerjee, U; Sen, A K

    2017-05-01

    We report the dynamical migration behavior of rigid polystyrene microparticles at an interface of co-flowing streams of primary CP1 (aqueous) and secondary CP2 (oils) immiscible phases at low Reynolds numbers (Re) in a microchannel. The microparticles initially suspended in the CP1 either continue to flow in the bulk CP1 or migrate across the interface into CP2, when the stream width of the CP1 approaches the diameter of the microparticles. Experiments were performed with different secondary phases and it is found that the migration criterion depends on the sign of the spreading parameter S and the presence of surfactant at the interface. To substantiate the migration criterion, experiments were also carried out by suspending the microparticles in CP2 (oil phase). Our study reveals that in case of aqueous-silicone oil combination, the microparticles get attached to the interface since S90°. For complete detachment of microparticles from the interface into the secondary phase, additional energy ΔG is needed. We discuss the role of interfacial perturbation, which causes detachment of microparticles from the interface. In case of mineral and olive oils, the surfactants present at the interface prevents attachment of the microparticles to the interface due to the repulsive disjoining pressure. Finally, using a aqueous-silicone oil system, we demonstrate size based sorting of microparticles of size 25μm and 15μm respectively from that of 15μm and 10μm and study the variation of separation efficiency η with the ratio of the width of the aqueous stream to the diameter of the microparticles ρ.

  5. SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

    2004-02-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine.

  6. Degeneration, Rigidity and Irreducible Components of Hopf Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdenacer Makhlouf

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the concepts of degeneration, deformation and rigidity of Hopf algebras and to apply them to the geometric study of the varieties of Hopf algebras. The main result is the description of the n-dimensional rigid Hopf algebras and the irreducible components for n < 14 and n = p2 with p a prime number.

  7. Non-rigid registration by geometry-constrained diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Per Rønsholt; Nielsen, Mads

    2001-01-01

    Assume that only partial knowledge about a non-rigid registration is given: certain points, curves, or surfaces in one 3D image are known to map to certain points, curves, or surfaces in another 3D image. In trying to identify the non-rigid registration field, we face a generalized aperture problem...

  8. Non-rigid image registration using bone growth model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus; Kreiborg, Sven

    1997-01-01

    Non-rigid registration has traditionally used physical models like elasticity and fluids. These models are very seldom valid models of the difference between the registered images. This paper presents a non-rigid registration algorithm, which uses a model of bone growth as a model of the change b...

  9. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  10. Reinforced molecular recognition as an alternative to rigid receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Sijbren

    2006-01-01

    In theory, a perfectly rigid receptor will probably be an unbeatable binder. However, rigidity may not be easy to achieve in practice and it is certainly not Nature’s method to realise high affinity. In many proteins binding affinity is increased through non-covalent interactions within the protein.

  11. Quadratic Twists of Rigid Calabi–Yau Threefolds Over

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gouvêa, Fernando Q.; Kiming, Ian; Yui, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    We consider rigid Calabi–Yau threefolds defined over Q and the question of whether they admit quadratic twists. We give a precise geometric definition of the notion of a quadratic twists in this setting. Every rigid Calabi–Yau threefold over Q is modular so there is attached to it a certain newfo...

  12. Stability of rigid body rotation from a bond graph perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the history of the bond graph description of rigid body rotation dynamics and resolves a paradox that resulted from the common Euler Junction Structure (EJS) description of the exterior product in the Newton–Euler equation describing rigid body rotation [D.C. Karnopp, R.C. Rosen

  13. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Somasundaran

    2006-04-30

    During this reporting period, further fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanism of the interactions between surfactants and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of pH and mixing ratio on the chemical loss by adsorption were investigated. Some preliminary modeling work has been done towards the aim of developing a guide book to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interfaces. The study of adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) was continued during this period. Based on the adsorption results, the effects of pH and mixing ratio on reagent loss were quantitatively evaluated. Adsorption of dodecyl maltoside showed a maximum at certain mixing ratio at low pH (3{approx}5), while adsorption of dodecyl maltoside steadily decreased with the increase in C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na. Analytical ultracentrifuge technique was employed to study the micellization of DM/C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na mixtures. Compositional changes of the aggregates were observed the mixing ratio of the components. Surfactant mixture micellization affects the conformation and orientation of adsorption layer at mineral/water interface and thus the wettability and as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes. A preliminary term, Reagent Loss Index (RLI), has been proposed to represent the adsorption of all the surfactants in a standardized framework for the development of the models. Previously reported adsorption data have been analyzed using the theoretical framework for the preparation of a guidebook to help optimization of chemical combinations and selection of reagent scheme for enhanced oil recovery.

  14. Tautochrone and Brachistochrone Shape Solutions for Rocking Rigid Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Glaschke, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Rocking rigid bodies appear in several shapes in everyday life: As furniture like rocking chairs and rocking cradles or as toys like rocking horses or tilting dolls. The familiar rocking motion of these objects, a non-linear combination of a rigid rotation and a translation of the center of mass, gives rise to a number of interesting dynamical properties. However, their study has received little attention in the literature. This work presents a comprehensive introduction to the dynamics of rocking rigid bodies, including a concise derivation of the equations of motion as well as a general inversion procedure to construct rocking rigid body shapes with specified dynamical properties. Moreover, two novel rigid body shapes are derived - the tautochrone shape and the brachistochrone shape - which represent an intriguing generalization of the well-know tautochrone and brachistochrone curves. In particular, tautochrone shapes offer an alternative construction of a tautochrone pendulum, in addition to Huygens' cyclo...

  15. Rigidity-Preserving Team Partitions in Multiagent Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Daniela; Williams, Ryan K; Gasparri, Andrea; Ulivi, Giovanni; Sukhatme, Gaurav S

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the strong influence network rigidity has on collaborative systems, in this paper, we consider the problem of partitioning a multiagent network into two sub-teams, a bipartition, such that the resulting sub-teams are topologically rigid. In this direction, we determine the existence conditions for rigidity-preserving bipartitions, and provide an iterative algorithm that identifies such partitions in polynomial time. In particular, the relationship between rigid graph partitions and the previously identified Z-link edge structure is given, yielding a feasible direction for graph search. Adapting a supergraph search mechanism, we then detail a methodology for discerning graphs cuts that represent valid rigid bipartitions. Next, we extend our methods to a decentralized context by exploiting leader election and an improved graph search to evaluate feasible cuts using only local agent-to-agent communication. Finally, full algorithm details and pseudocode are provided, together with simulation results that verify correctness and demonstrate complexity.

  16. Rigidity sensing and adaptation through regulation of integrin types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Bazellières, Elsa; Allen, Michael D.; Andreu, Ion; Oria, Roger; Sunyer, Raimon; Gomm, Jennifer J.; Marshall, John F.; Jones, J. Louise; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2014-06-01

    Tissue rigidity regulates processes in development, cancer and wound healing. However, how cells detect rigidity, and thereby modulate their behaviour, remains unknown. Here, we show that sensing and adaptation to matrix rigidity in breast myoepithelial cells is determined by the bond dynamics of different integrin types. Cell binding to fibronectin through either α5β1 integrins (constitutively expressed) or αvβ6 integrins (selectively expressed in cancer and development) adapts force generation, actin flow and integrin recruitment to rigidities associated with healthy or malignant tissue, respectively. In vitro experiments and theoretical modelling further demonstrate that this behaviour is explained by the different binding and unbinding rates of both integrin types to fibronectin. Moreover, rigidity sensing through differences in integrin bond dynamics applies both when integrins bind separately and when they compete for binding to fibronectin.

  17. Application of polyhydroxyalkanoate binding protein PhaP as a bio-surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dai-Xu; Chen, Chong-Bo; Fang, Guo; Li, Shi-Yan; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2011-08-01

    PhaP or phasin is an amphiphilic protein located on surfaces of microbial storage polyhydroxyalkanoates granules. This study aimed to explore amphiphilic properties of PhaP for possible application as a protein surfactant. Following agents were used to conduct this study as controls including bovine serum albumin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 20, sodium oleate, a commercial liquefied detergent together with the same amount of PhaP. Among all these tested control surfactants, PhaP showed the strongest effect to form emulsions with lubricating oil, diesel, and soybean oil, respectively. PhaP emulsion stability study compared with SDS revealed that PhaP had a stronger capability to maintain a very stable emulsion layer after 30 days while SDS lost half and two-thirds of its capacity after 2 and 30 days, respectively. When PhaP was more than 200 μg/ml in the water, all liquids started to exhibit stable emulsion layers. Similar to SDS, PhaP significantly reduced the water contact angles of water on a hydrophobic film of biaxially oriented polypropylene. PhaP was thermally very stable, it showed ability to form emulsion and to bind to the surface of polyhydroxybutyrate nanoparticles after a 60- min heating process at 95 °C. It is therefore concluded that PhaP is a protein with thermally stable property for application as natural and environmentally friendly surfactant for food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical usages.

  18. Photopyroelectric Calorimetry of Magnetic Nanofluids: Effect of Type of Surfactant and Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadarlat, D.; Longuemart, S.; Turcu, R.; Streza, M.; Vekas, L.; Hadj Sahraoui, A.

    2014-11-01

    Five types of magnetic nanofluids, based on nanoparticles with water as the carrier liquid, were investigated by using the two photopyroelectric (PPE) detection configurations (back (BPPE) and front (FPPE)), together with the thermal-wave resonator cavity (TWRC) technique as the scanning procedure. The difference between the nanofluids was the type of surfactant: double layers of lauric (LA-LA), oleic (OA-OA), and miristic (MA-MA) acids and also double layers of lauric-miristic (LA-MA) and palmitic-oleic (PA-OA) fatty acids were used. In both detection configurations, the information was contained in the phase of the PPE signal. The thermal diffusivity of nanofluids was obtained in the BPPE configuration, from the scan of the phase of the signal as a function of the liquid's thickness. Using the same scanning procedure in the FPPE configuration, the thermal effusivity was directly measured. The influence of a 0.12 kG magnetic field on the thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity was also investigated. Because of different surfactants, the thermal effusivity of the investigated nanofluids ranges from to , and the thermal diffusivity, from to . The magnetic field has practically no influence on the thermal effusivity, and produces a maximum increase of the thermal diffusivity (LA-LA surfactant) of about 4 %.

  19. Interaction of Moringa oleifera seed protein with a mineral surface and the influence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R; Barker, Robert

    2015-06-15

    The paper describes the adsorption of purified protein from seeds of Moringa oleifera to a sapphire interface and the effects of addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Neutron reflection was used to determine the structure and composition of interfacial layers adsorbed at the solid/solution interface. The maximum surface excess of protein was found to be about 5.3 mg m(-2). The protein does not desorb from the solid/liquid interface when rinsed with water. Addition of SDS increases the reflectivity indicating co-adsorption. It was observed that CTAB is able to remove the protein from the interface. The distinct differences to the behavior observed previously for the protein at the silica/water interface are identified. The adsorption of the protein to alumina in addition to other surfaces has shown why it is an effective flocculating agent for the range of impurities found in water supplies. The ability to tailor different surface layers in combination with various surfactants also offers the potential for adsorbed protein to be used in separation technologies.

  20. Surfactant influence on interface roughness and magnetoresistance value in Fe/Cr multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kąc, M., E-mail: malgorzata.kac@ifj.edu.pl; Polit, A.; Dobrowolska, A.; Zabila, Y.; Krupiński, M.; Marszałek, M.

    2013-09-02

    Effect of interfacial roughness on magnetoresistance (MR) value in Fe/Cr multilayers was studied. The Fe/Cr multilayers were prepared on a MgO(100) substrate by molecular beam deposition technique and doped with Bi and In surfactants. The morphology of the layers, especially the interface structure, was studied using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). CEMS spectra indicate an increase in the width of interfaces of modified samples; this effect is stronger for the sample doped with In. Auger electron spectroscopy shows the segregation of the surfactant to the surface. Magnetic and magnetotransport properties of the samples were studied by the magneto-optic Kerr effect and MR measurements. The observed hysteresis loops confirm in all samples antiferromagnetic arrangement of Fe layers sandwiched between Cr while the value of MR is larger for the doped samples. It was observed that roughening of the interfaces resulted in an increase of the MR effect. - Highlights: • Interface structure of Fe/Cr multilayers was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. • Segregating surfactants increased the interface roughness of the doped samples. • All samples, regardless of interface structure, were antiferromagnetically coupled. • The roughening of interfaces resulted in an increase of the magnetoresistance value.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FOR NOVEL ALCOHOL ETHOXYCARBOXYLATE SURFACTANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebone T. Moeti; Ramanathan Sampath

    2001-09-28

    This final technical report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-97FT97278 during the period October 01, 1997 to August 31, 2001 which covers the total performance period of the project. During this period, detailed information on optimal salinity, temperature, emulsion morphologies, effectiveness for surfactant retention and oil recovery was obtained for an Alcohol Ethoxycarboxylate (AEC) surfactant to evaluate its performance in flooding processes. Tests were conducted on several AEC surfactants and NEODOX (23-4) was identified as the most suitable hybrid surfactant that yielded the best proportion in volume for top, middle, and bottom phases when mixed with oil and water. Following the selection of this surfactant, temperature and salinity scans were performed to identify the optimal salinity and temperature, and the temperature and salinity intervals in which all three phases coexisted. NEODOX 23-4 formed three phases between 4 and 52.5 C. It formed an aqueous rich microemulsion phase at high temperatures and an oleic rich microemulsion phase at low temperatures--a characteristic of the ionic part of the surfactant. The morphology measurement system was set-up successfully at CAU. The best oil/water/surfactant system defined by the above phase work was then studied for emulsion morphologies. Electrical conductivities were measured for middle and bottom phases of the NEODOX 23-4/dodecane/10mM water system and by mixing measured volumes of the middle phase into a fixed volume of the bottom phase and vice versa at room temperature. Electrical conductivity of the mixture decreased as the fraction of volume of the middle phase was increased and vice versa. Also inversion phenomena was observed. These experiments were then repeated for bottom/middle (B/M) and middle/bottom (M/B) conjugate pair phases at 10, 15, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 C. Electrical conductivity measurements were then compared with the predictions of the conductivity model developed in

  2. Kinetic study of rigid polyurethane foams thermal decomposition by artificial neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Bárbara D L; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Sebastião, Rita C O

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models of solid thermal decomposition are traditionally used for individual fit of isothermal decomposition experimental data. However, this methodology can provide unacceptable errors in some cases. To solve this problem, a neural network (MLP) was developed and adopted in this work. The implemented algorithm uses the rate constants as predetermined weights between the input and intermediate layer and kinetic models as activation functions of neurons in the hidden layer. The contribution of each model in the overall fit of the experimental data is calculated as the weights between the intermediate and output layer. In this way, the phenomenon is better described as a sum of kinetic processes. Two rigid polyurethane foam samples: loaded with Al2O3 and no inorganic filler were used in this work. The R3 model described the thermal decomposition kinetic process for all temperatures for both foams with smaller residual error. However, the network residual errors are on average 102 times lower compared to ...

  3. Dynamic properties of cationic diacyl-glycerol-arginine-based surfactant/phospholipid mixtures at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Neus; Pinazo, Aurora; Pérez, Lourdes; Pons, Ramon

    2010-02-16

    In this Article, we study the binary surface interactions of 1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-O-(N(alpha)-acetyl-L-arginine) hydrochloride (1414RAc) with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on 0.1 M sodium chloride solutions. 1414RAc is a novel monocationic surfactant that has potential applications as an antimicrobial agent, is biodegradable, and shows a toxicity activity smaller than that of other commercial cationic surfactants. DPPC phospholipid was used as a model membrane component. The dynamic surface tension of 1414RAc/DPPC aqueous dispersions injected into the saline subphase was followed by tensiometry. The layer formation for the mixtures is always accelerated with respect to DPPC, and surprisingly, the surface tension reduction is faster and reaches lower surface tension values at surfactant concentration below its critical micellar concentration (cmc). Interfacial dilational rheology properties of mixed films spread on the air/water interface were determined by the dynamic oscillation method using a Langmuir trough. The effect of surfactant mole fraction on the rheological parameters of 1414RAc/DPPC mixed monolayers was studied at a relative amplitude of area deformation of 5% and a frequency of 50 mHz. The monolayer viscoelasticity shows a nonideal mixing behavior with predominance of the surfactant properties. This nonideal behavior has been attributed to the prevalence of electrostatic interactions.

  4. Effect of dielectric fluid with surfactant and graphite powder on Electrical Discharge Machining of titanium alloy using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murahari Kolli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method was employed to optimize the surfactant and graphite powder concentration in dielectric fluid for the machining of Ti-6Al-4V using Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM. The process parameters such as discharge current, surfactant concentration and powder concentration were changed to explore their effects on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR, Tool wear rate (TWR and Recast Layer Thickness (RLT. Detailed analysis of structural features of machined surface was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM to observe the influence of surfactant and graphite powder on the machining process. It was observed from the experimental results that the graphite powder and surfactant added dielectric fluid significantly improved the MRR, reduces the SR, TWR and RLT at various conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and F-test of experimental data values related to the important process parameters of EDM revealed that discharge current and surfactant concentration has more percentage of contribution on the MRR and TWR whereas the SR, and RLT were found to be affected greatly by the discharge current and graphite powder concentration.

  5. Modeling decomposition of rigid polyurethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams are used as encapsulants to isolate and support thermally sensitive components within weapon systems. When exposed to abnormal thermal environments, such as fire, the polyurethane foam decomposes to form products having a wide distribution of molecular weights and can dominate the overall thermal response of the system. Decomposing foams have either been ignored by assuming the foam is not present, or have been empirically modeled by changing physical properties, such as thermal conductivity or emissivity, based on a prescribed decomposition temperature. The hypothesis addressed in the current work is that improved predictions of polyurethane foam degradation can be realized by using a more fundamental decomposition model based on chemical structure and vapor-liquid equilibrium, rather than merely fitting the data by changing physical properties at a prescribed decomposition temperature. The polyurethane decomposition model is founded on bond breaking of the primary polymer and formation of a secondary polymer which subsequently decomposes at high temperature. The bond breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) from a single nonisothermal experiment with a heating rate of 20 C/min. Model predictions compare reasonably well with a separate nonisothermal TGA weight loss experiment with a heating rate of 200 C/min.

  6. Flow past 2-D Hemispherical Rigid Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2013-11-01

    The flow past a 2-dimensional rigid hemispherical shape is investigated using PIV. Flow field measurements and images were generated with the use of a Thermoflow® apparatus. Results of this study are compared to prior work (APS DFD 2012 Session E9.00003) which employed CFD to investigate the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachutes. The various sized gaps/open areas were positioned at distinct locations. The work presented here is part of a larger research project to investigate flow fields in deceleration devices and parachutes. Understanding the pitch-stability of parachutes is essential for accurate design and implementation of these deceleration devices but they present a difficult system to analyze. The flexibility of the parachute fabric results in large variations in the parachute geometry leading to complex fluid-structure interactions. Such flow, combined with flow through gaps and open areas, has been postulated to shed alternating vortices causing pitching/oscillations of the canopy. The results presented provide some insight into which geometric features affect vortex shedding and may enable the redesign of the baseline parachute to minimize instabilities.

  7. The rigidity of three flavor quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rishi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mannarelli, Massimo [IEEC/CSIC

    2008-01-01

    Cold three flavor quark matter at large (but not asymptotically large) densities may exist in a crystalline color superconducting phase. These phases are characterized by a gap parameter {Delta} that varies periodieally in space, forming a crystal structure. A Ginzburg-Landau expansion in {Delta} shows that two crystal structures based on cubic symetry are particularly favorable, and may be the ground state of matter at densities present in neutron star cores. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space-and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by {Delta}, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase ofmatter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superftuid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example, (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores.

  8. The theory of pseudo-rigid bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Harley

    1988-01-01

    This monograph concerns the development, analysis, and application of the theory of pseudo-rigid bodies. It collects together our work on that subject over the last five years. While some results have appeared else­ where, much of the work is new. Our objective in writing this mono­ graph has been to present a new theory of the deformation of bodies, one that has not only a firm theoretical basis, but also the simplicity to serve as an effective tool in practical problems. Consequently, the main body of the treatise is a multifaceted development of the theory, from foundations to explicit solutions to linearizations to methods of approximation. The fact that this variety of aspects, each examined in considerable detail, can be collected together in a single, unified treat­ ment gives this theory an elegance that we feel sets it apart from many others. While our goal has always been to give a complete treatment of the theory as it now stands, the work here is not meant to be definitive. Theories are not ent...

  9. Heat transfer in suspensions of rigid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Luca; Niazi Ardekani, Mehdi; Abouali, Omid

    2016-11-01

    We study the heat transfer in laminar Couette flow of suspensions of rigid neutrally buoyant particles by means of numerical simulations. An Immersed Boundary Method is coupled with a VOF approach to simulate the heat transfer in the fluid and solid phase, enabling us to fully resolve the heat diffusion. First, we consider spherical particles and show that the proposed algorithm is able to reproduce the correlations between heat flux across the channel, the particle volume fraction and the heat diffusivity obtained in laboratory experiments and recently proposed in the literature, results valid in the limit of vanishing inertia. We then investigate the role of inertia on the heat transfer and show an increase of the suspension diffusivity at finite particle Reynolds numbers. Finally, we vary the relativity diffusivity of the fluid and solid phase and investigate its effect on the effective heat flux across the channel. The data are analyzed by considering the ensemble averaged energy equation and decomposing the heat flux in 4 different contributions, related to diffusion in the solid and fluid phase, and the correlations between wall-normal velocity and temperature fluctuations. Results for non-spherical particles will be examined before the meeting. Supported by the European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2013- CoG-616186, TRITOS. The authors acknowledge computer time provided by SNIC (Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing).

  10. Foaming and foam stability for mixed polymer-surfactant solutions: effects of surfactant type and polymer charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, R; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D

    2012-03-20

    Solutions of surfactant-polymer mixtures often exhibit different foaming properties, compared to the solutions of the individual components, due to the strong tendency for formation of polymer-surfactant complexes in the bulk and on the surface of the mixed solutions. A generally shared view in the literature is that electrostatic interactions govern the formation of these complexes, for example between anionic surfactants and cationic polymers. In this study we combine foam tests with model experiments to evaluate and explain the effect of several polymer-surfactant mixtures on the foaminess and foam stability of the respective solutions. Anionic, cationic, and nonionic surfactants (SDS, C(12)TAB, and C(12)EO(23)) were studied to clarify the role of surfactant charge. Highly hydrophilic cationic and nonionic polymers (polyvinylamine and polyvinylformamide, respectivey) were chosen to eliminate the (more trivial) effect of direct hydrophobic interactions between the surfactant tails and the hydrophobic regions on the polymer chains. Our experiments showed clearly that the presence of opposite charges is not a necessary condition for boosting the foaminess and foam stability in the surfactant-polymer mixtures studied. Clear foam boosting (synergistic) effects were observed in the mixtures of cationic surfactant and cationic polymer, cationic surfactant and nonionic polymer, and anionic surfactant and nonionic polymer. The mixtures of anionic surfactant and cationic polymer showed improved foam stability, however, the foaminess was strongly reduced, as compared to the surfactant solutions without polymer. No significant synergistic or antagonistic effects were observed for the mixture of nonionic surfactant (with low critical micelle concentration) and nonionic polymer. The results from the model experiments allowed us to explain the observed trends by the different adsorption dynamics and complex formation pattern in the systems studied.

  11. Application of peptide gemini surfactants as novel solubilization surfactants for photosystems I and II of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Shuhei; Umezaki, Katsunari; Noji, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Taga, Keijiro; Dewa, Takehisa; Ito, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toshiki; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2013-09-17

    We designed novel peptide gemini surfactants (PG-surfactants), DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D, which can solubilize Photosystem I (PSI) of Thermosynecoccus elongatus and Photosystem II (PSII) of Thermosynecoccus vulcanus in an aqueous buffer solution. To assess the detailed effects of PG-surfactants on the original supramolecular membrane protein complexes and functions of PSI and PSII, we applied the surfactant exchange method to the isolated PSI and PSII. Spectroscopic properties, light-induced electron transfer activity, and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that PSI and PSII could be solubilized not only with retention of the original supramolecular protein complexes and functions but also without forming aggregates. Furthermore, measurement of the lifetime of light-induced charge-separation state in PSI revealed that both surfactants, especially DKDKC12D, displayed slight improvement against thermal denaturation below 60 °C compared with that using β-DDM. This degree of improvement in thermal resistance still seems low, implying that the peptide moieties did not interact directly with membrane protein surfaces. By conjugating an electron mediator such as methyl viologen (MV(2+)) to DKDKC12K (denoted MV-DKDKC12K), we obtained derivatives that can trap the generated reductive electrons from the light-irradiated PSI. After immobilization onto an indium tin oxide electrode, a cathodic photocurrent from the electrode to the PSI/MV-DKDKC12K conjugate was observed in response to the interval of light irradiation. These findings indicate that the PG-surfactants DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D provide not only a new class of solubilization surfactants but also insights into designing other derivatives that confer new functions on PSI and PSII.

  12. Monitoring the thinning dynamics of soap films by phase shift interferometry. The case of perfluoropolyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, Cecilia M C; Vannoni, Maurizio; Sordini, Andrea; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    An interferometric method to monitor the thinning process of vertical soap films from a water solution of surfactant materials is reported. Raw data maps of optical path difference introduced by the film are obtained by conventional phase shift interferometry. Off-line re-processing of such raw data taking into account the layered structure of soap films leads to an accurate measurement of the geometrical thickness. As an example of data acquisition and processing, the measuring chain is demonstrated on perfluoropolyether surfactants; the section profile of vertical films is monitored from drawing to black film state, and quantitative data on the dynamics of the thinning process are presented. The interferometric method proves effective to the task, and lends itself to further investigate the physical properties of soap films.

  13. Novel Highly Flexible Wormlike Micelles Formed by Cetylpyridinium Chloride and Trioxyethylene Monododecyl Ether Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Kapadia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of small nonionic hydrophobic molecule, trioxyethylene monododecyl ether (C12EO3, on the viscoelastic properties of aqueous solutions of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC is studied. As the C12EO3 concentration increases, the viscosity passes through a maximum. Dynamic rheological measurements revealed a comprehensive picture of how C12EO3 affects the different length scales in the entangled wormlike micelles. Increase in the viscosity can normally be caused by insertion of amphiphilic C12EO3 molecules into the cationic surfactant (CPC layer, or micellar swelling, caused by solubilization of very hydrophobic molecules in the micellar core. The partial phase behavior and rheology of this mixed surfactant systems is studied.

  14. Surfactant-assisted epitaxial growth and magnetism of Fe films on Cu(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, M A; Camarero, J; Miguel, J J de; Miranda, R [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Gomez, L [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Instituto de Fisica Rosario, 2000-Rosario (Argentina); Ferron, J [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Departamento de Materiales, Facultad de IngenierIa Quimica, UNL, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-07-02

    The magnetic properties of thin epitaxial layers of Fe grown on Cu(111) depend sensitively on the films' structure and morphology. A combination of experiments and numerical simulations reveals that the use of a surfactant monolayer (ML) of Pb during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth at room temperature reduces the amount of interdiffusion at the Cu-Fe interface, retards the fcc-to-bcc transformation by about 2 ML and substantially increases the films' coercivity. The origin of all these alterations to the magnetic behavior can be traced back to the structural modifications provoked by the surfactant during the early growth stages. These results open the way for the controlled fabrication of custom-designed materials with specific magnetic characteristics.

  15. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a

  16. SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

    2004-07-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactants makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluted to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. A dual-porosity version is demonstrated as a potential scale-up tool for fractured reservoirs.

  17. Modeling of surfactant transport and adsorption in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1991-04-01

    When surfactant solution is flowing in a reservoir formation, surfactants will be diluted by flow dispersion, retained in dead-end pores, adsorbed on rock surfaces, or precipitated due to ion exchange. The loss of surfactant will be detrimental to the performance of gas foam. Information of surfactant concentration profiles in reservoir formations is essential for gas foaming technique development. The major objective of this research is to investigate with mathematical models the transport and dynamic adsorption of surfactants in porous media. The mathematical models have taken into account the convection, dispersion, capacitance, and adsorption effects on concentrations of surfactants. Numerical methods and computer programs have been developed which can be used to match experimental results and to determine the characterization parameters in the models. The models can be included in foam simulation programs to calculate surfactant concentration profiles in porous media. A flow experimental method was developed to measure the effluent surfactant concentration, which will be used to determine the model parameters. Commercial foaming agent Alipal CD-128 was used in this study. Equilibrium adsorption and surfactant precipitation have been tested. Tracer solutions with a nonadsorbing solute such as dextrose and sucrose were used to determine the dispersion parameters for the experimental sandpack; thus, the adsorption of the surfactant in the test sand can be identified with an adequate model. 49 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase can be exchanged (diluted) using a laminar flow while the surface region remains unaltered. The rate of the re-equilibration is relatively slow and occurs over many tens of minutes, which is comparable with the dilution time scale of approximately 10-30 min. A detailed mathematical model, in which the rate of the desorption is determined by transport through a near-surface diffusion layer into a diluted bulk solution below, is developed and provides a good description of the time-dependent adsorption data. A key parameter of the model is the ratio of the depth of the diffusion layer, H c, to the depth of the fluid, Hf, and we find that this is related to the reduced Péclet number, Pe*, for the system, via Hc/Hf = C/Pe*1/2. Although from a highly idealized experimental arrangement, the results provide an important insight into the "rinse mechanism", which is applicable to a wide variety of domestic and industrial circumstances. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  20. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.