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Sample records for surfaces inhibit biofilm

  1. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  2. Inhibition of Adherence of Mycobacterium avium to Plumbing Surface Biofilms of Methylobacterium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Muñoz Egea

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both Mycobacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens that are found on pipe surfaces in households. However, examination of data published in prior microbiological surveys indicates that Methylobacterium spp. and Mycobacterium spp. tend not to coexist in the same household plumbing biofilms. That evidence led us to test the hypothesis that Methylobacterium spp. in biofilms could inhibit the adherence of Mycobacterium avium. Measurements of adherence of M. avium cells to stainless steel coupons using both culture and PCR-based methods showed that the presence of Methylobacterium spp. biofilms substantially reduced M. avium adherence and vice versa. That inhibition of M. avium adherence was not reduced by UV-irradiation, cyanide/azide exposure, or autoclaving of the Methylobacterium spp. biofilms. Further, there was no evidence of the production of anti-mycobacterial compounds by biofilm-grown Methylobacterium spp. cells. The results add to understanding of the role of microbial interactions in biofilms as a driving force in the proliferation or inhibition of opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing, and provide a potential new avenue by which M. avium exposures may be reduced for at-risk individuals.

  3. Limonene inhibits streptococcal biofilm formation by targeting surface-associated virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramenium, Ganapathy Ashwinkumar; Vijayakumar, Karuppiah; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-08-01

    The present study explores the efficacy of limonene, a cyclic terpene found in the rind of citrus fruits, for antibiofilm potential against species of the genus Streptococcus, which have been deeply studied worldwide owing to their multiple pathogenic efficacy. Limonene showed a concentration-dependent reduction in the biofilm formation of Streptococcus pyogenes (SF370), with minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of 400 μg ml - 1. Limonene was found to possess about 75-95 % antibiofilm activity against all the pathogens tested, viz. Streptococcus pyogenes (SF370 and 5 clinical isolates), Streptococcus mutans (UA159) and Streptococcus mitis (ATCC 6249) at 400 μg ml - 1 concentration. Microscopic analysis of biofilm architecture revealed a quantitative breach in biofilm formation. Results of a surface-coating assay suggested that the possible mode of action of limonene could be by inhibiting bacterial adhesion to surfaces, thereby preventing the biofilm formation cascade. Susceptibility of limonene-treated Streptococcus pyogenes to healthy human blood goes in unison with gene expression studies in which the mga gene was found to be downregulated. Anti-cariogenic efficacy of limonene against Streptococcus mutans was confirmed, with inhibition of acid production and downregulation of the vicR gene. Downregulation of the covR, mga and vicR genes, which play a critical role in regulating surface-associated proteins in Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus mutans, respectively, is yet further evidence to show that limonene targets surface-associated proteins. The results of physiological assays and gene expression studies clearly show that the surface-associated antagonistic mechanism of limonene also reduces surface-mediated virulence factors.

  4. Inhibition and inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms from polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces by essential oils and phenolic constituent carvacrol.

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    Soni, Kamlesh A; Oladunjoye, Ademola; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, M Wes; Silva, Juan L; Mikel, Benjy; Bailey, R Hartford

    2013-02-01

    Persistence of Salmonella biofilms within food processing environments is an important source of Salmonella contamination in the food chain. In this study, essential oils of thyme and oregano and their antimicrobial phenolic constituent carvacrol were evaluated for their ability to inhibit biofilm formation and inactivate preformed Salmonella biofilms. A crystal violet staining assay and CFU measurements were utilized to quantify biofilm cell mass, with evaluating factors such as strain variation, essential oil type, their concentrations, exposure time, as well as biofilm formation surface. Of the three Salmonella strains, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 23564 and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 19585 produced stronger biofilms than Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028. Biofilm formation by different Salmonella strains was 1.5- to 2-fold higher at 22°C than at 30 or 37°C. The presence of nonbiocidal concentrations of thyme oil, oregano oil, and phenolic carvacrol at 0.006 to 0.012% suppressed Salmonella spp. biofilm formation 2- to 4-fold, but could not completely eliminate biofilm formation. There was high correlation in terms of biofilm inactivation, as determined by the crystal violet-stained optical density (at a 562-nm wavelength) readings and the viable CFU counts. Reduction of biofilm cell mass was dependent on antimicrobial concentration. A minimum concentration of 0.05 to 0.1% of these antimicrobial agents was needed to reduce a 7-log CFU biofilm mass to a nondetectable level on both polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces within 1 h of exposure time.

  5. Antimicrobial peptide AMPNT-6 from Bacillus subtilis inhibits biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens and disrupts its preformed biofilms on both abiotic and shrimp shell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Pu, Yuehua; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rundong; Liao, Jianmeng; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Ying; Ye, Riying; Fang, Zhijia; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2017-12-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens biofilm formation is of great concern for the shrimp industry because it adheres easily to food and food-contact surfaces and is a source of persistent and unseen contamination that causes shrimp spoilage and economic losses to the shrimp industry. Different concentrations of an antimicrobial lipopeptide, the fermentation product of Bacillus subtilis, AMPNT-6, were tested for the ability to reduce adhesion and disrupt S. putrefaciens preformed biofilms on two different contact surfaces (shrimp shell, stainless steel sheet). AMPNT-6 displayed a marked dose- and time-dependent anti-adhesive effect>biofilm removal. 3MIC AMPNT-6 was able both to remove biofilm and prevent bacteria from forming biofilm in a 96-well polystyrene microplate used as the model surface. 2MIC AMPNT-6 prevented bacteria from adhering to the microplate surface to form biofilm for 3h and removed already existing biofilm within 24h. Secretion of extracellular polymeric substances incubated in LB broth for 24h by S. putrefaciens was minimal at 3× MIC AMPNT-6. Scanning electron microscopy showed that damage to S. putrefaciens bacteria by AMPNT-6 possibly contributed to the non-adherence to the surfaces. Disruption of the mature biofilm structure by AMPNT-6 contributed to biofilm removal. It is concluded that AMPNT-6 can be used effectively to prevent attachment and also detach S. putrefaciens biofilms from shrimp shells, stainless steel sheets and polystyrene surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Simvastatin inhibits Candida albicans biofilm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geoffrey; Vellucci, Vincent F; Kyc, Stephanie; Hostetter, Margaret K

    2009-12-01

    By inhibiting the conversion of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) to mevalonate, statins impair cholesterol metabolism in humans. We reasoned that statins might similarly interfere with the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol of the yeast cell membrane. As assessed by spectrophotometric and microscopic analysis, significant inhibition of biofilm production was noted after 16-h incubation with 1, 2.5, and 5 muM simvastatin, concentrations that did not affect growth, adhesion, or hyphal formation by C. albicans in vitro. Higher concentrations (10, 20, and 25 muM simvastatin) inhibited biofilm by >90% but also impaired growth. Addition of exogenous ergosterol (90 muM) overcame the effects of 1 and 2.5 muM simvastatin, suggesting that at least one mechanism of inhibition is interference with ergosterol biosynthesis. Clinical isolates from blood, skin, and mucosal surfaces produced biofilms; biofilms from bloodstream isolates were similarly inhibited by simvastatin. In the absence of fungicidal activity, simvastatin's interruption of a critical step in an essential metabolic pathway, highly conserved from yeast to man, has unexpected effects on biofilm production by a eukaryotic pathogen.

  7. Ginger Extract Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger’s ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39–56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  8. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...

  9. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  10. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Kamuthachad, Ludthawun; Anthapanya, Methinee; Samakchan, Natthapon; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Potup, Pachuen; Ferrante, Antonio; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2016-04-01

    Although kaffir lime has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and antileukemic activity, little is known about the antimicrobial effect of kaffir lime extract. Because Streptococcus mutans has been known to cause biofilm formation, it has been considered the most important causative pathogen of dental caries. Thus, the effective control of its effects on the oral biofilm is the key to the prevention of dental caries. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on biofilm formation and its antibacterial activity on S. mutans. We examined the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans. For the investigation we used a kaffir lime extract with high phenolic content. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract was determined by broth microdilution assay. The inhibitory effect of the test substances on biofilm formation was also investigated by biofilm formation assay and qRT-PCR of biofilm formation-associated genes. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits the growth of S. mutans, corresponding to the activity of an antibiotic, ampicillin. Formation of biofilm by S. mutans was also inhibited by the extract. These results were confirmed by the down-regulation of genes associated with the biofilm formation. The findings highlight the ability of kaffir lime leaves extract to inhibit S. mutans activity, which may be beneficial in the prevention of biofilm formation on dental surface, reducing dental plaque and decreasing the chance of dental carries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum lipoteichoic acid inhibits biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki Bum; Baik, Jung Eun; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent oral disease and Streptococcus mutans is the known primary etiologic agent of dental caries that initiates biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. Although some Lactobacillus strains inhibit biofilm formation of oral pathogenic bacteria, the molecular mechanisms by which lactobacilli inhibit bacterial biofilm formation are not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum lipoteichoic acid (Lp.LTA) inhibited the biofilm formation of S. mutans on polystyrene plates, hydroxyapatite discs, and dentin slices without affecting the bacterial growth. Lp.LTA interferes with sucrose decomposition of S. mutans required for the production of exopolysaccharide, which is a main component of biofilm. Lp.LTA also attenuated the biding of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran to S. mutans, which is known to have a high affinity to exopolysaccharide on S. mutans. Dealanylated Lp.LTA did not inhibit biofilm formation of S. mutans implying that D-alanine moieties in the Lp.LTA structure were crucial for inhibition. Collectively, these results suggest that Lp.LTA attenuates S. mutans biofilm formation and could be used to develop effective anticaries agents. PMID:29420616

  12. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

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    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

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    Qin, Zhiqiang [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 86 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan; Chi, Qijin [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mortensen, Ninell P. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Qu, Di [Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Molin, Soren [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens, E-mail: ju@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-07-15

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S. epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamide derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four compounds evoke significant inhibitory effects on the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms with compounds 47 and 73 being most effective. None of the compounds were found to inhibit growth of S. epidermidis in liquid cultures. Bacteria attached to the substrate when exposed to the compounds were not affected indicating that these compounds inhibit initial adhesion. These results suggest a pretreatment for medically implanted surfaces that can prevent the biofilm formation and reduce infection.

  15. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan; Chi, Qijin; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Qu, Di; Molin, Soren; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S. epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamide derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four compounds evoke significant inhibitory effects on the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms with compounds 47 and 73 being most effective. None of the compounds were found to inhibit growth of S. epidermidis in liquid cultures. Bacteria attached to the substrate when exposed to the compounds were not affected indicating that these compounds inhibit initial adhesion. These results suggest a pretreatment for medically implanted surfaces that can prevent the biofilm formation and reduce infection.

  16. Inhibition of biofilm formation on the surface of water storage containers using biosand zeolite silver-impregnated clay granular and silver impregnated porous pot filtration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budeli, Phumudzo; Moropeng, Resoketswe Charlotte; Mpenyana-Monyatsi, Lizzy; Momba, Maggie Ndombo Benteke

    2018-01-01

    Development of biofilms occurring on the inner surface of storage vessels offers a suitable medium for the growth of microorganisms and consequently contributes to the deterioration of treated drinking water quality in homes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the two point-of-use technologies (biosand zeolite silver-impregnated clay granular (BSZ-SICG) filter and silver-impregnated porous pot (SIPP) filter) deployed in a rural community of South Africa could inhibit the formation of biofilm on the surface of plastic-based containers generally used by rural households for the storage of their drinking water. Culture-based methods and molecular techniques were used to detect the indicator bacteria (Total coliforms, faecal coliform, E. coli) and pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and Vibrio cholerae) in intake water and on the surface of storage vessels containing treated water. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to visualize the development of biofilm. Results revealed that the surface water source used by the Makwane community was heavily contaminated and harboured unacceptably high counts of bacteria (heterotrophic plate count: 4.4-4.3 Log10 CFU/100mL, total coliforms: 2.2 Log10 CFU/100 mL-2.1 Log10 CFU/100 mL, faecal coliforms: 1.9 Log10 CFU/100 mL-1.8 Log10 CFU/100 mL, E. coli: 1.7 Log10 CFU/100 mL-1.6 Log10 CFU/100 mL, Salmonella spp.: 3 Log10 CFU/100 mL -8 CFU/100 mL; Shigella spp. and Vibrio cholerae had 1.0 Log10 CFU/100 mL and 0.8 Log10 CFU/100 mL respectively). Biofilm formation was apparent on the surface of the storage containers with untreated water within 24 h. The silver nanoparticles embedded in the clay of the filtration systems provided an effective barrier for the inhibition of biofilm formation on the surface of household water storage containers. Biofilm formation occurred on the surface of storage plastic vessels containing drinking water treated with the SIPP filter between 14 and 21 days, and on those

  17. Inhibition of biofilm formation on the surface of water storage containers using biosand zeolite silver-impregnated clay granular and silver impregnated porous pot filtration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moropeng, Resoketswe Charlotte; Mpenyana-Monyatsi, Lizzy; Momba, Maggie Ndombo Benteke

    2018-01-01

    Development of biofilms occurring on the inner surface of storage vessels offers a suitable medium for the growth of microorganisms and consequently contributes to the deterioration of treated drinking water quality in homes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the two point-of-use technologies (biosand zeolite silver-impregnated clay granular (BSZ-SICG) filter and silver-impregnated porous pot (SIPP) filter) deployed in a rural community of South Africa could inhibit the formation of biofilm on the surface of plastic-based containers generally used by rural households for the storage of their drinking water. Culture-based methods and molecular techniques were used to detect the indicator bacteria (Total coliforms, faecal coliform, E. coli) and pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and Vibrio cholerae) in intake water and on the surface of storage vessels containing treated water. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to visualize the development of biofilm. Results revealed that the surface water source used by the Makwane community was heavily contaminated and harboured unacceptably high counts of bacteria (heterotrophic plate count: 4.4–4.3 Log10 CFU/100mL, total coliforms: 2.2 Log10 CFU/100 mL—2.1 Log10 CFU/100 mL, faecal coliforms: 1.9 Log10 CFU/100 mL—1.8 Log10 CFU/100 mL, E. coli: 1.7 Log10 CFU/100 mL—1.6 Log10 CFU/100 mL, Salmonella spp.: 3 Log10 CFU/100 mL -8 CFU/100 mL; Shigella spp. and Vibrio cholerae had 1.0 Log10 CFU/100 mL and 0.8 Log10 CFU/100 mL respectively). Biofilm formation was apparent on the surface of the storage containers with untreated water within 24 h. The silver nanoparticles embedded in the clay of the filtration systems provided an effective barrier for the inhibition of biofilm formation on the surface of household water storage containers. Biofilm formation occurred on the surface of storage plastic vessels containing drinking water treated with the SIPP filter between 14 and 21 days, and on

  18. Effect of chlorine treatment on inhibition of E. coli serogroup O2 incorporation into 7-day-old biofilm on polyvinylchloride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, P; Dey, S; Huff, G; Zhang, W; Phillips, G K; Watkins, S

    2017-08-01

    Poultry waterlines are constructed using polyvinylchloride (PVC) material on which bacterial biofilm can easily form. Biofilm can harbor pathogens including avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains. An in vitro evaluation was performed to determine if E. coli sero group O2 (avian pathogenic) could attach on a PVC surface that had pre-formed biofilm and if this phenomenon could be affected when water was treated with chlorine. Initially, biofilm growth was induced in PVC test coupons (15.16 cm2) for a 7-day period mimicking the waterline scenario in the first wk of poultry brooding; and then this biofilm was challenged with E. coli O2 seeded water in presence/absence of chlorine treatment. After rinsing, test coupons were sampled for bacterial (APC) and E. coli O2 enumeration at various occasions post seeding the pathogen and chlorine treatment. Day 7 APC recovered from coupons was 4.35 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 1 and 3.66 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 2. E. coli O2 was not recovered from chlorine treated test coupons (P  3 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 1 and > 2 log10 cfu/cm2 in trial 2). This study suggests that E. coli O2 can incorporate into pre-formed biofilm on a PVC surface within 24 h if water sanitation is not present, and the attachment time of the pathogen can prolong in the absence of already formed biofilm. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Fresh garlic extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Ratthawongjirakul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the leading aetiological pathogens of nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces causing biofilm-associated infections. Within the biofilm, these bacteria might develop persistent and antimicrobial resistant characteristics resulting in chronic infections and treatment failures. Garlic exhibits broad pharmaceutical properties and inhibitory activities against S. aureus. We investigated the effects of aqueous fresh garlic extract on biofilm formation in S. aureus ATCC25923 and MRSA strains under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions. The viable bacteria and biofilm levels were quantified through colony count and crystal violet staining, respectively. The use of fresh garlic extract under both conditions significantly inhibited biofilm formation in S. aureus strains ATCC25923 and MRSA. Garlic could be developed as either a prophylactic or therapeutic agent to manage S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  20. Inhibition strategies of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms-current knowledge and future outlooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloketuyi, Sandra F; Khan, Fazlurrahman

    2017-09-01

    There is an increasing trend in the food industry on the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and inhibition. This is attributed to its easy survival on contact surfaces, resistance to disinfectants or antibiotics and growth under the stringent condition used for food processing and preservation thereby leading to food contamination products by direct or indirect exposure. Though, there is a lack of conclusive evidences about the mechanism of biofilm formation, in this review, the concept of biofilm formation and various chemical, physical, and green technology approaches to prevent or control the biofilm formed is discussed. State-of-the-art approaches ranging from the application of natural to synthetic molecules with high effectiveness and non-toxicity targeted at the different steps of biofilm formation could positively influence the biofilm inhibition in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

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    S. Chusri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5 μg/mL could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm.

  2. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Sompetch, K; Mukdee, S; Jansrisewangwong, S; Srichai, T; Maneenoon, K; Limsuwan, S; Voravuthikunchai, S P

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63-5 μg/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL) for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm.

  3. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  4. Kaempferol Inhibits the Primary Attachment Phase of Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Di; Wang, Dacheng; Cao, Fengjiao; Xiang, Hua; Mu, Dan; Cao, Junjie; Li, Bangbang; Zhong, Ling; Dong, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Xiaobo; Wang, Lin; Wang, Tiedong

    2017-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms on surfaces makes Staphylococcus aureus the main pathogenic factor in implanted medical device infections. The aim of this study was to discover a biofilm inhibitor distinct from the antibiotics used to prevent infections resulting from S. aureus biofilms. Here, we describe kaempferol, a small molecule with anti-biofilm activity that specifically inhibited the formation of S. aureus biofilms. Crystal violet (CV) staining and fluorescence microscopy clearly showed that 64 μg/ml kaempferol inhibited biofilm formation by 80%. Meanwhile, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and growth curve results indicated that kaempferol had no antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strain. Kaempferol inhibited the primary attachment phase of biofilm formation, as determined by a fibrinogen-binding assay. Moreover, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that kaempferol reduced the activity of S. aureus sortaseA (SrtA) and the expression of adhesion-related genes. Based on these results, kaempferol provides a starting point for the development of novel anti-biofilm drugs, which may decrease the risk of bacterial drug resistance, to prevent S. aureus biofilm-related infections.

  5. Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus on Various Surfaces and Their Resistance to Chlorine Sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Su; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sook-Young; Lee, Sun-Young

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of material types (polystyrene, polypropylene, glass, and stainless steel) and glucose addition on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, and the relationship between biofilm formation measured by crystal violet (CV) staining and the number of biofilm cells determined by cell counts was studied. We also evaluated the efficacy of chlorine sanitizer on inhibiting various different types of S. aureus biofilms on the surface of stainless steel. Levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus were higher on hydrophilic surfaces (glass and stainless steel) than on hydrophobic surfaces (polypropylene and polystyrene). With the exception of biofilm formed on glass, the addition of glucose in broth significantly increased the biofilm formation of S. aureus on all surfaces and for all tested strains (P ≤ 0.05). The number of biofilm cells was not correlated with the biomass of the biofilms determined using the CV staining method. The efficacy of chlorine sanitizer against biofilm of S. aureus was not significantly different depending on types of biofilm (P > 0.05). Therefore, further studies are needed in order to determine an accurate method quantifying levels of bacterial biofilm and to evaluate the resistance of bacterial biofilm on the material surface. Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus on the surface was different depending on the surface characteristics and S. aureus strains. There was low correlation between crystal violet staining method and viable counts technique for measuring levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus on the surfaces. These results could provide helpful information for finding and understanding the quantification method and resistance of bacterial biofilm on the surface. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Minocycline Inhibits Candida albicans Budded-to-Hyphal-Form Transition and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakado, Sanae; Takatori, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Takashi

    2017-09-25

    Candida albicans frequently causes bloodstream infections; its budded-to-hyphalform transition (BHT) and biofilm formation are major contributors to virulence. During an analysis of antibacterial compounds that inhibit C. albicans BHT, we found that the tetracycline derivative minocycline inhibited BHT and subsequent biofilm formation. Minocycline decreased expression of hypha-specific genes HWP1 and ECE1, and adhesion factor gene ALS3 of C. albicans. In addition, minocycline decreased cell surface hydrophobicity and the extracellular β-glucan level in biofilms. Minocycline has been widely used for catheter antibiotic lock therapy to prevent bacterial infection; this compound may also be prophylactically effective against Candida infection.

  7. Maggot excretions inhibit biofilm formation on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; van de Veerdonk, Mariëlle C; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Schreurs, Marco W J; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2010-10-01

    Biofilm-associated infections in trauma surgery are difficult to treat with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is important to develop new treatment modalities. Maggots in captured bags, which are permeable for larval excretions/secretions, aid in healing severe, infected wounds, suspect for biofilm formation. Therefore we presumed maggot excretions/secretions would reduce biofilm formation. We studied biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterobacter cloacae on polyethylene, titanium, and stainless steel. We compared the quantities of biofilm formation between the bacterial species on the various biomaterials and the quantity of biofilm formation after various incubation times. Maggot excretions/secretions were added to existing biofilms to examine their effect. Comb-like models of the biomaterials, made to fit in a 96-well microtiter plate, were incubated with bacterial suspension. The formed biofilms were stained in crystal violet, which was eluted in ethanol. The optical density (at 595 nm) of the eluate was determined to quantify biofilm formation. Maggot excretions/secretions were pipetted in different concentrations to (nonstained) 7-day-old biofilms, incubated 24 hours, and finally measured. The strongest biofilms were formed by S. aureus and S. epidermidis on polyethylene and the weakest on titanium. The highest quantity of biofilm formation was reached within 7 days for both bacteria. The presence of excretions/secretions reduced biofilm formation on all biomaterials. A maximum of 92% of biofilm reduction was measured. Our observations suggest maggot excretions/secretions decrease biofilm formation and could provide a new treatment for biofilm formation on infected biomaterials.

  8. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Alexander K; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1–100 mm s −1 ), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ∼ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ∼ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ∼ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ∼ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments. (paper)

  9. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  10. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan

    2009-01-01

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S....... epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both...... air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamicle derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four...

  11. Biofilm inhibition activity of compounds isolated from two Eunicea species collected at the Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Martínez Díaz

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilm has a primary role in the pathogenesis of diseases and in the attachment of multicellular organisms to a fouled surface. Because of that, the control of bacterial biofilms has been identified as an important target. In the present study, five lipid compounds isolated from soft coral Eunicea sp. and three terpenoids together with a mixture of sterols from Eunicea fusca collected at the Colombian Caribbean Sea showed different effectiveness against biofilm formation by three marine bacteria associated with immersed fouled surfaces, Ochrobactrum pseudogringnonense,Alteromona macleodii and Vibrio harveyi, and against two known biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The pure compounds were characterized by NMR, HRESI-MS, HRGC-MS and optical rotation. The most effective compounds were batyl alcohol (1 and fuscoside E peracetate (6, acting against four strains without affecting their microbial growth. Compound 1 showed biofilm inhibition greater than 30% against A. macleodii, and up to 60% against O. pseudogringnonense,V. harveyi and S. aureus. Compound 6 inhibited O. pseudogringnonense and V. harveyi between 25 and 50%, and P. aeruginosa or S. aureus up to 60% at 0.5 mg/ml. The results suggest that these compounds exhibit specific biofilm inhibition with lower antimicrobial effect against the bacterial species assayed.

  12. Axenic aerobic biofilms inhibit corrosion of copper and aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, A; Ornek, D; Duarte, D A; Lee, C C; Mansfeld, F B; Wood, T K

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed copper and aluminum alloy 2024 in modified Baar's medium has been studied with continuous reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. An axenic aerobic biofilm of either Pseudomonas fragi K or Bacillus brevis 18 was able to lessen corrosion as evidenced by a consistent 20-fold increase in the low-frequency impedance value of copper as well as by a consistent four- to seven-fold increase in the polarization resistance of aluminum 2024 after six days exposure compared to sterile controls. This is the first report of axenic aerobic biofilms inhibiting generalized corrosion of copper and aluminum. Addition of the representative sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio vulgaris (to simulate consortia corrosion behavior) to either the P. fragi K or B. brevis 18 protective biofilm on copper increased the corrosion to that of the sterile control unless antibiotic (ampicillin) was added to inhibit the growth of SRB in the biofilm.

  13. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inhibits Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2, synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  15. Biofilm-Forming Staphylococcus epidermidis Expressing Vancomycin Resistance Early after Adhesion to a Metal Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Sakimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated biofilm formation and time of vancomycin (VCM resistance expression after adhesion to a metal surface in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis with a VCM MIC of 1 μg/mL was used. The bacteria were made to adhere to a stainless steel washer and treated with VCM at different times and concentrations. VCM was administered 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after adhesion. The amount of biofilm formed was evaluated based on the biofilm coverage rates (BCRs before and after VCM administration, bacterial viability in biofilm was visually observed using the fluorescence staining method, and the viable bacterial count in biofilm was measured. The VCM concentration required to decrease BCR significantly compared with that of VCM-untreated bacteria was 4 μg/mL, even in the 0 hr group. In the 4 and 8 hr groups, VCM could not inhibit biofilm growth even at 1,024 μg/mL. In the 8 hr group, viable bacteria remained in biofilm at a count of 104 CFU even at a high VCM concentration (1,024 μg/mL. It was suggested that biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expresses resistance to VCM early after adhesion to a metal surface. Resistance increased over time after adhesion as the biofilm formed, and strong resistance was expressed 4–8 hours after adhesion.

  16. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, A K; Hochbaum, A I; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, J

    2011-01-01

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  17. Synergistic inhibition of Streptococcal biofilm by ribose and xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Jin; Kim, Se Chul; Kim, Jinkyung; Do, Aejin; Han, Se Yeong; Lee, Bhumgey David; Lee, Hyun Ho; Lee, Min Chan; Lee, So Hui; Oh, Taejun; Park, Sangbin; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are the major causative agents of human dental caries. Therefore, the removal or inhibition of these streptococcal biofilms is essential for dental caries prevention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of ribose treatment alone or in combination with xylitol on streptococcal biofilm formation for both species. Furthermore, we examined the expression of genes responsible for dextran-dependent aggregation (DDAG). In addition, we investigated whether ribose affects the biofilm formation of xylitol-insensitive streptococci, which results from long-term exposure to xylitol. The viability of streptococci biofilms formed in a 24-well polystyrene plate was quantified by fluorescent staining with the LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability and counting kit, which was followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. The effects of ribose and/or xylitol on the mRNA expression of DDAG-responsible genes, gbpC and dblB, was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Our data showed that ribose and other pentose molecules significantly inhibited streptococcal biofilm formation and the expression of DDAG-responsible genes. In addition, co-treatment with ribose and xylitol decreased streptococcal biofilm formation to a further extent than ribose or xylitol treatment alone in both streptococcal species. Furthermore, ribose attenuated the increase of xylitol-insensitive streptococcal biofilm, which results in the reduced difference of biofilm formation between S. mutans that are sensitive and insensitive to xylitol. These data suggest that pentose may be used as an additive for teeth-protective materials or in sweets. Furthermore, ribose co-treatment with xylitol might help to increase the anti-cariogenic efficacy of xylitol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei on Candida biofilm of denture surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Gyun; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans biofilm is associated with denture-related stomatitis and oral candidiasis of elderly. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria and have antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of various probiotics against C. albicans and the inhibitory effects of probiotics on Candida biofilm on the denture surface. The spent culture media of various probiotics were investigated the antifungal efficacy against C. albicans. Candida biofilm was formed on a denture base resin and was then treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei. Also, the biofilms of L. rhamnosus and L. casei were formed and were sequentially treated with C. albicans. Colony-forming units of C. albicans on the denture surface were counted after spreading on agar plate. The denture base resin was treated with the spent culture media for 30days, after which the denture surface roughness was analyzed with an atomic force microscope. L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited stronger antifungal activity than other probiotics. The spent culture medium of L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited the antifungal activity against blastoconidia and biofilm of C. albicans. L. rhamnosus and L. casei showed the antifungal activity against Candida biofilm, and the biofilm of L. rhamnosus and L. casei inhibited formation of Candida biofilm on denture surface. Neither of the probiotics affected the surface roughness of the denture base resin. L. rhamnosus and L. casei may be the ideal probiotics for the prevention and treatment of denture-related stomatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular DNA is essential for maintaining Bordetella biofilm integrity on abiotic surfaces and in the upper respiratory tract of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Conover

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. In this report, we investigated the function of DNA in Bordetella biofilm development. We show that DNA is a significant component of Bordetella biofilm matrix. Addition of DNase I at the initiation of biofilm growth inhibited biofilm formation. Treatment of pre-established mature biofilms formed under both static and flow conditions with DNase I led to a disruption of the biofilm biomass. We next investigated whether eDNA played a role in biofilms formed in the mouse respiratory tract. DNase I treatment of nasal biofilms caused considerable dissolution of the biofilm biomass. In conclusion, these results suggest that eDNA is a crucial structural matrix component of both in vitro and in vivo formed Bordetella biofilms. This is the first evidence for the ability of DNase I to disrupt bacterial biofilms formed on host organs.

  20. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation

  1. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Usup, Gires [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  2. Inhibition effect of cashew stem bark extract (Anacardium Occidentale L. on biofilm formation of Streptococcus sanguinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizni Amaliah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilm is communities of microorganisms attached to solid surface and enclosed in extracellular matrix that protected microorganisms from antibacterial agents and host defense. One of bacteria might have a role in initial colonization of biofilm formation is Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis. Previous studies showed that cashew stem bark extract (Anacardium occidentale L. can inhibit the growth of Streptococcus strains. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the inhibition effect of cashew (Anacardium occidentale L. stem bark ethanol extract on biofilm formation of S. sanguinis. Methods: Streptococcus sanguinis grown in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI + 2% sucrose medium by using microplate polystyrene 96 wells. The samples were divided into 3 groups, 5% polyethyleneglycol (PEG as negative control, cashew stem bark extract (concentration 3.125 mg/ml, 6.25 mg/ml, 9.375 mg/ml, and 12.5 mg/ml, and 0.12% chlorhexidine (as positive control. Biofilm was stained by 1% crystal violet. Afterwards, optical density (OD of samples were measured by microplate reader λ 595 nm. The data of biofilm formation inhibition percentage were analyzed by one way ANOVA and then continued by Least Significant Difference (LSD test. Results: The result of one way ANOVA showed that there were significant differences in inhibition of S. sanguinis biofilm formation (p<0.05. LSD test showed that concentration extract 3.125 mg/ml had significant difference with concentration 9.375 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml. Reciprocally, concentration 6.25 mg/ml had significant difference with concentration 9.375 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml. Conclusion: Cashew stem bark extract was able to inhibit biofilm formation of S. sanguinis.Latar belakang: Biofilm merupakan sekumpulan mikroorganisme yang melekat pada permukaan solid dan diselubungi oleh matriks ekstraseluler yang melindungi mikroorganisme dari bahan-bahan antibakteri dan sel-sel pertahanan tubuh. Salah satu bakteri yang

  3. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  4. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharide production, and virulence by an oxazole derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lulu; Ren, Zhi; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, a biofilm-related oral disease, is a result of disruption of the microbial ecological balance in the oral environment. Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the primary cariogenic bacteria, produces glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The EPSs, especially water-insoluble glucans, contribute to the formation of dental plaque, biofilm stability, and structural integrity, by allowing bacteria to adhere to tooth surfaces and supplying the bacteria with protection against noxious stimuli and other environmental attacks. The identification of novel alternatives that selectively inhibit cariogenic organisms without suppressing oral microbial residents is required. The goal of the current study is to investigate the influence of an oxazole derivative on S. mutans biofilm formation and the development of dental caries in rats, given that oxazole and its derivatives often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. Our data shows that one particular oxazole derivative, named 5H6, inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms and prevented synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides by antagonizing Gtfs in vitro, without affecting the growth of the bacteria. In addition, topical applications with the inhibitor resulted in diminished incidence and severity of both smooth and sulcal surface caries in vivo with a lower percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque compared to the control group (P mutans.

  5. Surface conditioning with Escherichia coli cell wall components can reduce biofilm formation by decreasing initial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces pose major risks to human health. Non-efficient cleaning of equipment surfaces and piping can act as a conditioning layer that affects the development of a new biofilm post-disinfection. We have previously shown that surface conditioning with cell extracts could reduce biofilm formation. In the present work, we hypothesized that E. coli cell wall components could be implicated in this phenomena and therefore mannose, myristic acid and palmitic acid were tested as conditioning agents. To evaluate the effect of surface conditioning and flow topology on biofilm formation, assays were performed in agitated 96-well microtiter plates and in a parallel plate flow chamber (PPFC, both operated at the same average wall shear stress (0.07 Pa as determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD. It was observed that when the 96-well microtiter plate and the PPFC were used to form biofilms at the same shear stress, similar results were obtained. This shows that the referred hydrodynamic feature may be a good scale-up parameter from high-throughput platforms to larger scale flow cell systems as the PPFC used in this study. Mannose did not have any effect on E. coli biofilm formation, but myristic and palmitic acid inhibited biofilm development by decreasing cell adhesion (in about 50%. These results support the idea that in food processing equipment where biofilm formation is not critical below a certain threshold, bacterial lysis and adsorption of cell components to the surface may reduce biofilm buildup and extend the operational time.

  6. Curcumin reduces Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation by inhibiting sortase A activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Ping; Chen, Min Wei

    2013-10-01

    Sortase A is an enzyme responsible for the covalent attachment of Pac proteins to the cell wall in Streptococcus mutans. It has been shown to play a role in modulating the surface properties and the biofilm formation and influence the cariogenicity of S. mutans. Curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric, was reported to be an inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus sortase A. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory ability of curcumin against S. mutans sortase A and the effect of curcumin for biofilm formation. The antimicrobial activity of the curcumin to the S. mutans and inhibitory ability of the curcumin against the purified sortase A in vitro were detected. Western-blot and real-time PCR were used to analysis the sortase A mediated Pac protein changes when the S. mutans was cultured with curcumin. The curcumin on the S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by biofilm formation analysis. Curcumin can inhibit purified S. mutans sortase A with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of (10.2±0.7)μmol/l, which is lower than minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 175μmol/l. Curcumin (15μmol/l) was found to release the Pac protein to the supernatant and reduce S. mutans biofilm formation. These results indicated that curcumin is an S. mutans sortase A inhibitor and has promising anti-caries characteristics through an anti-adhesion-mediated mechanism. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of molecularly imprinted polymers to block quorum sensing and inhibit bacterial biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Luyao; Feng, Shaolong; de la Fuente-Nunez, Cesar; Hancock, Robert E W; Lu, Xiaonan

    2018-05-16

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for most clinical infections and show increased antimicrobial resistance. In this study, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were developed to specifically capture prototypical quorum sensing autoinducers [i.e., N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12AHL)], interrupt quorum sensing, and subsequently inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human nosocomial pathogen. The synthesis of MIPs was optimized by considering the amount and type of the functional monomers itaconic acid (IA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). IA-based MIPs showed high adsorption affinity towards 3-oxo-C12AHL with an imprinting factor of 1.68. Compared to IA-based MIPs, the adsorption capacity of HEMA-based MIPs was improved 5-fold. HEMA-based MIPs significantly reduced biofilm formation (by ~65%), while biofilm suppression by IA-based MIPs was neutralized due to increased bacterial attachment. The developed MIPs represent promising alternative biofilm intervention agents that can be applied to surfaces relevant to clinical settings and food processing equipment.

  8. Biofilm Inhibition by Novel Natural Product- and Biocide-Containing Coatings Using High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural products (NPs as possible alternative biocidal compounds for use in antifouling coatings has been the focus of research over the past decades. Despite the importance of this field, the efficacy of a given NP against biofilm (mainly bacteria and diatoms formation is tested with the NP being in solution, while almost no studies test the effect of an NP once incorporated into a coating system. The development of a novel bioassay to assess the activity of NP-containing and biocide-containing coatings against marine biofilm formation has been achieved using a high-throughput microplate reader and highly sensitive confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, as well as nucleic acid staining. Juglone, an isolated NP that has previously shown efficacy against bacterial attachment, was incorporated into a simple coating matrix. Biofilm formation over 48 h was assessed and compared against coatings containing the NP and the commonly used booster biocide, cuprous oxide. Leaching of the NP from the coating was quantified at two time points, 24 h and 48 h, showing evidence of both juglone and cuprous oxide being released. Results from the microplate reader showed that the NP coatings exhibited antifouling efficacy, significantly inhibiting biofilm formation when compared to the control coatings, while NP coatings and the cuprous oxide coatings performed equally well. CLSM results and COMSTAT analysis on biofilm 3D morphology showed comparable results when the NP coatings were tested against the controls, with higher biofilm biovolume and maximum thickness being found on the controls. This new method proved to be repeatable and insightful and we believe it is applicable in antifouling and other numerous applications where interactions between biofilm formation and surfaces is of interest.

  9. Essential Oils and Eugenols Inhibit Biofilm Formation and the Virulence of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Gwon, Giyeon; Kim, Soon-Il; Park, Jae Gyu; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) has caused foodborne outbreaks worldwide and the bacterium forms antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms. We investigated the abilities of various plant essential oils and their components to inhibit biofilm formation by EHEC. Bay, clove, pimento berry oils and their major common constituent eugenol at 0.005% (v/v) were found to markedly inhibit EHEC biofilm formation without affecting planktonic cell growth. In addition, three other eugenol derivatives isoeugenol, 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol, and 4-ethylguaiacol had antibiofilm activity, indicating that the C-1 hydroxyl unit, the C-2 methoxy unit, and C-4 alkyl or alkane chain on the benzene ring of eugenol play important roles in antibiofilm activity. Interestingly, these essential oils and eugenol did not inhibit biofilm formation by three laboratory E. coli K-12 strains that reduced curli fimbriae production. Transcriptional analysis showed that eugenol down-regulated 17 of 28 genes analysed, including curli genes (csgABDFG), type I fimbriae genes (fimCDH) and ler-controlled toxin genes (espD, escJ, escR, and tir), which are required for biofilm formation and the attachment and effacement phenotype. In addition, biocompatible poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) coatings containing clove oil or eugenol exhibited efficient biofilm inhibition on solid surfaces. In a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model, clove oil and eugenol attenuated the virulence of EHEC. PMID:27808174

  10. Biofilm retention on surfaces with variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms on food processing equipment cause food spoilage and pose a hazard to consumers. The bacterial community on steel surfaces in a butcher’s shop was characterized, and bacteria representative of this community enriched from minced pork were used to study biofilm retention. Stainless steel...

  11. Surface proteins and the formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Chang, James; Rimal, Binayak; Yang, Hao; Schaefer, Jacob

    2018-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms pose a serious clinical threat as reservoirs for persistent infections. Despite this clinical significance, the composition and mechanism of formation of S. aureus biofilms are unknown. To address these problems, we used solid-state NMR to examine S. aureus (SA113), a strong biofilm-forming strain. We labeled whole cells and cell walls of planktonic cells, young biofilms formed for 12-24h after stationary phase, and more mature biofilms formed for up to 60h after stationary phase. All samples were labeled either by (i) [ 15 N]glycine and l-[1- 13 C]threonine, or in separate experiments, by (ii) l-[2- 13 C, 15 N]leucine. We then measured 13 C- 15 N direct bonds by C{N} rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR). The increase in peptidoglycan stems that have bridges connected to a surface protein was determined directly by a cell-wall double difference (biofilm REDOR difference minus planktonic REDOR difference). This procedure eliminates errors arising from differences in 15 N isotopic enrichments and from the routing of 13 C label from threonine degradation to glycine. For both planktonic cells and the mature biofilm, 20% of pentaglycyl bridges are not cross-linked and are potential surface-protein attachment sites. None of these sites has a surface protein attached in the planktonic cells, but one-fourth have a surface protein attached in the mature biofilm. Moreover, the leucine-label shows that the concentration of β-strands in leucine-rich regions doubles in the mature biofilm. Thus, a primary event in establishing a S. aureus biofilm is extensive decoration of the cell surface with surface proteins that are linked covalently to the cell wall and promote cell-cell adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hygrocin C from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSGAA 0027 inhibits biofilm formation in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SCSGAB0082 isolated from South China Sea gorgonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Nong, Xu-Hua; Amin, Muhammad; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Several ansamycins have been reported to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation and accelerate the eradication of developed biofilms, but little is known about the effect of hygrocin C, an ansamycin, on bacterial biofilm formation. Here, hygrocin C was isolated from the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSGAA 0027 and reported for the first time to be capable of inhibiting the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SCSGAB0082 with the production of anti-microbial lipopeptides from South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa at concentrations of less than minimum inhibitory concentrations. Moreover, hygrocin C also promoted the eradication of developed biofilms, affected the biofilm architecture, and lowered the extracellular polymeric matrix formation, cell motility, and surface hydrophobicity in B. amyloliquefaciens, which was in accordance with the inhibition of biofilm formation. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that hygrocin C altered the transcripts of several genes associated with bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar, two-component system and the synthesis of arginine and histidine, which are important for bacterial biofilm formation. In conclusion, hygrocin C could be used as a potential biofilm inhibitor against S. aureus and B. amyloliquefaciens. But further genetic investigations are needed to provide more details for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effects of hygrocin C on B. amyloliquefaciens biofilm formation.

  13. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Biofilms Inhibit the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Yi, Li; Yu, Ningwei; Wang, Guangyu; Ma, Zhe; Lin, Huixing; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) has emerged as a clinical problem in recent years. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an important mechanism for the trapping and killing of pathogens that are resistant to phagocytosis. Biofilm formation can protect bacteria from being killed by phagocytes. Until now, there have only been a few studies that focused on the interactions between bacterial biofilms and NETs. SS2 in both a biofilm state and a planktonic cell state were incubated with phagocytes and NETs, and bacterial survival was assessed. DNase I and cytochalasin B were used to degrade NET DNA or suppress phagocytosis, respectively. Extracellular DNA was stained with impermeable fluorescent dye to quantify NET formation. Biofilm formation increased up to 6-fold in the presence of neutrophils, and biofilms were identified in murine tissue. Both planktonic and biofilm cells induced neutrophils chemotaxis to the infection site, with neutrophils increasing by 85.1 and 73.8%, respectively. The bacteria in biofilms were not phagocytized. The bactericidal efficacy of NETs on the biofilms and planktonic cells were equal; however, the biofilm extracellular matrix can inhibit NET release. Although biofilms inhibit NETs release, NETs appear to be an important mechanism to eliminate SS2 biofilms. This knowledge advances the understanding of biofilms and may aid in the development of treatments for persistent infections with a biofilm component.

  14. Surface Characteristics and Biofilm Development on Selected Dental Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung H. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoral adjustment and polishing of dental ceramics often affect their surface characteristics, promoting increased roughness and consequent biofilm growth. This study correlated surface roughness to biofilm development with four commercially available ceramic materials. Methods. Four ceramic materials (Vita Enamic®, Lava™ Ultimate, Vitablocs Mark II, and Wieland Reflex® were prepared as per manufacturer instructions. Seventeen specimens of each material were adjusted and polished to simulate clinical intraoral procedures and another seventeen remained unaltered. Specimens were analysed by SEM imaging, confocal microscopy, and crystal violet assay. Results. SEM images showed more irregular surface topography in adjusted specimens than their respective controls. Surface roughness (Ra values were greater in all materials following adjustments. All adjusted materials with the exception of Vitablocs Mark II promoted significantly greater biofilm growth relative to controls. Conclusion. Simulated intraoral polishing methods resulted in greater surface roughness and increased biofilm accumulation.

  15. Biofilm Formation of Listeria monocytogenes on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mahdavi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is considered as a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen which can lead to serious infections, especially in newborns, elderly, pregnant, and immunocompromised people. The organism has been isolated from many foods and may cause meningitis, septicemia and abortion in pregnant women. Also L. monocytogenes forms biofilms on many food contact surface materials and medical devices. Development of biofilms on many surfaces is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission of foodborne pathogens. Materials & Methods: Biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes (RITCC 1293 serotype 4a was investigated. Hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes was measured by MATH method. Then biofilm formation of the organism was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 hours on stainless steel (type 304 no 2B, polyethylene and glass by drop plate method. Results: Results indicated that L. monocytogenes with 85% of hydrophobicity formed biofilm on each of three surfaces. Biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces was significantly more than other surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusion: The ability of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes on medical devices and food containers is very important as far as hygiene and disease outbreaks are concerned.

  16. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Petrus L B; Carvalho, Letícia T; Paschoal, Marco A B; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Moffa, Eduardo B; da Silva, Marcos A Dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use.

  17. Essential oil of Curcuma longa inhibits Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoi; Chang, Byoung-Soo; Ra, Ji-Young; Moon, Hae-Dalma; Seo, Bo-Ra; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) has been used as a spice in foods and as an antimicrobial in Oriental medicine. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of an essential oil isolated from C. longa on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), which is an important bacterium in dental plaque and dental caries formation. First, the inhibitory effects of C. longa essential oil on the growth and acid production of S. mutans were tested. Next, the effect of C. longa essential oil on adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HAs) was investigated. C. longa essential oil inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mg/mL. The essential oil also exhibited significant inhibition of S. mutans adherence to S-HAs at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. The essential oil of C. longa inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. The components of C. longa essential oil were then analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the major components were α-turmerone (35.59%), germacrone (19.02%), α-zingiberene (8.74%), αr-turmerone (6.31%), trans-β-elemenone (5.65%), curlone (5.45%), and β-sesquiphellandrene (4.73%). These results suggest that C. longa may inhibit the cariogenic properties of S. mutans. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Inhibition of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on stainless steel using Pseudomonas veronii biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y; Kim, H; Beuchat, L R; Ryu, J-H

    2018-05-01

    We produced a Pseudomonas veronii biofilm on the surface of a stainless steel that is inhibitory to Escherichia coli O157:H7. Pseudomonas veronii strain KACC 81051BP, isolated from lettuce, readily formed biofilm on the surface of stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in tryptic soy broth at 25°C. Cells showed significantly (P ≤ 0·05) enhanced tolerance to desiccation stress (43% relative humidity (RH)) and retained antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7. The number of E. coli O157:H7 (control; 4·1 ± 0·1 log CFU per coupon) on sterile SSCs decreased to 2·7 ± 0·2 log CFU per coupon after exposure to 43% RH at 25°C for 48 h, while the population of E. coli O157:H7 (4·1 ± 0·0 log CFU per coupon) on SSCs containing P. veronii biofilm decreased to below the theoretical detection limit (1·5 log CFU per coupon) within 24 h. The antimicrobial biofilm produced on stainless steel may have application in preventing cross-contamination by E. coli O157:H7 on other abiotic surfaces in food-contact environments. The presence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on environmental surfaces of food manufacturing, transportation and storage facilities is a significant food safety concern because it can result in cross-contamination of food products. In this study, we developed a Pseudomonas veronii biofilm on the surface of a stainless steel that inhibits the growth of E. coli O157:H7. Since P. veronii in biofilm resists desiccation, it provides persistent antimicrobial activity. Information presented here provides novel and practical insights to developing biological strategies to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 on diverse surfaces in food processing and handling environments. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. SEM Analysis of Surface Impact on Biofilm Antibiotic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luciana Calheiros; Mergulhão, Filipe José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the effect of ampicillin treatment on Escherichia coli biofilms formed on two surface materials with different properties, silicone (SIL) and glass (GLA). Epifluorescence microscopy (EM) was initially used to assess biofilm formation and killing efficiency on both surfaces. This technique showed that higher bacterial colonization was obtained in the hydrophobic SIL than in the hydrophilic GLA. It has also shown that higher biofilm inactivation was attained for GLA after the antibiotic treatment (7-log reduction versus 1-log reduction for SIL). Due to its high resolution and magnification, SEM enabled a more detailed analysis of the antibiotic effect on biofilm cells, complementing the killing efficiency information obtained by EM. SEM micrographs revealed that ampicillin-treated cells have an elongated form when compared to untreated cells. Additionally, it has shown that different materials induced different levels of elongation on cells exposed to antibiotic. Biofilms formed on GLA showed a 37% higher elongation than those formed on SIL. Importantly, cell elongation was related to viability since ampicillin had a higher bactericidal effect on GLA-formed biofilms. These findings raise the possibility of using SEM for understanding the efficacy of antimicrobial treatments by observation of biofilm morphology.

  20. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bin; Li, D Y; Davis, Elisabeth M; Irvin, Randall T; Hodges, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force

  1. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buf...... from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces...

  2. Inhibition and Inactivation of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Biofilms on Urinary Catheters by Sodium Selenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoolya Narayanan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are the most common hospital-acquired infections in humans and are caused primarily by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Indwelling urinary catheters become encrusted with UPEC biofilms that are resistant to common antibiotics, resulting in chronic infections. Therefore, it is important to control UPEC biofilms on catheters to reduce the risk for UTIs. This study investigated the efficacy of selenium for inhibiting and inactivating UPEC biofilms on urinary catheters. Urinary catheters were inoculated with UPEC and treated with 0 and 35 mM selenium at 37 °C for 5 days for the biofilm inhibition assay. In addition, catheters with preformed UPEC biofilms were treated with 0, 45, 60, and 85 mM selenium and incubated at 37 °C. Biofilm-associated UPEC counts on catheters were enumerated on days 0, 1, 3, and 5 of incubation. Additionally, the effect of selenium on exopolysacchride (EPS production and expression of UPEC biofilm-associated genes was evaluated. Selenium at 35 mM concentration was effective in preventing UPEC biofilm formation on catheters compared to controls (p < 0.05. Further, this inhibitory effect was associated with a reduction in EPS production and UPEC gene expression. Moreover, at higher concentrations, selenium was effective in inactivating preformed UPEC biofilms on catheters as early as day 3 of incubation. Results suggest that selenium could be potentially used in the control of UPEC biofilms on urinary catheters.

  3. Engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial and titanium-binding functions to inhibit biofilm formation on Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Yang; Adayi, Aidina; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xin; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants have been commonly used in oral medicine. However, despite their widespread clinical application, these implants are susceptible to failure induced by microbial infection due to bacterial biofilm formation. Immobilization of chimeric peptides with antibacterial properties on the Ti surface may be a promising antimicrobial approach to inhibit biofilm formation. Here, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting three sequences (hBD-3-1/2/3) derived from human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) with Ti-binding peptide-l (TBP-l: RKLPDAGPMHTW) via a triple glycine (G) linker to modify Ti surfaces. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the properties of individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their binding activity toward the Ti surface. The antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy of the peptides against initial settlers, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), was evaluated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study cell membrane changes and the underlying antimicrobial mechanism. Compared with the other two peptides, TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3 presented stronger antibacterial activity and remained stable in saliva and serum. Therefore, it was chosen as the best candidate to modify Ti surfaces in this study. This peptide inhibited the growth of initial streptococci and biofilm formation on Ti surfaces with no cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 cells. Disruption of the integrity of bacterial membranes and decreased expression of adhesion protein genes from S. gordonii revealed aspects of the antibacterial mechanism of TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3. We conclude that engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial activity provide a potential solution for inhibiting biofilm formation on Ti surfaces to reduce or prevent the occurrence of peri

  4. Live and heat-killed Lactobacillus spp. interfere with Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis during biofilm development on titanium surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciandrini, E; Campana, R; Baffone, W

    2017-06-01

    This research investigates the ability of live and heat-killed (HK) Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) to interfere with Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811 during biofilm formation. Eight Lactobacillus spp. and two oral colonizers, pathogenic Streptococcus mutans and resident Streptococcus oralis, were characterized for their aggregation abilities, cell surface properties and biofilm formation ability on titanium surface. Then, the interference activity of selected live and HK Lactobacillus spp. during S. mutans and S. oralis biofilm development were performed. The cell-free culture supernatants (CFCS) anti-biofilm activity was also determined. LAB possess good abilities of auto-aggregation (from 14.19 to 28.97%) and of co-aggregation with S. oralis. The cell-surfaces characteristics were most pronounced in S. mutans and S. oralis, while the highest affinities to xylene and chloroform were observed in Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (56.37%) and Lactobacillus paracasei B21060 (43.83%). S. mutans and S. oralis developed a biofilm on titanium surface, while LAB showed a limited or no ability to create biofilm. Live and HK L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 and L. paracasei B21060 inhibited streptococci biofilm formation by competition and displacement mechanisms with no substantial differences. The CFCSs of both LAB strains, particularly the undiluted one of L. paracasei B21060, decreased S. mutans and S. oralis biofilm formation. This study evidenced the association of LAB aggregation abilities and cell-surface properties with the LAB-mediated inhibition of S. mutans and S. oralis biofilm formation. Lactobacilli showed different mechanisms of action and peculiar strain-specific characteristics, maintained also in the heat-killed LAB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biogenic synthesis of Zinc oxide nanostructures from Nigella sativa seed: Prospective role as food packaging material inhibiting broad-spectrum quorum sensing and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabib, Nasser A; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmed, Faheem; Khan, Rais Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal; Alsharaeh, Edreese; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Hussain, Afzal; Rehman, Md Tabish; Yusuf, Mohammad; Hassan, Iftekhar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Alsalme, Ali Mohammed; Al-Ajmi, Mohamed F; Tarasov, Vadim V; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-12-05

    Bacterial spoilage of food products is regulated by density dependent communication system called quorum sensing (QS). QS control biofilm formation in numerous food pathogens and Biofilms formed on food surfaces act as carriers of bacterial contamination leading to spoilage of food and health hazards. Agents inhibiting or interfering with bacterial QS and biofilm are gaining importance as a novel class of next-generation food preservatives/packaging material. In the present study, Zinc nanostructures were synthesised using Nigella sativa seed extract (NS-ZnNPs). Synthesized nanostructures were characterized hexagonal wurtzite structure of size ~24 nm by UV-visible, XRD, FTIR and TEM. NS-ZnNPs demonstrated broad-spectrum QS inhibition in C. violaceum and P. aeruginosa biosensor strains. Synthesized nanostructures inhibited QS regulated functions of C. violaceum CVO26 (violacein) and elastase, protease, pyocyanin and alginate production in PAO1 significantly. NS-ZnNPs at sub-inhibitory concentrations inhibited the biofilm formation of four-food pathogens viz. C. violaceum 12472, PAO1, L. monocytogenes, E. coli. Moreover, NS-ZnNPs was found effective in inhibiting pre-formed mature biofilms of the four pathogens. Therefore, the broad-spectrum inhibition of QS and biofilm by biogenic Zinc oxide nanoparticles and it is envisaged that these nontoxic bioactive nanostructures can be used as food packaging material and/or as food preservative.

  6. Bacterial biofilm formation in different surfaces of food industries

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    Karine Angélica Dalla Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term biofilm describes the sessile microbial life form, characterized by microorganism adhesion to any surface and with the production of extracellular polymeric substances. In food industries, the formation of biofilms results in serious problems, since it can be a contamination source of the food product, compromising the final product quality and consumer health. The aim of this study was to verify the adhesion of biofilms (sessile cells of pathogenic and/or deteriorating bacteria against surfaces of the food industry. The bacterial species tested were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028. It was used stainless steel and polypropylene coupons as contact surfaces. The results demonstrated that P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium showed higher biofilm formation capacity. Statistically, there was no difference in count of P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium (p > 0.05 cells. The same occurred between L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. However, the counts of P. aeruginosa and S. Typhimurium cells were statistically higher than S. aureus and L. monocytogenes (p < 0.05. By means of scanning electron microscopy it was also found increased adhesion of P. aeruginosa. The results revealed that P. aeruginosa was the bacterial species with higher biofilm formation capacity among the others.

  7. AzaSite® inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus biofilm formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric C; Kowalski, Regis P; Romanowski, Eric G; Mah, Francis S; Gordon, Y Jerold; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of azithromycin (AZM) 1% ophthalmic solution in DuraSite® (AzaSite®) on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in vitro. Susceptible and resistant clinical strains (n = 8) of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were challenged with serial dilutions of AzaSite® and its components: AZM, benzalkonium chloride (BAK), and the DuraSite drug delivery vehicle. After 20 h of incubation, bacterial growth was quantified using a spectrophotometer (A = 600 nm). Plates were stained with crystal violet and biofilm formation was quantified spectrophotometrically at A = 590 nm. AzaSite® and AZM inhibited bacterial growth (P reduction in biofilm formation (P reduction in biofilm formation at concentrations from 1.25 to 10 mg/mL in most strains. DuraSite® inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations between 10% and 2.5% in all studied strains (P < 0.05), without affecting bacterial growth. BAK inhibited bacterial growth and biofilm formation in all strains between concentrations of 0.042 and 0.375 mg/mL (P < 0.05). AzaSite®, AZM, or BAK prevented biofilm formation by inhibiting growth of AZM-susceptible strains. AzaSite®, AZM, and DuraSite® also reduced biofilm formation at subinhibitory concentrations for growth. Our data indicate that AZM has a moderate inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, whereas DuraSite® appears to play a greater role in the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation by AzaSite®.

  8. Lipopeptide biosurfactants from Paenibacillus polymyxa inhibit single and mixed species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gerry A; Maloy, Aaron P; McClean, Stephen; Carney, Brian; Slater, John W

    2012-01-01

    Although biofilms are recognised as important in microbial colonisation, solutions to their inhibition are predominantly based on planktonic assays. These solutions have limited efficacy against biofilms. Here, a series of biofilm-orientated tests were used to identify anti-biofilm compounds from marine micro-flora. This led to the isolation of a complex of anti-biofilm compounds from an extract of Paenibacillus polymyxa (PPE). A combination of rpHPLC and mass spectrometry identified the principle components of PPE as fusaricidin B (LI-FO4b) and polymyxin D1, with minor contributions from surfactins. This complex (PPE) reduced the biofilm biomass of Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus bovis. In contrast, ampicillin was only effective against S. aureus. PPE also inhibited a self-assembling marine biofilm (SAMB) in co-incubation assays by 99.3% ± 1.9 and disrupted established SAMB by 72.4% ± 4.4, while ampicillin showed no significant reduction. The effectiveness of this complex of lipopeptides against single and multispecies biofilms suggests a future role in biofilm prevention strategies.

  9. Inhibition of Nitzschia ovalis biofilm settlement by a bacterial bioactive compound through alteration of EPS and epiphytic bacteria

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    Claudia D. Infante

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marine ecosystems contain benthic microalgae and bacterial species that are capable of secreting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, suggesting that settlement of these microorganisms can occur on submerged surfaces, a key part of the first stage of biofouling. Currently, anti-fouling treatments that help control this phenomenon involve the use of biocides or antifouling paints that contain heavy metals, which over a long period of exposure can spread to the environment. The bacterium Alteromonas sp. Ni1-LEM has an inhibitory effect on the adhesion of Nitzschia ovalis, an abundant diatom found on submerged surfaces. Results: We evaluated the effect of the bioactive compound secreted by this bacterium on the EPS of biofilms and associated epiphytic bacteria. Three methods of EPS extraction were evaluated to determine the most appropriate and efficient methodology based on the presence of soluble EPS and the total protein and carbohydrate concentrations. Microalgae were cultured with the bacterial compound to evaluate its effect on EPS secretion and variations in its protein and carbohydrate concentrations. An effect of the bacterial supernatant on EPS was observed by assessing biofilm formation and changes in the concentration of proteins and carbohydrates present in the biofilm. Conclusions: These results indicate that a possible mechanism for regulating biofouling could be through alteration of biofilm EPS and alteration of the epiphytic bacterial community associated with the microalga.How to cite: Infante, C.D., Castillo, F., Pérez, V., et al. Inhibition of Nitzschia ovalis biofilm settlement by a bacterial bioactive compound through alteration of EPS and epiphytic bacteria. Electron J Biotechnol 2018;33 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejbt.2018.03.002. Keywords: Anti-fouling, Benthic microalgae, Biofilm, Biofouling, Epiphytic bacterial community, EPS, Marine ecosystems, Metagenomic, Nitzschia ovalis, Settlement inhibition

  10. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

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    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (pbiofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (pbiofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  11. Inhibition and dispersal of Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms by a small diffusible Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoproduct(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbing, Michael E; Fuqua, Clay

    2012-06-01

    Environmental biofilms often contain mixed populations of different species. In these dense communities, competition between biofilm residents for limited nutrients such as iron can be fierce, leading to the evolution of competitive factors that affect the ability of competitors to grow or form biofilms. We have discovered a compound(s) present in the conditioned culture fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that disperses and inhibits the formation of biofilms produced by the facultative plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The inhibitory activity is strongly induced when P. aeruginosa is cultivated in iron-limited conditions, but it does not function through iron sequestration. In addition, the production of the biofilm inhibitory activity is not regulated by the global iron regulatory protein Fur, the iron-responsive extracytoplasmic function σ factor PvdS, or three of the recognized P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems. In addition, the compound(s) responsible for the inhibition and dispersal of A. tumefaciens biofilm formation is likely distinct from the recently identified P. aeruginosa dispersal factor, cis-2-decenoic acid (CDA), as dialysis of the culture fluids showed that the inhibitory compound was larger than CDA and culture fluids that dispersed and inhibited biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens had no effect on biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa.

  12. Inhibited Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Quaternized Chitosan-Loaded Titania Nanotubes with Various Diameters

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    Wen-tao Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanotube-based local drug delivery is an attractive strategy for combating implant-associated infection. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes could dramatically inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on implant surfaces. Considering the overuse of antibiotics may lead to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we synthesized a new quaternized chitosan derivative (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC with a 27% degree of substitution (DS; referred to as 27% HACC that had a strong antibacterial activity and simultaneously good biocompatibility with osteogenic cells. Titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm and 200 nm length were loaded with 2 mg of HACC using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. Two standard strain, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (American Type Culture Collection 43300 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984, and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the bacterial adhesion at 6 h and biofilm formation at 24, 48, and 72 h on the HACC-loaded nanotubes (NT-H using the spread plate method, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Smooth titanium (Smooth Ti was also investigated and compared. We found that NT-H could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on its surface compared with Smooth Ti, and the NT-H with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended HACC release time of NT-H with larger diameters. Therefore, NT-H can significantly improve the antibacterial ability of orthopedic implants and provide a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections.

  13. Inhibitory activity of Paenibacillus polymyxa on the biofilm formation of Cronobacter spp. on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soonwook; Kim, Seonhwa; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Hoikyung

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to control the survival or biofilm formation of Cronobacter spp. on stainless steel surfaces using Paenibacillus polymyxa. The antibacterial activity of a cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of P. polymyxa against Cronobacter spp. was found to vary with P. polymyxa incubation time. Maximum activity occurred when P. polymyxa was incubated at 25 or 30 °C for 96 h. When the CFCS was introduced to Cronobacter spp. adhered to stainless steel strips at 25 °C for up to 72 h, the CFCS successfully inhibited Cronobacter biofilm formation. Additionally, stainless steel surfaces with a preformed P. polymyxa biofilm were exposed to Cronobacter spp. suspensions in PBS or 0.1% peptone water at 3, 5, or 7 log CFU/mL to facilitate its attachment. The Cronobacter population significantly decreased on this surface, regardless of inoculum level or carrier, when the P. polymyxa biofilm was present. However, the microbial population decreased within 6 h and remained unchanged thereafter when the surface was immersed in an inoculum suspended in 0.1% peptone water at 5 or 7 log CFU/mL. These results indicate that P. polymyxa is able to use a promising candidate competitive-exclusion microorganism to control Cronobacter spp. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Anode biofilm transcriptomics reveals outer surface components essential for high density current production in Geobacter sulfurreducens fuel cells.

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    Kelly P Nevin

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Geobacter sulfurreducens transfers electrons through relatively thick (>50 microm biofilms to electrodes acting as a sole electron acceptor were investigated. Biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were grown either in flow-through systems with graphite anodes as the electron acceptor or on the same graphite surface, but with fumarate as the sole electron acceptor. Fumarate-grown biofilms were not immediately capable of significant current production, suggesting substantial physiological differences from current-producing biofilms. Microarray analysis revealed 13 genes in current-harvesting biofilms that had significantly higher transcript levels. The greatest increases were for pilA, the gene immediately downstream of pilA, and the genes for two outer c-type membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcZ. Down-regulated genes included the genes for the outer-membrane c-type cytochromes, OmcS and OmcT. Results of quantitative RT-PCR of gene transcript levels during biofilm growth were consistent with microarray results. OmcZ and the outer-surface c-type cytochrome, OmcE, were more abundant and OmcS was less abundant in current-harvesting cells. Strains in which pilA, the gene immediately downstream from pilA, omcB, omcS, omcE, or omcZ was deleted demonstrated that only deletion of pilA or omcZ severely inhibited current production and biofilm formation in current-harvesting mode. In contrast, these gene deletions had no impact on biofilm formation on graphite surfaces when fumarate served as the electron acceptor. These results suggest that biofilms grown harvesting current are specifically poised for electron transfer to electrodes and that, in addition to pili, OmcZ is a key component in electron transfer through differentiated G. sulfurreducens biofilms to electrodes.

  15. A new dry-surface biofilm model: An essential tool for efficacy testing of hospital surface decontamination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, Ahmad; Hu, Honghua; Deva, Anand; Gosbell, Iain B; Jacombs, Anita; Jensen, Slade O; Whiteley, Greg; Glasbey, Trevor; Vickery, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The environment has been shown to be a source of pathogens causing infections in hospitalised patients. Incorporation of pathogens into biofilms, contaminating dry hospital surfaces, prolongs their survival and renders them tolerant to normal hospital cleaning and disinfection procedures. Currently there is no standard method for testing efficacy of detergents and disinfectants against biofilm formed on dry surfaces. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible method of producing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with properties similar to those of biofilm obtained from dry hospital clinical surfaces, for use in efficacy testing of decontamination products. The properties (composition, architecture) of model biofilm and biofilm obtained from clinical dry surfaces within an intensive care unit were compared. The CDC Biofilm Reactor was adapted to create a dry surface biofilm model. S. aureus ATCC 25923 was grown on polycarbonate coupons. Alternating cycles of dehydration and hydration in tryptone soy broth (TSB) were performed over 12 days. Number of biofilm bacteria attached to individual coupons was determined by plate culture and the coefficient of variation (CV%) calculated. The DNA, glycoconjugates and protein content of the biofilm were determined by analysing biofilm stained with SYTO 60, Alexa-488-labelled Aleuria aurantia lectin and SyproOrange respectively using Image J and Imaris software. Biofilm architecture was analysed using live/dead staining and confocal microscopy (CM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Model biofilm was compared to naturally formed biofilm containing S. aureus on dry clinical surfaces. The CDC Biofilm reactor reproducibly formed a multi-layered, biofilm containing about 10(7) CFU/coupon embedded in thick extracellular polymeric substances. Within run CV was 9.5% and the between run CV was 10.1%. Protein was the principal component of both the in vitro model biofilm and the biofilms found on clinical surfaces. Continued

  16. Vizantin inhibits bacterial adhesion without affecting bacterial growth and causes Streptococcus mutans biofilm to detach by altering its internal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Shoji; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yuki; Ohshima, Hayato; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Terao, Yutaka; Noiri, Yuichiro

    2016-11-11

    An ideal antibiofilm strategy is to control both in the quality and quantity of biofilm while maintaining the benefits derived from resident microflora. Vizantin, a recently developed immunostimulating compound, has also been found to have antibiofilm property. This study evaluated the influence on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of sulfated vizantin and biofilm development following bacterial adhesion on a hydroxyapatite disc coated with sulfated vizantin. Supplementation with sulfated vizantin up to 50 μM did not affect either bacterial growth or biofilm formation, whereas 50 μM sulfated vizantin caused the biofilm to readily detach from the surface. Sulfated vizantin at the concentration of 50 μM upregulated the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes, but downregulated the expression of the gtfD gene, suggesting altered architecture in the biofilm. Biofilm development on the surface coated with sulfated vizantin was inhibited depending on the concentration, suggesting prevention from bacterial adhesion. Among eight genes related to bacterial adherence in S. mutans, expression of gtfB and gtfC was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of gtfD, GbpA and GbpC was downregulated according to the concentration of vizantin, especially with 50 μM vizantin by 0.8-, 0.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively. These findings suggest that sulfated vizantin may cause structural degradation as a result of changing gene regulation related to bacterial adhesion and glucan production of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tooth enamel surface micro-hardness with dual species Streptococcus biofilm after exposure to Java turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isjwara, F. R. G.; Hasanah, S. N.; Utami, Sri; Suniarti, D. F.

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus biofilm on tooth surfaces can decrease mouth environment pH, thus causing enamel demineralization that can lead to dental caries. Java Turmeric extract has excellent antibacterial effects and can maintain S. mutans biofilm pH at neutral levels for 4 hours. To analyze the effect of Java Turmeric extract on tooth enamel micro-hardness, the Java Turmeric extract was added on enamel tooth samples with Streptococcus dual species biofilm (S. sanguinis and S. mutans). The micro-hardness of enamel was measured by Knoop Hardness Tester. Results showed that Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. could not maintain tooth enamel surface micro-hardness. It is concluded that Java Turmeric extract ethanol could not inhibit the hardness of enamel with Streptococcus dual species biofilm.

  18. Biofilm Formation by Mycobacterium bovis: Influence of Surface Kind and Temperatures of Sanitizer Treatments on Biofilm Control

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    Victoria O. Adetunji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis causes classic bovine tuberculosis, a zoonosis which is still a concern in Africa. Biofilm forming ability of two Mycobacterium bovis strains was assessed on coupons of cement, ceramic, or stainless steel in three different microbiological media at 37°C with agitation for 2, 3, or 4 weeks to determine the medium that promotes biofilm. Biofilm mass accumulated on coupons was treated with 2 sanitizers (sanitizer A (5.5 mg L−1 active iodine and sanitizer B (170.6 g1 alkyl dimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride, 78 g−1 didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, 107.25 g L−1 glutaraldehyde, 146.25 g L−1 isopropanol, and 20 g L−1 pine oil at 28 and 45°C and in hot water at 85°C for 5 min. Residual biofilms on treated coupons were quantified using crystal violet binding assay. The two strains had a similar ability to form biofilms on the three surfaces. More biofilms were developed in media containing 5% liver extract. Biofilm mass increased as incubation time increased till the 3rd week. More biofilms were formed on cement than on ceramic and stainless steel surfaces. Treatment with hot water at 85°C reduced biofilm mass, however, sanitizing treatments at 45°C removed more biofilms than at 28°C. However, neither treatment completely eliminated the biofilms. The choice of processing surface and temperatures used for sanitizing treatments had an impact on biofilm formation and its removal from solid surfaces.

  19. Clotrimazole and econazole inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm and virulence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Ren, Biao; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Qiong; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of eight antifungal drugs on S. mutans growth, biofilm formation and virulence factors. The actions of antifungal drugs on S. mutans were determined by recovery plates and survival kinetic curves. Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the viable cells were recovered on BHI plates, meanwhile biofilms were stained by BacLight live/dead kit to investigate the biofilm viability. Bacteria/extracellular polysaccharides staining assays were performed to determine the EPS production of S. mutans biofilms. Acidogenicity and acidurity of S. mutans were determined using pH drop and acid tolerance assays, and the expression of ldh gene was evaluated using qPCR. We found that clotrimazole (CTR) and econazole (ECO) showed antibacterial activities on S. mutans UA159 and S. mutans clinical isolates at 12.5 and 25mg/L, respectively. CTR and ECO could also inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation and reduce the viability of preformed biofilm. CTR and ECO affected the live/dead ratio and the EPS/bacteria ratio of S. mutans biofilms. CTR and ECO also inhibited the pH drop, lactate acid production, and acid tolerance. The abilities of CTR and ECO to inhibit S. mutans ldh expression were also confirmed. We found that two antifungal azoles, CTR and ECO, had the abilities to inhibit the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans and more importantly, they could also inhibit the virulence factors of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biofilms.

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    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Using these bacteria as examples, we discuss the key features of biofilms as well as mechanisms by which extracellular signals trigger biofilm formation.

  1. Shewanella putrefaciens Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Food Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, Mette; Johansen, Charlotte; Huber, Ingrid; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25°C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 108 CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 102 CFU/cm2) than in a batch system (reaching 107 CFU/cm2), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  2. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  3. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries.

  4. Application of lipopeptide biosurfactant isolated from a halophile: Bacillus tequilensis CH for inhibition of biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mall, Gangotri; Panda, Himadri Tanaya; Sukla, Lala Behari; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-11-01

    Biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules having hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties produced by various microorganisms. These molecules trigger the reduction of surface tension or interfacial tension in liquids. A biosurfactant-producing halophile was isolated from Lake Chilika, a brackish water lake of Odisha, India (19°41'39″N, 85°18'24″E). The halophile was identified as Bacillus tequilensis CH by biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and assigned accession no. KC851857 by GenBank. The biosurfactant produced by B. tequilensis CH was partially characterized as a lipopeptide using thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The minimum effective concentration of a biosurfactant for inhibition of pathogenic biofilm (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans) on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was found to be 50 μg ml(-1). This finding has potential for a variety of applications.

  5. Lavage with allicin in combination with vancomycin inhibits biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis in a rabbit model of prosthetic joint infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohan Zhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present anti-infection strategy for prosthetic joint infections (PJI includes the use of antibiotics and surgical treatments, but the bacterial eradication rates are still low. One of the major challenges is the formation of biofilm causing poor bacterial eradication. Recently it has been reported that allicin (diallyl thiosulphinate, an antibacterial principle of garlic, can inhibit bacteria adherence and prevent biofilm formation in vitro. However, whether allicin could inhibit biofilm formation in vivo is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of allicin on biofilm formation, and whether allicin could potentiate the bactericidal effect of vancomycin in a rabbit PJI model. METHODS: A sterile stainless-steel screw with a sterile ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene washer was inserted into the lateral femoral condyle of the right hind knee joint of rabbit, and 1 mL inoculum containing 104 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus epidermidis was inoculated into the knee joint (n = 32. Fourteen days later, rabbits randomly received one of the following 4 treatments using continuous lavages: normal saline, vancomycin (20 mcg/mL, allicin (4 mg/L, or allicin (4 mg/L plus vancomycin (20 mcg/mL. Three days later, the washer surface biofilm formation was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The bacterial counts within the biofilm of implanted screws were determined by bacterial culture. RESULTS: The lowest number of viable bacterial counts of Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from the biofilm was in the rabbits treated with allicin plus vancomycin (P<0.01 vs. all other groups. The biofilm formation was significantly reduced or undetectable by SEM in rabbits receiving allicin or allicin plus vancomycin. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular allicincan inhibit biofilm formation and enhance the bactericidal effect of vancomycin on implant surface in vivo. Allicin in combination with vancomycin may be

  6. The efficacy of sarang semut extract (Myrmecodia pendens Merr & Perry in inhibiting Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm formation

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    Zulfan M. Alibasyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a pathogenic bacteria present in the oral cavity involved in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis and biofilm. This mass of microorganisms represents one of the virulent factors of P. gingivalis which plays an important role as an attachment initiator in host cells. Sarang semut is a natural material possessing the ability to inhibit the growth of P. gingivalis. Purpose: This study aims to analyze the effect of sarang semut extract on the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm. Methods: The study used methanol sarang semut extract and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and phosphomycin as a positive control. Treatment was initiated by means of culturing. Biofilm test and P. gingivalis biofilm formation observation were subsequently performed by means of a light microscope at a magnification of 400x. Results: The formation of P. gingivalis biofilms tended to increase at 3, 6, and 9 hours. Results of the violet crystal test showed that concentrations of 100% and 75% of the sarang semut extract successfully inhibited the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm according to the incubation time. Meanwhile, the sarang semut extracts at concentrations of 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.125% resulted in weak inhibition of the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm. The biofilm mass profile observed by a microscope tended to decrease as an indicator of the effects of the sarang semut extract. Conclusion: Sarang semut extract can inhibit the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm, especially at concentrations of 100% and 75%. Nevertheless, phosphomycin has stronger antibiofilm of P. gingivalis effects than those of the sarang semut extract at all of the concentrations listed above.

  7. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  8. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

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    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  9. Commonly used disinfectants fail to eradicate Salmonella enterica biofilms from food contact surface materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M; Morris, D; De Lappe, N; O'Connor, J; Lalor, P; Dockery, P; Cormican, M

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellosis is the second most common cause of food-borne illness worldwide. Contamination of surfaces in food processing environments may result in biofilm formation with a risk of food contamination. Effective decontamination of biofilm-contaminated surfaces is challenging. Using the CDC biofilm reactor, the activities of sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride were examined against an early (48-h) and relatively mature (168-h) Salmonella biofilm. All 3 agents result in reduction in viable counts of Salmonella; however, only sodium hydroxide resulted in eradication of the early biofilm. None of the agents achieved eradication of mature biofilm, even at the 90-min contact time. Studies of activity of chemical disinfection against biofilm should include assessment of activity against mature biofilm. The difficulty of eradication of established Salmonella biofilm serves to emphasize the priority of preventing access of Salmonella to postcook areas of food production facilities.

  10. Histidine Metabolism and IGPD Play a Key Role in Cefquinome Inhibiting Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus xylosus

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    Yong-hui Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus xylosus (S. xylosus is an AT-rich and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS. It is normally regarded as non-pathogenic, however, recent studies have demonstrated that it is related to human opportunistic infections and bovine mastitis. In addition, S. xylosus strains have the ability to form biofilm. Biofilms are also involved in chronic infections and antibiotic resistance, there are only a few reports about cefquinome inhibiting S. xylosus biofilm formation and the protein targets of cefquinome. In our study, we found that sub-MICs of cefquinome were sufficient to inhibit biofilm formation. To investigate the potential protein targets of cefquinome, we used iTRAQ for the analyses of cells at two different conditions: 1/2-MIC (0.125 μg/mL cefquinome treatment and no treatment. Using iTRAQ technique and KEGG database analysis, we found that proteins differently expression in histidine metabolism pathway may play a role in the process by which 1/2-MIC (0.125 μg/mL cefquinome inhibits S. xylosus biofilm formation. Interestingly, we found a sharply down-regulated enzyme [A0A068E9J3 imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPD] involved in histidine metabolism pathway in cefquinome-treated cells. We demonstrated the important role of IGPD in sub-MICs cefquinome inhibiting biofilm formation of S. xylosus by gene (hisB knockout, IGPD enzyme activity and histidine content assays. Thus, our data sheds light on important role of histidine metabolism in S. xylosus biofilm formation; especially, IGPD involved in histidine metabolism might play a crucial role in sub-MICs cefquinome inhibition of biofilm formation of S. xylosus, and we propose IGPD as an attractive protein target of cefquinome.

  11. Chitosanase purified from bacterial isolate Bacillus licheniformis of ruined vegetables displays broad spectrum biofilm inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslim, Sahira Nsayef; Al-Kadmy, Israa M S; Hussein, Nadheema Hammood; Mohammed Ali, Alaa Naseer; Taha, Buthainah Mohammed; Aziz, Sarah Naji; Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah Al; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar

    2016-11-01

    A number of bacterial species produces chitosanases which has variety of applications because of its high biodegradability, non-toxicity and antimicrobial assets. In the present study chitosanase is purified from new bacterial species Bacillus licheniformis from spoiled vegetable. This novel strain of Bacillus licheniformis isolated from spoilt cucumber and pepper samples has the ability to produce the chitosanase enzyme when grown on chitosan substrate. Study also examined its antibiofilm properties against diverse bacterial species with biofilm forming ability. The purified chitosanase inhibited the biofilm formation ability for all Gram-negative and Gram-positive biofilm-forming bacteria [biofilm producers] tested in this study in congo red agar and microtiter plate's methods. Highly antibiofilm activity of chitosanase was recorded against Pseudomonas aeruginosa followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae with reduction of biofilm formation upto 22 and 29%, respectively compared with [100] % of control. Biofilm formation has multiple role including ability to enhance resistance and self-protection from external stress. This chitosanase has promising benefit as antibiofilm agent against biofilm forming pathogenic bacteria and has promising application as alternative antibiofilm agents to combat the growing number of multidrug resistant pathogen-associated infections, especially in situation where biofilms are involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial Surface Colonization and Biofilm Development in Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Biotic and abiotic surfaces in marine waters are rapidly colonized by microorganisms. Surface colonization and subsequent biofilm formation and development provide numerous advantages to these organisms and support critical ecological and biogeochemical functions in the changing marine environment. Microbial surface association also contributes to deleterious effects such as biofouling, biocorrosion, and the persistence and transmission of harmful or pathogenic microorganisms and their genetic determinants. The processes and mechanisms of colonization as well as key players among the surface-associated microbiota have been studied for several decades. Accumulating evidence indicates that specific cell-surface, cell-cell, and interpopulation interactions shape the composition, structure, spatiotemporal dynamics, and functions of surface-associated microbial communities. Several key microbial processes and mechanisms, including (i) surface, population, and community sensing and signaling, (ii) intraspecies and interspecies communication and interaction, and (iii) the regulatory balance between cooperation and competition, have been identified as critical for the microbial surface association lifestyle. In this review, recent progress in the study of marine microbial surface colonization and biofilm development is synthesized and discussed. Major gaps in our knowledge remain. We pose questions for targeted investigation of surface-specific community-level microbial features, answers to which would advance our understanding of surface-associated microbial community ecology and the biogeochemical functions of these communities at levels from molecular mechanistic details through systems biological integration. PMID:26700108

  13. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  14. Role of Streptococcus mutans surface proteins for biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Matsumoto-Nakano

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as a primary causative agent of dental caries in humans. An important virulence property of the bacterium is its ability to form biofilm known as dental plaque on tooth surfaces. In addition, this organism also produces glucosyltransferases, multiple glucan-binding proteins, protein antigen c, and collagen-binding protein, surface proteins that coordinate to produce dental plaque, thus inducing dental caries. Bacteria utilize quorum-sensing systems to modulate environmental stress responses. A major mechanism of response to signals is represented by the so called two-component signal transduction system, which enables bacteria to regulate their gene expression and coordinate activities in response to environmental stress. As for S. mutans, a signal peptide-mediated quorum-sensing system encoded by comCDE has been found to be a regulatory system that responds to cell density and certain environmental stresses by excreting a peptide signal molecule termed CSP (competence-stimulating peptide. One of its principal virulence factors is production of bacteriocins (peptide antibiotics referred to as mutacins. Two-component signal transduction systems are commonly utilized by bacteria to regulate bacteriocin gene expression and are also related to biofilm formation by S. mutans. Keywords: Streptococcus mutans, Surface proteins, Biofilm, Signal transduction

  15. Streptococcal adhesin SspA/B analogue peptide inhibits adherence and impacts biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Ito

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the major causative agent of dental caries, adheres to tooth surfaces via the host salivary glycoprotein-340 (gp340. This adherence can be competitively inhibited by peptides derived from the SspA/B adhesins of Streptococcus gordonii, a human commensal microbe that competes for the same binding sites. Ssp(A4K-A11K, a double-lysine substituted SspA/B peptide analogue, has been shown to exhibit superior in vitro binding affinity for a gp340-derived peptide (SRCRP2, suggesting that Ssp(A4K-A11K may be of clinical interest. In the present work, we tested the inhibitory effects of Ssp(A4K-A11K on adherence and biofilm formation of S. mutans by reconstructing an artificial oral environment using saliva-coated polystyrene plates and hydroxyapatite disks. Bacterial adherence (adherence period: 1 h was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using biotinylated bacterial cells. Biofilm formation (periods: 8, 11, or 14 h was assessed by staining and imaging of the sessile cells, or by recovering biofilm cells and plating for cell counts. The pH values of the culture media were measured as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. Bactericidality was measured by loss of optical density during culturing in the presence of the peptide. We observed that 650 μM Ssp(A4K-A11K significantly inhibited adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated polystyrene; a similar effect was seen on bacterial affinity for SRCRP2. Ssp(A4K-A11K had lesser effects on the adherence of commensal streptococci. Pretreatment of polystyrene and hydroxyapatite with 650 μM Ssp(A4K-A11K significantly attenuated biofilm formation, whether tested with glucose- or sucrose-containing media. The SspA/B peptide's activity did not reflect bactericidality. Strikingly, pH in Ssp-treated 8-h (6.8 ± 0.06 and 11-h (5.5 ± 0.06 biofilms showed higher values than the critical pH. Thus, Ssp(A4K-A11K acts by inhibiting bacterial adherence and cariogrnic biofilm formation. We further

  16. Control of Listeria innocua Biofilms on Food Contact Surfaces with Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and the Risk of Biofilm Cells Transfer to Duck Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye Ri; Kwon, Mi Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2018-04-01

    Biofilm formation on food contact surfaces is a potential hazard leading to cross-contamination during food processing. We investigated Listeria innocua biofilm formation on various food contact surfaces and compared the washing effect of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) at 30, 50, 70, and 120 ppm with that of 200 ppm of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on biofilm cells. The risk of L. innocua biofilm transfer and growth on food at retail markets was also investigated. The viability of biofilms that formed on food contact surfaces and then transferred cells to duck meat was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. L. innocua biofilm formation was greatest on rubber, followed by polypropylene, glass, and stainless steel. Regardless of sanitizer type, washing removed biofilms from polypropylene and stainless steel better than from rubber and glass. Among the various SAEW concentrations, washing with 70 ppm of SAEW for 5 min significantly reduced L. innocua biofilms on food contact surfaces during food processing. Efficiency of transfer of L. innocua biofilm cells was the highest on polypropylene and lowest on stainless steel. The transferred biofilm cells grew to the maximum population density, and the lag time of transferred biofilm cells was longer than that of planktonic cells. The biofilm cells that transferred to duck meat coexisted with live, injured, and dead cells, which indicates that effective washing is essential to remove biofilm on food contact surfaces during food processing to reduce the risk of foodborne disease outbreaks.

  17. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia VERARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX, chloramine T (CHT, triclosan (TRI, and essential oils (EO on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES. Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group. Thus, the current gold standard (CHX did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  18. Electrochemical removal of biofilms from titanium dental implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Rudolph, Michael; Bause, Vanessa; Terfort, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The infection of dental implants may cause severe inflammation of tissue and even bone degradation if not treated. For titanium implants, a new, minimally invasive approach is the electrochemical removal of the biofilms including the disinfection of the metal surface. In this project, several parameters, such as electrode potentials and electrolyte compositions, were varied to understand the underlying mechanisms. Optimal electrolytes contained iodide as well as lactic acid. Electrochemical experiments, such as cyclic voltammetry or measurements of open circuit potentials, were performed in different cell set-ups to distinguish between different possible reactions. At the applied potentials of E species are formed at the anode, such as triiodide and hydrogen peroxide. Ex situ tests with model biofilms of E. coli clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of the respective anolytes in killing the bacteria, as determined by the LIVE/DEAD™ assay. Using optimized electrolysis parameters of 30 s at 7.0 V and 300 mA, a 14-day old wildtype biofilm could be completely removed from dental implants in vitro. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis by new halogenated furanones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumov, Airat R; Khakimullina, Elvina N; Sharafutdinov, Irshad S; Trizna, Elena Y; Latypova, Lilia Z; Thi Lien, Hoang; Margulis, Anna B; Bogachev, Mikhail I; Kurbangalieva, Almira R

    2015-05-01

    Gram-positive bacteria can cause various infections including hospital-acquired infections. While in the biofilm, the resistance of bacteria to both antibiotics and the human immune system is increased causing difficulties in the treatment. Bacillus subtilis, a non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is widely used as a model organism for studying biofilm formation. Here we investigated the effect of novel synthesized chloro- and bromo-containing 2(5H)-furanones on biofilm formation by B. subtilis. Mucobromic acid (3,4-dibromo-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) and the two derivatives of mucochloric acid (3,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone)-F8 and F12-were found to inhibit the growth and to efficiently prevent biofilm formation by B. subtilis. Along with the low production of polysaccharide matrix and repression of the eps operon, strong repression of biofilm-related yqxM also occurred in the presence of furanones. Therefore, our data confirm that furanones affect significantly the regulatory pathway(s) leading to biofilm formation. We propose that the global regulator, Spo0A, is one of the potential putative cellular targets for these compounds.

  20. Bacteriophage use to control Salmonella biofilm on surfaces present in chicken slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Keila Carolina de Ornellas Dutka; Corrêa, Isadora Mainieri de Oliveira; Pereira, Larissa Quinto; Silva, Tarcísio Macedo; Mioni, Mateus de Souza Ribeiro; Izidoro, Ana Carolina de Moraes; Bastos, Igor Henrique Vellano; Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto Marietto; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2017-09-01

    Foodborne diseases represent a major risk to public health worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria can live in the form of biofilm within the food industry, providing a permanent source of contamination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the types of adhesion surfaces on Salmonella biofilm formation at eight different times, and analyze the action time of a bacteriophage pool on established biofilms. Most of the samples used were classified as weak biofilm producers, with serovars Enteritidis and Heidelberg showing the highest frequency of biofilm formation. Glass and stainless steel surfaces significantly favored biofilm formation at 60 and 36 h of incubation respectively, but the polyvinyl chloride surface did not favor biofilm production, suggesting that the type of material may interfere with production. The bacteriophage pool action period focused on 3 h, but treatment of 9 h on glass surface biofilms was superior to other treatments because it affected the largest number of samples. These results suggests that some surface types and Salmonella serotypes may promote biofilm formation and indicate bacteriophages as an alternative to control biofilms. But further studies are required to prove the effectiveness and safety of bacteriophage therapy as an alternative in the antimicrobial control in the processing plants. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  3. To be or not to be planktonic? Self-inhibition of biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Elad; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2015-05-01

    The transition between planktonic growth and biofilm formation represents a tightly regulated developmental shift that has substantial impact on cell fate. Here, we highlight different mechanisms through which bacteria limit their own biofilm development. The mechanisms involved in these self-inhibition processes include: (i) regulation by secreted small molecules, which govern intricate signalling cascades that eventually decrease biofilm development, (ii) extracellular polysaccharides capable of modifying the physicochemical properties of the substratum and (iii) extracellular DNA that masks an adhesive structure. These mechanisms, which rely on substances produced by the bacterium and released into the extracellular milieu, suggest regulation at the communal level. In addition, we provide specific examples of environmental cues (e.g. blue light or glucose level) that trigger a cellular response reducing biofilm development. All together, we describe a diverse array of mechanisms underlying self-inhibition of biofilm development in different bacteria and discuss possible advantages of these processes. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Long-term release of antibiotics by carbon nanotube-coated titanium alloy surfaces diminish biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Akinoglu, Eser M; Wirtz, Dieter C; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Jepsen, Søren; Haddouti, El-Mustapha; Limmer, Andreas; Giersig, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause a considerable amount of prosthetic joint infections every year, resulting in morbidity and expensive revision surgery. To address this problem, surface modifications of implant materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been investigated in the past years. CNTs are biologically compatible and can be utilized as drug delivery systems. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated TiAl6V4 titanium alloy discs were fabricated and impregnated with Rifampicin, and tested for their ability to prevent biofilm formation over a period of ten days. Agar plate-based assays were employed to assess the antimicrobial activity of these surfaces against Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was shown that vertically aligned MWCNTs were more stable against attrition on rough surfaces than on polished TiAl6V4 surfaces. Discs with coated surfaces caused a significant inhibition of biofilm formation for up to five days. Therefore, MWCNT-modified surfaces may be effective against pathogenic biofilm formation on endoprostheses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chicken Juice Enhances Surface Attachment and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen L.; Reuter, Mark; Salt, Louise J.; Cross, Kathryn L.; Betts, Roy P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is primarily transmitted via the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs, especially poultry meat. In food processing environments, C. jejuni is required to survive a multitude of stresses and requires the use of specific survival mechanisms, such as biofilms. An initial step in biofilm formation is bacterial attachment to a surface. Here, we investigated the effects of a chicken meat exudate (chicken juice) on C. jejuni surface attachment and biofilm formation. Supplementation of brucella broth with ≥5% chicken juice resulted in increased biofilm formation on glass, polystyrene, and stainless steel surfaces with four C. jejuni isolates and one C. coli isolate in both microaerobic and aerobic conditions. When incubated with chicken juice, C. jejuni was both able to grow and form biofilms in static cultures in aerobic conditions. Electron microscopy showed that C. jejuni cells were associated with chicken juice particulates attached to the abiotic surface rather than the surface itself. This suggests that chicken juice contributes to C. jejuni biofilm formation by covering and conditioning the abiotic surface and is a source of nutrients. Chicken juice was able to complement the reduction in biofilm formation of an aflagellated mutant of C. jejuni, indicating that chicken juice may support food chain transmission of isolates with lowered motility. We provide here a useful model for studying the interaction of C. jejuni biofilms in food chain-relevant conditions and also show a possible mechanism for C. jejuni cell attachment and biofilm initiation on abiotic surfaces within the food chain. PMID:25192991

  6. Genetic adaptation of Streptococcus mutans during biofilm formation on different types of surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharoni Reuven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesion and successful colonization of bacteria onto solid surfaces play a key role in biofilm formation. The initial adhesion and the colonization of bacteria may differ between the various types of surfaces found in oral cavity. Therefore, it is conceivable that diverse biofilms are developed on those various surfaces. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular modifications occurring during in vitro biofilm development of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on several different dental surfaces. Results Growth analysis of the immobilized bacterial populations generated on the different surfaces shows that the bacteria constructed a more confluent and thick biofilms on a hydroxyapatite surface compared to the other tested surfaces. Using DNA-microarray technology we identified the differentially expressed genes of S. mutans, reflecting the physiological state of biofilms formed on the different biomaterials tested. Eight selected genes were further analyzed by real time RT-PCR. To further determine the impact of the tested material surfaces on the physiology of the bacteria, we tested the secretion of AI-2 signal by S. mutans embedded on those biofilms. Comparative transcriptome analyses indicated on changes in the S. mutans genome in biofilms formed onto different types of surfaces and enabled us to identify genes most differentially expressed on those surfaces. In addition, the levels of autoinducer-2 in biofilms from the various tested surfaces were different. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that gene expression of S. mutans differs in biofilms formed on tested surfaces, which manifest the physiological state of bacteria influenced by the type of surface material they accumulate onto. Moreover, the stressful circumstances of adjustment to the surface may persist in the bacteria enhancing intercellular signaling and surface dependent biofilm formation.

  7. The Development of Nitroxide Based Coatings for Biofilm Remediation- 154020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    combat biofilm formation and growth is to use small molecules that act through non-microbicidal mechanisms to inhibit and/or disperse biofilms ...of materials (such as titanium, stainless steel , aluminium etc.)? Experiment: Our approaches used to address each of the fundamental challenges are...surfaces for inhibition of biofilm growth in a static assay has shown that the surfaces have little effect on biofilm formation . This result is very

  8. Surface modification of platelet concentrate bags to reduce biofilm formation and transfusion sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Nieuwenhuis, Joels S T; Dempsey-Hibbert, Nina; Liauw, Christopher M; Whitehead, Kathryn A

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products poses a major risk in transfusion medicine, including transfusions involving platelet products. Although testing systems are in place for routine screening of platelet units, the formation of bacterial biofilms in such units may decrease the likelihood that bacteria will be detected. This work determined the surface properties of p-PVC platelet concentrate bags and investigated how these characteristics influenced biofilm formation. Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus epidermidis, two species commonly implicated in platelet contamination, were used to study biofilm growth. The platelet concentrate bags were physically flattened to determine if reducing the surface roughness altered biofilm formation. The results demonstrated that the flattening process of the platelet bags affected the chemistry of the surface and reduced the surface hydrophobicity. Flattening of the surfaces resulted in a reduction in biofilm formation for both species after 5 days, with S. marcescens demonstrating a greater reduction. However, there was no significant difference between the smooth and flat surfaces following 7 days' incubation for S. marcescens and no significant differences between any of the surfaces following 7 days' incubation for S. epidermidis. The results suggest that flattening the p-PVC surfaces may limit potential biofilm formation for the current duration of platelet storage time of 5 days. It is hoped that this work will enhance the understanding of how surface properties influence the development of microbial biofilms in platelet concentrate bags in order to devise a solution to discourage biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. D-Tagatose inhibits the growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasibul, Khaleque; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takaaki; Waki, Junpei; Tada, Ayano; Yoneda, Saori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is an important global health concern and Streptococcus mutans has been established as a major cariogenic bacterial species. Reports indicate that a rare sugar, D-tagatose, is not easily catabolized by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans GS-5 were examined. Monitoring S. mutans growth over a 24 h period revealed that D-tagatose prolonged the lag phase without interfering with the final cell yield. This growth retardation was also observed in the presence of 1% sucrose, although it was abolished by the addition of D-fructose. S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly inhibited by growth in sucrose media supplemented with 1 and 4% D-tagatose compared with that in a culture containing sucrose alone, while S. mutans formed granular biofilms in the presence of this rare sugar. The inhibitory effect of D-tagatose on S. mutans biofilm formation was significantly more evident than that of xylitol. Growth in sucrose media supplemented with D-tagatose significantly decreased the expression of glucosyltransferase, exo-β-fructosidase and D-fructose-specific phosphotransferase genes but not the expression of fructosyltransferase compared with the culture containing sucrose only. The activity of cell-associated glucosyltransferase in S. mutans was inhibited by 4% D-tagatose. These results indicate that D-tagatose reduces water-insoluble glucan production from sucrose by inhibiting glucosyltransferase activities, which limits access to the free D-fructose released during this process and retards the growth of S. mutans. Therefore, foods and oral care products containing D-tagatose are anticipated to reduce the risk of caries by inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation. PMID:29115611

  10. Enterococcus hirae biofilm formation on hospital material surfaces and effect of new biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lodovico, Silvia; Cataldi, Valentina; Di Campli, Emanuela; Ancarani, Elisabetta; Cellini, Luigina; Di Giulio, Mara

    2017-08-02

    Nowadays, the bacterial contamination in the hospital environment is of particular concern because the hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), also known as nosocomial infections, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. This work evaluated the capability of Enterococcus hirae to form biofilm on different surfaces and the action of two biocides on the produced biofilms. The biofilm formation of E. hirae ATCC 10541 was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces through the biomass quantification and the cell viability at 20 and 37 °C. The effect of LH IDROXI FAST and LH ENZYCLEAN SPRAY biocides on biomasses was expressed as percentage of biofilm reduction. E. hirae at 20 and 37 °C produced more biofilm on the stainless steel in respect to the polystyrene surface. The amount of viable cells was greater at 20 °C than with 37 °C on the two analyzed surfaces. Biocides revealed a good anti-biofilm activity with the most effect for LH ENZYCLEAN SPRAY on polystyrene and stainless steel at 37 °C with a maximum biofilm reduction of 85.72 and 86.37%, respectively. E. hirae is a moderate biofilm producer depending on surface material and temperature, and the analyzed biocides express a remarkable antibiofilm action. The capability of E. hirae to form biofilm can be associated with its increasing incidence in hospital-acquired infections, and the adoption of suitable disinfectants is strongly recommended.

  11. Biofilm formation and ethanol inhibition by bacterial contaminants of biofuel fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Joseph O; Leathers, Timothy D; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Anderson, Amber M; Nunnally, Melinda S

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contaminants can inhibit ethanol production in biofuel fermentations, and even result in stuck fermentations. Contaminants may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. A two-year longitudinal study was conducted of bacterial contaminants from a Midwestern dry grind corn fuel ethanol facility. Among eight sites sampled in the facility, the combined liquefaction stream and yeast propagation tank were consistently contaminated, leading to contamination of early fermentation tanks. Among 768 contaminants isolated, 92% were identified as Lactobacillus sp., with the most abundant species being Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus mucosae, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Seven percent of total isolates showed the ability to form biofilms in pure cultures, and 22% showed the capacity to significantly inhibit ethanol production. However, these traits were not correlated. Ethanol inhibition appeared to be related to acetic acid production by contaminants, particularly by obligately heterofermentative species such as L. fermentum and L. mucosae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anitha, V C; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Woo Joo, Sang; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Ki Min, Bong

    2015-01-01

    Titania (TiO 2 ) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 − 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO 2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ∼17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells. (paper)

  13. Biofilm inhibition activity of traditional medicinal plants from Northwestern Argentina against native pathogen and environmental microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Mariana Romero

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Plants have been commonly used in popular medicine of most cultures for the treatment of disease. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of certain Argentine plants used in traditional medicine has been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial, anti-biofilm, and anti-cell adherence activities of native plants (Larrea divaricata, Tagetes minuta, Tessaria absinthioides, Lycium chilense, and Schinus fasciculatus collected in northwestern Argentina. METHODS: The activities of the five plant species were evaluated in Bacillus strains and clinical strains of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolated from northwestern Argentina and identified by 16S rDNA. RESULT: Lycium chilense and Schinus fasciculatus were the most effective antimicrobial plant extracts (15.62µg/ml and 62.50µg/ml for Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1 and Bacillus sp. Mcn4, respectively. The highest (66% anti-biofilm activity against Bacillus sp. Mcn4 was observed with T. absinthioides and L. divaricate extracts. The highest (68% anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1 was observed with L. chilense extract. T. minuta, T. absinthioides, and L. divaricata showed percentages of anti-biofilm activity of between 55% and 62%. The anti-adherence effects of T. minuta and L. chilense observed in Bacillus sp. Mcn4 reflected a difference of only 22% and 10%, respectively, between anti-adherence and biofilm inhibition. Thus, the inhibition of biofilm could be related to cell adherence. In Staphylococcus sp. Mcr1, all plant extracts produced low anti-adherence percentages. CONCLUSION: These five species may represent a source of alternative drugs derived from plant extracts, based on ethnobotanical knowledge from northwest Argentina.

  14. Inhibiting effects of Streptococcus salivarius on competence-stimulating peptide-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, S; Yonezawa, H; Motegi, M; Nakao, R; Yoneda, S; Watanabe, H; Yamazaki, T; Senpuku, H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of Streptococcus salivarius on the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans were investigated. Biofilms were grown on 96-well microtiter plates coated with salivary components in tryptic soy broth without dextrose supplemented with 0.25% sucrose. Biofilm formations were stained using safranin and quantification of stained biofilms was performed by measuring absorbance at 492 nm. S. mutans formed substantial biofilms, whereas biofilms of S. salivarius were formed poorly in the medium conditions used. Furthermore, in combination cultures, S. salivarius strongly inhibited biofilm formation when cultured with S. mutans. This inhibition occurred in the early phase of biofilm formation and was dependent on inactivation of the CSP of S. mutans, which is associated with competence, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial activity of the bacterium, and is induced by expression of the comC gene. Comparisons between the S. mutans clinical strains FSC-3 and FSC-3DeltaglrA in separate dual-species cultures with S. salivarius indicated that the presence of the bacitracin transport ATP-binding protein gene glrA caused susceptibility to inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation by S. salivarius, and was also associated with the regulation of CSP production by com gene-dependent quorum sensing systems. It is considered that regulation of CSP by glrA in S. mutans and CSP inactivation by S. salivarius are important functions for cell-to-cell communication between biofilm bacteria and oral streptococci such as S. salivarius. Our results provide useful information for understanding the ecosystem of oral streptococcal biofilms, as well as the competition between and coexistence of multiple species in the oral cavity.

  15. Biofilm formation in geometries with different surface curvature and oxygen availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A; Kim, Harold D; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto; Marquez, Samantha M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria in the natural environment exist as interface-associated colonies known as biofilms . Complex mechanisms are often involved in biofilm formation and development. Despite the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation, it remains unclear how physical effects in standing cultures influence biofilm development. The topology of the solid interface has been suggested as one of the physical cues influencing bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm development. Using the model organism Bacillus subtilis, we study the transformation of swimming bacteria in liquid culture into robust biofilms in a range of confinement geometries (planar, spherical and toroidal) and interfaces (air/water, silicone/water, and silicone elastomer/water). We find that B. subtilis form submerged biofilms at both solid and liquid interfaces in addition to air-water pellicles. When confined, bacteria grow on curved surfaces of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. However, the confinement geometry does affect the resulting biofilm roughness and relative coverage. We also find that the biofilm location is governed by oxygen availability as well as by gravitational effects; these compete with each other in some situations. Overall, our results demonstrate that confinement geometry is an effective way to control oxygen availability and subsequently biofilm growth. (paper)

  16. Growth, viability and architecture of biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes formed on abiotic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Barbosa dos Reis-Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can persist in food processing plants for many years, even when appropriate hygienic measures are in place, with potential for contaminating ready-to-eat products and, its ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces certainly contributes for the environmental persistence. In this research, L. monocytogenes was grown in biofilms up 8 days attached to stainless steel and glass surfaces, contributing for advancing the knowledge on architecture of mature biofilms, since many literature studies carried out on this topic considered only early stages of cell adhesion. In this study, biofilm populations of two strains of L. monocytogenes (serotypes 1/2a and 4b on stainless steel coupons and glass were examined using regular fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and classic culture method. The biofilms formed were not very dense and microscopic observations revealed uneven biofilm structures, with presence of exopolymeric matrix surrounding single cells, small aggregates and microcolonies, in a honeycomb-like arrangement. Moreover, planktonic population of L. monocytogenes (present in broth media covering the abiotic surface remained stable throughout the incubation time, which indicates an efficient dispersal mechanism, since the culture medium was replaced daily. In conclusion, even if these strains of L. monocytogenes were not able to form thick multilayer biofilms, it was noticeable their high persistence on abiotic surfaces, reinforcing the need to focus on measures to avoid biofilm formation, instead of trying to eradicate mature biofilms.

  17. Growth, viability and architecture of biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes formed on abiotic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Teixeira, Fernanda Barbosa Dos; Alves, Virgínia Farias; de Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can persist in food processing plants for many years, even when appropriate hygienic measures are in place, with potential for contaminating ready-to-eat products and, its ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces certainly contributes for the environmental persistence. In this research, L. monocytogenes was grown in biofilms up 8 days attached to stainless steel and glass surfaces, contributing for advancing the knowledge on architecture of mature biofilms, since many literature studies carried out on this topic considered only early stages of cell adhesion. In this study, biofilm populations of two strains of L. monocytogenes (serotypes 1/2a and 4b) on stainless steel coupons and glass were examined using regular fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and classic culture method. The biofilms formed were not very dense and microscopic observations revealed uneven biofilm structures, with presence of exopolymeric matrix surrounding single cells, small aggregates and microcolonies, in a honeycomb-like arrangement. Moreover, planktonic population of L. monocytogenes (present in broth media covering the abiotic surface) remained stable throughout the incubation time, which indicates an efficient dispersal mechanism, since the culture medium was replaced daily. In conclusion, even if these strains of L. monocytogenes were not able to form thick multilayer biofilms, it was noticeable their high persistence on abiotic surfaces, reinforcing the need to focus on measures to avoid biofilm formation, instead of trying to eradicate mature biofilms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  18. Planctomycetes dominate biofilms on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea

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    Øvreås Lise

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria belonging to Planctomycetes display several unique morphological and genetic features and are found in a wide variety of habitats on earth. Their ecological roles in these habitats are still poorly understood. Planctomycetes have previously been detected throughout the year on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea from southwestern Norway. We aimed to make a detailed investigation of the abundance and phylogenetic diversity of planctomycetes inhabiting these kelp surfaces. Results Planctomycetes accounted for 51-53% of the bacterial biofilm cells in July and September and 24% in February according to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH results. Several separate planctomycetes lineages within Pirellulae, Planctomyces and OM190 were represented in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and the most abundant clones belonged to yet uncultured lineages. In contrast to the abundance, the diversity of the planctomycete populations increased from July to February and was probably influenced by the aging of the kelp tissue. One planctomycete strain that was closely related to Rhodopirellula baltica was isolated using selective cultivation techniques. Conclusions Biofilms on surfaces of L. hyperborea display an even higher proportion of planctomycetes compared to other investigated planctomycete-rich habitats such as open water, sandy sediments and peat bogs. The findings agree well with the hypothesis of the role of planctomycetes as degraders of sulfated polymeric carbon in the marine environment as kelps produce such substances. In addition, the abundant planctomycete populations on kelp surfaces and in association with other eukaryotes suggest that coexistence with eukaryotes may be a key feature of many planctomycete lifestyles.

  19. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces of variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Iversen, Anders

    L.Biofilm formation on surfaces in food production and processing can deteriorate the quality of food products and be a hazard to consumers. The food industry currently uses a number of approaches to either remove biofilm or prevent its formation. Due to the inherent resilience of bacteria...... in biofilm, a particularly attractive approach is the modification of surfaces with the aim to impede the first step in biofilm formation, namely bacterial adhesion. Surface properties such as hydrophobicity, roughness and predisposition for fouling by protein are recognised as important in bacterial...... adhesion. Sol-gel technology and the recent availability of organic modified silicas have lead to development of hybrid organic/inorganic glass ceramic coatings with specialised surface properties. In this study we investigate bacterial adhesion and the subsequent biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS...

  20. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR CONTROLLING MICROBIAL ADHESION AND BIOFILM FORMATION OF SURFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes how coating of surfaces with an extract, particularly a fish extract, can significantly reduce microbial adhesion, attachment, colonization and biofilm formation on surfaces. Such reduction of microbial adherence, attachment and colonization will be applicable...

  1. New quantitative image analysis of staphylococcal biofilms on the surfaces of nontranslucent metallic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouichi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Yonekura, Akihiko; Nishimura, Seisuke; Kajiyama, Shiro; Hirakata, Yoichi; Shindo, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    Implant-related infection after orthopedic surgery is difficult to cure. One of the causes of infection is the bacterial biofilm that forms around biomaterials used during surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate bacterial biofilms extensively to resolve the problems of these postoperative infections. However, no established culture method or quantification system exists for bacterial biofilms grown on the surface of the metallic biomaterials used in orthopedics, which are nonradiolucent. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method to evaluate the difference in resistance of stainless steel versus titanium to staphylococcal biofilms and the efficacy of antibiotics against biofilms. The bacterial strains used in this study were three Staphylococcus aureus stains: strain Seattle 1945 and two clinical strains cultured from postoperative infections. Staphylococcal biofilms were formed on stainless steel washers (SUS304) and titanium washers (pure titanium). They were stained with crystal violet and were examined with a digital microscope to calculate the bacterial coverage rate (BCR) by NIH imaging. The BCR of S. aureus biofilms formed on stainless steel and titanium washers increased over time. At 24, 48, and 72 h after cultivation, the amount of biofilm on the surface of the stainless steel washers was significantly greater or tended to be greater than that on the titanium. Cefazolin was applied to the obtained biofilms of two clinically isolated S. aureus strains. Cefazolin did not eradicate the biofilms but significantly reduced the biofilm of one strain. The newly developed quantitative method (static microtube culture and measurement system) was useful for assessing the amount of bacterial biofilms on the surface of nontranslucent biomaterial. We found that titanium may be more resistant to bacterial infection than stainless steel. To control implant-related severe infections, the biomaterials should be assessed from the viewpoint of

  2. Biofilm formation in surface and drinking water distribution systems in Mafikeng, South Africa

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    Suma George Mulamattathil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor quality source water and poorly treated reused wastewater may result in poor quality drinking water that has a higher potential to form biofilms. A biofilm is a group of microorganisms which adhere to a surface. We investigated biofilm growth in the drinking water distribution systems in the Mafikeng area, in the North- West Province of South Africa. Analysis was conducted to determine the presence of faecal coliforms, total coliforms, Pseudomonas spp. and Aeromonas spp. in the biofilms. Biofilms were grown on a device that contained copper and galvanised steel coupons. A mini tap filter – a point-of-use treatment device which can be used at a single faucet – was also used to collect samples. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that multi-species biofilms developed on all the coupons as well as on the point-of-use filters. Galvanised steel and carbon filters had the highest density of biofilm. Total coliforms, faecal coliforms and Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from raw water biofilm coupons only. Aeromonas spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from filters. The susceptibility of selected isolates was tested against 11 antibiotics of clinical interest. The most prevalent antibiotic resistance phenotype observed was KF-AP-C-E-OT-K-TM-A. The presence of virulence genes was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. These results indicate that bacteria present in the water have the ability to colonise as biofilms and drinking water biofilms may be a reservoir for opportunistic bacteria including Pseudomonas and Aeromonas species.

  3. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on composite resins containing ursolic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyeon; Song, Minju; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Park, Sung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid (UA)-containing composites on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm. Materials and Methods Composite resins with five different concentrations (0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt%) of UA (U6753, Sigma Aldrich) were prepared, and their flexural strengths were measured according to ISO 4049. To evaluate the effect of carbohydrate source on biofilm formation, either glucose or sucrose was used as a nutrient source, and to investigate the effect of saliva treatment, the specimen were treated with either unstimulated whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). For biofilm assay, composite disks were transferred to S. mutans suspension and incubated for 24 hr. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed with PBS and sonicated. The colony forming units (CFU) of the disrupted biofilm cultures were enumerated. For growth inhibition test, the composites were placed on a polystyrene well cluster, and S. mutans suspension was inoculated. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was recorded by Infinite F200 pro apparatus (TECAN). One-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction were used for the data analyses. Results The flexural strength values did not show significant difference at any concentration (p > 0.01). In biofilm assay, the CFU score decreased as the concentration of UA increased. The influence of saliva pretreatment was conflicting. The sucrose groups exhibited higher CFU score than glucose group (p composite showed inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and growth. PMID:23741708

  4. Biofilm growth on polyvinylchloride surface incubated in suboptimal microbial warm water and effect of sanitizers on biofilm removal post biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in vitro experiment was conducted to understand the nature of biofilm growth on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surface when exposed to sub optimal quality microbial water (> 4 log10 cfu/ml) obtained from poultry drinking water source mimicking water in waterlines during the first week of poultry broodi...

  5. Probiotic Lactobacillus sp. inhibit growth, biofilm formation and gene expression of caries-inducing Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfi, Reham; Abd El-Rahman, Ola A; Zafer, Mai M; Ashour, Hossam M

    2018-03-01

    Streptococcus mutans contributes significantly to dental caries, which arises from homoeostasic imbalance between host and microbiota. We hypothesized that Lactobacillus sp. inhibits growth, biofilm formation and gene expression of Streptococcus mutans. Antibacterial (agar diffusion method) and antibiofilm (crystal violet assay) characteristics of probiotic Lactobacillus sp. against Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) were evaluated. We investigated whether Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 393), Lactobacillus reuteri (ATCC 23272), Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 14917) or Lactobacillus salivarius (ATCC 11741) inhibit expression of Streptococcus mutans genes involved in biofilm formation, quorum sensing or stress survival using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Growth changes (OD600) in the presence of pH-neutralized, catalase-treated or trypsin-treated Lactobacillus sp. supernatants were assessed to identify roles of organic acids, peroxides and bacteriocin. Susceptibility testing indicated antibacterial (pH-dependent) and antibiofilm activities of Lactobacillus sp. against Streptococcus mutans. Scanning electron microscopy revealed reduction in microcolony formation and exopolysaccharide structural changes. Of the oral normal flora, L. salivarius exhibited the highest antibiofilm and peroxide-dependent antimicrobial activities. All biofilm-forming cells treated with Lactobacillus sp. supernatants showed reduced expression of genes involved in exopolysaccharide production, acid tolerance and quorum sensing. Thus, Lactobacillus sp. can inhibit tooth decay by limiting growth and virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Evaluation of modified stainless steel surfaces targeted to reduce biofilm formation by common milk sporeformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Shivali; Anand, Sanjeev; Huang, Kang; Goddard, Julie; Metzger, Lloyd; Amamcharla, Jayendra

    2016-12-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel (SS) surfaces poses a great threat to the quality of milk and other dairy products as the biofilm-embedded bacteria can survive thermal processing. Established biofilms offer cleaning challenges because they are resistant to most of the regular cleaning protocols. Sporeforming thermoduric organisms entrapped within biofilm matrix can also form heat-resistant spores, and may result in a long-term persistent contamination. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different nonfouling coatings [AMC 18 (Advanced Materials Components Express, Lemont, PA), Dursan (SilcoTek Corporation, Bellefonte, PA), Ni-P-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Avtec Finishing Systems, New Hope, MN), and Lectrofluor 641 (General Magnaplate Corporation, Linden, NJ)] on SS plate heat exchanger surfaces, to resist the formation of bacterial biofilms. It was hypothesized that modified SS surfaces would promote a lesser amount of deposit buildup and bacterial adhesion as compared with the native SS surface. Vegetative cells of aerobic sporeformers, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 15952), Bacillus licheniformis (ATCC 6634), and Bacillus sporothermodurans (DSM 10599), were used to study biofilm development on the modified and native SS surfaces. The adherence of these organisms, though influenced by surface energy and hydrophobicity, exhibited no apparent relation with surface roughness. The Ni-P-PTFE coating exhibited the least bacterial attachment and milk solid deposition, and hence, was the most resistant to biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy, which was used to visualize the extent of biofilm formation on modified and native SS surfaces, also revealed lower bacterial attachment on the Ni-P-PTFE as compared with the native SS surface. This study thus provides evidence of reduced biofilm formation on the modified SS surfaces. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier

  7. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients.

  8. Investigation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm growth on modified Au(111)-surfaces using AFM and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans constitute perhaps the most important direct cause of human dental caries formation. We have studied S. mutans biofilm formation and properties on Au(111)-surfaces modified by self-assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) of different thiol-based molecu...

  9. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the effects of magnolol: inhibition of autolysis and biofilms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dacheng; Jin, Qi; Xiang, Hua; Wang, Wei; Guo, Na; Zhang, Kaiyu; Tang, Xudong; Meng, Rizeng; Feng, Haihua; Liu, Lihui; Wang, Xiaohong; Liang, Junchao; Shen, Fengge; Xing, Mingxun; Deng, Xuming; Yu, Lu

    2011-01-01

    The targeting of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm structures are now gaining interest as an alternative strategy for developing new types of antimicrobial agents. Magnolol (MOL) shows inhibitory activity against S. aureus biofilms and Triton X-100-induced autolysis in vitro, although there are no data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MOL action in bacteria. The molecular basis of the markedly reduced autolytic phenotype and biofilm inhibition triggered by MOL were explored using transcriptomic analysis, and the transcription of important genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. The inhibition of autolysis by MOL was evaluated using quantitative bacteriolytic assays and zymographic analysis, and antibiofilm activity assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to elucidate the inhibition of biofilm formation caused by MOL in 20 clinical isolates or standard strains. The reduction in cidA, atl, sle1, and lytN transcript levels following MOL treatment was consistent with the induced expression of their autolytic repressors lrgA, lrgB, arlR, and sarA. MOL generally inhibited or reversed the expression of most of the genes involved in biofilm production. The growth of S. aureus strain ATCC 25923 in the presence of MOL dose-dependently led to decreases in Triton X-100-induced autolysis, extracellular murein hydrolase activity, and the amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA). MOL may impede biofilm formation by reducing the expression of cidA, a murein hydrolase regulator, to inhibit autolysis and eDNA release, or MOL may directly repress biofilm formation. MOL shows in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical and standard S. aureus strains grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures, suggesting that the structure of MOL may potentially be used as a basis for the development of drugs targeting biofilms.

  10. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the effects of magnolol: inhibition of autolysis and biofilms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The targeting of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm structures are now gaining interest as an alternative strategy for developing new types of antimicrobial agents. Magnolol (MOL shows inhibitory activity against S. aureus biofilms and Triton X-100-induced autolysis in vitro, although there are no data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MOL action in bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The molecular basis of the markedly reduced autolytic phenotype and biofilm inhibition triggered by MOL were explored using transcriptomic analysis, and the transcription of important genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. The inhibition of autolysis by MOL was evaluated using quantitative bacteriolytic assays and zymographic analysis, and antibiofilm activity assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to elucidate the inhibition of biofilm formation caused by MOL in 20 clinical isolates or standard strains. The reduction in cidA, atl, sle1, and lytN transcript levels following MOL treatment was consistent with the induced expression of their autolytic repressors lrgA, lrgB, arlR, and sarA. MOL generally inhibited or reversed the expression of most of the genes involved in biofilm production. The growth of S. aureus strain ATCC 25923 in the presence of MOL dose-dependently led to decreases in Triton X-100-induced autolysis, extracellular murein hydrolase activity, and the amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA. MOL may impede biofilm formation by reducing the expression of cidA, a murein hydrolase regulator, to inhibit autolysis and eDNA release, or MOL may directly repress biofilm formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MOL shows in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical and standard S. aureus strains grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures, suggesting that the structure of MOL may potentially be used as a basis for the development of drugs targeting biofilms.

  11. Biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces and a micro/nanofabrication-based preventive strategy using colloidal lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Vyas, Varun; Salve, Tushar S; Dellasega, David; Cortelli, Daniele; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Gade, W N

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of implant devices as a result of biofilm formation through bacterial infection has instigated major research in this area, particularly to understand the mechanism of bacterial cell/implant surface interactions and their preventions. In this paper, we demonstrate a controlled method of nanostructured titanium oxide surface synthesis using supersonic cluster beam depositions. The nanoscale surface characterization using atomic force microscopy and a profilometer display a regulated evolution in nanomorphology and physical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses display a stoichiometric nanostructured TiO 2 film. Measurement of the water contact angle shows a nominal increase in the hydrophilic nature of ns-TiO 2 films, whereas the surface energy increases with decreasing contact angle. Bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli interaction with nanostructured surfaces shows an increase in adhesion and biofilm formation with increasing nanoscale morphological properties. Conversely, limiting ns-TiO 2 film distribution to micro/nanopatterned designed substrates integrated with bovine serum albumin functionalization leads to a reduction in biofilm formations due to a globally decreased bacterial cell–surface interaction area. The results have potential implications in inhibiting bacterial colonization and promoting mammalian cell–implant interactions. (paper)

  12. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  13. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Silva-Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4.Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain´s site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion.Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  14. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Dias, Ana; Miranda, Isabel M; Branco, Joana; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio G

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4. Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However, the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain's site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion. Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  15. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  16. Inhibition of biofilm formation by D-tyrosine: Effect of bacterial type and D-tyrosine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cong; Li, Xuening; Zhang, Nan; Wen, Donghui; Liu, Charles; Li, Qilin

    2016-04-01

    D-Tyrosine inhibits formation and triggers disassembly of bacterial biofilm and has been proposed for biofouling control applications. This study probes the impact of D-tyrosine in different biofilm formation stages in both G+ and G- bacteria, and reveals a non-monotonic correlation between D-tyrosine concentration and biofilm inhibition effect. In the attachment stage, cell adhesion was studied in a flow chamber, where D-tyrosine caused significant reduction in cell attachment. Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy as well as quantitative analysis of cellular biomass and extracellular polymeric substances. D-Tyrosine exhibited strong inhibitive effects on both biofilms with an effective concentration as low as 5 nM; the biofilms responded to D-tyrosine concentration change in a non-monotonic, bi-modal pattern. In addition, D-tyrosine showed notable and different impact on EPS production by G+ and G- bacteria. Extracellular protein was decreased in P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased in those of B. subtilis. Exopolysaccharides production by P. aeruginosa was increased at low concentrations and reduced at high concentrations while no impact was found in B. subtilis. These results suggest that distinct mechanisms are at play at different D-tyrosine concentrations and they may be species specific. Dosage of D-tyrosine must be carefully controlled for biofouling control applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quercetin Assists Fluconazole to Inhibit Biofilm Formations of Fluconazole-Resistant Candida Albicans in In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Managements of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Gao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is a common gynecological disease. Candida albicans is believed to be mainly implicated in VVC occurrence, the biofilm of which is one of the virulence factors responsible for resistance to traditional antifungal agents especially to fluconazole (FCZ. Quercetin (QCT is a dietary flavonoid and has been demonstrated to be antifungal against C. albicans biofilm. Methods: 17 C. albicans isolates including 15 clinical ones isolated from VVC patients were employed to investigate the effects of QCT and/or FCZ on the inhibition of C. albicans biofilm. Results: We observed that 64 µg/mL QCT and/or 128 µg/mL FCZ could (i be synergistic against 10 FCZ-resistant planktonic and 17 biofilm cells of C. albicans, (ii inhibit fungal adherence, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH, flocculation, yeast-to-hypha transition, metabolism, thickness and dispersion of biofilms; (iii down-regulate the expressions of ALS1, ALS3, HWP1, SUN41, UME6 and ECE1 and up-regulate the expressions of PDE2, NRG1 and HSP90, and we also found that (iv the fungal burden was reduced in vaginal mucosa and the symptoms were alleviated in a murine VVC model after the treatments of 5 mg/kg QCT and/or 20 mg/kg FCZ. Conclusion: Together with these results, it could be demonstrated that QCT could be a favorable antifungal agent and a promising synergist with FCZ in the clinical management of VVC caused by C. albicans biofilm.

  18. Extract from the fermented soybean product Natto inhibits Vibrio biofilm formation and reduces shrimp mortality from Vibrio harveyi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatip, Pattanan; Nitin Chandra Teja, D; Flegel, Timothy W; Soowannayan, Chumporn

    2018-01-01

    Many bacteria, including Vibrio pathogens of shrimp, need to colonize and/or form biofilms in hosts or the environment to cause disease. Thus, one possible control strategy for shrimp Vibriosis is biofilm inhibition. With this objective, an extract from the Japanese fermented soybean product, Natto was tested with the luminescent shrimp pathogen Vibrio harveyi (VH) for its ability to inhibit or degrade biofilm and to interfere with cell growth in broth. Natto is a traditional fermentation product of Bacillus subtilis var Natto (BSN1). Using 96 well microtiter plates coated with 0.4% chitosan, we found that biofilm formation by VH was inhibited, while growth in parallel broth cultures was not. When an extract from Natto prepared using BSN1 was mixed with feed for the whiteleg shrimp Penaeus vannamei before immersion challenge with V. harveyi at 10 6  cfu/ml, survival was significantly higher (p≤0.05) than for control shrimp given feed without these additives. Further work done to test whether d-amino acids were involved in biofilm formation as previously reported for B. subtilis, Staphylococus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa gave negative results. In conclusion, we discovered that Natto extract can inhibit Vibrio biofilm formation and that it or BSN1 alone added to shrimp feed can significantly reduce shrimp mortality in immersion challenges with pathogenic VH. This shows some promise for possible application against Vibriosis in shrimp since Natto is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) for human consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term efficacy of denture cleansers in preventing Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Coelho Vieira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the long-term efficacy of denture cleansers against Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface. Specimens were fabricated of a poly(methyl methacrylate-based denture liner and had their surface roughness evaluated at baseline and after cleansing treatments. C. albicans or C. glabrata biofilms were formed on liner surface for 48 h, and then the specimens were randomly assigned to one of cleaning treatments: two alkaline peroxides (soaking for 3 or 15 min, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (10 min or distilled water (control; 15 min. After the treatments, the specimens were sonicated to disrupt the biofilm, and residual cells were counted (cell/mL. Long-term effectiveness of the cleaning processes was determined by submitting a set of cleaned specimens to biofilm growth conditions for 48 h followed by estimation of cell counts. The topography of specimens after cleaning treatments was analyzed by SEM. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α; = 0.05. Results of cell count estimation showed significant differences in cleanliness among the treatments (p 0.05 was observed among the Candida species regarding the recolonization condition. Alkaline denture cleansers showed similar cleaning performance and both differed from the control (p < 0.001. Sodium hypochlorite was the only treatment that removed biofilm efficiently, since no viable cells were found after its use. In conclusion, alkaline peroxide denture cleansers were not effective in removing Candida spp. biofilm from denture liner surfaces and preventing biofilm recolonization.

  20. Microbial biofilm detection on food contact surfaces by macro-scale fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging methods were utilized to evaluate the potential of multispectral fluorescence methods for detection of pathogenic biofilm formations on four types of food contact surface materials: stainless steel, high density polyethylene (HDPE) commonly used for cutting boards,...

  1. Biofilm development by blastospores and hyphae of Candida albicans on abraded denture acrylic resin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah; Coulthwaite, Lisa; Loewy, Zvi; Scallan, Anthony; Verran, Joanna

    2014-10-01

    Candida albicans is a known etiologic agent of denture stomatitis. Candida hyphae exhibit the ability to respond directionally to environmental stimuli. This characteristic is thought to be important in the penetration of substrata such as resilient denture liners and host epithelium. It has been suggested that hyphal production also enhances adhesion and survival of Candida on host and denture surfaces. Surface roughness, in addition, can enhance adhesion where stronger interactions occur between cells and surface features of similar dimensions. The purpose of this study was to assess the development of hyphal and blastospore biofilms on abraded denture acrylic resin specimens and measure the ease of removal of these biofilms. Biofilms were grown for 48 hours on abraded 1-cm² denture acrylic resin specimens from adhered hyphal phase C albicans or from adhered blastospores. Subsequently, all specimens were stained with Calcofluor White and examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Biofilms were removed by vortex mixing in sterile phosphate buffered saline solution. Removed cells were filtered (0.2-μm pore size). Filters were dried at 37°C for 24 hours for dry weight measurements. Any cells that remained on the acrylic resin specimens were stained with 0.03% acridine orange and examined with epifluorescence microscopy. Biofilms grown from both cell types contained all morphologic forms of C albicans. Although the underlying surface topography did not affect the amount of biofilm produced, biofilms grown from hyphal phase Candida were visibly thicker and had greater biomass (Phyphae in early Candida biofilms increased biofilm mass and resistance to removal. Increased surface roughness enhances retention of hyphae and yeast cells, and, therefore, will facilitate plaque regrowth. Therefore, minimization of denture abrasion during cleaning is desirable. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Maíra Maciel Mattos de; Brugnera,Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves,Eduardo; Piccoli,Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ?C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was de...

  3. Resistance of bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface to disinfecting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królasik, Joanna; Zakowska, Zofia; Krepska, Milena; Klimek, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    The natural ability of microorganisms for adhesion and biofilm formation on various surfaces is one of the factors causing the inefficiency of a disinfection agent, despite its proven activity in vitro. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of disinfecting substances on bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface. A universally applied disinfecting agent was used in the tests. Bacterial strains: Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas putida, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus hominis strains, were isolated from food contact surfaces, after a cleaning and disinfection process. The disinfecting agent was a commercially available acid specimen based on hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid, the substance that was designed for food industry usage. Model tests were carried out on biofilm formed on stainless steel (type 304, no 4 finish). Biofilms were recorded by electron scanning microscope. The disinfecting agent in usable concentration, 0.5% and during 10 minutes was ineffective for biofilms. The reduction of cells in biofilms was only 1-2 logarithmic cycles. The use of the agent in higher concentration--1% for 30 minutes caused reduction of cell number by around 5 logarithmic cycles only in the case of one microorganism, M. luteus. For other types: L. innocua, P. putida, S. hominis, the requirements placed on disinfecting agents were not fulfilled. The results of experiments proved that bacterial biofilms are resistant to the disinfectant applied in its operational parameters. Disinfecting effectiveness was achieved after twofold increase of the agent's concentration.

  4. Zein nanocapsules as a tool for surface passivation, drug delivery and biofilm prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H. Kasper

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Current oral hygiene treatments focus on managing oral biofilms (i.e. dental plaque by broad antimicrobial strategies, indiscriminately killing both pathogenic and commensal microorganisms present in the oral cavity. In an effort to identify alternative approaches to antimicrobials, several research groups, including our own, have identified small molecule inhibitors that interrupt cell-cell signaling and biofilm formation, with potential to be selective against pathogens while leaving commensal flora unperturbed. A drawback to such inhibitors is their limited efficacy when used in acute exposures (e.g. mouthwash or brushing. In order to enhance bioavailability and maximize efficacy of these agents in a complex and dynamic environment such as the oral cavity, it is necessary to maintain a constant reservoir of the agents in situ. Therefore, we formulated a biofilm inhibitor delivery system by encapsulating an inhibitor of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide, into zein nanocapsules. Nanocapsules formed 110–235 nm particles in a liquid-liquid dispersion synthesis procedure with S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide, as determined by dynamic light scattering. The inhibitor-loaded nanocapsules were then used to cast a film and subsequent S. mutans biofilm formation at this surface was studied. Nanocapsule films loaded with biofilm inhibitors were shown to deter early S. mutans biofilm development at 24 h, as well as reduce total viable biofilm-recovered cells at 48 h. This demonstrates proof-of-concept that biofilm inhibitor-loaded zein nanocapsules can reduce S. mutans biofilm growth, and demonstrates a new approach to extend the time that dental plaque inhibitors are present at the tooth surface. This approach has the potential to delay recolonization of the tooth and reduce oral infection/disease.

  5. Food-safe modification of stainless steel food processing surfaces to reduce bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Tarek Samir; Asker, Dalal; Hatton, Benjamin D

    2018-06-11

    Biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces of food processing plants, leading to foodborne illness outbreaks, is enabled by the attachment and confinement within microscale cavities of surface roughness (grooves, scratches). We report Foodsafe Oil-based Slippery Coatings (FOSCs) for food processing surfaces that suppress bacterial adherence and biofilm formation by trapping residual oil lubricant within these surface cavities to block microbial growth. SS surfaces were chemically functionalized with alkylphosphonic acid to preferentially wet a layer of food grade oil. FOSCs reduced the effective surface roughness, the adhesion of organic food residue, and bacteria. FOSCs significantly reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on standard roughness SS-316 by 5 log CFU cm-2, and by 3 log CFU cm-2 for mirror-finished SS. FOSCs also enhanced surface cleanability, which we measured by bacterial counts after conventional detergent cleaning. Importantly, both SS grades maintained their anti-biofilm activity after erosion of the oil layer by surface wear with glass beads, which suggests there is a residual volume of oil that remains to block surface cavity defects. These results indicate the potential of such low-cost, scalable approaches to enhance the cleanability of SS food processing surfaces and improve food safety by reducing biofilm growth.

  6. Commensal coagulase-negative Staphylococcus from the udder of healthy cows inhibits biofilm formation of mastitis-related pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Paula; Bohl, Luciana Paola; Breser, María Laura; Orellano, María Soledad; Conesa, Agustín; Ferrero, Marcela Alejandra; Porporatto, Carina

    2017-08-01

    Bovine mastitis, considered the most important cause of economic losses in the dairy industry, is a major concern in veterinary medicine. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the main pathogens associated with intramammary infections, and bacterial biofilms are suspected to be responsible for the persistence of this disease. CNS from the udder are not necessarily associated with intramammary infections. In fact, some commensal CNS have been shown to have biological activities. This issue led us to screen exoproducts from commensal Staphylococcus chromogenes for anti-biofilm activity against different mastitis pathogens. The cell-free supernatant from S. chromogenes LN1 (LN1-CFS) was confirmed to display a non-biocidal inhibition of pathogenic biofilms. The supernatant was subjected to various treatments to estimate the nature of the biofilm-inhibiting compounds. The results showed that the bioactive compound >5KDa in mass is sensitive to thermal treatment and proteinase K digestion, suggesting its protein properties. LN1-CFS was able to significantly inhibit S. aureus and CNS biofilm formation in a dose-independent manner and without affecting the viability of bovine cells. These findings reveal a new activity of the udder microflora of healthy animals. Studies are underway to purify and identify the anti-biofilm biocompound and to evaluate its biological activity in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-14

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca(2+) by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus.

  8. Capric acid secreted by S. boulardii inhibits C. albicans filamentous growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Murzyn

    Full Text Available Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and

  9. Capric Acid Secreted by S. boulardii Inhibits C. albicans Filamentous Growth, Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzyn, Anna; Krasowska, Anna; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Dziadkowiec, Dorota; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID

  10. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Maciel Mattos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4 stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ºC and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  11. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  12. Evaluation of the ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms on six different biomedical relevant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, C; Wu, J; Rickard, A H; Xi, C

    2016-10-01

    The human opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, has the propensity to form biofilms and frequently cause medical device-related infections in hospitals. However, the physio-chemical properties of medical surfaces, in addition to bacterial surface properties, will affect colonization and biofilm development. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of A. baumannii to form biofilms on six different materials common to the hospital environment: glass, porcelain, stainless steel, rubber, polycarbonate plastic and polypropylene plastic. Biofilms were developed on material coupons in a CDC biofilm reactor. Biofilms were visualized and quantified using fluorescent staining and imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and by direct viable cell counts. Image analysis of CLSM stacks indicated that the mean biomass values for biofilms grown on glass, rubber, porcelain, polypropylene, stainless steel and polycarbonate were 0·04, 0·26, 0·62, 1·00, 2·08 and 2·70 μm(3) /μm(2) respectively. Polycarbonate developed statistically more biofilm mass than glass, rubber, porcelain and polypropylene. Viable cell counts data were in agreement with the CLSM-derived data. In conclusion, polycarbonate was the most accommodating surface for A. baumannii ATCC 17978 to form biofilms while glass was least favourable. Alternatives to polycarbonate for use in medical and dental devices may need to be considered. In the hospital environment, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most persistent and difficult to control opportunistic pathogens. The persistence of A. baumannii is due, in part, to its ability to colonize surfaces and form biofilms. This study demonstrates that A. baumannii can form biofilms on a variety of different surfaces and develops substantial biofilms on polycarbonate - a thermoplastic material that is often used in the construction of medical devices. The findings highlight the need to further study the in

  13. Testing of Biologically Inhibiting Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill Madsen, Thomas; Larsen, Erup

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this course is to examine a newly developed biologically inhibiting material with regards to galvanic corrosion and electrochemical properties. More in detail, the concern was how the material would react when exposed to cleaning agents, here under CIP cleaning (Cleaning...

  14. Inhibition of biofilm formation, quorum sensing and infection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by natural products-inspired organosulfur compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel C Cady

    Full Text Available Using a microplate-based screening assay, the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation of several S-substituted cysteine sulfoxides and their corresponding disulfide derivatives were evaluated. From our library of compounds, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and its breakdown product, diphenyl disulfide, significantly reduced the amount of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa at levels equivalent to the active concentration of 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (NPO (1 mM. Unlike NPO, which is an established inhibitor of bacterial biofilms, our active compounds did not reduce planktonic cell growth and only affected biofilm formation. When used in a Drosophila-based infection model, both S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and diphenyl disulfide significantly reduced the P. aeruginosa recovered 18 h post infection (relative to the control, and were non-lethal to the fly hosts. The possibility that the observed biofilm inhibitory effects were related to quorum sensing inhibition (QSI was investigated using Escherichia coli-based reporters expressing P. aeruginosa lasR or rhIR response proteins, as well as an endogenous P. aeruginosa reporter from the lasI/lasR QS system. Inhibition of quorum sensing by S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide was observed in all of the reporter systems tested, whereas diphenyl disulfide did not exhibit QSI in either of the E. coli reporters, and showed very limited inhibition in the P. aeruginosa reporter. Since both compounds inhibit biofilm formation but do not show similar QSI activity, it is concluded that they may be functioning by different pathways. The hypothesis that biofilm inhibition by the two active compounds discovered in this work occurs through QSI is discussed.

  15. Culture Supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Adhesion to HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuko; Cho, Otomi; Sugita, Takashi; Ogishima, Daiki; Takeda, Satoru

    2018-03-30

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common superficial infection of the vaginal mucous membranes caused by the fungus Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to assess the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of the culture supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus, the predominant microbiota in Asian healthy women, on C. albicans biofilm formation. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was also investigated. Candida albicans biofilm was formed on polystyrene flat-bottomed 96-well plates, and the inhibitory effects on the initial colonization and maturation phases were determined using the XTT reduction assay. The expression levels of biofilm formation-associated genes (HWP1, ECE1, ALS3, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, and CPH1) were determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was evaluated by enumerating viable C. albicans cells. The culture supernatants of both Lactobacillus species inhibited the initial colonization and maturation of C. albicans biofilm. The expression levels of all biofilm formation-related genes were downregulated in the presence of Lactobacillus culture supernatant. The culture supernatant also inhibited C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. The culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by downregulating biofilm formation-related genes and C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. These findings support the notion that Lactobacillus metabolites may be useful alternatives to antifungal drugs for the management of VVC.

  16. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis enables mature biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces by Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; de Baura, Válter Antonio; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2014-01-01

    H. seropedicae associates endophytically and epiphytically with important poaceous crops and is capable of promoting their growth. The molecular mechanisms involved in plant colonization by this microrganism are not fully understood. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are usually necessary for bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, to other bacteria, and to form biofilms. The role of H. seropedicae SmR1 exopolysaccharide in biofilm formation on both inert and plant substrates was assessed by characterization of a mutant in the espB gene which codes for a glucosyltransferase. The mutant strain was severely affected in EPS production and biofilm formation on glass wool. In contrast, the plant colonization capacity of the mutant strain was not altered when compared to the parental strain. The requirement of EPS for biofilm formation on inert surface was reinforced by the induction of eps genes in biofilms grown on glass and polypropylene. On the other hand, a strong repression of eps genes was observed in H. seropedicae cells adhered to maize roots. Our data suggest that H. seropedicae EPS is a structural component of mature biofilms, but this development stage of biofilm is not achieved during plant colonization.

  17. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis enables mature biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces by Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Balsanelli

    Full Text Available H. seropedicae associates endophytically and epiphytically with important poaceous crops and is capable of promoting their growth. The molecular mechanisms involved in plant colonization by this microrganism are not fully understood. Exopolysaccharides (EPS are usually necessary for bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, to other bacteria, and to form biofilms. The role of H. seropedicae SmR1 exopolysaccharide in biofilm formation on both inert and plant substrates was assessed by characterization of a mutant in the espB gene which codes for a glucosyltransferase. The mutant strain was severely affected in EPS production and biofilm formation on glass wool. In contrast, the plant colonization capacity of the mutant strain was not altered when compared to the parental strain. The requirement of EPS for biofilm formation on inert surface was reinforced by the induction of eps genes in biofilms grown on glass and polypropylene. On the other hand, a strong repression of eps genes was observed in H. seropedicae cells adhered to maize roots. Our data suggest that H. seropedicae EPS is a structural component of mature biofilms, but this development stage of biofilm is not achieved during plant colonization.

  18. Aerobic Biofilms Grown from Athabasca Watershed Sediments Are Inhibited by Increasing Concentrations of Bituminous Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, John R.; Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Roy, Julie L.; Swerhone, George D. W.; Korber, Darren R.; Greer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Sediments from the Athabasca River and its tributaries naturally contain bitumen at various concentrations, but the impacts of this variation on the ecology of the river are unknown. Here, we used controlled rotating biofilm reactors in which we recirculated diluted sediments containing various concentrations of bituminous compounds taken from the Athabasca River and three tributaries. Biofilms exposed to sediments having low and high concentrations of bituminous compounds were compared. The latter were 29% thinner, had a different extracellular polysaccharide composition, 67% less bacterial biomass per μm2, 68% less cyanobacterial biomass per μm2, 64% less algal biomass per μm2, 13% fewer protozoa per cm2, were 21% less productive, and had a 33% reduced content in chlorophyll a per mm2 and a 20% reduction in the expression of photosynthetic genes, but they had a 23% increase in the expression of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation genes. Within the Bacteria, differences in community composition were also observed, with relatively more Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria and less Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in biofilms exposed to high concentrations of bituminous compounds. Altogether, our results suggest that biofilms that develop in the presence of higher concentrations of bituminous compounds are less productive and have lower biomass, linked to a decrease in the activities and abundance of photosynthetic organisms likely due to inhibitory effects. However, within this general inhibition, some specific microbial taxa and functional genes are stimulated because they are less sensitive to the inhibitory effects of bituminous compounds or can degrade and utilize some bitumen-associated compounds. PMID:24056457

  19. Inhibition of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by the Synthetic Lactoferricin Derived Peptide hLF1-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Paola; Fais, Roberta; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Tavanti, Arianna; Lupetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the synthetic peptide hLF1-11 against biofilm produced by clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different fluconazole susceptibility. The antibiofilm activity of the peptide hLF1-11 was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm cellular density, metabolic activity and sessile cell viability. The extent of morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms was also investigated microscopically. Transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production were analysed by qRT-PCR in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms. Exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) was used to rescue morphogenesis in cells exposed to the peptide. The results revealed that hLF1-11 exhibited an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all C. albicans isolates tested in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. Visual inspection of treated or untreated biofilm cells with an inverted microscope revealed a significant reduction in hyphal formation by hLF1-11 treated cells, as early as 3 hours of incubation. Moreover, hLF1-11 showed a reduced activity on preadherent cells. hLF1-11 induced the down-regulation of biofilm and hyphal-associated genes, which were predominantly regulated via the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Indeed, exogenous db-cAMP restored morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated cells. The hLF1-11 peptide significantly inhibited biofilm formation by C. albicans mainly at early stages, interfering with biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity, and affected morphogenesis through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence that hLF1-11 could represent a potential candidate for the prevention of biofilm formation by C. albicans.

  20. Dynamic Dispersal of Surface Layer Biofilm Induced by Nanosized TiO2 Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance and Waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Wang, Wei; Dai, You-Zhi; Fang, Fang; Wang, Gui-Xue; Shen, Yu

    2018-05-01

    Pollutant degradation is present mainly in the surface layer of biofilms, and the surface layer is the most vulnerable to impairment by toxic pollutants. In this work, the effects of nanosized TiO 2 (n-TiO 2 ) on the average thicknesses of Bacillus subtilis biofilm and on bacterial attachment on different surfaces were investigated. The binding mechanism of n-TiO 2 to the cell surface was also probed. The results revealed that n-TiO 2 caused biofilm dispersal and the thicknesses decreased by 2.0 to 2.6 μm after several hours of exposure. The attachment abilities of bacteria with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on hydrophilic surfaces were significantly reduced by 31% and 81% under 10 and 100 mg/liter of n-TiO 2 , respectively, whereas those of bacteria without EPS were significantly reduced by 43% and 87%, respectively. The attachment abilities of bacteria with and without EPS on hydrophobic surfaces were significantly reduced by 50% and 56%, respectively, under 100 mg/liter of n-TiO 2 The results demonstrated that biofilm dispersal can be attributed to the changes in the cell surface structure and the reduction of microbial attachment ability. IMPORTANCE Nanoparticles can penetrate into the outer layer of biofilm in a relatively short period and can bind onto EPS and bacterial surfaces. The current work probed the effects of nanosized TiO 2 (n-TiO 2 ) on biofilm thickness, bacterial migration, and surface properties of the cell in the early stage using the surface plasmon resonance waveguide mode. The results demonstrated that n-TiO 2 decreased the adhesive ability of both cell and EPS and induced bacterial migration and biofilm detachment in several hours. The decreased adhesive ability of microbes and EPS worked against microbial aggregation, reducing the effluent quality in the biological wastewater treatment process. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Interactions between multiple filaments and bacterial biofilms on the surface of an apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, CHENG; Maoyuan, XU; Shuhui, PAN; Xinpei, LU; Dawei, LIU

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the interactions between two dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) filaments and three bacterial biofilms are simulated. The modeling of a DBD streamer is studied by means of 2D finite element calculation. The model is described by the proper governing equations of air DBD at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The electric field in the computing domain and the self-consistent transportation of reactive species between a cathode and biofilms on the surface of an apple are realized by solving a Poisson equation and continuity equations. The electron temperature is solved by the electron energy conservation equation. The conductivity and permittivity of bacterial biofilms are considered, and the shapes of the bacterial biofilms are irregular in the uncertainty and randomness of colony growth. The distribution of the electrons suggests that two plasma channels divide into three plasma channels when the streamer are 1 mm from the biofilms. The toe-shapes of the biofilms and the simultaneous effect of two streamer heads result in a high electric field around the biofilms, therefore the stronger ionization facilitates the major part of two streamers combined into one streamer and three streamers arise. The distribution of the reactive oxygen species and the reactive nitrogen species captured by time fluences are non-uniform due to the toe-shaped bacterial biofilms. However, the plasma can intrude into the cavities in the adjacent biofilms due to the μm-scale mean free path. The two streamers case has a larger treatment area and realizes the simultaneous treatment of three biofilms compared with one streamer case.

  2. Modeling bacterial attachment to surfaces as an early stage of biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moustaid, Fadoua; Eladdadi, Amina; Uys, Lafras

    2013-06-01

    Biofilms are present in all natural, medical and industrial surroundings where bacteria live. Biofilm formation is a key factor in the growth and transport of both beneficial and harmful bacteria. While much is known about the later stages of biofilm formation, less is known about its initiation which is an important first step in the biofilm formation. In this paper, we develop a non-linear system of partial differential equations of Keller-Segel type model in one-dimensional space, which couples the dynamics of bacterial movement to that of the sensing molecules. In this case, bacteria perform a biased random walk towards the sensing molecules. We derive the boundary conditions of the adhesion of bacteria to a surface using zero-Dirichlet boundary conditions, while the equation describing sensing molecules at the interface needed particular conditions to be set. The numerical results show the profile of bacteria within the space and the time evolution of the density within the free-space and on the surface. Testing different parameter values indicate that significant amount of sensing molecules present on the surface leads to a faster bacterial movement toward the surface which is the first step of biofilm initiation. Our work gives rise to results that agree with the biological description of the early stages of biofilm formation.

  3. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG......) chains with two different functional groups (-PEG-NH2 and -PEG-CH3). Biofilm growth experiments using a mixed nitrifying bacterial culture revealed that the specific combination of PEG chains with amino groups resulted in most biofilm formation on both PP and PE samples. Detachment experiments showed...... structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH2 modification. The success of the-PEG-NH2 modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable...

  4. In vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic contact surfaces by outbreak-associated Vibrio harveyi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallaval Veera Bramha Chari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic food contact surfaces by Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi strains. Methods: Thirty six Gram-negative V. harveyi strains were isolated from various street vended seafood outlets in a food processing line and evaluated for their ability to produce mucoid biofilms on food contact surfaces using a microplate assay. Phenotypic characterization of mucoid biofilm producing V. harveyi strains were screened on Congo red agar, thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar and tryptic soy agar, respectively. Results: Only five V. harveyi strains (14% were mucoid biofilm producers characterized by formation of black colonies, whereas the remaining 31 strains (86% were not capable of producing biofilm characterized by formation of red colonies or pinkish-red colonies with darkening at the centre. The morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of these isolates were studied using standard protocols. Strain identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction targeted to species-specific polymerase chain reaction primers VH-1 and VH-2 corresponding to variable regions of V. harveyi 16S rRNA sequence. All the biofilm-forming strains showed resistance to at least three antimicrobial compounds tested. V. harveyi strains isolated from various seafood were able to form biofilms of different capacity, and the strains VB267, VB238 and VB166 isolated from cat fish, shrimp and eel fish exhibited significantly greater biofilm forming ability compared to other isolates. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the present study that the strain VB166 was able to better attach and form subsequent biofilms on glass and stainless steel compared to high density polyethylene. These properties allow these bacteria to survive, proliferate and persist in street vended seafood outlets.

  5. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    R Magetsari; P Dewo; BK Saputro; Z Lanodiyu

    2014-01-01

    S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 t...

  6. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva-Dias, Ana; Miranda, Isabel M.; Branco, Joana; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Pina-Vaz, Cid?lia; Rodrigues, Ac?cio G.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the C...

  7. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

    2009-05-01

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between

  8. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  9. Modulation of Candida albicans virulence by bacterial biofilms on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Wilson, Melanie; Lewis, Michael; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; da Silva, Wander José; Williams, David W

    2016-01-01

    Whilst Candida albicans occurs in peri-implant biofilms, its role in peri-implantitis remains unclear. This study therefore examined the virulence of C. albicans in mixed-species biofilms on titanium surfaces. Biofilms of C. albicans (Ca), C. albicans with streptococci (Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mutans) (Ca-Ss-Sm) and those incorporating Porphyromonas gingivalis (Ca-Pg and Ca-Ss-Sm-Pg) were developed. Expression of C. albicans genes associated with adhesion (ALS1, ALS3, HWP1) and hydrolytic enzymes (SAP2, SAP4, SAP6, PLD1) was measured and hyphal production by C. albicans quantified. Compared with Ca biofilms, significant (pbiofilms containing streptococci (Ca-Ss-Sm). In Ca-Pg biofilms, down-regulation of HWP1 and SAP4 expression, with reduced hyphal production occurred. Ca-Ss-Sm-Pg biofilms had increased hyphal proportions and up-regulation of ALS3, SAP2 and SAP6. In conclusion, C. albicans expressed virulence factors in biofilms that could contribute to peri-implantitis, but this was dependent on associated bacterial species.

  10. Sterilization of Biofilm on a Titanium Surface Using a Combination of Nonthermal Plasma and Chlorhexidine Digluconate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Thapa Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by opportunistic bacteria pose major healthcare problem worldwide. Out of the many microorganisms responsible for such infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium that accounts for 10–20% of hospital-acquired infections. These infections have mortality rates ranging from 18 to 60% and the cost of treatment ranges from $20,000 to $80,000 per infection. The formation of biofilms on medical devices and implants is responsible for the majority of those infections. Only limited progress has been made to prevent this issue in a safe and cost-effective manner. To address this, we propose employing jet plasma to break down and inactivate biofilms in vitro. Moreover, to improve the antimicrobial effect on the biofilm, a treatment method using a combination of jet plasma and a biocide known as chlorhexidine (CHX digluconate was investigated. We found that complete sterilization of P. aeruginosa biofilms can be achieved after combinatorial treatment using plasma and CHX. A decrease in biofilm viability was also observed using confocal laser scanning electron microscopy (CLSM. This treatment method sterilized biofilm-contaminated surfaces in a short treatment time, indicating it to be a potential tool for the removal of biofilms present on medical devices and implants.

  11. Allicin from garlic inhibits the biofilm formation and urease activity of Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Omid, Mahsa; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Amani, Mojtaba; Shokri Al-Hashem, Seyyedeh Khadijeh; Amir Mozafari, Nour; Peeri Doghaheh, Hadi

    2015-05-01

    Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis. This study determined the inhibitory effects of allicin on urease, hemolysin and biofilm of P. mirabilis ATCC 12453 and its antimicrobial activity against 20 clinical isolates of P. mirabilis. Allicin did not inhibit hemolysin, whereas it did inhibit relative urease activity in both pre-lysed (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 4.15 μg) and intact cells (IC50 = 21 μg) in a concentration-dependent manner. Allicin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (2-32 μg mL(-1)) showed no significant effects on the growth of the bacteria (P > 0.05), but it reduced biofilm development in a concentration-dependent manner (P mirabilis isolates were determined to be 128 and 512 μg mL(-1), respectively. The results suggest that allicin could have clinical applications in controlling P. mirabilis infections. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Penicillenols from a deep-sea fungus Aspergillus restrictus inhibit Candida albicans biofilm formation and hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Yao, Qi-Feng; Amin, Muhammad; Nong, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Penicillenols (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 and C2) were isolated from Aspergillus restrictus DFFSCS006, and could differentially inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate pre-developed biofilms of Candida albicans. Their structure-bioactivity relationships suggested that the saturation of hydrocarbon chain at C-8, R-configuration of C-5 and trans-configuration of the double bond between C-5 and C-6 of pyrrolidine-2,4-dione unit were important for their anti-biofilm activities. Penicillenols A2 and B1 slowed the hyphal growth and suppressed the transcripts of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4. Moreover, penicillenols A2 and B1 were found to act synergistically with amphotericin B against C. albicans biofilm formation.

  13. Inhibition and recovery of nitrification in treating real coal gasification wastewater with moving bed biofilm reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqiang Li; Hongjun Han; Maoan Du; Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was used to treat real coal gasification wastewater.Nitrification of the MBBR was inhibited almost completely during start-up period.Sudden increase of influent total NH3 concentration was the main factor inducing nitrification inhibition.Increasing DO concentration in the bulk liquid (from 2 to 3 mg/L) had little effect on nitrification recovery.Nitrification of the MBBR recovered partially by the addition of nitrifying sludge into the reactor and almost ceased within 5 days.Nitrification ratio of the MBBR achieved 65% within 12 days by increasing dilute ratio of the influent wastewater with tap water.The ratio of nitrification decreased to 25% when infiuent COD concentration increased from 650 to 1000 mg/L after nitrification recovery and recovered 70%for another 4 days.

  14. In vitro evaluation of a multispecies oral biofilm on different implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violant, Deborah; Galofré, Marta; Nart, José; Teles, Ricardo Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm accumulation on implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for early and late implant failure. Because of the related clinical implications, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bacterial cell attachment of a four-species oral biofilm on titanium discs of purity grade 2 and 4, with machined surfaces and etched-thermochemically modified with Avantblast®. The in vitro biofilm model was composed of early (Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus gordonii), secondary (Veillonella parvula), and intermediate (Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. polymorphum) colonizers of tooth surfaces. A total of 36 discs were divided into four groups: Tigr2-c (titanium grade 2, machined surface), Tigr2-t (titanium grade 2, modified surface with Avantblast®), Tigr4-c (titanium grade 4, machined surface), Tigr4-t (titanium grade 4, modified surface with Avantblast®). The experiment was repeated three times. Biofilm viability was tested with 1% 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution and bacterial cell quantification by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate biofilm composition and differences between groups were checked with the Mann–Whitney test (p < 0.05). After one week, multispecies biofilms showed a similar pattern of bacterial composition on all analyzed implant surfaces. The most prevalent bacterium was V. parvula (∼50% of the total biomass), followed by S. gordonii (∼30%), F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum (∼10%) and A. naeslundii (<5%). Total bacterial biomass was significantly higher in both grade-4-titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that not only implant surface treatment, but also titanium purity, influence early bacterial colonization. (paper)

  15. Bacterial inhibiting surfaces caused by the effects of silver release and/or electrical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Schroll, Casper

    2008-01-01

    In this study, silver-palladium surfaces and silver-bearing stainless steels were designed and investigated focusing on electrochemical principles to form inhibiting effects on planktonic and/or biofilm bacteria in water systems. Silver-resistant Escherichia coli and silver-sensitive E. coli were...... silver ions release can occur from their Surfaces. For silver-bearing stainless steels, the inhibiting effect can only be explained by high local silver ions release. and can be limited or deactivated dependent on the specific environment. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Calcium Increases Xylella fastidiosa Surface Attachment, Biofilm Formation, and Twitching Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F.; Cobine, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl2. The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 μM] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures. PMID:22194297

  17. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various...... surfaces in food processing. Biofilms of common foodborne pathogens are reviewed. The issue of persistent and nonpersistent microbial contamination in food processing is also discussed. It has been shown that biofilms can be difficult to remove and can thus cause severe disinfection and cleaning problems...... in food factories. In the prevention of biofilm formation microbial control in process lines should both limit the number of microbes on surfaces and reduce microbial activity in the process. Thus the hygienic design of process equipment and process lines is important in improving the process hygiene...

  18. Bacterial self-defense antibiotics release from organic-inorganic hybrid multilayer films for long-term anti-adhesion and biofilm inhibition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingwen; Li, Xi; Jin, Yingying; Sun, Lin; Ding, Xiaoxu; Liang, Lin; Wang, Lei; Nan, Kaihui; Ji, Jian; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bailiang

    2017-12-14

    Implant-associated bacterial infections pose serious medical and financial issues due to the colonization and proliferation of pathogens on the surface of the implant. The as-prepared traditional antibacterial surfaces can neither resist bacterial adhesion nor inhibit the development of biofilm over the long term. Herein, novel (montmorillonite/poly-l-lysine-gentamicin sulfate) 8 ((MMT/PLL-GS) 8 ) organic-inorganic hybrid multilayer films were developed to combine enzymatic degradation PLL for on-demand self-defense antibiotics release. Small molecule GS was loaded into the multilayer films during self-assembly and the multilayer films showed pH-dependent and linear growth behavior. The chymotrypsin- (CMS) and bacterial infections-responsive film degradation led to the peeling of the films and GS release. Enzyme-responsive GS release exhibited CMS concentration dependence as measured by the size of the inhibition zone and SEM images. Notably, the obtained antibacterial films showed highly efficient bactericidal activity which killed more than 99.9% of S. aureus in 12 h. Even after 3 d of incubation in S. aureus, E. coli or S. epidermidis solutions, the multilayer films exhibited inhibition zones of more than 1.5 mm in size. Both in vitro and in vivo antibacterial tests indicated good cell compatibility, and anti-inflammatory, and long-term bacterial anti-adhesion and biofilm inhibition properties.

  19. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse......, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently...... were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both...

  20. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol Ndoni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment in short-term (3 h and significantly reduce biofilm formation in long-term (1 week by gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Tuning the thickness or surface morphology of the nanoporous polymer films allowed to extent the anti-biofilm capability.

  1. Active species delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments to bacteria biofilms on the surface of apple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, He; Liu, Xin; Lu, Xinpei; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma has shown a significant potential as a novel food decontamination technology. In this paper, we report a computational study of the intersection of negative streamer produced by air dielectric barrier discharge with bacteria biofilm on an apple surface. The structure, conductivities, and permittivities of bacteria biofilm have been considered in the Poisson's equations and transportation equations of charge and neutral species to realize self-consistent transportation of plasma between electrode and charging surfaces of apple. We find that the ionization near the biofilm facilitates the propagation of negative streamer when the streamer head is 1 mm from the biofilm. The structure of the biofilm results in the non-uniform distribution of ROS and RNS captured by flux and time fluence of these reactive species. The mean free path of charged species in μm scale permitted the plasma penetrate into the cavity of the biofilm, therefore, although the density of ROS and RNS decrease by 6–7 order of magnitude, the diffusion results in the uniform distribution of ROS and RNS inside the cavity during the pulse off period.

  2. Active species delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments to bacteria biofilms on the surface of apple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, He; Liu, Xin; Lu, Xinpei [State Key Lab of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Dawei, E-mail: ldw636@msn.com [State Key Lab of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-07-15

    The atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma has shown a significant potential as a novel food decontamination technology. In this paper, we report a computational study of the intersection of negative streamer produced by air dielectric barrier discharge with bacteria biofilm on an apple surface. The structure, conductivities, and permittivities of bacteria biofilm have been considered in the Poisson's equations and transportation equations of charge and neutral species to realize self-consistent transportation of plasma between electrode and charging surfaces of apple. We find that the ionization near the biofilm facilitates the propagation of negative streamer when the streamer head is 1 mm from the biofilm. The structure of the biofilm results in the non-uniform distribution of ROS and RNS captured by flux and time fluence of these reactive species. The mean free path of charged species in μm scale permitted the plasma penetrate into the cavity of the biofilm, therefore, although the density of ROS and RNS decrease by 6–7 order of magnitude, the diffusion results in the uniform distribution of ROS and RNS inside the cavity during the pulse off period.

  3. CoBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-30

    CoBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces Alan W. Decho Department...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CoBOP: Microbial Biofilms: A Parameter Altering the Apparent Optical Properties of Sediments, Seagrasses and Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT...structures produced by bacteria. Their growth appears to depend on biofilm processes and light distributions ( photosynthesis ). Therefore, the data acquired

  4. Biocompatible succinic acid-based polyesters for potential biomedical applications: fungal biofilm inhibition and mesenchymal stem cell growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jäger, Eliezer; Donato, R. K.; Perchacz, Magdalena; Jäger, Alessandro; Surman, František; Höcherl, Anita; Konefal, Rafal; Donato, K. Z.; Venturini, Cristina Garcia; Bergamo, V. Z.; Schrekker, H. S.; Fuentefria, A. M.; Raucci, M. G.; Ambrosio, L.; Štěpánek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 104 (2015), s. 85756-85766 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14009; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI4/625 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyesters * coating of medical devices * fungal biofilm inhibition Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.289, year: 2015

  5. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  6. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; Imholz, Nicole C E; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J M; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections.

  7. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  8. Cleaning and Disinfection of Biofilms Composed of Listeria monocytogenes and Background Microbiota from Meat Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface-associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant toward C&D than their individual free-cell counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and L. monocytogenes dominated the community, both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genus cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65 to 76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11 to 15%) and L. monocytogenes (3 to 11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, for both the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectants, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival rates in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In the food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid the accumulation of spoilage bacteria and

  9. Cleaning and disinfection of biofilms composed of Listeria monocytogenes and background microbiota from meat processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-06-30

    Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant towards C&D than their individual free cells counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas , Acinetobacter and L. monocytogenes dominated the community both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genera cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles, mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65-76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11-15%) and L. monocytogenes (3-11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, both for the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectant, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as both persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid accumulation of spoilage bacteria and eliminate pathogens

  10. Reduced ability to detect surface-related biofilm bacteria after antibiotic exposure under in vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Christen; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Bétrisey, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    and microcalorimetry methods. Patients and methods - Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Propionibacterium acnes were formed on porous glass beads and exposed for 24 h to antibiotic concentrations from 1 to 1,024 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin......, daptomycin, rifampin, flucloxacillin, or ciprofloxacin. The beads were then sonicated to dislodge biofilm, followed by culture and measurement of growth-related heat flow by microcalorimetry of the resulting sonication fluid. Results - Vancomycin did not inhibit the heat flow of staphylococci and P. acnes...... at concentrations ≤1,024 μg/mL, whereas flucloxacillin at >128 μg/mL inhibited S. aureus. Daptomycin inhibited heat flow of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. acnes at lower concentrations (32-128 times MIC, p

  11. Evaluation of anti-Listeria meat borne Lactobacillus for biofilm formation on selected abiotic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Ibarreche, Mariana; Castellano, Patricia; Vignolo, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    The ability of meat borne anti-Listeria Lactobacillus to form biofilms under different in vitro conditions and on abiotic surfaces was investigated. Biofilm formation by the adhesion to polystyrene microtiter plates was determined, this being higher for Lactobacillus curvatus CRL1532 and CRL705 and Lactobacillus sakei CRL1862. The physicochemical properties of the cell surface were relatively hydrophilic and acidic in character; L. sakei CRL1862 exhibiting the strongest autoaggregation. The adhesion of lactobacilli to stainless steel (SS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) supports at 10°C was found to be maximal for L. sakei CRL1862 on SS after 6 days. When biofilm architecture was characterized by epifluorescence and SEM, L. sakei CRL1862 homogeneously covered the SS surface while cell clusters were observed on PTFE; the extracellular polymeric substance matrix adapted to the topography and hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics of each material. The feasibility of L. sakei CRL1862 to form biofilm on materials used in meat processing highlights its potential as a control strategy for Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Lei Mei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  13. Multitask Imidazolium Salt Additives for Innovative Poly(l-lactide) Biomaterials: Morphology Control, Candida spp. Biofilm Inhibition, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biocompatibility, and Skin Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Sokolovicz, Yuri C A; Raucci, Maria G; Selukar, Balaji S; Klitzke, Joice S; Lopes, William; Leal, Claudio A M; de Souza, Igor O P; Galland, Griselda B; Dos Santos, João Henrique Z; Mauler, Raquel S; Kol, Moshe; Dagorne, Samuel; Ambrosio, Luigi; Teixeira, Mário L; Morais, Jonder; Landers, Richard; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-08-24

    Candida species have great ability to colonize and form biofilms on medical devices, causing infections in human hosts. In this study, poly(l-lactide) films with different imidazolium salt (1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MImCl) and 1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate (C16MImMeS)) contents were prepared, using the solvent casting process. Poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films were obtained with different surface morphologies (spherical and directional), and the presence of the imidazolium salt in the surface was confirmed. These films with different concentrations of the imidazolium salts C16MImCl and C16MImMeS presented antibiofilm activity against isolates of Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida albicans. The minor antibiofilm concentration assay enabled one to determine that an increasing imidazolium salt content promoted, in general, an increase in the inhibition percentage of biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs confirmed the effective prevention of biofilm formation on the imidazolium salt containing biomaterials. Lower concentrations of the imidazolium salts showed no cytotoxicity, and the poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films presented good cell adhesion and proliferation percentages with human mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, no acute microscopic lesions were identified in the histopathological evaluation after contact between the films and pig ear skin. In combination with the good morphological, physicochemical, and mechanical properties, these poly(l-lactide)-based materials with imidazolium salt additives can be considered as promising biomaterials for use in the manufacturing of medical devices.

  14. Rapid in Vitro Quantification of S. aureus Biofilms on Vascular Graft Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Herten

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Increasing resistance of microorganisms and particularly tolerance of bacterial biofilms against antibiotics require the need for alternative antimicrobial substances. S. aureus is the most frequent pathogen causing vascular graft infections. In order to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy, quantification of the bacterial biofilms is necessary. Aim of the present study was the validation of an in vitro model for quantification of bacterial biofilm on vascular graft surfaces using three different assays.Methods: Standardized discs of vascular graft material (Dacron or PTFE or polystyrene (PS as control surface with 0.25 cm2 surface area were inoculated with 10−3 diluted overnight culture of three biofilm-producing S. aureus isolates (BEB-029, BEB-295, SH1000 in 96-well PS culture plates. After incubation for 4 and 18 h, the biofilm was determined by three different methods: (a mitochondrial ATP concentration as measure of bacterial viability (ATP, (b crystal violet staining (Cry, and (c vital cell count by calculation of colony-forming units (CFU. The experiments were performed three times. Quadruplicates were used for each isolate, time point, and method. In parallel, bacterial biofilms were documented via scanning electron microscopy.Results: All three methods could quantify biofilms on the PS control. Time needed was 0:40, 13:10, and 14:30 h for ATP, Cry, and CFU, respectively. The Cry assay could not be used for vascular graft surfaces due to high unspecific background staining. However, ATP assay and CFU count showed comparable results on vascular graft material and control. The correlations between ATP and CFU assay differed according to the surface and incubation time and were significant only after 4 h on Dacron (BEB-029, p = 0.013 and on PS (BEB-029, p < 0.001. Between ATP and Cry assay on PS, a significant correlation could be detected after 4 h (BEB-295, p = 0.027 and after 18 h (all three strains, p < 0.026. The

  15. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chusri, S.; Sompetch, K.; Mukdee, S.; Jansrisewangwong, S.; Srichai, T.; Maneenoon, K.; Limsuwan, S.; Voravuthikunchai, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The r...

  16. Combinatorial Effects of Aromatic 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas and Fluoride on In vitro Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Balamurugan, P; Uma Maheswari, C; Anitha, A; Princy, S Adline

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries occur as a result of disequilibrium between acid producing pathogenic bacteria and alkali generating commensal bacteria within a dental biofilm (dental plaque). Streptococcus mutans has been reported as a primary cariogenic pathogen associated with dental caries. Emergence of multidrug resistant as well as fluoride resistant strains of S. mutans due to over use of various antibiotics are a rising problem and prompted the researchers worldwide to search for alternative therapies. In this perspective, the present study was aimed to screen selective inhibitors against ComA, a bacteriocin associated ABC transporter, involved in the quorum sensing of S. mutans. In light of our present in silico findings, 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives which had better affinity to ComA were chemically synthesized in the present study for in vitro evaluation of S. mutans biofilm inhibition. The results revealed that 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives showed good biofilm inhibition. In addition, synthesized compounds exhibited potent synergy with a very low concentration of fluoride (31.25-62.5 ppm) in inhibiting the biofilm formation of S. mutans without affecting the bacterial growth. Further, the results were supported by confocal laser scanning microscopy. On the whole, from our experimental results we conclude that the combinatorial application of fluoride and disubstituted ureas has a potential synergistic effect which has a promising approach in combating multidrug resistant and fluoride resistant S. mutans in dental caries management.

  17. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Magetsari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 times using a mixture of cinnamon oil and chitosan 3% and 2% respectively with serial concentration of cinnamon from 0.125% to 2%. The coated implants were then put into tubes that contained bacterial suspension and incubated. Subsequently, the implants were washed with PBS solution followed by MTT soulution and isopropanol acid solution that related to biofilm formation. The results were expressed in numbers which represents the absorbance level at ELISA readings on 575 nm (A575 wavelength.The stainless steel implant coated with chitosan and cinnamon oil 2% and 1% has lower absorbance level compared with the absorbance level of S.Epidermidis biofilm only. This study showed that mixture of cinnamon oil and chitosan coated on the surface of stainless steel orthopaedic implant has an effect against S.Epidermidis biofilm formation with minimum cinnamon oil concentration of 1%.

  18. Inhibition of biofilm development of uropathogens by curcumin - an anti-quorum sensing agent from Curcuma longa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packiavathy, Issac Abraham Sybiya Vasantha; Priya, Selvam; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2014-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is caused primarily by the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent biofilm forming ability of uropathogens. In the present investigation, an anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) agent curcumin from Curcuma longa (turmeric) was shown to inhibit the biofilm formation of uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia marcescens, possibly by interfering with their QS systems. The antibiofilm potential of curcumin on uropathogens as well as its efficacy in disturbing the mature biofilms was examined under light microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope. The treatment with curcumin was also found to attenuate the QS-dependent factors, such as exopolysaccharide production, alginate production, swimming and swarming motility of uropathogens. Furthermore, it was documented that curcumin enhanced the susceptibility of a marker strain and uropathogens to conventional antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by the Synthetic Lactoferricin Derived Peptide hLF1-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Paola; Fais, Roberta; Rizzato, Cosmeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the synthetic peptide hLF1-11 against biofilm produced by clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different fluconazole susceptibility. The antibiofilm activity of the peptide hLF1-11 was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm cellular density, metabolic activity and sessile cell viability. The extent of morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms was also investigated microscopically. Transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production were analysed by qRT-PCR in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms. Exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) was used to rescue morphogenesis in cells exposed to the peptide. The results revealed that hLF1-11 exhibited an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all C. albicans isolates tested in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. Visual inspection of treated or untreated biofilm cells with an inverted microscope revealed a significant reduction in hyphal formation by hLF1-11 treated cells, as early as 3 hours of incubation. Moreover, hLF1-11 showed a reduced activity on preadherent cells. hLF1-11 induced the down-regulation of biofilm and hyphal-associated genes, which were predominantly regulated via the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Indeed, exogenous db-cAMP restored morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated cells. The hLF1-11 peptide significantly inhibited biofilm formation by C. albicans mainly at early stages, interfering with biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity, and affected morphogenesis through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence that hLF1-11 could represent a potential candidate for the prevention of biofilm formation by C. albicans. PMID:27902776

  20. Inhibition of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by the Synthetic Lactoferricin Derived Peptide hLF1-11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Morici

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the synthetic peptide hLF1-11 against biofilm produced by clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different fluconazole susceptibility. The antibiofilm activity of the peptide hLF1-11 was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm cellular density, metabolic activity and sessile cell viability. The extent of morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms was also investigated microscopically. Transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production were analysed by qRT-PCR in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms. Exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP was used to rescue morphogenesis in cells exposed to the peptide. The results revealed that hLF1-11 exhibited an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all C. albicans isolates tested in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. Visual inspection of treated or untreated biofilm cells with an inverted microscope revealed a significant reduction in hyphal formation by hLF1-11 treated cells, as early as 3 hours of incubation. Moreover, hLF1-11 showed a reduced activity on preadherent cells. hLF1-11 induced the down-regulation of biofilm and hyphal-associated genes, which were predominantly regulated via the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Indeed, exogenous db-cAMP restored morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated cells. The hLF1-11 peptide significantly inhibited biofilm formation by C. albicans mainly at early stages, interfering with biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity, and affected morphogenesis through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence that hLF1-11 could represent a potential candidate for the prevention of biofilm formation by C. albicans.

  1. A Polymethyl Methacrylate-Based Acrylic Dental Resin Surface Bound with a Photoreactive Polymer Inhibits Accumulation of Bacterial Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunishi, Miya; Inoue, Yuuki; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    The aim of this study was to examine the ability of a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butylmethacrylate-co-2-methacryloyloxyethyloxy-p-azidobenzoate) (PMBPAz) coating on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin to inhibit bacterial plaque formation, as well as the polymer's durability against water soaking and chemical exposure. Successful application of PMBPAz on PMMA surfaces was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and measuring the static air contact angle in water. The anti-adhesive effects to bacterial plaque were evaluated using Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation assay. The mechanical and chemical durabilities of the PMBPAz coating on the PMMA surfaces were examined using soaking and immersion tests, respectively. XPS signals for phosphorus and nitrogen atoms and hydrophilic status on PMMA surfaces treated with PMBPAz were observed, indicating the presence of the polymer on the substrates. The treated PMMA surfaces showed significant inhibition of S mutans biofilm formation compared to untreated surfaces. The PMBPAz coating was preserved after water soaking and chemical exposure. In addition, water soaking did not decrease the ability of treated PMMA to inhibit biofilm formation compared to treated PMMA specimens not subjected to water soaking. This study suggests that PMBPAz coating may represent a useful modification to PMMA surfaces for inhibiting denture plaque accumulation.

  2. Phenotypes of non-attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates resemble surface attached biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Alhede

    Full Text Available For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non

  3. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this inve...

  4. Biofilm formation on surface characterized micro-implants for skeletal anchorage in orthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; de Vries, Jacob; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik

    Micro-implants are increasingly popular in clinical orthodontics to effect skeletal anchorage. However, biofilm formation on their surfaces and subsequent infection of peri-implant tissues can result in either exfoliation or surgical removal of these devices. The present study aimed to assess

  5. Evidence for Interactions between Surface Water and Periphyton Biofilms in Artificial Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies suggest that periphyton in streambeds can harbor fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and, under certain circumstances, can be transferred from the periphyton biofilm into the surface water. An indoor mesocosm study was conducted at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Expe...

  6. Analysis of hyper-baric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, A.; Tsaloglou, N. M.; Connelly, D.; Keevil, B.; Mowlem, M.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of the environment is essential to our understanding of global processes, such as global warming, and their impact. As biofilm formation occurs after only short deployment periods in the marine environment, it is a major problem in long-term operation of environmental sensors. This makes the development of anti-fouling strategies for in situ sensors critical to their function. The effects on sensors can range from measurement drift, which can be compensated, to blockage of channels and material degradation, rendering them inoperative. In general, the longer the deployment period the more severe the effects of the biofouling become. Until now, biofilm research has focused mainly on the eutrophic and euphotic zones of the oceans. Hyper-baric biofilms are poorly understood due to difficulties in experimental setup and the assumption that biofouling in these oligotrophic regions could be regarded as insignificant. Our study shows significant biofilm formation occurs in the deep sea. We deployed a variety of materials, typically used in engineering structures, on a 4500 metre deep mooring during a cruise to the Cayman Trough, for 10 days. The materials were clear plain glass, poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), Delrin™, and copper, a known antifouling agent. The biofilms were studied by fluorescence microscopy and molecular analysis. For microscopy the nucleic acid stain, SYTO©9, was used and surface coverage was quantified by using a custom MATLAB™ program. Further molecular analyses, including UV Vis spectrometric quantification of DNA, nucleic acid amplification using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), were utilised for the analysis of the microbial community composition of these biofilms. Six 16S/18S universal primer sets representative for the three kingdoms, Archea, Bacteria, and Eukarya were used for the PCR and DGGE. Preliminary results from fluorescence microscopy showed that the biofilm

  7. Methods for dynamic investigations of surface-attached in vitro bacterial and fungal biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Shirtliff, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Three dynamic models for the investigation of in vitro biofilm formation are described in this chapter. In the 6-well plate assay presented here, the placing of the plate on a rotating platform provides shear, thereby making the system dynamic with respect to the static microtiter assay.The second...... reported model, especially suitable for harvesting high amounts of cells for transcriptomic or proteomic investigations, is based on numerous glass beads placed in a flask incubated with shaking on a rotating platform, thus increasing the surface area for biofilm formation. Finally, the flow-cell system...

  8. Reduction of Aeromonas hidrophyla biofilm on stainless stell surface by essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Farias Millezi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the possibility of using sanitizing detergents based on natural products for the elimination and/or reduction of Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formed on stainless steel surfaces. The goal of this work was to determine the reduction effect of sanitizing detergents containing essential oils of Thymus vulgaris (thyme and Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass on biofilm formed by A. hydrophila on AISI 304 stainless steel coupons, using UHT skimmed milk as substratum. There was adhesion and biofilm formation by A. hydrophila at 28 ºC, presenting 7.60 log cfu.cm-2 after the fourth day of cultivation. There was no significant difference between the lemongrass treatment and that of the thyme oil (p 0.05. The treatment with lemongrass solution reduced the biofilm by 4.51 log cfu cm-2 at 25 ºC. The thyme detergent also reduced the number of cfu cm-2 by 3.84 log cycles at 25 ºC. The use of the lemongrass and thyme solutions efficiently reduced the A. hydrophila biofilm.

  9. Reduction of Aeromonas hidrophyla biofilm on stainless stell surface by essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millezi, Alessandra Farias; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of using sanitizing detergents based on natural products for the elimination and/or reduction of Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formed on stainless steel surfaces. The goal of this work was to determine the reduction effect of sanitizing detergents containing essential oils of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) on biofilm formed by A. hydrophila on AISI 304 stainless steel coupons, using UHT skimmed milk as substratum. There was adhesion and biofilm formation by A. hydrophila at 28 °C, presenting 7.60 log cfu.cm−2 after the fourth day of cultivation. There was no significant difference between the lemongrass treatment and that of the thyme oil (p 0.05). The treatment with lemongrass solution reduced the biofilm by 4.51 log cfu cm−2 at 25 °C. The thyme detergent also reduced the number of cfu cm−2 by 3.84 log cycles at 25 °C. The use of the lemongrass and thyme solutions efficiently reduced the A. hydrophila biofilm. PMID:24159286

  10. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo1, Donaji Velasco-Arias2, David Diaz2, Katiushka Arevalo-Niño1, Marianela Garza-Enriquez1, Myriam A De la Garza-Ramos1, Claudio Cabral-Romero11Instituto de Biotecnologia, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias de la Salud, CIDICS, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 2Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Distrito Federal, MexicoBackground and methods: Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities.Results: Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM.Conclusion: These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation.Keywords: zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles, antimicrobial agent, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans

  11. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Issam; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-02-01

    To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent.

  12. Response to antiseptic agents of periodontal pathogens in in vitro biofilms on titanium and zirconium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M C; Fernández, E; Llama-Palacios, A; Figuero, E; Herrera, D; Sanz, M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop in vitro biofilms on SLA titanium (Ti-SLA) and zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) surfaces and to evaluate the effect of antiseptic agents on the number of putative periodontal pathogenic species. An in vitro biofilm model was developed on sterile discs of Ti-SLA and ZrO 2 . Three antiseptic agents [chlorhexidine and cetyl-pyridinium-chloride (CHX/CPC), essential oils (EEOOs) and cetyl-peridinium-chloride (CPC)] were applied to 72-h biofilms, immersing discs during 1min in the antiseptic solution, either with or without mechanical disruption. Viable bacteria [colony forming units (CFU/mL)] were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with propidium monoazide. A generalized lineal model was constructed to determine the effect of the agents on the viable bacterial counts of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum on each surface. The exposure to each antiseptic solution resulted in a statistically significant reductions in the number of viable target species included in the in vitro multi-species biofilm, on both Ti-SLA and ZrO 2 (pzirconium surfaces, in spite of the described structural differences between these bacterial communities. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term efficacy of denture cleansers in preventing Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana Paula Coelho; Senna, Plínio Mendes; Silva, Wander José da; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term efficacy of denture cleansers against Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface. Specimens were fabricated of a poly(methyl methacrylate)-based denture liner and had their surface roughness evaluated at baseline and after cleansing treatments. C. albicans or C. glabrata biofilms were formed on liner surface for 48 h, and then the specimens were randomly assigned to one of cleaning treatments: two alkaline peroxides (soaking for 3 or 15 min), 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (10 min) or distilled water (control; 15 min). After the treatments, the specimens were sonicated to disrupt the biofilm, and residual cells were counted (cell/mL). Long-term effectiveness of the cleaning processes was determined by submitting a set of cleaned specimens to biofilm growth conditions for 48 h followed by estimation of cell counts. The topography of specimens after cleaning treatments was analyzed by SEM. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α; = 0.05). Results of cell count estimation showed significant differences in cleanliness among the treatments (p 0.05) was observed among the Candida species regarding the recolonization condition. Alkaline denture cleansers showed similar cleaning performance and both differed from the control (p recolonization.

  14. Detection of cell surface hydrophobicity, biofilm and fimbirae genes in salmonella isolated from tunisian clinical and poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdallah, Fethi; Lagha, Rihab; Said, Khaled; Kallel, Héla; Gharbi, Jawhar

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of 15 serotypes of Salmonella to form biofilm on polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass surfaces. . Initially slime production was assessed on CRA agar and hydrophobicity of 20 Salmonella strains isolated from poultry and human and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium references strains was achieved by microbial adhesion to n-hexadecane. In addition, biofilm formation on polystyrene, PVC and glass surfaces was also investigated by using MTT and XTT colorimetric assay. Further, distribution of Salmonella enterotoxin (stn), Salmonella Enteritidis fimbrial (sef) and plasmid encoded fimbrial (pef) genes among tested strains was achieved by PCR. Salmonella strains developed red and white colonies on CRA and they are considered as hydrophilic with affinity values to n-hexadecane ranged between 0.29% and 29.55%. Quantitative biofilm assays showed that bacteria are able to form biofilm on polystyrene with different degrees and 54.54% of strains produce a strong biofilm on glass. In addition, all the strains form only a moderate (54.54%) and weak (40.91%) biofilm on PVC. PCR detection showed that only S. Enteritidis harbour Sef gene, whereas Pef and stn genes were detected in S. Kentucky, S. Amsterdam, S. Hadar, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. Salmonella serotypes are able to form biofilm on hydrophobic and hydrophilic industrial surfaces. Biofilm formation of Salmonella on these surfaces has an increased potential to compromise food safety and potentiate public health risk.

  15. Surface physicochemical properties at the micro and nano length scales: role on bacterial adhesion and Xylella fastidiosa biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Gabriela S; Janissen, Richard; Clerici, João H; Rodrigues, Carolina M; Tomaz, Juarez P; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Mônica A

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa grows as a biofilm causing vascular occlusion and consequently nutrient and water stress in different plant hosts by adhesion on xylem vessel surfaces composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and proteins. Understanding the factors which influence bacterial adhesion and biofilm development is a key issue in identifying mechanisms for preventing biofilm formation in infected plants. In this study, we show that X. fastidiosa biofilm development and architecture correlate well with physicochemical surface properties after interaction with the culture medium. Different biotic and abiotic substrates such as silicon (Si) and derivatized cellulose films were studied. Both biofilms and substrates were characterized at the micro- and nanoscale, which corresponds to the actual bacterial cell and membrane/ protein length scales, respectively. Our experimental results clearly indicate that the presence of surfaces with different chemical composition affect X. fastidiosa behavior from the point of view of gene expression and adhesion functionality. Bacterial adhesion is facilitated on more hydrophilic surfaces with higher surface potentials; XadA1 adhesin reveals different strengths of interaction on these surfaces. Nonetheless, despite different architectural biofilm geometries and rates of development, the colonization process occurs on all investigated surfaces. Our results univocally support the hypothesis that different adhesion mechanisms are active along the biofilm life cycle representing an adaptation mechanism for variations on the specific xylem vessel composition, which the bacterium encounters within the infected plant.

  16. The Impact of Biofilms upon Surfaces Relevant to an Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Geological Disposal Facility under Simulated Near-Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Charles

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of biofilms to form on a range of materials (cementious backfill (Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB, graphite, and stainless steel relevant to potential UK intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW disposal concepts was investigated by exposing these surfaces to alkaliphilic flocs generated by mature biofilm communities. Flocs are aggregates of biofilm material that are able to act as a transport vector for the propagation of biofilms. In systems where biofilm formation was observed there was also a decrease in the sorption of isosaccharinic acids to the NRVB. The biofilms were composed of cells, extracellular DNA (eDNA, proteins, and lipids with a smaller polysaccharide fraction, which was biased towards mannopyranosyl linked carbohydrates. The same trend was seen with the graphite and stainless steel surfaces at these pH values, but in this case the biofilms associated with the stainless steel surfaces had a distinct eDNA basal layer that anchored the biofilm to the surface. At pH 13, no structured biofilm was observed, rather all the surfaces accumulated an indistinct organic layer composed of biofilm materials. This was particularly the case for the stainless steel coupons which accumulated relatively large quantities of eDNA. The results demonstrate that there is the potential for biofilm formation in an ILW-GDF provided an initiation source for the microbial biofilm is present. They also suggest that even when conditions are too harsh for biofilm formation, exposed surfaces may accumulate organic material such as eDNA.

  17. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias T Hägi

    Full Text Available There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts.Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR, b ultrasonication (US, c subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP and d subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX. The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz, the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD.After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10. The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10. Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm in comparison with US (14±12 µm, EAP (6±7 µm and EAP-CHX (11±10 µm. Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts.The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results

  18. The formation of biofilms on superduplex UNS S32750 steel subjected to different surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnin, Sergio [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barreiro Junior, Walter Cravo; Bott, Ivani de S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Biocorrosion is a phenomenon involving metallic surface deterioration accelerated, or induced, by microorganisms. Such microbiological mechanisms occur when microorganisms are deposited on the surfaces exposed to the carrier fluids. Various factors influence the deposition mechanisms, such as the physical characteristics and chemical composition of the metallic surfaces, both of which can cause significant alterations in the processes that lead to the formation of biofilms. The current study evaluates the formation of biofilms, of a sulphate-reducing strain of bacteria (SRB), on superduplex UNS S32750 stainless steels exposed to synthetic seawater containing this bacterial strain. The experiments were carried out in a dynamic system using a controlled-flow test loop, and the steel surfaces were prepared using different techniques, such as polishing and shot peening, in order to present different physical surface conditions and, consequently, different deposition rates. The levels of organic acids, and of the sulphates consumed and produced, were measured. The morphologies of the biofilms produced were also analysed, by scanning electron microscopy, and surface roughness was measured by atom force microscopy. The level of biocorrosion was determined by counting the pits formed. The results obtained revealed that, despite high bacterial adhesion levels for the various treated surfaces examined, no relevant pitting had occurred, indicating that a corrosive process had not taken place for the testing conditions considered. (author)

  19. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to liquid disinfectants on contaminated surfaces before formation of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, J L; Bonifacino, A

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effectiveness of popular disinfectants (Cavicide, Cidexplus, Clorox, Exspor, Lysol, Renalin, and Wavicide) under conditions prescribed for disinfection in the respective product labels on Pseudomonas aeruginosa either in suspension or deposited onto surfaces of metallic or polymeric plastic devices. The testing also included 7 nonformulated germicidal agents (glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, phenol, and cupric ascorbate) commonly used in disinfection and decontamination. Results showed that P. aeruginosa is on average 300-fold more resistant when present on contaminated surfaces than in suspension. This increase in resistance agrees with results reported in studies of biofilms, but unexpectedly, it precedes biofilm formation. The surface to which bacteria are attached can influence the effectiveness of disinfectants. Viable bacteria attached to devices may require dislodging through more than a one-step method for detection. The data, obtained with a sensitive and quantitative test, suggest that disinfectants are less effective on contaminated surfaces than generally acknowledged.

  20. Inhibition of Steptococcus mutans biofilm formation by extracts of Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, a bacterium with wide-spectrum quorum quenching activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muras, Andrea; Mayer, Celia; Romero, Manuel; Camino, Tamara; Ferrer, Maria D.; Mira, Alex; Otero, Ana

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Previous studies have suggested the quorum sensing signal AI-2 as a potential target to prevent the biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen involved in tooth decay. Objective: To obtain inhibition of biofilm formation by S. mutans by extracts obtained from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J interfering with the AI-2 quorum sensing system. Design: The AI-2 inhibitory activity was tested with the biosensors Vibrio harveyi BB170 and JMH597. S. mutans ATCC25175 biofilm formation was monitored using impedance real-time measurements with the xCELLigence system®, confocal laser microscopy, and the crystal violet quantification method. Results: The addition of the cell extract from Tenacibaculum sp. 20J reduced biofilm formation in S. mutans ATCC25175 by 40–50% compared to the control without significantly affecting growth. A decrease of almost 40% was also observed in S. oralis DSM20627 and S. dentisani 7747 biofilms. Conclusions: The ability of Tenacibaculum sp. 20J to interfere with AI-2 and inhibit biofilm formation in S. mutans was demonstrated. The results indicate that the inhibition of quorum sensing processes may constitute a suitable strategy for inhibiting dental plaque formation, although additional experiments using mixed biofilm models would be required. PMID:29410771

  1. Application of bacteriophages to reduce biofilms formed by hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria on surfaces in a rendering plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria (SPB) in raw animal by-products are likely to grow and form biofilms in the rendering processing environments, resulting in the release of harmful hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas. The objective of this study was to reduce SPB biofilms formed on different surfaces typically found in rendering plants by applying a bacteriophage cocktail. Using a 96-well microplate method, we determined that 3 SPB strains of Citrobacter freundii and Hafnia alvei are strong biofilm formers. Application of 9 bacteriophages (10(7) PFU/mL) from families of Siphoviridae and Myoviridae resulted in a 33%-70% reduction of biofilm formation by each SPB strain. On stainless steel and plastic templates, phage treatment (10(8) PFU/mL) reduced the attached cells of a mixed SPB culture (no biofilm) by 2.3 and 2.7 log CFU/cm(2) within 6 h at 30 °C, respectively, as compared with 2 and 1.5 log CFU/cm(2) reductions of SPB biofilms within 6 h at 30 °C. Phage treatment was also applied to indigenous SPB biofilms formed on the environmental surface, stainless steel, high-density polyethylene plastic, and rubber templates in a rendering plant. With phage treatment (10(9) PFU/mL), SPB biofilms were reduced by 0.7-1.4, 0.3-0.6, and 0.2-0.6 log CFU/cm(2) in spring, summer, and fall trials, respectively. Our study demonstrated that bacteriophages could effectively reduce the selected SPB strains either attached to or in formed biofilms on various surfaces and could to some extent reduce the indigenous SPB biofilms on the surfaces in the rendering environment.

  2. Biofilm formation affects surface properties of novel bioactive glass-containing composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Hong-Keun; Salehi, Satin; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of bacterial biofilm on the surface properties of novel bioactive glass (BAG)-containing composites of different initial surface roughness. BAG (65 mol% Si; 4% P; 31% Ca) and BAG-F (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and micronized (size ∼0.1-10 μm). Composites with 72wt% total filler load were prepared by replacing 15% of the silanized Sr glass with BAG, BAG-F, or silanized silica. Specimens (n=10/group) were light-cured and divided into 4 subgroups of different surface roughness by wet polishing with 600 and then up to 1200, 2400, or 4000 grit SiC. Surface roughness (SR), gloss, and Knoop microhardness were measured before and after incubating in media with or without a Streptococcus mutans (UA 159) biofilm for 2 weeks. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=0.05). The SR of the BAG-containing composites with the smoothest surfaces (2400/4000 grit) increased in media or bacteria; the SR of the roughest composites (600 grit) decreased. The gloss of the smoothest BAG-containing composites decreased in bacteria and media-only, but more in media-alone. The microhardness of all of the composites decreased with exposure to media or bacteria, with BAG-containing composites affected more than the control. Exposure to bacterial biofilm and its media produced enhanced roughness and reduced gloss and surface microhardness of highly polished dental composites containing a bioactive glass additive, which could affect further biofilm formation, as well as the esthetics, of restorations made from such a material. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular analysis of long-term biofilm formation on PVC and cast iron surfaces in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruyin; Zhu, Junge; Yu, Zhisheng; Joshi, DevRaj; Zhang, Hongxun; Lin, Wenfang; Yang, Min

    2014-04-01

    To understand the impacts of different plumbing materials on long-term biofilm formation in water supply system, we analyzed microbial community compositions in the bulk water and biofilms on faucets with two different materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cast iron, which have been frequently used for more than10 years. Pyrosequencing was employed to describe both bacterial and eukaryotic microbial compositions. Bacterial communities in the bulk water and biofilm samples were significantly different from each other. Specific bacterial populations colonized on the surface of different materials. Hyphomicrobia and corrosion associated bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus spp., Aquabacterium spp., Limnobacter thiooxidans, and Thiocapsa spp., were the most dominant bacteria identified in the PVC and cast iron biofilms, respectively, suggesting that bacterial colonization on the material surfaces was selective. Mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were common potential pathogenic bacteria occurred in the biofilm samples, but their abundance was different in the two biofilm bacterial communities. In contrast, the biofilm samples showed more similar eukaryotic communities than the bulk water. Notably, potential pathogenic fungi, i.e., Aspergillus spp. and Candida parapsilosis, occurred in similar abundance in both biofilms. These results indicated that microbial community, especially bacterial composition was remarkably affected by the different pipe materials (PVC and cast iron). Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Delgadillo R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo,1 Donaji Velasco-Arias,3 Juan Jose Martinez-Sanmiguel,2 David Diaz,3 Inti Zumeta-Dube,3 Katiushka Arevalo-Niño,1 Claudio Cabral-Romero2 1Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, Mexico; 2Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL, Monterrey, México; 3Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Distrito Federal, México Abstract: Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85% and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized

  5. Systematic Exploration of Natural and Synthetic Flavonoids for the Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, Suvi; Skogman, Malena; Goeres, Darla; Vuorela, Pia; Fallarero, Adyary

    2013-01-01

    When single-cell (or suspended) bacteria switch into the biofilm lifestyle, they become less susceptible to antimicrobials, imposing the need for anti-biofilms research. Flavonoids are among the most extensively studied natural compounds with an unprecedented amount of bioactivity claims. Most studies focus on the antibacterial effects against suspended cells; fewer reports have researched their anti-biofilm properties. Here, a high throughput phenotypic platform was utilized to screen for the inhibitory activity of 500 flavonoids, including natural and synthetic derivatives, against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Since discrepancies among results from earlier antibacterial studies on flavonoids had been noted, the current study aimed to minimize sources of variations. After the first screen, flavonoids were classified as inactive (443), moderately active (47) or highly active (10). Further, exclusion criteria combining bioactivity and selectivity identified two synthetic flavans as the most promising. The body of data reported here serves three main purposes. First, it offers an improved methodological workflow for anti-biofilm screens of chemical libraries taking into account the (many times ignored) connections between anti-biofilm and antibacterial properties. This is particularly relevant for the study of flavonoids and other natural products. Second, it provides a large and freely available anti-biofilm bioactivity dataset that expands the knowledge on flavonoids and paves the way for future structure-activity relationship studies and structural optimizations. Finally, it identifies two new flavans that can successfully act on biofilms, as well as on suspended bacteria and represent more feasible antibacterial candidates. PMID:24071942

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di

    2009-01-01

    Multiple bacterial species often coexist as communities, and compete for environmental resources. Here, we describe how an opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses extracellular products to interact with the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms and p...... of a novel strategy for controlling S. epidermidis biofilms....

  7. Biofilm inhibition formation of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutans, photocatalytic activity of azo dye and GC-MS analysis of leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Kamarudheen, Neethu; Bhaskara Rao, K V; Santhakumar, K

    2017-04-01

    The investigation was conducted to analyse the bioactive compounds from the leaf extracts of L. speciosa by GC-MS. The extracts were screened for antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against potential clinical strains. The bioactive compounds from the leaves of L. speciosa were extracted by soxhlet continuous extraction method and their chemical composition was analysed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated against clinical strain like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi by well diffusion technique. We also screened for antibacterial property against common food borne pathogens namely Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus at varied concentration 250μml -1 to 1000μml -1 . Thereafter antibiofilm assay was carried out at from 250 to 1000μg/ml against P. aeruginosa (high biofilm forming pathogen) clinical strain by cover slip technique and the morphology of the pathogen was observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy-(SEM). It was observed that diverse class of secondary metabolites were found by GC-MS analysis for all the extracts upon the continuous extraction. It was found that only minimum inhibition was seen in alcoholic extract for antibacterial activity, whereas all other extracts showed negligible activity. P. aeruginosa biofilm inhibited to 93.0±2% and 91±2% at higher concentration (1000μg/ml) for methanolic and ethanolic extract respectively. Absence of extracellular matrix structure and the surface cracking of biofilm were viewed by SEM, which confirmed the antibiofilm activity. Hence this study reveals that L. speciosa showed significant antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa due to the phytoconstituents present in the leaf extracts which was well documented in the alcoholic extracts by GC-MS analysis. The methanolic and ethanolic extract showed good photocatalytic activity of 77.44% and 96.66% against azo dye degradation respectively. Further

  8. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%, total protease (56%, pyocyanin (89%, chitinase (55%, exopolysaccharide production (58% and swarming motility (74% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82% over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Fohad M.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Al-thubiani, Abdullah S.; Abulreesh, Hussein H.; AlHazza, Ibrahim M.; Aqil, Farrukh

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango) has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML) extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%), total protease (56%), pyocyanin (89%), chitinase (55%), exopolysaccharide production (58%) and swarming motility (74%) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82%) over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28484444

  10. Biofilm three-dimensional architecture influences in situ pH distribution pattern on the human enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Hara, Anderson T; Kim, Dongyeop; Zero, Domenick T; Koo, Hyun; Hwang, Geelsu

    2017-06-01

    To investigate how the biofilm three-dimensional (3D) architecture influences in situ pH distribution patterns on the enamel surface. Biofilms were formed on human tooth enamel in the presence of 1% sucrose or 0.5% glucose plus 0.5% fructose. At specific time points, biofilms were exposed to a neutral pH buffer to mimic the buffering of saliva and subsequently pulsed with 1% glucose to induce re-acidification. Simultaneous 3D pH mapping and architecture of intact biofilms was performed using two-photon confocal microscopy. The enamel surface and mineral content characteristics were examined successively via optical profilometry and microradiography analyses. Sucrose-mediated biofilm formation created spatial heterogeneities manifested by complex networks of bacterial clusters (microcolonies). Acidic regions (pHinterior of microcolonies, which impedes rapid neutralization (taking more than 120 min for neutralization). Glucose exposure rapidly re-created the acidic niches, indicating formation of diffusion barriers associated with microcolonies structure. Enamel demineralization (white spots), rougher surface, deeper lesion and more mineral loss appeared to be associated with the localization of these bacterial clusters at the biofilm-enamel interface. Similar 3D architecture was observed in plaque-biofilms formed in vivo in the presence of sucrose. The formation of complex 3D architectures creates spatially heterogeneous acidic microenvironments in close proximity of enamel surface, which might correlate with the localized pattern of the onset of carious lesions (white spot like) on teeth.

  11. The Role of Oral Cavity Biofilm on Metallic Biomaterial Surface Destruction–Corrosion and Friction Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemirowicz-Laskowska, Katarzyna; Łysik, Dawid; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Dąbrowski, Jan R.; Bucki, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Metallic biomaterials in the oral cavity are exposed to many factors such as saliva, bacterial microflora, food, temperature fluctuations, and mechanical forces. Extreme conditions present in the oral cavity affect biomaterial exploitation and significantly reduce its biofunctionality, limiting the time of exploitation stability. We mainly refer to friction, corrosion, and biocorrosion processes. Saliva plays an important role and is responsible for lubrication and biofilm formation as a transporter of nutrients for microorganisms. The presence of metallic elements in the oral cavity may lead to the formation of electro-galvanic cells and, as a result, may induce corrosion. Transitional microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria may also be present among the metabolic microflora in the oral cavity, which can induce biological corrosion. Microorganisms that form a biofilm locally change the conditions on the surface of biomaterials and contribute to the intensification of the biocorrosion processes. These processes may enhance allergy to metals, inflammation, or cancer development. On the other hand, the presence of saliva and biofilm may significantly reduce friction and wear on enamel as well as on biomaterials. This work summarizes data on the influence of saliva and oral biofilms on the destruction of metallic biomaterials. PMID:29509686

  12. The Role of Oral Cavity Biofilm on Metallic Biomaterial Surface Destruction-Corrosion and Friction Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystkowska, Joanna; Niemirowicz-Laskowska, Katarzyna; Łysik, Dawid; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Dąbrowski, Jan R; Bucki, Robert

    2018-03-06

    Metallic biomaterials in the oral cavity are exposed to many factors such as saliva, bacterial microflora, food, temperature fluctuations, and mechanical forces. Extreme conditions present in the oral cavity affect biomaterial exploitation and significantly reduce its biofunctionality, limiting the time of exploitation stability. We mainly refer to friction, corrosion, and biocorrosion processes. Saliva plays an important role and is responsible for lubrication and biofilm formation as a transporter of nutrients for microorganisms. The presence of metallic elements in the oral cavity may lead to the formation of electro-galvanic cells and, as a result, may induce corrosion. Transitional microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria may also be present among the metabolic microflora in the oral cavity, which can induce biological corrosion. Microorganisms that form a biofilm locally change the conditions on the surface of biomaterials and contribute to the intensification of the biocorrosion processes. These processes may enhance allergy to metals, inflammation, or cancer development. On the other hand, the presence of saliva and biofilm may significantly reduce friction and wear on enamel as well as on biomaterials. This work summarizes data on the influence of saliva and oral biofilms on the destruction of metallic biomaterials.

  13. The Role of Oral Cavity Biofilm on Metallic Biomaterial Surface Destruction–Corrosion and Friction Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mystkowska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials in the oral cavity are exposed to many factors such as saliva, bacterial microflora, food, temperature fluctuations, and mechanical forces. Extreme conditions present in the oral cavity affect biomaterial exploitation and significantly reduce its biofunctionality, limiting the time of exploitation stability. We mainly refer to friction, corrosion, and biocorrosion processes. Saliva plays an important role and is responsible for lubrication and biofilm formation as a transporter of nutrients for microorganisms. The presence of metallic elements in the oral cavity may lead to the formation of electro-galvanic cells and, as a result, may induce corrosion. Transitional microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria may also be present among the metabolic microflora in the oral cavity, which can induce biological corrosion. Microorganisms that form a biofilm locally change the conditions on the surface of biomaterials and contribute to the intensification of the biocorrosion processes. These processes may enhance allergy to metals, inflammation, or cancer development. On the other hand, the presence of saliva and biofilm may significantly reduce friction and wear on enamel as well as on biomaterials. This work summarizes data on the influence of saliva and oral biofilms on the destruction of metallic biomaterials.

  14. Comparing Methods of Separating Bacterial Biofilms on the Surface of Water Transportation Pipes and Equipment of Milking in the Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    setareh nabizadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bacterial biofilms can be both useful and harmful based on their combination and locations. Biofilm formation occurs as a stepwise process. Their formation in liquid transportation pipes used for milking system and drinking water in animal farms may create some problems and is a potential source of pollution. Speed of biofilm formation depends on many factors including: construction and functional characteristics of bacteria, the composition and culture conditions such as temperature and substratum. In this research the Bacillus subtillis bacteria with special characteristics was selected due to its capability for biofilm creation. Bacillus subtillis bacteria is mobility and a stronger connection than other bacteria levels are created. In the research conducted in the biofilm there are many resources on biofilm formation by Bacillus subtillis bacteria. Bacillus subtillis is saprophytic in the soil, water and air. There is also the ability to form spores of Bacillus subtillis. Materials and Methods Firstly the possibility of creating biofilms on different Plastic (polyvinilchlorid, polypropylene, polyethylengelycole, alluminum and glass surfaces in three temperatures of 4°C, 30°C and 37°C were studied. Two different methods of biofilms separation including separating swap and vortex were tested and their efficienceies were calculated. After biofilm formation on parts of the vortex separation method after washing parts in sterile conditions in a tube containing normal saline for 4 minutes was vortex. The bacterial suspension decreasing dilution series was created. Pour plate in medium using agar plate count agar and was cultured at 30°C for 24-48 hours. Numbers of colonies were counted. The numbers of biofilm cells were calculated. In swap method after biofilm formation on parts using a cotton swap was isolated biofilms. The swap was transferred to tube containing normal saline and the bacterial suspension decreasing dilution

  15. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  16. Pitting corrosion inhibition of aluminum 2024 by Bacillus biofilms secreting polyaspartate or gamma-polyglutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornek, D; Jayaraman, A; Syrett, B C; Hsu, C-H; Mansfeld, F B; Wood, T K

    2002-04-01

    Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion of anionic peptides by engineered and natural Bacillus biofilms and was studied in continuous reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Compared to sterile controls, pitting was reduced dramatically by the presence of the biofilms. The secretion of a 20 amino acid polyaspartate peptide by an engineered Bacillus subtilis WB600/pBE92-Asp biofilm slightly reduced the corrosion rate of the passive aluminum alloy at pH 6.5; however, the secretion of gamma-polyglutamate by a Bacillus licheniformis biofilm reduced the corrosion rate by 90% (compared to the B. subtilis WB600/pBE92 biofilm which did not secrete polyaspartate or gamma-polyglutamate). The corrosion potential ( E(corr)) of aluminum 2024 was increased by about 0.15-0.44 V due to the formation of B. subtilis and B. licheniformis biofilms as compared to sterile controls. The increase of E(corr) and the observed prevention of pitting indicate that the pitting potential ( E(pit)) had increased. This result and the further decrease of corrosion rates for the passive aluminum alloy suggest that the rate of the anodic metal dissolution reaction was reduced by an inhibitor produced by the biofilms. Purified gamma-polyglutamate also decreased the corrosion rates of aluminum 2024.

  17. Raman microspectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, and stable-isotope Raman microspectroscopy for biofilm characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Kubryk, Patrick; Niessner, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant form of microbial life on our planet. These aggregates of microorganisms, which are embedded in a matrix formed by extracellular polymeric substances, may colonize nearly all interfaces. Detailed knowledge of microorganisms enclosed in biofilms as well as of the chemical composition, structure, and functions of the complex biofilm matrix and their changes at different stages of the biofilm formation and under various physical and chemical conditions is relevant in different fields. Important research topics include the development and improvement of antibiotics and medical devices and the optimization of biocides, antifouling strategies, and biological wastewater treatment. Raman microspectroscopy is a capable and nondestructive tool that can provide detailed two-dimensional and three-dimensional chemical information about biofilm constituents with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope and without interference from water. However, the sensitivity of Raman microspectroscopy is rather limited, which hampers the applicability of Raman microspectroscopy especially at low biomass concentrations. Fortunately, the resonance Raman effect as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering can help to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, the combination of Raman microspectroscopy with other microscopic techniques, mass spectrometry techniques, or particularly with stable-isotope techniques can provide comprehensive information on monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Here, an overview of different Raman microspectroscopic techniques, including resonance Raman microspectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, for in situ detection, visualization, identification, and chemical characterization of biofilms is given, and the main feasibilities and limitations of these techniques in biofilm research are presented. Future possibilities of and challenges for Raman microspectroscopy alone and in combination with other

  18. The Influence of Prior Modes of Growth, Temperature, Medium, and Substrate Surface on Biofilm Formation by Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Amy Huei Teen; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bacterial gastrointestinal food-borne infection worldwide. It has been suggested that biofilm formation may play a role in survival of these bacteria in the environment. In this study, the influence of prior modes of growth (planktonic or sessile), temperatures (37 and 42 °C), and nutrient conditions (nutrient broth and Mueller-Hinton broth) on biofilm formation by eight C. jejuni strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles was examined. The ability of these strains to form biofilm on different abiotic surfaces (stainless steel, glass, and polystyrene) as well as factors potentially associated with biofilm formation (bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, and initial attachment) was also determined. The results showed that cells grown as sessile culture generally have a greater ability to form biofilm (P Biofilm was also greater (P biofilm formation in a strain-dependent manner. The strains were able to attach and form biofilms on different abiotic surfaces, but none of them demonstrated strong, complex, or structured biofilm formation. There were no clear trends between the bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, attachment, and biofilm formation by the strains. This finding suggests that environmental factors did affect biofilm formation by C. jejuni, and they are more likely to persist in the environment in the form of mixed-species rather than monospecies biofilms.

  19. Antibacterial isoeugenol coating on stainless steel and polyethylene surfaces prevents biofilm growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, C K; Subbiahdoss, G; Zeng, G; Salmi, Z; Kjems, J; Mygind, T; Snabe, T; Meyer, R L

    2018-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria can spread between individuals or between food items via the surfaces they share. Limiting the survival of pathogens on surfaces, therefore, presents an opportunity to limit at least one route of how pathogens spread. In this study, we propose that a simple coating with the essential oil isoeugenol can be used to circumvent the problem of bacterial transfer via surfaces. Two commonly used materials, stainless steel and polyethylene, were coated by physical adsorption, and the coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and water contact angle measurements. We quantified and visualized the colonization of coated and uncoated surfaces by three bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens. No viable cells were detected on surfaces coated with isoeugenol. The isoeugenol coating prepared with simple adsorption proved effective in preventing biofilm formation on stainless steel and polyethylene surfaces. The result was caused by the antibacterial effect of isoeugenol, as the coating did not diminish the adhesive properties of the surface. Our study demonstrates that a simple isoeugenol coating can prevent biofilm formation of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and P. fluorescens on two commonly used surfaces. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Biofilm Composition and Threshold Concentration for Growth of Legionella pneumophila on Surfaces Exposed to Flowing Warm Tap Water without Disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Dick; Bakker, Geo L; Italiaander, Ronald; Veenendaal, Harm R; Wullings, Bart A

    2017-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila in potable water installations poses a potential health risk, but quantitative information about its replication in biofilms in relation to water quality is scarce. Therefore, biofilm formation on the surfaces of glass and chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) in contact with tap water at 34 to 39°C was investigated under controlled hydraulic conditions in a model system inoculated with biofilm-grown L. pneumophila The biofilm on glass (average steady-state concentration, 23 ± 9 pg ATP cm -2 ) exposed to treated aerobic groundwater (0.3 mg C liter -1 ; 1 μg assimilable organic carbon [AOC] liter -1 ) did not support growth of the organism, which also disappeared from the biofilm on CPVC (49 ± 9 pg ATP cm -2 ) after initial growth. L. pneumophila attained a level of 4.3 log CFU cm -2 in the biofilms on glass (1,055 ± 225 pg ATP cm -2 ) and CPVC (2,755 ± 460 pg ATP cm -2 ) exposed to treated anaerobic groundwater (7.9 mg C liter -1 ; 10 μg AOC liter -1 ). An elevated biofilm concentration and growth of L. pneumophila were also observed with tap water from the laboratory. The Betaproteobacteria Piscinibacter and Methyloversatilis and amoeba-resisting Alphaproteobacteria predominated in the clones and isolates retrieved from the biofilms. In the biofilms, the Legionella colony count correlated significantly with the total cell count (TCC), heterotrophic plate count, ATP concentration, and presence of Vermamoeba vermiformis This amoeba was rarely detected at biofilm concentrations of water-associated disease outbreaks reported in the United States. The organism proliferates in biofilms on surfaces exposed to warm water in engineered freshwater installations. An investigation with a test system supplied with different types of warm drinking water without disinfectant under controlled hydraulic conditions showed that treated aerobic groundwater (0.3 mg liter -1 of organic carbon) induced a low biofilm concentration that supported no or very

  1. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sara Svensson,1,2 Magnus Forsberg,1,2 Mats Hulander,1,2 Forugh Vazirisani,1,2 Anders Palmquist,1,2 Jukka Lausmaa,2,3 Peter Thomsen,1,2 Margarita Trobos1,21Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, SwedenAbstract: The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth

  2. Inhibition of Steptococcus mutans biofilm formation by extracts of Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, a bacterium with wide-spectrum quorum quenching activity

    OpenAIRE

    Muras, Andrea; Mayer, Celia; Romero, Manuel; Camino, Tamara; Ferrer, Maria D.; Mira, Alex; Otero, Ana

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Previous studies have suggested the quorum sensing signal AI-2 as a potential target to prevent the biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen involved in tooth decay. Objective: To obtain inhibition of biofilm formation by S. mutans by extracts obtained from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J interfering with the AI-2 quorum sensing system. Design: The AI-2 inhibitory activity was tested with the biosensors Vibrio harveyi BB170 and JMH597. S. mutans AT...

  3. De novo biofilm community assembly from tap water source communities favors Nitrotoga over Nitrospira under elevated nitrite surface loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    -through biofilm system to continuous immigration from a tap water metacommunity while applying different nitrite surface loading rates. After 63 days of operation, we extracted biofilms and analyzed the community composition via Illumina MiSeq targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Previous studies have shown...... that Nitrospira is the dominant nitrite oxidizing genus in low nitrite environments. Hence, we postulated that by elevating the nitrite surface loading we would select for NOB with lower nitrite affinity than Nitrospira. We observed different dominant NOB species under different loading rates. While...... in the metacommunity, Nitrotoga and Nitrospira were found at near equal abundances, in the biofilm community, elevated nitrite loading strongly selected for Nitrotoga over Nitrospira. The biofilms were also significantly different in their alpha-diversity (pdiversity, and the evenness and richness...

  4. N-Acetyl-l-Cysteine Affects Growth, Extracellular Polysaccharide Production, and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Solid Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-01-01

    N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Usi...

  5. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  6. Effect of temperature, pH, and water activity on biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica enteritidis PT4 on stainless steel surfaces as indicated by the bead vortexing method and conductance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, E; Chorianopoulos, N; Nychas, G J E

    2005-10-01

    An assay was developed in an effort to elucidate the effect of important environmental parameters (temperature, pH, and water activity [aw]) on Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces. To achieve this, a modified microbiological technique used for biofilm studying (the bead vortexing method) and a rapid method based on conductivity measurements were used. The ability of the microorganism to generate biofilm on the stainless surfaces was studied at three temperatures (5, 20, and 37 degrees C), four pH values (4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.4), and four aw values (0.5, 1.5, 5.5, and 10.5% NaCl). Results obtained by the bead vortexing method show that maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter (106 CFU/cm2) were attained in 6 days at 20 degrees C. Biofilm formation after 7 days of incubation at 20 degrees C was found to be independent of the pH value. In addition, the high concentration of sodium chloride (10.5% NaCl, aw = 0.94) clearly inhibited the adherence of cells to the coupons. Conductance measurements were used as a supplementary tool to measure indirectly the attachment and biofilm formation of bacterial cells on stainless steel surfaces via their metabolic activity (i.e., changes in the conductance of the growth medium due to microbial growth or metabolism). Results obtained by conductance measurements corresponded well to those of the bead vortexing method. Furthermore, we were able to detect cells that remained attached on the metal surfaces even after vortexing via their metabolic activity. The results, except for demonstrating environmental-dependent Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation, indicated that traditional vortexing with beads did not remove completely biofilm cells from stainless steel; hence, conductance measurements seem to provide a more sensitive test capable to detect down to one single viable organism.

  7. Deconvoluting the effects of surface chemistry and nanoscale topography: Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm nucleation on Si-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Huang, Jinglin; Say, Carmen; Dorit, Robert L; Queeney, K T

    2018-06-01

    The nucleation of biofilms is known to be affected by both the chemistry and topography of the underlying substrate, particularly when topography includes nanoscale (topography vs. chemistry is complicated by concomitant variation in both as a result of typical surface modification techniques. Analyzing the behavior of biofilm-forming bacteria exposed to surfaces with systematic, independent variation of both topography and surface chemistry should allow differentiation of the two effects. Silicon surfaces with reproducible nanotopography were created by anisotropic etching in deoxygenated water. Surface chemistry was varied independently to create hydrophilic (OH-terminated) and hydrophobic (alkyl-terminated) surfaces. The attachment and proliferation of Psuedomonas aeruginosa to these surfaces was characterized over a period of 12 h using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. The number of attached bacteria as well as the structural characteristics of the nucleating biofilm were influenced by both surface nanotopography and surface chemistry. In general terms, the presence of both nanoscale features and hydrophobic surface chemistry enhance bacterial attachment and colonization. However, the structural details of the resulting biofilms suggest that surface chemistry and topography interact differently on each of the four surface types we studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiologic actions of zinc related to inhibition of acid and alkali production by oral streptococci in suspensions and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T-N; Buckner, T; Sheng, J; Baldeck, J D; Marquis, R E

    2004-02-01

    Zinc is a known inhibitor of acid production by mutans streptococci. Our primary objective was to extend current knowledge of the physiologic bases for this inhibition and also for zinc inhibition of alkali production by Streptococcus rattus FA-1 and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419. Zinc at concentrations as low as 0.01-0.1 mm not only inhibited acid production by cells of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 in suspensions or in biofilms but also sensitized glycolysis by intact cells to acidification. Zinc reversibly inhibited the F-ATPase of permeabilized cells of S. mutans with a 50% inhibitory concentration of about 1 mm for cells in suspensions. Zinc reversibly inhibited the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system with 50% inhibition at about 0.3 mm ZnSO4, or about half that concentration when the zinc-citrate chelate was used. The reversibility of these inhibitory actions of zinc correlates with findings that it is mainly bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal. Zinc inhibited alkali production from arginine or urea and was a potent enzyme inhibitor for arginine deiminase of S. rattus FA-1 and for urease of S. salivarius. In addition, zinc citrate at high levels of 10-20 mm was weakly bactericidal.

  9. Superhydrophilic nanopillar-structured quartz surfaces for the prevention of biofilm formation in optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Soo; Ji, Seungmuk; Abdullah, Abdullah; Kim, Duckil; Lim, Hyuneui; Lee, Donghyun

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on optical devices such as contact lenses, optical glasses, endoscopic devices, and microscopic slides and lenses are major concerns in the field of medicine and biomedical engineering. To solve these problems, here we present the first report of superhydrophilic transparent nanopillar-structured surfaces with bactericidal properties. To construct bactericidal surfaces, we imitated a topological mechanism found in nature in which nanopillar-structured surfaces cause a mechanical disruption of the outer cell membranes of bacteria, resulting in bacterial cell death. We used nanosphere lithography to fabricate nanopillars with various sharpnesses and heights on a quartz substrate. Water contact angle and light reflectance measurements revealed superhydrophilic, antifogging and antireflective properties, which are important for use in optical devices. To determine bactericidal efficiency, the fabricated surfaces were incubated and tested against two Gram-negative bacteria associated with biofilm formation and various diseases in humans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The highest bactericidal activity was achieved with nanopillars that measured 300 nm in height and 10 nm in apex diameter. Quartz substrates patterned with such nanopillars killed ∼38,000 P. aeruginosa and ∼27,000 E. coli cells cm-2 min-1, respectively. Thus, the newly designed nanopillar-structured bactericidal surfaces are suitable for use in the development of superhydrophilic and transparent optical devices.

  10. Bacterial biofilms utilization of low concentrations of organic matter on hydrophile surfaces submerged in seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Manuela Moldoveanu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments were designed to determine the effect and the metabolic rate utilization of various types of organic matter in low concentration by heterotrophic marine bacteria using as Henrici slide technique as culture method and “in vitro” static conditions in sterile containers in order to obtain bacterial biofilms on the hydrophile surface of glass. The bacteria attachment and biofilm formation was analyzed for a period from 2 hours to 72 hours in order to observe de first phase of biofilm formation in condition of seawater supplied  with organic matter and noninvasive optic microscopy analysis. The utilization of five different  types of organic substances (amino-acid mixture, yeast extract, tryptone, glucose and starch reveled that bacteria multiply and are otherwise physiologically active in this very dilute nutrient solutions of 0.1% and also the results revealed that the bacterial growth was considerable in the case of the substances like amino-acid mixture with a total density of 30.9∙103 cells/mm2  and tryptone with a total density of 28.85∙103 cells/mm2  comparable to the other types of organic matter used to supply the seawater

  11. Nitrite accumulation from simultaneous free-ammonia and free-nitrous-acid inhibition and oxygen limitation in a continuous-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Chung, Jinwook; Rittmann, Bruce E; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-01-01

    To achieve nitrite accumulation for shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) in a biofilm process, we explored the simultaneous effects of oxygen limitation and free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition in the nitrifying biofilm. We used the multi-species nitrifying biofilm model (MSNBM) to identify conditions that should or should not lead to nitrite accumulation, and evaluated the effectiveness of those conditions with experiments in continuous flow biofilm reactors (CFBRs). CFBR experiments were organized into four sets with these expected outcomes based on the MSNBM as follows: (i) Control, giving full nitrification; (ii) oxygen limitation, giving modest long-term nitrite build up; (iii) FA inhibition, giving no long-term nitrite accumulation; and (iv) FA inhibition plus oxygen limitation, giving major long-term nitrite accumulation. Consistent with MSNBM predictions, the experimental results showed that nitrite accumulated in sets 2-4 in the short term, but long-term nitrite accumulation was maintained only in sets 2 and 4, which involved oxygen limitation. Furthermore, nitrite accumulation was substantially greater in set 4, which also included FA inhibition. However, FA inhibition (and accompanying FNA inhibition) alone in set 3 did not maintained long-term nitrite accumulation. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity batch tests confirmed that little NOB or only a small fraction of NOB were present in the biofilms for sets 4 and 2, respectively. The experimental data supported the previous modeling results that nitrite accumulation could be achieved with a lower ammonium concentration than had been required for a suspended-growth process. Additional findings were that the biofilm exposed to low dissolved oxygen (DO) limitation and FA inhibition was substantially denser and probably had a lower detachment rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Licheniocin 50.2 and Bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis BGBU1-4 Inhibit Biofilms of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci and Listeria monocytogenes Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirkovic, Ivana; Bozic, Dragana D; Draganic, Veselin; Lozo, Jelena; Beric, Tanja; Kojic, Milan; Arsic, Biljana; Garalejic, Eliana; Djukic, Slobodanka; Stankovic, Slavisa

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) and Listeria monocytogenes have important roles in pathogenesis of various genital tract infections and fatal foetomaternal infections, respectively. The aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of two novel bacteriocins on biofilms of CoNS and L. monocytogenes genital isolates. The effects of licheniocin 50.2 from Bacillus licheniformis VPS50.2 and crude extract of bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis BGBU1-4 (BGBU1-4 crude extract) were evaluated on biofilm formation and formed biofilms of eight CoNS (four S. epidermidis, two S. hominis, one S. lugdunensis and one S. haemolyticus) and 12 L. monocytogenes genital isolates. Licheniocin 50.2 and BGBU1-4 crude extract inhibited the growth of both CoNS and L. monocytogenes isolates, with MIC values in the range between 200-400 AU/ml for licheniocin 50.2 and 400-3200 AU/ml for BGBU1-4 crude extract. Subinhibitory concentrations (1/2 × and 1/4 × MIC) of licheniocin 50.2 inhibited biofilm formation by all CoNS isolates (p < 0.05, respectively), while BGBU1-4 crude extract inhibited biofilm formation by all L. monocytogenes isolates (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Both bacteriocins in concentrations of 100 AU/mL and 200 AU/mL reduced the amount of 24 h old CoNS and L. monocytogenes biofilms (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001). This study suggests that novel bacteriocins have potential to be used for genital application, to prevent biofilm formation and/or to eradicate formed biofilms, and consequently reduce genital and neonatal infections by CoNS and L. monocytogenes.

  13. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Progress toward understanding the contribution of alkali generation in dental biofilms to inhibition of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Ling; Nascimento, Marcelle; Burne, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria is believed to have a major impact on oral microbial ecology and to be inibitory to the initiation and progression of dental caries. A substantial body of evidence is beginning to accumulate that indicates the modulation of the alkalinogenic potential of dental biofilms may be a promising strategy for caries control. This brief review highlights recent progress toward understanding molecular genetic and physiologic aspects of important alkali-generating pathways in oral bacteria, and the role of alkali production in the ecology of dental biofilms in health and disease. PMID:22996271

  15. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Leite de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 x 2 cm when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 ºC. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L and peracetic acid (30 mg/L in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers.

  16. Use of a stainless steel washer platform to study Acinetobacter baumannii adhesion and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsinger-Jacobsen, Samantha J; Patel, Shenan S; Vellozzi, Ernestine M; Gialanella, Phillip; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequent cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia, and has recently increased in incidence as the causative agent of severe disease in troops wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq. Clinical approaches are limited since A. baumannii strains isolated from patients are extremely resistant to current antimicrobials. A. baumannii can survive desiccation and during outbreaks has been recovered from various sites in the patients' environment. To better understand its prevalence in hospital settings, we used a stainless steel washer (SSW) platform to investigate A. baumannii biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that A. baumannii forms strong biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. This platform was combined with a colorimetric 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) reduction assay to observe the metabolic activity of bacterial cells, and to facilitate the manipulation and comparison of multiple A. baumannii clinical strains. A strong correlation between XTT and c.f.u. assays was demonstrated. To complement the cell viability assays, A. baumannii biofilm mass was measured by crystal violet staining. Furthermore, the effect of commonly used disinfectants and environmental stressors on A. baumannii biofilms and planktonic cells was compared and characterized. Biofilms on SSWs were significantly more resistant than their planktonic counterparts, providing additional evidence that may allow us to understand the high prevalence of this microbe in hospital settings. Our results validate that SSWs are a simple, versatile and innovative method to study A. baumannii biofilms in vitro.

  17. Two potential uses for silver nanoparticles coated with Solanum nigrum unripe fruit extract: Biofilm inhibition and photodegradation of dye effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaikozhundan, Balasubramanian; Vijayakumar, Sekar; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Jenifer, Anthonisamy Anthoni; Chitra, Ponnaiah; Prabhu, Narayanan Marimuthu; Kannapiran, Ethiraj

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanoparticle was green synthesized involving the unripe fruit extracts of Solanum nigrum (Sn-AgNPs). The synthesized Sn-AgNPs was bio-physically characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV-Vis recorded the absorbance spectra at 443 nm. XRD analysis clearly demonstrated the crystalline nature of Sn-AgNPs with Bragg's reflection peaks at 111, 200, 220 and 311 lattice planes. The FTIR spectrum of Sn-AgNPs showed strong bands at 3432, 1555, 1455, 862 and 406 cm -1 which corresponds at O-H, C-H, C-C, C-OH and C-N groups respectively. TEM exhibited the spherical shape of Sn-AgNPs with particle size between 20 and 30 nm. The antibacterial effects of Sn-AgNPs were tested on clinically important biofilm forming Gram positive (Bacillus pumulis and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram negative (Proteus vulgaris and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) bacteria. The greater inhibition of B. pumulis and E. faecalis was observed at 100 μg mL -1 of Sn-AgNPs compared to P. vulgaris and V. parahaemolyticus. The biofilm inhibition potential of Sn-AgNPs was greater against Gram positive bacteria than that of Gram negative bacteria. Furthermore, Sn-AgNPs effectively degraded the industrial effluent methyl orange dye by photocatalysis. It is concluded that Sn-AgNPs could be used as an effective therapeutics against the biofilm of clinically important bacteria. The green synthesized Sn-AgNPs can be employed to degrade dye effluents and prevent environmental pollution as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioguided Fractionation Shows Cassia alata Extract to Inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Takashi Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant extracts have a long history to be used in folk medicine. Cassia alata extracts are known to exert antibacterial activity but details on compounds and mechanism of action remain poorly explored. We purified and concentrated the aqueous leaf extract of C. alata by reverse phase-solid phase extraction and screened the resulting CaRP extract for antimicrobial activity. CaRP extract exhibited antimicrobial activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. CaRP also inhibited biofilm formation of S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Several bacterial growth-inhibiting compounds were detected when CaRP extract was fractionated by TLC chromatography coupled to bioautography agar overlay technique. HPLC chromatography of CaRP extract yielded 20 subfractions that were tested by bioautography for antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Five bioactive fractions were detected and chemically characterized, using high-resolution mass spectrometry (qTOF-MS/MS. Six compounds from four fractions could be characterized as kaempferol, kaempferol-O-diglucoside, kaempferol-O-glucoside, quercetin-O-glucoside, rhein, and danthron. In the Salmonella/microsome assay CaRP showed weak mutagenicity (MI<3 only in strain TA98, pointing to a frameshift mutation activity. These results indicate that C. alata leaf extract contains a minimum of 7 compounds with antimicrobial activity and that these together or as single substance are active in preventing formation of bacterial biofilm, indicating potential for therapeutic applications.

  19. Bioguided Fractionation Shows Cassia alata Extract to Inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Samuel Takashi; Trentin, Danielle da Silva; Macedo, Alexandre José; Pungartnik, Cristina; Gosmann, Grace; Silveira, Jaqueline de Deos; Guecheva, Temenouga Nikolova; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Brendel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Plant extracts have a long history to be used in folk medicine. Cassia alata extracts are known to exert antibacterial activity but details on compounds and mechanism of action remain poorly explored. We purified and concentrated the aqueous leaf extract of C. alata by reverse phase-solid phase extraction and screened the resulting CaRP extract for antimicrobial activity. CaRP extract exhibited antimicrobial activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. CaRP also inhibited biofilm formation of S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Several bacterial growth-inhibiting compounds were detected when CaRP extract was fractionated by TLC chromatography coupled to bioautography agar overlay technique. HPLC chromatography of CaRP extract yielded 20 subfractions that were tested by bioautography for antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Five bioactive fractions were detected and chemically characterized, using high-resolution mass spectrometry (qTOF-MS/MS). Six compounds from four fractions could be characterized as kaempferol, kaempferol-O-diglucoside, kaempferol-O-glucoside, quercetin-O-glucoside, rhein, and danthron. In the Salmonella/microsome assay CaRP showed weak mutagenicity (MI < 3) only in strain TA98, pointing to a frameshift mutation activity. These results indicate that C. alata leaf extract contains a minimum of 7 compounds with antimicrobial activity and that these together or as single substance are active in preventing formation of bacterial biofilm, indicating potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:22548121

  20. Antibiotic-loaded poly(trimethylene carbonate) degradation, release and staphylococcal biofilm inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin, Otto Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Infections localised to bone (osteomyelitis) rapidly progress to a chronic state in which bacteria form organised communities (biofilms) where they are protected from host defences and antibiotic therapy. Treatment requires surgery followed by systemic and/or local application of antibiotics. With

  1. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR lay expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp...

  2. The effect of iatrogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis intercellar adhesion operon on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianhua, Ye; Yunchao, Huang; Guangqiang, Zhao; Kun, Yang; Xing, Liu; Fengli, Guo

    2014-12-01

    The intercellular adhesion gene (ica) of Staphylococcus epidermidis is a key factor for bacterial aggregation. This study explored the effect of ica on the formation of bacterial biofilm on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Genes related to bacterial biofilm formation, including 16S rRNA, autolysin (atlE), fibrinogen binding protein gene (fbe), and ica were identified and sequenced from 112 clinical isolates of iatrogenic S. epidermidis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Based on the sequencing result, ica operon-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) and ica operon-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains were separated and co-cultivated with PVC material. After 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 h of co-culture, the thickness of the bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on the PVC surface were measured under the confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope. The positive rate of S. epidermidis-specific 16SrRNA in 112 iatrogenic strains was 100% (112/112). The genotype of ica-positive (icaADB+/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 57.1% (64/112), and genotype of ica-negative (icaADB-/atlE+/fbe+) strains accounted for 37.5% (42/112). During 30 h of co-culture, no obvious bacterial biofilm formed on the surface of PVC in the ica-positive group, however, mature bacterial biofilm structure formed after 24 h. For all time points, thickness of bacterial biofilm and quantity of bacterial colony on PVC surfaces in the ica operon-positive group were significantly higher than those in ica operon-negative group (poperon-negative and ica operon-positive strains. The ica operon plays an important role in bacterial biofilm formation and bacterial multiplication on PVC material.

  3. Chamaecyparis obtusa Essential Oil Inhibits Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Expression of Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sook; Kang, Sun-Young; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Young-Eun; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk; Kim, Kang-Ju

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has caused difficulty in treating infectious diseases. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most commonly recognized antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel antibiotics are urgently required to treat these bacteria. Raw materials derived from natural sources can be used for the development of novel antibiotics, such as Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which has been traditionally used in treating asthmatic disease. In this study, the antibacterial activity of the essential oil (EO) extracted from C. obtusa leaves against MRSA was investigated. MRSA growth and acid production from glucose metabolism were inhibited at concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/mL C. obtusa EO. MRSA biofilm formation was observed using scanning electron microscopy and safranin staining. C. obtusa EO inhibited MRSA biofilm formation at concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/mL. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, mRNA expression of virulence factor genes, sea, agrA, and sarA, was observed. agrA expression was inhibited with C. obtusa EO concentrations greater than 0.2 mg/mL, whereas inhibition of sea and sarA expression was also observed at a concentration of 0.3 mg/mL. C. obtusa EO was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled for mass spectrometry, which identified 59 constituents, accounting to 98.99% of the total EO. These findings suggest that C. obtusa EO has antibacterial effects against MRSA, which might be associated with the major components of C. obtusa EO, such as sabinene (19.06%), α-terpinyl acetate (16.99%), bornyl acetate (10.48%), limonene (8.54%), elemol (7.47%), myrcene (5.86%), γ-terpinene (4.04%), and hibaene (3.01%).

  4. Effect of surface roughness and stainless steel finish on Listeria monocytogenes attachment and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Andres; Autio, Wesley R; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface roughness (Ra) and finish of mechanically polished stainless steel (Ra = 0.26 +/- 0.05, 0.49 +/- 0.10, and 0.69 +/- 0.05 microm) and electropolished stainless steel (Ra = 0.16 +/- 0.06, 0.40 +/- 0.003, and 0.67 +/- 0.02 microm) on Listeria adhesion and biofilm formation. A four-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes was used. Each strain (0.1%) was added to 200 ml of tryptic soy broth (TSB), and coupons were inserted to the mixture for 5 min. For biofilm formation, coupons with adhesive cells were incubated in 1:20 diluted TSB at 32 degrees C for 48 h. The experiment was performed by a randomized block design. Our results show that the level of Listeria present after 48 h of incubation (mean = 7 log CFU/cm2) was significantly higher than after 5 min (mean = 6.0 log CFU/cm2) (P stainless steel (mean = 6.7 log CFU/cm2) (P > 0.05). Listeria initial adhesion (values ranged from 5.9 to 6.1 log CFU/cm2) or biofilm formation (values ranged from 6.9 to 7.2 log CFU/cm2) was not significantly correlated with Ra values (P > 0.05). Image analysis with an atomic force microscope showed that bacteria did not colonize the complete surface after 48 h but were individual cells or grouped in microcolonies that ranged from 5 to 10 microm in diameter and one to three cell layers in thickness. Exopolymeric substances were observed to be associated with the colonies. According to our results, electropolishing stainless steel does not pose a significant advantage for food sanitation over mechanically finished stainless steel.

  5. Identification of lactobacilli with inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Ouali, Fatma; Al Kassaa, Imad; Cudennec, Benoit; Abdallah, Marwan; Bendali, Farida; Sadoun, Djamila; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Drider, Djamel

    2014-11-17

    Two hundred and thirty individual clones of microorganisms were recovered from milk tanks and milking machine surfaces at two distinct farms (Bejaja City, Algeria). Of these clones, 130 were identified as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In addition Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were identified in the remaining 100 isolates-spoilage isolate. These isolates were assayed for ability to form biofilms. S. aureus, Lactobacillus brevis strains LB1F2, LB14F1 and LB15F1, and Lactobacillus pentosus strains LB2F2 and LB3F2 were identified as the best biofilm formers. Besides, these LAB isolates were able to produce proteinaceous substances with antagonism against the aforementioned spoilage isolates, when grown in MRS or TSB-YE media. During the screening, L. pentosus LB3F2 exhibited the highest antibacterial activity when grown in TSB-YE medium at 30 °C. Additionally, L. pentosus LB3F2 was able to strongly hamper the adhesion of S. aureus SA3 on abiotic surfaces as polystyrene and stainless steel slides. LAB isolates did not show any hemolytic activity and all of them were sensitive to different families of antibiotic tested. It should be pointed out that LB3F2 isolate was not cytotoxic on the intestinal cells but could stimulate their metabolic activity. This report unveiled the potential of LB1F2, LB14F1, LB15F1, LB2F2, and LB3F2 isolates to be used as natural barrier or competitive exclusion organism in the food processing sector as well as a positive biofilm forming bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing bacteria using antimicrobial-producing biofilms in Three-Mile-Island process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, R; Ornek, D; Syrett, B C; Green, R M; Hsu, C-H; Mansfeld, F B; Wood, T K

    2004-04-01

    Biofilms were used to produce gramicidin S (a cyclic decapeptide) to inhibit corrosion-causing, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In laboratory studies these biofilms protected mild steel 1010 continuously from corrosion in the aggressive, cooling service water of the AmerGen Three-Mile-Island (TMI) nuclear plant, which was augmented with reference SRB. The growth of both reference SRB (Gram-positive Desulfosporosinus orientis and Gram-negative Desulfovibrio vulgaris) was shown to be inhibited by supernatants of the gramicidin-S-producing bacteria as well as by purified gramicidin S. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss measurements showed that the protective biofilms decreased the corrosion rate of mild steel by 2- to 10-fold when challenged with the natural SRB of the TMI process water supplemented with D. orientis or D. vulgaris. The relative corrosion inhibition efficiency was 50-90% in continuous reactors, compared to a biofilm control which did not produce the antimicrobial gramicidin S. Scanning electron microscope and reactor images also revealed that SRB attack was thwarted by protective biofilms that secrete gramicidin S. A consortium of beneficial bacteria (GGPST consortium, producing gramicidin S and other antimicrobials) also protected the mild steel.

  7. A new microtitre plate screening method for evaluating the viability of aerobic respiring bacteria in high surface biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, L M; Alvarez, B L; Codony, F; Fittipaldi, M; Adrados, B; Peñuela, G; Morató, J

    2010-09-01

    It is difficult to determine the effects of bactericidal compounds against bacteria in a biofilm because classical procedures for determining cell viability require several working days, multiple complicated steps and are frequently only applicable to cells in suspension. We attempt to develop a compact, inexpensive and versatile system to measure directly the extent of biofilm formation from water systems and to determine the viability of respiring bacteria in high surface biofilms. It has been reported that the reduction of tetrazolium sodium salts, such as XTT (sodium 3,3'-[1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]Bis(4-methoxy)-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid hydrate), during active bacterial metabolism can be incorporated into a colorimetric method for quantifying cell viability. XTT is reduced to a soluble formazan compound during bacterial aerobic metabolism such that the amount of formazan generated is proportional to the bacterial biomass. We show here, for the first time, that this colorimetric approach can be used to determine the metabolic activity of adherent aerobic bacteria in a biofilm as a measure of cell viability. This technique has been used to estimate viability and proliferation of bacteria in suspension, but this is the first application to microbial communities in a real undisturbed biofilm. This simple new system can be used to evaluate the complex biofilm community without separating the bacteria from their support. Thus, the results obtained by this practice may be more representative of the circumstances in a natural system, opening the possibility to multiple potential applications.

  8. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinna de Mendonça e Bertolini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based, and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10 were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8. Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p < 0.01. Silicone-based specimens mostly underwent adhesive failures, while samples containing PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p < 0.01. The PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  9. Ability of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli to survive within dry-surface biofilms and transfer to fresh lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adator, Emelia Hornam; Cheng, Meining; Holley, Rick; McAllister, Tim; Narvaez-Bravo, Claudia

    2018-03-23

    Biofilms are known to play important roles in bacterial survival and persistence in food-processing environments. This study aimed to determine the ability of the top 7 STEC serotypes to form biofilms on polystyrene (POL) and stainless steel (SS) plates and to quantify their survival and transfer from dry-surface biofilms to lettuce pieces. The ability of 14 STEC strains to form biofilms on these two materials at different exposure times and temperatures was assessed using crystal violet, Congo red and SEM. At 10 °C all serotypes were weak biofilm producers on both surfaces. In contrast, serotypes O45-040, O45-445, O103-102, O103-670 and O157-R508 were strong biofilm producers at 25 °C. Strains O103-102, O103-670, O111-CFS, O111-053 and O157:H7-R508 were expressers of curli. Under scanning electron microscopy, strains O103-670, O111-CFS, O157-R508, and O121-083 formed more discernible multilayer, mature biofilms on SS coupons. Regardless of the surface (POL/SS), all STEC strains were able to transfer viable cells onto fresh lettuce within a short contact time (2 min) to varying degrees (up to 6.35 log cfu/g). On POL, viable cell of almost all serotypes exhibited decreased detachment (p = 0.001) over 6 days; while after 30 days on SS, serotypes O45-040, O103-102, O103-670, O111-053, O111-CFS, O121-083, O145-231 O157:H7-R508 and O157:H7-122 were transferred to lettuce. After enrichment, all 14 STEC strains were recovered from dry-surface biofilms on POL and SS plates after 30 days. Results demonstrated that the top 7 STEC remained viable within dry-surface biofilms for at least 30 days, transferring to lettuce within 2 min of exposure and acting as a source of adulteration. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Melittin and its potential in the destruction and inhibition of the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoli, Tony; Peter, Cristina Mendes; Zani, João Luíz; Waller, Stefanie Bressan; Lopes, Matheus Gomes; Boesche, Kamilla Neutzling; Vargas, Gilberto D Ávila; Hübner, Silvia de Oliveira; Fischer, Geferson

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa stand out in veterinary and human medicine for their role in opportunistic infections and their pathogenic mechanisms, including the biofilms formation. It was investigated the antibacterial activity of melittin and antibiofilm of such bacteria. Twelve strains of these microorganisms isolated from bovine milk were used, as well as the strains S. aureus ATCC 12600, E. coli ATCC 8739 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by broth microdilution technique. The biofilms were formed in 96-well plates and melittin on these colonies was added at different concentrations and times. Bacteria previously exposed to melittin were evaluated for inhibition of biofilm production. The MIC and MBC were respectively in μg/mL: S. aureus (6-7 and 32-64), E. coli (40-42.5 and 64-128) and P. aeruginosa (65-70 and 64-128). S. aureus biofilms were more sensitive to the action of melittin, since upon exposure to a concentration 10 times lower than the MIC for 4 h, was completely destroyed. In Gram negative bacteria, the pre-formed biofilm was destroyed only when exposed for 4 h under the MIC. With respect to inhibition of biofilm production, S. aureus was the most sensitive again because produced only 37.2% of the biofilm formed by the control (without previous exposure to melittin), when exposed to the MIC, and at a concentration hundred times smaller than MIC, this microorganism produced 75.2% of the biofilm. E. coli was the most resistant bacteria and produced 56.3% of the biofilm, even if previously exposed to melittin MIC. Melittin presents desirable effects in combating microorganisms studied both at your disposal, biofilm destruction and inhibition of the formation, and maybe used in future studies of new strategies to combat infections caused by these pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Inhibition of Fungal Colonization by Pseudoalteromonas tunicata Provides a Competitive Advantage during Surface Colonization†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, A.; Egan, S.; Holmström, C.; James, S.; Lappin-Scott, H.; Kjelleberg, S.

    2006-01-01

    The marine epiphytic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata produces a range of extracellular secondary metabolites that inhibit an array of common fouling organisms, including fungi. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the ability to inhibit fungi provides P. tunicata with an advantage during colonization of a surface. Studies on a transposon-generated antifungal-deficient mutant of P. tunicata, FM3, indicated that a long-chain fatty acid-coenzyme A ligase is involved in the production of a broad-range antifungal compound by P. tunicata. Flow cell experiments demonstrated that production of an antifungal compound provided P. tunicata with a competitive advantage against a marine yeast isolate during surface colonization. This compound enabled P. tunicata to disrupt an already established fungal biofilm by decreasing the number of yeast cells attached to the surface by 66% ± 9%. For in vivo experiments, the wild-type and FM3 strains of P. tunicata were used to inoculate the surface of the green alga Ulva australis. Double-gradient denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that after 48 h, the wild-type P. tunicata had outcompeted the surface-associated fungal community, whereas the antifungal-deficient mutant had no effect on the fungal community. Our data suggest that P. tunicata is an effective competitor against fungal surface communities in the marine environment. PMID:16957232

  12. Inhibition of fungal colonization by Pseudoalteromonas tunicata provides a competitive advantage during surface colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, A; Egan, S; Holmström, C; James, S; Lappin-Scott, H; Kjelleberg, S

    2006-09-01

    The marine epiphytic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata produces a range of extracellular secondary metabolites that inhibit an array of common fouling organisms, including fungi. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the ability to inhibit fungi provides P. tunicata with an advantage during colonization of a surface. Studies on a transposon-generated antifungal-deficient mutant of P. tunicata, FM3, indicated that a long-chain fatty acid-coenzyme A ligase is involved in the production of a broad-range antifungal compound by P. tunicata. Flow cell experiments demonstrated that production of an antifungal compound provided P. tunicata with a competitive advantage against a marine yeast isolate during surface colonization. This compound enabled P. tunicata to disrupt an already established fungal biofilm by decreasing the number of yeast cells attached to the surface by 66% +/- 9%. For in vivo experiments, the wild-type and FM3 strains of P. tunicata were used to inoculate the surface of the green alga Ulva australis. Double-gradient denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that after 48 h, the wild-type P. tunicata had outcompeted the surface-associated fungal community, whereas the antifungal-deficient mutant had no effect on the fungal community. Our data suggest that P. tunicata is an effective competitor against fungal surface communities in the marine environment.

  13. Role of cell surface composition and lysis in static biofilm formation by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Smid, Eddy J.; Hols, Pascal; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Abee, Tjakko

    2018-01-01

    Next to applications in fermentations, Lactobacillus plantarum is recognized as a food spoilage organism, and its dispersal from biofilms in food processing environments might be implicated in contamination or recontamination of food products. This study provides new insights into biofilm

  14. Biofilms 2015: Multidisciplinary Approaches Shed Light into Microbial Life on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Fitnat

    2016-01-01

    The 7th ASM Conference on Biofilms was held in Chicago, Illinois, from 24 to 29 October 2015. The conference provided an international forum for biofilm researchers across academic and industry platforms, and from different scientific disciplines, to present and discuss new findings and ideas. The meeting covered a wide range of topics, spanning environmental sciences, applied biology, evolution, ecology, physiology, and molecular biology of the biofilm lifestyle. This report summarizes the presentations with regard to emerging biofilm-related themes. PMID:26977109

  15. Surface-to-surface biofilm transfer: a quick and reliable startup strategy for mixed culture microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Andreas; Bischof, Franz; Wichern, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is known to be prone to failure or result in erratic performance impeding the research. The aim of this study was to advise a quick launch strategy for laboratory-scale MFCs that ensures steady operation performance in a short period of time. Different startup strategies were investigated and compared with membraneless single chamber MFCs. A direct surface-to-surface biofilm transfer (BFT) in an operating MFC proved to be the most efficient method. It provided steady power densities of 163 ± 13 mWm(-2) 4 days after inoculation compared to 58 ± 15 mWm(-2) after 30 days following a conventional inoculation approach. The in situ BFT eliminates the need for microbial acclimation during startup and reduces performance fluctuations caused by shifts in microbial biodiversity. Anaerobic pretreatment of the substrate and addition of suspended enzymes from an operating MFC into the new MFC proved to have a beneficial effect on startup and subsequent operation. Polarization methods were applied to characterize the startup phase and the steady state operation in terms of power densities, internal resistance and power overshoot during biofilm maturation. Applying this method a well-working MFC can be multiplied into an array of identically performing MFCs.

  16. Antibiotic-loaded MoS2 nanosheets to combat bacterial resistance via biofilm inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Wentao; Liu, Lizhi; Yang, Mei; Huang, Lunjie; Chen, Kai; Wang, Rong; Yang, Baowei; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has resulted in increasing difficulty in treating clinical infections associated with biofilm formation, one of the key processes in turn contributing to enhanced antibiotic resistance. With the rapid development of nanotechnology, a new way to overcome antibiotic resistance has opened up. Based on the many and diverse properties of MoS2 nanosheets that have attracted wide attention, in particular their antibacterial potential, herein, a novel antimicrobial agent to combat resistant gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Salmonella was prepared using chitosan functionalized MoS2 nanosheets loading tetracycline hydrochloride drugs (abbreviated to CM-TH). The antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of the CM-TH nanocomposites showed the synergetic effect that the combination of nanomaterials and antibiotics was more efficient than either working alone. In particularly, the minimum inhibitory concentration values generally decreased by a factor of dozens, suggesting that CM-TH may become a possible alternative to traditional antibiotics in disrupting biofilms and overcoming antibiotic resistance in treating medical diseases.

  17. The effects of diode laser on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide adherent to titanium oxide surface of dental implants. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This in vitro study aims at providing the experimental basis for possible use of diode laser (λ 808 nm) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was grown for 48 h on titanium discs with porous surface corresponding to the bone-implant interface and then irradiated with a diode laser (λ 808 nm) in noncontact mode with airflow cooling for 1 min using a Ø 600-μm fiber. Setting parameters were 2 W (400 J/cm 2 ) for continuous wave mode; 22 μJ, 20 kHz, 7 μs (88 J/cm 2 ) for pulsed wave mode. Bactericidal effect was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and counting the residual colony-forming units. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, the titanium discs were coated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), laser-irradiated and seeded with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Diode laser irradiation in both continuous and pulsed modes induced a statistically significant reduction of viable bacteria and nitrite levels. These results indicate that in addition to its bactericidal effect laser irradiation can also inhibit LPS-induced macrophage activation and thus blunt the inflammatory response. The λ 808-nm diode laser emerges as a valuable tool for decontamination/detoxification of the titanium implant surface and may be used in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

  18. Surface-Adaptive, Antimicrobially Loaded, Micellar Nanocarriers with Enhanced Penetration and Killing Efficiency in Staphylococcal Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yong; Busscher, Henk J; Zhao, Bingran; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Zhenkun; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin; Shi, Linqi

    Biofilms cause persistent bacterial infections and are extremely recalcitrant to antimicrobials, due in part to reduced penetration of antimicrobials into biofilms that allows bacteria residing in the depth of a biofilm to survive antimicrobial treatment. Here, we describe the preparation of

  19. Data on enterobacteria activity on biofilm formation at surface mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv Ataulfo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Ragazzo-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic factors influenced the capacity of the strains to form biofilms. Classification of the adhesion type is related with the optical density measured on the biofilm formation of tested strains. The relationship between the biofilm formation in real values with theoretical values of the strains was used to determine the mechanism involved during mixed cultures.

  20. The effect of Streptococcus mutans and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans biofilms formed on different surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira-Cenci, T.; Deng, D.M.; Kraneveld, E.A.; Manders, E.M.M.; Del Bel Cury, A.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Although Candida containing biofilms contribute to the development of oral candidosis, the characteristics of multi-species Candida biofilms and how oral bacteria modulate these biofilms is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between Candida albicans and either

  1. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  2. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleimani, Sahar; Isgor, O. Burkan; Ormeci, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process

  3. Scaffold of Selenium Nanovectors and Honey Phytochemicals for Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateeksha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Honey is an excellent source of polyphenolic compounds that are effective in attenuating quorum sensing (QS, a chemical process of cell-to-cell communication system used by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. However, lower water solubility and inadequate bioavailability remains major concerns of these therapeutic polyphenols. Its therapeutic index can be improved by using nano-carrier systems to target QS signaling potently. In the present study, we fabricated a unique drug delivery system comprising selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs; non-viral vectors and polyphenols of honey (HP for enhancement of anti-QS activity of HP against P. aeruginosa PAO1. The developed selenium nano-scaffold showed superior anti-QS activity, anti-biofilm efficacy, and anti-virulence potential in both in-vitro and in-vivo over its individual components, SeNPs and HP. LasR is inhibited by selenium nano-scaffold in-vitro. Using computational molecular docking studies, we have also demonstrated that the anti-virulence activity of selenium nano-scaffold is reliant on molecular binding that occurs between HP and the QS receptor LasR through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Our preliminary investigations with selenium-based nano-carriers hold significant promise to improve anti-virulence effectiveness of phytochemicals by enhancing effective intracellular delivery.

  4. Evaluation of Two Surface Sampling Methods for Microbiological and Chemical Analyses To Assess the Presence of Biofilms in Food Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sharon; Huu, Son Nguyen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Weyenberg, Stephanie van; Steenackers, Hans; Verplaetse, Alex; Vackier, Thijs; Sampers, Imca; Raes, Katleen; Reu, Koen De

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms are an important source of contamination in food companies, yet the composition of biofilms in practice is still mostly unknown. The chemical and microbiological characterization of surface samples taken after cleaning and disinfection is very important to distinguish free-living bacteria from the attached bacteria in biofilms. In this study, sampling methods that are potentially useful for both chemical and microbiological analyses of surface samples were evaluated. In the manufacturing facilities of eight Belgian food companies, surfaces were sampled after cleaning and disinfection using two sampling methods: the scraper-flocked swab method and the sponge stick method. Microbiological and chemical analyses were performed on these samples to evaluate the suitability of the sampling methods for the quantification of extracellular polymeric substance components and microorganisms originating from biofilms in these facilities. The scraper-flocked swab method was most suitable for chemical analyses of the samples because the material in these swabs did not interfere with determination of the chemical components. For microbiological enumerations, the sponge stick method was slightly but not significantly more effective than the scraper-flocked swab method. In all but one of the facilities, at least 20% of the sampled surfaces had more than 10 2 CFU/100 cm 2 . Proteins were found in 20% of the chemically analyzed surface samples, and carbohydrates and uronic acids were found in 15 and 8% of the samples, respectively. When chemical and microbiological results were combined, 17% of the sampled surfaces were contaminated with both microorganisms and at least one of the analyzed chemical components; thus, these surfaces were characterized as carrying biofilm. Overall, microbiological contamination in the food industry is highly variable by food sector and even within a facility at various sampling points and sampling times.

  5. Time-Resolved Analysis of Cytosolic and Surface-Associated Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus HG001 under Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Martin; Schlüter, Rabea; Bernhardt, Jörg; Plate, Kristina; Riedel, Katharina; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2015-09-04

    Staphylococcal biofilms are associated with persistent infections due to their capacity to protect bacteria against the host's immune system and antibiotics. Cell-surface-associated proteins are of great importance during biofilm formation. In the present study, an optimized biotinylation approach for quantitative GeLC-MS-based analysis of the staphylococcal cell-surface proteome was applied and the cytoplasmic protein fraction was analyzed to elucidate proteomic differences between colony biofilms and planktonic cells. The experimental setup enabled a time-resolved monitoring of the proteome under both culture conditions and the comparison of biofilm cells to planktonic cells at several time points. This allowed discrimination of differences attributed to delayed growth phases from responses provoked by biofilm conditions. Biofilm cells expressed CcpA-dependent catabolic proteins earlier than planktonic cells and strongly accumulated proteins that belong to the SigB stress regulon. The amount of the cell-surface protein and virulence gene regulator Rot decreased within biofilms and MgrA-dependent regulations appeared more pronounced. Biofilm cells simultaneously up-regulated activators (e.g., SarZ) as well as repressors (e.g., SarX) of RNAIII. A decreased amount of high-affinity iron uptake systems and an increased amount of the iron-storage protein FtnA possibly indicated a lower demand of iron in biofilms.

  6. Inhibition of growth and biofilm formation of clinical bacterial isolates by NiO nanoparticles synthesized from Eucalyptus globulus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Samia; Ahmed, Bilal; Khan, Mohammad Saghir; Al-Shaeri, Majed; Musarrat, Javed

    2017-10-01

    Nanotechnology based therapeutics has emerged as a promising approach for augmenting the activity of existing antimicrobials due to the unique physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs). Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) have been suggested as prospective antibacterial and antitumor agent. In this study, NiO-NPs have been synthesized by a green approach using Eucalyptus globulus leaf extract and assessed for their bactericidal activity. The morphology and purity of synthesized NiO-NPs determined through various spectroscopic techniques like UV-Visible, FT-IR, XRD, EDX and electron microscopy differed considerably. The synthesized NiO-NPs were pleomorphic varying in size between 10 and 20 nm. The XRD analysis revealed the average size of NiO-NPs as 19 nm. The UV-Vis spectroscopic data showed a strong SPR of NiO-NPs with a characteristic spectral peak at 396 nm. The FTIR data revealed various functional moieties like C=C, C-N, C-H and O-H which elucidate the role of leaf biomolecules in capping and dispersal of NiO-NPs. The bioactivity assay revealed the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of NiO-NPs against ESβL (+) E. coli, P. aeruginosa, methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus. Growth inhibition assay demonstrated time and NiO-NPs concentration dependent decrease in the viability of treated cells. NiO-NPs induced biofilm inhibition was revealed by a sharp increase in characteristic red fluorescence of PI, while SEM images of NiO-NPs treated cells were irregular shrink and distorted with obvious depressions/indentations. The results suggested significant antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of NiO-NPs which may play an important role in the management of infectious diseases affecting human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inactivation of Cronobacter malonaticus cells and inhibition of its biofilm formation exposed to hydrogen peroxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yingwang; Zhang, Maofeng; Jiao, Rui; Ling, Na; Zhang, Xiyan; Tong, Liaowang; Zeng, Haiyang; Zhang, Jumei; Wu, Qingping

    2018-01-01

    Presence of Cronobacter malonaticus in powdered infant formula (PIF) poses a high risk to infant and public health. Cronobacter malonaticus has been widely distributed in food and food processing environments, and the true origin of C. malonaticus in PIF is poorly understood. Control and prevention of C. malonaticus is necessary for achieving microbial safety of PIF. However, little information about decontamination of C. malonaticus is available. In this study, effects of hydrogen peroxide on inactivation and morphological changes of C. malonaticus cells were determined. Furthermore, inhibitory effects of H 2 O 2 on biofilm formation in C. malonaticus were also performed. Results indicated that H 2 O 2 could completely inactivate C. malonaticus in sterile water with 0.06% H 2 O 2 for 25 min, 0.08% H 2 O 2 for 15 min, and 0.10% for 10 min, respectively, whereas the survival rates of C. malonaticus in tryptic soy broth medium significantly increased with the same treatment time and concentration of H 2 O 2 . In addition, morphological changes of C. malonaticus cells, including cell shrinkage, disruption of cells, cell intercession, and leakage of intercellular material in sterile water after H 2 O 2 treatment, were more predominant than those in tryptic soy broth. Finally, significant reduction in biofilm formation by H 2 O 2 was found using crystal violet staining, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy detection compared with control samples. This is the first report to determine the effects of H 2 O 2 on C. malonaticus cells and biofilm formation. The findings provided valuable information for practical application of H 2 O 2 for decontamination of C. malonaticus in dairy processing. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium.

  9. D-Tagatose inhibits the growth and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibul, Khaleque; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takaaki; Waki, Junpei; Tada, Ayano; Yoneda, Saori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is an important global health concern and Streptococcus mutans has been established as a major cariogenic bacterial species. Reports indicate that a rare sugar, D-tagatose, is not easily catabolized by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans GS-5 were examined. Monitoring S. mutans growth over a 24 h period revealed that D-tagatose prolonged the lag phase without interfering with the final c...

  10. Comparison of Cultural and Molecular Fecal Indicator Measurements in Surface Water and Periphyton Biofilms in Artificial Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies suggest that periphyton in streambeds can harbor fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and, under certain circumstances, can be transferred from the periphyton biofilm into the surface water. An indoor mesocosm study was conducted at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Expe...

  11. The effect of titanium implant surface modification on the dynamic process of initial microbial adhesion and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, A.; Li, X.; Huang, B.; Tsoi, J.K.-H.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Chen, Z.; Deng, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the dynamic process of biofilm adhesion on titanium implant with two surface treatments, either pickled (PT) or moderately roughened by sandblasting with large grits and acid-etched (SLA). Materials and methods: Two types of titanium disks with

  12. Combined treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with bacteriophages and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a growing concern in a broad range of areas. In this study, a mixture of RNA bacteriophages isolated from municipal wastewater was used to control and remove biofilms. At the concentrations of 400 and 4 × 10(7) PFU/mL, the phages inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 45 ± 15% and 73 ± 8%, respectively. At the concentrations of 6,000 and 6 × 10(7) PFU/mL, the phages removed 45 ± 9% and 75 ± 5% of pre-existing P. aeruginosa biofilms, respectively. Chlorine reduced biofilm growth by 86 ± 3% at the concentration of 210 mg/L, but it did not remove pre-existing biofilms. However, a combination of phages (3 × 10(7) PFU/mL) and chlorine at this concentration reduced biofilm growth by 94 ± 2% and removed 88 ± 6% of existing biofilms. In a continuous flow system with continued biofilm growth, a combination of phages (a one-time treatment at the concentration of 1.9 × 10(8) PFU/mL for 1 h first) with chlorine removed 97 ± 1% of biofilms after Day 5 while phage and chlorine treatment alone removed 89 ± 1% and 40 ± 5%, respectively. For existing biofilms, a combined use of a lower phage concentration (3.8 × 10(5) PFU/mL) and chlorination with a shorter time duration (12 h) followed by continuous water flushing removed 96 ± 1% of biofilms in less than 2 days. Laser scanning confocal microscopy supplemented with electron microscopy indicated that the combination treatment resulted in biofilms with lowest cell density and viability. These results suggest that the combination treatment of phages and chlorine is a promising method to control and remove bacterial biofilms from various surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Combinatorial effects of aromatic 1,3 – disubstituted ureas and fluoride on in vitro inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurmeet eKaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries occurs as a result of disequilibrium between acid producing pathogenic bacteria and alkali generating commensal bacteria within a dental biofilm (dental plaque. S. mutans has been reported as a primary cariogenic pathogen associated with dental caries. Emergence of multidrug resistant as well as fluoride resistant strains of Streptococcus mutans due to over usage of various antibiotics is a rising problem and prompted the researchers worldwide to search for alternative therapies. In this perspective, the present study was aimed to screen selective inhibitors against ComA, a bacteriocin associated ABC transporter, involved in the quorum sensing of S. mutans. In light of our previous in silico findings, 1,3- disubstituted urea derivatives which had better affinity to ComA were chemically synthesized in the present study for in vitro evaluation of S. mutans biofilm inhibition. The results revealed that 1,3- disubstituted urea derivatives showed good biofilm inhibition. In addition, the synthesized compounds exhibited potent synergy with a very low concentration of fluoride (31.25 ppm to 62.5 ppm in inhibiting the biofilm formation of S. mutans without affecting the bacterial growth. Further, the results were confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. On the whole, from our experimental results we conclude that the combinatorial application of fluoride and disubstituted ureas has a potential synergistic effect which has a promising approach in combating multidrug resistant and fluoride resistant S. mutans in dental caries management.

  14. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, Sara A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140114432; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19545264X

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms.

  15. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them.

  16. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  17. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chronopoulou, Laura [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Di Domenico, Enea Gino [IRCCS, Department of Clinical Pathology and Microbiology, San Gallicano Institute (Italy); Ascenzioni, Fiorentina [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Biology and Biotechnology C. Darwin (Italy); Palocci, Cleofe, E-mail: cleofe.palocci@uniroma1.it [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Chemistry (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  18. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronopoulou, Laura; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Palocci, Cleofe

    2016-01-01

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  19. Positively charged biopolymeric nanoparticles for the inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Laura; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Palocci, Cleofe

    2016-10-01

    Currently, many microbial infections have the potential to become lethal owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance by means of different mechanisms and mainly on the basis of the fact that many drugs are unable to reach therapeutic levels in the target sites. This requires the use of high doses and frequent administrations, causing adverse side effects or in some cases toxicity. The use of nanoparticle systems could help overcome such problems and increase drug efficacy. In the present study, we developed a new drug delivery system based on the use of biopolymeric nanovectors loaded with tobramycin (Tb), which is the standard antibiotic for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis-associated P. aeruginosa lung infections. Tb-loaded biopolymeric nanoparticles composed by dextran sulfate (DS) and chitosan (CS) were prepared by ionotropic gelation. We optimized drug entrapment in DS/CS nanoparticles, obtaining particles of 170 nm and with a drug loading of 400 µg Tb/mg of nanoparticles. In accord with in vitro release experiments, such preparations were able to release approximately 25 % of their cargo in 60 h. In vitro, the antimicrobial efficacy of the drug delivery system on P. aeruginosa biofilm was tested and compared to the effects of free drug revealing that this formulation can reduce the viability of P. aeruginosa biofilms for 48 h with a single-dose administration.

  20. Chirality in microbial biofilms is mediated by close interactions between the cell surface and the substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauffred, Liselotte; Munk Vejborg, Rebecca; Korolev, Kirill S; Brown, Stanley; Oddershede, Lene B

    2017-01-01

    From microbial biofilms to human migrations, spatial competition is central to the evolutionary history of many species. The boundary between expanding populations is the focal point of competition for space and resources and is of particular interest in ecology. For all Escherichia coli strains studied here, these boundaries move in a counterclockwise direction even when the competing strains have the same fitness. We find that chiral growth of bacterial colonies is strongly suppressed by the expression of extracellular features such as adhesive structures and pili. Experiments with other microbial species show that chiral growth is found in other bacteria and exclude cell wall biosynthesis and anisotropic shape as the primary causes of chirality. Instead, intimate contact with the substratum is necessary for chirality. Our results demonstrate that through a handful of surface molecules cells can fundamentally reorganize their migration patterns, which might affect intra- and interspecific competitions through colony morphology or other mechanisms. PMID:28362723

  1. NATURAL ANTIBIOFOULING AGENTS AS NEW CONTROL METHOD FOR PHOTOTROPHIC BIOFILMS DWELLING ON MONUMENTAL STONE SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Adriana CUZMAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Five natural antibiofoulants with terrestrial (capsaicine - CS, cinnamaldehyde - CI and marine origin (zosteric acid - ZA, poly-alkylpyridinium salts - pAPS and Ceramium botryocarpum extract - CBE have been selected and tested against phototrophic biofilm formation on the stone surfaces for their inhibitory properties. The antibiofouling agents (ABAs were incorporated into two commercial silicone based coatings (Silres BS OH 100 - S and Silres BS 290 - W. In this work, phototrophic growth was evaluated by epifluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative image analysis. The results showed an inhibitory efficiency for almost all tested ABAs. However, this efficiency has been found for short time or when the incorporating agent were incompletely cured. Among the ABAs tested, the poly-alkylpyridinium salts and cinnamaldehyde incorporated into Silres BS 290 showed the best inhibitory efficiency.

  2. Presence of biofilm containing viable multiresistant organisms despite terminal cleaning on clinical surfaces in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, K; Deva, A; Jacombs, A; Allan, J; Valente, P; Gosbell, I B

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent attention to surface cleaning and hand hygiene programmes, multiresistant organisms (MROs) continue to be isolated from the hospital environment. Biofilms, consisting of bacteria embedded in exopolymeric substances (EPS) are difficult to remove due to their increased resistance to detergents and disinfectants, and periodically release free-swimming planktonic bacteria back into the environment which may may act as an infection source. To establish whether reservoirs of MROs exist in the environment as biofilms. Following terminal cleaning, equipment and furnishings were removed aseptically from an intensive care unit (ICU) and subjected to culture and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples were placed in 5 mL of tryptone soya broth, sonicated for 5 min before plate culture on horse blood agar, Brillance MRSA and Brilliance VRE agar plates. Samples for SEM were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde and hexamethyldisilizane (HMDS) prior to sputter-coating with gold and examination in an electron microscope. Biofilm was demonstrated visually on the sterile supply bucket, the opaque plastic door, the venetian blind cord, and the sink rubber, whereas EPS alone was seen on the curtain. Viable bacteria were grown from three samples, including MRSA from the venetian blind cord and the curtain. Biofilm containing MROs persist on clinical surfaces from an ICU despite terminal cleaning, suggesting that current cleaning practices are inadequate to control biofilm development. The presence of MROs being protected within these biofilms may be the mechanism by which MROs persist within the hospital environment. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphasic analysis of an Azoarcus-Leptothrix-dominated bacterial biofilm developed on stainless steel surface in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Tibor; Táncsics, András; Szabó, István; Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Fábián, Krisztina; Maróti, Gergely; Kriszt, Balázs

    2016-05-01

    Pump and treat systems are widely used for hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater remediation. Although biofouling (formation of clogging biofilms on pump surfaces) is a common problem in these systems, scarce information is available regarding the phylogenetic and functional complexity of such biofilms. Extensive information about the taxa and species as well as metabolic potential of a bacterial biofilm developed on the stainless steel surface of a pump submerged in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater is presented. Results shed light on a complex network of interconnected hydrocarbon-degrading chemoorganotrophic and chemolitotrophic bacteria. It was found that besides the well-known hydrocarbon-degrading aerobic/facultative anaerobic biofilm-forming organisms (e.g., Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Acidovorax, Thauera, Pseudomonas, etc.), representatives of Fe(2+)-and Mn(2+)-oxidizing (Thiobacillus, Sideroxydans, Gallionella, Rhodopseudomonas, etc.) as well as of Fe(3+)- and Mn(4+)-respiring (Rhodoferax, Geobacter, Magnetospirillum, Sulfurimonas, etc.) bacteria were present in the biofilm. The predominance of β-Proteobacteria within the biofilm bacterial community in phylogenetic and functional point of view was revealed. Investigation of meta-cleavage dioxygenase and benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes indicated that within the biofilm, Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Zoogloea, and Thauera species are most probably involved in intrinsic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Polyphasic analysis of the biofilm shed light on the fact that subsurface microbial accretions might be reservoirs of novel putatively hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Moreover, clogging biofilms besides their detrimental effects might supplement the efficiency of pump and treat systems.

  4. Evidence of extensive diversity in bacterial adherence mechanisms that exploit unanticipated stainless steel surface structural complexity for biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Li, Dongyang; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Yu, Bin; Muruve, Daniel; Irvin, Randall T

    2013-04-01

    Three protease-resistant bioorganic 304 stainless steel surfaces were created through the reaction of synthetic peptides consisting of the D-enantiomeric isomer (D-K122-4), the retro-inverso D-enantiomeric isomer (RI-K122-4), and a combination of the two peptides (D+RI) of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilA receptor binding domain with steel surfaces. The peptides used to produce the new materials differ only in handedness of their three-dimensional structure, but they reacted with the steel to yield materials that differed in their surface electron work function (EWF) while displaying an identical chemical composition and equivalent surface adhesive force properties. These surfaces allowed for an assessment of the relative role of surface EWF in initial biofilm formation. We examined the ability of various bacteria (selected strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis) to initiate biofilm formation. The D-K1224 generated surface displayed the lowest EWF (classically associated with greater molecular interactions and more extensive biofilm formation) but was observed to be least effectively colonized by bacteria (>50% decrease in bacterial adherence of all strains). The highest surface EWF with the lowest surface free energy (RI-K122-4 generated) was more extensively colonized by bacteria, with the binding of some strains being equivalent to unmodified steel. The D+RI generated surface was least effective in minimizing biofilm formation, where some strains displayed enhanced bacterial colonization. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the D and RI peptides displayed similar but clearly different binding patterns, suggesting that the peptides recognized different sites on the steel, and that differential binding of the peptides to the steel surfaces influences the binding of different bacterial strains and species. We have demonstrated that stainless steel surfaces can be easily modified by peptides to generate surfaces with

  5. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria, E-mail: maria.godoy.gallardo@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Guillem-Marti, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.guillem.marti@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sevilla, Pablo, E-mail: psevilla@euss.es [Department of Mechanics, Escola Universitària Salesiana de Sarrià (EUSS), C/ Passeig de Sant Bosco, 42, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Manero, José M., E-mail: jose.maria.manero@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Francisco J., E-mail: francesc.xavier.gil@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in NanoEngineering (CRNE) — UPC, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  6. Anhydride-functional silane immobilized onto titanium surfaces induces osteoblast cell differentiation and reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Sevilla, Pablo; Manero, José M.; Gil, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection in dental implants along with osseointegration failure usually leads to loss of the device. Bioactive molecules with antibacterial properties can be attached to titanium surfaces with anchoring molecules such as silanes, preventing biofilm formation and improving osseointegration. Properties of silanes as molecular binders have been thoroughly studied, but research on the biological effects of these coatings is scarce. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro cell response and antibacterial effects of triethoxysilypropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) silane anchored on titanium surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed a successful silanization. The silanized surfaces showed no cytotoxic effects. Gene expression analyses of Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) osteoblast-like cells cultured on TESPSA silanized surfaces reported a remarkable increase of biochemical markers related to induction of osteoblastic cell differentiation. A manifest decrease of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation at early stages was observed on treated substrates, while favoring cell adhesion and spreading in bacteria–cell co-cultures. Surfaces treated with TESPSA could enhance a biological sealing on implant surfaces against bacteria colonization of underlying tissues. Furthermore, it can be an effective anchoring platform of biomolecules on titanium surfaces with improved osteoblastic differentiation and antibacterial properties. - Highlights: • TESPSA silane induces osteoblast differentiation. • TESPSA reduces bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. • TESPSA is a promising anchoring platform of biomolecules onto titanium.

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Provides insight into the Key Proteins as Possible Targets Involved in Aspirin Inhibiting Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus xylosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Geng Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus xylosus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infection in humans and cow mastitis. And S. xylosus possesses a strong ability to form biofilms in vitro. As biofilm formation facilitates resistance to antimicrobial agents, the discovery of new medicinal properties for classic drugs is highly desired. Aspirin, which is the most common active component of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, affects the biofilm-forming capacity of various bacterial species. We have found that aspirin effectively inhibits biofilm formation of S. xylosus by Crystal violet (CV staining and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The present study sought to elucidate possible targets of aspirin in suppressing S. xylosus biofilm formation. Based on an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ fold-change of >1.2 or <0.8 (P-value < 0.05, 178 differentially expressed proteins, 111 down-regulated and 67 up-regulated, were identified after application of aspirin to cells at a 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration. Gene ontology analysis indicated enrichment in metabolic processes for the majority of the differentially expressed proteins. We then used the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database to analyze a large number of differentially expressed proteins and identified genes involved in biosynthesis of amino acids pathway, carbon metabolism (pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways, tricarboxylic acid cycle and nitrogen metabolism (histidine metabolism. These novel proteins represent candidate targets in aspirin-mediated inhibition of S. xylosus biofilm formation at sub-MIC levels. The findings lay the foundation for further studies to identify potential aspirin targets.

  8. Mechanisms of inhibition by fluoride of urease activities of cell suspensions and biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces naeslundii and of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza-Silva, E; Castro, A C D; Marquis, R E

    2005-12-01

    Fluoride is known to be a potent inhibitor of bacterial ureases and can also act in the form of hydrofluoric acid as a transmembrane proton conductor to acidify the cytoplasm of intact cells with possible indirect, acid inhibition of urease. Our research objectives were to assess the inhibitory potencies of fluoride for three urease-positive bacteria commonly found in the mouth and to determine the relative importance of direct and indirect inhibition of ureases for overall inhibition of intact cells or biofilms. The experimental design involved intact bacteria in suspensions, mono-organism biofilms, cell extracts, and dental plaque. Standard enzymatic assays for ammonia production from urea were used. We found that ureolysis by cells in suspensions or mono-organism biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus salivarius or Actinomyces naeslundii was inhibited by fluoride at plaque levels of 0.1-0.5 mm in a pH-dependent manner. The results of experiments with the organic weak acids indomethacin and capric acid, which do not directly inhibit urease enzyme, indicated that weak-acid effects leading to cytoplasmic acidification are also involved in fluoride inhibition. However, direct fluoride inhibition of urease appeared to be the major mechanism for reduction in ureolytic activity in acid environments. Results of experiments with freshly harvested supragingival dental plaque indicated responses to fluoride similar to those of S. salivarius with pH-dependent fluoride inhibition and both direct and indirect inhibition of urease. Fluoride can act to diminish alkali production from urea by oral bacteria through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  9. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba María Paz-Méndez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella. In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three different subspecies and isolated from poultry houses was evaluated. To simulate food chain conditions, four different growth media (Tryptic Soy Broth at 1/20 dilution, milk at 1/20 dilution, tomato juice, and chicken meat juice, two different surfaces (stainless steel and polystyrene and two temperatures (6 °C and 22 °C were used to evaluate the biofilm formation. The morphotype, motility, and biofilm formation of Salmonella was temperature-dependent. Biofilm formation was significantly higher with 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth in all the surfaces and temperatures tested, in comparison with the other growth media. The laboratory growth medium 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth enhanced biofilm formation in Salmonella. This could explain the great differences in biofilm formation found between this growth medium and food residues. However, Salmonella strains were able to produce biofilm on the presence of food residues in all the conditions tested. Therefore, the Salmonella strain can use food residues to produce biofilm on common surfaces of the food chain. More studies combining more strains and food residues are necessary to fully understand the mechanism used by Salmonella to produce biofilm on the presence of these sources of nutrients.

  10. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Méndez, Alba María; Lamas, Alexandre; Vázquez, Beatriz; Miranda, José Manuel; Cepeda, Alberto; Franco, Carlos Manuel

    2017-11-29

    Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella . In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three different subspecies and isolated from poultry houses was evaluated. To simulate food chain conditions, four different growth media (Tryptic Soy Broth at 1/20 dilution, milk at 1/20 dilution, tomato juice, and chicken meat juice), two different surfaces (stainless steel and polystyrene) and two temperatures (6 °C and 22 °C) were used to evaluate the biofilm formation. The morphotype, motility, and biofilm formation of Salmonella was temperature-dependent. Biofilm formation was significantly higher with 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth in all the surfaces and temperatures tested, in comparison with the other growth media. The laboratory growth medium 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth enhanced biofilm formation in Salmonella . This could explain the great differences in biofilm formation found between this growth medium and food residues. However, Salmonella strains were able to produce biofilm on the presence of food residues in all the conditions tested. Therefore, the Salmonella strain can use food residues to produce biofilm on common surfaces of the food chain. More studies combining more strains and food residues are necessary to fully understand the mechanism used by Salmonella to produce biofilm on the presence of these sources of nutrients.

  11. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Alexandre [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Elie, Anne-Marie [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Plawinski, Laurent [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Serro, Ana Paula [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQE-Centro de Química Estrutural, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQFM-Centro de Química-Física Molecular and Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology - IN, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, Amélia [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Urdaci, Maria C. [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Durrieu, Marie-Christine [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Vilar, Rui, E-mail: rui.vilar@tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The short-term adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus onto femtosecond laser textured surfaces of titanium was investigated. • The laser textured surfaces consist of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars. • The laser treatment enhances the hydrophilicity and the surface free energy of the material. • The laser treatment reduces significantly the adhesion of S. aureus and biofilm formation. • Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic implants with antibacterial properties. - Abstract: The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method

  12. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F.; Martínez-Castañón, G.A.; Téllez-Déctor, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans

  13. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  14. Streptococcus oligofermentans inhibits Streptococcus mutans in biofilms at both neutral pH and cariogenic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, X.; de Soet, J.J.; Tong, H.; Gao, X.; He, L.; van Loveren, C.; Deng, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide

  15. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilms: A focus on anti-biofilm agents and their mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa; Donelli, Gianfranco; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm refers to the complex, sessile communities of microbes found either attached to a surface or buried firmly in an extracellular matrix as aggregates. The biofilm matrix surrounding bacteria makes them tolerant to harsh conditions and resistant to antibacterial treatments. Moreover, the biofilms are responsible for causing a broad range of chronic diseases and due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria it has really become difficult to treat them with efficacy. Furthermore, the antibiotics available till date are ineffective for treating these biofilm related infections due to their higher values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), which may result in in-vivo toxicity. Hence, it is critically important to design or screen anti-biofilm molecules that can effectively minimize and eradicate biofilm related infections. In the present article, we have highlighted the mechanism of biofilm formation with reference to different models and various methods used for biofilm detection. A major focus has been put on various anti-biofilm molecules discovered or tested till date which may include herbal active compounds, chelating agents, peptide antibiotics, lantibiotics and synthetic chemical compounds along with their structures, mechanism of action and their respective MICs, MBCs, minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) as well as the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values available in the literature so far. Different mode of action of anti biofilm molecules addressed here are inhibition via interference in the quorum sensing pathways, adhesion mechanism, disruption of extracellular DNA, protein, lipopolysaccharides, exopolysaccharides and secondary messengers involved in various signaling pathways. From this study, we conclude that the molecules considered here might be used to treat biofilm-associated infections after significant structural modifications, thereby

  16. An In Vitro Model for Candida albicans–Streptococcus gordonii Biofilms on Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Montelongo-Jauregui

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity serves as a nutrient-rich haven for over 600 species of microorganisms. Although many are essential to maintaining the oral microbiota, some can cause oral infections such as caries, periodontitis, mucositis, and endodontic infections, and this is further exacerbated with dental implants. Most of these infections are mixed species in nature and associated with a biofilm mode of growth. Here, after optimization of different parameters including cell density, growth media, and incubation conditions, we have developed an in vitro model of C. albicans–S. gordonii mixed-species biofilms on titanium discs that is relevant to infections of peri-implant diseases. Our results indicate a synergistic effect for the development of biofilms when both microorganisms were seeded together, confirming the existence of beneficial, mutualistic cross-kingdom interactions for biofilm formation. The morphological and architectural features of these dual-species biofilms formed on titanium were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Mixed biofilms formed on titanium discs showed a high level of resistance to combination therapy with antifungal and antibacterial drugs. This model can serve as a platform for further analyses of complex fungal/bacterial biofilms and can also be applied to screening of new drug candidates against mixed-species biofilms.

  17. II. Inhibited Diffusion Driven Surface Transmutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2006-02-01

    This paper is the second of a set of three papers dealing with the role of coherent partitioning as a common element in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR), by which is meant cold-fusion related processes. This paper discusses the first step in a sequence of four steps that seem to be necessary to explain Iwamura 2-α-addition surface transmutations. Three concepts are examined: salt-metal interface states, sequential tunneling that transitions D+ ions from localized interstitial to Bloch form, and the general applicability of 2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional symmetry hosting networks.

  18. II. Inhibited diffusion driven surface transmutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubb, Talbot A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of three papers dealing with the role of coherent partitioning as a common element in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR), by which is meant cold-fusion related processes. This paper discusses the first step in a sequence of four steps that seem to be necessary to explain lwamura 2-α-addition surface transmutations. Three concepts are examined: salt metal interface states, sequential tunneling that transitions D + ions from localized interstitial to Bloch form, and the general applicability of 2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional symmetry hosting networks. (author)

  19. II. Inhibited diffusion driven surface transmutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubb, Talbot A. [Greenwich Corp., 5023 N. 38th St., Arlington, VA 22207 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second of a set of three papers dealing with the role of coherent partitioning as a common element in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR), by which is meant cold-fusion related processes. This paper discusses the first step in a sequence of four steps that seem to be necessary to explain lwamura 2-{alpha}-addition surface transmutations. Three concepts are examined: salt metal interface states, sequential tunneling that transitions D{sup +} ions from localized interstitial to Bloch form, and the general applicability of 2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional symmetry hosting networks. (author)

  20. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%. Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8% and Mycenas rosea (44.8% presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4% and Russula delica (53.1%. Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract. This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other

  1. CMEIAS bioimage informatics that define the landscape ecology of immature microbial biofilms developed on plant rhizoplane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank B Dazzo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the rhizoplane habitat is an important activity that enables certain microorganisms to promote plant growth. Here we describe various types of computer-assisted microscopy that reveal important ecological insights of early microbial colonization behavior within biofilms on plant root surfaces grown in soil. Examples of the primary data are obtained by analysis of processed images of rhizoplane biofilm landscapes analyzed at single-cell resolution using the emerging technology of CMEIAS bioimage informatics software. Included are various quantitative analyses of the in situ biofilm landscape ecology of microbes during their pioneer colonization of white clover roots, and of a rhizobial biofertilizer strain colonized on rice roots where it significantly enhances the productivity of this important crop plant. The results show that spatial patterns of immature biofilms developed on rhizoplanes that interface rhizosphere soil are highly structured (rather than distributed randomly when analyzed at the appropriate spatial scale, indicating that regionalized microbial cell-cell interactions and the local environment can significantly affect their cooperative and competitive colonization behaviors.

  2. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  3. Effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, F; Sculean, A; Wieland, M; Horn, N; Nuesry, E; Bube, C; Becker, J

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present pilot study is to investigate the effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. Test specimens were manufactured from commercially pure grade 2 titanium according to one of the following procedures: polished (P), acid-etched (A), chemically modified (mod) A (modA), sand-blasted large grit and A (SLA), and modSLA. Intraoral splints were used to collect an in vivo supragingival plaque biofilm in each group at 12, 24, and 48 h. Stained plaque biofilm (PB) areas (%) were morphometrically assessed. All groups exhibited significant increases of mean PB areas over time (p P > A =modA (p modSLA = P > A = modA (p A = modA (p < 0.001; respectively). Within the limits of a pilot study, it could be concluded that hydrophilicity had no apparent effect, while microtopography had a highly uneven and unpredictable influence on supragingival plaque biofilm formation.

  4. Biofilm formation and disinfectant resistance of Salmonella sp. in mono- and dual-species with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, X Y; Yang, Y S; Yuk, H G

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the biofilm formation and disinfectant resistance of Salmonella cells in mono- and dual-species biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and to investigate the role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the protection of biofilms against disinfection treatment. The populations of Salmonella in mono- or dual-species biofilms with P. aeruginosa on stainless steel (SS) coupons were determined before and after exposure to commercial disinfectant, 50 μg ml -1 chlorine or 200 μg ml -1 Ecolab ® Whisper™ V (a blend of four effective quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC)). In addition, EPS amount from biofilms was quantified and biofilm structures were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Antagonistic interactions between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa resulted in lower planktonic population level of Salmonella, and lower density in dual-species biofilms compared to mono-species biofilms. The presence of P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced disinfectant resistance of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis biofilm cells for 2 days, and led to an average of 50% increase in polysaccharides amount in dual-species biofilms than mono-species biofilms of Salmonella. Microscopy observation showed the presence of large microcolonies covered by EPS in dual-species biofilms but not in mono-species ones. The presence of P. aeruginosa in dual-species culture inhibited the growth of Salmonella cells in planktonic phase and in biofilms, but protected Salmonella cells in biofilms from disinfection treatment, by providing more production of EPS in dual-species biofilms than mono-species ones. This study provides insights into inter-species interaction, with regard to biofilm population dynamics and disinfectant resistance. Thus, a sanitation protocol should be designed considering the protective role of secondary species to pathogens in biofilms on SS surface which has been widely used at food surfaces and manufacturers. © 2017 The Society

  5. Surface zwitterionization: Effective method for preventing oral bacterial biofilm formation on hydroxyapatite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungjin; Kim, Heejin; Seo, Jiae; Kang, Minji; Kang, Sunah; Jang, Joomyung; Lee, Yan; Seo, Ji-Hun

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we conducted surface zwitterionization of hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces by immersing them in the zwitterionic polymer solutions to provide anti-bacterial properties to the HA surface. Three different monomers containing various zwitterionic groups, i.e., phosphorylcholine (PC), sulfobetaine (SB), and carboxybetaine (CB), were copolymerized with the methacrylic monomer containing a Ca2+-binding moiety, using the free radical polymerization method. As a control, functionalization of the copolymer containing the Ca2+-binding moiety was synthesized using a hydroxy group. The stable immobilization of the zwitterionic functional groups was confirmed by water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conducted after the sonication process. The zwitterionized HA surface showed significantly decreased protein adsorption, whereas the hydroxyl group-coated HA surface showed limited efficacy. The anti-bacterial adhesion property was confirmed by conducting Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion tests for 6 h and 24 h. When furanone C-30, a representative anti-quorum sensing molecule for S. mutans, was used, only a small amount of bacteria adhered after 6 h and the population did not increase after 24 h. In contrast, zwitterionized HA surfaces showed almost no bacterial adhesion after 6 h and the effect was retained for 24 h, resulting in the lowest level of oral bacterial adhesion. These results confirm that surface zwitterionization is a promising method to effectively prevent oral bacterial adhesion on HA-based materials.

  6. Inhibition of uropathogenic biofilm growth on silicone rubber in human urine by lactobacilli - a teleologic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Busscher, HJ; Reid, G; van der Mei, HC

    2000-01-01

    The ability of three Lactobacillus strains to inhibit the adhesion and growth of naturally occurring uropathogens on silicone rubber was investigated in human urine. The importance of biosurfactant production by Lactobacillus in discouraging uropathogen growth was determined in relation to the

  7. Dual-species biofilm of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli on stainless steel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grandi, Aline Zago; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; Destro, Maria Teresa

    2018-04-12

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium commonly associated with foodborne diseases. Due its ability to survive under adverse environmental conditions and to form biofilm, this bacterium is a major concern for the food industry, since it can compromise sanitation procedures and increase the risk of post-processing contamination. Little is known about the interaction between L. monocytogenes and Gram-negative bacteria on biofilm formation. Thus, in order to evaluate this interaction, Escherichia coli and L. monocytogenes were tested for their ability to form biofilms together or in monoculture. We also aimed to evaluate the ability of L. monocytogenes 1/2a and its isogenic mutant strain (ΔprfA ΔsigB) to form biofilm in the presence of E. coli. We assessed the importance of the virulence regulators, PrfA and σ B , in this process since they are involved in many aspects of L. monocytogenes pathogenicity. Biofilm formation was assessed using stainless steel AISI 304 #4 slides immersed into brain heart infusion broth, reconstituted powder milk and E. coli preconditioned medium at 25 °C. Our results indicated that a higher amount of biofilm was formed by the wild type strain of L. monocytogenes than by its isogenic mutant, indicating that prfA and sigB are important for biofilm development, especially maturation under our experimental conditions. The presence of E. coli or its metabolites in preconditioned medium did not influence biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes. Our results confirm the possibility of concomitant biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes and E. coli, two bacteria of major significance in the food industry.

  8. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  9. Fate of Eight Different Polymers under Uncontrolled Composting Conditions: Relationships Between Deterioration, Biofilm Formation, and the Material Surface Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Anne; Gravouil, Kevin; Aucher, Willy; Brosset-Vincent, Sandra; Kadri, Linette; Colas, Jenny; Bouchon, Didier; Ferreira, Thierry

    2017-02-21

    With the ever-increasing volume of polymer wastes and their associated detrimental impacts on the environment, the plastic life cycle has drawn increasing attention. Here, eight commercial polymers selected from biodegradable to environmentally persistent materials, all formulated under a credit card format, were incubated in an outdoor compost to evaluate their fate over time and to profile the microbial communities colonizing their surfaces. After 450 days in compost, the samples were all colonized by multispecies biofilms, these latest displaying different amounts of adhered microbial biomass and significantly distinct bacterial and fungal community compositions depending on the substrate. Interestingly, colonization experiments on the eight polymers revealed a large core of shared microbial taxa, predominantly composed of microorganisms previously reported from environments contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or plastics debris. These observations suggest that biofilms may contribute to the alteration process of all the polymers studied. Actually, four substrates, independently of their assignment to a polymer group, displayed a significant deterioration, which might be attributed to biologically mediated mechanisms. Relevantly, the deterioration appears strongly associated with the formation of a high-cell density biofilm onto the polymer surfaces. The analysis of various surface properties revealed that roughness and hydrophilicity are likely prominent parameters for driving the biological interactions with the polymers.

  10. The biofilm-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates in raw materials, foodstuffs and on contact surfaces in processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelová, J; Babák, V; Holasová, M; Dendis, M

    2008-01-01

    Isolates from the "farm to fork" samples (182 isolates from 2779 samples) were examined genotypically (icaAB genes) and phenotypically (in vitro biofilm formation, typical growth on Congo red agar; CRA) with the aim to assess the risk of penetration of virulent strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis into the food chain. The contamination of meat and milk products was significantly higher in comparison with raw materials. Contamination of contact surfaces in the meat-processing plants was significantly lower than that of contact surfaces in the dairy plants. The ica genes (which precondition the biofilm formation) were concurrently detected in 20 isolates that also showed a typical growth on CRA. Two ica operon-negative isolates produced biofilm in vitro but perhaps by an ica-independent mechanism. The surfaces in the dairy plants and the milk products were more frequently contaminated with ica operon-positive strains (2.3 and 1.2 % samples) than the other sample types (0-0.6 % samples).

  11. Amide side chain amphiphilic polymers disrupt surface established bacterial bio-films and protect mice from chronic Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Samaddar, Sandip; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms represent the root-cause of chronic or persistent infections in humans. Gram-negative bacterial infections due to nosocomial and opportunistic pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are more difficult to treat because of their inherent and rapidly acquiring resistance to antibiotics. Due to biofilm formation, A. baumannii has been noted for its apparent ability to survive on artificial surfaces for an extended period of time, therefore allowing it to persist in the hospital environment. Here we report, maleic anhydride based novel cationic polymers appended with amide side chains that disrupt surface established multi-drug resistant A. baumannii biofilms. More importantly, these polymers significantly (p polymers also show potent antibacterial efficacy against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii with minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. We observe that optimal hydrophobicity dependent on the side chain chemical structure of these polymers dictate the selective toxicity to bacteria. Polymers interact with the bacterial cell membranes by causing membrane depolarization, permeabilization and energy depletion. Bacteria develop rapid resistance to erythromycin and colistin whereas no detectable development of resistance occurs against these polymers even after several passages. These results suggest the potential use of these polymeric biomaterials in disinfecting biomedical device surfaces after the infection has become established and also for the topical treatment of chronic bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species in oral candidiasis patients: Correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm forming activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muadcheingka, Thaniya; Tantivitayakul, Pornpen

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to study the prevalence of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida (NAC) species from oral candidiasis patients and evaluate the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and biofilm forming capacity of the clinical isolates Candida species from oral cavity. This study identified a total of 250 Candida strains isolated from 207 oral candidiasis patients with PCR-RFLP technique. CSH value, total biomass of biofilm and biofilm forming ability of 117 oral Candida isolates were evaluated. C. albicans (61.6%) was still the predominant species in oral candidiasis patients with and without denture wearer, respectively, followed by C. glabrata (15.2%), C. tropicalis (10.4%), C. parapsilosis (3.2%), C. kefyr (3.6%), C. dubliniensis (2%), C. lusitaniae (2%), C. krusei (1.6%), and C. guilliermondii (0.4%). The proportion of mixed colonization with more than one Candida species was 18% from total cases. The relative CSH value and biofilm biomass of NAC species were greater than C. albicans (poral isolates NAC species had biofilm forming ability, whereas 78% of C. albicans were biofilm formers. Furthermore, the significant difference of relative CSH values between biofilm formers and non-biofilm formers was observed in the NAC species (poral cavity was gradually increasing. The possible contributing factors might be high cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm forming ability. The relative CSH value could be a putative factor for determining biofilm formation ability of the non-albicans Candida species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serrulatane Diterpenoid from Eremophila neglecta Exhibits Bacterial Biofilm Dispersion and Inhibits Release of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines from Activated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Htwe H; Christo, Susan N; Ndi, Chi P; Jasieniak, Marek; Rickard, Heather; Hayball, John D; Griesser, Hans J; Semple, Susan J

    2015-12-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the biofilm-removing efficacy and inflammatory activity of a serrulatane diterpenoid, 8-hydroxyserrulat-14-en-19-oic acid (1), isolated from the Australian medicinal plant Eremophila neglecta. Biofilm breakup activity of compound 1 on established Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms was compared to the antiseptic chlorhexidine and antibiotic levofloxacin. In a time-course study, 1 was deposited onto polypropylene mesh to mimic a wound dressing and tested for biofilm removal. The ex-vivo cytotoxicity and effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release were studied in mouse primary bone-marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Compound 1 was effective in dispersing 12 h pre-established biofilms with a 7 log10 reduction of viable bacterial cell counts, but was less active against 24 h biofilms (approximately 2 log10 reduction). Compound-loaded mesh showed dosage-dependent biofilm-removing capability. In addition, compound 1 displayed a significant inhibitory effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion from BMDM cells, but interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) secretion was not significant. The compound was not cytotoxic to BMDM cells at concentrations effective in removing biofilm and lowering cytokine release. These findings highlight the potential of this serrulatane diterpenoid to be further developed for applications in wound management.

  14. EFFECT OF ESSENTIAL OIL ON BIOFILM PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENT LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Comi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different essential oil (hexanal, 2-(E-hexenal, carvacrol, citron, red orange, thymol and limonene on biofilm production of some Lmonocytogenes strains are evaluated. The formation of biofilm on certain surfaces or on the food, seems to be related with cross-contamination during processing or with the contamination of the final product, with potential risk for the consumer. Many studies were done on the antimicrobial activity of essential oils and their components, but not too much is known about their capacity to influence and reduce the microbial production of biofilm. Our data showed that essential oils can inhibit or limit the biofilm production.

  15. The Effects of Sugars on the Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli 185p on Stainless Steel and Polyethylene Terephthalate Surfaces in a Laboratory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangholi, Mahdi; Jamalli, Ailar

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria utilize various methods in order to live in protection from adverse environmental conditions. One such method involves biofilm formation; however, this formation is dependent on many factors. The type and concentration of substances such as sugars that are present in an environment can be effective facilitators of biofilm formation. First, the physico-chemical properties of the bacteria and the target surface were studied via the MATS and contact angle measurement methods. Additionally, adhesion to different surfaces in the presence of various concentrations of sugars was compared in order to evaluate the effect of these factors on the biofilm formation of Escherichia coli , which represents a major food contaminant . Results showed that the presence of sugars has no effect on the bacterial growth rate; all three concentrations of sugars were hydrophilic and demonstrated a high affinity toward binding to the surfaces. The impact of sugars and other factors on biofilm formation can vary depending on the type of bacteria present.

  16. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Aspects on Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta T. Melo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm represents a way of life that allows greater survival of microorganisms in hostile habitats. Campylobacter jejuni is able to form biofilms in vitro and on surfaces at several points in the poultry production chain. Genetic determinants related to their formation are expressed differently between strains and external conditions are decisive in this respect. Our approach combines phylogenetic analysis and the presence of seven specific genes linked to biofilm formation in association with traditional microbiology techniques, using Mueller Hinton and chicken juice as substrates in order to quantify, classify, determine the composition and morphology of the biomass of simple and mixed biofilms of 30 C. jejuni strains. It also evaluates the inhibition of its formation by biocides commonly used in industry and also by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Genetic analysis showed high heterogeneity with the identification of 23 pulsotypes. Despite the diversity, the presence of flaA, cadF, luxS, dnaJ, htrA, cbrA, and sodB genes in all strains shows the high potential for biofilm formation. This ability was only expressed in chicken juice, where they presented phenotype of a strong biofilm producer, with a mean count of 7.37 log CFU/mL and an ultrastructure characteristic of mature biofilm. The composition of simple and mixed biofilms was predominantly composed by proteins. The exceptions were found in mixed biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which includes a carbohydrate-rich matrix, lower ability to sessile form in chicken juice and compact architecture of the biofilm, this aspects are intrinsic to this species. Hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and peracetic acid were more effective in controlling viable cells of C. jejuni in biofilm, but the existence of tolerant strains indicates exposure to sublethal concentrations and development of adaptation mechanisms. This study shows that in chicken juice C. jejuni presents greater potential in producing mature

  17. An individual-based model for biofilm formation at liquid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardré, Maxime; Henry, Hervé; Douarche, Carine; Plapp, Mathis

    2015-12-10

    The bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently forms biofilms at the interface between the culture medium and the air. We present a mathematical model that couples a description of bacteria as individual discrete objects to the standard advection-diffusion equations for the environment. The model takes into account two different bacterial phenotypes. In the motile state, bacteria swim and perform a run-and-tumble motion that is biased toward regions of high oxygen concentration (aerotaxis). In the matrix-producer state they excrete extracellular polymers, which allows them to connect to other bacteria and to form a biofilm. Bacteria are also advected by the fluid, and can trigger bioconvection. Numerical simulations of the model reproduce all the stages of biofilm formation observed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we study the influence of various model parameters on the dynamics and morphology of biofilms.

  18. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, Kshipra; Kowshik, Meenal

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO 2 nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO 2 acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO 2 being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix

  19. Deactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms on a Tooth Surface Using He Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar Imola; Papp Judit; Simon Alpar; Anghel Sorin Dan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the low temperature atmospheric helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on tooth surface. Pig jaws were also treated by plasma to detect if there is any harmful effect on the gingiva. The plasma was characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy. Experimental data indicated that the discharge is very effective in deactivating Streptococcus mutans biofilms. It can destroy them with an average decimal reduction time (D-time) of 19 s and about 98% of them were killed after a treatment time of 30 s. According to the survival curve kinetic an overall 32 s treatment time would be necessary to perform a complete sterilization. The experimental results presented in this study indicated that the helium dielectric barrier discharge, in plan-parallel electrode configuration, could be a very effective tool for deactivation of oral bacteria and might be a promising technique in various dental clinical applications.

  20. Deactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms on a Tooth Surface Using He Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imola, Molnar; Judit, Papp; Alpar, Simon; Sorin, Dan Anghel

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the low temperature atmospheric helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on tooth surface. Pig jaws were also treated by plasma to detect if there is any harmful effect on the gingiva. The plasma was characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy. Experimental data indicated that the discharge is very effective in deactivating Streptococcus mutans biofilms. It can destroy them with an average decimal reduction time (D-time) of 19 s and about 98% of them were killed after a treatment time of 30 s. According to the survival curve kinetic an overall 32 s treatment time would be necessary to perform a complete sterilization. The experimental results presented in this study indicated that the helium dielectric barrier discharge, in plan-parallel electrode configuration, could be a very effective tool for deactivation of oral bacteria and might be a promising technique in various dental clinical applications.

  1. A New Approach for Biologically-Inhibiting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.

    2007-01-01

    in nanometers. Due to the difference in potentials, the biologically-inhibiting material will act as a galvanic element in contact with an electrolyte. The electrochemical processes taking place at the metal surface seem to exhibit a catalytic oxidation character more than an oligomeric effect from the silver....

  2. Role of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fat on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, Patricia A; Stea, Emma C; Knøchel, Susanne; Hansen, Truelstrup

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fatty food soils on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel (SS) coupons. L. monocytogenes cultures grown (at 15 °C for 48 h) in Tryptic Soy Broth with 1% glucose (TSB-glu) containing either 0.5 or 5% (w/v) NaCl were re-suspended in TSB-glu containing either 0.5 or 5% NaCl and used to contaminate SS coupons at levels of 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Desiccation (at 15 °C for 20 days, 43% RH) commenced immediately (non-biofilm) or following biofilm formation (at 15 °C for 48 h, 100% RH). To study the impact of food lipids, non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells were suspended in TSB-glu containing either canola oil (5-10%) or lard (20-60%) and desiccated as above on SS coupons. Following desiccation for 20 days, survivors decreased by 1.4-3.7 log CFU/cm² for non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells. The contamination level had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on survival kinetics. SEM micrographs showed mature biofilms on coupons initially contaminated with 5.5 and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Mature biofilm cells were significantly (p biofilms formed by the lowest contamination level. Besides biofilm maturity/formation, previous osmoadaptation, exposure to lard (20-60%) or salt (5%) during desiccation significantly (p biofilms and salty or fatty soils on food contact surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbiota formed on attached stainless steel coupons correlates with the natural biofilm of the sink surface in domestic kitchens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Birgitte; Røssvoll, Elin; Måge, Ingrid; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig

    2016-02-01

    Stainless steel coupons are frequently used in biofilm studies in the laboratory, as this material is commonly used in the food industry. The coupons are attached to different surfaces to create a "natural" biofilm to be studied further in laboratory trials. However, little has been done to investigate how well the microbiota on such coupons represents the surrounding environment. The microbiota on sink wall surfaces and on new stainless steel coupons attached to the sink wall for 3 months in 8 domestic kitchen sinks was investigated by next-generation sequencing (MiSeq) of the 16S rRNA gene derived from DNA and RNA (cDNA), and by plating and identification of colonies. The mean number of colony-forming units was about 10-fold higher for coupons than sink surfaces, and more variation in bacterial counts between kitchens was seen on sink surfaces than coupons. The microbiota in the majority of biofilms was dominated by Moraxellaceae (genus Moraxella/Enhydrobacter) and Micrococcaceae (genus Kocuria). The results demonstrated that the variation in the microbiota was mainly due to differences between kitchens (38.2%), followed by the different nucleic acid template (DNA vs RNA) (10.8%), and that only 5.1% of the variation was a result of differences between coupons and sink surfaces. The microbiota variation between sink surfaces and coupons was smaller for samples based on their RNA than on their DNA. Overall, our results suggest that new stainless steel coupons are suited to model the dominating part of the natural microbiota of the surrounding environment and, furthermore, are suitable for different downstream studies.

  4. Interfacial Electrochemical Electron Transfer Processes in Bacterial Biofilm Environments on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    We have studied Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biolilm growth and growth inhibition on Au(111)-surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interfacial electrochemistry of a number of redox probe molecules. AFM of the biofilm growth and growth inhibition on both mica and Au(111)-surfaces wa...

  5. Antibiofilm activity of carboxymethyl chitosan on the biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Moser, Doris; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-09-20

    Although most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, non-C. albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. In this study, we determined the inhibition of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) on single and mixed species biofilm of non-albicans Candida species, including Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata. Biofilm by all tested species in microtiter plates were inhibited nearly 70%. CM-chitosan inhibited mixed species biofilm in microtiter plates and also on medical materials surfaces. To investigate the mechanism, the effect of CM-chitosan on cell viability and biofilm growth was employed. CM-chitosan inhibited Candida planktonic growth as well as adhesion. Further biofilm formation was inhibited with CM-chitosan added at 90min, 12h or 24h after biofilm initiation. CM-chitosan was not only able to inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida cells, but was also active upon the establishment and the development of biofilms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Baicalin inhibits biofilm formation, attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence and enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance in a mouse peritoneal implant infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing (QS circuit plays a role in the precise regulation of genes controlling virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. QS-controlled biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings has remained controversial due to emerging drug resistance; therefore, screening diverse compounds for anti-biofilm or anti-QS activities is important. This study demonstrates the ability of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of baicalin, an active natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal Scutellaria baicalensis, to inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance the bactericidal effects of various conventional antibiotics in vitro. In addition, baicalin exerted dose-dependent inhibitory effects on virulence phenotypes (LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, motilities and exotoxin A regulated by QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the expression levels of QS-regulatory genes, including lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, pqsR and pqsA, were repressed after sub-MIC baicalin treatment, resulting in significant decreases in the QS signaling molecules 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL, confirming the ability of baicalin-mediated QS inhibition to alter gene and protein expression. In vivo experiments indicated that baicalin treatment reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Greater worm survival in the baicalin-treated group manifested as an increase in the LT50 from 24 to 96 h. In a mouse peritoneal implant infection model, baicalin treatment enhanced the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the implants of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with the control group. Moreover, the combination of baicalin and antibiotics significantly reduced the numbers of colony-forming units in the implants to a significantly greater degree than antibiotic treatment alone. Pathological and histological analyses revealed

  7. Impact of the surface roughness of AISI 316L stainless steel on biofilm adhesion in a seawater-cooled tubular heat exchanger-condenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Sergio; Trueba, Alfredo; Vega, Luis M; Madariaga, Ernesto

    2016-11-01

    The present study evaluated biofilm growth in AISI 316L stainless steel tubes for seawater-cooled exchanger-condensers that had four different arithmetic mean surface roughness values ranging from 0.14 μm to 1.2 μm. The results of fluid frictional resistance and heat transfer resistance regarding biofilm formation in the roughest surface showed increases of 28.2% and 19.1% respectively, compared with the smoothest surface. The biofilm thickness taken at the end of the experiment showed variations of up to 74% between the smoothest and roughest surfaces. The thermal efficiency of the heat transfer process in the tube with the roughest surface was 17.4% greater than that in the tube with the smoothest surface. The results suggest that the finish of the inner surfaces of the tubes in heat exchanger-condensers is critical for improving energy efficiency and avoiding biofilm adhesion. This may be utilised to reduce biofilm adhesion and growth in the design of heat exchanger-condensers.

  8. Changes in the Expression of Biofilm-Associated Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Food-Environmental Isolates Subjected to Sublethal Concentrations of Disinfectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Cincarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublethal concentrations (sub-MICs of certain disinfectants are no longer effective in removing biofilms from abiotic surfaces and can even promote the formation of biofilms. Bacterial cells can probably adapt to these low concentrations of disinfectants and defend themselves by way of biofilm formation. In this paper, we report on three Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formers (strong B+++, moderate B++, and weak B+ that were cultivated with sub-MICs of commonly used disinfectants, ethanol or chloramine T, and quantified using Syto9 green fluorogenic nucleic acid stain. We demonstrate that 1.25–2.5% ethanol and 2500 μg/mL chloramine T significantly enhanced S. aureus biofilm formation. To visualize differences in biofilm compactness between S. aureus biofilms in control medium, 1.25% ethanol, or 2500 μg/mL chloramine T, scanning electron microscopy was used. To describe changes in abundance of surface-exposed proteins in ethanol- or chloramine T-treated biofilms, surface proteins were prepared using a novel trypsin shaving approach and quantified after dimethyl labeling by LC-LTQ/Orbitrap MS. Our data show that some proteins with adhesive functions and others with cell maintenance functions and virulence factor EsxA were significantly upregulated by both treatments. In contrast, immunoglobulin-binding protein A was significantly downregulated for both disinfectants. Significant differences were observed in the effect of the two disinfectants on the expression of surface proteins including some adhesins, foldase protein PrsA, and two virulence factors.

  9. The Fluid Dynamics of Nascent Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Nicola; Snow, Ben; Wilson, Laurence; Bees, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Many anti-biofilm approaches target mature biofilms with biochemical or physio-chemical interventions. We investigate the mechanics of interventions at an early stage that aim to inhibit biofilm maturation, focusing on hydrodynamics as cells transition from planktonic to surface-attached. Surface-attached cells generate flow fields that are relatively long-range compared with cells that are freely-swimming. We look at the effect of these flows on the biofilm formation. In particular, we use digital inline holographic microscopy to determine the three-dimensional flow due to a surface-attached cell and the effect this flow has on both tracers and other cells in the fluid. We compare experimental data with two models of cells on boundaries. The first approach utilizes slender body theory and captures many of the features of the experimental field. The second model develops a simple description in terms of singularity solutions of Stokes' flow, which produces qualitatively similar dynamics to both the experiments and more complex model but with significant computational savings. The range of validity of multiple cell arrangements is investigated. These two descriptions can be used to investigate the efficacy of actives developed by Unilever on nascent biofilms.

  10. Transfer, attachment, and formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli O157:H7 on meat-contact surface materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Beauchamp, Catherine; Dourou, Dimitra; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Yoon, Yohan; Scanga, John A; Belk, Keith E; Smith, Gary C; Nychas, George-John E; Sofos, John N

    2012-06-01

    Studies examined the effects of meat-contact material types, inoculation substrate, presence of air at the liquid-solid surface interface during incubation, and incubation substrate on the attachment/transfer and subsequent biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 on beef carcass fabrication surface materials. Materials studied as 2 × 5 cm coupons included stainless steel, acetal, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene. A 6-strain rifampicin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 composite was used to inoculate (6 log CFU/mL, g, or cm²) tryptic soy broth (TSB), beef fat/lean tissue homogenate (FLH), conveyor belt-runoff fluids, ground beef, or beef fat. Coupons of each material were submerged (4 °C, 30 min) in the inoculated fluids or ground beef, or placed between 2 pieces of inoculated beef fat with pressure (20 kg) applied. Attachment/transfer of the pathogen was surface material and substrate dependent, although beef fat appeared to negate differences among surface materials. Beef fat was the most effective (P transfer and subsequent biofilm formation by E. coli O157:H7. The results highlight the importance of thoroughly cleaning soiled surfaces to remove all remnants of beef fat or other organic material that may harbor or protect microbial contaminants during otherwise lethal antimicrobial interventions. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Evaluation of various metallic coatings on steel to mitigate biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Ikigai, Hajime; Yoshitake, Michiko

    2009-02-01

    In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments.

  12. Evaluation of Various Metallic Coatings on Steel to Mitigate Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Ikigai

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments.

  13. A Genotypic Analysis of Five P. aeruginosa Strains after Biofilm Infection by Phages Targeting Different Cell Surface Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P. Pires

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance constitutes one of the most serious threats to the global public health and urgently requires new and effective solutions. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses increasingly recognized as being good alternatives to traditional antibiotic therapies. In this study, the efficacy of phages, targeting different cell receptors, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cell cultures was evaluated over the course of 48 h. Although significant reductions in the number of viable cells were achieved for both cases, the high level of adaptability of the bacteria in response to the selective pressure caused by phage treatment resulted in the emergence of phage-resistant variants. To further investigate the genetic makeup of phage-resistant variants isolated from biofilm infection experiments, some of these bacteria were selected for phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Whole genome sequencing was performed on five phage-resistant variants and all of them carried mutations affecting the galU gene as well as one of pil genes. The sequencing analysis further revealed that three of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 variants carry large deletions (>200 kbp in their genomes. Complementation of the galU mutants with wild-type galU in trans restored LPS expression on the bacterial cell surface of these bacterial strains and rendered the complemented strains to be sensitive to phages. This provides unequivocal evidence that inactivation of galU function was associated with resistance to the phages that uses LPS as primary receptors. Overall, this work demonstrates that P. aeruginosa biofilms can survive phage attack and develop phage-resistant variants exhibiting defective LPS production and loss of type IV pili that are well adapted to the biofilm mode of growth.

  14. Mitigation of biofilm formation on corrugated cardboard fresh produce packaging surfaces using a novel thiazolidinedione derivative integrated in acrylic emulsion polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eBrandwein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Various surfaces associated with the storage and packing of food are known to harbor distinct bacterial pathogens. Conspicuously absent among the plethora of studies implicating food packaging materials and machinery is the study of corrugated cardboard packaging, the worldwide medium for transporting fresh produce. In this study, we observed the microbial communities of three different store-bought fruits and vegetables, along with their analogue cardboard packaging using high throughput sequencing technology. We further developed an anti-biofilm polymer meant to coat corrugated cardboard surfaces and mediate bacterial biofilm growth on said surfaces. Integration of a novel thiazolidinedione derivative into the acrylic emulsion polymers was assessed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry analysis and surface topography was visualized and quantified on corrugated cardboard surfaces. Biofilm growth was measured using q-PCR targeting the gene encoding 16s rRNA. Additionally, architectural structure of the biofilm was observed using SEM. The uniform integration of the thiazolidinedione derivative TZD-6 was confirmed, and it was determined via q-PCR to reduce biofilm growth by ~80% on tested surfaces. A novel and effective method for reducing microbial load and preventing contamination on food packaging is thereby proposed.

  15. Mitigation of Biofilm Formation on Corrugated Cardboard Fresh Produce Packaging Surfaces Using a Novel Thiazolidinedione Derivative Integrated in Acrylic Emulsion Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwein, Michael; Al-Quntar, Abed; Goldberg, Hila; Mosheyev, Gregory; Goffer, Moshe; Marin-Iniesta, Fulgencio; López-Gómez, Antonio; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Various surfaces associated with the storage and packing of food are known to harbor distinct bacterial pathogens. Conspicuously absent among the plethora of studies implicating food packaging materials and machinery is the study of corrugated cardboard packaging, the worldwide medium for transporting fresh produce. In this study, we observed the microbial communities of three different store-bought fruits and vegetables, along with their analog cardboard packaging using high throughput sequencing technology. We further developed an anti-biofilm polymer meant to coat corrugated cardboard surfaces and mediate bacterial biofilm growth on said surfaces. Integration of a novel thiazolidinedione derivative into the acrylic emulsion polymers was assessed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analysis and surface topography was visualized and quantified on corrugated cardboard surfaces. Biofilm growth was measured using q-PCR targeting the gene encoding 16s rRNA. Additionally, architectural structure of the biofilm was observed using SEM. The uniform integration of the thiazolidinedione derivative TZD-6 was confirmed, and it was determined via q-PCR to reduce biofilm growth by ~80% on tested surfaces. A novel and effective method for reducing microbial load and preventing contamination on food packaging is thereby proposed.

  16. Analyses of Biofilm on Implant Abutment Surfaces Coating with Diamond-Like Carbon and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huacho, Patricia Milagros Maquera; Nogueira, Marianne N Marques; Basso, Fernanda G; Jafelicci Junior, Miguel; Francisconi, Renata S; Spolidorio, Denise M P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface free energy (SFE), wetting and surface properties as well as antimicrobial, adhesion and biocompatibility properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated surfaces. In addition, the leakage of Escherichia coli through the abutment-dental implant interface was also calculated. SFE was calculated from contact angle values; R a was measured before and after DLC coating. Antimicrobial and adhesion properties against E. coli and cytotoxicity of DLC with human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. Further, the ability of DLC-coated surfaces to prevent the migration of E. coli into the external hexagonal implant interface was also evaluated. A sterile technique was used for the semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (semi-quantitative PCR). The surfaces showed slight decreases in cell viability (p0.05). It was concluded that DLC was shown to be a biocompatible material with mild cytotoxicity that did not show changes in R a, SFE, bacterial adhesion or antimicrobial properties and did not inhibit the infiltration of E. coli into the abutment-dental implant interface.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Regulator SarA Targeted Compound, 2-[(Methylaminomethyl]phenol Inhibits Biofilm and Down-Regulates Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Balamurugan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a widely acknowledged Gram-positive pathogen for forming biofilm and virulence gene expressions by quorum sensing (QS, a cell to cell communication process. The quorum regulator SarA of S. aureus up-regulates the expression of many virulence factors including biofilm formation to mediate pathogenesis and evasion of the host immune system in the late phases of growth. Thus, inhibiting the production or blocking SarA protein might influence the down-regulation of biofilm and virulence factors. In this context, here we have synthesized 2-[(Methylaminomethyl]phenol, which was specifically targeted toward the quorum regulator SarA through in silico approach in our previous study. The molecule has been evaluated in vitro to validate its antibiofilm activity against clinical S. aureus strains. In addition, antivirulence properties of the inhibitor were confirmed with the observation of a significant reduction in the expression of representative virulence genes like fnbA, hla and hld that are governed under S. aureus QS. Interestingly, the SarA targeted inhibitor showed negligible antimicrobial activity and markedly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration of conventional antibiotics when used in combination making it a more attractive lead for further clinical tests.

  18. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Soares Caixeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1 when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at 7 °C, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed biofilm when cultivated at 28 °C. However, only the adhesion of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens was observed when incubated at 7 °C. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate was the most efficient sanitizer in the reduction of the adhered P. aeruginosa cells at 7 and 28 °C and those on the biofilm, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide was more effective in the reduction of adhered cells of P. fluorescens at 7 °C.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of Salmonella biofilms on various food-contact surfaces in catfish mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the growth and survival of Salmonella enterica in the presence of high and low concentrations (375 µg/ml and 15 µg/ml) of catfish mucus extract at 10 °C and 22 °C for 63 days. The second objective of this study was to investigate the biofilm formation of ...

  20. Activity of essential oil-based microemulsions against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms developed on stainless steel surface in different culture media and growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Raffaella; Casettari, Luca; Fagioli, Laura; Cespi, Marco; Bonacucina, Giulia; Baffone, Wally

    2017-01-16

    Food safety is a fundamental concern for both consumers and the food industry, especially as the numbers of reported cases of food-associated infections continue to increase. Industrial surfaces can provide a suitable substrate for the development and persistence of bacterial organized in biofilms that represent a potential source of food contamination. The negative consumer perception of chemical disinfectants has shifted the attention to natural substances, such as plant extracts. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using the essential oils (EOs) in the fight against S. aureus biofilms. First, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC), Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MBIC), Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) of eleven EOs against S. aureus were determined. Cinnamomum cassia and Salvia officinalis EOs showed the greatest antibacterial properties with 1.25% MIC and MBC, 1.25% MBIC and 2.5% MBEC respectively. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed cinnamaldehyde (82.66%) and methoxy cinnamaldehyde (10.12%) as the most abundant substances of C. cassia, while cis-thujone (23.90%), camphor (19.22%) and 1.8-cineole (10.62%) of S. officinalis. Three different microemulsions, formulated with C. cassia, S. officinalis or both, were finally tested against S. aureus biofilms in different culture media and growth conditions, causing a >3 logarithmic reductions in S. aureus 24h-old biofilms and desiccated biofilms, and up to 68% of biofilm removal after 90min of exposure. The obtained data suggest the potential use of EOs, alone or in combination, for the formulation of sanitizers as alternative or in support in the disinfection of contaminated surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of minocycline-loaded chitosan/alginate multilayer on titanium substrates to inhibit biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongbin; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Cen, Lian; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation are primary causes of implant associated infection. The biofilm makes the bacteria highly resistant to the host defense and antimicrobial treatment. Antibacterial coatings on the surface of titanium implant can prevent biofilm formation effectively, but it is still a challenge to accomplish relatively long lasting antibacterial effects before wound healing or formation of biological seal. The purpose of our work was to construct antibacterial multilayer coatings loaded with minocycline on surface of Ti substrates using chitosan and alginate based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. In this study, the surfaces of Ti substrates were first hydroxylated and then treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) to obtain amino-functionalized Ti substrates. Next, the precursor layer of chitosan was covalently conjugated to amino-functionalized Ti substrates. The following alternately coating alginate loaded with minocycline and chitosan onto the precursor layer of chitosan was carried out via LbL self-assembly technique to construct the multilayer coatings on Ti substrates. The multilayer coatings loaded more minocycline and improved sustainability of minocycline release to kill planktonic and adherent bacteria. Moreover, surface charge and hydrophilicity of the coatings and antibacterial ability of chitosan itself also played roles in the antibacterial performance, which can keep the antibacterial ability of the multilayer coatings after minocycline release ceases. In conclusion, LbL self-assembly method provides a promising strategy to fabricate long-term antibacterial surfaces, which is especially effective in preventing implant associated infections in the early stage. Loading minocycline on the surface of implants based on LbL self-assembly strategy can endow implants with sustained antibacterial property. This can inhabit the immediate colonization of bacteria onto the surface of implants in the

  2. Enterococcus faecium biofilm formation: identification of major autolysin AtlAEfm, associated Acm surface localization, and AtlAEfm-independent extracellular DNA Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; Willems, Rob J L; Jansen, Pamela; Hendrickx, Antoni; Zhang, Xinglin; Bonten, Marc J M; Leavis, Helen L

    2013-04-16

    Enterococcus faecium is an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen causing biofilm-mediated infections in patients with medical devices. Insight into E. faecium biofilm pathogenesis is pivotal for the development of new strategies to prevent and treat these infections. In several bacteria, a major autolysin is essential for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release in the biofilm matrix, contributing to biofilm attachment and stability. In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the major autolysin of E. faecium E1162 by a bioinformatic genome screen followed by insertional gene disruption of six putative autolysin genes. Insertional inactivation of locus tag EfmE1162_2692 resulted in resistance to lysis, reduced eDNA release, deficient cell attachment, decreased biofilm, decreased cell wall hydrolysis, and significant chaining compared to that of the wild type. Therefore, locus tag EfmE1162_2692 was considered the major autolysin in E. faecium and renamed atlAEfm. In addition, AtlAEfm was implicated in cell surface exposure of Acm, a virulence factor in E. faecium, and thereby facilitates binding to collagen types I and IV. This is a novel feature of enterococcal autolysins not described previously. Furthermore, we identified (and localized) autolysin-independent DNA release in E. faecium that contributes to cell-cell interactions in the atlAEfm mutant and is important for cell separation. In conclusion, AtlAEfm is the major autolysin in E. faecium and contributes to biofilm stability and Acm localization, making AtlAEfm a promising target for treatment of E. faecium biofilm-mediated infections. IMPORTANCE Nosocomial infections caused by Enterococcus faecium have rapidly increased, and treatment options have become more limited. This is due not only to increasing resistance to antibiotics but also to biofilm-associated infections. DNA is released in biofilm matrix via cell lysis, caused by autolysin, and acts as a matrix stabilizer. In this study

  3. Influence of epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium surface coatings on surface roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Moshabab A.; AlShahrani, Ibrahim; Almoammar, Salem; Durgesh, Bangalore H.; Kheraif, Abdulaziz A. Al; Hashem, Mohamed I.

    2018-02-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium surface coatings on surface roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) archwires Methods. Three different coated (Epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and rhodium) and one uncoated Ni-Ti archwires were evaluated in the present study. Surface roughness (Ra) was assessed using a non-contact surface profilometer. The mechanical properties (nano-hardness and elastic modulus) were measured using a nanoindenter. Bacterial adhesion assays were performed using Streptococcus mutans (MS) and streptococcus sobrinus (SS) in an in-vitro set up. The data obtained were analyzed using analyses of variance, Tukey’s post hoc test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Result. The highest Ra values (1.29 ± 0.49) were obtained for epoxy coated wires and lowest Ra values (0.29 ± 0.16) were obtained for the uncoated wires. No significant differences in the Ra values were observed between the rhodium coated and uncoated archwires (P > 0.05). The highest nano-hardness (3.72 ± 0.24) and elastic modulus values (61.15 ± 2.59) were obtained for uncoated archwires and the lowest nano-hardness (0.18 ± 0.10) and elastic modulus values (4.84 ± 0.65) were observed for epoxy coated archwires. No significant differences in nano-hardness and elastic modulus values were observed between the coated archwires (P > 0.05). The adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (MS) to the wires was significantly greater than that of streptococcus sobrinus (SS). The epoxy coated wires demonstrated an increased adhesion of MS and SS and the uncoated wires demonstrated decreased biofilm adhesion. The Spearman correlation test showed that MS and SS adhesion was positively correlated with the surface roughness of the wires. Conclusion. The different surface coatings significantly influence the roughness, nano-mechanical properties and biofilm adhesion parameters of the archwires. The

  4. Effect of nanoporous TiO2 coating and anodized Ca2+ modification of titanium surfaces on early microbial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennerberg Ann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soft tissue around dental implants forms a barrier between the oral environment and the peri-implant bone and a crucial factor for long-term success of therapy is development of a good abutment/soft-tissue seal. Sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2 coatings have been shown to enhance soft-tissue attachment but their effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by oral bacteria is unknown. Methods We have investigated how the properties of surfaces that may be used on abutments: turned titanium, sol-gel nanoporous TiO2 coated surfaces and anodized Ca2+ modified surfaces, affect biofilm formation by two early colonizers of the oral cavity: Streptococcus sanguinis and Actinomyces naeslundii. The bacteria were detected using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization together with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Interferometry and atomic force microscopy revealed all the surfaces to be smooth (Sa ≤ 0.22 μm. Incubation with a consortium of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii showed no differences in adhesion between the surfaces over 2 hours. After 14 hours, the level of biofilm growth was low and again, no differences between the surfaces were seen. The presence of saliva increased the biofilm biovolume of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii ten-fold compared to when saliva was absent and this was due to increased adhesion rather than biofilm growth. Conclusions Nano-topographical modification of smooth titanium surfaces had no effect on adhesion or early biofilm formation by S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii as compared to turned surfaces or those treated with anodic oxidation in the presence of Ca2+. The presence of saliva led to a significantly greater biofilm biovolume but no significant differences were seen between the test surfaces. These data thus suggest that modification with sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2, which has been shown to improve osseointegration and soft-tissue healing in vivo, does not cause greater biofilm

  5. New Weapons to Fight Old Enemies: Novel Strategies for the (Bio)control of Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Laura M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities characterized by their adhesion to solid surfaces and the production of a matrix of exopolymeric substances, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA and lipids, which surround the microorganisms lending structural integrity and a unique biochemical profile to the biofilm. Biofilm formation enhances the ability of the producer/s to persist in a given environment. Pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species capable of forming biofilms are a significant problem for the healthcare and food industries, as their biofilm-forming ability protects them from common cleaning processes and allows them to remain in the environment post-sanitation. In the food industry, persistent bacteria colonize the inside of mixing tanks, vats and tubing, compromising food safety and quality. Strategies to overcome bacterial persistence through inhibition of biofilm formation or removal of mature biofilms are therefore necessary. Current biofilm control strategies employed in the food industry (cleaning and disinfection, material selection and surface preconditioning, plasma treatment, ultrasonication, etc.), although effective to a certain point, fall short of biofilm control. Efforts have been explored, mainly with a view to their application in pharmaceutical and healthcare settings, which focus on targeting molecular determinants regulating biofilm formation. Their application to the food industry would greatly aid efforts to eradicate undesirable bacteria from food processing environments and, ultimately, from food products. These approaches, in contrast to bactericidal approaches, exert less selective pressure which in turn would reduce the likelihood of resistance development. A particularly interesting strategy targets quorum sensing systems, which regulate gene expression in response to fluctuations in cell-population density governing essential cellular processes including biofilm formation. This review article discusses the problems associated

  6. New weapons to fight old enemies: novel strategies for the (biocontrol of bacterial biofilms in the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maria Coughlan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities characterized by their adhesion to solid surfaces and the production of a matrix of exopolymeric substances (EPS, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA and lipids, which surround the microorganisms lending structural integrity and a unique biochemical profile to the biofilm. Biofilm formation enhances the ability of the producer/s to persist in a given environment. Pathogenic and spoilage bacterial species capable of forming biofilms are a significant problem for the healthcare and food industries, as their biofilm-forming ability protects them from common cleaning processes and allows them to remain in the environment post-sanitation. In the food industry, persistent bacteria colonize the inside of mixing tanks, vats and tubing, compromising food safety and quality. Strategies to overcome bacterial persistence through inhibition of biofilm formation or removal of mature biofilms are therefore necessary. Current biofilm control strategies employed in the food industry (cleaning and disinfection, material selection and surface preconditioning, plasma treatment, ultrasonication, etc., although effective to a certain point, fall short of biofilm control. Efforts have been explored, mainly with a view to their application in pharmaceutical and healthcare settings, which focus on targeting molecular determinants regulating biofilm formation. Their application to the food industry would greatly aid efforts to eradicate undesirable bacteria from food processing environments and, ultimately, from food products. These approaches, in contrast to bactericidal approaches, exert less selective pressure which in turn would reduce the likelihood of resistance development. A particularly interesting strategy targets quorum sensing systems, which regulate gene expression in response to fluctuations in cell-population density governing essential cellular processes including biofilm formation. This review article discusses

  7. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Kshipra, E-mail: kshipra_naik21@yahoo.co.in; Kowshik, Meenal, E-mail: meenal@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO{sub 2} acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO{sub 2} being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix.

  8. Long alkyl-chain imidazolium ionic liquids: Antibiofilm activity against phototrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kiran Kumar; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P

    2017-07-01

    Biofilm formation is problematic and hence undesirable in medical and industrial settings. In addition to bacteria, phototrophic organisms are an integral component of biofilms that develop on surfaces immersed in natural waters. 1-Alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium ionic liquids (IL) with varying alkyl chain length were evaluated for their influence on the formation of monospecies (Navicula sp.) and multispecies biofilms under phototrophic conditions. An IL with a long alkyl side chain, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidaazolium chloride ([C 16 (MIM)][Cl]) retarded growth, adhesion and biofilm formation of Navicula sp. at concentrations as low as 5μM. Interestingly, [C 16 (MIM)][Cl] was very effective in preventing multispecies phototrophic biofilms on fibre reinforced plastic surfaces immersed in natural waters (fresh and seawater). SYTOX ® Green staining and chlorophyll leakage assay confirmed that the biocidal activity of the IL was exerted through cell membrane disruption. The data show that [C 16 (MIM)][Cl] is a potent inhibitor of phototrophic biofilms at micromolar concentrations and a promising agent for biofilm control in re-circulating cooling water systems. This is the first report that ionic liquids inhibit biofilm formation by phototrophic organisms which are important members of biofilms in streams and cooling towers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biofilm inhibitory effect of chlorhexidine conjugated gold nanoparticles against Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Khan, Anum Khalid; Anwar, Ayaz; Ali, Syed Abid; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2016-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) is one of the major pathogen associated with nosocomial infections, especially catheter associated urinary tract infections which involved biofilm formation. This study was designed to evaluate the antibiofilm efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugated with chlorhexidine (Au-CHX) against K. pneumoniae isolates. Au-CHX was synthesized and analyzed for stability by using UV-Visible spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). Biofilm inhibition and eradication was performed by crystal violet, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and further confirmed by florescence and AFM microscopy. Au-CHX showed the maxima surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 535 nm, spherical morphology and polydispersity with size in the range of 20-100 nm. The micro molar concentrations (i.e. 25 and 100 μM) of Au-CHX completely inhibited the biofilm formation and metabolic activity within biofilms of K. pneumoniae reference and three tested clinical isolates, respectively. Time dependant biofilm inhibition assay showed that Au-CHX inhibited the early stage of biofilm formation. While at 75 and 100 μM concentrations, it also eradicated the established biofilms of K. pneumoniae isolates as compared to 2 mM chlorhexidine. Reduced florescence signals and surface roughness during microscopic analysis further confirms the antibiofilm activity of Au-CHX against K. pneumoniae ATCC13882 and clinical isolates. Thus it is concluded that chlorhexidine coated gold nanoparticle not only inhibits the biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae ATCC and clinical isolates but also eradicated the preformed biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The evaluation of relationship between the origin of Candida sp. and the ability of biofilm formation on surface of different biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciok-Pater, Emilia; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Prazyńska, Małgorzata; Bogiel, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    The increase of fungal infections in recent years is connected with the progress in medicine. The vast usage of biomaterials is an inseparable element of contemporary medicine but it also leads to development of infections. The ability to produce biofilm by those yeasts plays an important role in the pathogenesis of candidiasis. Candida biofilm can form on the surface of plastic materials (silicon, polychloride vinyl, polymethacrylate methyl) used to catheters, drains and dentures production that is why it is a serious problem in case of fungal infections in patients who during the diagnosis and treatment have contact with biomaterials. The aim of the study was the assessment of ability to form biofilm on the surface of different biomaterials (latex silicon, polychloride vinyl, polystyrene, nylon and polymethacrylate methyl). 150 strains of Candida sp. were examined: 85 (56.7%) C. albicans and 65 (43.3%) C. non-albicans. The examined yeasts produced biofilm on the surface of polymethacrylate methyl in 39.3%, latex silicone in 38.7%, polychloride vinyl in 38.0%, polystyrene in 35.3% and nylon in 30.7%. Biofilm was most frequently produced by the strains of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei and C. lusitaniae species.

  11. Metabolic differentiation of surface and invasive cells of yeast colony biofilms revealed by gene expression profiling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršíková, J.; Wilkinson, D.; Hlaváček, Otakar; Gilfillan, G.D.; Mizeranschi, A.; Hughes, T.; Begany, Markéta; Rešetárová, Stanislava; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, OCT 23 (2017), s. 814 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14083; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * Colony biofilms * Cell differentiation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2016

  12. Provision of water by halite deliquescence for Nostoc commune biofilms under Mars relevant surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänchen, Jochen; Feyh, Nina; Szewzyk, Ulrich; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by findings of new mineral related water sources for organisms under extremely dry conditions on Earth we studied in an interdisciplinary approach the water sorption behaviour of halite, soil component and terrestrial Nostoc commune biofilm under Mars relevant environmental conditions. Physicochemical methods served for the determination of water sorption equilibrium data and survival of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilm samples with different water contents was assured by recultivation. Deliquescence of halite provides liquid water at temperatures <273 K and may serve as water source on Mars during the morning stabilized by the CO2 atmosphere for a few hours. The protecting biofilm of N. commune is rather hygroscopic and tends to store water at lower humidity values. Survival tests showed that a large proportion of the Alphaproteobacteria dominated microbiota associated to N. commune is very desiccation tolerant and water uptake from saturated NaCl solutions (either by direct uptake of brine or adsorption of humidity) did not enhance recultivability in long-time desiccated samples. Still, a minor part can grow under highly saline conditions. However, the salinity level, although unfavourable for the host organism, might be for parts of the heterotrophic microbiota no serious hindrance for growing in salty Mars-like environments.

  13. Controlled Release of Plectasin NZ2114 from a Hybrid Silicone-Hydrogel Material for Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Kasper; Grønnemose, Rasmus Birkholm; Alm, Martin

    2017-01-01

    this system with plectasin derivate NZ2114 in an attempt to design an S. aureus biofilm-resistant catheter. The material demonstrated promising antibiofilm properties, including properties against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, thus suggesting a novel application of this antimicrobial peptide....

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for In-Situ Biofilm Surface Characterization during Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water distribution system biofilm are attached to pipe walls and found in sediments. These biofilms are complex and contain a variety of microorganisms embedded in a matrix with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), providing protection from disinfection. Without pro...

  15. Proteomic and genetics insights on the response of the bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus sakei CRL1862 during biofilm formation on stainless steel surface at 10°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ibarreche, Mariana; Mendoza, Lucía M; Vignolo, Graciela; Fadda, Silvina

    2017-10-03

    Some lactic acid bacteria have the ability to form biofilms on food-industry surfaces and this property could be used to control food pathogens colonization. Lactobacillus sakei CR1862 was selected considering its bacteriocinogenic nature and ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces at low temperatures. In this study, the proteome of L. sakei CRL1862 grown either under biofilm on stainless steel surface and planktonic modes of growth at 10°C, was investigated. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 29 out of 43 statistically significant spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ten proteins resulted up-regulated whereas 16 were down-regulated during biofilm formation. Differentially expressed proteins were found to belong to carbohydrate, nucleotide, aminoacid and lipid metabolisms as well as translation, peptide hydrolysis, cell envelope/cell wall biosynthesis, adaption to atypical conditions and protein secretion. Some proteins related to carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolisms, translation and peptide degradation were overexpressed whereas those associated to stress conditions were synthesized in lower amounts. It seems that conditions for biofilm development would not imply a stressful environment for L. sakei CRL1862 cells, directing its growth strategy towards glycolytic flux regulation and reinforcing protein synthesis. In addition, L. sakei CRL1862 showed to harbor nine out of ten assayed genes involved in biofilm formation and protein anchoring. By applying qRT-PCR analysis, four of these genes showed to be up regulated, srtA2 being the most remarkable. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the physiology of L. sakei CRL1862 growing in biofilm on a characteristic food contact surface. The use of this strain as green biocide preventing L. monocytogenes post-processing contamination on industrial surfaces may be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial dynamics in a microphytobenthic biofilm: A tidal mesocosm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogué, Hélène; Mallet, Clarisse; Orvain, Francis; De Crignis, Margot; Mornet, Françoise; Dupuy, Christine

    2014-09-01

    In intertidal mudflats, during low tide exposure, microphytobenthos (MPB) migrate vertically through the surface sediment and form, with the heterotrophic bacteria, a transient biofilm. Inside this biofilm, multiple interactions exist between MPB and bacteria. These micro-organisms secrete a wide range of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are major components of the biofilm matrix. In this study, we used a tidal mesocosm experiment in order to decipher the interactions of the MPB-EPS-bacteria complex within the biofilm. We tried to determine if the EPS could control bacterial activities and/or production and/or richness according to the age of the biofilm and to the immersion/emersion period. The dynamics of biomasses of MPB and prokaryotes, the bacterial production, the hydrolysis of predominating organic constituents in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool (i.e., carbohydrates and polypeptides), and the bacterial structure were studied in relation to the different EPS fractions (carbohydrates and proteins: colloidal and bound) dynamics during 8 days. Our experiment had emphasized the influence of the environmental conditions (light, immersion/emersion) on the interactions within the biofilm and also on the effects on biofilm aging. Bacterial production was always inhibited by the bound EPS-carbohydrate, especially during low tide. Our results suggest that the concentration and composition of EPS had a major role in the bacterial/MPB interactions: these interactions can be either positive or negative in order to regulate the productive phases of MPB and bacteria.

  17. Characterization of the effect of serum and chelating agents on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation; chelating agents augment biofilm formation through clumping factor B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nabil Mathew

    Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of a diverse array of acute and chronic infections, and some these infections, including infective endocarditis, joint infections, and medical device-associated bloodstream infections, depend upon its capacity to form tenacious biofilms on surfaces. Inserted medical devices such as intravenous catheters, pacemakers, and artificial heart valves save lives, but unfortunately, they can also serve as a substrate on which S. aureus can form a biofilm, attributing S. aureus as a leading cause of medical device-related infections. The major aim of this work was take compounds to which S. aureus would be exposed during infection and to investigate their effects on its capacity to form a biofilm. More specifically, the project investigated the effects of serum, and thereafter of catheter lock solutions on biofilm formation by S. aureus. Pre-coating polystyrene with serum is frequently used as a method to augment biofilm formation. The effect of pre-coating with serum is due to the deposition of extracellular matrix components onto the polystyrene, which are then recognized by MSCRAMMs. We therefore hypothesized that the major component of blood, serum, would induce biofilm formation. Surprisingly, serum actually inhibited biofilm formation. The inhibitory activity was due to a small molecular weight, heat-stable, non-proteinaceous component/s of serum. Serum-mediated inhibition of biofilm formation may represent a previously uncharacterized aspect of host innate immunity that targets the expression of a key bacterial virulence factor: the ability to establish a resistant biofilm. Metal ion chelators like sodium citrate are frequently chosen to lock intravenous catheters because they are regarded as potent inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and viability. We found that, while chelating compounds abolished biofilm formation in most strains of S. aureus, they actually augmented the phenotype in a subset of strains. We

  18. Antimicrobial activity of denture adhesive associated with Equisetum giganteum- and Punica granatum-enriched fractions against Candida albicans biofilms on acrylic resin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Nara Ligia Martins; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; da Silva, Rafaela Alves; Pinke, Karen Henriette; da Costa, Eliane Ferraz; Porto, Vinicius Carvalho; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2018-01-01

    Candida biofilms adhere to the internal surface of removable dentures, which is an etiological factor in the pathogenesis of denture stomatitis (DS). Adhesive materials are used at the base of maxillary complete dentures to improve their retention and chewing qualities. This article reports the antimicrobial activity of the enriched fractions of Equisetum giganteum and Punica granatum incorporated into a denture adhesive against C. albicans biofilm. The biofilms were induced on the surface of heat-cured acrylic resin specimens that were previously treated with a mixture of adhesive/herb extracts. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by CFU counts, XTT reduction, and SEM and CLSM analysis. Both herb extracts amplified the anti-biofilm action of the adhesive on the acrylic resin by up to 12 h. Therefore, when these extracts were combined with COREGA®, they played a collaborative and innovative role in biofilm control and can be considered alternatives for temporary use in the treatment and/or prevention of DS.

  19. Inhibited biofilm formation and improved antibacterial activity of a novel nanoemulsion against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li YF

    2015-01-01

    . CNE treatment at a concentration of 0.2 µg/mL inhibited biofilm formation more effectively than CHX, as indicated by the crystal violet staining method, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The cell membrane of S. mutans was also severely disrupted by 0.2 µg/mL CNE, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. These results demonstrated that CNE greatly improved the solubility and antimicrobial activity of this agent against S. mutans both in vitro and in vivo. This novel nanoemulsion is a promising medicine for preventing and curing dental caries. Keywords: nanoemulsion, chlorhexidine acetate, Streptococcus mutans, antibacterial

  20. The effect of ozone and open air factor on surface-attached and biofilm environmental Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, R; Dunton, P; Tatham, A; Fielding, L

    2013-08-01

    The effects of gaseous ozone and open air factor (OAF) on environmental Listeria monocytogenes attached to three common food contact surfaces were investigated. Listeria monocytogenes on different food contact surfaces was treated with ozone and OAF. Microbiological counts, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed. Ozone at 10 ppm gave <1-log reduction when L. monocytogenes was attached to stainless steel, while 45 ppm gave a log reduction of 3.41. OAF gave better log reductions than 10 ppm ozone, but lower log reductions than 45 ppm. Significant differences were found between surfaces. Biofilm organisms were significantly more resistant than those surface attached on stainless steel. SEM and AFM demonstrated different membrane and cell surface modifications following ozone or OAF treatment. The strain used demonstrated higher resistance to ozone than previous studies. This may be due to the fact that it was isolated from a food manufacturing premises that used oxidizing disinfectants. OAF was more effective at reducing the levels of the organism than an ozone concentration of 10 ppm. Pathogen management strategies must account for resistance of environmental strains when validating cleaning and disinfection. OAF has shown potential for surface decontamination compared with ozone. SEM and AFM are valuable tools for determining mechanisms of action of antimicrobial agents. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Short communication: Evaluation of a sol-gel-based stainless steel surface modification to reduce fouling and biofilm formation during pasteurization of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dylan Zhe; Jindal, Shivali; Amamcharla, Jayendra; Anand, Sanjeev; Metzger, Lloyd

    2017-04-01

    Milk fouling and biofilms are common problems in the dairy industry across many types of processing equipment. One way to reduce milk fouling and biofilms is to modify the characteristics of milk contact surfaces. This study examines the viability of using Thermolon (Porcelain Industries Inc., Dickson, TN), a sol-gel-based surface modification of stainless steel, during thermal processing of milk. We used stainless steel 316L (control) and sol-gel-modified coupons in this study to evaluate fouling behavior and bacterial adhesion. The surface roughness as measured by an optical profiler indicated that the control coupons had a slightly smoother finish. Contact angle measurements showed that the modified surface led to a higher water contact angle, suggesting a more hydrophobic surface. The modified surface also had a lower surface energy (32.4 ± 1.4 mN/m) than the control surface (41.36 ± 2.7 mN/m). We evaluated the susceptibility of control and modified stainless steel coupons to fouling in a benchtop plate heat exchanger. We observed a significant reduction in the amount of fouled layer on modified surfaces. We found an average fouling weight of 19.21 mg/cm 2 and 0.37 mg/cm 2 on the control and modified stainless steel coupons, respectively. We also examined the adhesion of Bacillus and biofilm formation, and observed that the modified stainless steel surface offered greater resistance to biofilm formation. Overall, the Thermolon-modified surface showed potential in the thermal processing of milk, offering significantly lower fouling and bacterial attachment than the control surface. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biogenic selenium and tellurium nanoparticles synthesized by environmental microbial isolates efficaciously inhibit bacterial planktonic cultures and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele eZonaro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with Se0- and Te0-based nanoparticles bio-synthesized by two selenite- and tellurite-reducing bacterial strains, namely Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SeITE02 and Ochrobactrum sp. MPV1, isolated from polluted sites. We discovered that, by regulating culture conditions and exposure time to the selenite and tellurite oxyanions, differently sized zero-valent Se and Te nanoparticles were produced. The results revealed that these Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles possess antimicrobial and biofilm eradication activity against E. coli JM109, P. aeruginosa PAO1, and S. aureus ATCC 25923. In particular, Se0 nanoparticles exhibited antimicrobial activity at quite low concentrations, below that of selenite. Toxic effects of both Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles can be related to the production of reactive oxygen species upon exposure of the bacterial cultures. Evidence so far achieved suggests that the antimicrobial activity seems to be strictly linked to the dimensions of the nanoparticles: indeed, the highest activity was shown by nanoparticles of smaller sizes. In particular, it is worth noting how the bacteria tested in biofilm mode responded to the treatment by Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles with a susceptibility similar to that observed in planktonic cultures. This suggests a possible exploitation of both Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles as efficacious antimicrobial agents with a remarkable biofilm eradication capacity.

  3. Response surface model for the reduction of Salmonella biofilm on stainless steel with lactic acid, ethanol and chlorine as controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on food contact surfaces can be sources of contamination of processed foods and poses a serious threat to health. Since chlorine- or ethanol-based disinfection is commonly used in the food industry and kitchens, a disinfectant containing chlorine (Cl), et...

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilm on food-contact surfaces by sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Hong, Ayoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Rhee, Min Suk; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the efficacy of sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide and drying in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms formed on stainless steel, glass, plastic, and wooden surfaces. Cells attached to and formed a biofilm on wooden surfaces at significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher levels compared with other surface types. The lethal activities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on various food-contact surfaces were compared. Chlorine dioxide generally showed greater lethal activity than NaOCl against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on the same type of surface. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to both sanitizers increased in the order of wood>plastic>glass>stainless steel. The synergistic lethal effects of sequential ClO₂ and drying treatments on E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on wooden surfaces were evaluated. When wooden surfaces harboring E. coli O157:H7 biofilm were treated with ClO₂ (200 μg/ml, 10 min), rinsed with water, and subsequently dried at 43% relative humidity and 22 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface decreased by an additional 6.4 CFU/coupon within 6 h of drying. However, when the wooden surface was treated with water or NaOCl and dried under the same conditions, the pathogen decreased by only 0.4 or 1.0 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 12 h of drying. This indicates that ClO₂ treatment of food-contact surfaces results in residual lethality to E. coli O157:H7 during the drying process. These observations will be useful when selecting an appropriate type of food-contact surfaces, determining a proper sanitizer for decontamination, and designing an effective sanitization program to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 on food-contact surfaces in food processing, distribution, and preparation environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsin Jamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living. Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease.

  6. Laser-Assisted Synthesis of Mn0.50Zn0.50Fe2O4 Nanomaterial: Characterization and In Vitro Inhibition Activity towards Bacillus subtilis Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaukat Ali Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the development of novel nanomaterials with potential antimicrobial activity and lesser toxicity. In the current research work, Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via a novel coprecipitation cum laser ablation technique yielding fine spinal structured material. The synthesized nanomaterial was structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction technique which confirmed the formation and the crystalline nature of Mn0.50Zn0.50Fe2O4 nanomaterial. The crystallite size determined by Debye-Scherrer’s formula was found to be ~12 nm. The formation of nanoparticles was evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA was performed for elemental analysis. The synthesized nanomaterial was interestingly found to be an effective antimicrobial agent and inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation. The 5 µg of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanomaterial dissolved in 1 mL of DMSO showed excellent biofilm inhibitory activity 91.23% ± 1.87 against Bacillus subtilis.

  7. Bisbibenzyls, a new type of antifungal agent, inhibit morphogenesis switch and biofilm formation through upregulation of DPP3 in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The yeast-to-hypha transition plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of C. albicans. Farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule (QSM secreted by the fungal itself, could prevent the formation of hyphae and subsequently lead to the defect of biofilm formation. The DPP3, encoding phosphatase, is a key gene in regulating farnesol synthesis. In this study, we screened 24 bisbibenzyls and 2 bibenzyls that were isolated from bryophytes or chemically synthesized by using CLSI method for antifungal effect. Seven bisbibenzyls were found to have antifungal effects with IC(80 less than 32 µg/ml, and among them, plagiochin F, isoriccardin C and BS-34 were found to inhibit the hyphae and biofilm formation of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. To uncover the underlying relationship between morphogenesis switch and QSM formation, we measured the farnesol production by HPLC-MS and quantified Dpp3 expression by detecting the fluorescent intensity of green fluorescent protein tagged strain using Confocal Laser Scanning microscopy and Multifunction Microplate Reader. The DPP3 transcripts were determined by real-time PCR. The data indicated that the bisbibenzyls exerted antifungal effects through stimulating the synthesis of farnesol via upregulation of Dpp3, suggesting a potential antifungal application of bisbibenzyls. In addition, our assay provides a novel, visual and convenient method to measure active compounds against morphogenesis switch.

  8. Potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Mi, Zhiqiang; Niu, Wenkai; An, Xiaoping; Yuan, Xin; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Yong; Feng, Yuzhong; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xianglilan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Fan, Hang; Peng, Fan; Li, Puyuan; Tong, Yigang; Bai, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms and develop antibiotic resistance makes it difficult to control infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, we explored the potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms. The potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms was assessed by performing electron microscopy, live/dead bacterial staining, crystal violet staining and by determining adenosine triphosphate release. The bacteriophage inhibited the formation of and disrupted preformed A. baumannii biofilms. Results of disinfection assay showed that the lytic bacteriophage lysed A. baumannii cells suspended in blood or grown on metal surfaces. These results suggest the potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms.

  9. Enhanced biofilm formation and melanin synthesis by the oyster settlement-promoting Shewanella colwelliana is related to hydrophobic surface and simulated intertidal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sayani; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    A direct relationship between biofilm formation and melanogenesis in Shewanella colwelliana with increased oyster recruitment is already established. Previously, S. colwelliana was grown in a newly patented biofilm-cultivation device, the conico-cylindrical flask (CCF), offering interchangeable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces. Melanization was enhanced when S. colwelliana was cultivated in a hydrophobic vessel compared with a hydrophilic vessel. In the present study, melanogenesis in the CCF was positively correlated with increased architectural parameters of the biofilm (mean thickness and biovolume obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy) and melanin gene (melA) expression observed by densitometry. Niche intertidal conditions were mimicked in a process operated in an ultra-low-speed rotating disk bioreactor, which demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation, melanogenesis, exopolysaccharide synthesis and melA gene expression compared with a process where 12-h periodic immersion and emersion was prevented. The wettability properties of the settling plane as well as intermittent wetting and drying, which influenced biofilm formation and melA expression, may affect oyster settlement in nature.

  10. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  11. An MFS Transporter-Like ORF from MDR Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7 Is Associated with Adherence and Biofilm Formation on Biotic/Abiotic Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K. Sahu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A major facilitator superfamily (MFS transporter-like open reading frame (ORF of 453 bp was identified in a pathogenic strain Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7, and its association with adherence and biofilm formation was investigated. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR showed differential expression in surface-attached biofilm cells than nonadherent cells. In vitro translation showed synthesis of a ∼17 kDa protein, further confirmed by cloning and heterologous expression in E. coli DH5. Up to 2.1-, 3.1-, and 4.1- fold biofilm augmentation was observed on abiotic (polystyrene and biotic (S. cerevisiae/HeLa surface, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and gfp-tagged fluorescence microscopy revealed increased adherence to abiotic (glass and biotic (S. cerevisiae surface. Extracellular DNA(eDNA was found significantly during active growth; due to probable involvement of the protein in DNA export, strong sequence homology with MFS transporter proteins, and presence of transmembrane helices. In summary, our findings show that the putative MFS transporter-like ORF (pmt is associated with adherence, biofilm formation, and probable eDNA release in A. baumannii AIIMS 7.

  12. Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of biofilm formation on dental materials such as denture bases is key to oral health. Recently, a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) coating, was reported to inhibit sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture bases. However, S. mutans is a minor component of the oral microbiome and does not play an important role in biofilm formation in the absence of sucrose. Other, more predominant oral streptococci must play an indispensable role in sucrose-independent biofilm formation. In the present study, the effect of PMB coating on PMMA was evaluated using various oral streptococci that are known to be initial colonizers during biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. PMB coating on PMMA drastically reduced sucrose-dependent tight biofilm formation by two cariogenic bacteria (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), among seven tested oral streptococci, as described previously [N. Takahashi, F. Iwasa, Y. Inoue, H. Morisaki, K. Ishihara, K. Baba, J. Prosthet. Dent. 112 (2014) 194-203]. Streptococci other than S. mutans and S. sobrinus did not exhibit tight biofilm formation even in the presence of sucrose. On the other hand, all seven species of oral streptococci exhibited distinctly reduced glucose-dependent soft biofilm retention on PMB-coated PMMA. We conclude that PMB coating on PMMA surfaces inhibits biofilm attachment by initial colonizer oral streptococci, even in the absence of sucrose, indicating that PMB coating may help maintain clean conditions on PMMA surfaces in the oral cavity.

  13. Intensive care unit environmental surfaces are contaminated by multidrug-resistant bacteria in biofilms: combined results of conventional culture, pyrosequencing, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Johani, K; Gosbell, I B; Jacombs, A S W; Almatroudi, A; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Jensen, S; Vickery, K

    2015-09-01

    Hospital-associated infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and are expensive to treat. Organisms causing these infections can be sourced from the inanimate environment around a patient. Could the difficulty in eradicating these organisms from the environment be because they reside in dry surface biofilms? The intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral hospital was decommissioned and the opportunity to destructively sample clinical surfaces was taken in order to investigate whether multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) had survived the decommissioning process and whether they were present in biofilms. The ICU had two 'terminal cleans' with 500 ppm free chlorine solution; items from bedding, surrounds, and furnishings were then sampled with cutting implements. Sections were sonicated in tryptone soya broth and inoculated on to chromogenic plates to demonstrate MDROs, which were confirmed with the Vitek2 system. Genomic DNA was extracted directly from ICU samples, and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for femA to detect Staphylococcus aureus and the microbiome by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed on environmental samples. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were cultured from 52% (23/44) of samples cultured. S. aureus PCR was positive in 50%. Biofilm was demonstrated in 93% (41/44) of samples by CLSM and/or SEM. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that the biofilms were polymicrobial and contained species that had multidrug-resistant strains. Dry surface biofilms containing MDROs are found on ICU surfaces despite terminal cleaning with chlorine solution. How these arise and how they might be removed requires further study. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobine, Paul A; Cruz, Luisa F; Navarrete, Fernando; Duncan, Daniel; Tygart, Melissa; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold), manganese (6-fold), zinc (5-fold), calcium (2-fold) and potassium (2-fold) in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM) slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  15. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Cobine

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold, manganese (6-fold, zinc (5-fold, calcium (2-fold and potassium (2-fold in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  16. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  17. Effects of Aronia melanocarpa Constituents on Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bräunlich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria growing on surfaces form biofilms. Adaptive and genetic changes of the microorganisms in this structure make them resistant to antimicrobial agents. Biofilm-forming organisms on medical devices can pose serious threats to human health. Thus, there is a need for novel prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of Aronia melanocarpa extracts, subfractions and compounds to prevent biofilm formation and to inhibit bacterial growth of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus in vitro. It was found that several aronia substances possessed anti-biofilm activity, however, they were not toxic to the species screened. This non-toxic inhibition may confer a lower potential for resistance development compared to conventional antimicrobials.

  18. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Vahey, B.R. [Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, 925 W 34 St, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-900 (Brazil); Pimenta, A.L., E-mail: andrea@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Biologia, ERRMECe, Université de Cergy Pontoise, 2, Av. Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy, Pontoise (France); Integrated Laboratories Technologies (InteLab), Dept. Chemical and Food Engineering (EQA), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis/SC, 88040-970 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml{sup −1}), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10{sup 2} CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfacesBiofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  19. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, J.G.; Geremias, T.C.; Montero, J.F.D.; Vahey, B.R.; Benfatti, C.A.M.; Souza, J.C.M.; Magini, R.S.; Pimenta, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48 h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml −1 ), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5 × 10 2 CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4 × 10 2 CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. - Highlights: • A novel synthetic compound is tested on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfacesBiofilm inhibition has been achieved on titanium surfaces containing the novel compound. • Planktonic growth of S. mutans was not affected by the presence of lactams on titanium.

  20. A flow chamber assay for quantitative evaluation of bacterial surface colonization used to investigate the influence of temperature and surface hydrophilicity on the biofilm forming capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Emil; Kingshott, Peter; Palarasah, Yaseelan

    2010-01-01

    to those found on an implanted device. We have used the method to evaluate the biofilm forming capacity of clinically isolated Escherichia coli on silicone rubber and on silicone rubber containing a hydrophilic coating. It was found that the surface chemistry influenced the colonization of the isolates...... very differently. In addition, the temperature was found to have a considerable influence upon the adhesion and biofilm forming capacity of some of the isolates, and that the influence of surface chemistry depended on temperature. Our results suggest that the step from using E. coli laboratory strains...

  1. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm

  2. Modern techniques for studying biofilm-influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, I.B.

    1998-01-01

    In natural and made-made environments the presence of biofilms on surfaces of metals and their alloys influences electrochemistry at the biofilm/substratum interface, enhancing or inhibiting corrosion reactions. Due to the complexity of the biocorrosion phenomenon a range of techniques is commonly employed to study mechanisms involved. In addition to traditional methods of corrosion investigation such as electrochemical measurements and light and scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Modern techniques of surface science proved to be very useful in elucidating biofilm/metal interactions. Recent applications of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to biocorrosion studies allowed better understanding of the biologically influenced metal deterioration process. The scope and promise of these latter techniques will be discussed and their use illustrated on practical examples. (Author)

  3. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  4. The Effects of Allium sativum Extracts on Biofilm Formation and Activities of Six Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Garlic is considered a rich source of many compounds, which shows antimicrobial effects. The ability of microorganisms to adhere to both biotic and abiotic surfaces and to form biofilm is responsible for a number of diseases of chronic nature, demonstrating extremely high resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of sessile microorganisms, embedded in an extracellular matrix and irreversibly attached to various surfaces. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Allium sativum extract against the biofilms of six pathogenic bacteria and their free-living forms. The clinical isolates in this study had not been studied in any other studies, especially in regard to biofilm disruption and inhibition of biofilm cell metabolic activity. Antimicrobial activities of A. sativum L. extracts (methanol and ethanol extracts) against planktonic forms of bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were evaluated by a macrobroth dilution technique. The anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. The results showed that the A. sativum L. extract discs did not have any zone of inhibition for the tested bacteria. However, The MIC values of A. sativum L. extracts (0.078 - 2.5 mg/mL) confirmed the high ability of these extracts for inhibition of planktonic bacteria. A. sativum L. extracts were efficient to inhibit biofilm structures and the concentration of each extract had a direct relation with the inhibitory effect. Finally, it can be suggested that the extracts of this plant be applied as antimicrobial agents against these pathogens, particularly in biofilm forms.

  5. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  6. Morphological Change and Decreasing Transfer Rate of Biofilm-Featured Listeria monocytogenes EGDe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuejia; Wang, Chinling

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes , a lethal foodborne pathogen, has the ability to resist the hostile food processing environment and thus frequently contaminates ready-to-eat foods during processing. It is commonly accepted that the tendency of L. monocytogenes ' to generate biofilms on various surfaces enhances its resistance to the harshness of the food processing environment. However, the role of biofilm formation in the transferability of L. monocytogenes EGDe remains controversial. We examined the growth of Listeria biofilms on stainless steel surfaces and their effect on the transferability of L. monocytogenes EGDe. The experiments were a factorial 2 × 2 design with at least three biological replicates. Through scanning electron microscopy, a mature biofilm with intensive aggregates of cells was observed on the surface of stainless steel after 3 or 5 days of incubation, depending on the initial level of inoculation. During biofilm development, L. monocytogenes EGDe carried out binary fission vigorously before a mature biofilm was formed and subsequently changed its cellular morphology from rod shaped to sphere shaped. Furthermore, static biofilm, which was formed after 3 days of incubation at 25°C, significantly inhibited the transfer rate of L. monocytogenes EGDe from stainless steel blades to 15 bologna slices. During 7 days of storage at 4°C, however, bacterial growth rate was not significantly impacted by whether bacteria were transferred from biofilm and the initial concentrations of transferred bacteria on the slice. In conclusion, this study is the first to report a distinct change in morphology of L. monocytogenes EGDe at the late stage of biofilm formation. More importantly, once food is contaminated by L. monocytogenes EGDe, contamination proceeds independently of biofilm development and the initial level of contamination when food is stored at 4°C, even if contamination with L. monocytogenes EGDe was initially undetectable before storage.

  7. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  8. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  10. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haiya, E-mail: flying850612@126.com; Tian, Yimei, E-mail: ymtian_2000@126.com; Wan, Jianmei, E-mail: 563926510@qq.com; Zhao, Peng, E-mail: zhpeng@tju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  11. Impaired respiration elicits SrrAB-dependent programmed cell lysis and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; van de Guchte, Adriana; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface or each other. Biofilm-associated cells are the etiologic agents of recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections. Infected human tissues are hypoxic or anoxic. S. aureus increases biofilm formation in response to hypoxia, but how this occurs is unknown. In the current study we report that oxygen influences biofilm formation in its capacity as a terminal electron acceptor for cellular respiration. Genetic, physiological, or chemical inhibition of respiratory processes elicited increased biofilm formation. Impaired respiration led to increased cell lysis via divergent regulation of two processes: increased expression of the AtlA murein hydrolase and decreased expression of wall-teichoic acids. The AltA-dependent release of cytosolic DNA contributed to increased biofilm formation. Further, cell lysis and biofilm formation were governed by the SrrAB two-component regulatory system. Data presented support a model wherein SrrAB-dependent biofilm formation occurs in response to the accumulation of reduced menaquinone. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23845.001 PMID:28221135

  12. The Effect of a Silver Nanoparticle Polysaccharide System on Streptococcal and Saliva-Derived Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigina Cellini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we studied the antimicrobial properties of a nanocomposite system based on a lactose-substituted chitosan and silver nanoparticles: Chitlac-nAg. Twofold serial dilutions of the colloidal Chitlac-nAg solution were both tested on Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Streptococcus oralis planktonic phase and biofilm growth mode as well as on saliva samples. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of Chitlac-nAg were evaluated together with its effect on sessile cell viability, as well as both on biofilm formation and on preformed biofilm. In respect to the planktonic bacteria, Chitlac-nAg showed an inhibitory/bactericidal effect against all streptococcal strains at 0.1% (v/v, except for S. mitis ATCC 6249 that was inhibited at one step less. On preformed biofilm, Chitlac-nAg at a value of 0.2%, was able to inhibit the bacterial growth on the supernatant phase as well as on the mature biofilm. For S. mitis ATCC 6249, the biofilm inhibitory concentration of Chitlac-nAg was 0.1%. At sub-inhibitory concentrations, the Streptococcal strains adhesion capability on a polystyrene surface showed a general reduction following a concentration-dependent-way; a similar effect was obtained for the metabolic biofilm activity. From these results, Chitlac-nAg seems to be a promising antibacterial and antibiofilm agent able to hinder plaque formation.

  13. Silver nanoparticles impede the biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; BarathManiKanth, Selvaraj; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Deepak, Venkataraman; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-09-01

    Biofilms are ensued due to bacteria that attach to surfaces and aggregate in a hydrated polymeric matrix. Formation of these sessile communities and their inherent resistance to anti-microbial agents are the source of many relentless and chronic bacterial infections. Such biofilms are responsible play a major role in development of ocular related infectious diseases in human namely microbial keratitis. Different approaches have been used for preventing biofilm related infections in health care settings. Many of these methods have their own demerits that include chemical based complications; emergent antibiotic resistant strains, etc. silver nanoparticles are renowned for their influential anti-microbial activity. Hence the present study over the biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles, exhibited a potential anti-biofilm activity that was tested in vitro on biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis during 24-h treatment. Treating these organisms with silver nanoparticles resulted in more than 95% inhibition in biofilm formation. The inhibition was known to be invariable of the species tested. As a result this study demonstrates the futuristic application of silver nanoparticles in treating microbial keratitis based on its potential anti-biofilm activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel microfluidic system for online monitoring of biofilm dynamics by electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schwartz, Thomas; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation is ubiquitous in nature where microorganisms attach to surfaces and form highly adapted and protected communities. In technical and industrial systems like drinking water supply, food production or shipping industry biofilms are a major cause of product contamination, biofouling, and biocorrosion. Therefore, understanding of biofilm formation and means of preventing biofilm formation is important to develop novel biofilm treatment strategies. A system allowing directly online detection and monitoring biofilm formation is necessary. However, until today, there are little to none technical systems featuring a non-destructive real-time characterization of biofilm formation in a highthroughput manner. This paper presents such a microfluidic system based on electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperomertic current measurement. The sensor consists of four modules, each housing 24 independent electrodes within 12 microfluidic channels. Attached biomass on the electrodes is monitored as increased inhibition in charge transfer by EIS and a change in metabolic activity is measured as change in produced electric current by amperometry. This modular sensor system is highly adaptable and suitable for a broad range of microbiological applications. Among others, biofilm formation processes can be characterized online, biofilm manipulation like inactivation or destabilization can be monitored in real-time and gene expression can be analyzed in parallel. The use of different electrode designs allows effective biofilm studies during all biofilm phases. The whole system was recently extended by an integrated pneumatic microfluidic pump which enables easy handling procedures. Further developments of this pumping module will allow a fully- automated computer-controlled valving and pumping.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species ( i.e. , multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  17. Predicting adhesion and biofilm formation boundaries on stainless steel surfaces by five Salmonella enterica strains belonging to different serovars as a function of pH, temperature and NaCl concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Juliana O; Cruz, Ellen A; Souza, Enio G F; Oliveira, Tereza C M; Alvarenga, Verônica O; Peña, Wilmer E L; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Magnani, Marciane

    2018-05-26

    This study aimed to assess the capability of 97 epidemic S. enterica strains belonging to 18 serovars to form biofilm. Five strains characterized as strong biofilm-producers, belonging to distinct serovars (S. Enteritidis 132, S. Infantis 176, S. Typhimurium 177, S. Heidelberg 281 and S. Corvallis 297) were assayed for adhesion/biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces. The experiments were conducted in different combinations of NaCl (0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10% w/v), pH (4, 5, 6 and 7) and temperatures (8 °C, 12 °C, 20 °C and 35 °C). Only adhesion was assumed to occur when S. enterica counts were ≥3 and biofilm formation was defined as when the counts were ≥5 log CFU/cm 2 . The binary responses were used to develop models to predict the probability of adhesion/biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces by five strains belonging to different S. enterica serovars. A total of 99% (96/97) of the tested S. enterica strains were characterized as biofilm-producers in the microtiter plate assays. The ability to form biofilm varied (P biofilm-producers, 21% (20/96), 45% (43/96), and 35% (34/96) were weak, moderate and strong biofilm-producers, respectively. The capability for adhesion/biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces under the experimental conditions studied varied among the strains studied, and distinct secondary models were obtained to describe the behavior of the five S. enterica tested. All strains showed adhesion at pH 4 up to 4% of NaCl and at 20 °C and 35 °C. The probability of adhesion decreased when NaCl concentrations were >8% and at 8 °C, as well as in pH values ≤ 5 and NaCl concentrations > 6%, for all tested strains. At pH 7 and 6, biofilm formation for S. Enteritidis, S. Infantis, S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg was observed up to 6% of NaCl at 35 °C and 20 °C. The predicted boundaries for adhesion were pH values biofilm formation, the predicted boundaries were pH values biofilm formation

  18. Early staphylococcal biofilm formation on solid orthopaedic implant materials: in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Koseki

    Full Text Available Biofilms forming on the surface of biomaterials can cause intractable implant-related infections. Bacterial adherence and early biofilm formation are influenced by the type of biomaterial used and the physical characteristics of implant surface. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, the main pathogen in implant-related infections, to form biofilms on the surface of the solid orthopaedic biomaterials, oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy (Co-Cr-Mo, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V, commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti and stainless steel. A bacterial suspension of Staphylococcus epidermidis strain RP62A (ATCC35984 was added to the surface of specimens and incubated. The stained biofilms were imaged with a digital optical microscope and the biofilm coverage rate (BCR was calculated. The total amount of biofilm was determined with the crystal violet assay and the number of viable cells in the biofilm was counted using the plate count method. The BCR of all the biomaterials rose in proportion to culture duration. After culturing for 2-4 hours, the BCR was similar for all materials. However, after culturing for 6 hours, the BCR for Co-Cr-Mo alloy was significantly lower than for Ti-6Al-4V, cp-Ti and stainless steel (P0.05. These results suggest that surface properties, such as hydrophobicity or the low surface free energy of Co-Cr-Mo, may have some influence in inhibiting or delaying the two-dimensional expansion of biofilm on surfaces with a similar degree of smoothness.

  19. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  20. Determination of biofilm production by Candida tropicalis isolated from hospitalized patients and its relation to cellular surface hydrophobicity, plastic adherence and filamentation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Ladero, M A; Blanco-Blanco, M T; Hurtado, C; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Blanco, M T; Gómez-García, A C

    2013-09-01

    Candida tropicalis is an emerging virulent species. The aim of this study is to determine the biofilm-forming ability of 29 strains of C. tropicalis isolated from inpatients, and to examine its relation with other virulence factors such as cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH), immediate (15 min, IA) and late (24 h, LA) plastic adherence and filamentation ability. The study was performed in parallel using two incubation temperatures - 37 and 22 °C - to determine the effect of growth temperature variations on these pathogenic attributes of C. tropicalis. Biofilm formation (BF) was measured by optical density (OD) and by XTT reduction (XTT); Slime index (SI), which includes growth as a correction factor in BF, was calculated in both methods. All strains were hydrophobic and adherent - at 15 min and 24 h - at both temperatures, with higher values for 22 °C; the adhered basal yeast layer appears to be necessary to achieve subsequent development of biofilm. Filamentation ability varied from 76.2% of strains at 37 °C to 26.6% at 22 °C. All C. tropicalis strains were biofilm producers, with similar results obtained using OD determination and XTT measurement to evaluation methods; SI is useful when good growth is not presented. BF at 37 °C was similar at 24 h and 96 h incubation; conversely, at 22 °C, the highest number of biofilm-producing strains was detected at 96 h. CSH is an important pathogenic factor which is involved in adherence, is influenced by the filamentation of yeast, and plays a critical role in BF. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Formation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms in the presence of hydrogen peroxide; the effect of the AiiA gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliuta, V A; Andreenko, Iu V; Kuznetsov, A E; Khmel', I A

    2013-01-01

    In the natural ecosystems, most bacteria exist as specifically organized biofilms attached to various surfaces; the biofilms have a complex architecture and are surrounded by an exopolymeric matrix. The bacteria in the biofilms are extremely resistant to antibacterial agents. The ability of the pathogenic bacteria to produce biofilms causes serious problems in medicine. Therefore, the study of the action of different compounds with antibacterial activity is of great interest. In this work, we studied the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the formation of biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. It was shown that H2O2 in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth (or suppress it only weakly) stimulates the formation of the biofilms. At higher concentrations, H2O2 inhibits the formation of the biofilms. In order to determine if the stimulation of the biofilm formation depends on Quorum Sensing (QS) regulation, the plasmid pME6863 containing the heterologous gene aiiA encoding the N-acyl-homoserine lactonase AiiA was introduced into P. aeruginosa PAO1. The synthesis by cells of this enzyme degrading N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), signaling molecules of the QS systems, led to the absence of the stimulation of the biofilm formation by the action of H2O2. This fact indicates that the stimulation of the biofilm formation in the presence of H2O2 depends on the functioning of the QS systems of the gene expression regulation of P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm removal by targeting biofilm-associated extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Methods: Biofilm assay was done in 96-well microtitre plate to evaluate the effect of proteinase K on biofilms of bovine mastitis S. Aureus isolates. Extracellular polymeric substances were extracted and evaluated for their composition (protein, polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, before and after the proteinase K treatment. Results: Biofilm assay showed that 2 μg/ml proteinase K significantly inhibited biofilm development in bap-positive S. aureus V329 as well as other S. aureus isolates (SA7, SA10, SA33, SA352, but not in bap-mutant M556 and SA392 (a weak biofilm-producing strain. Proteinase K treatment on S. aureus planktonic cells showed that there was no inhibition of planktonic growth up to 32 μg/ml of proteinase K. Proteinase K treatment on 24 h old preformed biofilms showed an enhanced dispersion of bap-positive V329 and SA7, SA10, SA33 and SA352 biofilms; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-mutant S. aureus M556 and SA392 biofilms. Biofilm compositions study before and after proteinase K treatment indicated that Bap might also be involved in eDNA retention in the biofilm matrix that aids in biofilm stability. When proteinase K was used in combination with antibiotics, a synergistic effect in antibiotic efficacy was observed against all biofilm-forming S. aureus isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Proteinase K inhibited biofilms growth in S. aureus bovine mastitis isolates but did not affect their planktonic growth. An enhanced dispersion of preformed S. aureus biofilms was observed on proteinase K treatment. Proteinase K treatment with antibiotics showed a synergistic effect against S. aureus biofilms. The study suggests that dispersing S. aureus by protease can be of use while devising strategies againstS. aureus biofilms.

  3. Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobials against Biofilm Bacteria on Hard, Non-Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the availability of two test methods (MB-19 and MB-20) for evaluating the efficacy of antimicrobial pesticides against two biofilm bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

  4. Effects of Shifts in Cell Surface Properties on Adhesion and Activity in Engineered Bioluminescent Bacteria in Biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, David

    1997-01-01

    ... (again increasing in strain Idaho and decreasing in strain MW1200). Possibly due to the alteration in LPS structure, stable biofilms of strain Idaho formed more quickly in the presence of solvent than was observed in the absence of solvent...

  5. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewski, Kristen M; Nistico, Laura; Longwell, Mark J; Hynes, Matthew J; Maurer, Joshua A; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2013-05-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with long alkyl chains terminated with hydrophobic (-CH3) or hydrophilic (oligoethylene glycol) tail groups were used to form coatings and in an orthogonal approach, SAMs were used to immobilize gentamicin or vancomycin on SS316L