WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface water kinetics

  1. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  2. Effects of fractal surface on rheological behavior and combustion kinetics of modified brown coal water slurries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifang Gao; Shuquan Zhu; Mingdong Zheng; Zhaojin Wu; Huihong Lu; Weiming Liu

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports the effects of surface fractal structures on the rheological behavior and combustion kinetics of raw brown coal and three modified coal water slurries (CWSs). The results show that the fractal structures and physicochemical properties of samples are dependent on various modification processes. The apparent viscosities of the coal water slurries increase with increasing surface fractal dimensions (D), especially with decreasing shear rates. Fur-thermore, it has been proved that the ignition temperatures and apparent activation energies of modified CWSs are lower than that of raw coal water slurry. Compared with the traditional qualitative analysis of the effect of pore structures on CWSs properties, D can more efficiently indicate the quantificational effect of pore structures on the rheological behavior and combustion kinetics of CWSs.

  3. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. van der Grift

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater to surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we investigated Fe(II oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than one week before complete oxidation of Fe(II is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilisation of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II oxidation proces which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II is competly depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III-phosphates at redox gradients

  4. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in s

  5. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, van der B.; Rozemeijer, J.C.; Griffioen, J.; Velde, van der Y.

    2014-01-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and 5 P immobilization along the flow-path fro

  6. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from

  7. Degradation kinetics of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in surface waters: photolysis vs biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Nogueras, Rosa María; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2017-07-15

    Poor removal of many pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in sewage treatment leads to their discharge into the receiving waters, where they may cause negative effects. Their elimination from the water column depends of several processes, including photochemical and biological degradation. We have focused this research on comparing the degradation kinetics of a wide number (n=33) of frequently detected PPCPs considering different types of water, pH and solar irradiation. For those compounds that were susceptible of photodegradation, their rates (k) varied from 0.02 to 30.48h(-1) at pH7, with the lowest values for antihypertensive and psychiatric drugs (t1/2>1000h). Modification of the pH turned into faster disappearance of most of the PPCPs (e.g., k=0.072 and 0.066h(-1) for atenolol and carbamazepine at pH4, respectively). On the other hand, biodegradation was enhanced by marine bacteria in many cases, for example for mefenamic acid, caffeine and triclosan (k=0.019, 0.01 and 0.04h(-1), respectively), and was faster for anionic surfactants. Comparing photodegradation and biodegradation processes, hydrochlorothiazide and diclofenac, both not biodegradable, were eliminated exclusively by irradiation (t1/2=0.15-0.43h and t1/2=0.14-0.17h, respectively). Salicylic acid and phenylbutazone were efficiently photo (t1/2<3h) and biodegraded (t1/2=116-158h), whereas some compounds such as ibuprofen, carbamazepine and atenolol had low degradation rates by any of the processes tested (t1/2=23-2310h), making then susceptible to persist in the aquatic media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. What determines water-bridge lifetimes at the surface of DNA? Insight from systematic molecular dynamics analysis of water kinetics for various DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    The lifetime during which a water molecule resides at the surface of a biomolecule varies according to the hydration site. What determines this variety of lifetimes? Despite many previous studies, there is still no uniform picture quantitatively explaining this phenomenon. Here we calculate the lifetime for a particular hydration pattern in the DNA minor groove, the water bridge, for various DNA sequences to show that the water-bridge lifetime varies from 1 to ~300ps in a sequence-dependent manner. We find that it follows 1/k(V(step))P(m), where P(m) and V(step) are two crucial factors, namely the probability of forming a specific hydrogen bond in which more than one donor atom participates, and the structural fluctuation of DNA, respectively. This relationship provides a picture of the water kinetics with atomistic detail and shows that water dissociation occurs when a particular hydrogen-bonding pattern appears. The rate constant of water dissociation k can be described as a function of the structural fluctuations of DNA. This picture is consistent with the model of Laage and Hynes proposing that hydrogen-bond switching occurs when an unusual number of hydrogen bonds are formed. The two new factors suggested here are discussed in the context of the surface's geometry and electrostatic nature, which were previously proposed as the determinants of water lifetimes.

  9. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  10. A photocatalytic reaction kinetics model based on electrical double layer theory(Ⅰ)--Surface complexation model at TiO2/water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新军; 李芳柏; 何明兴; 王良焱; 徐悦华; 黄琮

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of photocatalysis can be us ually described by Langmiur-H inshelwood adsorption expression. The adsorption can be greatly influenced by the surface properties of photocatalyst. Triple layer model (TLM) was chosen to describe the surface adsorption of TiO2 based on electrical double layer (EDL) theory at the TiO2/water interface. And through the potentiometrictit ration the parameters of TLM were determined by the extrapolation method and Fit eql3.1 software. The results show that surface complexation dominates the surfac e charge and the numerical calculation fits the experiment data satisfactorily.

  11. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon mixtures in surface waters at environmentally relevant levels - Effect of inoculum origin on kinetics and sequence of degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Hammershøj, Rikke Høst; Comber, Mike

    2017-01-01

    potentially impacting the observed biodegradation kinetics. In this study we investigated the effect of inoculum origin on the biodegradation kinetics of hydrocarbons for five inocula from surface waters varying in urbanization and thus expected pre-exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. A new biodegradation......Biodegradation is a dominant removal process for many organic pollutants, and biodegradation tests serve as tools for assessing their environmental fate within regulatory risk assessment. In simulation tests, the inoculum is not standardized, varying in microbial quantity and quality, thereby...... in four of the five waters but lower in water from a rural lake. The sequence of degradation between the 9 hydrocarbons showed similar patterns in the five waters indicating the potential for using selected hydrocarbons for benchmarking between biodegradation tests. Degradation half-times were shorter...

  12. Survival Kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on a Plastic Surface at Low Relative Humidity and on Low-Water Activity Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokunan, Hidekazu; Koyama, Kento; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the survival kinetics of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli under various water activity (aw) conditions to elucidate the net effect of aw on pathogen survival kinetics and to pursue the development of a predictive model of pathogen survival as a function of aw. Four serotypes of S. enterica (Stanley, Typhimurium, Chester, and Oranienburg) and three serotypes of enterohemorrhagic E. coli ( E. coli O26, E. coli O111, and E. coli O157:H7) were examined. These bacterial strains were inoculated on a plastic plate surface at a constant relative humidity (RH) (22, 43, 58, 68, or 93% RH, corresponding to the aw) or on a surface of almond kernels (aw 0.58), chocolate (aw 0.43), radish sprout seeds (aw 0.58), or Cheddar cheese (aw 0.93) at 5, 15, or 25°C for up to 11 months. Under most conditions, the survival kinetics were nonlinear with tailing regardless of the storage aw, temperature, and bacterial strain. For all bacterial serotypes, there were no apparent differences in pathogen survival kinetics on the plastic surface at a given storage temperature among the tested RH conditions, except for the 93% RH condition. Most bacterial serotypes were rapidly inactivated on Cheddar cheese when stored at 5°C compared with their inactivation on chocolate, almonds, and radish sprout seeds. Distinct trends in bacterial survival kinetics were also observed between almond kernels and radish sprout seeds, even though the aws of these two foods were not significantly different. The survival kinetics of bacteria inoculated on the plastic plate surface showed little correspondence to those of bacteria inoculated on food matrices at an identical aw. Thus, these results demonstrated that, for low-aw foods and/or environments, aw alone is insufficient to account for the survival kinetics of S. enterica and enterohemorrhagic E. coli .

  13. APEX (Aqueous Photochemistry of Environmentally occurring Xenobiotics): a free software tool to predict the kinetics of photochemical processes in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrato, Marco; Vione, Davide

    2014-04-01

    The APEX software predicts the photochemical transformation kinetics of xenobiotics in surface waters as a function of: photoreactivity parameters (direct photolysis quantum yield and second-order reaction rate constants with transient species, namely ˙OH, CO₃(-)˙, (1)O₂ and the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, (3)CDOM*), water chemistry (nitrate, nitrite, bicarbonate, carbonate, bromide and dissolved organic carbon, DOC), and water depth (more specifically, the optical path length of sunlight in water). It applies to well-mixed surface water layers, including the epilimnion of stratified lakes, and the output data are average values over the considered water column. Based on intermediate formation yields from the parent compound via the different photochemical pathways, the software can also predict intermediate formation kinetics and overall yield. APEX is based on a photochemical model that has been validated against available field data of pollutant phototransformation, with good agreement between model predictions and field results. The APEX software makes allowance for different levels of knowledge of a photochemical system. For instance, the absorption spectrum of surface water can be used if known, or otherwise it can be modelled from the values of DOC. Also the direct photolysis quantum yield can be entered as a detailed wavelength trend, as a single value (constant or average), or it can be defined as a variable if unknown. APEX is based on the free software Octave. Additional applications are provided within APEX to assess the σ-level uncertainty of the results and the seasonal trend of photochemical processes.

  14. Freezing Kinetics in Overcompressed Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Reaugh, J; Reisman, D

    2006-09-27

    We report high pressure dynamic compression experiments of liquid water along a quasi-adiabatic path leading to the formation of ice VII. We observe dynamic features resembling Van der Waals loops and find that liquid water is compacted to a metastable state close to the ice density before the onset of crystallization. By analyzing the characteristic kinetic time scale involved we estimate the nucleation barrier and conclude that liquid water has been compressed to a high pressure state close to its thermodynamic stability limit.

  15. Desorption Kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, Methane, Ethane, and Propane from Graphene and Amorphous Solid Water Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-03-03

    The desorption kinetics for Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, methane, ethane, and propane from grapheme covered Pt(111) and amorphous solid water (ASW) surfaces are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TPD spectra for all of the adsorbates from graphene have well-resolved first, second, third, and multi- layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent the zero-order desorption for all of the adsorbates. An Arrhenius analysis is used to obtain desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from graphene for all of the adsorbates. In contrast, the leading desorption edges for the adsorbates from ASW do not align (for coverages < 2 ML). The non-alignment of TPD leading edges suggests that there are multiple desorption binding sites on the ASW surface. Inversion analysis is used to obtain the coverage dependent desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from ASW for all of the adsorbates.

  16. Photochemical transformation of anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol in surface waters: laboratory and model assessment of the degradation kinetics, and comparison with field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Babita; De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2012-06-01

    Anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol (NCP) may occur in surface waters as a nitroderivative of 4-chlorophenol, which is a transformation intermediate of the herbicide dichlorprop. Here we show that NCP would undergo efficient photochemical transformation in environmental waters, mainly by direct photolysis and reaction with OH. NCP has a polychromatic photolysis quantum yield Φ(NCP)=(1.27±0.22)·10(-5), a rate constant with OH k(NCP,)(OH)=(1.09±0.09)·10(10) M(-1) s(-1), a rate constant with (1)O(2)k(NCP,1O2)=(2.15±0.38)·10(7) M(-1) s(-1), a rate constant with the triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate k(NCP,3AQ2S*)=(5.90±0.43)·10(8) M(-1) s(-1), and is poorly reactive toward CO(3)(-). The k(NCP,3AQ2S*) value is representative of reaction with the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The inclusion of photochemical reactivity data into a model of surface-water photochemistry allowed the NCP transformation kinetics to be predicted as a function of water chemical composition and column depth. Very good agreement between model predictions and field data was obtained for the shallow lagoons of the Rhône delta (Southern France).

  17. Photochemical transformation of anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol in surface waters: Laboratory and model assessment of the degradation kinetics, and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Babita [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering, Calcutta University, 92 Acharya P. C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vione, Davide [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Anionic 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol (NCP) may occur in surface waters as a nitroderivative of 4-chlorophenol, which is a transformation intermediate of the herbicide dichlorprop. Here we show that NCP would undergo efficient photochemical transformation in environmental waters, mainly by direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH. NCP has a polychromatic photolysis quantum yield {Phi}{sub NCP} = (1.27 {+-} 0.22) {center_dot} 10{sup -5}, a rate constant with {center_dot}OH k{sub NCP,}{center_dot}{sub OH} = (1.09 {+-} 0.09) {center_dot} 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with {sup 1}O{sub 2}k{sub NCP,1O2} = (2.15 {+-} 0.38) {center_dot} 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a rate constant with the triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} = (5.90 {+-} 0.43) {center_dot} 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and is poorly reactive toward CO{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}. The k{sub NCP,3AQ2S*} value is representative of reaction with the triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The inclusion of photochemical reactivity data into a model of surface-water photochemistry allowed the NCP transformation kinetics to be predicted as a function of water chemical composition and column depth. Very good agreement between model predictions and field data was obtained for the shallow lagoons of the Rhone delta (Southern France). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phototransformation kinetics of 2-nitro-4-chlorophenol, relevant to surface waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of photochemical reactivity data in the laboratory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model approach to combine photochemical reactivity with environmental variables. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement with field data in lagoon water (Rhone delta, Southern France). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct photolysis and reaction with {center_dot}OH as main photoprocesses in the environment.

  18. Kinetic Monte Carlo investigation of pit formation at the CaCO 3(101¯4) surface-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, J. M.; LaFemina, John P.

    1997-03-01

    On the basis of quantitative information derived from atomic-force microscopy (AFM) studies of shallow pit formation at the CaCO 3(101¯4) surface-water interface in the surface-reaction regime, we have developed a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model which reproduces quantitatively the experimental behaviour of the time-evolution of the pits. This allows the rates of all the important elementary atomistic processes involved in the dissolution to be obtained, rates not readily obtainable directly from AFM data. The KMC model also provides important insight into the evolution of very small pits, which in principle can be resolved using AFM, but which in practice are very difficult to observe because of the low probability of their occurrence in the microscope scan area. The KMC simulations show that the growing pits exhibit two different growth regimes, in agreement with the predictions of a simple terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model. For very small pits the linear pit size increases exponentially with time and the pit edges accelerate (double-kink self-annihilation regime). Having attained a certain pit size (˜25 nm for a temperature of 300 K), thereafter the pit sizes increase linearly with time, the pit edges maintaining a constant velocity (kink-kink annihilation regime). A comparison of the quantitative predictions of the TLK model with KMC simulations shows that, in spite of its simplicity, the TLK model provides a satisfactory semi-quantitative description of the pit evolution. The KMC model presented provides the starting point for the development of a more comprehensive model of the calcite-water interface which will include the effects of adsorbates and other variations in interface conditions. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Influence of surface charge on wetting kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puah, Lee San; Sedev, Rossen; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Blake, Terry

    2010-11-16

    The wettability of a titania surface, partially covered with octadecyltrihydrosilane, has been investigated as a function of solution pH. The results show that surface charge affects both static wettability and wetting kinetics. The static contact angle decreases above and below the point of zero charge of the titania surface in a Lippman-like manner as the pH is altered. The dependence of dynamic contact angle on velocity is also affected by pH. The molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) is used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data. The frequency of molecular displacement κ(0) strongly varies with surface charge, whereas the mean molecular displacement length λ is essentially unaffected. There is an exponential dependence of contact-line friction upon work of adhesion, which is varied simply by altering the pH.

  20. Effect of morphology of hydrophobic surfaces on cavitation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUZAR,ALENKA; LEUNG,KEVIN

    2000-04-24

    Cavitation has been suggested to be a possible source of long range interactions between mesoscopic hydrophobic surfaces. While evaporation is predicted by thermodynamics, little is known about its kinetics. Glauber dynamics Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice gas close to liquid-gas coexistence and confined between partially drying surfaces are used to model the effect of water confinement on the dynamics of surface-induced phase transition. Specifically, they examine how kinetics of induced evaporation change as the texture of hydrophobic surfaces is varied. Evaporation rates are considerably slowed with relatively small amount of hydrophilic coverage. However, the distribution of hydrophilic patches is found to be crucial, with the homogeneous one being much more effective in slowing the formation of vapor tubes which triggers the evaporation process. They estimate the free energy barrier of vapor tube formation via transition state theory, using a constrained forward-backward umbrella sampling technique applied to the metastable, confined liquid. Furthermore, to relate simulation rates to experimental ones, they perform simulations using the mass-conserving Kawasaki algorithm. They predict evaporation time scales that range from hundreds of picoseconds in the case of mesoscopic surfaces {approximately} 10{sup 4} nm{sup 2} to tens of nanoseconds for smaller surfaces {approximately} 40 nm{sup 2}, when the two surfaces are {approximately} 10 solvent layers apart. The present study demonstrates that cavitation is kinetically viable in real systems and should be considered in studies of processes at confined geometry.

  1. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  2. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  3. Reaction kinetics of fluorite in flow systems and surface chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣华; 胡书敏

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic experiments of fluorite in water-HCl solution in an open-flow system at the temperatures ≤100℃ reveal that the variation of flow rate (U) can change the reaction rate orders from 0 to 2 or higher. In the far from equilibrium systems, the dissolution rates of fluorite in aqueous solutions have a zero order.The reaction rates are controlled by pH values of input solutions. In fact, the reaction rates are related to the concentrations of the active sites occupied by H+ on fluorite surface [SOH]. X-ray photospectroscopy observations on fluorite surface before and after reaction indicate that surface chemical processes control the reaction rates: Cl- cations attach on and enter into surface of fluorite besides H+ when fluorites react with HCl solutions, which affect the reaction rates.

  4. Water on graphene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  5. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  6. Effect of operational and water quality parameters on conventional ozonation and the advanced oxidation process O3/H2O2: Kinetics of micropollutant abatement, transformation product and bromate formation in a surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgin, Marc; Borowska, Ewa; Helbing, Jakob; Hollender, Juliane; Kaiser, Hans-Peter; Kienle, Cornelia; McArdell, Christa S; Simon, Eszter; von Gunten, Urs

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of ozone-based processes under various conditions was studied for the treatment of a surface water (Lake Zürich water, Switzerland) spiked with 19 micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, industrial chemical, X-ray contrast medium, sweetener) each at 1 μg L(-1). Two pilot-scale ozonation reactors (4-5 m(3) h(-1)), a 4-chamber reactor and a tubular reactor, were investigated by either conventional ozonation and/or the advanced oxidation process (AOP) O3/H2O2. The effects of selected operational parameters, such as ozone dose (0.5-3 mg L(-1)) and H2O2 dose (O3:H2O2 = 1:3-3:1 (mass ratio)), and selected water quality parameters, such as pH (6.5-8.5) and initial bromide concentration (15-200 μg L(-1)), on micropollutant abatement and bromate formation were investigated. Under the studied conditions, compounds with high second-order rate constants kO3>10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for their reaction with ozone were well abated (>90%) even for the lowest ozone dose of 0.5 mg L(-1). Conversely, the abatement efficiency of sucralose, which only reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH), varied between 19 and 90%. Generally, the abatement efficiency increased with higher ozone doses and higher pH and lower bromide concentrations. H2O2 addition accelerated the ozone conversion to OH, which enables a faster abatement of ozone-resistant micropollutants. Interestingly, the abatement of micropollutants decreased with higher bromide concentrations during conventional ozonation due to competitive ozone-consuming reactions, except for lamotrigine, due to the suspected reaction of HOBr/OBr(-) with the primary amine moieties. In addition to the abatement of micropollutants, the evolution of the two main transformation products (TPs) of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and tramadol (TRA), chlorothiazide (CTZ) and tramadol N-oxide (TRA-NOX), respectively, was assessed by chemical analysis and kinetic modeling. Both selected TPs were quickly formed initially to reach a

  7. Unsteady mixed flows in non uniform closed water pipes: a Full Kinetic Appraoch

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdarias, Christian; Gerbi, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    We recall the \\PFS} model constructed for the modeling of unsteady mixed flows in closed water pipes where transition points between the free surface and pressurized flow are treated as a free boundary associated to a discontinuity of the gradient of pressure. Then we present a numerical kinetic scheme for the computations of unsteady mixed flows in closed water pipes. This kinetic method that we call FKA for "Full Kinetic Approach" is an easy and mathematically elegant way to deal with multiple transition points when the changes of state between free surface and pressurized flow occur. We use two approaches namely the "ghost waves approach" and the "Full Kinetic Approach" to treat these transition points. We show that this kinetic numerical scheme has the following properties: it is wet area conservative, under a CFL condition it preserves the wet area positive, it treats "naturally" the drying and flooding area and most of all it preserves every stationary flow. Finally numerical experiment versus laborator...

  8. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional...... mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have...... not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water.In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical...

  9. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-08-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  10. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  11. Water vapor interactions with polycrystalline titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, A.; Shamir, N.; Volterra, V.; Mintz, M. H.

    1999-02-01

    The initial interactions of water vapor with polycrystalline titanium surfaces were studied at room temperature. Measurements of water vapor surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analysis system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry (DRS), Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The kinetics of accommodation of the water dissociation fragments (H, O and OH) displayed a complex behavior depending not only on the exposure dose but also on the exposure pressure. For a given exposure dose the efficiency of chemisorption increased with increasing exposure pressure. DRS measurements indicated the occurrence of clustered hydroxyl moieties with tilted O-H bonds formed even at very low surface coverage. A model which assumes two parallel routes of chemisorption, by direct collisions (Langmuir type) and by a precursor state is proposed to account for the observed behavior. The oxidation efficiency of water seemed to be much lower than that of oxygen. No Ti 4+ states were detected even at high water exposure values. It is likely that hydroxyl species play an important role in the reduced oxidation efficiency of water.

  12. Adsorption kinetics of organophosphonic acids on plasma-modified oxide-covered aluminum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, M; Thissen, P; Grundmeier, G

    2008-08-19

    Tailoring of oxide chemistry on aluminum by means of low-pressure water and argon plasma surface modification was performed to influence the kinetics of the self-assembly process of octadecylphosphonic acid monolayers. The plasma-induced surface chemistry was studied by in situ FTIR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Ex situ IRRAS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of the adsorbed self-assembled monolayers. The plasma-induced variation of the hydroxide to oxide ratio led to different adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid from dilute ethanol solutions as measured by means of a quartz crystal microbalance. Water plasma treatment caused a significant increase in the density of surface hydroxyl groups in comparison to that of the argon-plasma-treated surface. The hydroxyl-rich surface led to significantly accelerated adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid with a time of monolayer formation of less than 1 min. On the contrary, decreasing the surface hydroxyl density slowed the adsorption kinetics.

  13. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  14. Interpolated lattice Boltzmann boundary conditions for surface reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D C; Saar, M O

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a method for implementing surface reaction kinetics in lattice Boltzmann simulations. The interpolated boundary conditions are capable of simulating surface reactions and dissolution at both stationary and moving solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Results obtained with the boundary conditions are compared to analytical solutions for first-order and constant-flux kinetic surface reactions in a one-dimensional half space, as well as to the analytical solution for evaporation from the surface of a cylinder. Excellent agreement between analytical and simulated results is obtained for a wide range of diffusivities, lattice velocities, and surface reaction rates. The boundary model's ability to represent dissolution in binary fluid mixtures is demonstrated by modeling diffusion from a rising bubble and dissolution of a droplet near a flat plate.

  15. LSM Microelectrodes: Kinetics and Surface Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanum strontium manganite microelectrodes with the nominal composition of (La0.75Sr0.25)0.95MnO3 and a thickness of ca 500 nm was electrochemically characterized in situ at temperatures from 660 to 850◦C using a controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope. Impedance...... spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed on electrodes with diameters of 20–100 μm in oxygen, air and nitrogen both at open circuit voltage and at anodic and cathodic polarization. In situ conductance mapping, ex situ surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and scanning...

  16. Degradation Kinetics of Petroleum Contaminants in Soil-Water Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xilai; WANG Bingchen; LI Yuying; XIA Wenxiang

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of site investigation and sample collection of petroleum contaminants in the soil-water-crop system in the Shenyang-Fushun sewage irrigation area, the physical-chemical-biological compositions of the unsaturated zone is analyzed systematically in this paper. At the same time, the degradation kinetics of residual and aqueous oils is determined through biodegradation tests. The studies show that dominant microorganisms have been formed in the soils after long-term sewage irrigation. The microorganisms mainly include bacteria, and a few of fungus and actinomycetes.After a 110-days' biodegradation test, the degradation rate of residual oil is 9.74%-10.63%, while the degradation rate of aqueous oil reaches 62.43%. This indicates that the degradation rate of low-carbon aqueous oil is higher than that of highcarbon residual oil. In addition, although microbial degradation of petroleum contaminants in soils is suitable to the firstorder kinetics equation, the half-lives of aqueous oil, No. 20 heavy diesel and residual oil in the surface soils (L2-1, S1-1 and X1-1) are 1732 h, 3465 h and 17325 h, respectively.

  17. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the low...

  18. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  19. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  20. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  1. Kinetic model of water vapour adsorption by gluten-free starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocieczek, Aneta; Kostek, Robert; Ruszkowska, Millena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch molecules derived from wheat. The aim of the study was to determine an equation that would allow estimation of water content in tested material in any timepoint of the adsorption process aimed at settling a balance with the environment. An adsorption isotherm of water vapour on starch granules was drawn. The parameters of the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer equation were determined by characterizing the tested product and adsorption process. The equation of kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch was determined based on the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer model describing the state of equilibrium and on the model of a first-order linear inert element describing the changes in water content over time.

  2. Water in the physiology of plant: thermodynamics and kinetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Cocucci

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular properties of water molecule determine its role in plant physiology. At molecular level the properties of water molecules determine the behaviour of other plant molecules; in particular its physic characteristics are important in the operativeness of macromolecules and in plant thermoregulation. Plant water supply primarily dependent on thermodynamics properties in particular water chemical potential and its components, more recently there are evidences that suggest an important role in the water kinetic characteristics, depending, at cell membrane level, in particular plasmalemma, on the presence of specific water channel, the aquaporines controlled in its activity by a number of physiological and biochemical factors. Thermodynamics and kinetic factors controlled by physiological, biochemical properties and molecular effectors, control water supply and level in plants to realize their survival, growth and differentiation and the consequent plant production.

  3. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    KAUST Repository

    Hisatomi, Takashi

    2014-10-16

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical processes in particulate semiconductors. This review article presents a brief introduction to photocatalysis, followed by kinetic aspects of the photocatalytic water-splitting reaction.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Kinetics of water adsorption on minerals and the breathing of the Martian regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P.; Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2010-10-01

    Several observations of the total amount of water vapor in Mars atmosphere display diurnal variations. A possible explanation is an atmosphere/surface coupling that occurs through H2O exchange with the regolith, where adsorbed water molecules have been proposed as a consequent water reservoir. In order to test this hypothesis, experimental laboratory measurements of adsorption isotherms are needed together with adsorption kinetics measurements. Following our previous measurements of the adsorption isotherms of a series of Mars surface analog materials, we report here on kinetics measurements on the same samples at a temperature of 243 K (volcanic tuff, dunite, ferrihydrite, smectite, JSC-Mars1). We observed that even for thin samples (1 mm), diffusion through the sample might influence the adsorption process and significant caution is required to infer kinetics parameters of strongly adsorbing samples. The kinetics parameters kd and dka/dP were extracted following the Langmuir theory. Results show that adsorption is fast but not instantaneous with regard to the diurnal time scale (kd = 10-2-10-3 s-1, dka/dP = 10-3-10-4 Pa-1 s-1). Large variations are found between the different samples, which suggest a possible geological control on the amount of exchangeable water between the regolith and the atmosphere. We estimate the impact of a noninstantaneous kinetics on the diurnal water vapor cycle by calculating the maximum amount of exchangeable water. We found that a significant amount of H2O can be trapped within the regolith, even in weakly adsorbing analog materials. The similarity in adsorption properties between the JSC-Mars1 and ferrihydrite samples suggests that the adsorption properties of the latter are controlled by the presence of iron oxyhydroxide. These materials have strong adsorption capacities, and their presence on the Martian surface might explain the observed spatial correlation between the average surface humidity and the abundance of surface dust.

  5. Investigation of contact-induced charging kinetics on variably modified glass surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, G., E-mail: agnellogp@corning.com [Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States); Hamilton, J.; Manley, R.; Streltsova, E. [Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); LaCourse, W.; Cormack, A. [New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Flat glass surfaces with different treatments were assessed for contact charge behavior. • Charging kinetics are believed to be highly dependent on surface reactivity with atmospheric water. • A proton driven model is proposed to account for charge transfer in metal–glass contact systems. - Abstract: The accumulation and dissipation of electrical charge on glass surfaces is of considerable academic and industrial interest. The purpose of the present article, is to report on the differences in charging kinetics of several flat alumina-borosilicate (low alkali content) glass surfaces via a rolling sphere test (RST) [1] that have been physically and/or chemically modified by different approaches and exposed to variable environmental conditions (i.e. relative humidity). Methods used for surface modification include chemical etching (HF based chemistries of variable molarity) and plasma processing/thin film deposition (CH4 via Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) and/or Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (APPCVD)). Trends in glass surface charge rates, along with corresponding surface resistivity, energy and zeta potential measurements indicate that glass surface, and perhaps bulk, chemistry (specifically a surface’ reactivity/affinity with/to water) play critical roles in charge dynamics. Based on the results, we propose an ion-based transfer model facilitated by surface–water molecular interactions as the primary mechanism responsible for contact electrification in glass–metal contact systems.

  6. Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation in ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Vladimir G.; Malin, Timur V.; Galitsyn, Yurij G.; Shklyaev, Alexander A.; Zhuravlev, Konstantin S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation under an ammonia flux at different substrate temperatures are investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Two different stages of the nitridation process were revealed. The initial stage is the fast (within few seconds) formation of ordered two-dimensional SiN phase, occuring due to the topmost active surface Si atom (Sisurf) interaction with ammonia molecules. It is followed by the late stage consisting in the slow (within few minutes) amorphous Si3N4 phase formation as a result of the interaction of Si atoms in the lattice site (Siinc) with chemisorbed ammonia molecules. It was found that the ordered SiN phase formation rate decreases, as the temperature increases. The kinetic model of the initial stage was developed, in which the ordered SiN phase formation is the two-dimensional phase transition in the lattice gas with SiN cells. The enthalpy of the active surface Si atom generation on the clean Si(111) surface was estimated to be about 1.5 eV. In contrast, the amorphous Si3N4 phase formation is the normal (thermally activated) chemical process with the first-order kinetics, whose activation energy and pre-exponential factor are 2.4 eV and 108 1/s, respectively.

  7. Nonzero Ideal Gas Contribution to the Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Marcello; Fábián, Balázs; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2017-06-15

    Surface tension, the tendency of fluid interfaces to behave elastically and minimize their surface, is routinely calculated as the difference between the lateral and normal components of the pressure or, invoking isotropy in momentum space, of the virial tensor. Here we show that the anisotropy of the kinetic energy tensor close to a liquid-vapor interface can be responsible for a large part of its surface tension (about 15% for water, independent from temperature).

  8. NDMA formation kinetics from three pharmaceuticals in four water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ruqiao; Andrews, Susan A

    2011-11-01

    N, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging disinfection by-product (DBP) that has been widely detected in many drinking water systems and commonly associated with the chloramine disinfection process. Some amine-based pharmaceuticals have been demonstrated to form NDMA during chloramination, but studies regarding the reaction kinetics are largely lacking. This study investigates the NDMA formation kinetics from ranitidine, chlorphenamine, and doxylamine under practical chloramine disinfection conditions. The formation profile was monitored in both lab-grade water and real water matrices, and a statistical model is proposed to describe and predict the NDMA formation from selected pharmaceuticals in various water matrices. The results indicate the significant impact of water matrix components and reaction time on the NDMA formation from selected pharmaceuticals, and provide fresh insights on the estimation of ultimate NDMA formation potential from pharmaceutical precursors.

  9. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  10. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  11. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... facilitated by microbial enzyme activity. The model describes how the hydrogen peroxide removal declines and eventually stops at relatively low chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations. It is hypothesized that this is due to an enzyme deficit because it is destructed due to the reactive radicals created...

  12. Swelling kinetics of tea in hot water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhushan S; Farakte, Raosaheb A; Yadav, Geeta U; Patwardhan, Ashwin W; Singh, Gurmeet

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the swelling kinetics of individual tea particles as well as bed of tea granules were investigated for different types of teas. The swelling experiments involved image analysis and volume measurements of tea particles. Each individual particle shows different swelling characteristics. Separating funnels and cylindrical columns of varying sizes were used to study the changes in volume of tea bed. Swelling in separating funnel was observed to be more than that in column. The effect of temperature, particle size, bed height and vessel diameter were investigated. The extent as well as the rate of swelling is found to increase with rise in temperature (60 to 80 °C) and reduction in particle size. A decrease in swelling is observed with increase in bed height as well as decrease in vessel diameter and vice a versa. About 70 to 75 % swelling occurs in the first 40 to 45 s. Two empirical models viz. Weibull and Peleg were used to fit the experimental data. The rate parameters obtained for a sample T5 at different temperatures were in the range of 0.012 to 0.016. The volume changes of all the teas were compared with their elution behavior, by measuring the absorbance of a diluted sample of brew at 272 nm. The activation energies for the process of tea swelling calculated for T1 (1.2 mm), T5 (2.2 mm) and T5 (0.72 mm) were 14.156, 8.37 and 13.42 kJ/mol respectively.

  13. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    The excess proton mobility in water has attracted scientific attention for more than a century. Detailed theoretical concepts and models are also presently in strong focus in efforts toward understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon. In the present report, we discuss a theoretical framework...... for rationalizing the excess proton mobility, based on computer simulations, theory of proton transfer (PT) in condensed media, and analysis of classical proton conductivity experiments over broad temperature ranges. The mechanistic options involved are (i) classical hydrodynamic motion of the hydronium ion (H3O......+), (ii) proton transfer from hydronium to a neighboring water molecule, and (iii) structural diffusion of the Zundel complex (H5O2+), the processes all controlled by orientational fluctuations or hydrogen bond breaking in neighboring hydration shells. Spontaneous conversion of excess proton states...

  14. Kinetics of Ce and Nd scavenging in Black Sea waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, Johan; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Millero, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing experiments were performed during Leg 5 of the 1988 Black Sea Expedition in order to learn more about the mechanism and kinetics of rare earth element (REE) scavenging at the oxic-anoxic interface of anoxic basins and, more specifically, in the suboxic zone of the Black Sea. Water from the de

  15. Interconversion kinetic studies of betamethasone acetate polymorphs in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xue; Ping, QiNeng; Liao, ZhengGen

    2006-10-01

    This study assessed the effect of polymers on the transformation of polymorphs of betamethasone acetate (BA) when suspended in water. The results showed that the polymers, in particular HPMC E5, retarded the transition of the forms Ialpha and Ibeta. However, the form Ialpha, as the metastable form, with the aid of HPMC E5, was preferred for BA suspension preparation through kinetic studies, while the form Ibeta was not suitable due to its instability in water.

  16. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  17. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    for rationalizing the excess proton mobility, based on computer simulations, theory of proton transfer (PT) in condensed media, and analysis of classical proton conductivity experiments over broad temperature ranges. The mechanistic options involved are (i) classical hydrodynamic motion of the hydronium ion (H3O......+), (ii) proton transfer from hydronium to a neighboring water molecule, and (iii) structural diffusion of the Zundel complex (H5O2+), the processes all controlled by orientational fluctuations or hydrogen bond breaking in neighboring hydration shells. Spontaneous conversion of excess proton states...... between Zundel and hydrated hydronium states and between hydrated and bare hydronium states are the crucial parts of the scheme. A comparison between experimental data and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations shows that prototropic structural diffusion is determined by comparable contributions...

  18. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts.

  19. The Mechanism of Surface Chemical Kinetics of Dissolution of Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭凯旋; 张哲儒; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of dissolution reaction kinetics of minerals in aqueous solution based on the theory of surface chemistry.Surface chemical catalysis would lead to an obvous decrease in active energy of dissolution reaction of minerals.The dissolution rate of minerals is controlled by suface adsorption,surface exchange reaction and desorption,depending on pH of the solution and is directly proportional to δHn0+,When controlled by surface adsorption,i.e.,nθ=1,the dissolution rate will decrease with increasing pH;when controlled by surface exchane reaction,i.e.,nθ=0,the dissolution rate is independent of pH;when controlled by desorption,nθis a positive decimal between 0 and 1 in acidic solution and a negative decimal between-1 and 0 in alkaline solution.Dissolution of many minerals is controlled by surface adsorption and/or surface exchange reactions under acid conditions and by desorption under alkaline conditions.

  20. Kinetics of coal conversion in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anatoli A. Vostrikov; Sergey A. Psarov; Dmitri Yu. Dubov; Oxana N. Fedyaeva; Mikhail Ya. Sokol [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermophysics

    2007-09-15

    Conversion of the coal particle pack in supercritical water (SCW) was studied in the semibatch reactor under the pressure of P = 30 MPa, in the temperature range of T = 500-750{sup o}C, and in the reaction time of t = 60-720 s. The experimental results were analyzed within the framework of homogeneous, nonreacted core, and random pore models. The quantitative composition of conversion products was determined. Dependences of the conversion rate on the degree of coal conversion, reaction time, and temperature were described in an assumption of the first-order reaction and Arrhenius dependence. It was found that activation energy of conversion is E = 103 kJ/mol and the pre-exponential factor is A{sub 0} = 1.3 x 10{sup 3.1} s{sup -1}. It was revealed that coal gasification in SCW without oxidants is the weakly endothermic process. The addition of CO{sub 2} into SCW decreases the conversion rate and increases the CO yield. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Surface Photocatalysis-TPD Spectrometer for Photochemical Kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-feng Ren; Qing Guo; Chen-biao Xu; Wen-shao Yang; Chun-lei Xiao; Dong-xu Dai; Xue-ming Yang

    2012-01-01

    A surface photocatalysis-TPD apparatus devoted to studying kinetics and mechanism of photocatalytic processes with various signal crystal surfaces has been constructed.Extremely high vacuum (~0.2 nPa) in the ionization region is obtained by using multiple ultrahigh vacuum pumps.Compared with similar instruments built previously by others,the H2,CH4 background in the ionization region can be reduced by about two orders of magnitude,and other residual gases in the ionization region can be reduced by about an order of magnitude.Therefore,the signal-to-noise ratio for the temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and time of flight (TOF) spectra is substantially enhanced,making experimental studies of photocatalytic processes on surfaces much easier.In this work,we describe the new apparatus in detail and present some preliminary studies on the photo-induced oxygen vacancy defects on TiO2(110) at 266 nm by using the TPD and TOF methods.Preliminary results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying kinetics and mechanism of photochemical processes.

  2. Kinetics of Microstructure Evolution during Gaseous Thermochecical Surface Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Christiansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    precipitation 6f ailoying element nitrides/carbides"or by thE development of a continuo_us laye_r of iron-based (carbo-) nitrides. The evolution of the microstructure during thermochemical treatme_nts is not only determined by solid-state diffusion, but in many cases also by the kinetics of the surface...... reactions and the interptay with mechanical stress.'In the present arlicle a few examplesr_co_ve_ring-research on the inleraction of carbon and,/or nitrogen with iron-based metals, are included to illustrate the various aspects of gas-metal interactidns....

  3. Lateral interactions and non-equilibrium in surface kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    Work modelling reactions between surface species frequently use Langmuir kinetics, assuming that the layer is in internal equilibrium, and that the chemical potential of adsorbates corresponds to that of an ideal gas. Coverage dependences of reacting species and of site blocking are usually treated with simple power law coverage dependences (linear in the simplest case), neglecting that lateral interactions are strong in adsorbate and co-adsorbate layers which may influence kinetics considerably. My research group has in the past investigated many co-adsorbate systems and simple reactions in them. We have collected a number of examples where strong deviations from simple coverage dependences exist, in blocking, promoting, and selecting reactions. Interactions can range from those between next neighbors to larger distances, and can be quite complex. In addition, internal equilibrium in the layer as well as equilibrium distributions over product degrees of freedom can be violated. The latter effect leads to non-equipartition of energy over molecular degrees of freedom (for products) or non-equal response to those of reactants. While such behavior can usually be described by dynamic or kinetic models, the deeper reasons require detailed theoretical analysis. Here, a selection of such cases is reviewed to exemplify these points.

  4. Intermediates and kinetics for phenol gasification in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Chad M; Savage, Phillip E

    2012-02-28

    We processed phenol with supercritical water in a series of experiments, which systematically varied the temperature, water density, reactant concentration, and reaction time. Both the gas and liquid phases were analyzed post-reaction using gas chromatographic techniques, which identified and quantified the reaction intermediates and products, including H(2), CO, CH(4), and CO(2) in the gas phase and twenty different compounds--mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--in the liquid phase. Many of these liquid phase compounds were identified for the first time and could pose environmental risks. Higher temperatures promoted gasification and resulted in a product gas rich in H(2) and CH(4) (33% and 29%, respectively, at 700 °C), but char yields increased as well. We implicated dibenzofuran and other identified phenolic dimers as precursor molecules for char formation pathways, which can be driven by free radical polymerization at high temperatures. Examination of the trends in conversion as a function of initial water and phenol concentrations revealed competing effects, and these informed the kinetic modeling of phenol disappearance. Two different reaction pathways emerged from the kinetic modeling: one in which rate ∝ [phenol](1.73)[water](-16.60) and the other in which rate ∝ [phenol](0.92)[water](1.39). These pathways may correspond to pyrolysis, which dominates when there is abundant phenol and little water, and hydrothermal reactions, which dominate in excess water. This result confirms that supercritical water gasification of phenol does not simply follow first-order kinetics, as previous efforts to model phenol disappearance had assumed.

  5. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind,, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2013-10-15

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank–van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  6. Kinetics of Microstructure Evolution during Gaseous Thermochemical Surface Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Christiansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nitrogen or carbon in steel is widely applied to provide major improvements in materials performance with respect to fatigue, wear, tribology and atmospheric corrosion. These improvements rely on a modification of the surface adjacent region of the material, by the (internal......) precipitation of alloying element nitrides/carbides or by the development of a continuous layer of iron-based (carbo-) nitrides. The evolution of the microstructure during thermochemical treatments is not only determined by solid state diffusion, but in many cases also by the kinetics of the surface reactions...... and the interplay with mechanical stress. In the present article a few examples, covering research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals, are included to illustrate the various aspects of gas-metal interactions....

  7. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind

    2013-10-01

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank-van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  8. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  9. Kinetics of marine surfactant adsorption at an air water interface. Baltic Sea studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanis³aw J. Pogorzelski

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the results of studies of natural surface film adsorption kinetics carried out in inland waters and in shallow offshore regions of the Baltic Sea during 2000-01 under calm sea conditions. The novel approach presented here for the adsorption dynamics is based on the mixed kinetic-diffusion model and analyses of the surface pressure-time plots at short (t ->0 and long( t -> ∞ adsorption time intervals. Values of the effective relative diffusion coefficient Deff / D (= 0.008-0.607 and energy barrier for adsorption Ea / RT (= 0.49-7.10 agree well with the data reported for model non-ionic surfactant solutions of pre-cmc concentrations. Wind speed is one of the factors affecting the adsorption barrier via the increased surface pressure of the natural film exposed to wind shear stress (~ U102, and enters the relation Ea / RT = 1.70 U101/3.

  10. Differentiation of rye and wheat flour as well as mixtures by using the kinetics of Karl Fischer water titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hădărugă, Daniel I; Costescu, Corina I; Corpaş, Laura; Hădărugă, Nicoleta G; Isengard, Heinz-Dieter

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to find a simple way to differentiate between rye and wheat flour and their mixtures by using the kinetic parameters of Karl Fischer water titration (KFT). Consequently, the water content and type of molecules in rye and wheat mixtures used in Romanian bread making have been investigated by means of volumetric KFT. Further, the kinetics of KFT have been determined and novel kinetic parameters corresponding to "surface" and "strongly-retained" water molecules have been identified to discriminate between rye and wheat flour and their mixtures. The "surface" and "strongly-retained" water reaction rates well correlate with the rye content in the flour mixtures, especially at higher temperature analysis (r>0.95). These parameters can be used as indicators for quality evaluation of such type of mixtures, as well as to identify adulteration by improper use of the rye-wheat flour ratios in bread making.

  11. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  12. Kinetic model for astaxanthin aggregation in water-methanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Rita; Alibabaei, Leila; Pucciarelli, Filippo

    2009-07-01

    The aggregation of astaxanthin in hydrated methanol was kinetically studied in the temperature range from 10 °C to 50 °C, at different astaxanthin concentrations and solvent composition. A kinetic model for the formation and transformation of astaxanthin aggregated has been proposed. Spectrophotometric studies showed that monomeric astaxanthin decayed to H-aggregates that after-wards formed J-aggregates when water content was 50% and the temperature lower than 20 °C; at higher temperatures, very stable J-aggregates were formed directly. Monomer formed very stable H-aggregates when the water content was greater than 60%; in these conditions H-aggregates decayed into J-aggregates only when the temperature was at least 50 °C. Through these findings it was possible to establish that the aggregation reactions took place through a two steps consecutive reaction with first order kinetic constants and that the values of these depended on the solvent composition and temperature.

  13. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  14. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  15. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) for Water Year 2003 (WY 2003) (October I, 2002 to September 30, 2003) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at...

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  18. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  19. Simulations of the thermodynamics and kinetics of NH3 at the RuO2 (110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdtman, Edvin; Andersson, Mike; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Ojamäe, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Ruthenium(IV)oxide (RuO2) is a material used for various purposes. It acts as a catalytic agent in several reactions, for example oxidation of carbon monoxide. Furthermore, it is used as gate material in gas sensors. In this work theoretical and computational studies were made on adsorbed molecules on RuO2 (110) surface, in order to follow the chemistry on the molecular level. Density functional theory calculations of the reactions on the surface have been performed. The calculated reaction and activation energies have been used as input for thermodynamic and kinetics calculations. A surface phase diagram was calculated, presenting the equilibrium composition of the surface at different temperature and gas compositions. The kinetics results are in line with the experimental studies of gas sensors, where water has been produced on the surface, and hydrogen is found at the surface which is responsible for the sensor response.

  20. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cadmium Carbonate Heteroepitaxial Growth at the Calcite (101¯4) Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10-14) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  1. Kinetics and mechanisms of cadmium carbonate heteroepitaxial growth at the calcite (10 1bar 4) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10 1bar 4) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  2. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, H.; Andersen, M. S.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    Several processes have been proposed to describe the low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs which has caused both technical and environmental concerns. This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 with different ionic concentrations) into crushed and sieved shale fragments. The results of the study indicate that the cumulative water uptake under pressure is likely to be controlled by three processes: surface hydration, capillary hydration including advective flow, and osmotic hydration. Each of these processes is a function of the differences between the in situ pore fluid and the injection fluid (solution chemistry and concentration) and the shale physicochemical properties, in particular the contact surface area, pore diameter, and the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). The uptake is not instantaneous, but is diffusion limited, with the rate governed by a number of kinetic processes. Uptake proceeds in three stages, each associated with a different process: (1) predominantly surface hydration, (2) predominantly capillary hydration and finally, (3) predominantly osmotic hydration. It was also shown that shale can take up a significant amount of water compared to its available solid volume. However, contrary to the conventional understanding, the increase in salinity of the injection fluid does not necessarily lead to reduced water uptake into shales, but is dependent on the type and concentration of cations within the shale and injecting fluid.

  3. Water-in-Water Emulsion Based Synthesis of Hydrogel Nanospheres with Tunable Release Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Derya; Kızılel, Seda

    2016-06-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) micro/nanospheres have several unique advantages as polymer based drug delivery systems (DDS) such as tunable size, large surface area to volume ratio, and colloidal stability. Emulsification is one of the widely used methods for facile synthesis of micro/nanospheres. Two-phase aqueous system based on polymer-polymer immiscibility is a novel approach for preparation of water-in-water (w/w) emulsions. This method is promising for the synthesis of PEG micro/nanospheres for biological systems, since the emulsion is aqueous and do not require organic solvents or surfactants. Here, we report the synthesis of nano-scale PEG hydrogel particles using w/w emulsions using phase separation of dextran and PEG prepolymer. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scaning electron microscopy (SEM) results demonstrated that nano-scale hydrogel spheres could be obtained with this approach. We investigated the release kinetics of a model drug, pregabalin (PGB) from PEG nanospheres and demonstrated the influence of polymerization conditions on loading and release of the drug as well as the morphology and size distribution of PEG nanospheres. The experimental drug release data was fitted to a stretched exponential function which suggested high correlation with experimental results to predict half-time and drug release rates from the model equation. The biocompatibility of nanospheres on human dermal fibroblasts using cell-survival assay suggested that PEG nanospheres with altered concentrations are non-toxic, and can be considered for controlled drug/molecule delivery.

  4. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Herrera Delgado; Lubow Maier; Steffen Tischer; Alexander Zellner; Henning Stotz; Olaf Deutschmann

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented i...

  5. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process.

  6. Aqueous photochemical degradation of hydroxylated PAHs: Kinetics, pathways, and multivariate effects of main water constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Chang-Er [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Li, Jun [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China); Ju, Maowei; Wang, Ying; Li, Kai [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: pzhang@nmemc.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Yao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) are contaminants of emerging concern in the aquatic environment, so it is of great significance to understand their environmental transformation and toxicity. This study investigated the aqueous photochemical behavior of four OH-PAHs, 9-Hydroxyfluorene (9-OHFL), 2-Hydroxyfluorene, 9-Hydroxyphenanthrene and 1-Hydroxypyrene, under simulated sunlight irradiation (λ > 290 nm). It was observed that their photodegradation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. Based on the determined quantum yields, their calculated solar apparent photodegradation half-lives in surface waters at 45° N latitude ranged from 0.4 min for 9-Hydroxyphenanthrene to 7.5 × 10{sup 3} min for 9-OHFL, indicating that the OH-PAHs would intrinsically photodegrade fast in sunlit surface waters. Furthermore, 9-OHFL as an example was found to undergo direct photolysis, and self-sensitized photooxidation via ·OH rather than {sup 1}O{sub 2} in pure water. The potential photoreactions involved photoinduced hydroxylation, dehydrogenation and isomerization based on product identification by GC–MS/MS. 9-OHFL photodegraded slower in natural waters than in pure water, which was attributed to the integrative effects of the most photoreactive species, such as Fe(III), NO{sub 3}{sup −}, Cl{sup −} and humic acid. The photomodified toxicity was further examined using Vibrio fischeri, and it was found that the toxicity of photolyzed 9-OHFL did not decrease significantly (p > 0.05) either in pure water or in seawater, implying the comparable or higher toxicity of some intermediates. These results are important for assessing the fate and risks of OH-PAHs in surface waters. - Graphical abstract: Aqueous photochemical behavior of 4 hydroxylated PAHs is first reported on revealing the kinetics, mechanisms, toxicity, and multivariate effects of water constituents. - Highlights: • It is first reported on aqueous photochemical behavior of 4 hydroxylated

  7. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  8. Kinetic Limited Water Evaporation in Hydrophilic Nanofluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinxiao; Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Capillary evaporation is one of the most efficient approaches for heat and mass transfer, but the interfacial resistance in capillary evaporation governed by the kinetic theory has remained poorly understood. Here we report experimental studies of the kinetic-limited water capillary evaporation in 2-D hydrophilic nanochannels. A novel hybrid nanochannel design is employed to guarantee sufficient water supply to the liquid/vapor evaporation interface and to enable precise evaporation rate measurements. We study the effects of confinement (16 ~ 105nm), temperature (20 ~ 40 °C), and relative humidity (0% ~ 60%) on the evaporation rate and the evaporation coefficient. A maximum evaporation flux of 21287 micron/s is obtained in 16-nm nanochannels at 40°C and RH =0%, which corresponds to a heat flux of 4804 W/cm°. The evaporation coefficient is found to be independent on geometrical confinement, but shows a clear dependence on temperature, decreasing from 0.55 at 20°C to 0.5 at 40 °C. These findings have implications for understanding heat and mass transport in nanofluidic devices and porous media, and shed light on further development of evaporation-based technologies for thermal management, membrane purification and lab-on-a-chip devices. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  9. Removal of Crystal Violet dye from aqueous solution using water hyacinth: Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajeswari Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Effluent water from dyeing industries has now for long been a taxing issue. Of the various dyes which are extremely toxic, Crystal Violet which is used in the dyeing industry is known for its mutagenic and mitotic poisoning nature. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes is a perennial aquatic plant notorious for its rapid invasive growth on the surface of water bodies causing ill-effects on the biodiversity. The potential of powdered roots of water hyacinth was studied for decolorization of Crystal Violet dye. Influence of parameters such as initial pH (2.0–10.0, initial dye concentration (100–500 ppm, biosorbent dosage (0.5–5 g/l, contact time (10–240 min and temperature (300–323 K were examined. Maximum removal of dye was observed at pH 7.8. The obtained data were fit into different kinetic models and the biosorption was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic model. The Langmuir monolayer biosorption capacity of water hyacinth was estimated as 322.58 mg/g. The study has demonstrated water hyacinth as a potential low cost biosorbent for effective removal of Crystal Violet dye from aqueous solution.

  10. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIUJunhong; GUOTianmin

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water,brines with single salt and mixed salts,and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured.A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane+water systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetic approach.The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy.The feasibility of extending the kenetic model of salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  11. Surface Dilution Kinetics Using Substrate Analog-Enantiomers as Diluents: Enzymatic Lipolysis by Bee-Venom Phospholipase A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A novel assay employing D-enantiomers of phospholipids as diluents for characterizing surface kinetics of lipid hydrolysis by phospholipases is introduced. The rationale of the method are: (i) D-enantiomers resist hydrolysis because of the stereoselectivity of the enzymes toward L-enantiomers and (ii) mixtures of L+D-lipids at various L:D ratios but constant L+D-lipid concentrations yield a surface dilution series of variable L-lipid concentration with constant medium properties. Kinetic characterization of bee-venom phospholipase A2 activity at bile salt + phospholipid aggregate-water interfaces was performed using the mixed L+D-lipid surface dilution assay and interface kinetic parameters were obtained. The assay applies to bio-membrane models as well. Activity was measured by pH-Stat methods. Aggregation numbers and interface hydration/microviscosity measured by time resolved fluorescence quenching and electron spin resonance respectively confirmed that interface properties were indeed invariant in a surface dilution series, supporting rationale (ii) and were used to calculate substrate concentrations. Activity data show excellent agreement with a kinetic model derived with D-enantiomers as diluents and also that D-phospholipids bind to the enzyme but resist hydrolysis; underscoring rationale (i). The assay is significant to enabling determination of interface specific kinetic parameters for the first time and thereby characterization of interface specificity of lipolytic enzymes. PMID:20727845

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of dimethoate chlorination during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Liu, Wenjun; Guo, Guang; Qiang, Zhimin; Zhang, Can

    2014-05-01

    Dimethoate (DMT), a commonly used organophosphorus pesticide, is of great concern because of its toxicity and potentially harmful effects on water sources. The elimination of DMT as well as the toxicity and persistence of the byproducts formed during DMT degradation is most important for the safety of drinking water. This study first determined the reaction kinetics of DMT with free chlorine (FC) under typical water treatment conditions. The reaction between DMT and FC proceeded rapidly, exhibiting first-order with respect to each reactant. The degradation of DMT by FC was highly pH dependent, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant decreased obviously from 0.13 to 0.02 s(-1) with an increase in pH from 7.0 to 8.3. Bromide ion accelerated the reaction by acting as a catalyst, and the accelerated reaction rate was linearly proportional to the bromide concentration. As a ubiquitous component in natural waters, humic acid also increased the reaction rate. However, the presence of ammonium inhibited the degradation of DMT due to its rapid converting FC to chloramines. Omethoate (OMT) was identified as an important byproduct of DMT chlorination, but only accounted for ca. 28% of the DMT degraded; and other two organic byproducts were also identified. The acute toxicity of DMT solution increased after treatment with FC due to the formation of more toxic byproducts (e.g. OMT).

  13. Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Surface Water Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset showing the locations of surface water intakes. These intake locations are part of the safe drinking water information system...

  14. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  15. Kinetics of the water adsorption driven structural transformationof ZnS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodell, C.M.; Gilbert, B.; Weigand, S.J.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-08-01

    Nanoparticles of certain materials can respond structurally to changes in their surface environments. We have previously shown that methanol, water adsorption, and aggregation-disaggregation can change the structure of 3 nm diameter zinc sulfide (ZnS). However, in prior observations of water-driven structure change, aggregation may also have taken place. Therefore, we investigated the structural consequences of water adsorption alone on anhydrous nanoparticles that were dried to minimize changes in aggregation. Using simultaneously collected small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) data, we show that water vapor adsorption alone drives a structural transformation in ZnS nanoparticles in the temperature range 22-40 C. The transition kinetics are strongly temperature dependent, with an activation energy of 58.1 {+-} 9.8 kJ/mol, consistent with atom displacement rather than bond breaking. At 50 C, aggregate restructuring occurred, increasing the transition kinetics beyond the rate expected for water adsorption alone. The observation of isosbestic points in the WAXS data suggests that the particles do not transform continuously between the initial and final structural state but rather undergo an abrupt change from a less ordered to a more ordered state.

  16. Anti-Aliased Rendering of Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Qin; Eihachiro Nakamae; Wei Hua; Yasuo Nagai; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Water surface is one of the most important components of landscape scenes. When rendering spacious far from the viewpoint. This is because water surface consists of stochastic water waves which are usually modeled by periodic bump mapping. The incident rays on the water surface are actually scattered by the bumped waves,pattern, we estimate this solid angle of reflected rays and trace these rays. An image-based accelerating method is adopted so that the contribution of each reflected ray can be quickly obtained without elaborate intersection calculation. We also demonstrate anti-aliased shadows of sunlight and skylight on the water surface. Both the rendered images and animations show excellent effects on the water surface of a reservoir.

  17. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics (Bio-remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Water)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Chris

    My talk will focus on modeling the kinetics of the adsorption and filtering process using differential equations, stochastic methods, and recursive functions. The models have been developed in support of our interdisciplinary lab group which is conducting research into bio-remediation of heavy metal contaminated water via filtration through biomass such as spent tea leaves. The spent tea leaves are available in large quantities as a result of the industrial production of tea beverages. The heavy metals bond with the surfaces of the tea leaves (adsorption). Funding: CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant.

  19. Kinetic modeling of water sorption by roasted and ground coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Baptestini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to model the kinetics of water sorption in roasted and ground coffee. Crude Arabica coffee beans with an initial moisture content of 0.1234 kgwkgdm-1 were used. These beans were roasted to a medium roast level (SCCA # 55 and ground at three particle sizes: coarse (1.19 mm, medium (0.84 mm and fine (0.59 mm. To obtain the water sorption isotherms and the isosteric heat, different conditions of temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using the dynamic method at 25ºC (0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and 30°C (0.30, 0.40, 0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and using the static method at 25ºC (0.332 and 0.438 of RH. The GAB model best represented the hygroscopic equilibrium of roasted coffee at every particle size. Isosteric heat of sorption for the fine particle size increased with increments of equilibrium moisture content, indicating a strong bond energy between water molecules and the product components. The Gibbs free energy decreased with the increase in equilibrium moisture content and with temperature.

  20. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN THE RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA DUMITRAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is an increasingly important and why it is important to surfacewater quality, which is given by the analysis of physical - chemical, biological andobserving the investigation of water, biota, environments investigation. Analysis ofthe Prut river in terms of biological and physical elements - chemical. Evaluationof ecological and chemical status of water was done according to order of approvalof the standard classification nr.161/2006 surface water to determine the ecologicalstatus of water bodies

  1. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  2. Kinetics of gravity-driven water channels under steady rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, Cesare M.; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Frétigny, Christian; Durian, Douglas J.; Dreyfus, Rémi

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-two-dimensional experimental setup composed of a random close packing of monodisperse glass beads. Using controlled experiments, we analyze the finger instabilities that develop from the wetting front as a function of fundamental granular (particle size) and fluid properties (rainfall, viscosity). These finger instabilities act as precursors for water channels, which serve as outlets for water drainage. We look into the characteristics of the homogeneous wetting front and channel size as well as estimate relevant time scales involved in the instability formation and the velocity of the channel fingertip. We compare our experimental results with that of the well-known prediction developed by Parlange and Hill [D. E. Hill and J. Y. Parlange, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 36, 697 (1972), 10.2136/sssaj1972.03615995003600050010x]. This model is based on linear stability analysis of the growth of perturbations arising at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Results show that, in terms of morphology, experiments agree with the proposed model. However, in terms of kinetics we nevertheless account for another term that describes the homogenization of the wetting front. This result shows that the manner we introduce the fluid to a porous medium can also influence the formation of finger instabilities. The results also help us to calculate the ideal flow rate needed for homogeneous distribution of water in the soil and minimization of runoff, given the grain size, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. This could have applications in optimizing use of irrigation water.

  3. Manufacturing and characterisation of water repellent surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Botija, Pablo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    design criteria for such surfaces. The problem of adapting this behaviour to artificially roughened surfaces is addressed by providing design criteria for superhydrophobic, water-repellent and self-cleaning surfaces according to the concrete performance desired for them. Different kind of manufacturing...

  4. Photoproducts ejected from liquid surfaces: The importance of photochemical, diffusional, kinetic, and surface structural effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlan, A. [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hall, G.E. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Gas-phase products of liquid surface photochemistry in high vacuum were analyzed by time-of-flight/quadrupole mass spectroscopy. A thin liquid film of a long-chain alkyl iodide, C{sub 18}H{sub 37}I, dissolved in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) was irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses at 275 nm. The photoproducts leaving the liquid after a low-fluence laser pulse (0.5 mJ/cm{sup 2}) were I, HI, and I{sub 2}. Since these species may desorb at times delayed by diffusion in the liquid phase, time-of-flight profiles were also recorded using a chopper wheel in front of the surface. This allowed a reconstruction of the time-dependent flux from the surface. The flight time distributions were compared to model calculations which take into account laser photolysis of C{sub 18}H{sub 37}I, diffusion and surface evaporation of I, HI, and I{sub 2}, and the condensed-phase kinetics of radical reactions, and allow for a component of direct photodissociation of surface layer molecules, leading to hyperthermal I atoms. Simulations based on a comprehensive kinetic scheme are in good agreement with our measurements, with no specific surface processes other than evaporation of thermalized species formed at, or diffusing to the surface. However, compared to results previously found for liquid C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I, the caging of the geminate pair is much stronger in our system, and the fraction of I atoms promptly reacting to HI is smaller. The absence of prompt hyperthermal I fragments is interpreted by a preferential orientation of the C{sub 18}H{sub 37}I molecules in the topmost liquid layer with the I atom pointing into the liquid. The sensitivity of the method is discussed with respect to surface-specific processes, as well as primary and secondary radical reactions occurring in the bulk liquid. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The MN Department of Agriculture (MDA) is charged with periodically collecting and analyzing water samples from selected locations throughout the state to determine...

  6. Tuning kinetics to control droplet shapes on chemically stripe patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Sotthewes, K.; Ganser, C.; Teichert, C.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The typically elongated shape of droplets on chemically microstriped surfaces has been suggested to depend strongly on the kinetics during deposition. Here, we unequivocally establish the importance of impact kinetics by comparing the geometry of pico- to microliter droplets deposited from an inkjet

  7. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  8. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay, E-mail: mandal_ajay@hotmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  9. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  10. Sulfate radical-based oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Kinetics, mechanisms and effects of natural water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Canlan; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Chen, Jifei; Cai, Tianming

    2016-12-01

    Widespread occurrence of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported and their remediation is essentially needed. Sulfate radical (SO4(-)) based advanced oxidation processes (SR-AOPs) are promising technologies for soil and groundwater remediation. In this study, the degradation kinetics, mechanisms, and effects of natural water matrices on heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation of FQs were systematically investigated. Experimental results clearly demonstrated that 92% of CIP was removed within 180 min (pH = 7, 60 °C). Higher temperature and lower pH facilitated the degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP). The piperazine moiety of CIP was identified as the reactive site for SO4(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs, flumequine (FLU) and 1-(2-fluorophenyl) piperazine (FPP). A comparison of the degradation of CIP, norfloxacin (NOR), enrofloxacin (ENR) and ofloxacin (OFL) confirmed that the presence of cyclopropane ring also influence the degradation of FQs. Water matrix significantly influenced the degradation of CIP and ENR, and the degradation rate followed the order of Milli-Q water (pH = 7) > groundwater > artificial seawater > artificial surface water > lake water. Degradation products of CIP in different water matrix were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and then analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Detailed transformation pathways of CIP were proposed and were compared with respect to different water matrices. Four transformation pathways including stepwise piperazine ring oxidation, OH/F substitution, hydroxylation, and cyclopropane ring cleavage were proposed for CIP degradation. Results clearly show that the water matrix influenced the degradation of FQs appreciably, a phenomenon that should be taken into consideration when applying SR-AOPs for remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by

  11. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  12. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  13. Crystal Growth Kinetics of Nanocrystalline ZnS under Surface Adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The crystal growth mechanism, kinetics, and microstructure development play a fundamental role in tailoring the materials with controllable size and morphology. In this study,by introducing the strong surface adsorption of the concentrated NaOH, two-stage crystal growth kinetics of ZnS nanoparticles was observed. In the first stage, the primary particles grow into a size over a hundred times of the original volume and the growth is controlled by the crystallographically specific oriented attachment. The first stage data were fitted by the "multistep OA kinetic model" built based on the molecular collision and reaction. In the second stage, following the dispersal of nanoparticles, an abrupt transition from asymptotic to parabola growth kinetics occurs, which can be fitted by a standard Ostwald ripening volume diffusion model. The presence of surface adsorption causes the two-stage growth kinetics and permits an almost exclusive OA-based growth to dominate in the first stage.

  14. Reaction Kinetic Parameters and Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Cu2O Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O nanocubes were synthesized by reducing Cu(OH2 in the presence of sodium citrate at room temperature. The samples were characterized in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and N2 absorption (BET specific surface area. The equations for acquiring reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of Cu2O nanocubes were deduced by establishment of the relations between thermodynamic functions of Cu2O nanocubes and these of the bulk Cu2O. Combined with thermochemical cycle, transition state theory, basic theory of chemical thermodynamics, and in situ microcalorimetry, reaction kinetic parameters, specific surface enthalpy, specific surface Gibbs free energy, and specific surface entropy of Cu2O nanocubes were successfully determined. We also introduced a universal route for gaining reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of nanomaterials.

  15. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALPFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources,...

  16. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku

    2013-07-01

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO2, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  17. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Gikan H., E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO{sub 2}, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  18. Exit Creek Water Surface Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from a longitudinal profile of water surface surveyed June 23-24, 2013 at Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai...

  19. US Forest Service Surface Drinking Water Importance

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting watershed indexes to help identify areas of interest for protecting surface drinking water quality. The dataset depicted in this...

  20. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  1. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  2. Kinetic Analysis of Haloacetonitrile Stability in Drinking Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Reckhow, David A

    2015-09-15

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are an important class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that are reactive and can undergo considerable transformation on time scales relevant to system distribution (i.e., from a few hours to a week or more). The stability of seven mono-, di-, and trihaloacetonitriles was examined under a variety of conditions including different pH levels and disinfectant doses that are typical of drinking water distribution systems. Results indicated that hydroxide, hypochlorite, and their protonated forms could react with HANs via nucleophilic attack on the nitrile carbon, forming the corresponding haloacetamides (HAMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as major reaction intermediates and end products. Other stable intermediate products, such as the N-chloro-haloacetamides (N-chloro-HAMs), may form during the course of HAN chlorination. A scheme of pathways for the HAN reactions was proposed, and the rate constants for individual reactions were estimated. Under slightly basic conditions, hydroxide and hypochlorite are primary reactants and their associated second-order reaction rate constants were estimated to be 6 to 9 orders of magnitude higher than those of their protonated conjugates (i.e., neutral water and hypochlorous acid), which are much weaker but more predominant nucleophiles at neutral and acidic pHs. Developed using the estimated reaction rate constants, the linear free energy relationships (LFERs) summarized the nucleophilic nature of HAN reactions and demonstrated an activating effect of the electron withdrawing halogens on nitrile reactivity, leading to decreasing HAN stability with increasing degree of halogenation of the substituents, while subsequent shift from chlorine to bromine atoms has a contrary stabilizing effect on HANs. The chemical kinetic model together with the reaction rate constants that were determined in this work can be used for quantitative predictions of HAN concentrations depending on pH and free chlorine

  3. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauner, Ines M; Deblais, Antoine; Beattie, James K; Kellay, Hamid; Bonn, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m(-1)) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m(-1)) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments.

  4. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  5. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during convention

  6. Polyfluorinated chemicals in European surface waters, ground- and drinking waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschauzier, C.; de Voogt, P.; Brauch, H.-J.; Lange, F.T.; Knepper, T.P.; Lange, F.T.

    2012-01-01

    Polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), especially short chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonates and carboxylates, are ubiquitously found in the environment. This chapter aims at giving an overview of PFC concentrations found in European surface, ground- and drinking waters and their behavior during

  7. Cadmium and lead interaction with diatom surfaces: A combined thermodynamic and kinetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélabert, A.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Schott, J.; Boudou, A.; Feurtet-Mazel, A.

    2007-08-01

    This work is devoted to the physico-chemical study of cadmium and lead interaction with diatom-water interfaces for two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii, TW; Skeletonema costatum, SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum, AMIN; Navicula minima, NMIN) by combining adsorption measurements with surface complexation modeling. Adsorption kinetics was studied as a function of pH and initial metal concentration in sodium nitrate solution and in culture media. Kinetic data were consistent with a two-step mechanism in which the loss of a water molecule from the inner coordination sphere of the metal is rate limiting. Reversible adsorption experiments, with 3 h of exposure to metal, were performed as a function of pH (2-9), metal concentration in solution (10 -9-10 -3 M), and ionic strength (10 -3-1.0 M). While the shape of pH-dependent adsorption edge is similar among all four diatom species, the constant-pH adsorption isotherm and maximal binding capacities differ. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities ( μ) revealed negative surface potential for AMIN diatom, however, the absolute value of μ decreases with increase of [Pb 2+] aq suggesting the metal adsorption on negative surface sites. These observations allowed us to construct a surface complexation model (SCM) for cadmium and lead binding by diatom surfaces that postulates the Constant Capacitance of the electric double layer and considers Cd and Pb complexation with mainly carboxylic and, partially, silanol groups. In the full range of investigated Cd concentration, the SCM is able to describe the concentration of adsorbed metal as a function of [Cd 2+] aq without implying the presence of high affinity, low abundance sites, that are typically used to model the metal interactions with natural multi-component organic substances. At the same time, Cd fast initial reaction requires the presence of "highly reactive sites" those concentration represents only 2.5-3% of the

  8. Theory and Experiment on the Measurement of Kinetic Rate Constants for Surfactant Exchange at an Air/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan; Green; Maldarelli

    1998-09-15

    The paper focuses on the measurement of the rate constants for the kinetic steps of adsorption and desorption of surfactant between an air/water surface and the aqueous bulk sublayer adjacent to the surface. Kinetic constants are determined in nonequilibrium experiments in which either a clean surface is contacted with a bulk solution and surfactant diffuses toward and adsorbs onto the interface, or the area of an established monolayer in equilibrium with an underlying solution is changed, and surfactant exchanges between the surface and bulk. The dynamic tension change due to the surfactant exchange is measured, and compared to predictions of kinetic-diffusive transport models in order to infer the kinetic coefficients as well the diffusion coefficients. Model comparisons for highly surface active surfactants have resolved only the diffusion coefficient as the transport was found to be diffusion controlled; kinetic constants have only been established for less active materials such as alcohols or bolaform surfactants. In this study, we demonstrate that kinetics can be differentiated from diffusion in clean interface adsorption and re-equilibration if high bulk concentrations of the surfactant are used, or in re-equilibration, if the surface is compressed sufficiently. We first establish theoretically that mass transfer shifts from diffusion-limited to mixed as the bulk concentration increases in clean interface adsorption, or the surface compression is increased in re-equilibration. We then experimentally verify this idea by using the polyethoxylated surfactant C12E6 (C12H25 (OCH2CH2)6-OH) and by measuring dynamic surface tensions in clean interface adsorption and re-equilibration, respectively by the shape analysis of pendant bubbles. We find values of 6 x 10(-10) m2/s for the diffusion coefficient, and 1.4 x 10(-5) m/sec and 1.4 x 10(-4) s-1 for the adsorption and desorption rate constants, respectively, in a Frumkin kinetic formulation. While the adsorption

  9. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of In induced superstructures on Si(5 5 7) surface during RT and HT adsorption/desorption process. • Kinetics is governed by substrate temperature which exhibits various growth modes (FM, SK, VB) under different conditions. • Strain relaxation play significant role in the commencement of desorption/rearrangement of atoms. • A consolidated phase diagram of In/Si(5 5 7) interface has been reported with new √3 × √3-R30° and 4 × 1 phases. - Abstract: This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500°C, growth of In follows Stranski–Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500°C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250–340°C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520°C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560°C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580°C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  10. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  11. On the kinetics and thermodynamics of excitons at the surface of semiconductor nanocrystals: Are there surface excitons?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambhampati, Patanjali, E-mail: pat.kambhampati@mcgill.ca

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • The surface of semiconductor nanocrystals is one of their defining features. • The kinetics of surface trapping can be monitored by pump/probe spectroscopy. • The thermodynamics of surface trapping is revealed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. • We produce the first microscopic picture of how excitons are coupled to the surface. • We discuss the possibility of surface excitons in nanocrystals. - Abstract: The surface of semiconductor nanocrystals is one of their defining features by virtue of their nanometer size. Yet the surface is presently among the most poorly understood aspects of nanocrystal science. This perspective provides an overview of spectroscopic work that has revealed the first insights into the nature of the surface, focusing upon CdSe nanocrystals. We focus on two aspects of surface processes in nanocrystals: the kinetics of surface trapping and the thermodynamics of core/surface equilibria. We describe femtosecond pump/probe spectroscopic experiments which reveal the signatures of carrier trapping at the surface. We also describe temperature dependent steady-state photoluminescence experiments which reveal new aspects of the surface. This work suggest that the surface emission is largely driven by homogeneous broadening via phonon progressions. The implications are that the surface electronic state bears similarity to the quantized excitonic core of the nanocrystal.

  12. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  13. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Ananta R., E-mail: aacharya@georgiasouthern.edu, E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia 30460 (United States); Thoms, Brian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Nepal, Neeraj [American Association for Engineering Education, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC 20034 (United States); Eddy, Charles R. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  14. Photochemical transformation of zearalenone in aqueous solutions under simulated solar irradiation: Kinetics and influence of water constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emídio, Elissandro S; Calisto, Vânia; de Marchi, Mary Rosa R; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2017-02-01

    The presence of estrogenic mycotoxins, such as zearalenone (ZEN), in surface waters is an emerging environmental issue. Little is known about its phototransformation behavior, which may influence its environmental fate. In this context, the phototransformation of ZEN was investigated in pure water, river water and estuarine water using simulated sunlight irradiation. Kinetic studies revealed that two concomitant processes contribute to the fate of ZEN under solar irradiation: photoisomerization and photodegradation. This phototransformation followed a pseudo-first order kinetics. ZEN degrades quickly in natural waters and slowly in deionized water, with half-lives (t1/2) of 28 ± 4 min (estuarine water), 136 ± 21 min (river water) and 1777 ± 412 min (deionized water). The effects of different water constituents on the phototransformation of ZEN in aqueous solution have been assessed (NaCl, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), NO3(-) and oxalate ions, synthetic seawater, Fe(III)-oxalate and Mg(II)-oxalate complexes, humic acids, fulvic acids and XAD-4 fraction). In the presence of synthetic seawater salt (t1/2 = 18 ± 5 min) and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes (t1/2 = 61 ± 9 min), the transformation rate increased considerably in relation to other water constituents tested. The solution pH also had a considerable effect in the kinetics with maximum transformation rates occurring around pH 8.5. These results allow us to conclude that phototransformation by solar radiation can be an important degradation pathway of ZEN in natural waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiolysis of water with aluminum oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Sarah C.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum oxide, Al2O3, nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H2, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. Surface analysis techniques included: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer - Emmett - Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Production of H2 by γ-ray radiolysis was determined for samples with adsorbed water and for Al2O3 - water slurries. For Al2O3 samples with adsorbed water, the radiation chemical yield of H2 was measured as 80±20 molecules/100 eV (1 molecule/100 eV=1.04×10-7 mol/J). The yield of H2 was observed to decrease as the amount of water present in the Al2O3 - water slurries increased. Surface studies indicated that the α-phase Al2O3 samples changed phase following irradiation by He ions, and that the oxyhydroxide layer, present on the pristine sample, is removed by γ-ray and He ion irradiation.

  16. Surface enzyme kinetics for biopolymer microarrays: a combination of Langmuir and Michaelis-Menten concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Wark, Alastair W; Goodrich, Terry T; Fang, Shiping; Corn, Robert M

    2005-04-26

    Real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements of surface enzymatic reactions on DNA microarrays are analyzed using a kinetics model that couples the contributions of both enzyme adsorption and surface enzyme reaction kinetics. For the case of a 1:1 binding of an enzyme molecule (E) to a surface-immobilized substrate (S), the overall enzymatic reaction can be described in terms of classical Langmuir adsorption and Michaelis-Menten concepts and three rate constants: enzyme adsorption (k(a)), enzyme desorption (k(d)) and enzyme catalysis (k(cat)). In contrast to solution enzyme kinetics, the amount of enzyme in solution is in excess as compared to the amount of substrate on the surface. Moreover, the surface concentration of the intermediary enzyme-substrate complex (ES) is not constant with time, but goes to zero as the reaction is completed. However, kinetic simulations show that the fractional surface coverage of ES on the remaining unreacted sites does reach a steady-state value throughout the course of the surface reaction. This steady-state value approaches the Langmuir equilibrium value for cases where k(a)[E] > k(cat). Experiments using the 3' --> 5' exodeoxyribonuclease activity of Exonuclease III on double-stranded DNA microarrays as a function of temperature and enzyme concentration are used to demonstrate how this model can be applied to quantitatively analyze the SPR imaging data.

  17. Kinetic model of II-VI(001) semiconductor surfaces : Growth rates in atomic layer epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkmann, T; Ahr, M; Biehl, M

    2004-01-01

    We present a zinc-blende lattice gas model of II-VI(001) surfaces, which is investigated by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Anisotropic effective interactions between surface metal atoms allow for the description of, e.g., the sublimation of CdTe(001), including the reconstruction of Cd-te

  18. Quantification of the types of water in Eudragit RLPO polymer and the kinetics of water loss using FTIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirayavaraporn, Chompak; Rades, Thomas; Gordon, Keith C

    2013-01-01

    . Using a curve fitting procedure, the water region (3100-3,700 cm(-1)) of the spectra was analyzed, and used to identify water present in differing environments in the polymer and to determine the water loss kinetics upon purging the sample with dry compressed air. It was found that four environments can...

  19. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The surface of Mars once had abundant water flowing on its surface, but now there is a general perception that this surface is completely dry. Several lines of research have shown that there are sources of potentially large quantities of water at many locations on the surface, including regions considered as candidates for future human missions. Traditionally, system designs for these human missions are constrained to tightly recycle water and oxygen, and current resource utilization strategies involve ascent vehicle oxidizer production only. But the assumption of relatively abundant extant water may change this. Several scenarios were constructed to evaluate water requirements for human Mars expeditions to assess the impact to system design if locally produced water is available. Specifically, we have assessed water resources needed for 1) ascent vehicle oxidizer and fuel production, 2) open-loop water and oxygen life support requirements along with more robust usage scenarios, and 3) crew radiation protection augmentation. In this assessment, production techniques and the associated chemistry to transform Martian water and atmosphere into these useful commodities are identified, but production mass and power requirements are left to future analyses. The figure below illustrates the type of water need assessment performed and that will be discussed. There have been several sources of feedstock material discussed in recent literature that could be used to produce these quantities of water. This paper will focus on Mars surface features that resemble glacier-like forms on Earth. Several lines of evidence indicate that some of these features are in fact buried ice, likely remnants from an earlier ice age on Mars. This paper examines techniques and hardware systems used in the polar regions of Earth to access this buried ice and withdraw water from it. These techniques and systems will be described to illustrate options available. A technique known as a Rodriguez Well

  20. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  1. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  2. Electrolysis of water on (oxidized) metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    directly from the electronic structure calculations. We consider electrodes of Pt(111) and Au(111) in detail and then discuss trends for a series of different metals. We show that the difficult step in the water splitting process is the formation of superoxy-type (OOH) species on the surface...... by the splitting of a water molecule on top an adsorbed oxygen atom. One conclusion is that this is only possible on metal surfaces that are (partly) oxidized. We show that the binding energies of the different intermediates are linearly correlated for a number of metals. In a simple analysis, where the linear...... relations are assumed to be obeyed exactly, this leads to a universal relationship between the catalytic rate and the oxygen binding energy. Finally, we conclude that for systems obeying these relations, there is a limit to how good a water splitting catalyst an oxidized metal surface can become. (c) 2005...

  3. Design of a robust superhydrophobic surface: thermodynamic and kinetic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Anjishnu

    2014-01-01

    The design of a robust superhydrophobic surface is a widely pursued topic.While many investigations are limited to applications with high impact velocities (for raindrops of the order of a few m/s), the essence of robustness is yet to be analyzed for applications involving quasi-static liquid transfer.To achieve robustness with high impact velocities, the surface parameters (geometrical details, chemistry) have to be selected from a narrow range of permissible values, which often entail additional manufacturing costs.From the dual perspectives of thermodynamics and mechanics, we analyze the significance of robustness for quasi-static drop impact, and present the range of permissible surface characteristics.For surfaces with a Youngs contact angle greater than 90{\\deg} and square micropillar geometry, we show that robustness can be enforced when an intermediate wetting state (sagged state) impedes transition to a wetted state (Wenzel state).From the standpoint of mechanics, we use available scientific data to ...

  4. Surface Modification of Water Purification Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J; Dreyer, Daniel R; Bielawski, Christopher W; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-04-18

    Polymeric membranes are an energy-efficient means of purifying water, but they suffer from fouling during filtration. Modification of the membrane surface is one route to mitigating membrane fouling, as it helps to maintain high levels of water productivity. Here, a series of common techniques for modification of the membrane surface are reviewed, including surface coating, grafting, and various treatment techniques such as chemical treatment, UV irradiation, and plasma treatment. Historical background on membrane development and surface modification is also provided. Finally, polydopamine, an emerging material that can be easily deposited onto a wide variety of substrates, is discussed within the context of membrane modification. A brief summary of the chemistry of polydopamine, particularly as it may pertain to membrane development, is also described. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Separation kinetics of an oil-in-water emulsion under enhanced gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    The breakup of crude oil emulsions to produce clean oil and water phases is an important task in crude oil processing. We have investigated the demulsification kinetics of a model oil-in-water emulsion in a centrifugal field to mimic the forces acting on emulsion droplets in oil/water separators

  6. Surface Water Protection by Productive Buffers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christen, Benjamin

    Vegetated riparian buffer zones are a widely recommended best management practice in agriculture for protecting surface and coastal waters from diffuse nutrient pollution. On the background of the EU funded research project NitroEurope (NEU; www.NitroEurope.eu), this study concentrates...... on the mitigation of nitrogen pollution in surface and groundwater, using riparian buffer zones for biomass production. The objectives are to map suitable areas for buffer implementation across the six NEU study landscapes, model tentative N-loss mitigation, calculate biomass production potential and economic...... designed for local conditions could be a way of protecting water quality attractive to many stakeholders....

  7. Proton transfer pathways, energy landscape, and kinetics in creatine-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Whittleston, Chris S; Carr, Joanne M; Imhof, Petra; Goerke, Steffen; Bachert, Peter; Wales, David J

    2014-02-27

    We study the exchange processes of the metabolite creatine, which is present in both tumorous and normal tissues and has NH2 and NH groups that can transfer protons to water. Creatine produces chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proton transfer pathway from zwitterionic creatine to water is examined using a kinetic transition network constructed from the discrete path sampling approach and an approximate quantum-chemical energy function, employing the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. The energy landscape consists of two distinct regions corresponding to the zwitterionic creatine structures and deprotonated creatine. The activation energy that characterizes the proton transfer from the creatine NH2 group to water was determined from an Arrhenius fit of rate constants as a function of temperature, obtained from harmonic transition state theory. The result is in reasonable agreement with values obtained in water exchange spectroscopy (WEX) experiments.

  8. Surface-Water Conditions in Georgia, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jaime A.; Landers, Mark N.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center-in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies-collected surface-water streamflow, water-quality, and ecological data during the 2005 Water Year (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). These data were compiled into layers of an interactive ArcReaderTM published map document (pmf). ArcReaderTM is a product of Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI?). Datasets represented on the interactive map are * continuous daily mean streamflow * continuous daily mean water levels * continuous daily total precipitation * continuous daily water quality (water temperature, specific conductance dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity) * noncontinuous peak streamflow * miscellaneous streamflow measurements * lake or reservoir elevation * periodic surface-water quality * periodic ecological data * historical continuous daily mean streamflow discontinued prior to the 2005 water year The map interface provides the ability to identify a station in spatial reference to the political boundaries of the State of Georgia and other features-such as major streams, major roads, and other collection stations. Each station is hyperlinked to a station summary showing seasonal and annual stream characteristics for the current year and for the period of record. For continuous discharge stations, the station summary includes a one page graphical summary page containing five graphs, a station map, and a photograph of the station. The graphs provide a quick overview of the current and period-of-record hydrologic conditions of the station by providing a daily mean discharge graph for the water year, monthly statistics graph for the water year and period of record, an annual mean streamflow graph for the period of record, an annual minimum 7-day average streamflow graph for the period of record, and an annual peak streamflow graph for the period of record. Additionally, data can be accessed through the layer's link

  9. Microbial Species Diversity, Community Dynamics, and Metabolite Kinetics of Water Kefir Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Laureys, David; De Vuyst, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Water kefir is a sour, alcoholic, and fruity fermented beverage of which the fermentation is started with water kefir grains. These water kefir grains consist of polysaccharide and contain the microorganisms responsible for the water kefir fermentation. In this work, a water kefir fermentation process was followed as a function of time during 192 h to unravel the community dynamics, the species diversity, and the kinetics of substrate consumption and metabolite production. The majority of the...

  10. Ultra Water Repellent Polypropylene Surfaces with Tunable Water Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tang; Cai, Chao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2017-03-22

    Polypropylene (PP), including isotactic PP (i-PP) and atactic PP (a-PP) with distinct tacticity, is one of the most widely used general plastics. Herein, ultra water repellent PP coatings with tunable adhesion to water were prepared via a simple casting method. The pure i-PP coating shows a hierarchical morphology with micro/nanobinary structures, exhibiting a water contact angle (CA) larger than 150° and a sliding angle less than 5° (for 5 μL water droplet). In contrast, the pure a-PP coating has a less rough morphology with a water contact angle of about 130°, and the water droplets stick on the coating at any tilted angles. For the composite i-PP/a-PP coatings, however, ultra water repellency with CA > 150° but water adhesion tailorable from slippery to sticky can be realized, depending on the contents of a-PP and i-PP. The different wetting behaviors are due to the various microstructures of the composite coatings resulting from the distinct crystallization ability of a-PP and i-PP. Furthermore, the existence of a-PP in the composite coatings enhances the mechanical properties compared to the i-PP coating. The proposed method is feasible to modify various substrates and potential applications in no-loss liquid transportation, slippery surfaces, and patterned superhydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  11. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature 500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  12. Deposition kinetics of MS2 bacteriophages on clay mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Meiping; Shen, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-04-01

    The deposition of bacteriophage MS2 on bare and clay-coated silica surfaces was examined in both monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2) and MgCl(2)) solutions under a wide range of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Two types of clay, bentonite and kaolinite, were concerned in this study. To better understand MS2 deposition mechanisms, QCM-D data were complemented by zeta potentials measurements and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction forces calculation. In both monovalent and divalent solutions, deposition efficiencies of MS2 increased with increasing ionic strength both on bare and clay-coated surfaces, which agreed with the trends of interaction forces between MS2 and solid surface and thus was consistent with DLVO theory. The presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in solutions greatly increased virus deposition on both silica and clay deposited surfaces. Coating silica surfaces with clay minerals, either kaolinite or bentonite, could significantly increase MS2 deposition.

  13. Adsorption rate of phenol from aqueous solution onto organobentonite: surface diffusion and kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Perez, Raul; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    The concentration decay curves for the adsorption of phenol on organobentonite were obtained in an agitated tank batch adsorber. The experimental adsorption rate data were interpreted with diffusional models as well as first-order, second-order and Langmuir kinetic models. The surface diffusion model adjusted the data quite well, revealing that the overall rate of adsorption was controlled by surface diffusion. Furthermore, the surface diffusion coefficient increased raising the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium and was independent of the particle diameter in the range 0.042-0.0126 cm. It was demonstrated that the overall rate of adsorption was essentially not affected by the external mass transfer. The second-order and the Langmuir kinetic models fitted the experimental data quite well; however, the kinetic constants of both models varied without any physical meaning while increasing the particle size and the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Ciprofloxacin Oxidation on Hematite Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sébastien; Shchukarev, Andrey; Hanna, Khalil; Boily, Jean-François

    2015-10-20

    Adsorption of antibiotics at mineral surfaces has been extensively studied over the past 20 years, yet much remains to be learned on their interfacial properties and transformation mechanisms. In this study, interactions of Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic with two sets of synthetic nanosized hematite particles, with relatively smooth (H10, 10-20 nm in diameter) and roughened (H80, 80-90 nm in diameter) surfaces, were studied by means of liquid chromatography (LC), mass spectrometry (MS), and spectroscopy (vibration and X-ray photoelectron). Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy provides evidence for inner-sphere bidentate complex formation of CIP at hematite surfaces in 0.01 M NaCl, irrespective of pH and particle size. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy also revealed that the sorbed mother CIP molecule decayed to other surface species over a period of at least 65 h. This was supported by the detection of three daughter products in the aqueous phase by LC/MS. The appearance of NH3(+) groups during the course of these experiments, revealed by cryogenic XPS, provides further evidence that CIP oxidation proceeds through an opening of piperazine ring via N-dealkylation. Additional in vacuo FTIR experiments under temperature-programmed desorption also showed that oxidation of sorbed byproducts were effectively degraded beyond 450 °C, a result denoting considerably strong (inter)molecular bonds of both mother and daughter products. This work also showed that rougher, possibly multidomainic particles (H80) generated slower rates of CIP decomposition but occurring through more complex schemes than at smoother particle surfaces (H10). This work thus uncovered key aspects of the binding of an important antibiotic at iron oxide surfaces, and therefore provided additional constraints to our growing understanding of the fate of emerging contaminants in the environment.

  15. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  16. Kinetics of Microstructure Evolution during Gaseous Thermochecical Surface Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Christiansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nitrogen or carbon in steel is widely applied to provide major improvements in-materials performance with respect to fatigue, weaif tribology, and atmospheric corrosion. These improvements rely on a modification of the surface-adjacent region of the materiat by tl.re (interna...

  17. Kinetics of Microstructure Evolution during Gaseous Thermochemical Surface Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Christiansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nitrogen or carbon in steel is widely applied to provide major improvements in materials performance with respect to fatigue, wear, tribology and atmospheric corrosion. These improvements rely on a modification of the surface adjacent region of the material, by the (internal)...

  18. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Kostik; Biljana Bauer; Zoran Kavrakovski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  19. Thermodynamic properties of water solvating biomolecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, Matthias

    Changes in the potential energy and entropy of water molecules hydrating biomolecular interfaces play a significant role for biomolecular solubility and association. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods allow calculations of free energy differences between two states from simulations. However, these methods are computationally demanding and do not provide insights into individual thermodynamic contributions, i.e. changes in the solvent energy or entropy. Here, we employ methods to spatially resolve distributions of hydration water thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of biomolecular surfaces. This allows direct insights into thermodynamic signatures of the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solvent accessible sites of proteins and small molecules and comparisons to ideal model surfaces. We correlate dynamic properties of hydration water molecules, i.e. translational and rotational mobility, to their thermodynamics. The latter can be used as a guide to extract thermodynamic information from experimental measurements of site-resolved water dynamics. Further, we study energy-entropy compensations of water at different hydration sites of biomolecular surfaces. This work is supported by the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC 1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  20. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Lance, Blake; Ho, Clifford K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0deg, 10deg, and 45deg), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47deg contact angle and non-wetting = 93deg contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of %7E3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45deg tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  1. Adsorption of gaseous hydrocarbons on activated carbon: characteristic kinetic curve. [Includes effect of surface migration on kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.; Calleja, G.; Domingo, F.

    1985-06-01

    The internal diffusion coefficients, D /sub i/ , of pure methane, ethane and ethylene as well as some of their binary and ternary mixtures, have been calculated at 20/sup 0/C for solid particles of a commercial activated carbon. It has been observed that the contribution of the surface migration mechanism to the global mass transfer process inside the adsorbent particles can be as much as 70-80%. Values for the surface migration coefficient D /sub s/ have also been calculated from the relation D /sub i/ = D /sub g/ + KD /sub s/ , where K is a dimensionless mean slope factor. Values found for both coefficients are of the same order of magnitude as those reported in the literature for similar systems. All the values for the internal diffusion coefficients of these pure components and their mixtures fit into a single correlation curve, the characteristic kinetic curve of the adsorbent.

  2. Kinetics of surface dissolution: A coupled thermodynamics-climatic approach for Titan and the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Cordier, Daniel; Le Bahers, Tangui; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    (water, carbon dioxide). With the help of the thermodynamic theory of solid-liquid equilibria, we are able to predict the maximum solubility of Titan's pure solids and Earth's pure minerals in the corresponding relevant liquid. The kinetics of surface dissolution are computed in the model using the estimates of the maximum solubilities associated with a reasonable range of atmospheric precipitation rates estimates for both Titan and the Earth. The comparison between terrestrial and titanian dissolution rates indicates that dissolution should be as significant for the evolution of Titan's surface as it is for Earth's. Quantitative assessment of dissolution rates on Titan will help to constrain the age of its lacustrine depressions.

  3. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Herrera Delgado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented in a one-dimensional flow field description of a fixed bed reactor. The model is evaluated by comparison of numerical simulations with data derived from isothermal experiments in a flow reactor over a powdered nickel-based catalyst using varying inlet gas compositions and operating temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of hydrogen and water as co-feed on methane dry reforming with CO2 is also investigated.

  4. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  5. Second Harmonic Correlation Spectroscopy: Theory and Principles for Determining Surface Binding Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2017-06-01

    A novel application of second harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) for the direct determination of molecular adsorption and desorption kinetics to a surface is discussed in detail. The surface-specific nature of second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an efficient means to determine the kinetic rates of adsorption and desorption of molecular species to an interface without interference from bulk diffusion, which is a significant limitation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The underlying principles of SHCS for the determination of surface binding kinetics are presented, including the role of optical coherence and optical heterodyne mixing. These properties of SHCS are extremely advantageous and lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise (S/N) of the correlation data, increasing the sensitivity of the technique. The influence of experimental parameters, including the uniformity of the TEM00 laser beam, the overall photon flux, and collection time are also discussed, and are shown to significantly affect the S/N of the correlation data. Second harmonic correlation spectroscopy is a powerful, surface-specific, and label-free alternative to other correlation spectroscopic methods for examining surface binding kinetics.

  6. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water: Multifactorial determination of significant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshuk, Tim; de Oliveira Livera, Diogo; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Vijayaraghavan, Sucharita; Wong, Timothy; Gu, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is generated as a byproduct of bitumen extraction in Canada's oil sands. Due to the water's toxicity, associated with dissolved acid extractable organics (AEO), especially naphthenic acids (NAs), along with base-neutral organics, OSPW may require treatment to enable safe discharge to the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalysis is a promising advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW remediation, however, predicting treatment efficacy can be challenging due to the unique water chemistry of OSPW from different tailings ponds. The objective of this work was to study various factors affecting the kinetics of photocatalytic AEO degradation in OSPW. The rate of photocatalytic treatment varied significantly in two different OSPW sources, which could not be accounted for by differences in AEO composition, as studied by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The effects of inorganic water constituents were investigated using factorial and response surface experiments, which revealed that hydroxyl (HO) radical scavenging by iron (Fe(3+)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) inhibited the NA degradation rate. The effects of NA concentration and temperature on the treatment kinetics were also evaluated in terms of Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Arrhenius models; pH and temperature were identified as weak factors, while dissolved oxygen (DO) was critical to the photo-oxidation reaction. Accounting for all of these variables, a general empirical kinetic expression is proposed, enabling prediction of photocatalytic treatment performance in diverse sources of OSPW.

  7. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  8. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of calspermin-calmodulin binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew J; Kemp, Fred; Love, John

    2008-05-01

    We cloned, expressed, and purified a chimeric fusion between a soluble green fluorescent protein (smGFP) and the calmodulin binding protein calspermin. We have shown that the fusion protein, labeled smGN, has a K(i) in the calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity assay of 1.97 nM, i.e., 3800 times smaller than that of the commonly used calmodulin inhibitor W7. Association and dissociation rate constants (k(a) and k(d)) and the dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) of smGN for calmodulin were determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The k(a)=1.24 x 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), the k(d)=5.49 x 10(-3)s(-1), and the K(D)=4.42 x 10(-9)M. We also found that the GFP moiety was important for successfully binding calspermin to the surface of the CM5 flow cell at a sufficiently high concentration for SPR, and that this procedure may be used for SPR analysis of other acidic polypeptides, whose pIliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, indicating a high level of specificity. We conclude that the high affinity and specific binding between smGN and calmodulin make it an easily localized recombinant alternative to chemical calmodulin inhibitors.

  9. Streamers sliding on a water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishev, Yuri Semenov; Karalnik, Vladimir; Medvedev, Mikhail; Petryakov, Alexander; Trushkin, Nikolay; Shafikov, Airat

    2017-06-01

    The features of an electrical interaction between surface streamers (thin current filaments) sliding on a liquid and liquid itself are still unknown in many details. This paper presents the experimental results on properties of the surface streamers sliding on water with different conductivity (distilled and tap water). The streamers were initiated with a sharpened thin metallic needle placed above the liquid and stressed with a periodical or pulsed high voltage. Two electrode systems were used and tested. The first of them provides in advance the existence of the longitudinal electric field above the water. The second one imitates the electrode geometry of a pin-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge in which the barrier is a thick layer of liquid. The electrical and optical characteristics of streamers were complemented with data on the spectroscopic measurements. It was revealed that surface streamers on water have no spatial memory. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  10. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  11. DEFLUORIDATION OF DRINKING WATER BY ELECTROCOAGULATION/ELECTROFLOTATION - KINETIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennajah Mounir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A variable order kinetic (VOK model derived from the langmuir-freundlish equation was applied to determine the kinetics of fluoride removal reaction by electrocoagulation (EC. Synthetic solutions were employed to elucidate the effects of the initial fluoride concentration, the applied current and the initial acidity on the simulation results of the model. The proposed model successfully describes the fluoride removal in Airlift reactor in comparison with the experimental results. In this study two EC cells with the same capacity (V = 20 L were used to carry out fluoride removal with aluminum electrodes, the first is a stirred tank reactor (STR the second is an airlift reactor (ALR. The comparison of energy consumption demonstrates that the (ALR is advantageous for carrying out the defluoridation removal process.

  12. DEFLUORIDATION OF DRINKING WATER BY ELECTROCOAGULATION/ELECTROFLOTATION: KINETIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Bennajah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A variable order kinetic (VOK model derived from the langmuir-freundlish equation was applied to determine the kinetics of fluoride removal reaction by electrocoagulation (EC. Synthetic solutions were employed to elucidate the effects of the initial fluoride concentration, the applied current and the initial acidity on the simulation results of the model. The proposed model successfully describes the fluoride removal in Airlift reactor in comparison with the experimental results. In this study two EC cells with the same capacity (V = 20 L were used to carry out fluoride removal with aluminum electrodes, the first is a stirred tank reactor (STR the second is an airlift reactor (ALR. The comparison of energy consumption demonstrates that the (ALR is advantageous for carrying out the defluoridation removal process.

  13. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Kinetics of wetting of liquid on a solid surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To consider a sessile drop on an ideal solid surface in equilibrium with a vapor phase, the classic Young equation was given. The derivation of the Young equation was based on both the mechanics and the energy knowledge. According to the constant volume of the liquid in the wetting process of the liquid on a smooth and homogeneous solid surface and the low energy law, Young equation was ob-tained through the mathematic method in this paper. The previous work indicated that the contact angle θ was a function of time, but the coefficient can be obtained only through experiments. It was assumed that the liquid was steady Newtonian flow. Then the relationships between the dynamic contact angles and the wetting time were found in terms of the equilibrium of the spreading force and the restoring force. An immediate theoretical justification for the dependence of contact angles and the time was given. It was assumed that the effect of the gravity on wetting was negligible in the investigation. Under what conditions was the gravity negligible? The criterion of the gravity on the wetting process of the liquid was proposed when contact angles were greater than 90°. If the criterion, I, was much smaller than 1, the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could be ignored. If the criterion, I, was equal to or larger than 1, the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could not be ignored. On mercury-mica systems, the gravity may be considered only when the equilibrium contact radius reached 1.5 mm.

  15. Kinetics of wetting of liquid on a solid surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chuang; LI BangSheng; REN MingXing; FU HengZhi

    2009-01-01

    To consider a sessile drop on an ideal solid surface In equilibrium with a vapor phase,the classic Young equation was given.The derivation of the Young equation was based on both the mechanics and the energy knowledge.According to the constant volume of the liquid in the wetting process of the liquid on a smooth and homogeneous solid surface and the low energy law,Young equation was obtained through the mathematic method in this paper.The previous work indicated that the contact angle θ was a function of time,but the coefficient can be obtained only through experiments.It was assumed that the liquid was steady Newtonian flow.Then the relationships between the dynamic contact angles and the wetting time were found in terms of the equilibrium of the spreading force and the restoring force.An immediate theoretical justification for the dependence of contact angles and the time was given.It was assumed that the effect of the gravity on wetting was negligible in the investigation.Under what conditions was the gravity negligible? The criterion of the gravity on the wetting process of the liquid was proposed when contact angles were greater than 90°.If the criterion,Ⅰ,was much smaller than 1,the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could be ignored.If the criterion,Ⅰ,was equal to or larger than 1,the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could not be ignored.On mercury-mica systems,the gravity may be considered only when the equilibrium contact radius reached 1.5 mm.

  16. Variations in calcite growth kinetics with surface topography: molecular dynamics simulations and process-based growth kinetics modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Zhimei; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cation dehydration is the rate-limiting step to crystal growth from aqueous solution. Here we employ classical molecular dynamics simulations to show that the water exchange frequency at structurally distinct calcium sites in the calcite surface varies by about two orde

  17. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality

  18. Weak mixing and anomalous kinetics along filamented surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, G. M.; Edelman, M.

    2001-06-01

    We consider chaotic properties of a particle in a square billiard with a horizontal bar in the middle. Such a system can model field-line windings of the merged surfaces. The system has weak-mixing properties with zero Lyapunov exponent and entropy, and it can be also interesting as an example of a system with intermediate chaotic properties, between the integrability and strong mixing. We show that the transport is anomalous and that its properties can be linked to the ergodic properties of continued fractions. The distribution of Poincaré recurrences, distribution of the displacements, and the moments of the truncated distribution of the displacements are obtained. Connections between different exponents are found. It is shown that the distribution function of displacements and its truncated moments as a function of time exhibit log-periodic oscillations (modulations) with a universal period Tlog=π2/12 ln 2. We note that similar results are valid for a family of billiard, particularly for billiards with square-in-square geometry.

  19. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  20. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  1. Convergent surface water distributions in U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.K. Steele; J.B. Heffernan; N. Bettez; J. Cavender-Bares; P.M. Groffman; J.M. Grove; S. Hall; S.E. Hobbie; K. Larson; J.L. Morse; C. Neill; K.C. Nelson; J. O' Neil-Dunne; L. Ogden; D.E. Pataki; C. Polsky; R. Roy Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Earth's surface is rapidly urbanizing, resulting in dramatic changes in the abundance, distribution and character of surface water features in urban landscapes. However, the scope and consequences of surface water redistribution at broad spatial scales are not well understood. We hypothesized that urbanization would lead to convergent surface water abundance and...

  2. Removal of bentazone from micro-polluted water using MIEX resin: Kinetics, equilibrium, and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zequn Liu; Xiaomin Yan; Mary Drikas; Danong Zhou; Dongsheng Wang; Min Yang; Jiuhui Qu

    2011-01-01

    The contamination of surface and ground water by bentazone has attracted increasing global concern in recent years.We conducted a detailed investigation using MIEX resin to eliminate bentazone from waters.Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of process parameters, such as retention time, resin amount, and initial pesticide concentration, on removal efficiency of bentazone.Results showed the sorption process was fast and bentazone could be efficiently removed in 30 minutes.The kinetic process of bentazone sorption on MIEX resin was well described by pseudo second-order model and intraparticle diffusion was the rate controlling step.The MIEX resin possessed the highest sorption capacity of 0.2656 mmol/mL for bentazone according to Langmuir fitting.Bentazone is a hydrophobic ionizable organic compound, and both ionic charge and hydrophobic aromatic structure governed the sorption characteristics on MIEX resin.The different removal efficiencies of ionic and non-ionic pesticides, combined with the charge balance equations of bentazone, SO42-, NO3- and Cl-, indicated that removal of bentazone using MIEX resin occurred primarily via ion exchange.

  3. Study of adsorption kinetics for fluorescent whitening agent on fiber surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG XianNan; HUANG YanGui; CHAI XinSheng; WEI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics for a stilbene derivative type fluorescent whitening agent (FWA) on fiber surfaces was studied based on a real-time spectroscopic measurement system. Results showed that the time-dependent behavior of FWA agrees to that of a mono-molecular adsorption layer on fiber surfaces, as characterized in Langmuir-type expression. The adsorption has two distinguishable stages include-ing initial fast phase with the primary constant of 1.51×1014 and the later near-equilibrium phase with the secondary constant of 4.96×10-4, The maximum amount of FWA adsorbed on fiber surfaces is 1.67×10-4g (per dry weight based fiber) in the initial phase. A mathematical model of adsorption kinetics was therefore established and evaluated, This model is important for the optimization of FWA applica-tion in papermaking.

  4. Study of adsorption kinetics for fluorescent whitening agent on fiber surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics for a stilbene derivative type fluorescent whitening agent (FWA) on fiber surfaces was studied based on a real-time spectroscopic measurement system. Results showed that the time-dependent behavior of FWA agrees to that of a mono-molecular adsorption layer on fiber surfaces,as characterized in Langmuir-type expression. The adsorption has two distinguishable stages includ-ing initial fast phase with the primary constant of 1.51×1014 and the later near-equilibrium phase with the secondary constant of 4.96×10-4. The maximum amount of FWA adsorbed on fiber surfaces is 1.67×10-4g (per dry weight based fiber) in the initial phase. A mathematical model of adsorption kinetics was therefore established and evaluated. This model is important for the optimization of FWA applica-tion in papermaking.

  5. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  6. In Situ Atomic Scale Visualization Of Surface Kinetics Driven Dynamics Of Oxide Growth On A Ni–Cr Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Zou, Lianfeng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Baer, Donald R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Zhou, Guangwen; Wang, Chong M.

    2016-01-20

    We report in situ atomic-scale visualization of the dynamical three-dimensional (3D) growth of NiO during initial oxidation of Ni-10at%Cr using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). Despite the thermodynamic preference for Cr2O3 formation, cubic NiO oxides nucleated and grew epitaxially as the dominating oxide phase on the Ni-Cr (100) surface during initial oxidation. The growth of NiO islands proceeds through step-by-step adatom mechanism in 3D, which is sustained by surface diffusion of Ni and O atoms. Although the shapes of oxide islands are controlled by strain energy between oxide and alloy substrate, local surface kinetic variations can lead to the change of surface planes of oxide islands. These results demonstrate that surface diffusion dominates initial oxidation of Ni-Cr in these test conditions.

  7. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of sodium cromoglycate adsorption on chitosan: mass uptake and surface charging considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, C R M; Pereira, M R; Fonseca, J L C

    2013-09-01

    Chitosan has more and more been suggested as a material for use as adsorbent in the treatment of effluents as well as in the synthesis of drug-loaded nanoparticles for controlled release. In both cases, a good understanding of the process of adsorption, both kinetically and in terms of equilibrium, has an importance of its own. In this manuscript we study the interaction between sodium cromoglycate, a drug used in asthma treatment, and chitosan. Equilibrium experiments showed that Sips (or Freundlich-Langmuir) isotherm described well the resultant data and adsorption possibly occurred as in multilayers. A model based on ordinary reaction-rate theory, compounded of two processes, each one with a correlated velocity constant, described the kinetics of sorption. Kinetic and equilibrium data suggested the possibility of surface rearrangement, favored by the increase of temperature.

  8. Investigation of equilibration and growth of stepped surfaces by Kinetic Monte Carlo in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkan, A.; Esen, M.; Tüzemen, A. Türker; Özdemir, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the equilibration and in the case of a particle flux to the surface, the growth of a one dimensional semi-conductor surface of "V" initial shape is investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo method. The initial surface is assumed to consist of atomic height steps separated by terraces. In Monte Carlo simulations, the following processes are considered: the diffusion of free particles on the surface, the attachment/detachment of particles to/from step edges from/to a terrace in front of a step or to a terrace above the step. In the simulations the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier is also taken into account. The equilibration of "V" initial shape at various temperatures is investigated. Moreover, the effect of particle bonding energy on the surface profile and on the evolution of the surface is also investigated. In the case of a particle flux to the surface, the surface profile and its growth kinetics are investigated at various temperatures and flux values.

  9. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of surface segregation in Pd–Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, Nanjing University (China); He, Xiang [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chen, Zhao-Xu, E-mail: zxchen@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, Nanjing University (China); Huang, Yu-Gai [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, Nanjing University (China); JiangSu Second Normal University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-05

    The knowledge of surface composition and atomic arrangement is prerequisite for understanding of catalytic properties of an alloy catalyst. Gaining such knowledge is rather difficult, especially for those possessing surface segregation. Pd–Cu alloy is used in many fields and possesses surface segregation. In this paper kinetic Monte Carlo method is used to explore the surface composition and structure and to examine the effects of bulk composition and temperature on the surface segregation of Pd–Cu alloys. It is shown that the segregation basically completes within 900 s at 500 K. Below 900 K and within 20 min the enriched surface Cu atoms mainly come from the top five layers. For the first time we demonstrate that there exists a “bulk-inside flocking” or clustering phenomenon (the same component element congregates in bulk) in Pd–Cu alloys. Our results indicate that for alloys with higher Cu content there are small Pd ensembles like monomers, dimers and trimers with contiguous subsurface Pd atoms. - Highlights: • Kinetic Monte Carlo was first used to study surface segregation of Pd–Cu alloys. • Bulk-inside flocking (the same component element congregates in bulk) was observed. • Small Pd ensembles with contiguous subsurface Pd exist on surfaces of Cu-rich alloys.

  10. Unraveling the surface formation of regular and deuterated water in space : a combined laboratory and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Agneta Luciana Matthanja (Thanja)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of regular and deuterated water in ices and on surfaces against an interstellar background. A large network for the formation of regular water has been studied with the use of a Kinetic Monte Carlo model. A specific reaction has been investigated as well: H2 + O -

  11. Surface Transformations and Water Uptake on Liquid and Solid Butanol near the Melting Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S; Markovic, Nikola; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Water interactions with organic surfaces are of central importance in biological systems and many Earth system processes. Here we describe experimental studies of water collisions and uptake kinetics on liquid and solid butanol from 160 to 200 K. Hyperthermal D2O molecules (0.32 eV) undergo efficient trapping on both solid and liquid butanol, and only a minor fraction scatters inelastically after an 80% loss of kinetic energy to surface modes. Trapped molecules either desorb within a few ms, or are taken up by the butanol phase during longer times. The water uptake and surface residence time increase with temperature above 180 K indicating melting of the butanol surface 4.5 K below the bulk melting temperature. Water uptake changes gradually across the melting point and trapped molecules are rapidly lost by diffusion into the liquid above 190 K. This indicates that liquid butanol maintains a surface phase with limited water permeability up to 5.5 K above the melting point. These surface observations are indic...

  12. Ocean swell within the kinetic equation for water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Badulin, Sergei I

    2016-01-01

    Effects of wave-wave interactions on ocean swell are studied. Results of extensive simulations of swell evolution within the duration-limited setup for the kinetic Hasselmann equation at long times up to $10^6$ seconds are presented. Basic solutions of the theory of weak turbulence, the so-called Kolmogorov-Zakharov solutions, are shown to be relevant to the results of the simulations. Features of self-similarity of wave spectra are detailed and their impact on methods of ocean swell monitoring are discussed. Essential drop of wave energy (wave height) due to wave-wave interactions is found to be pronounced at initial stages of swell evolution (of order of 1000 km for typical parameters of the ocean swell). At longer times wave-wave interactions are responsible for a universal angular distribution of wave spectra in a wide range of initial conditions.

  13. Equilibrium Kinetics and Isotherm Studies of Cu (II Adsorption from Waste Water onto Alkali Activated Oil Palm Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Z. Chowdhury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Heavy metal accumulation in waste water could affect aquatic life, human health and overall ecosystem adversely. Therefore, in recent years much emphasis has been given for the use of industrial waste material as low cost adsorbents for removal of metallic contaminants from waste water. Approach: Present study deals with the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of Cu (II cation using sodium hydroxide activated Oil Palm Ash (OPA. Adsorption was investigated in a batch system with respect to various parameters such as initial metal ion concentration, contact time and pH of the solution. Surface characterization of the prepared adsorbent was done by using surface area analyzer, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and X-ray Fluorescence and compared with natural oil palm ash. The adsorption equilibrium data were best represented by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin model. Equilibrium kinetics studies were performed by Pseudo first order, Pseudo second order and Intra-particle diffusion. Results: Maximum monolayer adsorption capacity observed at 30°C was 18.86 mg g−1. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo second order model, suggesting that the adsorption process might be chemical sorption. The linear plots of intra particle diffusion revealed that the adsorption process was mainly governed by pore diffusion. Equilibrium uptake was increased with increase of initial concentration and contact time. Experimental data showed that about 96.03% of copper can be removed at pH 5.5. Conclusion: The research concluded that activation by alkali treatment of natural OPA would produce sufficient porosities and surface area and it has got good potential to remove Cu (II from waste water.

  14. Kinetics of Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum in Acidic Media by Water-Soluble Natural Polymeric Pectates as Anionic Polyelectrolyte Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat M. Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion inhibition of aluminum (Al in hydrochloric acid by anionic polyeletrolyte pectates (PEC as a water-soluble natural polymer polysaccharide has been studied using both gasometric and weight loss techniques. The results drawn from these two techniques are comparable and exhibit negligible differences. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The inhibition action of PEC on Al metal surface was found to obey the Freundlich isotherm. Factors such as the concentration and geometrical structure of the inhibitor, concentration of the corrosive medium, and temperature affecting the corrosion rates were examined. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and a suitable corrosion mechanism consistent with the kinetic results is discussed in the paper.

  15. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  16. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  17. Water droplet evaporation from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Kim, Wuseok; Lee, Sanghee; Baek, Seunghyeon; Yong, Kijung; Jeon, Sangmin

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation dynamics of water from sticky superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microresonator and an optical microscope. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) layers with different pore sizes were directly fabricated onto quartz crystal substrates and hydrophobized via chemical modification. The resulting AAO layers exhibited hydrophobic or superhydrophobic characteristics with strong adhesion to water due to the presence of sealed air pockets inside the nanopores. After placing a water droplet on the AAO membranes, variations in the resonance frequency and Q-factor were measured throughout the evaporation process, which were related to changes in mass and viscous damping, respectively. It was found that droplet evaporation from a sticky superhydrophobic surface followed a constant contact radius (CCR) mode in the early stage of evaporation and a combination of CCR and constant contact angle modes without a Cassie-Wenzel transition in the final stage. Furthermore, AAO membranes with larger pore sizes exhibited longer evaporation times, which were attributed to evaporative cooling at the droplet interface.

  18. Use of molecular beams for kinetic measurements of chemical reactions on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    In this review we survey the contributions that molecular beam experiments have provided to our understanding of the dynamics and kinetics of chemical interactions of gas molecules with solid surfaces. First, we describe the experimental details of the different instrumental setups and approaches available for the study of these systems under the ultrahigh vacuum conditions and with the model planar surfaces often used in modern surface-science experiments. Next, a discussion is provided of the most important fundamental aspects of the dynamics of chemical adsorption that have been elucidated with the help of molecular beam experiments, which include the development of potential energy surfaces, the determination of the different channels for energy exchange between the incoming molecules and the surface, the identification of adsorption precursor states, the understanding of dissociative chemisorption, the determination of the contributions of corrugation, steps, and other structural details of the surface to the adsorption process, the effect to molecular steering, the identification of avenues for assisting adsorption, and the molecular details associated with the kinetics of the uptake of adsorbates as a function of coverage. We follow with a summary of the work directed at the determination of kinetic parameters and mechanistic details of surface reactions associated with catalysis, mostly those promoted by late transition metals. This discussion we initiate with an overview of what has been learned about simple bimolecular reactions such as the oxidation of CO and H2 with O2 and the reaction of CO with NO, and continue with the review of the studies of more complex systems such as the oxidation of alcohols, the conversion of organic acids, the hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins, and the oxidative activation of alkanes under conditions of short contact times. Sections 6 and 7 of this review deal with the advances made in the use of molecular beams with

  19. Growth kinetics of indium metal atoms on Si(1 1 2) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Vidur; Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Controlled growth of indium atoms on Si(1 1 2) surface has been carried out systematically and the influence of substrate temperature on the kinetics is analysed under various growth conditions. Temperature induced anomalous layer-to-clusters transformation during thermal desorption has also been reported. - Highlights: • Controlled growth of indium atoms on Si(1 1 2) surface & their thermal stability. • Influence of substrate temperature on the kinetics under various growth conditions. • Temperature induced layer-to-clusters transformation during thermal desorption. - Abstract: The growth kinetics and desorption behavior of indium (In) atoms grown on high index Si(1 1 2) surface at different substrate temperatures has been studied. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis revealed that In growth at room temperature (RT) and high substrate temperature (HT) ∼250 °C follows Frank–van der Merve growth mode whereas at temperatures ≥450 °C, In growth evolves through Volmer–Weber growth mode. Thermal desorption studies of RT and 250 °C grown In/Si(1 1 2) systems show temperature induced rearrangement of In atoms over Si(1 1 2) surface leading to clusters to layer transformation. The monolayer and bilayer desorption energies for RT grown In/Si(1 1 2) system are calculated to be 2.5 eV and 1.52 eV, while for HT-250 °C the values are found to be 1.6 eV and 1.3 eV, respectively. This study demonstrates the effect of temperature on growth kinetics as well as on the multilayer/monolayer desorption pathway of In on Si(1 1 2) surface.

  20. Sequence and Temperature Influence on Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement at Gold Electrode Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biala, Katarzyna; Sedova, Ada; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2015-09-16

    Understanding complex contributions of surface environment to tethered nucleic acid sensing experiments has proven challenging, yet it is important because it is essential for interpretation and calibration of indispensable methods, such as microarrays. We investigate the effects of DNA sequence and solution temperature gradients on the kinetics of strand displacement at heated gold wire electrodes, and at gold disc electrodes in a heated solution. Addition of a terminal double mismatch (toehold) provides a reduction in strand displacement energy barriers sufficient to probe the secondary mechanisms involved in the hybridization process. In four different DNA capture probe sequences (relevant for the identification of genetically modified maize MON810), all but one revealed a high activation energy up to 200 kJ/mol during hybridization, that we attribute to displacement of protective strands by capture probes. Protective strands contain 4 to 5 mismatches to ease their displacement by the surface-confined probes at the gold electrodes. A low activation energy (30 kJ/mol) was observed for the sequence whose protective strand contained a toehold and one central mismatch, its kinetic curves displayed significantly different shapes, and we observed a reduced maximum signal intensity as compared to other sequences. These findings point to potential sequence-related contributions to oligonucleotide diffusion influencing kinetics. Additionally, for all sequences studied with heated wire electrodes, we observed a 23 K lower optimal hybridization temperature in comparison with disc electrodes in heated solution, and greatly reduced voltammetric signals after taking into account electrode surface area. We propose that thermodiffusion due to temperature gradients may influence both hybridization and strand displacement kinetics at heated microelectrodes, an explanation supported by computational fluid dynamics. DNA assays with surface-confined capture probes and temperature

  1. Kinetic Isotopic Fractionation During Diffusion of Ionic Speciesin Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Frank M.; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Christensen, John; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Williams, Ross W.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Beloso Jr.,Abelardo D.

    2005-06-09

    Experiments specifically designed to measure the ratio of the diffusivities of ions dissolved in water were used to determine D{sub Li}/D{sub K}, D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}}, D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}}, D{sub 26{sub Mg}}/D{sub 25{sub Mg}}, and D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}}. The measured ratio of the diffusion coefficients for Li and K in water (D{sub Li}/D{sub K} = 0.6) is in good agreement with published data, providing evidence that the experimental design being used resolves the relative mobility of ions with adequate precision to also be used for determining the fractionation of isotopes by diffusion in water. In the case of Li we found measurable isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of dissolved LiCl (D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}} = 0.99772 {+-} 0.00026). This difference in the diffusion coefficient of {sup 7}Li compared to {sup 6}Li is significantly less than reported in an earlier study, a difference we attribute to the fact that in the earlier study Li diffused through a membrane separating the water reservoirs. Our experiments involving Mg diffusing in water found no measurable isotopic fractionation (D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}} = 1.00003 {+-} 0.00006). Cl isotopes were fractionated during diffusion in water (D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}} = 0.99857 {+-} 0.00080) whether or not the co-diffuser (Li or Mg) was isotopically fractionated. The isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of ions in water is much smaller than values we found previously for the isotopic fractionation of Li and Ca isotopes by diffusion in molten silicate liquids. A major distinction between water and silicate liquids is that water, being a polar liquid, surrounds dissolved ions with hydration shells, which very likely play an important but still poorly understood role in reducing isotopic fractionation associated with diffusion.

  2. Kinetic energy distribution of OH+ from water fragmentation by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Natalia; Sigaud, L.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    The release of the highly reactive radical OH+ from the fragmentation of water by electron impact is made mostly through the OH++H0 channel. This channel ejects suprathermal OH+ ions with a kinetic energy distribution whose details are unexplored so far due to the difficulty in experimentally characterizing ions ejected with very low kinetic energy without another charged partner. These ions are studied here using the delayed extraction time-of-flight technique (DETOF). The structures and substructures in the kinetic energy distribution of OH+ associated with both single and double ionization are identified qualitatively and quantitatively. A comparison with the kinetic energy distribution of the complementary channel OH0+H+ , also originating from vacancies in the 1 b2 orbital, shows marked differences between the two, mainly regarding the relative role between the fragmentation involving the H2O+ ground state or via transitions to repulsive states.

  3. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence...

  4. The effect of pH modification on wetting kinetics of a naturally water repellent coniferous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmad; Diehl, Dörte; Schaumann, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The interfacial dynamics of soil-water interactions are significantly affected by the hydrophobic properties of organic matter. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of soil water repellency (SWR) are still under discussion. Various environmental factors control the appearance and degree of SWR. The wetting of soil greatly depends on the physicochemical characteristics of soil surfaces which in turn depends on pH. In this contribution, we propose a mechanism for the change in SWR that is observed upon the artificial change in soil pH. Wetting kinetics were studied by the time dependent sessile drop measurements (TISED) of the contact angle, the work of spreading and the drop base diameter as time elapsed under controlled relative humidity. Modification of pH strongly affected the wetting kinetics, suggesting maximum wetting resistance at the control pH (3.60) and with decreased wetting resistance as pH was changed in either direction. The enhancement of the wetting kinetics by artificial modification of soil pH can be attributed to the chemical modification in organic materials coating soil particles based on the magnitude of spreading activation energy and the hydrophilic/hydrophobic moieties ratio of treated soil samples measured by (XPS & MIR spectroscopy). On the basis of our current state of knowledge, we propose that acid and base catalyzed hydrolysis-condensation reactions as dominant processes responsible for the chemical nature of SWR.

  5. Ocean swell within the kinetic equation for water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badulin, Sergei I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.

    2017-06-01

    Results of extensive simulations of swell evolution within the duration-limited setup for the kinetic Hasselmann equation for long durations of up to 2 × 106 s are presented. Basic solutions of the theory of weak turbulence, the so-called Kolmogorov-Zakharov solutions, are shown to be relevant to the results of the simulations. Features of self-similarity of wave spectra are detailed and their impact on methods of ocean swell monitoring is discussed. Essential drop in wave energy (wave height) due to wave-wave interactions is found at the initial stages of swell evolution (on the order of 1000 km for typical parameters of the ocean swell). At longer times, wave-wave interactions are responsible for a universal angular distribution of wave spectra in a wide range of initial conditions. Weak power-law attenuation of swell within the Hasselmann equation is not consistent with results of ocean swell tracking from satellite altimetry and SAR (synthetic aperture radar) data. At the same time, the relatively fast weakening of wave-wave interactions makes the swell evolution sensitive to other effects. In particular, as shown, coupling with locally generated wind waves can force the swell to grow in relatively light winds.

  6. Surface interactions of aromatic organoarsenical compounds with hematite nanoparticles using ATR-FTIR: kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Derek; Abdus Sabur, Md; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2013-03-14

    Aromatic organoarsenicals p-arsanilic acid (pAsA) and roxarsone (ROX) are used as feed additives in developing countries that allow the use of arsenic-containing compounds in their poultry industry. These compounds are introduced to the environment through the application of contaminated poultry litter. Little is known about the surface chemistry of these organoarsenicals on the molecular level with reactive components in soils. We report herein the first in situ and surface-sensitive rapid kinetic studies on the adsorption and desorption of pAsA to/from hematite nanoparticles at pH 7 using ATR-FTIR. Values for the apparent initial rates of adsorption and desorption were extracted from experimental data as a function of spectral components. Hydrogen phosphate was used as a desorbing agent due to its ubiquitous presence in litter, and its adsorption kinetics was investigated on surfaces with and without surface arsenic. Initial first-order pseudo-adsorption rate constant for pAsA was lower by a factor of 1.6 than that of iAs(V), suggesting an average behavior for the formation of quantitatively more weakly bonded monodentate or hydrogen-bonded complexes for the former relative to strongly bonded bidentate surface complexes for the latter under our experimental conditions. Initial first-order pseudo-adsorption rate constants for hydrogen phosphate decrease in this order: fresh hematite > pAsA/hematite ≈ phenylarsonic acid (PhAs)/hematite > iAs/hematite by factors 1.5 and 3 relative to fresh films, respectively. Initial desorption kinetics of aromatic organoarsenicals due to flowing hydrogen phosphate proceed with a nonunity overall order, suggesting a complex mechanism, which is consistent with the existence of more than one type of surface complexes. The impact of our studies on the environmental fate and transport of aromatic organoarsenicals in geochemical environments and their overall surface chemistry with iron (oxyhyr)oxides is discussed.

  7. Wettability and water uptake of holm oak leaf surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Plant trichomes play important protective functions and may have a major influence on leaf surface wettability. With the aim of gaining insight into trichome structure, composition and function in relation to water-plant surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of Quercus ilex L. (holm oak) as model. By measuring the leaf water potential 24 h after the deposition of water drops on to abaxial and adaxial surfaces, evidence for water penetration through the upper l...

  8. Groundwater–surface water interactions in wetlands for integrated water resources management (preface)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Winter, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater–surface water interactions constitute an important link between wetlands and the surrounding catchment. Wetlands may develop in topographic lows where groundwater exfiltrates. This water has its functions for ecological processes within the wetland, while surface water outflow from

  9. Diffusion Kinetics of Carbonate Hydroxyapatite (CHAP) for Adsorbing F- Dissolved in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhiliang; ZHANG Lianmeng; LIU Yu; WANG Qilin; HE Qianjun; CHEN Wei

    2006-01-01

    A systematic research was performed about diffusion kinetics of adsorbing F- dissolved in water for carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHAP) from the natural hydroxyapatite which was modified by adulterating with CO32-. The result shows that the speed of F- adsorption is controlled by membrane diffusion when F- concentration is relatively low, which is expressed by the kinetic equation of diffusion Q=0.0005(Ci-C)(t-ti)+0.3967, or by vacancy diffusion when F- concentration is relatively high, which is expressed by the kinetic equation of diffusion In[C(o, t)]=8.4718-0.5048Int. Based on the feature of CHAP for adsorbing F- dissolved in water and its special channel of the structure of CO32-- modified hydroxyapatite, models of vacancy diffusion and membrane diffusion were established.

  10. Influence of TiO{sub 2} Surface Properties on Water Pollution Treatment and Photocatalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Min [Southwest Univ. of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China)

    2013-03-15

    The titania surface showed different characteristics depending on the charge of the dye molecules. Compared with the MB molecules, the negatively charged MO molecules strongly adsorbed on the titania surface. Furthermore, the decomposition kinetics of the dye molecules by the photocatalytic activity also deepened with the charge of the dye molecules. The relation between the UV irradiation time and the molar ratio of the decomposed dye molecules followed the Avrami equation. According to the results of the analysis by using the Avrami equation, the MO molecules were decomposed on the titania particle surface. In contrast, the MB molecules were decomposed in the aqueous solution. The difference in kinetics was related to the interaction of the dye molecules and the titania surface. These preferential adsorption and decomposition characteristics will improve its applications in water pollution treatment.

  11. General survey and conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Publikatie die bestaat uit twee delen: 1. General survey of the relation between water quantity and water quality; 2. Conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

  12. Quartz crystal microbalance study of the kinetics of surface initiated polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Surface initiated polymerization (SIP) is a valuable tool in synthesizing functional polymer brushes,yet the kinetic understanding of SIP lags behind the development of its application. We apply quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to address two issues that are not fully addressed yet play a central role in the rational design of functional polymer brushes,namely quantitative determination of the kinetics and the initiator efficiency (IE) of SIP. SIP are monitored online using QCM. Two quantitative frequencythickness (f-T) relations make the direct determination and comparison of the rate of polymerization possible even for different monomers. Based on the bi-termination model,the kinetics of SIP is simply described by two variables,which are related to two polymerization constants,namely a = 1/(kp,s,app-[M][R·]0) and b = kt,s,app/(kp,s,app[M]). Factors that could alter the kinetics of SIP are studied,including (i) the molecular weight of monomers,(ii) the solvent used,(iii) the initial density of the initiator,(iv) the concentration of monomer,[M],and (v) the catalyst system (ratio among the ingredients,metal,ligands,and additives). The dynamic nature of IE is also described by these two variables,IE = a/(a + bt). Instead of the molecular weight and the polydispersity,we suggest that film thickness,the two kinetic parameters (a and b),and the initial density of the initiator and IE be the parameters that characterize ultrathin polymer brushes. Besides the kinetics study of SIP,the reported method has many other applications,for example,in the fast screening of catalyst system for SIP and other polymerization systems.

  13. Simulated single-cycle kinetics improves the design of surface plasmon resonance assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, William; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2013-09-30

    Instruments based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle are widely used to monitor in real time molecular interactions between a partner, immobilized on a sensor chip surface and another one injected in a continuous flow of buffer. In a classical SPR experiment, several cycles of binding and regeneration of the surface are performed in order to determine the rate and the equilibrium constants of the reaction. In 2006, Karlsson and co-workers introduced a new method named single-cycle kinetics (SCK) to perform SPR assays. The method consists in injecting sequentially increasing concentrations of the partner in solution, with only one regeneration step performed at the end of the complete binding cycle. A 10 base-pair DNA duplex was characterized kinetically to show how simulated sensorgrams generated by the BiaEvaluation software provided by Biacore™ could really improve the design of SPR assays performed with the SCK method. The DNA duplex was investigated at three temperatures, 10, 20 and 30 °C, to analyze fast and slow rate constants. The results show that after a short obligatory preliminary experiment, simulations provide users with the best experimental conditions to be used, in particular, the maximum concentration used to reach saturation, the dilution factor for the serial dilutions of the sample injected and the duration of the dissociation and association phases. The use of simulated single-cycle kinetics saves time and reduces sample consumption. Simulations can also be used to design SPR experiments with ternary complexes.

  14. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  15. Equilibrium and kinetics of water adsorption in carbon molecular sieve: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, S W; Coons, J E

    2004-09-28

    Measurements of water adsorption equilibrium and kinetics in Takeda carbon molecular sieve (CMS) were undertaken in an effort to characterize fundamental mechanisms of adsorption and transport. Adsorption equilibrium revealed a type III isotherm that was characterized by cooperative multimolecular sorption theory. Water adsorption was found to be reversible and did not display hysteresis upon desorption over the conditions studied. Adsorption kinetics measurements revealed that a Fickian diffusion mechanism governed the uptake of water and that the rate of adsorption decreased with increasing relative pressure. Previous investigations have attributed the observed decreasing trend in the rate of adsorption to blocking of micropores. Here, it is proposed that the decrease is attributed to the thermodynamic correction to Fick's law which is formulated on the basis of the chemical potential as the driving force for transport. The thermodynamically corrected formulation accounted for observations of transport of water and other molecules in CMS.

  16. Kinetics of biofilm formation by drinking water isolated Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Lima, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge on drinking water (DW) biofilms has been obtained mainly from studies on bacterial biofilms. Very few reports on filamentous fungi (ff) biofilms are available, although they can contribute to the reduction in DW quality. This study aimed to assess the dynamics of biofilm formation by Penicillium expansum using microtiter plates under static conditions, mimicking water flow behaviour in stagnant regions of drinking water distribution systems. Biofilms were analysed in terms of biomass (crystal violet staining), metabolic activity (resazurin, fluorescein diacetate and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide [MTT]) and morphology (epifluorescence [calcofluor white M2R, FUN-1, FDA and acridine orange] and bright-field microscopies). Biofilm development over time showed the typical sigmoidal curve with noticeable different phases in biofilm formation (induction, exponential, stationary, and sloughing off). The methods used to assess metabolic activity provided similar results. The microscope analysis allowed identification of the involvement of conidia in initial adhesion (4 h), germlings (8 h), initial monolayers (12 h), a monolayer of intertwined hyphae (24 h), mycelial development, hyphal layering and bundling, and development of the mature biofilms (≥48 h). P. expansum grows as a complex, multicellular biofilm in 48 h. The metabolic activity and biomass of the fungal biofilms were shown to increase over time and a correlation between metabolism, biofilm mass and hyphal development was found.

  17. Water-Promoted Kinetic Separation of trans- and cis-Limonene Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐招兵; 渠瑾

    2012-01-01

    The efficient hydrolytic kinetic separation of trans/cis-(R)-(+)-limonene oxides was realized in a 1 : 1 mixed solvent of water and 1,4-dioxane without additional catalyst. Optically pure trans-(R)-(+)-limonene oxide was recovered in high yield (77%).

  18. Recovery from acidification in European surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data for 56 long-term monitoring sites in eight European countries are used to assess freshwater responses to reductions in acid deposition at a large spatial scale. In a consistent analysis of trends from 1980 onwards, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56 showed significant (p ≤0.05 decreasing trends in pollution-derived sulphate. Only two sites showed a significant increase. Nitrate, on the other hand, had a much weaker and more varied pattern, with no significant trend at 35 of 56 sites, decreases at some sites in Scandinavia and Central Europe, and increases at some sites in Italy and the UK. The general reduction in surface water acid anion concentrations has led to increases in acid neutralising capacity (significant at 27 of 56 sites but has also been offset in part by decreases in base cations, particularly calcium (significant at 26 of 56 sites, indicating that much of the improvement in runoff quality to date has been the result of decreasing ionic strength. Increases in acid neutralising capacity have been accompanied by increases in pH and decreases in aluminium, although fewer trends were significant (pH 19 of 56, aluminium 13 of 53. Increases in pH appear to have been limited in some areas by rising concentrations of organic acids. Within a general trend towards recovery, some inter-regional variation is evident, with recovery strongest in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, moderate in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, and apparently weakest in Germany. Keywords: acidification, recovery, European trends, sulphate, nitrate, acid neutralising capacity

  19. Adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Imtithal; Kabbani, Ahmad; Holail, Hanafy

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have gained great attention because of their novel size- and shape-dependent properties, large specific surface area and high reaction activity. Moreover, nanomaterials have a wide range of applications, as in the technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion, catalysis, medicine, and water treatments. In the present study, nanostructured graphite oxide, silica/graphite oxide composites and silica nanoparticles were used for the removal of the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption method and the adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite was evaluated. The experimental results revealed a strong adsorption of the metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide, this is reflected in the shifts in wave numbers after adsorption with nanostructured graphite oxide and the big shift in wave numbers (Δv¯) for nickel ions reflects chemosorption type of adsorption. This is confirmed by the coherence between Δv¯, removal percentage and crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE). Silica/ GO (2:3) composite showed the greatest removal percentage at different concentrations compared to pure graphite oxide and silica nanoparticles. The higher removal percentage of nickel ions by silica /GO composite (2:3) was observed at 180 min contact time and basic pH. The kinetic studies showed that silica/ GO (2:3) composite had rapid adsorption rate and efficiency and it was found to follow first order rate expression or an exponential decay of the metal cations from water study.

  20. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  1. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  2. Dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at dolomite-water interfaces: effects of electrolyte specific ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Sullivan, Katie; Vanness, Garrett; Knauss, Kevin G; Higgins, Steven R

    2013-01-02

    Elucidating dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at carbonate mineral-water interfaces is essential to many environmental and geochemical processes, including geologic CO(2) sequestration in deep aquifers. In the present work, effects of background electrolytes on dolomite (CaMg(CO(3))(2)) reactivity were investigated by measuring step dissolution rates using in situ hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) at 90 °C. Cleaved surfaces of dolomite were exposed to sodium chloride and tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl) aqueous solutions with ionic strengths (I) ranging from 0 to 0.77 m at pH 4 and pH 9. HAFM results demonstrated that dolomite step retreat rates increased with increasing solution ionic strength and decreasing pH. Comparison of [481] and [441] steps revealed that the anisotropy of [481] and [441] step speeds became significant as solution ionic strength increased, with NaCl exerting more pronounced effects than TMACl for the same I. To interpret the different trends observed for NaCl and TMACl, a dissolution mechanism involving orientation-dependent ion adsorption and consequent edge free energy changes is proposed.

  3. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R B

    2001-04-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface

  4. Modeling surface disinfection kinetics of fresh tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum using chlorine solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Solano Cornejo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fresh tomatoes Italian variety were subjected to surface disinfection processes using calcium hypochlorite solutions to determine their germicidal efficiency and kinetics that governs the surface inactivation process in aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and molds. Chlorine as surface disinfectant was effective against aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and molds in this order, the resistance of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and molds of their values expressed in zchlorine was 455, 500 and 625 ppm respectively. Aerobic mesophilic bacteria present in the tomato surface show a higher resistance to chlorine disinfection according contact time germtomato skin is greater due to a better adherence to the tomato skin making it difficult for the action of chlorine on germs; this effect is not present in the case of yeasts or molds. Experimental Dchlorine 20°C values and Dchlorine_20°C values predicted by the First Bigelow’s Model were fit with a correlation of between 0.91 and 0.99. The experimental zchlorine values and values zchlorine predicted by the Second Bigelow’s Model were adjusted with a correlation of 0.72 to 0.86. The variability in the values zchlorine was because germs analyzed to validate the proposed model were composed of various genera. So, the Bigelow’s Method applied to inactivation kinetics of surface chlorine was validated.

  5. Surface induced constant composition crystal growth kinetics studies. The brushite gypsum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, A.; Nancollas, G. H.; Grynpas, M.

    2001-02-01

    The possible oriented growth of one crystalline phase on the surface of another is especially important in systems containing both phosphate and sulfate salts of calcium. Whether the overgrowth results from a true epitaxial relationship is dependent on factors such as the thermodynamic driving forces and the free energies of the surfaces. Despite the fact that calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD, gypsum) and calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite) show many crystallographic and structural analogies, their surface reactions are quite different. The nucleation and growth of gypsum on brushite surfaces has been investigated in supersaturated solutions of calcium sulfate dihydrate at 25.0°C using the constant composition (CC) method. During the kinetics experiments, the harvested solid phases were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). Induction periods, τ, preceding the initial formation of gypsum crystals at the brushite surfaces, varied markedly with relative supersaturation, σ. A thin layer wicking method was used to investigate the interfacial free energies of the growing phases, and these data were also calculated from the kinetics results. The interfacial free energy, γ, estimated from initial growth rates was 8.4 mJ m -2, while that calculated from the induction times was 8.9 mJ m -2. These values were in agreement with those determined directly using thin layer wicking.

  6. Effect of Ingredient Loading on Surface Migration Kinetics of Additives in Vulcanized Natural Rubber Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan B. Pajarito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface migration kinetics of chemical additives in vulcanized natural rubber compounds were studied as function of ingredient loading. Rubber sheets were compounded according to a 212-8 fractional factorial design of experiment, where ingredients were treated as factors varied at two levels of loading. Amount of migrated additives in surface of rubber sheets was monitored through time at ambient conditions. The maximum amount and estimated rate of additive migration were determined from weight loss kinetic curves. Attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to characterize the chemical structure and surface morphology of sheet specimens during additive migration. ANOVA results showed that increased loading of reclaimed rubber, CaCO3, and paraffin wax signif icantly decreased the maximum amount of additive migration; by contrast, increased loading of used oil, asphalt, and mercaptobenzothiazole disulphide (MBTS increased the maximum amount. Increased loading of sulfur, diphenylguanidine (DPG, and paraffin wax significantly decreased the additive migration rate; increased loading of used oil, asphalt, and stearic acid elicited an opposite effect. Comparison of ATRFTIR spectra of migrated and cleaned rubber surfaces showed signif icant variation in intensity of specif ic absorbance bands that are also present in infrared spectra of migrating chemicals. Paraffin wax, used oil, stearic acid, MBTS, asphalt, and zinc stearate were identified to bloom and bleed in the rubber sheets. Optical micrographs of migrated rubber surfaces revealed formation of white precipitates due to blooming and of semi-transparent wet patches due to bleeding.

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration Zoning and Kinetic Process of Mineral-Water Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣华; 胡书敏; 苏艳丰

    2002-01-01

    This study reports the kinetic experimental results of albite in water and in KCl solution at 22 MPa in the temperature range of 25 to 400(C. Kinetic experiments have been carried out in an open flow-through reaction system (packed bed reactor). Albite dissolution is always incongruent in water at most temperatures, but becomes congruent at 300(C (close to the critical point 374(C). At temperatures from 25 to 300(C, the incongruent dissolution of albite is reflected by the fact that sodium and aluminum are easily dissolved into water; from 300 to 400(C it is reflected by silicon being more easily dissolved in water than Al and Na. Maximum albite dissolution rates in the flow hydrothermal systems have been repeatedly observed at 300(C, independent of flow rates.The kinetic experiments of albite dissolution in a KCl aqueous solution (0.1 mol KCl) indicate that the dissolution rate of albite increases with increasing temperature. Maximum silicon release rates of albite have been observed at 400(C, while maximum aluminum release rates of albite at 374(C. The reaction rates of albite also depend on the potassium concentration in the aqueous solution.These results can be used to interpret the mechanism for forming hydrothermal alteration. The kinetic experiments of mineral-aqueous solutions interactions in the hydrothermal system from 25 to 400(C and at 22 MPa indicate that the formation of the feldspar-mica-kaolinite zoning occurring in some ore deposits may depend not only on the mineral stability but also on the kinetics of feldspar hydration, which is affected by the water property variation when crossing the critical point.

  8. Structured free-water clusters near lubricating surfaces are essential in water-based lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; de Vries, Joop; Van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Water-based lubrication provides cheap and environmentally friendly lubrication and, although hydrophilic surfaces are preferred in water-based lubrication, often lubricating surfaces do not retain water molecules during shear. We show here that hydrophilic (42° water contact angle) quartz surfaces facilitate water-based lubrication to the same extent as more hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces (61°), while lubrication by hydrophilic Ge crystal surfaces (44°) is best. Thus surface hydrophilicity is not sufficient for water-based lubrication. Surface-thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that all surfaces, regardless of their water-based lubrication, were predominantly electron donating, implying water binding with their hydrogen groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ge crystal surfaces providing optimal lubrication consisted of a mixture of -O and =O functionalities, while Si crystal and quartz surfaces solely possessed -O functionalities. Comparison of infrared absorption bands of the crystals in water indicated fewer bound-water layers on hydrophilic Ge than on hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces, while absorption bands for free water on the Ge crystal surface indicated a much more pronounced presence of structured, free-water clusters near the Ge crystal than near Si crystal surfaces. Accordingly, we conclude that the presence of structured, free-water clusters is essential for water-based lubrication. The prevalence of structured water clusters can be regulated by adjusting the ratio between surface electron-donating and electron-accepting groups and between -O and =O functionalities.

  9. Potentially hazardous substances in surface waters. II. Cholinesterase inhibitors in Dutch surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greve, P.A.; Freudenthal, J.; Wit, S.L.

    1972-01-01

    Several analytical methods were employed to determine the concentrations of cholinesterase inhibitors in several Dutch surface waters. An Auto-Analyzer method was used for screening purposes; thin-layer chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for identification and q

  10. Surface kinetic roughening caused by dental erosion: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartarone, Eliana; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco

    2008-05-01

    Surface kinetic roughening takes place both in case of growth and erosion processes. Teeth surfaces are eroded by contact with acid drinks, such as those used to supplement mineral salts during sporting activities. Calcium-phosphate based (CPP-ACP) pastes are known to reduce the erosion process, and to favour the enamel remineralization. In this study we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the surface roughening during dental erosion, and the mechanisms at the basis of the protection role exerted by a commercial CPP-ACP paste. We found a statistically significant difference (proughness of surfaces exposed and not exposed to the acid solutions. The treatment with the CPP-ACP paste determined a statistically significant reduction of the roughness values. By interpreting the AFM results in terms of fractal scaling concepts and continuum stochastic equations, we showed that the protection mechanism of the paste depends on the chemical properties of the acid solution.

  11. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  12. Plasma surface functionalization and dyeing kinetics of Pan-Pmma copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, C.; Canal, C.; Rodríguez, C.; Caballero, G.; Canal, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Fiber surface modification with air corona plasma has been studied through dyeing kinetics under isothermal conditions at 30 °C on an acrylic-fiber fabric with a cationic dye (CI Basic Blue 3) analyzing the absorption, desorption and fixing on the surface of molecules having defined cationic character. The initial dyeing rate in the first 60 s indicates an increase of 58.3% in the dyeing rate due to the effect of corona plasma on the acrylic fiber surface. At the end of the dyeing process, the plasma-treated fabrics absorb 24.7% more dye, and the K/S value of the acrylic fabric increases by 8.8%. With selected dyestuff molecules, new techniques can be designed to amplify the knowledge about plasma-treated surface modifications of macromolecules.

  13. On the formation of Ganymede's surface brightness asymmetries: Kinetic simulations of Ganymede's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S.; Poppe, A. R.; Khurana, K. K.; Holmström, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2016-05-01

    Ganymede possesses strong surface brightness asymmetries both between its polar cap and equatorial regions and between its leading and trailing hemispheres. Here we test the hypothesis that these asymmetries are due to differential Jovian plasma and energetic particle precipitation to the surface with the combination of a hybrid plasma model (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) and a particle tracing model. We describe the hybrid model, the first of its kind applied to Ganymede, and compare the results to both Galileo observations and previous MHD and MHD-EPIC models of Ganymede. We calculate spatially resolved precipitating Jovian ion fluxes to the surface of Ganymede for energies 1 particle fluxes are the primary driver for altering the surface brightness of Ganymede.

  14. Kinetics of Chlorine Decay in Water Distribution Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建华; 薛罡; 赵洪宾; 汪永辉; 郭美芳

    2004-01-01

    A combined first and second-order model, which includes bulk decay and wall decay, was developed to describe chlorine decay in water distribution systems. In the model the bulk decay has complex relationships with total organic carbon (TOC), the initial chlorine concentration and the temperature. Except for the initial stages they can be simplified into a linear increase with TOC, a linear decrease with initial chlorine concentration and an exponential relationship with the temperature. The model also explains why chlorine decays rapidly in the initial stages. The parameters of model are determined by deriving the best fitness with experimental data. And the accuracy of model has been verified by using the experimental data and the monitoring data in a distribution system.

  15. Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; Ren, Wei; Tan, Hui Ru; Liu, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanoparticle-modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes were prepared using a dehydration of carbohydrate compound method. The structural change was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller measurement. Fast adsorption kinetics was observed for multi-wall carbon nanotubes with modification, as demonstrated by the adsorption of the model compound methylene blue. This work provides a novel facile engineering strategy to equip multi-wall carbon nanotubes with fast adsorption kinetics, which is promising for efficient water purification.

  16. Oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in acidic DMF–water medium: A kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.L. Hiran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in DMF–water (70:30% mixture in presence of perchloric acid leads to the formation of corresponding aldehyde. The reaction is of first order each in [PCC], [HClO4] and [AA]. Michaelis–Menten type kinetics was observed with phenyl alanine. The reaction rates were determined at different temperatures [25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 °C] and the activation parameters were calculated. The reaction does not induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. With an increase in the amount of DMF in its aqueous mixture, the rate increases. A suitable mechanism for the reaction was postulated.

  17. Electron affinity coefficients of nitrogen oxides and biodegradation kinetics in denitrification of contaminated stream water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Jong-Bae; Jeong, Byeong-Ryong; Lee, Young-Deuk; Prasher, Shiv O

    2003-01-01

    During the dry season in Korea, rivers become more vulnerable to contamination by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and nitrogen. It is hypothesized that the natural characteristics of the streams in Korea allow the contaminated water to be treated at the tributaries. Down-stream river water quality in Korea may be improved by spraying the contaminated stream water from the tributaries over the surrounding floodplains. The consequent water filtration through the soil could remove the contaminants through aerobic and denitrifying reactions. In this study, the kinetics parameters of the denitrifying reaction in floodplain filtration were determined using contaminated stream water. For the electron donor the Monod kinetics was used, while the competitive Michaelis-Menten model was employed for the electron acceptors. The parameters to the competitive Michaelis-Menten model were found using continuous denitrifying reactions, instead of the batch reactions employed in previous studies, to match the conditions needed to apply the competitive Michaelis-Menten kinetics. From the result, it was found that continuous reactions as well as batch reactions could be used to determine the affinity coefficients in denitrification. The results of this study also showed that the affinity coefficient of NO2, using continuous reactions, was similar to that of other studies in the literature found via batch reactions, whereas the affinity coefficient of N2O was much larger than that acquired with batch reactions. The parameters obtained in this study will be used in future work to simulate the contaminant behaviors during floodplain filtration using a mathematical model.

  18. Grooved organogel surfaces towards anisotropic sliding of water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Liu, Hongliang; Meng, Jingxin; Yang, Gao; Liu, Xueli; Wang, Shutao; Jiang, Lei

    2014-05-21

    Periodic micro-grooved organogel surfaces can easily realize the anisotropic sliding of water droplets attributing to the formed slippery water/oil/solid interface. Different from the existing anisotropic surfaces, this novel surface provides a versatile candidate for the anisotropic sliding of water droplets and might present a promising way for the easy manipulation of liquid droplets for water collection, liquid-directional transportation, and microfluidics.

  19. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  20. Turing Systems, Entropy, and Kinetic Models for Self-Healing Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Kagan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the methods of description of friction-induced self-healing at the interface between two solid bodies. A macroscopic description of self-healing is based on a Turing system for the transfer of matter that leads to self-organization at the interface in the case of an unstable state. A microscopic description deals with a kinetic model of the process and entropy production during self-organization. The paper provides a brief overview of the Turing system approach and statistical kinetic models. The relation between these methods and the description of the self-healing surfaces is discussed, as well as results of their application. The analytical considerations are illustrated by numerical simulations.

  1. On Riemann Solvers and Kinetic Relations for Isothermal Two-Phase Flows with Surface Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Rohde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We consider a sharp-interface approach for the inviscid isothermal dynamics of compressible two-phase flow, that accounts for phase transition and surface tension effects. To fix the mass exchange and entropy dissipation rate across the interface kinetic relations are frequently used. The complete uni-directional dynamics can then be understood by solving generalized two-phase Riemann problems. We present new well-posedness theorems for the Riemann problem and corresponding computable Riemann solvers, that cover quite general equations of state, metastable input data and curvature effects. The new Riemann solver is used to validate different kinetic relations on physically relevant problems including a comparison with experimental data. Riemann solvers are building blocks for many numerical schemes that are used to track interfaces in two-phase flow. It is shown that the new Riemann solver enables reliable and efficient computations for physical situations that could not be treated before.

  2. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Da-Jiang [Ames Laboratory; Evans, James W. [Ames Laboratory

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  3. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: A Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jacob; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of s...

  4. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  5. Porosity effects on crystallization kinetics of amorphous solid water: Implications for cold icy objects in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Emily H.; Raut, Ujjwal; Teolis, Benjamin D.; Baragiola, Raúl A.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of porosity on the crystallization kinetics of amorphous solid water (ASW). Porosity in ASW films, condensed from the vapor phase at varying incidences at 10 K, was characterized using ultraviolet-visible interferometry and quartz crystal microgravimetry. The films were heated to crystallization temperatures between 130 and 141 K, resulting in partial pore compaction. The isothermal phase transformation was characterized using transmission infrared spectroscopy to monitor the time evolution of the 3.1-μm Osbnd H stretch absorption band. We find that ASW crystallization unfolds in two distinct stages. The first stage, responsible for ∼10% transformation, is initiated from nucleation at the external surface. The dominant second stage begins with nucleation at the internal pore surfaces and completes the transformation of the film at a faster rate compared to the first stage. A key finding is that porosity has major influence on crystallization kinetics; a film with five-times-higher porosity was observed to crystallize ∼15 times faster, compared to the less porous counterpart. We extrapolate our results to predict crystallization times for amorphous ices condensed on Europa's surface from plume sources, as recently observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  6. Kinetics and thermodynamics of interaction between sulfonamide antibiotics and humic acids: Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration microcalorimetry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-25

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in the environments has been recognized as a crucial issue. Their migration and transformation in the environment is determined by natural organic matters that widely exist in natural water and soil. In this study, the kinetics and thermodynamics of interactions between humic acids (HA) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) were investigated by employing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) combined with isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) technologies. Results show that SMZ could be effectively bound with HA. The binding strength could be enhanced by increasing ionic strength and decreasing temperature. High pH was not favorable for the interaction. Hydrogen bond and electrostatic interaction may play important roles in driving the binding process, with auxiliary contribution from hydrophobic interaction. The results implied that HA existed in the environment may have a significant influence on the migration and transformation of organic pollutants through the binding process.

  7. Preparation of Ag nanoparticle surface modified TiO2 nanotube arrays and establishment of a catalytic kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Xu, Yingcao; Zhang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by anodic oxidation method. The electrolyte was composed of ammonium fluoride (0.25 mol/L), glycerol and water (volume ratio 2:1). The anodic oxidation voltage was 25 V, time for two hours. The temperature of calcinations was 450°C, time for four hours. The silver nanoparticles were modified on the surface of TiO2 nanotube arrays by the method of ultrasonic atomization. The experimental results showed that the diameter of TiO2 nanotubes was about 120 nm, the wall thickness was about 12 nm, and the diameter of Ag nanoparticles was about 10 nm, which was more evenly distributed on the pipe diameter. Finally, the catalytic kinetic model of Ag-TiO2 photocatalyst was established based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model.

  8. Petroleum pollutant degradation by surface water microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Malisa P; Jovancićević, Branimir S; Ilić, Mila; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2006-09-01

    It is well known that the composition of petroleum or some of its processing products changes in the environment mostly under the influence of microorganisms. A series of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum conditions for an efficient biodegradation of petroleum pollutant, or bioremediation of different segments of the environment. The aim of these investigations was to show to what extent the hydrocarbons of a petroleum pollutant are degraded by microbial cultures which were isolated as dominant microorganisms from a surface water of a wastewater canal of an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant. Biodegradation experiments were conducted on one paraffinic, and one naphthenic type of petroleum during a three month period under aerobic conditions, varying the following parameters: Inorganic (Kp) or an organic medium (Bh) with or without exposition to light. Microorganisms were analyzed in a surface water sample from a canal (Pancevo, Serbia), into which wastewater from an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant is released. The consortia of microorganisms were isolated from the water sample (most abundant species: Phormidium foveolarum--filamentous Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae and Achanthes minutissima, diatoms, algae). The simulation experiments of biodegradation were conducted with the biomass suspension and crude oils Sirakovo (Sir, paraffinic type) and Velebit (Ve, naphthenic type). After a three month period, organic substance was extracted by means of chloroform. In the extracts, the content of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids was determined (the group composition). n-Alkanes and isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes, pristane and phytane, in the aliphatic fractions, were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Total isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes and polycyclic alkanes of sterane and triterpane types were analyzed by GC-MS. Paraffinic type petroleums have a significant loss of saturated hydrocarbons. For naphthenic

  9. Effect of surface properties of elastomer colloids on their coalescence and aggregation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Cornelius; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-10-20

    We study the aggregation kinetics of two elastomer colloids with similar bulk polymer properties but with different surface charge groups in order to understand the role of the surface properties in particle coalescence during aggregation. It is confirmed that clusters of the elastomer particles stabilized purely by ionic surfactants coalesce in both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited aggregation (RLCA and DLCA) regimes and that the coalescence is independent of the coagulant type. On the other hand, clusters formed by elastomer particles stabilized by charged polymer end groups, which are fixed on the particle surface, are fractal objects with a fractal dimension of 1.7 in the DLCA and 2.1 in the RLCA regime. This indicates insignificant cluster coalescence during aggregation, most likely due to a hindrance effect of the fixed charges.

  10. Classifying the expansion kinetics and critical surface dynamics of growing cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Block, M; Drasdo, D

    2006-01-01

    Based on a cellular automaton model the growth kinetics and the critical surface dynamics of cell monolayers is systematically studied by variation of the cell migration activity, the size of the proliferation zone and the cell cycle time distribution over wide ranges. The model design avoids lattice artifacts and ensures high performance. The monolayer expansion velocity derived from our simulations can be interpreted as a generalization of the velocity relationship for a traveling front in the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) equation that is frequently used to model tumor growth phenomena by continuum models. The critical surface dynamics corresponds to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class for all parameters and model variations studied. While the velocity agrees quantitatively with experimental observations by Bru et al, the critical surface dynamics is in contrast to their interpretation as generic molecular-beam-epitaxy-like growth.

  11. Atmospheric Water Harvesting: Role of Surface Wettability and Edge Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Yong

    2017-06-23

    Atmospheric water is emerging as an important potable water source. The present work experimentally and theoretically investigates water condensation and collection on flat surfaces with contrasting contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) to elucidate their roles on water mass collection efficiency. The experimental results indicate that a hydrophilic surface promotes nucleation and individual droplets growth, and a surface with a low CAH tends to let a smaller droplet to slide down, but the overall water mass collection efficiency is independent of both surface contact angle and CAH. The experimental results agree well with our theoretical calculations. During water condensation, a balance has to be struck between single droplet growth and droplet density on a surface so as to maintain a constant water droplet surface coverage ratio, which renders the role of both surface wettability and hysteresis insignificant to the ultimate water mass collection. Moreover, water droplets on the edges of a surface grow much faster than those on the non-edge areas and thus dominate the contribution to the water mass collection by the entire surface, directly pointing out the very important role of edge effect on water condensation and collection.

  12. Adsorbed water on iron surface by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, F.W.; Campos, T.M.B.; Cividanes, L.S., E-mail: flaviano@ita.br; Simonetti, E.A.N.; Thim, G.P.

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a new force field to describe the Fe–H{sub 2}O interaction. • We developed a new force field to describe the flexible water model at low temperature. • We analyze the orientation of water along the iron surface. • We calculate the vibrational spectra of water near the iron surface. • We found a complex relationship between water orientation and the atomic vibrational spectra at different sites of adsorption along the iron surface. - Abstract: The adsorption of H{sub 2}O molecules on metal surfaces is important to understand the early process of water corrosion. This process can be described by computational simulation using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo. However, this simulation demands an efficient description of the surface interactions between the water molecule and the metallic surface. In this study, an effective force field to describe the iron-water surface interactions was developed and it was used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed a very good agreement between the simulated vibrational-DOS spectrum and the experimental vibrational spectrum of the iron–water interface. The water density profile revealed the presence of a water double layer in the metal interface. Furthermore, the horizontal mapping combined with the angular distribution of the molecular plane allowed the analysis of the water structure above the surface, which in turn agrees with the model of the double layer on metal surfaces.

  13. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  14. Kinetics of Evaporation and Growth of Drops of Aqueous Solutions of Surface Active Substances at Negative Temperatures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-Ri56 961 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION FIND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS i/i SOLUTIONS OF SURFA .(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AlFB OH Y I...Jall IN ,I" FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 t FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION Lfl -• KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE ACTIVE...TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0938-84 25 June 1985 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-85-C-000451 KINETICS OF EVAPORATION AND GROWTH OF DROPS OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF SURFACE

  15. Sorption kinetics of ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Achilias, Dimitris S; Karabela, Maria M

    2007-04-01

    In the present investigation the sorption-desorption kinetics of 75 vol % ethanol/water solution by dimethacrylate-based dental resins and resin composites was studied in detail. The resins examined were made by light-curing of bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA), and mixtures of these monomers. The resin composites were prepared from two commercial light-cured restorative materials (Z100 MP and Filtek Z250), the resin matrix of which is based on copolymers of the above-mentioned monomers. Ethanol/water sorption/desorption was examined in both equilibrium and dynamic conditions in two adjacent sorption-desorption cycles. For all the materials studied, it was found that the amount of ethanol/water sorbed or desorbed was always larger than the corresponding one reported in literature in case of water immersion. It was also observed that the chemical structure of the monomers used for the preparation of the resins directly affects the amount of solvent sorbed or desorbed, as well as sorption kinetics, while desorption rate was nearly unaffected. In the case of composites studied, it seems that the sorption/desorption process is not influenced much by the presence of filler. Furthermore, diffusion coefficients calculated for the resins were larger than those of the composites and were always higher during desorption than during sorption. Finally, an interesting finding concerning the rate of ethanol/water sorption was that all resins and composites followed Fickian diffusion kinetics during almost the whole sorption curve; however, during desorption the experimental data were overestimated by the theoretical model. Instead, it was found that a dual diffusion-relaxation model was able to accurately predict experimental data during the whole desorption curve. Kinetic relaxation parameters, together with diffusion coefficients, are reported

  16. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  17. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  18. Photoinduced superhydrophilicity: a kinetic study of time dependent photoinduced contact angle changes on TiO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Philip S; Boxall, Colin; Denison, Kieth R

    2012-12-21

    Transparent TiO(2) thin films were prepared on quartz substrates via a reverse micelle, sol-gel, spin-coating technique. The time dependence of the TiO(2) film photoinduced superhydrophilicity (PISH) was measured by goniometric observation of the contact angle, θ, of sessile water drops at the film surfaces. In these measurements, the TiO(2) substrate was illuminated by 315 nm light and drops were sequentially applied at a range of illumination times. Using a model for the wetting of heterogeneous surfaces derived by Israelachvili and Gee, these measurements were used to calculate the time dependence of f(2), the fractional surface coverage of the TiO(2) surface by adventitious contaminating organics (Israelachvili, J. N.; Gee, M. L. Contact angles on chemically heterogeneous surfaces. Langmuir 1989, 5, 288). Extending this model to include a Langmuir-Hinshelwood based kinetic analysis of f(2) as a function of time allowed for calculation of an expected value for θ immediately prior to illumination, that is, at illumination time t = 0. Such expected values of θ at t = 0 were calculated using two possible values of θ(1), the contact angle on a pristine unilluminated homogeneous TiO(2) surface: (i) θ(1) = 4° as suggested by, inter alia, Zubkov et al. (Zubkov, T.; Stahl, D.; Thompson, T. L.; Panayotov, D.; Diwald, O.; Yates, J. T. Ultraviolet Light-Induced Hydrophilicity Effect on TiO(2)(110)(1 × 1). Dominant Role of the Photooxidation of Adsorbed Hydrocarbons Causing Wetting by Water Droplets. J. Phys. Chem. B2005, 109, 15454); and (ii) where θ(1) = 25°, as suggested by Fujishima et al., representative of a more hydrophobic homogeneous TiO(2) surface that reconstructs upon exposure to ultraband gap illumination into a hydrophilic surface where θ(1) → 0° (Fujishima, A.; Zhang, X.; Tryk, D. A. TiO(2) photocatalysis and related surface phenomena Surf. Sci. Rep.2008, 63, 515). Analysis of data from our experiments and from selected literature sources

  19. Molecular kinetics of proteins at the surface of porcine sperm before and during fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P S; Gadella, B M

    2009-01-01

    Fertilization is a decisive moment in life and enables the combination of the DNA from two gametes to ultimately form a new organism. The sperm surface, especially the head area, has distinguishable subdomains that are involved in distinct fertilization processes. It is known that the sperm head surface undergoes constant remodelling during epididymal maturation and migration in the male and female genital tract. But intriguingly, the identity, origin and spatial ordering of proteins at the sperm surface that are involved in mammalian fertilization are essentially unknown. This review deals with sperm surface protein modifications that are under somatic cell control. As soon as the sperm is released from the seminiferous tubules it is subjected to these modifications. These surface reorganisations continue until the sperm reside in the fallopian tube where they meet the oocyte and may fertilize it. Most likely, a selective process allows only functionally mature and intact sperm to optimally interact and fertilize the oocyte. Recent data suggest that even the perivitelline fluid is involved in sperm surface remodelling as it contains factors which could facilitate the first penetrating sperm to fertilize the oocyte. In this contribution, the kinetics of proteins at the sperm surface will be overviewed. Better understanding of this would help to design strategies to improve male fertility or to devise novel contraceptives.

  20. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kostik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, while in ground water samples from wells boreholes and mineral waters with the technique of ion chromatography. The research shows that lithium concentration in potable water ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 μg/L; in surface water from 0.5 to 15.0 μg/L; ground water from wells boreholes from 16.0 to 49.1 μg/L and mineral water from 125.2 to 484.9 μg/L. Obtained values are in accordance with the relevant international values for the lithium content in water.

  1. Mobility of large clusters on a semiconductor surface: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Esen; A, T. Tüzemen; M, Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    The mobility of clusters on a semiconductor surface for various values of cluster size is studied as a function of temperature by kinetic Monte Carlo method. The cluster resides on the surface of a square grid. Kinetic processes such as the diffusion of single particles on the surface, their attachment and detachment to/from clusters, diffusion of particles along cluster edges are considered. The clusters considered in this study consist of 150-6000 atoms per cluster on average. A statistical probability of motion to each direction is assigned to each particle where a particle with four nearest neighbors is assumed to be immobile. The mobility of a cluster is found from the root mean square displacement of the center of mass of the cluster as a function of time. It is found that the diffusion coefficient of clusters goes as D = A(T)Nα where N is the average number of particles in the cluster, A(T) is a temperature-dependent constant and α is a parameter with a value of about -0.64 a value of -0.5. The diffusion coefficient is found to change by one order of magnitude as a function of cluster size.

  2. Solid oxide electrode kinetics in light of in situ surface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    The combination of in situ and in particular in operando characterization methods such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on both technical and model electrode are well known ways to gain some practical insight in electrode reaction kinetics. Yet, is has become clear that in spite...... couple of decades, but recent in situ - or even better - in operando surface measurements such as high temperature scanning probe measurements and Raman spectroscopy have proven very valuable in obtaining new data that can support the interpretation of EIS and current – voltage (i-V) measurements...

  3. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  4. How to repel hot water from a superhydrophobic surface?

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhejun

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces, with water contact angles greater than 150° and slide angles less than 10°, have attracted a great deal of attention due to their self-cleaning ability and excellent water-repellency. It is commonly accepted that a superhydrophobic surface loses its superhydrophobicity in contact with water hotter than 50 °C. Such a phenomenon was recently demonstrated by Liu et al. [J. Mater. Chem., 2009, 19, 5602], using both natural lotus leaf and artificial leaf-like surfaces. However, our work has shown that superhydrophobic surfaces maintained their superhydrophobicity, even in water at 80 °C, provided that the leaf temperature is greater than that of the water droplet. In this paper, we report on the wettability of water droplets on superhydrophobic thin films, as a function of both their temperatures. The results have shown that both the water contact and slide angles on the surfaces will remain unchanged when the temperature of the water droplet is greater than that of the surface. The water contact angle, or the slide angle, will decrease or increase, however, with droplet temperatures increasingly greater than that of the surfaces. We propose that, in such cases, the loss of superhydrophobicity of the surfaces is caused by evaporation of the hot water molecules and their condensation on the cooler surface. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  5. Structure and reactivity of water at biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, E A

    1998-02-01

    Molecular self association in liquids is a physical process that can dominate cohesion (interfacial tension) and miscibility. In water, self association is a powerful organizational force leading to a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network (water structure). Localized perturbations in the chemical potential of water as by, for example, contact with a solid surface, induces compensating changes in water structure that can be sensed tens of nanometers from the point of origin using the surface force apparatus (SFA) and ancillary techniques. These instruments reveal attractive or repulsive forces between opposing surfaces immersed in water, over and above that anticipated by continuum theory (DLVO), that are attributed to a variable density (partial molar volume) of a more-or-less ordered water structure, depending on the water wettability (surface energy) of the water-contacting surfaces. Water structure at surfaces is thus found to be a manifestation of hydrophobicity and, while mechanistic/theoretical interpretation of experimental results remain the subject of some debate in the literature, convergence of experimental observations permit, for the first time, quantitative definition of the relative terms 'hydrophobic' and 'hydrophilic'. In particular, long-range attractive forces are detected only between surfaces exhibiting a water contact angle theta > 65 degrees (herein defined as hydrophobic surfaces with pure water adhesion tension tau O = gamma O cos theta 30 dyn/cm). These findings suggest at least two distinct kinds of water structure and reactivity: a relatively less-dense water region against hydrophobic surfaces with an open hydrogen-bonded network and a relatively more-dense water region against hydrophilic surfaces with a collapsed hydrogen-bonded network. Importantly, membrane and SFA studies reveal a discrimination between biologically-important ions that preferentially solubilizes divalent ions in more-dense water regions relative to less

  6. Distribution of {sup 129}I in terrestrial surface water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuegao [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Meng [College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Yi, Peng, E-mail: pengyi1915@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Yu, Zhongbo [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Li [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-15

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. {sup 129}I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of {sup 129}I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of {sup 129}I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on {sup 129}I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  7. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  8. Kinetics of the forelimb in horses circling on different ground surfaces at the trot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateau, Henry; Camus, Mathieu; Holden-Douilly, Laurène; Falala, Sylvain; Ravary, Bérangère; Vergari, Claudio; Lepley, Justine; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Pourcelot, Philippe; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    Circling increases the expression of distal forelimb lameness in the horse, depending on rein, diameter and surface properties of the circle. However, there is limited information about the kinetics of horses trotting on circles. The aim of this study was to quantify ground reaction force (GRF) and moments in the inside and outside forelimb of horses trotting on circles and to compare the results obtained on different ground surfaces. The right front hoof of six horses was equipped with a dynamometric horseshoe, allowing the measurement of 3-dimensional GRF, moments and trajectory of the centre of pressure. The horses were lunged at slow trot (3 m/s) on right and left 4 m radius circles on asphalt and on a fibre sand surface. During circling, the inside forelimb produced a smaller peak vertical force and the stance phase was longer in comparison with the outside forelimb. Both right and left circling produced a substantial transversal force directed outwards. On a soft surface (sand fibre), the peak transversal force and moments around the longitudinal and vertical axes of the hoof were significantly decreased in comparison with a hard surface (asphalt). Sinking of the lateral or medial part of the hoof in a more compliant surface enables reallocation of part of the transversal force into a proximo-distal force, aligned with the limb axis, thus limiting extrasagittal stress on the joints.

  9. Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting Method for the Shallow Water Wave Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施卫平; WeiShyy

    2003-01-01

    Based on the analogy to gas dynamics,the kinetic flux flux vector splitting (KFVS) method is used to stimulate the shallow water wave equations,The flus vectors of the equations are split on the basis of the local equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution One dimensional examples including a dam breaking wave and flows over a ridge are calcualted.The solutions exhibit second-order accuracy with no spurious oscillation.

  10. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w

  11. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  12. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setúbal do Instituto Politécnico de Setúbal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setúbal (Portugal); Pereira, V.J. [Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB) – Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Av. da República, Estação Agronómica Nacional, 2780-157 Oeiras, 5 Portugal (Portugal); Carvalho, G., E-mail: gs.carvalho@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Soeiro, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Gaffney, V.; Almeida, C. [Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Lisboa (FFUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 1600-049 Lisboa (Portugal); Cardoso, V. Vale; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J. [Empresa Portuguesa das Águas Livres, S.A., Direcção de Controlo de Qualidade da Água, Laboratório Central, Avenida de Berlim, 15, 1800-031 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Direct UV photolysis of 3 pharmaceuticals in pure and waste water was investigated. ► Ketoprofen has higher photodegradion kinetics, followed by diclofenac and atenolol. ► MP/UV photodegradation products were identified for the 3 compounds. ► Photodegradation pathways were proposed to explain the obtained products. ► The persistent photoproducts were identified for each compound. -- Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis.

  13. Silicon Impurity Release and Surface Transformation of TiO2 Anatase and Rutile Nanoparticles in Water Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface transformation can affect the stability, reactivity, and toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) when released to water environments. Herein, we investigated the release kinetics of Si impurity frequently introduced during NP synthesis and the resulting ef...

  14. Kinetics of anisotropic ordering in Laponite dispersions induced by a water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujala, Ravi Kumar; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report the kinetics of ordering occurring at the water-air interface of Laponite dispersions. Propagation of such ordering into the bulk and its relaxation dynamics were systematically studied through light scattering measurements. Depolarization ratio Dp, which accounted for the optical anisotropy, was measured as a function of depth from the interface and aging of the samples. The extent of spatial ordering was found to be several decades larger than the typical particle size. Spatial ordering originated from the interface and percolated into the bulk with aging time tw. Growth in Dp with waiting time was found to follow power-law behavior given as Dp˜twn, with n increasing from 0.1 to 4 as one moved away from the interface into the bulk. Dp decreased exponentially with depth h given as Dp˜e-(h/h0), where h0 is the decay length, increasing from 0.4 to 0.75 mm with aging time. Dynamic structure factor measurements performed on the samples at various aging times, depths, and temperatures yielded two distinct relaxation times: one fast mode followed by a slow mode. The fast mode remained invariant while slow mode relaxation time followed an exponential decay with depth. This study indicated that the arrested phase nucleated from the interface and propagated into the bulk, which was not observed when the surface was insulated with a layer of hydrophobic liquid. Dilution of the concentrated samples destroyed the aforesaid ordering and made the dispersion homogeneous implying the ordered state was a glass.

  15. Salt effects on the air/solution interfacial properties of PEO-containing copolymers: equilibrium, adsorption kinetics and surface rheological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Sara; Mendoza, Alma J; Guzmán, Eduardo; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G

    2013-06-15

    Lithium cations are known to form complexes with the oxygen atoms of poly(oxyethylene) chains. The effect of Li(+) on the surface properties of three block-copolymers containing poly(oxyethylene) (PEO) have been studied. Two types of copolymers have been studied, a water soluble one of the pluronic family, PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO, PPO being poly(propyleneoxyde), and two water insoluble ones: PEO-b-PS and PEO-b-PS-b-PEO, PS being polystyrene. In the case of the pluronic the adsorption kinetics, the equilibrium surface tension isotherm and the aqueous/air surface rheology have been measured, while for the two insoluble copolymers only the surface pressure and the surface rheology have been studied. In all the cases two different Li(+) concentrations have been used. As in the absence of lithium ions, the adsorption kinetics of pluronic solutions shows two processes, and becomes faster as [Li(+)] increases. The kinetics is not diffusion controlled. For a given pluronic concentration the equilibrium surface pressure increases with [Li(+)], and the isotherms show two surface phase transitions, though less marked than for [Li(+)]=0. A similar behavior was found for the equilibrium isotherms of PEO-b-PS and PEO-b-PS-b-PEO. The surface elasticity of these two copolymers was found to increase with [Li(+)] over the whole surface concentration and frequency ranges studied. A smaller effect was found in the case of the pluronic solutions. The results of the pluronic solutions were modeled using a recent theory that takes into account that the molecules can be adsorbed at the surface in two different states. The theory gives a good fit for the adsorption kinetics and a reasonably good prediction of the equilibrium isotherms for low and intermediate concentrations of pluronic. However, the theory is not able to reproduce the isotherm for [Li(+)]=0. Only a semi-quantitative prediction of the surface elasticity is obtained for [pluronic]≤1×10(-3) mM.

  16. Biofilm development on metal surfaces in tropical marine waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Bhosle, N.B.

    environments. However, little is known about biofilm bacteria developed on metal surfaces, especially immersed in tropical marine waters. Similarly, not much is known about the nature of organic matter deposited on the surfaces over the period of immersion...

  17. The glass-liquid transition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2008-09-28

    Interactions of thin water films with surfaces of graphite and vitrified room-temperature ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF(6)])] were investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature and annealing time to elucidate the glass-liquid transition of water at the molecular level. Surface diffusion of water occurs at temperatures higher than 120 K, thereby forming three-dimensional clusters (a two-dimensional layer) on the [bmim][PF(6)] (graphite) surface. The hydrophobic effect of the surface decreases with increasing coverage of water; the bulklike properties evolve up to 40 ML, as evidenced by the occurrence of film dewetting at around the conventional glass transition temperature (140 K). Results also showed that aging is necessary for the water monolayer (a 40 ML water film) to dewet the graphite ([bmim][PF(6)]) surface. The occurrence of aging is explainable by the successive evolution of two distinct liquids during the glass-liquid transition: low density liquid is followed by supercooled liquid water. The water monolayer on graphite is characterized by the preferred orientation of unpaired OH groups toward the surface; this structure is arrested during the aging time despite the occurrence of surface diffusion. However, the water monolayer formed on the [bmim][PF(6)] surface agglomerates immediately after the commencement of surface diffusion. The structure of low density liquid tends to be arrested by the attractive interaction with the neighbors.

  18. Microbial species diversity, community dynamics, and metabolite kinetics of water kefir fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, David; De Vuyst, Luc

    2014-04-01

    Water kefir is a sour, alcoholic, and fruity fermented beverage of which the fermentation is started with water kefir grains. These water kefir grains consist of polysaccharide and contain the microorganisms responsible for the water kefir fermentation. In this work, a water kefir fermentation process was followed as a function of time during 192 h to unravel the community dynamics, the species diversity, and the kinetics of substrate consumption and metabolite production. The majority of the water kefir ecosystem was found to be present on the water kefir grains. The most important microbial species present were Lactobacillus casei/paracasei, Lactobacillus harbinensis, Lactobacillus hilgardii, Bifidobacterium psychraerophilum/crudilactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Dekkera bruxellensis. The microbial species diversities in the water kefir liquor and on the water kefir grains were similar and remained stable during the whole fermentation process. The major substrate, sucrose, was completely converted after 24 h of fermentation, which coincided with the production of the major part of the water kefir grain polysaccharide. The main metabolites of the fermentation were ethanol and lactic acid. Glycerol, acetic acid, and mannitol were produced in low concentrations. The major part of these metabolites was produced during the first 72 h of fermentation, during which the pH decreased from 4.26 to 3.45. The most prevalent volatile aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate, which might be of significance with respect to the aroma of the end product.

  19. Microbial Species Diversity, Community Dynamics, and Metabolite Kinetics of Water Kefir Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, David

    2014-01-01

    Water kefir is a sour, alcoholic, and fruity fermented beverage of which the fermentation is started with water kefir grains. These water kefir grains consist of polysaccharide and contain the microorganisms responsible for the water kefir fermentation. In this work, a water kefir fermentation process was followed as a function of time during 192 h to unravel the community dynamics, the species diversity, and the kinetics of substrate consumption and metabolite production. The majority of the water kefir ecosystem was found to be present on the water kefir grains. The most important microbial species present were Lactobacillus casei/paracasei, Lactobacillus harbinensis, Lactobacillus hilgardii, Bifidobacterium psychraerophilum/crudilactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Dekkera bruxellensis. The microbial species diversities in the water kefir liquor and on the water kefir grains were similar and remained stable during the whole fermentation process. The major substrate, sucrose, was completely converted after 24 h of fermentation, which coincided with the production of the major part of the water kefir grain polysaccharide. The main metabolites of the fermentation were ethanol and lactic acid. Glycerol, acetic acid, and mannitol were produced in low concentrations. The major part of these metabolites was produced during the first 72 h of fermentation, during which the pH decreased from 4.26 to 3.45. The most prevalent volatile aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate, which might be of significance with respect to the aroma of the end product. PMID:24532061

  20. Water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces: insights from environmental molecular beam experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Johansson, Sofia M; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2014-11-26

    Water uptake on aerosol and cloud particles in the atmosphere modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for climate on Earth. Here, we apply an environmental molecular beam (EMB) method to characterize water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces. The adsorption of surface-active compounds including short-chain alcohols, nitric acid, and acetic acid significantly affects accommodation of D2O on ice. n-Hexanol and n-butanol adlayers reduce water uptake by facilitating rapid desorption and function as inefficient barriers for accommodation as well as desorption of water, while the effect of adsorbed methanol is small. Water accommodation is close to unity on nitric-acid- and acetic-acid-covered ice, and accommodation is significantly more efficient than that on the bare ice surface. Water uptake is inefficient on solid alcohols and acetic acid but strongly enhanced on liquid phases including a quasi-liquid layer on solid n-butanol. The EMB method provides unique information on accommodation and rapid kinetics on volatile surfaces, and these studies suggest that adsorbed organic and acidic compounds need to be taken into account when describing water at environmental interfaces.

  1. Explicit Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting Scheme for the 2-D Shallow Water Wave Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施卫平; 黄明游; 王婷; 张小江

    2004-01-01

    Originally, the kinetic flux vector splitting (KFVS) scheme was developed as a numerical method to solve gas dynamic problems. The main idea in the approach is to construct the flux based on the microscopical description of the gas. In this paper, based on the analogy between the shallow water wave equations and the gas dynamic equations, we develop an explicit KFVS method for simulating the shallow water wave equations. A 1D steady flow and a 2D unsteady flow are presented to show the robust and accuracy of the KFVS scheme.

  2. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  3. Dissolution kinetics at edge dislocation site of (1 1 1) surface of copper crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Y.

    2011-03-01

    For the study of the dissolution kinetics at dislocation site of crystal surface, copper crystals were anodically dissolved under several different conditions of potentiostatic electrolysis by using an electrolytic cell. The overpotential and temperature dependences of the dissolution rates at dislocation-free and edge dislocation sites of (1 1 1) surface were investigated. The experimental results were electrochemically analyzed, and quantitatively discussed by a nucleation model of two-dimensional pit. The critical free energy change for the formation of a two-dimensional pit at edge dislocation site as well as the activation energy at separation of an atom from the active site were estimated. It is concluded that the present estimation of the critical free energy change seems to reasonably consist with the evaluation of the precedent study and also that its value changes in different manners respectively with overpotential and temperature.

  4. Conjunctive Surface Water and Groundwater Management under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change can result in significant impacts on regional and global surface water and groundwater resources. Using groundwater as a complimentary source of water has provided an effective means to satisfy the ever-increasing water demands and deal with surface water shortages problems due to robust capability of groundwater in responding to climate change. Conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater is crucial for integrated water resources management. It is helpful to reduce vulnerabilities of water supply systems and mitigate the water supply stress in responding to climate change. Some critical challenges and perspectives are discussed to help decision/policy makers develop more effective management and adaptation strategies for conjunctive water resources use in facing climate change under complex uncertainties.

  5. Use of surface plasmon resonance to investigate lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of polydopamine films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cui, Dafu; Cai, Haoyuan; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Xing; Sun, Jianhai; Chao, Yapeng

    2013-03-15

    Dopamine (DA) is a particularly important neurotransmitter. Polydopamine (pDA) films have been demonstrated to be important materials for the immobilization of biomolecules onto almost any type of solid substrate. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensor system with the sensor chip surface parallel to the direction of gravity was used to investigate the lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of pDA films. The deposition kinetics of pDA Films are limited by the oxidation process. The pDA film could not be removed from the sensor chip completely by a strongly alkaline solution, indicating that the pDA film was heterogeneous in the direction of deposition. The pDA film formed near the interior of the solution was less stable than the film formed near the gold-solution interface. Adsorption of proteins on pDA film was studied compared with that on bare gold and dextran sensor chip. The reduction of Au(111) cations by the pDA film, forming a layer of gold particles, was monitored using SPR.

  6. Potential and Kinetic Electron Emissions from HOPG Surface Irradiated by Highly Charged Xenon and Neon Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Yu; ZHAO Yong-Tao; SUN Jian-Rong; LI De-Hui; QAYYUM Abdul; LI Jin-Yu; WANG Ping-Zhi; XIAO Guo-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Highly charged 129 Xeq+ (q =10-30) and 40Neq+ (q =4-8) ion-induced secondary electron emissions on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are reported. The total secondary electron yield is measured as a function of the potential energy of incident ions. The experimental data are used to separate contributions of kinetic and potential electron yields. Our results show that about 4.5% and 13.2% of ion's potential energies are consumed in potential electron emission due to different Xeq+-HOPG and Neq+-HOPG combinations. A simple formula is introduced to estimate the fraction of ion's potential energy for potential electron emission.%@@ Highly charged 129 Xeq+(q =10-30) and 40Neq+(q =4-8) ion-induced secondary electron emissions on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite(HOPG) are reported.The total secondary electron yield is measured as a function of the potential energy of incident ions.The experimental data are used to separate contributions of kinetic and potential electron yields.Our results show that about 4.5% and 13.2% of ion's potential energies are consumed in potential electron emission due to different Xeq+-HOPG and Neq+-HOPG combinations.A simple formula is introduced to estimate the fraction of ion's potential energy for potential electron emission.

  7. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  8. Region 9 Surface Water Intakes (SDWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  9. Molecular kinetic theory of boundary slip on textured surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, LiYa; Wang, FengChao; Yang, FuQian; Wu, HengAn

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical model extended from the Frenkel-Eyring molecular kinetic theory (MKT) was applied to describe the boundary slip on textured surfaces. The concept of the equivalent depth of potential well was adopted to characterize the solid-liquid interactions on the textured surfaces. The slip behaviors on both chemically and topographically textured surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The extended MKT slip model is validated by our MD simulations under various situations, by constructing different complex surfaces and varying the surface wettability as well as the shear stress exerted on the liquid. This slip model can provide more comprehensive understanding of the liquid flow on atomic scale by considering the influence of the solid-liquid interactions and the applied shear stress on the nano-flow. Moreover, the slip velocity shear-rate dependence can be predicted using this slip model, since the nonlinear increase of the slip velocity under high shear stress can be approximated by a hyperbolic sine function.

  10. Molecular kinetic theory of boundary slip on textured surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LiYa; WANG FengChao; YANG FuQian; WU HengAn

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model extended from the Frenkel-Eyring molecular kinetic theory (MKT) was applied to describe the boundary slip on textured surfaces.The concept of the equivalent depth of potential well was adopted to characterize the solid-liquid interactions on the textured surfaces.The slip behaviors on both chemically and topographically textured surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.The extended MKT slip model is validated by our MD simulations under various situations,by constructing different complex surfaces and varying the surface wettability as well as the shear stress exerted on the liquid.This slip model can provide more comprehensive understanding of the liquid flow on atomic scale by considering the influence of the solid-liquid interactions and the applied shear stress on the nano-flow.Moreover,the slip velocity shear-rate dependence can be predicted using this slip model,since the nonlinear increase of the slip velocity under high shear stress can be approximated by a hyperbolic sine function.

  11. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN SURFACE WATER HARVESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-11-25

    Nov 25, 2014 ... There is seasonal water scarcity in Marigat Division and the water demand has been ... with improved storage and rainwater harvesting methods. Such water can be ..... in the planning process and decision making and this ... The organizations support the community ... systems for domestic uses in urban.

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of GaN homoepitaxy on c- and m-plane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongwei; Zapol, Peter; Stephenson, G. Brian; Thompson, Carol

    2017-04-01

    The surface orientation can have profound effects on the atomic-scale processes of crystal growth and is essential to such technologies as GaN-based light-emitting diodes and high-power electronics. We investigate the dependence of homoepitaxial growth mechanisms on the surface orientation of a hexagonal crystal using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. To model GaN metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, in which N species are supplied in excess, only Ga atoms on a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) lattice are considered. The results are thus potentially applicable to any HCP material. Growth behaviors on c-plane (0001) and m-plane (01 1 ¯ 0 ) surfaces are compared. We present a reciprocal space analysis of the surface morphology, which allows extraction of growth mode boundaries and direct comparison with surface X-ray diffraction experiments. For each orientation, we map the boundaries between 3-dimensional, layer-by-layer, and step flow growth modes as a function of temperature and growth rate. Two models for surface diffusion are used, which produce different effective Ehrlich-Schwoebel step-edge barriers and different adatom diffusion anisotropies on m-plane surfaces. Simulation results in agreement with observed GaN island morphologies and growth mode boundaries are obtained. These indicate that anisotropy of step edge energy, rather than adatom diffusion, is responsible for the elongated islands observed on m-plane surfaces. Island nucleation spacing obeys a power-law dependence on growth rate, with exponents of -0.24 and -0.29 for the m- and c-plane, respectively.

  13. Kinetic Model for Simultaneous Adsorption/Photodegradation Process of Alizarin Red S in Water Solution by Nano-TiO2 under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Giovannetti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous adsorption and visible light photodegradation of Alizarin Red S in water solutions were studied in real time mode by using nano-TiO2, such as Anatase and Aeroxide P-25, supported on polypropylene strips. Kinetic results of the overall process were compared with those obtained from separated steps of adsorption and photodegradation previously studied; kinetic advantages were evidenced with the simultaneous approach. From the study of different dye concentrations, a kinetic model has been proposed which describes the overall process. This model considered two consecutive processes: The adsorption of dye on TiO2 surface and its photodegradation. The obtained results were in good agreement with experimental data and can predict the profiles of free dye, dye adsorbed on TiO2 and photoproduct concentrations during the total process.

  14. Modeling the Release Kinetics of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Molecules from Liposomal Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Loew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are frequently used as pharmaceutical nanocarriers to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs such as temoporfin, cyclosporine A, amphotericin B, and paclitaxel to their target site. Optimal drug delivery depends on understanding the release kinetics of the drug molecules from the host liposomes during the journey to the target site and at the target site. Transfer of drugs in model systems consisting of donor liposomes and acceptor liposomes is known from experimental work to typically exhibit a first-order kinetics with a simple exponential behavior. In some cases, a fast component in the initial transfer is present, in other cases the transfer is sigmoidal. We present and analyze a theoretical model for the transfer that accounts for two physical mechanisms, collisions between liposomes and diffusion of the drug molecules through the aqueous phase. Starting with the detailed distribution of drug molecules among the individual liposomes, we specify the conditions that lead to an apparent first-order kinetic behavior. We also discuss possible implications on the transfer kinetics of (1 high drug loading of donor liposomes, (2 attractive interactions between drug molecules within the liposomes, and (3 slow transfer of drugs between the inner and outer leaflets of the liposomes.

  15. Modeling the Release Kinetics of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Molecules from Liposomal Nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; May, Sylvio

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes are frequently used as pharmaceutical nanocarriers to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs such as temoporfin, cyclosporine A, amphotericin B, and paclitaxel to their target site. Optimal drug delivery depends on understanding the release kinetics of the drug molecules from the host liposomes during the journey to the target site and at the target site. Transfer of drugs in model systems consisting of donor liposomes and acceptor liposomes is known from experimental work to typically exhibit a first-order kinetics with a simple exponential behavior. In some cases, a fast component in the initial transfer is present, in other cases the transfer is sigmoidal. We present and analyze a theoretical model for the transfer that accounts for two physical mechanisms, collisions between liposomes and diffusion of the drug molecules through the aqueous phase. Starting with the detailed distribution of drug molecules among the individual liposomes, we specify the conditions that lead to an apparent first-order kinetic behavior. We also discuss possible implications on the transfer kinetics of (1) high drug loading of donor liposomes, (2) attractive interactions between drug molecules within the liposomes, and (3) slow transfer of drugs between the inner and outer leaflets of the liposomes. PMID:21773045

  16. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  17. Kinetic Model for the Radical Degradation of Tri-Halonitromethane Disinfection Byproducts in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen P. Mezyk; Bruce J. Mincher; William J. Cooper; S. Kirkham Cole; Robert V. Fox; Pieror R. Gardinali

    2012-10-01

    The halonitromethanes (HNMs) are byproducts of the ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of drinking waters. Although typically occurring at low concentrations HNMs have high cytotoxicity and mutagenicity, and may therefore represent a significant human health hazard. In this study, we have investigated the radical based mineralization of fully-halogenated HNMs in water using the congeners bromodichloronitromethane and chlorodibromonitromethane. We have combined absolute reaction rate constants for their reactions with the hydroxyl radical and the hydrated electron as measured by electron pulse radiolysis and analytical measurements of stable product concentrations obtained by 60Co steady-state radiolysis with a kinetic computer model that includes water radiolysis reactions and halide/nitrogen oxide radical chemistry to fully elucidate the reaction pathways of these HNMs. These results are compared to our previous similar study of the fully chlorinated HNM chloropicrin. The full optimized computer model, suitable for predicting the behavior of this class of compounds in irradiated drinking water is provided.

  18. Kinetic model for the radical degradation of tri-halonitromethane disinfection byproducts in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Cooper, William J.; Kirkham Cole, S.; Fox, Robert V.; Gardinali, Piero R.

    2012-10-01

    The halonitromethanes (HNMs) are byproducts of the ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of drinking waters. Although typically occurring at low concentrations HNMs have high cytotoxicity and mutagenicity, and may therefore represent a significant human health hazard. In this study, we have investigated the radical based mineralization of fully-halogenated HNMs in water using the congeners bromodichloronitromethane and chlorodibromonitromethane. We have combined absolute reaction rate constants for their reactions with the hydroxyl radical and the hydrated electron as measured by electron pulse radiolysis and analytical measurements of stable product concentrations obtained by 60Co steady-state radiolysis with a kinetic computer model that includes water radiolysis reactions and halide/nitrogen oxide radical chemistry to fully elucidate the reaction pathways of these HNMs. These results are compared to our previous similar study of the fully chlorinated HNM chloropicrin. The full optimized computer model, suitable for predicting the behavior of this class of compounds in irradiated drinking water, is provided.

  19. Adsorption mechanism of water molecule on goethite (010) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fangyuan; Zhou, Long; Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin

    2016-12-01

    Goethite widely exists among ocean sediments; it plays an important role in fixing heavy metals and adsorbing organic contaminants. So the understanding of the adsorbing process of water molecule on its surface will be very helpful to further reveal such environmental friendly processes. The configuration, electronic properties and interaction energy of water molecules adsorbed on pnma goethite (010) surface were investigated in detail by using density functional theory on 6-31G (d,p) basis set and projector- augment wave (PAW) method. The mechanism of the interaction between goethite surface and H2O was proposed. Despite the differences in total energy, there are four possible types of water molecule adsorption configurations on goethite (010) surface (Aa, Ab, Ba, Bb), forming coordination bond with surface Fe atom. Results of theoretical modeling indicate that the dissociation process of adsorbed water is an endothermic reaction with high activation energy. The dissociation of adsorbed water molecule is a proton transportation process between water's O atoms and surface. PDOS results indicate that the bonding between H2O and (010) surface is due to the overlapping of water's 2p orbitals and Fe's 3d orbitals. These results clarify the mechanism on how adsorbed water is dissociated on the surface of goethite and potentially provide useful information of the surface chemistry of goethite.

  20. The degradation behaviour of nine diverse contaminants in urban surface water and wastewater prior to water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Guillaume; Barbeau, Benoit; Arp, Hans Peter H; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    An increasing diversity of emerging contaminants are entering urban surface water and wastewater, posing unknown risks for the environment. One of the main contemporary challenges in ensuring water quality is to design efficient strategies for minimizing such risks. As a first step in such strategies, it is important to establish the fate and degradation behavior of contaminants prior to any engineered secondary water treatment. Such information is relevant for assessing treatment solutions by simple storage, or to assess the impacts of contaminant spreading in the absence of water treatment, such as during times of flooding or in areas of poor infrastructure. Therefore in this study we examined the degradation behavior of a broad array of water contaminants in actual urban surface water and wastewater, in the presence and absence of naturally occurring bacteria and at two temperatures. The chemicals included caffeine, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, atrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, diclofenac, desethylatrazine and norethindrone. Little information on the degradation behavior of these pollutants in actual influent wastewater exist, nor in general in water for desethylatrazine (a transformation product of atrazine) and the synthetic hormone norethindrone. Investigations were done in aerobic conditions, in the absence of sunlight. The results suggest that all chemicals except estradiol are stable in urban surface water, and in waste water neither abiotic nor biological degradation in the absence of sunlight contribute significantly to the disappearance of desethylatrazine, atrazine, carbamazepine and diclofenac. Biological degradation in wastewater was effective at transforming norethindrone, 17β-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, caffeine and sulfamethoxazole, with measured degradation rate constants k and half-lives ranging respectively from 0.0082-0.52 d(-1) and 1.3-85 days. The obtained degradation data generally followed a pseudo-first-order-kinetic model

  1. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface

  2. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream......, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short......, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using...

  3. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  4. Simulation of water cluster assembly on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Zhang, R Q; Lee, S T; Elstner, M; Frauenheim, Th; Wan, L J

    2005-07-28

    The assembly of small water clusters (H2O)n, n = 1-6, on a graphite surface is studied using a density functional tight-binding method complemented with an empirical van der Waals force correction, with confirmation using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. It is shown that the optimized geometry of the water hexamer may change its original structure to an isoenergy one when interacting with a graphite surface in some specific orientation, while the smaller water cluster will maintain its cyclic or linear configurations (for the water dimer). The binding energy of water clusters interacting with graphite is dependent on the number of water molecules that form hydrogen bonds, but is independent of the water cluster size. These physically adsorbed water clusters show little change in their IR peak position and leave an almost perfect graphite surface.

  5. Modeling aerosol surface chemistry and gas-particle interaction kinetics with K2-SURF: PAH oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. They have the ability to impact cloud properties, radiative balance and provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions. The uptake of gaseous species on aerosol surfaces impacts both the aerosol particles and the atmospheric budget of trace gases. These subsequent changes to the aerosol can in turn impact the aerosol chemical and physical properties. However, this uptake, as well as the impact on the aerosol, is not fully understood. This uncertainty is due not only to limited measurement data, but also a dearth of comprehensive and applicable modeling formalizations used for the analysis, interpretation and description of these heterogeneous processes. Without a common model framework, comparing and extrapolating experimental data is difficult. In this study, a novel kinetic surface model (K2-SURF) [Ammann & Pöschl, 2007; Pöschl et al., 2007] was used to describe the oxidation of a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Integrated into this consistent and universally applicable kinetic and thermodynamic process model are the concepts, terminologies and mathematical formalizations essential to the description of atmospherically relevant physicochemical processes involving organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosols. Within this process model framework, a detailed master mechanism, simplified mechanism and parameterizations of atmospheric aerosol chemistry are being developed and integrated in analogy to existing mechanisms and parameterizations of atmospheric gas-phase chemistry. One of the key aspects to this model is the defining of a clear distinction between various layers of the particle and surrounding gas phase. The processes occurring at each layer can be fully described using known fluxes and kinetic parameters. Using this system there is a clear separation of gas phase, gas-surface and surface bulk transport and reactions. The partitioning of compounds can be calculated using the flux

  6. Interactions on external MOF surfaces: desorption of water and ethanol from CuBDC nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Alexander C; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B; Nair, Sankar; Orlando, Thomas M

    2017-09-06

    The external surfaces of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are difficult to experimentally isolate due to the high porosities of these materials. MOF surface surrogates in the form of copper benzenedicarboxylate (CuBDC) nanosheets were synthesized using a bottom-up approach and the surface interactions of water and ethanol were investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A method of analysis of diffusion-influenced TPD was developed to measure the kinetic desorption properties of these porous materials. This approach also allows the extraction of diffusion coefficients from TPD data. Water desorbs from CuBDC nanosheets with activation energies of 44±2 kJ/mol at edge sites and 58 ± 1 kJ/mol at internal and surface sites. Ethanol desorbs with activation energies of 58 ± 1 kJ/mol at internal sites and 66 ± 0.4 kJ/mol at external surface sites. Co-adsorption of water and ethanol was also investigated. The presence of ethanol was found to inhibit the desorption of water that results in a water desorption process with an activation energy of 68 ± 0.7.

  7. Formation of trichloronitromethane and dichloroacetonitrile in natural waters: Precursor characterization, kinetics and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Yi-Hsueh; Tung, Hsin-hsin, E-mail: htung@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Aromatic NOM is the important precursor for TCNM and DCAN in chloramination. • TCNM and DCAN originated from DON followed 2nd order reaction kinetics. • TCNM and DCAN formation was faster when precursors were originated from DON than from chloramine. • DCAN formation kinetics equations were confirmed by tyrosine {sup 15}N-chloramination study. • 4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde is an important DCAN precursor during chloramination of natural water. - Abstract: During the chloramination of natural waters, both chloramines and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can serve as nitrogen sources for the formation of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN). The present study investigated the formation kinetics and precursor characteristics of TCNM and DCAN. {sup 15}N-Isotopic monochloramination of the organic fractions produced both {sup 15}N- and {sup 14}N-DCAN and TCNM. Nitrogenous disinfection byproduct (N-DBP) formation, in which the nitrogen precursor originated from DON ({sup 14}N-DCAN and {sup 14}N-TCNM), followed a second-order reaction kinetics (k = 3.2 × 10{sup −5} to 9.4 × 10{sup −5} μM{sup −1} h{sup −1}). The formation of N-DBP where the nitrogen atoms originated from chloramines (e.g. {sup 15}N-DCAN and {sup 15}N-TCNM) correlated linearly with chloramine exposure. The discrepancy in formation kinetics results in that the {sup 14}N-DCAN concentrations were two to ten times higher than {sup 15}N-DCAN in the beginning of the reaction (<12 h). Possible rate equations are proposed in this study. The results of a model compound study support the results of the chloramination of natural waters. In addition, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an oxidative product commonly found during chlorination/chloramination of natural organic matters, gave a 10-fold greater yield of DCAN than that produced from tyrosine; 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde is thus an important precursor in DCAN formation by chloramine incorporation during the

  8. Surface Curvature-Induced Directional Movement of Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a surface curvature-induced directional movement phenomenon, based on molecular dynamics simulations, that a nanoscale water droplet at the outer surface of a graphene cone always spontaneously moves toward the larger end of the cone, and at the inner surface toward the smaller end. The analysis on the van der Waals interaction potential between a single water molecule and a curved graphene surface reveals that the curvature with its gradient does generate the driving force resulting in the above directional motion. Furthermore, we found that the direction of the above movement is independent of the wettability, namely is regardless of either hydrophobic or hydrophilic of the surface. However, the latter surface is in general leading to higher motion speed than the former. The above results provide a basis for a better understanding of many reported observations, and helping design of curved surfaces with desired directional surface water transportation.

  9. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  10. Enhanced boronizing kinetics of alloy steel assisted by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haopeng, E-mail: hpyang1993@163.com; Wu, Xiaochun, E-mail: xcwu@staff.shu.edu.cn; Yang, Zhe; Pu, Shengjun; Wang, Hongbin

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • Nanostructured surface layer is fabricated on H13 steel assisted by SMAT. • The boronizing kinetics of SMAT sample can be enhanced remarkably. • Borided layer can delay fatigue cracks initiation and impede their propagation. -- Abstract: A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on AISI H13 steel by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). Boronizing behaviors of the SMAT samples were systematically investigated in comparison with their coarse-grained counterparts. The boron diffusion depth of the SMAT sample with pack boriding treatment at 600 °C for 2 h was about 8 μm, which was much deeper than that of the coarse-grained sample. A much thicker borided layer on the SMAT sample can be synthesized by a duplex boronizing treatment at 600 °C followed by at a higher temperature. The borided layer was composed with monophase of Fe{sub 2}B and the growth of it exhibited a (0 0 2) preferred orientation. Moreover, the activation energy of boron diffusion for the SMAT sample is 140.3 kJ/mol, which is much lower than 209.4 kJ/mol for the coarse-grained counterpart. The results indicate that the boronizing kinetics can be significantly enhanced in the SMAT sample with a duplex boronizing treatment. Furthermore, the thermal fatigue tests show that the borided layer with excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at elevated temperatures could effectively delay the thermal fatigue cracks initiation and impede their propagation. Therefore, the thermal fatigue property of H13 steel with a duplex boronizing treatment can be improved remarkably.

  11. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  12. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  13. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  14. KINETIC AND THERMODYNAMIC STUDY ON ADSORPTION BY STARCHY MATERIALS IN THE ETHANOL-WATER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Carmo

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Improving adsorptive processes demands a constant search for new adsorbents. In the specific case of ethanol-water separation, A zeolites are successfully being used. The use of nonconventional adsorbents to substitute zeolites, mainly starchy adsorbents in virtue of their known chemical affinity water, has recently been proposed. In this work a thermodynamic and kinetic study has been undertaken on the liquid phase adsorption of water from an ethanol-water mixture using manioc starch pellets as the adsorbent. The fundamental thermodynamic data were obtained by means of the static method, using a thermostated bath at four different temperatures (25, 40, 50 and 60° C, and could be correlated by means of a semi-empirical isotherm. The kinetic data, in turn, were obtained in a finite circulating liquid bath cell, enabling the construction of uptake rate curves, whereby the influence of temperature, interstitial velocity and adsorbent mean particle size on the adsorption rate was analyzed. The effective internal diffusivities at the experimental temperatures were estimated by a pore diffusion model and the results obtained were compared with those for commercial 3A zeolite

  15. Size Effect of Silica Shell on Gas Uptake Kinetics in Dry Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Diwei; Bai, Dongsheng; Li, Shujing; Wang, Xinrui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-07-26

    Two kinds of dry water (DW) particles are prepared by mixing water and hydrophobic silica particles with nanometer or micrometer dimensions, and the two DW particles are found to have similar size distributions regardless of the size of the silica shell. The CO2 uptake kinetics of DW with nanometer (nanoshell) and micrometer shells (microshell) are measured, and both uptake rate and capacity show the obvious size effect of the silica shell. The DW with a microshell possesses a larger uptake capacity, whereas the DW with a nanoshell has a faster uptake rate. By comparing the uptake kinetics of soluble NH3 and CO2 further, we found that the microshell enhances the stability and the dispersion degree of DW and the nanoshell offers a shorter path for the transit of guest gas into the water core. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation is introduced to illustrate the nanosize effect of the silica shell on the initial step of the gas uptake. It is found that the concentration of gas molecules close to the silica shell is higher than that in the bulk water core. With the increase in the size of the silica shell, the amount of CO2 in the silica shell decreases, and it is easier for the gas uptake to reach steady state.

  16. KINETICS OF THE PHOTOCATALYTIC DEGRADATION OF SELECTED ORGANIC MICROPOLLUTANTS IN THE WATER ENVIROMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Anna Kudlek

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an assessment of the removal degree of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (anthracene, benzo(apyrene, xenoestrogens (octylphenol, pentachlorophenol and pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac in the process of heterogeneous photocatalysis of their water solutions, which were prepared on the base of deionized water. Titanium dioxide at a dose of 100 mg/dm3 was used as a photocatalyst of the process. The kinetics of the process was determined based on the Langmuir-Hinsherlwood equation, assuming the pseudo-first-order reaction of micropollutants decomposition. Furthermore a toxicological analysis of water samples of test compounds was performed by the use of the Microtox® test. It has been found that the micropollutant concentrations decreased with the increase of process time and their removal degree after 60 minutes exceeds 90%. The analysis of the proces kinetic showed that the oxidation of the compounds occurred with the greatest intensity in the first stage of the process up to 10 min. The preformed toxicological assessment confirmed the incomplete decomposition of pollutants and the generation of by-products, which contribute to the increase of the toxicity of treated water solutions.

  17. Adsorption and thin-film adhesion on single-crystalline surfaces: Enthalpies, entropies, and kinetic prefactors for surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Jason R. V.

    Chemical bonding at solid surfaces and interfaces is influential in a wide range of important technological applications including catalysis, fuel cells, batteries, chemical sensors, and device fabrication for microelectronics, computers, solar cells, and all variety of coatings. Adsorption and adhesion energetics are key elements in understanding interfacial properties, and these properties can be used to develop functional industrial materials. First, the properties of single-crystalline oxide surfaces are reviewed in detail, particularly in regards to the adsorption energetics of these surfaces. This includes the largest collection of experimental adsorption data on single-crystalline oxide surfaces ever presented, from which trends in the thermodynamic properties of adsorbates are revealed which greatly expand our understanding of the physical processes occurring on these surfaces. Among these trends is the discovery that the entropy of adsorbed molecules tracks their gas-phase entropy, retaining ~2/3 of that entropy upon adsorption. This allows for a method of predicting not only entropies of adsorption, but also the kinetic prefactors associated with many classes of elementary surface reactions. These estimations of desorption prefactors are then used to improve calculations of adsorption energies from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements for many systems. Metal adsorption on oxide surfaces and the strength of the binding at metal / oxide interfaces are then discussed. The motivation here is to understand oxide-supported transition metal nanoparticles such as those used in industrial heterogeneous catalysis. For metal atom adsorption, adsorption energetics and adhesion energies are directly related to the energy of the adsorbed atoms, which define their stability, sintering rates, and reactivity, and which are found to vary with both the size of the nanoparticle and the nature of the oxide support. The experimental techniques necessary for

  18. Solvatochromic effect and kinetics of methyl violet reduction with potassium iodide in water-isopropanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Maria; Saeed, Rehana; Khan, Sameera Razi; Masood, Summyia

    2016-12-01

    The solvent influence on the reduction kinetics of methyl violet with iodide in binary mixture of aqueous isopropanol was investigated spectrophotometrically. The absorption spectra of methyl violet were recorded in water, aqueous isopropanol and absolute isopropanol. In these solvents λmax was in the range from 580.5 to 582.5 nm. The CNIBS/R-K model was used to calculate the solvatochromic parameters in a binary mixture; polynomial equation was also applied to describe the experimental data. The transition energies ( E T) were calculated. They show bathochromic shift with the decrease in the polarity of the solvent. The temperature was varied from 298-318 K, while the pH of the reaction was maintained at 4.99 and 6.00. The reduction reaction was found to be first order by potassium iodide and zero order by methyl violet. The thermodynamic parameters were also evaluated to support the kinetic data.

  19. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies of amaranth dye biosorption from aqueous solution onto water hyacinth leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Coronilla, Imelda; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-04-01

    The present study explored the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of amaranth (acid red 27) anionic dye (AD) biosorption to water hyacinth leaves (LEC). The effect of LEC particle size, contact time, solution pH, initial AD concentration and temperature on AD biosorption was studied in batch experiments. AD biosorption increased with rising contact time and initial AD concentration, and with decreasing LEC particle size and solution pH. Pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provided the best correlation for the experimental data. Isotherm studies showed that the biosorption of AD onto LEC closely follows the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum biosorption capacity of about 70 mg g(-1). The thermodynamic parameters confirm that AD biosorption by LEC is non-spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Results indicate that LEC is a strong biosorbent capable of effective detoxification of AD-laden wastewaters.

  20. Plasma Kinetics in the Ethanol/Water/Air Mixture in "Tornado" Type Electrical Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Levko, D; Chernyak, V; Olszewski, S; Nedybaliuk, O

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a new modification of the "tornado" type electrical discharge. Numerical modeling clarifies the nature of the non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of nonequilibrium plasma-chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

  1. In-Situ calibration of POCIS for the sampling of polar pesticides and metabolites in surface water

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Imtiaz; Togola, Anne; Gonzalez, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    on line version; International audience; Over the past years, passive sampling devices have been successfully used for the monitoring of various pollutants in water. The present work studied the uptake kinetics in surface water of ten polar pesticides and metabolites, using pharmaceutical POCIS samplers. The aim was to determine sampling rates from in-situ calibration and to compare results with those obtained earlier under laboratory conditions, with the final objective of assessing the impa...

  2. Kinetics of Hydrothermal Reactions of Minerals in Near-critical and Supercritical Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This work presents new experimental results on the kinetics of mineral dissolution in near-critical and supercritical water in a temperature range (T) from 25 to 400° C and a constant pressure of 23 MPa. Kinetic experiments were carried out by using a flow reactor (packed bed reactor) of an open system. The dissolution rates of albite and magnetite were measured under these experimental conditions. Na, Al and Si release rates for albite dissolution in water were measured as a function of the temperature and flow velocity in the reaction system. The maximum release rates of Na, Al and Si of albite dissolution in the hydrothermal flow systems under different flow velocities were always obtained at 300° C, that is to say, the maximum albite dissolution rates in the flow systems, regardless of different flow rates, were repeatedly measured at 300° C. Results indicate a wide fluctuation in albite dissolution rates occurring close to the critical point of water. The dissolution rates increased when the temperatures increased from 25 to 300° C and decreased when the temperatures increase from 300 to 400° C. At some flow velocities, the dissolution rates rose as the temperature surpassed 374° C. Albite dissolution was incongruent in water at most temperatures. It was only at 300° C that albite dissolution was congruent. The albite dissolution from 25 to 300° C (at 23 MPa) will change from incongruent to congruent, whereas from subcritical 300 to 400° C (at 23 MPa), the dissolution will change from congruent to incongruent. The release ratio of Al/Si (or Na/Si) is positive at T300° C. The dissolution rates of magnetite in water increased with increasing T until T at the critical point of water or around it. The authors believe that this is caused by the wide fluctuations in water properties under the conditions from the near-critical to supercritical state.

  3. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-29

    term goals were to 1. exploit measurements of breaking wave noise and photographic images of whitecaps to infer bubble cloud populations at the sea ...surface reverberation in wind-driven seas , an additional objective has been to study the role of sub-surface bubbles on the attenuation and scattering of...acoustic signals, including determining methods for quantifying bubble populations with video footage of the sea surface and developing models of

  4. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  5. Water-Mediated Interactions between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R

    2016-09-01

    All surfaces in water experience at short separations hydration repulsion or hydrophobic attraction, depending on the surface polarity. These interactions dominate the more long-ranged electrostatic and van der Waals interactions and are ubiquitous in biological and colloidal systems. Despite their importance in all scenarios where the surface separation is in the nanometer range, the origin of these hydration interactions is still unclear. Using atomistic solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the interaction free energies of charge-neutral model surfaces with different elastic and water-binding properties. The surface polarity is shown to be the most important parameter that not only determines the hydration properties and thereby the water contact angle of a single surface but also the surface-surface interaction and whether two surfaces attract or repel. Elastic properties of the surfaces are less important. On the basis of surface contact angles and surface-surface binding affinities, we construct a universal interaction diagram featuring three different interaction regimes-hydration repulsion, cavitation-induced attraction-and for intermediate surface polarities-dry adhesion. On the basis of scaling arguments and perturbation theory, we establish simple combination rules that predict the interaction behavior for combinations of dissimilar surfaces.

  6. Comparison of kinetic models for atom recombination on high-temperature reusable surface insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Five kinetic models are compared for their ability to predict recombination coefficients for oxygen and nitrogen atoms over high-temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI). Four of the models are derived using Rideal-Eley or Langmuir-Hinshelwood catalytic mechanisms to describe the reaction sequence. The fifth model is an empirical expression that offers certain features unattainable through mechanistic description. The results showed that a four-parameter model, with temperature as the only variable, works best with data currently available. The model describes recombination coefficients for oxygen and nitrogen atoms for temperatures from 300 to 1800 K. Kinetic models, with atom concentrations, demonstrate the influence of atom concentration on recombination coefficients. These models can be used for the prediction of heating rates due to catalytic recombination during re-entry or aerobraking maneuvers. The work further demonstrates a requirement for more recombination experiments in the temperature ranges of 300-1000 K, and 1500-1850 K, with deliberate concentration variation to verify model requirements.

  7. Optimization and Kinetic Studies on Biodiesel Production from Kusum (Schleichera triguga) Oil Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarve, Antaram; Varma, Mahesh N; Sonawane, Shriram S

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the low-cost non-edible kusum (Schleichera triguga) oil with a substantial amount of free fatty acid (FFA) was utilized for biodiesel synthesis. In pretreatment step, FFA was reduced by the acid catalyzed esterification method. Then, response surface method (RSM) in conjunction with centre composite design (CCD) containing 30 experimental runs were statistically employed for process optimization and kinetic study for the base catalyzed transesterification process. A statistical model predicted highest fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield of 97.37% at the optimal values of process parameters as follows: sodium methoxide concentration 0.9 wt% of oil, Methanol to oil molar ratio 9:1, temperature 58.9 ℃ and reaction time 58.5 min. Using these optimal parameters under experimental conditions in three independent replicates an actual FAME content of 98.14% was obtained which was in reasonable agreement with predicted one. The developed kinetic model suggested a 1.8(th) order reaction with activation energy of 31.42 kcal mol(-1) and frequency factor of 5.53×10(19) L mol(-1)min(-1). Furthermore, Important fuel properties of kusum oil biodiesel (KOB) was compared with ASTM 6751 and DIN EN 14214. The viscosity was found to be 5.34 Cst at 40 °C and the flash point was 152°C.

  8. Surface water quality assessment by environmetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioglu, Hülya; Boyacioglu, Hayal

    2007-08-01

    This environmetric study deals with the interpretation of river water monitoring data from the basin of the Buyuk Menderes River and its tributaries in Turkey. Eleven variables were measured to estimate water quality at 17 sampling sites. Factor analysis was applied to explain the correlations between the observations in terms of underlying factors. Results revealed that, water quality was strongly affected from agricultural uses. Cluster analysis was used to classify stations with similar properties and results distinguished three groups of stations. Water quality at downstream of the river was quite different from the other part. It is recommended to involve the environmetric data treatment as a substantial procedure in assessment of water quality data.

  9. Quantifying body water kinetics and fecal and urinary water output from lactating Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appuhamy, J A D R N; Wagner-Riddle, C; Casper, D P; France, J; Kebreab, E

    2014-10-01

    Reliable estimates of fresh manure water output from dairy cows help to improve storage design, enhance efficiency of land application, quantify the water footprint, and predict nutrient transformations during manure storage. The objective of the study was to construct a mechanistic, dynamic, and deterministic mathematical model to quantify urinary and fecal water outputs (kg/d) from individual lactating dairy cows. The model contained 4 body water pools: reticulorumen (QRR), post-reticulorumen (QPR), extracellular (QEC), and intracellular (QIC). Dry matter (DM) intake, dietary forage, DM, crude protein, acid detergent fiber and ash contents, milk yield, and milk fat and protein contents, days in milk, and body weight were input variables to the model. A set of linear equations was constructed to determine drinking, feed, and saliva water inputs to QRR and fractional water passage from QRR to QPR. Water transfer via the rumen wall was subjected to changes in QEC and total water input to QRR. Post-reticulorumen water passage was adjusted for DM intake. Metabolic water production and respiratory cutaneous water losses were estimated with functions of heat production in the model. Water loss in urine was driven by absorbed N left after being removed via milk. Model parameters were estimated simultaneously using observed fecal and urinary water output data from lactating Holstein cows (n=670). The model was evaluated with data that were not used for model development and optimization (n=377). The observations in both data sets were related to thermoneutral conditions. The model predicted drinking water intake, fecal, urinary, and total fresh manure water output with root mean square prediction errors as a percentage of average values of 18.1, 15.6, 30.6, and 14.6%, respectively. In all cases, >97% of the prediction error was due to random variability of data. The model can also be used to determine saliva production, heat and metabolic water production, respiratory

  10. Advacancy-mediated atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative island nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikov, S. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Kosolobov, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated Si(111) surface morphology transformations during high-temperature sublimation and oxygen treatments by means of in situ ultrahigh vacuum reflection electron microscopy. By analyzing atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative (vacancy) islands nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface with extremely wide (up to 120 μm in size) terraces we have estimated the activation energy associated with the surface-bulk vacancy exchange processes. We show that atomic steps motion and negative islands nucleation kinetics at temperatures above 1180 °C can be described by the step-flow model of Burton, Cabrera and Frank taking into account advacancies formation. By comparing experimental results with predictions of model we conclude that the surface mass transport at temperatures above 1180 °C is governed by surface vacancies nucleation and interaction with atomic steps rather than via adatoms surface diffusion.

  11. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility... Water Act, as amended. (b) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility shall not cause...

  12. Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water: A case study ... in Mvudi River used as a source of domestic water for people who live around it. ... of Water Affairs and Forestry of South Africa (DWAF) and the World Health ...

  13. Intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid under different water quality and light conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfite is an important process in wet flue gas desulfurization.Using highly purified water or distilled water as a reaction medium and a transparent or an opaque intermittent reaction apparatus,the intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid was investigated under four dif-ferent conditions.The reaction order of the reagents and the activation energy were obtained.The re-sults indicate that water quality and light have no obvious effects on the reaction order and activation energy,but have an influence on the reaction rate constant.The mechanism of the intrinsic reaction is proposed.The results derived with this mechanism are in good agreement with the experimental re-sults.

  14. Intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid under different water quality and light conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LiDong; ZHAO Yi; LI QiangWei; CHEN ZhouYan; LIU SongTao; MA YongLiang; HAO JiMing

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfite is an important process in wet flue gas desulfurization. Using highly purified water or distilled water as a reaction medium and a transparent or an opaque intermittent reaction apparatus, the intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid was investigated under four dif-ferent conditions. The reaction order of the reagents and the activation energy were obtained. The re-sults indicate that water quality and light have no obvious effects on the reaction order and activation energy, but have an influence on the reaction rate constant. The mechanism of the intrinsic reaction is proposed. The results derived with this mechanism are in good agreement with the experimental re-sults.

  15. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  16. Gas-phase surface alloying under ''kinetic control'': a novel approach to improving the surface properties of titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, F.; Michal, G.M.; Heuer, A.H. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Oba, F. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, L. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Nanocerox, Inc. Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Blush, J. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Johns Manville Corp. Littleton (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A novel process, ''nitridation under kinetic control of the nitrogen activity'', has been developed for diffusing substantial amounts ({approx} 10at.%) of interstitially dissolved nitrogen into the surface of Ti alloys (Ti-6Al-4V). By operating with a gas phase providing a very small, controlled nitrogen activity, this process generates a homogeneous Ti-N solid solution, free of detrimental titanium nitride precipitates, in which the nitrogen concentration smoothly decreases from the surface towards the interior. The process is conformal (applicable to workpieces of arbitrary shape) and provides a substantial (about twofold) increase in surface hardness. The hardened surface layer appears to possess adequate ductility for many structural applications. The concept of ''surface alloying under kinetic control'' is very general and may also serve to generate well-controlled surface concentration profiles of carbon or oxygen in Ti-base and other structural alloys. (orig.)

  17. Redox kinetics of adriamycin adsorbed on the surface of graphite and mercury electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Sebojka

    2006-09-01

    Kinetics of the surface redox reactions of adriamycin (doxorubicin hydrochloride) adsorbed on paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and on mercury electrode is measured by square-wave voltammetry. In 0.9 mol/L KNO3 buffered to pH 4.65, the standard electrode reaction rate constants of the first quinone/hydroquinone redox couple (see Scheme 2) on PIGE and mercury are k(s1)=49+/-12 s(-1) and k(s1)=147+/-36 s(-1), respectively. Under the same conditions, the standard rate constant of the second redox couple on the PIGE is smaller than 4 s(-1) and the electron transfer coefficient of the reduction is alpha2=0.35.

  18. A Reaction-based Diagonalization Approach to Modeling Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Yeh, G.; Zhang, F.; Wu, T.; Hu, G.

    2005-12-01

    There are many water quality models (e.g., WASP, QAUL2E/QUAL2K, CE-QUAL-ICM, RCA, RMA11, etc.) that have been employed by practitioners in surface water quality modeling. All of these models are similar to each others. The major differences among them are the number of water quality parameters included and the number of biogeochemical processes considered. Because of the limitation on the number of biogeochemical processes considered and, in a lesser extent, on the number of water quality parameters included, these models often perform only fairly in validation and their predictions may be unreliable, even though they can be adequately calibrated in most occasions and excellently in some occasions. Obviously, there is a need to develop a model that would allow the inclusion of any number of water quality parameters and enable the hypothesis of any number of biogeochemical processes. This paper presents the development of a numerical water quality model using a general paradigm of reaction-based approaches. In a reaction-based approach, all conceptualized biogoechemical processes are transformed into a reaction network. Through the decomposition of species governing equations via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network, (1) redundant fast reactions and irrelevant kinetic reactions are removed from the system, which alleviates the problem of unnecessary and erroneous formulation and parameterization of these reactions, and (2) fast reactions and slow reactions are decoupled, which enables robust numerical integrations. The system of species governing equations is transformed into two sets: algebraic equations (either mass action equations or users' specified) of equilibrium variables and differential equations of kinetic variables. As a result, the model alleviates the needs of using simple partitions for fast reactions and uses kinetic-variables instead of biogeochemical species as primary dependent variables. With the diagonalization strategy, it

  19. Importance of surface diffusivities in pesticide adsorption kinetics onto granular versus powdered activated carbon: experimental determination and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baup, S; Wolbert, D; Laplanche, A

    2002-10-01

    Three pesticides (atrazine, bromoxynil and diuron) and two granular activated carbons are involved in equilibrium and kinetic adsorption experiments. Equilibrium is represented by Freundlich isotherm law and kinetic is described by the Homogeneous Surface Diffusion Model, based on external mass transfer and intraparticle surface diffusion. Equilibrium and long-term experiments are conducted to compare Powdered Activated Carbon and Granular Activated Carbon. These first investigations show that crushing GAC into PAC improves the accessibility of the adsorption sites without increasing the number of these sites. In a second part, kinetics experiments are carried out using a Differential Column Batch Reactor. Thanks to this experimental device, the external mass transfer coefficient k(f) is calculated from empirical correlation and the effect of external mass transfer on adsorption is likely to be minimized. In order to obtain the intraparticle surface diffusion coefficient D. for these pesticides, comparisons between experimental kinetic data and simulations are conducted and the best agreement leads to the Ds coefficient. This procedure appears to be an efficient way to acquire surface diffusion coefficients for the adsorption of pesticides onto GAC. Finally it points out the role of surface diffusivity in the adsorption rate. As a matter of fact, even if the amount of the target-compound that could be potentially adsorbed is really important, its surface diffusion coefficient may be small, so that its adsorption may not have enough contact time to be totally achieved.

  20. The Kinetics and Mechanism of Spontaneous Dispersion of Ionic Compounds Onto Surfaces of Supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪传宝; 谢有畅; 唐有祺

    1994-01-01

    The dispersion kinetics of ionic compounds on the surfaces of supports is studied by using atemperature-programmed X-ray diffractometer.It is observed that for a given ionic compound/support mix-ture,there exists a critical dispersion temperature T_c,at which the ionic compound starts to disperse ontothe surface of the support at an appreciable rate.The dispersion process has 2 steps:the ions first leave thesurface of the ionic compound for the external surface of the support,and then the ions diffuse to the wholesurface of the support.For the dispersion of ionic compounds with high melting points,the first step is rate-determining.Their critical dispersion temperatures and dispersion activation energies depend on the ioniccompounds themselves and increase with their melting points,but are independent of supports.For the dis-persion of ionic compounds with low melting points,the second step is rate-determining.Their critical dis-persion temperatures and dispersion activation energies depend on both the ionic compounds and the sup-ports.

  1. A pinch of salt is all it takes: chemistry at the frozen water surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Tara F; Wren, Sumi N; Donaldson, D James

    2014-05-20

    Chemical interactions at the air-ice interface are of great importance to local atmospheric chemistry but also to the concentrations of pollutants deposited onto natural snow and ice. However, the study of such processes has been hampered by the lack of general, surface-specific probes. Even seemingly basic chemical properties, such as the local concentration of chemical compounds, or the pH at the interface, have required the application of assumptions about solute distributions in frozen media. The measurements that have been reported have tended for the most part to focus on entire ice or snow samples, rather than strictly the frozen interface with the atmosphere. We have used glancing-angle laser spectroscopy to interrogate the air-ice interface; this has yielded several insights into the chemical interactions there. The linear fluorescence and Raman spectra thus measured have the advantage of easy interpretability; careful experimentation can limit their probe depth to that which is relevant to atmospheric heterogeneous processes. We have used these techniques to show that the environment at the interface between air and freshwater ice surfaces is distinct from that at the interface between air and liquid water. Acids such as HCl that adsorb to ice surfaces from the gas phase result in significantly different pH responses than those at liquid water surfaces. Further, the solvation of aromatic species is suppressed at freshwater ice surfaces compared with that at liquid water surfaces, leading to extensive self-association of aromatics at ice surfaces. Photolysis kinetics of these species are much faster than at liquid water surfaces; this can sometimes (but not always) be explained by red shifts in the absorption spectra of self-associated aromatics increasing the extent to which solar radiation is absorbed. The environment presented by frozen saltwater surfaces, in contrast, appears to be reasonably well-described by liquid water. The extent of hydrogen

  2. Surface properties of a single perfluoroalkyl group on water surfaces studied by surface potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoaka, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Shioya, Nobutaka; Morita, Kohei; Sonoyama, Masashi; Amii, Hideki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A discriminative study of a single perfluoroalkyl (Rf) group from a bulk material is recently recognized to be necessary toward the total understanding of Rf compounds based on a primary chemical structure. The single molecule and the bulk matter have an interrelationship via an intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) aggregation property of an Rf group, which is theorized by the stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory. Since an Rf group has dipole moments along many C-F bonds, a single Rf group would possess a hydrophilic-like character on the surface. To reveal the hydration character of a single Rf group, in the present study, surface potential (ΔV) measurements are performed for Langmuir monolayers of Rf-containing compounds. From a comparative study with a monolayer of a normal hydrocarbon compound, the hydration/dehydration dynamics of a lying Rf group on water has first been monitored by ΔV measurements, through which a single Rf group has been revealed to have a unique "dipole-interactive" character, which enables the Rf group interacted with the water 'surface.' In addition, the SDA theory proves to be useful to predict the 2D aggregation property across the phase transition temperature of 19°C by use of the ΔV measurements.

  3. Neutron scattering from myelin revisited: bilayer asymmetry and water-exchange kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denninger, Andrew R. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Demé, Bruno; Cristiglio, Viviana [Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL), CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); LeDuc, Géraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS 40220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Feller, W. Bruce [NOVA Scientific Inc., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Kirschner, Daniel A., E-mail: kirschnd@bc.edu [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The structure of internodal myelin in the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems has been determined using neutron diffraction. The kinetics of water exchange in these tissues is also described. Rapid nerve conduction in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS, respectively) of higher vertebrates is brought about by the ensheathment of axons with myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar assembly of membranes. The ability of myelin to electrically insulate depends on the regular stacking of these plasma membranes and on the presence of a number of specialized membrane-protein assemblies in the sheath, including the radial component, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and the axo–glial junctions of the paranodal loops. The disruption of this fine-structure is the basis for many demyelinating neuropathies in the CNS and PNS. Understanding the processes that govern myelin biogenesis, maintenance and destabilization requires knowledge of myelin structure; however, the tight packing of internodal myelin and the complexity of its junctional specializations make myelin a challenging target for comprehensive structural analysis. This paper describes an examination of myelin from the CNS and PNS using neutron diffraction. This investigation revealed the dimensions of the bilayers and aqueous spaces of myelin, asymmetry between the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets of the membrane, and the distribution of water and exchangeable hydrogen in internodal multilamellar myelin. It also uncovered differences between CNS and PNS myelin in their water-exchange kinetics.

  4. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  5. Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IESWTR balances the need for treatment with potential increases in disinfection by -products. The materials found on this page are intended to assist public water systems and state in the implementation of the IESWTR.

  6. SurfaceWater Source Protection Areas (SPAs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Source Protection Area (SPA) boundaries have been located on RF 24000 & RF 25000 scale USGS topographic maps by Water Supply Division (DEC) and VT Dept of Health...

  7. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental pollution derived from domestic and industrial activities. Due to the inadequacy of controlled waste management strategies and waste treatment plants ... Oxygen Demand (COD), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Dissolved ... appropriate waste water purifying plants. ..... University of Turku, Finland. 2.

  8. Bioinspired aquatic microrobot capable of walking on water surface like a water strider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbin; Zhao, Jie; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Mingwen; Pan, Qinmin

    2011-07-01

    Walking on the water surface is a dream of humans, but it is exactly the way of life for some aquatic insects. In this study, a bionic aquatic microrobot capable of walking on the water surface like a water strider was reported. The novel water strider-like robot consisted of ten superhydrophobic supporting legs, two miniature dc motors, and two actuating legs. The microrobot could not only stand effortlessly but also walk and turn freely on the water surface, exhibiting an interesting motion characteristic. A numerical model describing the interface between the partially submerged leg and the air-water surface was established to fully understand the mechanism for the large supporting force of the leg. It was revealed that the radius and water contact angle of the legs significantly affect the supporting force. Because of its high speed, agility, low cost, and easy fabrication, this microrobot might have a potential application in water quality surveillance, water pollution monitoring, and so on.

  9. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  10. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  11. Growth Kinetics of Thiobacillus thiooxidans on the Surface of Elemental Sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Y; Asai, S; Yoshida, N

    1995-10-01

    The growth kinetics of Thiobacillus thiooxidans on elemental sulfur in batch cultures at 30(deg)C and pH 1.5 was studied by measuring the time courses of the concentration of adsorbed cells on sulfur, the concentration of free cells suspended in liquid medium, and the amount of sulfur oxidized. As the elemental sulfur was oxidized to sulfate ions, the surface concentration of adsorbed cells per unit mass of sulfur approached a maximum value (maximum adsorption capacity of sulfur particles) whereas the concentration of free cells continued to increase with time. There was a close relationship between the concentrations of free and adsorbed cells during the microbial sulfur oxidation, and the two cell concentrations were well correlated by the Langmuir isotherm with adsorption equilibrium constant K(infA) and maximum adsorption capacity X(infAm) of 2.10 x 10(sup-9) ml per cell and 4.57 x 10(sup10) cells per g, respectively. The total concentration of free and adsorbed cells increased in parallel with the amount of sulfate formed. The total growth on elemental sulfur gave a characteristic growth curve in which a linear-growth phase followed the period of an initial exponential phase. The batch rate data collected under a wide variety of inoculum levels (about 10(sup5) to 10(sup8) cells per ml) were consistent with a kinetic model assuming that the growth rate of adsorbed bacteria is proportional to the product of the concentration, X(infA), of adsorbed cells and the fraction, (theta)(infV), of adsorption sites unoccupied by cells. The kinetic and stoichiometric parameters appearing in the model were estimated from the experimental data, and the specific growth rate, (mu)(infA), and growth yield, Y(infA), were 2.58 day(sup-1) and 2.05 x 10(sup11) cells per g, respectively. The proposed model and the parameter values allowed us to predict quantitatively the surface attachment of T. thiooxidans cells on elemental sulfur and the bacterial growth in both initial

  12. Unique water-water coordination tailored by a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; MacNaughton, J.;

    2013-01-01

    At low coverage of water on Cu(110), substrate-mediated electrostatics lead to zigzagging chains along [001] as observed with STM [T. Yamada, S. Tamamori, H. Okuyama, and T. Aruga, “Anisotropic water chain growth on Cu(110) observed with scanning tunneling microscopy” Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 036105...... (2006)]. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy we find an anomalous low-energy resonance at ~533.1 eV which, based on density functional theory spectrum simulations, we assign to an unexpected configuration of water units whose uncoordinated O-H bonds directly face those of their neighbors...

  13. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  14. Kinetics of Exhaled Carbon Monoxide After Water-pipe Smoking Indoors and Outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Agnes; Pap, Dalma; Barta, Imre; Drozdovszky, Orsolya; Egresi, Andrea; Antus, Balazs

    2017-05-01

    Despite accumulating evidence about its adverse health effects, water-pipe tobacco smoking has become very popular among youth. The aim of this study was to compare smoke exposure and the kinetics of exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO) between water-pipe and cigarette smokers under different conditions. Using a cross-over study design, changes in eCO and urinary cotinine levels were measured in a cohort of 32 healthy university students after sessions of water-pipe smoking indoors and outdoors. An indoor cigarette smoking session with equal amounts of tobacco was conducted for reference purposes. Both active and passive smokers participated in all sessions. In indoor sessions, we found that among active participants, eCO levels were approximately 7.5-fold higher in water-pipe users than cigarette smokers. eCO levels remained significantly elevated even 10 h after discontinuing water-pipe smoking. Notably, eCO levels in passive water-pipe smokers were in the same range as in active cigarette smokers. Compared with indoor sessions, eCO levels in active water-pipe users were reduced in outdoor environments. Nonetheless, levels were still higher in these subjects than those in active cigarette smokers measured in indoor sessions. Urinary cotinine levels were comparable in active water-pipe and cigarette smokers. Our results suggest that water-pipe smoking is associated with significantly higher toxicant exposure than cigarette smoking even in outdoor environments. Furthermore, even passive, indoor water-pipe smoke exposure may have significant health hazards compared with those of active cigarette smoking. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  16. Kinetic study of empty fruit bunch using hot liquid water and dilute acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Choi, Won Il; Kang, Minsu; Park, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jin-Suk

    2012-07-01

    Empty fruit bunch (EFB), a residual product of the palm plantation, is an attractive biomass for biorefinery. As xylan is susceptible to high temperature pretreatment, it is important to setup a proper pretreatment condition to maximize the sugar recovery from EFB. Kinetic parameters of mathematical models were obtained in order to predict the concentration of xylose, glucose, furfural, and acetic acid in the hydrolysate and to find production conditions of xylose. We investigated the kinetics of hot liquid water and dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis over a 40-min period using a self-designed setup by measuring the concentrations of released sugars (xylose, glucose) and degradation products (acetic acid and furfural). The reaction was performed within the range 160∼180 °C, under reaction conditions of various concentration of sulfuric acid (0.1∼0.2%) and 1:7 solid-liquid ratio in a batch reactor. The kinetic constants can be expressed by the Arrhenius equation with the activation energy for the hydrolysis of sugar and decomposition of sugar. The activation energy of xylose was determined to be 136.2187 kJ mol(-1).

  17. Measurements of water surface snow lines in classical protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Blevins, Sandra M; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R; Carr, John S; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1-100 AU using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model comprising of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of $\\sim 3-11$ AU, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abu...

  18. A study of charge transfer kinetics in dye-sensitized surface conductivity solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Dennis

    2011-05-15

    The efficiency of the quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell developed by Junghaenel and Tributsch, the so-called Nano Surface Conductivity Solar Cell (NSCSC), was improved from 2% to 3.5% introducing a compact TiO{sub 2} underlayer, modifying the surface of the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} electrode, optimizing the deposition process of the electrolyte film, and replacing the platinum counter electrode by a carbon layer. Space-resolved photocurrent images revealed the importance of a homogeneous distribution of the electrolyte film. An uneven dispersion led to localized areas of high and low photocurrents, whereas the latter were attributed to an insufficient concentration of the redox couple. Impedance spectroscopy was performed on cells containing different concentrations of the redox couple. By modeling the spectra using an equivalent circuit with a transmission line of resistive and capacitive elements, the characteristic parameters of electron transport in the TiO{sub 2}, such as diffusion length and electron lifetime were obtained. The measurements indicated that the transport of the positive charge to the counter electrode is the main process limiting the efficiency of the cells. Excess charge carrier decay in functioning devices was analyzed by contactless transient photoconductance measurements in the microwave frequency range (TRMC). The lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers was observed to decrease with increasing applied potential, reaching its maximum close to the opencircuit potential of the cell, where the photocurrent density was minimal, i.e. the potential dependent decay observed was limited by the injection of electrons into the front contact. The functioning of this NSCSC indicated that the transport of the positive charge occurs by solid-state diffusion at the surface of the TiO{sub 2} particles. TRMC measurements on subset devices in the form of sensitized TiO{sub 2} layers revealed charge carrier kinetics strongly dependent on the

  19. Transition state kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption at gibbsite-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Seneviratne, Wasana; Bandara, Atula

    2007-08-25

    Kinetics of adsorption plays a pivotal factor in determining the bio-availability and mobility of Hg(II) in the environment. The kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption on gibbsite was examined as a function of pH, temperature and electrolyte type. Adsorption of Hg(II) was highly non-linear where the rate of Hg(II) retention was rapid initially and was followed by gradual or somewhat slow retention behavior with increasing contact time. The respective rate constants designated as k(1) (S-1: fast step) and k(2) (S-2: slow step). Always k(1) follows the order: k(1)(CIO)(4) >/= k(1)(NO3)(4) > k(1)(Cl). Such a relationship was not observed for the S-2 route. A two-step reaction model with pseudo-first order kinetics successfully described the adsorption rates of Hg(II) on gibbsite. Arrhenius and Erying models determined the thermodynamic parameters at activation states, which correspond to S-1 and S-2 routes. In a given system, always the activation energies showed a decrease with the pH. Gibbs free energy (DeltaG(#)), enthalpy (DeltaH(#)), and entropy (DeltaS(#)) values of activation states were almost similar both in NaClO(4) and NaNO(3) which signal a similar Hg(II) adsorptive mechanism on gibbsite. The configurations of different Hg(II)-surface complexes were elucidated by transmission vibration spectroscopy.

  20. Disposition kinetics of tylosin tartrate administered intravenously and intramuscularly to normal and water-deprived camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, G; Creveld, C V; Ben-Zvi, Z; Glickman, A; Yagil, R

    1995-08-01

    The disposition kinetics of tylosin tartrate administered intravenously (i.v.) at 10 mg/kg and intramuscularly (i.m.) at 20 mg/kg were studied in normal camels and in the same camels at the end of a 14 day water-deprivation period. After i.v. treatment, serum tylosin concentrations in the water-deprived camels were significantly higher, rate of drug elimination was slower, the volume of distribution was significantly smaller, and total body clearance was significantly slower than in the normal camels. On the other hand, serum drug concentrations were lower in the water deprived camels after i.m. dosing, the mean absorption time was significantly shorter and the i.m. availability was significantly smaller than in the normal camels. Water-deprivation was thought to cause reduced rate of tylosin elimination by the liver, as was shown for antipyrine--a drug which is eliminated from the body exclusively by the liver. Redistribution of tylosin in tissues concomitant with a greater proportion of drug in blood and extracellular fluid of water-deprived camels was suggested as a partial explanation for the higher serum drug levels seen after i.v. dosing. The low i.m. availability observed in the water-deprived camels implies that i.v. is the route of choice for tylosin administration to ill, dehydrated camels.

  1. Water renewal in Montevideo's bay: a two compartments model for tritium kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto, E-mail: rsuarez@ucu.edu.uy [Universidad Catolica del Uruguay (UCU), Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2013-07-01

    During field work about dynamics and renewal of water in Montevideo's Bay, 100 Ci of tritiated water were evenly distributed in the north-east region of the bay, by a continuous injection of a solution, during 5 hours, from a 200 litres tank, using a peristaltic pump. The whole bay was divided in 20 concentration cells, taking into account available bathymetric charts and corrections from field data obtained in situ. Tritium concentrations (activities per unit volume) and other relevant parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, etc.) were measured in vertical profiles during three weeks, in the mid-point of each cell, first twice a day and the on a daily basis. Remnant total tritium activity was estimated from cells volumes and midpoint cells activity concentrations. Consistency checks were done. A one compartment model was used to estimate a global renewal time of circa 29 hours. However, the details of the measured tritium kinetics, a careful consideration of bathymetric data, water movements in a tidal environment (measured with drogues, fluorescent tracers and current meters), as well as the results of computer fluid dynamics modelling (in depth averaged) suggests that the bay can be meaningfully divided in two main compartments: a North-East and a South-West compartment. The purpose of this paper is threefold: (1) to describe the construction of a two compartments model for water renewal in Montevideo's Bay, (2) to apply experimental data of tritium kinetics to estimate the parameters of the model, and (3) to discuss the validity of the model and its practical applicability. The meaning of the renewal time of each compartment and its relation with the measured tritium kinetics in each cell is discussed. The perturbations in water circulation and renewal produced by civil works already done or the perturbations that could be expected due to civil works to be done, in relation with Montevideo's harbour, is discussed. The tracer model

  2. Reaction kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokcen, Dincer; Bae, Sang-Eun [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Brankovic, Stanko R., E-mail: Stanko.Brankovic@mail.uh.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States)

    2011-06-30

    The study of the kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers is presented. The model system was Pt submonolayer deposition on Au(1 1 1) via red-ox replacement of Pb and Cu UPD monolayers on Au(1 1 1). The kinetics of a single replacement reaction was studied using the formalism of the comprehensive analytical model developed to fit the open circuit potential transients from deposition experiments. The practical reaction kinetics parameters like reaction half life, reaction order and reaction rate constant are determined and discussed with their relevance to design and control of deposition experiments. The effects of transport limitation and the role of the anions/electrolyte on deposition kinetics are investigated and their significance to design of effective deposition process is discussed.

  3. Light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis: energetics, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    The essential steps of photosynthetic water splitting take place in Photosystem II (PSII) and comprise three different reaction sequences: (i) light induced formation of the radical pair P680(+)Q(A)(-), (ii) P680(+) driven oxidative water splitting into O(2) and four protons, and (iii) two step plastoquinone reduction to plastoquinol by Q(A)(-). This mini-review briefly summarizes our state of knowledge on energetics, kinetics and mechanism of oxidative water splitting. Essential features of the two types of reactions involved are described: (a) P680(+) reduction by the redox active tyrosine Y(z) and (b) sequence of oxidation steps induced by Y(z)(ox) in the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The rate of the former reaction is limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer (NET) step and the multi-phase kinetics shown to originate from a sequence of relaxation processes. In marked contrast, the rate of the stepwise oxidation by Y(z)(ox) of the WOC up to the redox level S(3) is not limited by NET but by trigger reactions which probably comprise proton shifts and/or conformational changes. The overall rate of the final reaction sequence leading to formation and release of O(2) is assumed to be limited by the electron transfer step from the S(3) state of WOC to Y(z)(ox) due to involvement of an endergonic redox equilibrium. Currently discussed controversial ideas on possible pathways are briefly outlined. Several crucial points of the mechanism of oxidative water splitting, like O-O bond formation, role of local proton shift(s), details of hydrogen bonding, are still not clarified and remain a challenging topic of future research.

  4. Kinetics of oxidation of dimethyl trisulfide by potassium permanganate in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoyanMA; Shifei HU; Hongyu WANG; Jun LI; Jing HUANG; Yun ZHANG; Weigang LU; Qingsong LI

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites of algae such as geosmin, 2- methylisoborneol etc. are reported to induce pungent odors into drinking water and attract additional scientifc attention. Recently, in China, taste and odor outbreaks in drinking water supply have become increasingly common. In source water affected by eutrophication, dimethyl trisulfide, speculated to be produced by decayed algae, was found to be the source of taste and odor issues and can be removed effectively by usual oxidation agents. In this experimental study, batch scale tests were carried out focusing on the removal of dimethyl trisulfide. Reaction kinetics of dimethyl trisulfide oxidized by potassium permanganate in water had been studied; influence factors such as pH, organic substrate, other existed taste, and odor contaminant in equivalent concentration were also dis- cussed. Results showed that dimethyl trisulfide can be removed by potassium permanganate efficiently; the ratio can reach more than 70% with oxidant dosage of 4 mg. L~ and contact time prolonged to 120 min. The dimethyl trisulfide decomposition followed a second-order kinetics pattern with a rate constant k -- 0.00213 L.(min.mg)-1. Typically, the degradation rate of dimethyl trisulfide was increased with the increasing KMnO4 dosage, but dramatically dropped with the increasing levels of humic acid (1.8-4.5 mg. L-1) and other odor-causing compounds (e.g. fl-cyclocitral, 0-1886.0 pg.L-1). Solution pH (5.2- 9.0) and initial dimethyl trisulfide concentration did not significantly affected the degradation. This study demon- strates that KMnO4 oxidation is an effective option to remove dimethyl trisulfide from water.

  5. Survival of Phytophthora infestans in Surface Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lyndon D; Johnson, Dennis A

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT Coverless petri dishes with water suspensions of sporangia and zoospores of Phytophthora infestans were embedded in sandy soil in eastern Washington in July and October 2001 and July 2002 to quantify longevity of spores in water under natural conditions. Effects of solar radiation intensity, presence of soil in petri dishes (15 g per dish), and a 2-h chill period on survival of isolates of clonal lineages US-8 and US-11 were investigated. Spores in water suspensions survived 0 to 16 days under nonshaded conditions and 2 to 20 days under shaded conditions. Mean spore survival significantly increased from 1.7 to 5.8 days when soil was added to the water. Maximum survival time of spores in water without soil exposed to direct sunlight was 2 to 3 days in July and 6 to 8 days in October. Mean duration of survival did not differ significantly between chilled and nonchilled sporangia, but significantly fewer chilled spores survived for extended periods than that of nonchilled spores. Spores of US-11 and US-8 isolates did not differ in mean duration of survival, but significantly greater numbers of sporangia of US-8 survived than did sporangia of US-11 in one of three trials.

  6. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  7. Surface complexation at calcium mineral-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liuming

    1994-01-01

    Surface reactions occurring at solid-water interfaces in calcium mineral-ligands systems have been studied. Both hydrous apatite and fluorite surfaces show clear amphoteric properties. An ion exchange process between lattice ions of F- on fluorite and OH- ions in bulk solution is discovered. The surface adsorption of Alizarin Red S and sodium oleate are determined. Surface chemical reaction models are established based on acidbase potentiometric titrations, solubility, adsorption and zeta-pot...

  8. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yongjun; WEI Bingbo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the surface properties of water in a temperature range from 228 to 293 K by using the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and four-site TIP4P potentials. The calculated surface tension increases with the decrease of temperature, and moreover the slopes of the surface tension-temperature curves show a weak rise below 273 K, whereas no obvious anomalies appear near 228 K, which accords with the previous experiments. Compared with the measured values, the SPC/E potential shows a good agreement, and the TIP4P potential scription of the surface structure of supercooled water for the SPC/E. When simulating the orientational distributions of water molecules near the surface, the SPC/E potential produces higher ordering and larger surface potentials than the TIP4P potential.

  9. Improved neutron kinetics for coupled three-dimensional boiling water reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan

    The need for a more accurate method of modelling cross section variations for off-nominal core conditions is becoming an important issue with the increased use of coupled three-dimensional (3-D) thermal-hydraulics/neutronics simulations. In traditional reactor core analysis, thermal reactor core calculations are customarily performed with 3-D two-group nodal diffusion methods. Steady-state multi-group transport theory calculations on heterogeneous single assembly domains subject to reflective boundary conditions are normally used to prepare the equivalent two-group spatially homogenized nodal parameters. For steady-state applications, the equivalent nodal parameters are theoretically well-defined; but, for transient applications, the definition of the nodal kinetics parameters, in particular, delayed neutron precursor data is somewhat unclear. The fact that delayed neutrons are emitted at considerably lower energies than prompt neutrons and that this difference cannot be accounted for in a two-group representation is of particular concern. To compensate for this inherent deficiency of the two-group model a correction is applied to the nodal values of the delayed neutron fractions; however, the adequacy of this correction has never been tested thoroughly for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) applications, especially where the instantaneous thermal-hydraulic conditions play an important role on the core neutron kinetics calculations. This thesis proposes a systematic approach to improve the 3-D neutron kinetics modelling in coupled BWR transient calculations by developing, implementing and validating methods for consistent generation of neutron kinetics and delayed neutron data for such coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics simulations.

  10. A Novel Biosorbent, Water-Hyacinth, Uptaking Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solution: Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nasir Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of MB dye from aqueous solution onto HCl acid treated water-hyacinth (H-WH was investigated by carried out batch sorption experiments. The effect of process parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage, concentrations and contact time, and ionic strength were studied. Adsorption of MB onto H-WH was found highly pH dependent and ionic strength shows negative impact on MB removal. To predict the biosorption isotherms and to determine the characteristic parameters for process design, Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Halsey isotherms models were utilized to equilibrium data. The adsorption kinetics was tested for pseudo-first-order (PFO, pseudo-second-order (PSO, intraparticle diffusion (IPD, and Bangham’s kinetic models. The Langmuir isotherm model showed the goodness-of-fit among the tested models for equilibrium adsorption of MB over H-WH and indicated the maximum adsorption capacity as 63.30 mg/g. Higher coefficient of determination (R2>0.99 and better agreement between the qe (experimental and qe (calculated values predicted that PSO kinetic model showed the goodness-of-fit for kinetic data along with rate constant 1.66×10-3, 4.42×10-3, and 3.57×10-3 mg·g-1min⁡-1/2⁡, respectively, for the studied concentration range. At the initial stage of adsorption, the overall rate of dye uptake was found to be dominated by external mass transfer, and afterwards, it is controlled by IPD mechanism.

  11. Tractor beam on the water surface

    CERN Document Server

    Punzmann, Horst; Xia, Hua; Falkovich, Gregory; Shats, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Can one send a wave to bring an object from a distance? The general idea is inspired by the recent success in moving micro particles using light and the development of a tractor beam concept. For fluid surfaces, however, the only known paradigm is the Stokes drift model, where linear planar waves push particles in the direction of the wave propagation. Here we show how to fetch a macroscopic floater from a large distance by sending a surface wave towards it. We develop a new method of remote manipulation of floaters by forming inward and outward surface jets, stationary vortices, and other complex surface flows using nonlinear waves generated by a vertically oscillating plunger. The flows can be engineered by changing the geometry and the power of a wave maker, and the flow dissipation. The new method is robust and works both for long gravity and for short capillary waves. We use a novel method of visualising 3D particle trajectories on the surface. This letter introduces a new conceptual framework for unders...

  12. Experimental Observation of Dark Solitons on Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    vertical walls are made of transparent sections of glass supported by the metal frame. The water level of the free surface is measured with seven resistive...Experimental observation of dark solitons on water surface A. Chabchoub1,∗, O. Kimmoun2, H. Branger3, N. Hoffmann1, D. Proment4, M. Onorato4,5, and N...observation of dark solitons on the water surface. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation

  13. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  14. Dissolution kinetics of volatile organic compound vapors in water: An integrated experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Pérez Guerrero, Jesús S.; Raoof, Amir; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we performed batch experiments to investigate the dissolution kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene vapors in water at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The batch systems consisted of a water reservoir and a connected headspace, the latter containing a small glass cylinder filled with pure volatile organic compound (VOC). Results showed that air phase concentrations of both TCE and toluene increased relatively quickly to their maximum values and then became constant. We considered subsequent dissolution into both stirred and unstirred water reservoirs. Results of the stirred experiments showed a quick increase in the VOC concentrations with time up to their solubility limit in water. VOC vapor dissolution was found to be independent of pH. In contrast, salinity had a significant effect on the solubility of TCE and toluene vapors. VOC evaporation and vapor dissolution in the stirred water reservoirs followed first-order rate processes. Observed data could be described well using both simplified analytical solutions, which decoupled the VOC dynamics in the air and water phases, as well as using more complete coupled solutions. However, the estimated evaporation (ke) and dissolution (kd) rate constants differed by up to 70% between the coupled and uncoupled formulations. We also numerically investigated the effects of fluid withdrawal from the small water reservoir due to sampling. While decoupling the VOC air and water phase mass transfer processes produced unreliable estimates of kd, the effects of fluid withdrawal on the estimated rate constants were found to be less important. The unstirred experiments showed a much slower increase in the dissolved VOC concentrations versus time. Molecular diffusion of the VOCs within the aqueous phase became then the limiting factor for mass transfer from air to water. Fluid withdrawal during sampling likely caused some minor convection within the reservoir, which was simulated by increasing the

  15. Drainage-water travel times as a key factor for surface water contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Groenendijk, P.; Eertwegh, van den, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the unsaturated zone as an inextricable part of the hydrologic cycle has long been recognized. The root zone and the unsaturated sub-surface domain are chemically and biologically the most active zones. The interrelationships between soil, subsoil and surface waters make it unrealistic to treat the saturated and unsaturated zones and the discharge to surface waters separately. Point models describe vertical water flow in the saturated zone and possibly lateral flow by defini...

  16. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2012 water year (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), data were collected at 81 stations—73 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 6 alternate Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 78 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  17. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.; Schneider, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2013 water year (October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2013), data were collected at 79 stations—73 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 4 alternate Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 76 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  18. Droplet Kinetic Energy from Center-Pivot Sprinklers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic energy of discrete water drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy developmen...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN AN ARSENIC CONTAMINATED VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud C. Saikia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of ground water has occurred in various parts of the world, becoming a menace in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra basin (West Bengal and Assam in India and Bangladesh. Recently arsenic has been detected in Cachar and Karimganj districts of barak valley, Assam, bordering Bangladesh. In this area coli form contamination comprises the major constraint towards utilization of its otherwise ample surface water resources. The local water management exploited ground water sources using a centralized piped water delivery scheme without taking into account the geologically arsenic-prone nature of the sediments and aquifers in this area. Thus surface water was the suggestive alternative for drinking water in this area. The present study investigated surface water quality and availability in a village of Karimganj district, Assam, India contaminated with arsenic for identifying the potential problems of surface water quality maintenance so that with effective management safe drinking water could be provided. The study revealed that the area was rich in freshwater ecosystems which had all physico-chemical variables such as water temperature, pH, DO, total alkalinity, free CO2, heavy metals like lead, chromium and cadmium within WHO standards. In contrast, coli form bacteria count was found far beyond permissible limit in all the sources. Around 60% people of the village preferred ground water for drinking and only 6% were aware of arsenic related problems. The problem of bacterial contamination could be controlled by implementing some ameliorative measures so that people can safely use surface water. Inhabitants of the two districts should be given proper education regarding arsenic contamination and associated health risk. Effluents should be treated to acceptable levels and standards before discharging them into natural streams.

  20. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  1. Characterizing the fluorescence intermittency and photobleaching kinetics of dye molecules immobilized on a glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Edwin K L; Melnikov, Sergey M; Bell, Toby D M; De Schryver, Frans C; Hofkens, Johan

    2006-02-09

    The blinking behavior of single Atto565 molecules on a glass surface is studied under air or nitrogen atmospheres using confocal microscopy. The broad distributions for both on- and off-time durations obey power law kinetics that are rationalized using a charge tunneling model. In this case, a charge is transferred from the Atto565 molecule to localized states found on the glass surface. Subsequent charge recombination by back charge tunneling from trap to Atto565 cation (i.e., dark state) restores the fluorescence. The off-time distribution is independent of excitation intensity (I), whereas the on-time distribution exhibits a power law exponent that varies with I. Two pathways have been identified to lead to the formation of the radical dark state. The first involves direct charge tunneling from the excited singlet S1 state to charge traps in the surrounding matrix, and the second requires charge ejection from the triplet T1 state after intersystem crossing from S1. Monte Carlo simulation studies complement the two-pathway model. Photobleaching curves of both single and ensemble molecules do not exhibit monoexponential decays suggesting complex bleaching dynamics arising from triplet and radical states.

  2. Scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy from surface drifters in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwada, Dhruv; LaCasce, Joseph H.; Speer, Kevin G.

    2016-10-01

    The scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy is probed at the surface in the Gulf of Mexico using surface drifters from the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) experiment. The second-order velocity structure function and its decomposition into rotational and divergent components are examined. The results reveal that the divergent component, compared to the rotational component, dominates at scales below 5 km, and the pattern is reversed at larger scales. The divergent component has a slope near 2/3 below 5 km, similar to an energy cascade range (k-5/3). The third-order velocity structure function at scales below 5 km is negative and implies a forward cascade of energy to smaller scales. The rotational component has a steeper slope, roughly 1.5, from scales of 5 km up to the deformation radius. This is similar to a 2-D enstrophy cascade, although the slope is shallower than the predicted 2. There is a brief 2/3 range from the deformation radius to 200 km, suggestive of a 2-D inverse cascade.

  3. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2010-11-04

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Primary biodegradation of veterinary antibiotics in aerobic and anaerobic surface water simulation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Flemming; Toräng, Lars; Loke, M.-L.

    2001-01-01

    of the study was to provide rate data for primary biodegradation in the scenario where antibiotics pollute surface waters as a result of run-off from arable land. The source of antibiotics may be application of manure as fertilizer or excreta of grazing animals. Assuming first-order degradation kinetics......The primary aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability at intermediate concentrations (50-5000 mug/l) of the antibiotics olaquindox (OLA), metronidazole (MET), tylosin (TYL) and oxytetracycline (OTC) was studied in a simple shake flask system simulating the conditions in surface waters. The purpose......, ranges of half-lifes for aerobic degradation of the four antibiotics studied were 4-8 days (OLA), 9.5-40 days (TYL), 14-104 days (MET) and 42-46 days (OTC). OLA and OTC were degraded with no initial lag phase whereas lag phases from 2 to 34 days (MET) and 31 to 40 days (TYL) were observed for other...

  5. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R; Pereira, V J; Carvalho, G; Soeiro, R; Gaffney, V; Almeida, C; Vale Cardoso, V; Ferreira, E; Benoliel, M J; Ternes, T A; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M; Noronha, J P

    2013-01-15

    Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis.

  6. Phase separation kinetics in amorphous solid dispersions upon exposure to water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel fluorescence technique employing environment-sensitive fluorescent probes to study phase separation kinetics in hydrated matrices of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) following storage at high humidity and during dissolution. The initial miscibility of the ASDs was confirmed using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fluorescence spectroscopy, as an independent primary technique, was used together with conventional confirmatory techniques including DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence microscopy, and IR spectroscopy to study phase separation phenomena. By monitoring the emission characteristics of the environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, it was possible to successfully monitor amorphous-amorphous phase separation (AAPS) as a function of time in probucol-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and ritonavir-PVP ASDs after exposure to water. In contrast, a ritonavir-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) ASD, did not show AAPS and was used as a control to demonstrate the capability of the newly developed fluorescence method to differentiate systems that showed no phase separation following exposure to water versus those that did. The results from the fluorescence studies were in good agreement with results obtained using various other complementary techniques. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy can be utilized as a fast and efficient tool to detect and monitor the kinetics of phase transformations in amorphous solid dispersions during hydration and will help provide mechanistic insight into the stability and dissolution behavior of amorphous solid dispersions.

  7. NH4+ adsorption and adsorption kinetics by sediments in a drinking water reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suna Hongyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The sorption isotherm and sorption kinetics of NH4+ by the Fen River reservoir sediment were investigated for a better understanding of the NH4+ sorption characteristics and parameters. The results showed that Q (adsorption content increased with the increase of Ceq (equilibrium concentration, sorption isotherms could be described by Freundlich equation (R2 from 0.97 to 0.99. Cation exchange capacity (CEC had a significant correlation with the parameters K and n (R2 was 0.85 and 0.95, respectively. The ENC0 (Ceq as Q was zero of S1, S2, S3 and S4 was 1.25, 0.57, 1.15 and 1.14 mg L-1, respectively, and they were less than the NH4+ concentrations in reservoir water. The sediments released NH4+ to the Fen River reservoir water and acted as a pollution source, in the form of complex and heterogeneous adsorbents. The NH4+ adsorption kinetic process was composed of ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ reaction patterns and could be fitted using both Elovich equation and Pseudo second-equation. More than one-step may be involved in the NH4+ sorption processes, and interior diffusion was not dominant ion action.

  8. Microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment – Potential and kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    or metabolites mecoprop (MCPP), bentazone, glyphosate and p-nitrophenol were applied in initial concentrations of 0.03–2.4 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration of pesticides in the water decreased – MCPP decreased to 42–85%, bentazone to 15–35%, glyphosate to 7–14% and p-nitrophenol 1......–3% – from the initial concentration over a period of 6–13 days. Mineralisation of three out of four investigated pesticides was observed at Sjælsø waterworks Plant II – up to 43% of the initial glyphosate was mineralised within six days. At Sjælsø waterworks Plant II the removal kinetics of bentazone......Filter sand samples, taken from aerobic rapid sand filters used for treating groundwater at three Danish waterworks, were investigated for their pesticide removal potential and to assess the kinetics of the removal process. Microcosms were set up with filter sand, treated water, and the pesticides...

  9. Modeling the Effect of Dissolved Hydrogen Sulfide on Mg2+-water Complex on Dolomite {104} Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Brown, Philip E; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    The key kinetic barrier to dolomite formation is related to the surface Mg2+-H2O complex, which hinders binding of surface Mg2+ ions to the CO3 2- ions in solution. It has been proposed that this reaction can be catalyzed by dissolved hydrogen sulfide. To characterize the role of dissolved hydrogen sulfide in the dehydration of surface Mg 2+ ions, ab initio simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out to study the thermodynamics of competitive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and water on dolomite (104) surfaces from solution. We find that water is thermodynamically more stable on the surface with the difference in adsorption energy of -13.6 kJ/mol (in vacuum) and -12.8 kJ/mol (in aqueous solution). However, aqueous hydrogen sulfide adsorbed on the surface increases the Mg2+-H2O distances on surrounding surface sites. Two possible mechanisms were proposed for the catalytic effects of adsorbed hydrogen sulfide on the anhydrous Ca-Mg-carbonate crystallization at low temperature.

  10. Kinetics of the reaction between H{sup ·} and superheated water probed with muonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcorn, Chris D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Smith, Marisa [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@mta.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada)

    2014-05-19

    Highlights: • Rate constants for reactions of H with water resolve a controversy. • H reacts with superheated water via two channels. • The findings have important implications for the safety of some nuclear power reactors. - Abstract: Safe operation of supercritical water-cooled reactors requires knowledge of the kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the range 300–650 °C. Using muonium, it is possible to study aqueous H{sup ·} atom chemistry over this temperature range. An important reaction to study is that of the H{sup ·} atom with water itself, because it is a potential source of molecular H{sub 2}. The concentration of H{sub 2} is important to plant coolant chemistry, as H{sub 2} is currently added to suppress oxidative corrosion in CANDU reactors. The reaction of muonium with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O was studied experimentally up to 450 °C, and also via quantum chemical computations to investigate possible isotope effects. Our results suggest that although the H{sup ·} atom abstraction from H{sub 2}O is important at temperatures above 300 °C, the electron-producing channel (H{sup ·} + H{sub 2}O ⇌ H{sub 3}O{sup +} + e{sub aq}{sup -}) is significant at temperatures up to 300 °C, and becomes the dominant reaction channel at lower temperatures.

  11. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics.

  12. [Distribution model of aluminum species in drinking water basing on the reaction kinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-dong; Yang, Hong-wei; Wang, Xiao-chang; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Wan-peng; Jiang, Zhan-peng

    2010-04-01

    The effects of excess aluminum on water distribution system and human health were mainly attributable to the presences of some aluminum species in drinking water. A prediction model for the concentrations of aluminum species was developed using three-layer front feedback artificial neural network method. Results showed that the reaction rates of both inorganic monomeric aluminum and soluble aluminum varied with reaction time and water quality parameters, such as water temperature, pH, total aluminum, fluoride, phosphate and silicate. Their reaction orders were both three. The reaction kinetic parameters of inorganic monomeric aluminum and soluble aluminum could be predicted effectively applying artificial neural network; the correlation coefficients of k and 1/C0(2) between calculated value and predicted value were both greater than 0.999. Aluminum species prediction results in the drinking water of City M showed that when the concentration of total aluminum was less than 0.05 mg x L(-1), the relative prediction error was large for inorganic monomeric aluminum. When the concentration of total aluminum was above 0.05 mg x L(-1), the model could predict inorganic monomeric aluminum and soluble aluminum concentrations effectively, with relative prediction errors of +/- 15% and +/- 10% respectively.

  13. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2015-12-18

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2014 water year (October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014), data were collected at 74 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Assessment Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 71 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  14. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2010 water year (October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2010), data were collected at 75 stations-72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, and 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  15. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2009 water year (October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009), data were collected at 75 stations-69 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, and 3 stations sampled in cooperation with the Elk River Watershed Improvement Association. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and seven-day low flow is presented.

  16. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2011 water year (October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011), data were collected at 75 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, and 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and 7-day low flow is presented.

  17. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.; Heimann, David C.

    2016-11-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams and springs throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During water year 2015 (October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015), data were collected at 74 stations—72 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations and 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Assessment Network stations. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, Escherichia coli bacteria, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 71 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak streamflows, monthly mean streamflows, and 7-day low flows is presented.

  18. Role of water in polymer surface modification using organosilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallapalle, Pradeep Kumar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    In general, polymers exhibit excellent bulk properties but may not possess specific surface properties for successful applications in biomaterials and nanotechnology. Surface modification of polymers with the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes - ‘Silanization’ - is an attractive approach to alter surface properties without altering the polymer’s desired bulk properties. However, a pretreatment such as exposure to UV/O or plasma is normally required to generate active surface groups prior to silanization. These pretreatments cause undesirable surface changes such as severe surface roughening and excessive surface damage. Recent studies in silanization suggest that the presence of water or OH groups on the surface is essential to form SAMs. In this study we investigated the importance of surface water layer and OH groups in the formation of SAMs for a variety of polymers. The pre and post-modified polymers were examined using fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning probe microscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that organosilanes can be grafted to a polymer surface as long as a water layer can be physisorbed to the surface or the polymer itself contains OH groups. However the monolayers formed are less organized compared to those formed on silicon wafers due to the amorphous nature of the polymers.

  19. SWFSC FED Mid Water Trawl Juvenile Rockfish Survey, Surface Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC FED Mid Water Trawl Juvenile Rockfish Survey: Station Information and Surface Data. Surveys have been conducted along the central California coast in May/June...

  20. Treatability of South African surface waters by enhanced coagulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-05

    Jun 5, 2013 ... The majority of South African inland surface water sources are compromised due to a ... minimising residual coagulant, minimising sludge production .... included as being indicative of the worst effects of indirect reuse.

  1. Second Inflection Point of the Surface Tension of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalova, Jana; Mares, Radim

    2012-06-01

    The theme of a second inflection point of the temperature dependence of the surface tension of water remains a subject of controversy. Using data above 273 K, it is difficult to get a proof of existence of the second inflection point, because of experimental uncertainties. Data for the surface tension of supercooled water and results of a molecular dynamics study were included into the exploration of existence of an inflection point. A new term was included into the IAPWS equation to describe the surface tension in the supercooled water region. The new equation describes the surface tension values of ordinary water between 228 K and 647 K and leads to the inflection point value at a temperature of about 1.5 °C.

  2. Continuous monitoring of summer surface water vapor isotopic composition above the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present here surface water vapor isotopic measurements conducted from June to August 2010 at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling Project camp, NW Greenland (77.45° N, 51.05° W, 2484 m a.s.l.. Measurements were conducted at 9 different heights from 0.1 m to 13.5 m above the snow surface using two different types of cavity-enhanced near-infrared absorption spectroscopy analyzers. For each instrument specific protocols were developed for calibration and drift corrections. The inter-comparison of corrected results from different instruments reveals excellent reproducibility, stability, and precision with a standard deviations of ~ 0.23‰ for δ18O and ~ 1.4‰ for δD. Diurnal and intraseasonal variations show strong relationships between changes in local surface humidity and water vapor isotopic composition, and with local and synoptic weather conditions. This variability probably results from the interplay between local moisture fluxes, linked with firn–air exchanges, boundary layer dynamics, and large-scale moisture advection. Particularly remarkable are several episodes characterized by high (> 40‰ surface water vapor deuterium excess. Air mass back-trajectory calculations from atmospheric analyses and water tagging in the LMDZiso (Laboratory of Meteorology Dynamics Zoom-isotopic atmospheric model reveal that these events are associated with predominant Arctic air mass origin. The analysis suggests that high deuterium excess levels are a result of strong kinetic fractionation during evaporation at the sea-ice margin.

  3. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    compare the results with experiment. This work will be used to help interpret field data of bistatic scattering from sea ice cover and calibrate...approximate analytical and numerical acoustic models used to compute bistatic scattering. The clouds of bubbles entrained at the sea surface by breaking...ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified

  4. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  5. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  6. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  7. Kinetics of Oxygen Surface Exchange on Epitaxial Ruddlesden-Popper Phases and Correlations to First-Principles Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin; Lee, Dongkyu; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-01-21

    Through alignment of theoretical modeling with experimental measurements of oxygen surface exchange kinetics on (001)-oriented La2-xSrxMO4+δ (M = Co, Ni, Cu) thin films, we demonstrate here the capability of the theoretical bulk O 2p-band centers to correlate with oxygen surface-exchange kinetics of the Ruddlesden-Popper oxide (RP214) (001)-oriented thin films. In addition, we demonstrate that the bulk O 2p-band centers can also correlate with the experimental activation energies for bulk oxygen transport and oxygen surface exchange of both the RP214 and the perovskite polycrystalline materials reported in the literature, indicating the effectiveness of the bulk O 2p-band centers in describing the associated energetics and kinetics. We propose that the opposite slopes of the bulk O 2p-band center correlations between the RP214 and the perovskite materials are due to the intrinsic mechanistic differences of their oxygen surface exchange kinetics and bulk anionic transport.

  8. A model and experimental study of phosphate uptake kinetics in algae:Considering surface adsorption and P-stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Yao; Beidou Xi; Chunming Hu; Shouliang Huo; Jing Su; Hongliang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus is an important limiting nutrient in many ecosystems. Consequently, there is increasing interest on phosphate uptake and algal growth due to the increasing frequency and magnitude of algal blooms induced by eutrophication. The co-existence of surface adsorbed and intracellular phosphorus pools indicate that phosphate uptake by phytoplankton is, to some extent, a two-stage kinetic process. However, almost all previous uptake models considered the internal uptake stage only and ignored the possible impact of surface adsorption. In this article, a two-stage kinetic uptake model considering both surface adsorption and P-stress on phosphate uptake by algae was constructed and compared to conventional one-stage models, based on experimental data on short-term uptake kinetics of a green algae S. quadricauda. Results indicated that with suitable parameters, the two-stage uptake model not only fit the experimental data better, but also gave more reasonable and realistic explanations to the phosphate uptake process. The results are meaningful as surface-adsorption of phosphate may affect the uptake process of phosphate and assist in understanding realistic phosphate uptake kinetics in phytoplankton.

  9. A kinetic analysis of manual wheelchair propulsion during start-up on select indoor and outdoor surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koontz, AM; Cooper, RA; Boninger, ML; Yang, YS; Impink, BG; van der Woude, LHV

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a kinetic analysis of manual wheelchair propulsion during start-LIP on select indoor and Outdoor surfaces. Eleven manual wheelchairs were fitted with a SMART(Wheel) and their users were asked to Push on a Course consisting of high- and low-pile carpet, indo

  10. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.;

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  11. Super water repellent surface 'strictly' mimicking the surface structure of lotus leaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Tae Gon; Kim, Ho Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Moon, Myoung Woon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    To achieve the hierarchy of roughness as observed in lotus leaves, most artificial water-repellent surfaces have nano-asperities on top of micropillars. However, observation of real lotus leaves through SEM reveals that nonoscale roughness covers the entire surface including the base as well as bumps. Thus we fabricate surfaces having the same hierarchical roughness structure as the lotus leaf by forming nanopillars on both micropillars and base. We compare the measures of water-repellency (static contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and transition pressure between the Cassie and Wenzel states) of the lotus-like surface with those of surfaces having single micro- and nano- roughness. The results show that nanoscale roughness covering entire surface area leads to superior water-repellency to other surface roughness structures. We also give a theoretical consideration of this observation.

  12. Cascade ultrafiltration and competing ligand exchange for kinetic speciation of aluminium, iron, and nickel in fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nouri M; Murimboh, John D; Sekaly, Amina L R; Mandal, Rupasri; Chakrabarti, Chuni L; Grégoire, D Conrad

    2006-04-01

    Kinetic speciation of nickel, aluminium, and iron in fresh water has been investigated by cascade ultrafiltration followed by competing ligand exchange of the ultrafiltered fractions. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the kinetics of metal complex dissociation. Dissolved metal species were fractionated by cascade ultrafiltration. Metal speciation in each ultrafiltered fraction was then characterized as free metal ions, "labile" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants >/=10(-3) s(-1)), "slowly labile" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants >10(-6) s(-1)), and "inert" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants measurement of dissociation kinetics alone.

  13. Thermal inactivation kinetics of surface contaminating Listeria monocytogenes on vacuum-packaged agar surface and ready-to-eat sliced ham and sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Geeraerd, Annemie; Steen, Liselot; Fraeye, Ilse; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes on vacuum-packaged food surfaces. The kinetics were first determined on model agar systems (BHI agar plates), mimicking cooked meat products, which have the same characteristics (pH, sodium chloride (NaCl) or sodium lactate (NaL) content and thickness) as the cooked meat products. Then, in order to validate how well the thermal inactivation on the model agar system simulated inactivation on real products, inactivation kinetics of L. monocytogenes on slices of cooked ham and cooked sausage were examined. BHI agar plates (pH6.2 or 7.2) were prepared with and without the addition of 3% NaCl or NaL. They were initially inoculated with approximately 10(9)CFU/plate culture, aseptically packaged in linear low-density polyethylene pouches, and vacuum-sealed. Thermal treatments were performed by submerging packages in a water bath maintained at 60°C. For most of the conditions studied, the inactivation curves were linear; shoulders were only observed for curves at conditions of pH6.2 with 3.0% NaL. The t4D values (time needed to obtain an inactivation of four-log reduction) were calculated based on the best fitting models included in GInaFit. The observed t4D values for L. monocytogenes on agar surfaces ranged from 6.8 (pH6.2) to 13.7min (pH7.2 with 3.0% NaCl). At pH6.2 addition of NaCl or NaL significantly increased the heat resistance of L. monocytogenes while at pH7.2 this effect was not significant. NaL seemed to affect the heat resistance to the same extent as NaCl. Inactivation curves of L. monocytogenes on slices of cooked ham at pH6.2 with or without addition of NaCl or NaL appeared to be log-linear in shape. However, the curves obtained from cooked sausages were markedly concave and the Weibull model was used for fitting. Concerning heat resistance of L. monocytogenes on meat products, t4D values increased approximately two-fold compared to those corresponding on model agar

  14. Kinetic study on the H + SiH4 abstraction reaction using an ab initio potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianwei; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Chunfang; Bian, Wensheng; Guo, Yin

    2011-01-14

    Variational transition state theory calculations with the correction of multidimensional tunneling are performed on a 12-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for the H + SiH(4) abstraction reaction. The surface is constructed using a dual-level strategy. For the temperature range 200-1600 K, thermal rate constants are calculated and kinetic isotope effects for various isotopic species of the title reaction are investigated. The results are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  15. Simulation method for determining biodegradation in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeberl, P.; Guhl, W. [Henkel KGaA, Duesseldorf (Germany). Hauptabteilung Oekologie; Scholz, N. [OXENO GmbH, Marl (Germany); Taeger, K. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    OECD guidelines and EU directives on the biological testing of chemicals contain no methods able to simulate biodegradation in surface waters. The surface water simulation method presented in this paper is suitable for closing this gap. The species in the autochthonous biocoenosis used in the method form part of the food web in natural surface waters. The microbial degradation activity measured by the half-life is comparable with that in surface waters. The degrees of degradation measured in this surface water simulation method can be applied to natural surface waters. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die OECD- und EU-Richtlinien zur biologischen Pruefung von Chemikalien enthalten kein Verfahren, mit dem der biologische Abbau in Fliessgewaessern simuliert werden kann. Das in dieser Arbeit vorgestellte Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell ist geeignet, diese Luecke zu schliessen. Die Arten der autochthonen Biocoenose des Modells sind Glieder im Nahrungsnetz natuerlicher Fliessgewaesser. Die an der Halbwertszeit gemessene mikrobielle Abbauaktivitaet ist mit derjenigen in Fliessgewaessern vergleichbar. Die im Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell gemessenen Abbaugrade sind auf natuerliche Fliessgewaesser uebertragbar. (orig.)

  16. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  17. Water-clay surface interaction: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, O., E-mail: sobolev38@gmail.com [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France); Favre Buivin, F. [HES-SO Fribourg, Bd de Perolles 80-CP 32, CH-1705 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kemner, E.; Russina, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Beuneu, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin and Ikerbasque, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Charlet, L. [LGIT, University of Grenoble and CNRS, BP 53-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: Interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces was studied by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} was used to reduce hydration of interlayer cations. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate interaction between water molecules and internal clay surfaces by means of neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering. A hydrophobic cation, TMA{sup +} (NC{sub 4}H{sub 12}), was used to saturate the interlayer space of nontronite NAu-1 in order to reduce hydration of interlayer cations that could hinder the effects related to the clay-water interactions. The water content was low in order to reduce hydrogen bonding between water molecules. It was found that water molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with surface oxygen atoms of nontronite. The diffusion activation energy value E{sub a} = 29 {+-} 3 kJ/mol was obtained for water molecules hydrating the clay surface. These results confirm the assumption that surfaces of smectite clays with tetrahedral substitutions are hydrophilic.

  18. Dropwise condensation rate of water breath figures on polymer surfaces having similar surface free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface roughness, wettability, water contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and wetting hysteresis (WH) of polymeric substrates to the water drop condensation rate. We used five polyolefin coatings whose surface free energies were in a close range of 30-37 mJ/m2 but having different surface roughness and CAH. The formation of water breath figures was monitored at a temperature just below the dew point. The initial number of the condensed droplets per unit area (N0) and droplet surface coverage were determined during the early stage of drop condensation where the droplet coalescence was negligible. It was found that the mean drop diameter of condensed droplets on these polymer surfaces grow according to a power law with exponent 1/3 of time, similar to the previous reports given in the literature. It was determined that surface roughness and corresponding CAH and WH properties of polymers have important effects on the number of nucleation sites and growth rate of the condensed water droplets. N0 values and the surface coverage increased with the increase in surface roughness, CAH and WH of the polymer surfaces. The total condensed water drop volume also increased with the increase in surface roughness in accordance with the increase of the number of nucleated droplets.

  19. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T.; van Staalduinen, M.A.; van der Sluijs, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expe

  20. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of heavy metal river Ingulets surface water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Trokhymenko, Ganna G.; Tsyhanyuk, Nina V.

    2017-01-01

    The low efficiency of implemented targeted programs to reduce the anthropogenic impact on hydroecosystem and overcoming its negative consequences demand a search for the optimal evidence reasonable decisions to improve the quality of Ingul river water basin for different economic sectors of water resources and the required number and suitable quality. Methodical bases of such research must be based on a detailed and comprehensive study of the hydrochemical regime and surface water quality. Th...

  2. Influential factors of formation kinetics of flocs produced by water treatment coagulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunde Wu; Lin Wang; Bing Hu; Jian Ye

    2013-01-01

    The growth rate and size of floc formation is of great importance in water treatment especially in coagulation process.The floc formation kinetics and the coagulation efficiency of synthetic water were investigated by using an on-line continuous optical photometric dispersion analyze and the analysis of water quality.Experimental conditions such as alum dosage,pH value for coagulation,stirring intensity and initial turbidity were extensively examined.The photometric dispersion analyze results showed that coagulation of kaolin suspensions with two coagulants (alum and polyaluminium chloride) could be taken as a two-phase process:slow and rapid growth periods.Operating conditions with higher coagulant doses,appropriate pH and average shear rate might be particularly advantageous.The rate of overall floc growth was mainly determined by a combination of hydraulic and water quality conditions such as pH and turbidity.The measurement of zeta potential indicates that polyaluminium chloride exhibited higher charge-neutralizing ability than alum and achieved lower turbidities than alum for equivalent Al dosages.Under the same operating conditions,the alum showed a higher grow rate,but with smaller floc size.

  3. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Surface Water near Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Pincus, Philip A; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-12-06

    Despite much effort to probe the properties of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution, the effects of DMSO on water, especially near plasma membrane surfaces, still remain elusive. By performing molecular dynamics simulations at varying DMSO concentrations (XDMSO), we study how DMSO affects structural and dynamical properties of water in the vicinity of phospholipid bilayers. As proposed by a number of experiments, our simulations confirm that DMSO induces dehydration from bilayer surfaces and disrupts the H-bond structure of water. However, DMSO-enhanced water diffusivity at solvent-bilayer interfaces, an intriguing discovery reported by a spin-label measurement, is not confirmed in our simulations. To resolve this discrepancy, we examine the location of the spin label (Tempo) relative to the solvent-bilayer interface. In accord with the evidence in the literature, our simulations, which explicitly model Tempo-phosphatidylcholine, find that the Tempo moiety is equilibrated at ∼8-10 Å below the bilayer surface. Furthermore, the DMSO-enhanced surface-water diffusion is confirmed only when water diffusion is analyzed around the Tempo moiety that is immersed below the bilayer surface, which implies that the experimentally detected signal of water using Tempo stems from the interior of bilayers, not from the interface. Our analysis finds that the increase of water diffusion below the bilayer surface is coupled to the increase of area per lipid with an increasing XDMSO(≲10mol%). Underscoring the hydrophobic nature of the Tempo moiety, our study calls for careful re-evaluation of the use of Tempo in measurements on lipid bilayer surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University; Mark, David [University at Buffalo (SUNY); Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  5. Rapid surface-water volume estimations in beaver ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, Daniel J.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Johnston, Carol A.; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Beaver ponds are surface-water features that are transient through space and time. Such qualities complicate the inclusion of beaver ponds in local and regional water balances, and in hydrological models, as reliable estimates of surface-water storage are difficult to acquire without time- and labour-intensive topographic surveys. A simpler approach to overcome this challenge is needed, given the abundance of the beaver ponds in North America, Eurasia, and southern South America. We investigated whether simple morphometric characteristics derived from readily available aerial imagery or quickly measured field attributes of beaver ponds can be used to approximate surface-water storage among the range of environmental settings in which beaver ponds are found. Studied were a total of 40 beaver ponds from four different sites in North and South America. The simplified volume-area-depth (V-A-h) approach, originally developed for prairie potholes, was tested. With only two measurements of pond depth and corresponding surface area, this method estimated surface-water storage in beaver ponds within 5 % on average. Beaver pond morphometry was characterized by a median basin coefficient of 0.91, and dam length and pond surface area were strongly correlated with beaver pond storage capacity, regardless of geographic setting. These attributes provide a means for coarsely estimating surface-water storage capacity in beaver ponds. Overall, this research demonstrates that reliable estimates of surface-water storage in beaver ponds only requires simple measurements derived from aerial imagery and/or brief visits to the field. Future research efforts should be directed at incorporating these simple methods into both broader beaver-related tools and catchment-scale hydrological models.

  6. Estimation of Oxidation Kinetics and Oxide Scale Void Position of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliation of oxide scales from high-temperature heating surfaces of power boilers threatened the safety of supercritical power generating units. According to available space model, the oxidation kinetics of two ferritic-martensitic steels are developed to predict in supercritical water at 400°C, 500°C, and 600°C. The iron diffusion coefficients in magnetite and Fe-Cr spinel are extrapolated from studies of Backhaus and Töpfer. According to Fe-Cr-O ternary phase diagram, oxygen partial pressure at the steel/Fe-Cr spinel oxide interface is determined. The oxygen partial pressure at the magnetite/supercritical water interface meets the equivalent oxygen partial pressure when system equilibrium has been attained. The relative error between calculated values and experimental values is analyzed and the reasons of error are suggested. The research results show that the results of simulation at 600°C are approximately close to experimental results. The iron diffusion coefficient is discontinuous in the duplex scale of two ferritic-martensitic steels. The simulation results of thicknesses of the oxide scale on tubes (T91 of final superheater of a 600 MW supercritical boiler are compared with field measurement data and calculation results by Adrian’s method. The calculated void positions of oxide scales are in good agreement with a cross-sectional SEM image of the oxide layers.

  7. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  8. Metropolitan Spokane Region Water Resources Study. Appendix A. Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    the river as surface supply. This second area lies mostly north of the Spokane River extending up the val- ley known as Rathdrum Prairie and includes...4 10. 2-29 I .~ -A- IvA -4 -4 IS I rp4r 1-4 - 4NCs 4~ 10. 2- 3o * r~tar gg~wr 4 . fAPPENDIX I en00 -4 - r., 0 CM- WMC q ~~0 0r0 4. .44 . VFog 4102A3

  9. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  10. Equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors and their implications on Si isotope distributions in the Earth's surface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among minerals, organic molecules and the H4SiO4 solution are complemented to facilitate explanation of distributions of Si isotope in the Earth's surface environments. The results reveal that heavy Si isotopes will be significantly enriched in the secondary silicate minerals in comparison to aqueous H4SiO4. On the contrary, quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes are enriched in light silicon isotope relative to the solution. The extent of 28Si-enrichment in hyper-coordinated organosilicon complexes is found the largest. In addition, the large kinetic isotope effect associated with the polymerization of monosilicic acid and dimer is calculated and the result supports previous statement that highly 28Si-enrichment in the formation of amorphous quartz precursor contributes to the discrepancy between theoretical calculations and field observations. With equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in many surface systems of the Earth can be explained. For example, the change of bulk soil δ30Si can be predicted as a concave pattern with respect to weathering degree, with the minimum value where allophane completely dissolves and the total amount of sesqui-oxides and poorly crystalline minerals reaches its maximum. When well-crystallized clays start to precipitate from pore solutions under equilibrium conditions, the bulk soil δ30Si will increase again and reach a constant value. Similarly, the precipitation of crystalline smectite and the dissolution of poorly crystalline kaolinite may explain δ30Si variations in the ground water profile. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionations among quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes and the H4SiO4 solution may also shed the light on the Si isotope distributions in Si-accumulating plants.

  11. Stormwater Priority Pollutants Versus Surface Water Quality Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Ledin, Anna; Baun, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Stormwater in urban areas comprises of a substantial part of the urban water cycle, dominating the flow in many small urban streams, and the pollution levels are sizeable. No stormwater quality criteria were found here and no European or national emission limit values exist. Stormwater pollutants...... however are present in levels exceeding most of the regulated surface water quality criteria and environmental quality standards. Therefore catchment characterisation is needed to chose suitable treatment prior to discharge into receiving surface waters, as the mixing may be insufficient in small streams....

  12. Multi-scale kinetic surface roughening of reactive-sputtered TaN thin films characterized by wavelet transform approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.J., E-mail: jjyang@scu.edu.cn; Miao, F.M.; Tang, J., E-mail: tangjun@scu.edu.cn; Yang, Y.Y.; Liao, J.L.; Liu, N.

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic surface roughening of TaN thin films deposited by reactive sputtering was investigated by using atomic force microscopy. Wavelet transform method incorporating power spectrum density analysis was applied to extract the global and local surface morphologies of the films. Then the dynamical exponents of global and local surface roughening were calculated in terms of dynamic scaling theory. The results show that the kinetic surface roughening of TaN thin films exhibits multi-scale characteristics, where a set of local dynamical exponents (α{sub l} = 0.95, β{sub l} = 0.24) and global dynamical exponents (α{sub g} = 1.56, β{sub g} = 0.71) was obtained. The local surface roughening is dominated by the competition between linear surface diffusion and deposition flux noise, while the global surface roughening displays anomalous rapid-roughening behavior due to the preferred grain growth. - Highlights: • Film surface multi-scale behaviors were characterized by wavelet transform. • Microscopic mechanisms of surface multi-scale behaviors were investigated.

  13. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor – Part 1: Microstructure, phase transitions, hygroscopic growth and kinetic limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we outline characteristic features and differences in the interaction of amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles with water vapor. Using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA, we performed hydration, dehydration and cyclic hydration&dehydration experiments with aerosol particles composed of levoglucosan, oxalic acid and ammonium sulfate (diameters ~100–200 nm, relative uncertainties <0.4%, relative humidities <5% to 95% at 298 K. The measurements and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following main conclusions: 1. Many organic substances (including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids. 2. Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at much lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts. 3. In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supra-molecular networks and undergo stepwise transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures. 4. Organic gels or (semi-solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water by submicron aerosol particles on (multi-second time scales, which may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN. 5. The shape and porosity of amorphous

  14. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-12-26

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  15. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-11-25

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  16. Kinetic analysis of inhibition of glucoamylase and active site mutants via chemoselective oxime immobilization of acarbose on SPR chip surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Jørgen; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte;

    2013-01-01

    We here report a quantitative study on the binding kinetics of inhibition of the enzyme glucoamylase and how individual active site amino acid mutations influence kinetics. To address this challenge, we have developed a fast and efficient method for anchoring native acarbose to gold chip surfaces...... shown that at pH 7.0 the association and dissociation rate constants for the acarbose-glucoamylase interaction are 104M−1s−1 and 103s−1, respectively, and that the conformational change to a tight enzyme–inhibitor complex affects the dissociation rate constant by a factor of 102s−1. Additionally...

  17. Surface Water Resources Response to Climate Changes in Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The response of surface water resources on climate changes was studied.[Method] By dint of monthly average temperature and precipitation in 45 meteorological stations in Jilin Province from 1960 to 2000,monthly runoff in 56 hydrological stations in Songhuajiang and Liaohe region,the surface runoff change and the response of surface water resources to climate change in 41 years were expounded.[Result] The runoff of Songliao region was limited during 1960s and 1970s.It began to increase slowly in ...

  18. Removal of selenium species from waters using various surface-modified natural particles and waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Nevzat O.; Tozum, Seda [Department of Environmental Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    Waste red mud and natural pumice/volcanic slag particles were surface modified and their selenium adsorption from waters was investigated. Acid activation/heat treatment of original red mud (ORM) particles significantly increased their micropore and external surface area and cumulative volume of pores. Iron oxide coating of pumice/slags and acid activation of ORM decreased their pH{sub pzc} values and increased surface acidity. Selenite/selenate adsorption on iron oxide surfaces and acid activated red mud (AARM) was very fast with approximately first-order adsorption kinetics. Iron oxide coating of pumice/slag and acid activation of ORM particles significantly enhanced their selenite and selenate uptakes. Maximum Se adsorption capacities as high as 6.3 (mg Se/g adsorbent) were obtained by AARM. The extent of selenate uptakes by the surface modified particles was generally lower than those of selenite. Due to competition among Se species and other background water matrix for iron oxide adsorption sites, reduced selenite/selenate uptakes were found in natural water compared to single solute tests. Higher Se uptakes by iron oxide surfaces were found at pH 7.5 compared to pH 8.9, due to increased electrostatic repulsion among iron oxides and Se species at higher pH. The most effective adsorbents among the tested 17 different particles for Se uptake were AARM and iron oxide coated pumice. Se concentrations less than drinking water standards (5-10 {mu}g/L) can be achieved by these particles. These low-cost, natural, or recyclable waste particles appear to be promising adsorbents for Se removal after their surface modification. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Surface-coating regulated lithiation kinetics and degradation in silicon nanowires for lithium ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Langli; Yang, Hui; Yan, Pengfei; Travis, Jonathan J; Lee, Younghee; Liu, Nian; Piper, Daniela Molina; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhao, Peng; George, Steven M; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Cui, Yi; Zhang, Sulin; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong-Min

    2015-05-26

    Silicon (Si)-based materials hold promise as the next-generation anodes for high-energy lithium (Li)-ion batteries. Enormous research efforts have been undertaken to mitigate the chemo-mechanical failure due to the large volume changes of Si during lithiation and delithiation cycles. It has been found that nanostructured Si coated with carbon or other functional materials can lead to significantly improved cyclability. However, the underlying mechanism and comparative performance of different coatings remain poorly understood. Herein, using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) through a nanoscale half-cell battery, in combination with chemo-mechanical simulation, we explored the effect of thin (∼5 nm) alucone and Al2O3 coatings on the lithiation kinetics of Si nanowires (SiNWs). We observed that the alucone coating leads to a "V-shaped" lithiation front of the SiNWs, while the Al2O3 coating yields an "H-shaped" lithiation front. These observations indicate that the difference between the Li surface diffusivity and bulk lithiation rate of the coatings dictates lithiation induced morphological evolution in the nanowires. Our experiments also indicate that the reaction rate in the coating layer can be the limiting step for lithiation and therefore critically influences the rate performance of the battery. Further, the failure mechanism of the Al2O3 coated SiNWs was also explored. Our studies shed light on the design of high capacity, high rate and long cycle life Li-ion batteries.

  20. Surface-Coating Regulated Lithiation Kinetics and Degradation in Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Yang, Hui; Yan, Pengfei; Travis, Jonathan J.; Lee, Younghee; Liu, Nian; Piper, Daniela M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhao, Peng; George, Steven M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Cui, Yi; Zhang, Sulin; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-05-26

    Silicon (Si)-based materials hold promise as the next-generation anodes for high-energy lithium (Li)-ion batteries. Enormous research efforts have been undertaken to mitigate the chemo-mechanical failure due to the large volume changes of Si during lithiation and delithiation cycles. It has been found nanostructured Si coated with carbon or other functional materials can lead to significantly improved cyclability. However, the underlying mechanism and comparative performance of different coatings remain poorly understood. Herein, using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) through a nanoscale half-cell battery, in combination with chemo-mechanical simulation, we explored the effect of thin (~5 nm) alucone and Al2O3 coatings on the lithiation kinetics of Si nanowires (SiNWs). We observed that the alucone coating leads to a “V-shaped” lithiation front of the SiNWs , while the Al2O3 coating yields an “H-shaped” lithiation front. These observations indicate that the difference between the Li surface diffusivity and bulk diffusivity of the coatings dictates lithiation induced morphological evolution in the nanowires. Our experiments also indicate that the reaction rate in the coating layer can be the limiting step for lithiation and therefore critically influences the rate performance of the battery. Further, the failure mechanism of the Al2O3 coated SiNWs was also explored. Our studies shed light on the design of high capacity, high rate and long cycle life Li-ion batteries.

  1. Kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine in surface and subsurface agricultural soils in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Olli H; Deshmukh, Vaidehi; Özkaya, Bestamin; Radosevich, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess atrazine mineralization in surface and subsurface samples retrieved from vertical cores of agricultural soils from two farm sites in Ohio. The Defiance site (NW-Ohio) was on soybean-corn rotation and Piketon (S-Ohio) was on continuous corn cultivation. Both sites had a history of atrazine application for at least a couple of decades. The clay fraction increased at the Defiance site and the organic matter and total N content decreased with depth at both sites. Mineralization of atrazine was assessed by measurement of (14)CO2 during incubation of soil samples with [U-ring-(14)C]-atrazine. Abiotic mineralization was negligible in all soil samples. Aerobic mineralization rate constants declined and the corresponding half-lives increased with depth at the Defiance site. Anaerobic mineralization (supplemented with nitrate) was mostly below the detection at the Defiance site. In Piketon samples, the kinetic parameters of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine displayed considerable scatter among replicate cores and duplicate biometers. In general, this study concludes that data especially for anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine can be more variable as compared to aerobic conditions and cannot be extrapolated from one agricultural site to another.

  2. The Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Alsdorf, Douglas; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Morrow, Rosemary; Mognard, Nelly; Vaze, Parag; Lafon, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A new space mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is being developed jointly by a collaborative effort of the international oceanographic and hydrological communities for making high-resolution measurement of the water elevation of both the ocean and land surface water to answer the questions about the oceanic submesoscale processes and the storage and discharge of land surface water. The key instrument payload would be a Ka-band radar interferometer capable of making high-resolution wide-swath altimetry measurement. This paper describes the proposed science objectives and requirements as well as the measurement approach of SWOT, which is baselined to be launched in 2019. SWOT would demonstrate this new approach to advancing both oceanography and land hydrology and set a standard for future altimetry missions.

  3. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  4. The influence of lithology on surface water sources | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of surface water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed “rainout effect”, which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the leeward side of the Oregon Coastal Range. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Results indicate a significant difference in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation was the most distinct during the summer when low flows reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall and winter) showed a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. This indicates that baseflow within streams drained by sandstone versus basalt is being supplied from two distinctly separate water sources. In addition, Marys River flow at the outle

  5. Kinetics of homogeneous and surface-catalyzed mercury(II) reduction by iron(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of elemental mercury, Hg(0), via Hg(II) reduction is an important pathway that should be considered when studying Hg fate in environment. We conducted a kinetic study of abiotic homogeneous and surface-catalyzed Hg(0) production by Fe(II) under dark anoxic conditions. Hg(0) production rate, from initial 50 pM Hg(II) concentration, increased with increasing pH (5.5–8.1) and aqueous Fe(II) concentration (0.1–1 mM). The homogeneous rate was best described by the expression, rhom = khom [FeOH+] [Hg(OH)2]; khom = 7.19 × 10+3 L (mol min)−1. Compared to the homogeneous case, goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) increased and γ-alumina (γ-Al2O3) decreased the Hg(0) production rate. Heterogeneous Hg(0) production rates were well described by a model incorporating equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption, rate-limited Hg(II) reduction by dissolved and adsorbed Fe(II), and rate-limited Hg(II) adsorption. Equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption was described using a surface complexation model calibrated with previously published experimental data. The Hg(0) production rate was well described by the expression rhet = khet [>SOFe(II)] [Hg(OH)2], where >SOFe(II) is the total adsorbed Fe(II) concentration; khet values were 5.36 × 10+3, 4.69 × 10+3, and 1.08 × 10+2 L (mol min)−1 for hematite, goethite, and γ-alumina, respectively. Hg(0) production coupled to reduction by Fe(II) may be an important process to consider in ecosystem Hg studies.

  6. Kinetic modelling of molten carbonate fuel cells: Effects of cathode water and electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arato, E.; Audasso, E.; Barelli, L.; Bosio, B.; Discepoli, G.

    2016-10-01

    Through previous campaigns the authors developed a semi-empirical kinetic model to describe MCFC performance for industrial and laboratory simulation. Although effective in a wide range of operating conditions, the model was validated for specific electrode materials and dry feeding cathode compositions. The new aim is to prove that with appropriate improvements it is possible to apply the model to MCFC provided by different suppliers and to new sets of reactant gases. Specifically, this paper describes the procedures to modify the model to switch among different materials and identify a new parameter taking into account the effects of cathode water vapour. The new equation is integrated as the kinetic core within the SIMFC (SIMulation of Fuel Cells) code, an MCFC 3D model set up by the PERT group of the University of Genova, for reliability test. Validation is performed using data collected through tests carried out at the University of Perugia using single cells. The results are discussed giving examples of the simulated performance with varying operating conditions. The final formulation average percentage error obtained for all the simulated cases with respect to experimental results is maintained around 1%, despite the difference between the basic and the new conditions and facilities.

  7. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors.

  8. Kinetic modeling of the oxidative degradation of additive free PE in bleach disinfected water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikdam, Aïcha; Colin, Xavier; Billon, Noëlle; Minard, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    The chemical interactions between PE and bleach were studied at 60°C in immersion in bleach solutions kept at a free chlorine concentration of 100 ppm and a pH of 5 or 7.2. It was found that the polymer undergoes a severe oxidation from the earliest weeks of exposure, in a superficial layer whose thickness (of about 50-70 µm) is almost independent of the pH value, although the superficial oxidation rate is faster in acidic than in neutral medium. Oxidation leads to the formation and accumulation of a large variety of carbonyl products (mostly ketones and carboxylic acids) and, after a few weeks, to a decrease in the average molar mass due to the large predominance of chain scissions over crosslinking. A scenario was elaborated for explaining such unexpected results. According to this scenario, the non-ionic molecules (Cl2 and ClOH) formed from the disinfectant in the water phase, would migrate deeply into PE and dissociate into highly reactive radicals (Cl• and HO•) in order to initiate a radical chain oxidation. A kinetic model was derived from this scenario for predicting the general trends of the oxidation kinetics and its dependence on environmental factors such as temperature, free chlorine concentration and pH. The validity of this model was successfully checked by comparing the numerical simulations with experimental data.

  9. Surface water waves due to an oscillatory wavemaker in the presence of surface tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Mandal

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial value problem of generation of surface water waves by a harmonically oscillating plane vertical wavemaker in an infinite incompressible fluid under the action of gravity and surface tension is investigated. In the asymptotic evaluation of the free surface depression for large time and distance, the contribution to the integral by stationary phase method gives rise to transient component of the free surface depression while the contribution from the poles give rise to steady state component. It is observed that the presence of surface tension sometimes changes the qualitative nature of the transient component of free surface depression.

  10. Modeling and Understanding BOD Removal Processes in Free-Water Surface Constructed Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Free-water surface constructed wetlands have proven to be effective systems for removal of various pollutants in wastewater and agricultural drainage water. Modeling tools are needed for understanding the processes and mechanisms responsible for the removal of pollutants and for the design of new constructed wetlands. This paper presents a new model for mimicking the processes and mechanisms controlling the removal of BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) in free-water surface constructed wetlands. The processes and mechanisms, simulated in the model, include advection, dispersion, diffusion, monod kinetics of bacterial growth, water gains (via precipitation) and losses (evaporation and seepage) and mass exchange between water column and root layers of a wetland. A novel feature of the new model is the incorporation of a dynamic diffusive root-zone. Sensitivity analysis of the model input vaiables indicates that the BOD removal in free water surface constructed wetlands is most sensitive to the biological removal process of BOD in the root zone, controlled by acetic acid and anaerobic bacteria in root zone, and the flow velocity (controlling mean hydraulic residence time) and organic carbon in the water column. The application of the new model is demonstrated through two case studies involving two distinct constructed wetlands with one (Gustine Wetland) for treatment of secondary wastewater located in the USA and another (Lake Manzala Engineered Wetland) for treatment of agricultural drainage water in Egypt. The model is relatively simple yet effective, as evidenced by the high coefficient of determination of 0.73 - 0.99 for the Gustine Wetland and 0.98 for Manzala Wetland. The model is a reliable and efficient tool for designing constructed wetlands and for understanding effects of various processes and mechanisms on the treatment efficiency of wastewater in constructed wetlands.

  11. Surface tension isotherms of the dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhambulatov, R. S.; Dadashev, R. Kh.; Elimkhanov, D. Z.; Dadashev, I. N.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the concentration dependence of surface tension of aqueous solutions of the 1,4-dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems were given. The studies were performed by the hanging-drop method on a DSA100 tensiometer. The maximum error of surface tension was 1%. The theoretical models for calculating the surface tension of the ternary systems of organic solutions were analyzed.

  12. Supplementary report on surface-water and ground-water surveys, Nueces River Basin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, W.L.; Ellsworth, C.E.

    1950-01-01

    A report on the ground-water and surface-water surveys of the Nueces River Basin was included in a report by the Bureau of Reclamation, entitled "Comprehensive plan for water-resources development of the Nueces River Basin project planning report number 5-14.04-3, February 1946".

  13. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  14. The δ15N of nitrate in the Southern Ocean: Consumption of nitrate in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Altabet, M. A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Francois, R.; Fischer, G.

    1999-12-01

    We report nitrogen isotope data for nitrate from transects of hydrocast and surface samples collected in the eastern Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean, focusing here on the data from the upper water column to study the effect of nitrate consumption by phytoplankton. The δ15N of nitrate increases by 1-2‰ from deep water into the Antarctic summertime surface layer, due to kinetic isotopic fractionation during nitrate uptake. Estimation of the nitrate uptake isotope effect from Antarctic depth profiles yields values in the range of 5-6‰ in east Indian sector and 4-5‰ in the east Pacific sector. Surface transect data from the Pacific sector also yield values of 4-5‰. The major uncertainty in the profile-based estimation of the isotope effect involves the δ15N of nitrate from the temperature minimum layer below the summertime Antarctic surface layer, which deviates significantly from the predictions of simple models of isotope fractionation. For the Subantarctic surface, it is possible to distinguish between nitrate supplied laterally from the surface Antarctic and nitrate supplied vertically from the Subantarctic thermocline because of the distinctive relationships between the δ15N and concentration of nitrate in these two potential sources. Our Subantarctic samples, collected during the summer and fall, indicate that nitrate is supplied to the Subantarctic surface largely by northward transport of Antarctic surface water. Isotopic data from the Pacific sector of the Subantarctic suggest an isotope effect of 4.5‰, indistinguishable from the Antarctic estimates in this sector.

  15. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  16. Kinetics of non-catalyzed hydrolysis of tannin in high temperature liquid water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li LU; Xiu-yang LU; Nan MA

    2008-01-01

    High temperature liquid water (HTLW) has drawn increasing attention as an environmentally benign medium for organic chemical reactions,especially acid-/base-catalyzed reactions.Non-catalyzed hydrolyses of gallotannin and tara tannin in HTLW for the simultaneous preparation of gallic acid (GA) and pyrogallol (PY) are under investigation in our laboratory.In this study,the hydrolysis kinetics of gallotannin and tara tannin were determined.The reaction is indicated to be a typical consecutive first-order one in which GA has formed as a main intermediate and PY as the final product.Selective decomposition of tannin in HTLW was proved to be possible by adjusting reaction temperature and time.The present results provide an important basic data and reference for the green preparation of GA and PY.

  17. Oxidation kinetics of model compounds of metabolic waste in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, Paul A.; Holgate, Henry R.; Stevenson, David M.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01

    In this NASA-funded study, the oxidation kinetics of methanol and ammonia in supercritical water have been experimentally determined in an isothermal plug flow reactor. Theoretical studies have also been carried out to characterize key reaction pathways. Methanol oxidation rates were found to be proportional to the first power of methanol concentration and independent of oxygen concentration and were highly activated with an activation energy of approximately 98 kcal/mole over the temperature range 480 to 540 C at 246 bar. The oxidation of ammonia was found to be catalytic with an activation energy of 38 kcal/mole over temperatures ranging from 640 to 700 C. An elementary reaction model for methanol oxidation was applied after correction for the effect of high pressure on the rate constants. The conversion of methanol predicted by the model was in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Photolytic treatment of atrazine-contaminated water: products, kinetics, and reactor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuejun; Chen, Daniel; Li, Kuyen; Wang, Bin; Hopper, Jack

    2007-08-01

    This study investigates the products, kinetics, and reactor design of atrazine photolysis under 254-nm ultraviolet-C (UVC) irradiation. With an initial atrazine concentration of 60 microg/L (60 ppbm), only two products remain in detectable levels. Up to 77% of decomposed atrazine becomes hydroxyatrazine, the major product. Both atrazine and hydroxyatrazine photodecompose following the first-order rate equation, but the hydroxyatrazine photodecomposition rate is significantly slower than that of atrazine. For atrazine photodecomposition, the rate constant is proportional to the square of UVC output, but inversely proportional to the reactor volume. For a photochemical reactor design, a series of equations are proposed to calculate the needed UVC output power, water treatment capacity, and atrazine outlet concentration.

  19. Survival of adenovirus types 2 and 41 in surface and ground waters measured by a plaque assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotto, C; Hanley, K; Rochelle, P A; De Leon, R; Barardi, C R M; Yates, M V

    2011-05-01

    To manage artificial recharge systems, it is necessary to understand the inactivation process of microorganisms within aquifers so that requirements regarding storage times and treatment strategies for ground and surface waters can be developed and modeled to improve water management practices. This study was designed to investigate the survival of representative adenoviruses in surface- and groundwaters using a cell culture plaque assay with human lung carcinoma cells (A549) to enumerate surviving viruses. Adenovirus types 2 (Ad2) and 41 (Ad41) were seeded into 50 mL of three sterilized surface waters and groundwaters, and incubated at 10 and 19 °C for up to 301 days. Concentrations of Ad2 and Ad41 were relatively stable in all waters at 10 °C for at least 160 days and in some instances up to 301 days. At 19 °C, virus concentrations were reduced by 99.99% (4 log) after 301 days in surface water. There was approximately 90% (1 log) reduction of both viruses at 19 °C after 160 days of incubation in groundwater samples. There was no overall difference in survival kinetics in surface waters compared to groundwaters. The relatively high stability and long-term survival of adenoviruses in environmental waters at elevated temperatures should be considered in risk assessment models and drinking water management strategies.

  20. Foulant characteristics comparison in recycling cooling water system makeup by municipal reclaimed water and surface water in power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water.

  1. Kinetic and Phase Behaviors of Catalytic Cracking Dry Gas Hydrate in Water-in-Oil Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qinglan; HUANG Qiang; CHEN Guangjin; WANG Xiulin; SUN Changyu; YANG Lanying

    2013-01-01

    The systematic experimental studies were performed on the hydrate formation kinetics and gas-hydrate equilibrium for a simulated catalytic cracking gas in the water-in-oil emulsion.The effect of temperature,pressure and initial gas-liquid ratio on the hydrate formation was studied,respectively.The data were obtained at pressures ranging from 3.5 to 5 MPa and temperatures from 274.15 to 277.15 K.The results showed that hydrogen and methane can be separated from the C2+ fraction by forming hydrate at around 273.15 K which is much higher temperature than that of the cryogenic separation method,and the hydrate formation rate can be enhanced in the water-in-oil emulsion compared to pure water.The experiments provided the basic data for designing the industrial process,and setting the suitable operational conditions.The measured data of gas-hydrate equilibria were compared with the predictions by using the Chen-Guo hydrate thermodynamic model.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    and DNA microarrays technologies.4,5,6,7,8 Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water,2,9-16 at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle...... computations of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems.3,16,17,18 For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence...

  3. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-06-07

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10(5)-10(7) cfu/mL). The effects of ClO2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the Cavg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Dissimilar Kinetic Behavior of Electrically Manipulated Single- and Double-Stranded DNA Tethered to a Gold Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Tornow, Marc; Kim, Yong Woon; Netz, Roland R.; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Abstreiter, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    We report on the electrical manipulation of single- and double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides that are end tethered to gold surfaces in electrolyte solution. The response to alternating repulsive and attractive electric surface fields is studied by time-resolved fluorescence measurements, revealing markedly distinct dynamics for the flexible single-stranded and stiff double-stranded DNA, respectively. Hydrodynamic simulations rationalize this finding and disclose two different kinetic mechanisms: stiff polymers undergo rotation around the anchoring pivot point; flexible polymers, on the other hand, are pulled onto the attracting surface segment by segment. PMID:16473909

  5. A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  7. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  8. The significant surface-water connectivity of "geographically isolated wetlands"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Mushet, David M.; Alexander, Laurie C.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Richter, Stephen; Walls, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the current literature, coupled with our collective research expertise, on surface-water connectivity of wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” (sensu Tiner Wetlands 23:494–516, 2003a) to critically assess the scientific foundation of grouping wetlands based on the singular condition of being surrounded by uplands. The most recent research on wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” shows the difficulties in grouping an ecological resource that does not reliably indicate lack of surface water connectivity in order to meet legal, regulatory, or scientific needs. Additionally, the practice of identifying “geographically isolated wetlands” based on distance from a stream can result in gross overestimates of the number of wetlands lacking ecologically important surface-water connections. Our findings do not support use of the overly simplistic label of “geographically isolated wetlands”. Wetlands surrounded by uplands vary in function and surface-water connections based on wetland landscape setting, context, climate, and geographic region and should be evaluated as such. We found that the “geographically isolated” grouping does not reflect our understanding of the hydrologic variability of these wetlands and hence does not benefit conservation of the Nation’s diverse wetland resources. Therefore, we strongly discourage use of categorizations that provide overly simplistic views of surface-water connectivity of wetlands fully embedded in upland landscapes.

  9. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  10. Operational Surface Water Detection and Monitoring Using Radarsat 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bolanos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional on-site methods for mapping and monitoring surface water extent are prohibitively expensive at a national scale within Canada. Despite successful cost-sharing programs between the provinces and the federal government, an extensive number of water features within the country remain unmonitored. Particularly difficult to monitor are the potholes in the Canadian Prairie region, most of which are ephemeral in nature and represent a discontinuous flow that influences water pathways, runoff response, flooding and local weather. Radarsat-2 and the Radarsat Constellation Mission (RCM offer unique capabilities to map the extent of water bodies at a national scale, including unmonitored sites, and leverage the current infrastructure of the Meteorological Service of Canada to monitor water information in remote regions. An analysis of the technical requirements of the Radarsat-2 beam mode, polarization and resolution is presented. A threshold-based procedure to map locations of non-vegetated water bodies after the ice break-up is used and complemented with a texture-based indicator to capture the most homogeneous water areas and automatically delineate their extents. Some strategies to cope with the radiometric artifacts of noise inherent to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images are also discussed. Our results show that Radarsat-2 Fine mode can capture 88% of the total water area in a fully automated way. This will greatly improve current operational procedures for surface water monitoring information and impact a number of applications including weather forecasting, hydrological modeling, and drought/flood predictions.

  11. Studying surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Fallah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of water exchange in a region or area, which emphasizes the principle of conservation of matter in the water cycle, is called balance. Investigating their balance is the basis for managing the rivers’ water management, the results of which refer to the change rate in surface water supply and can efficiently be used in decision making and optimal use of water resources. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS. In so doing, digital topographic maps, soil map of the area, and meteorological data retrieved from the regional stations were used to prepare layers of precipitation, evaporation and infiltration of rainwater into the soil. Discharge-arearegion comparative method was employed to measure the amount of runoff and base flow for each sub-basin in raster form saved per unit area which was subsequently overlapped based on balance equation, and the balance of the region was displayed in a graphical mode. The results indicated that more surface water is wasted in the southeast and central area of the province.

  12. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  13. Influence of building resolution on surface water inundation outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess water is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of all UK flood risk. This risk is predicted to increase due to future climatic changes resulting in an increasing magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain an understanding of the depth, extent and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although numerical models allow the simulation of surface water inundation in a particular region, the model parameters (e.g. roughness, hydraulic conductivity) and resolution of topographic data have been shown to exert a profound influence on the inundation outputs which often leads to an over- or under-estimation of flood depths and extent without the use of external validation data to calibrate model outputs. Although previous research has demonstrated that model outputs are highly sensitive to Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mesh resolution, with flood inundation over large and complex topographies often requiring mesh resolutions coarser than the structural features (e.g. buildings) present within the study catchment, the specific influence of building resolution on surface flowpaths and connectivity during a surface water flood event has not been investigated. In this study, a LiDAR-derived DEM and OS MasterMap buildings layer of the Loughborough University campus, UK, were rasterized into separate 1m, 5m and 10m resolution layers. These layers were combined to create a series of Digital Surface Models (DSM) with varying, mismatching building and DEM resolutions (e.g. 1m DEM resolution, 10m building resolution, etc.) to understand

  14. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, F.; Albrechtsen, H.; Binning, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using data of a tracer experiment in a riparian zone. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a new biodegradable and strongly sorbed pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the method of Morris was employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results showed that the presence of an aquitard and its characteristics (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depth are the crucial factors affecting the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. Global sensitivity analysis results were compared with rank correlation statistics between pesticide concentrations and geological parameters derived from a comprehensive database of Danish drinking water wells. Aquitard thickness and well depth are the most critical parameters in both the model and observed data.

  15. Return of naturally sourced Pb to Atlantic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgestock, Luke; van de Flierdt, Tina; Rehkämper, Mark; Paul, Maxence; Middag, Rob; Milne, Angela; Lohan, Maeve C.; Baker, Alex R.; Chance, Rosie; Khondoker, Roulin; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Achterberg, Eric P.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions completely overwhelmed natural marine lead (Pb) sources during the past century, predominantly due to leaded petrol usage. Here, based on Pb isotope measurements, we reassess the importance of natural and anthropogenic Pb sources to the tropical North Atlantic following the nearly complete global cessation of leaded petrol use. Significant proportions of up to 30-50% of natural Pb, derived from mineral dust, are observed in Atlantic surface waters, reflecting the success of the global effort to reduce anthropogenic Pb emissions. The observation of mineral dust derived Pb in surface waters is governed by the elevated atmospheric mineral dust concentration of the North African dust plume and the dominance of dry deposition for the atmospheric aerosol flux to surface waters. Given these specific regional conditions, emissions from anthropogenic activities will remain the dominant global marine Pb source, even in the absence of leaded petrol combustion.

  16. Macroelements in the surface microlayer of water of urban ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonowicz Józef Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyses were conducted concerning the accumulation of four metals representing the group of macroelements, i.e. sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium in two ponds located in the city of Słupsk. Water samples for chemical analyses were collected from the surface microlayer using a Garrett net. At the same time subsurface water samples were collected. Concentrations of metals were determined using a mass spectrometer. Generally, amounts of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium were similar in surface microlayer and subsurface water. Only in the case of potassium and calcium was low enrichment observed in the surface microlayer in one pond, while the greatest extent for magnesium enrichment was observed in the spring period.

  17. Occurrence of illicit drugs in surface waters in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiyang; Du, Peng; Xu, Zeqiong; Gao, Tingting; Li, Xiqing

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as a group of emerging contaminants. In this work, occurrence of common illicit drugs and their metabolites in Chinese surface waters was examined by collecting samples from 49 lakes and 4 major rivers across the country. Among the drugs examined, methamphetamine and ketamine were detected with highest frequencies and concentration levels, consistent with the fact that these are primary drugs of abuse in China. Detection frequencies and concentrations of other drugs were much lower than in European lakes and rivers reported in the literature. In most Chinese surface waters methamphetamine and ketamine were detected at concentrations of several ng L(-1) or less, but in some southern lakes and rivers, these two drugs were detected at much higher concentrations (up to several tens ng L(-1)). Greater occurrence of methamphetamine and ketamine in southern surface waters was attributed to greater abuse and more clandestine production of the two drugs in southern China.

  18. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海涛; 程营; 王敬时; 刘晓峻

    2015-01-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection.

  19. Kinetic modeling for thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs: a combined model for induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruka; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2014-04-03

    In this study, ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorph particles, α- and β-phases, with square bipyramidal and quadratic prismatic shapes, respectively, were synthesized. Thermal dehydration of the samples was subjected to kinetic study as a typical reaction that indicates a significant induction period and a sigmoidal mass-loss behavior. On the basis of the formal kinetic analysis of the mass-loss traces recorded under isothermal, nonisothermal, and constant transformation rate conditions and the morphological observations of the surface textures of the partially reacted sample particles, a combined kinetic model for the induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction was developed. The sigmoidal mass-loss behavior after the significant induction period under isothermal conditions was satisfactorily simulated by the combined kinetic model. The kinetic parameters for the component processes of induction period, surface reaction, and phase boundary reaction were separately determined from the kinetic simulation. The differences in the kinetic behaviors of the induction period and the phase boundary reaction between α- and β-phase samples were well described by the kinetic parameters. The applicability of the combined kinetic model to practical systems was demonstrated through characterizing the physicogeometrical kinetics of the thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs.

  20. Direct measurements of quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable water near the triple point: an experimental benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurements of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra accurate lineshapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, benchmarked with ice at the same temperature, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, {i.e.} key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establis...

  1. Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics of atrazine on surface oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Cai; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Zhou, Yi-Quan; Shen, Xiu-e; Huang, Hong-Lin; Khan, Shahamat U

    2009-09-30

    The adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic of atrazine on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) containing 0.85%, 2.16%, and 7.07% oxygen was studied. Kinetic analyses were performed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The regression results showed that the pseudo-second-order law fit the adsorption kinetics. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of atrazine on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Standard free energy (DeltaG(0)) became less negative when the oxygen content of MWCNTs increased from 0.85% to 7.07% which is consistent with the low adsorption affinity of MWCNTs for atrazine.

  2. Ozonolysis of surface adsorbed methoxyphenols: kinetics of aromatic ring cleavage vs. alkene side-chain oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. O'Neill

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin pyrolysis products, which include a variety of substituted methoxyphenols, constitute a major component of organics released by biomass combustion and may play a central role in the formation of atmospheric brown carbon. Understanding the atmospheric fate of these compounds upon exposure to trace gases is therefore critical to predicting the chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosol. We used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to monitor the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, and isoeugenol adsorbed on NaCl and α-Al2O3 substrates. Adsorption of gaseous methoxyphenols onto these substrates produced near monolayer surface concentrations of 3 × 1018 molecules m-2. The subsequent dark heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed 4-propylguaiacol cleaved the aromatic ring between the methoxy and phenol groups with the product conclusively identified by GC-MS and 1H-NMR. Kinetic analysis of eugenol and isoeugenol dark ozonolysis also suggested the formation of ring-cleaved products, although ozonolysis of the unsaturated substituent groups forming carboxylic acids and aldehydes was an order of magnitude faster. Average uptake coefficients for NaCl-adsorbed methoxyphenols were γ = 2.3 (±0.8 × 10-7 and 2 (±1 × 10-6 for ozonolysis of the aromatic ring and the unsaturated side chain, respectively, and reactions on α-Al2O3 were approximately two times slower. UV-visible radiation (λ>300 nm enhanced eugenol ozonolysis of the aromatic ring by a factor of 4(±1 but had no effect on ozonolysis of the alkene side-chain.

  3. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface.

  4. Spring and surface water quality of the Cyprus ophiolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of surface, spring and borehole waters associated with the ophiolite rocks of Cyprus shows five broad water types (1 Mg-HCO3, (2 Na-SO4-Cl-HCO3, (3 Na-Ca-Cl-SO4-OH-CO3, (4 Na-Cl-SO4 and (5 Ca-SO4. The waters represent a progression in chemical reactivity from surface waters that evolve within a groundwater setting due to hydrolysis of the basic/ultrabasic rock as modified by CO2-weathering. An increase in salinity is also observed which is due to mixing with a saline end-member (modified sea-water and dissolution of gypsum/anhydrite. In some cases, the waters have pH values greater than 11. Such high values are associated with low temperature serpentinisation reactions. The system is a net sink for CO2. This feature is related not only to the hydrolysis of the primary minerals in the rock, but also to CaCO3 or Ca-Mg-CO3 solubility controls. Under hyperalkaline conditions, virtually all the carbon dioxide is lost from the water due to the sufficiently high calcium levels and carbonate buffering is then insignificant. Calcium sulphate solubility controls may also be operative when calcium and sulphate concentrations are particularly high. Keywords: Cyprus, Troodos, ophiolite, serpentinisation, spring, stream, water quality, bromide, iodine, boron, trace elements, hyperalkaline.

  5. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  6. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  7. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales...

  8. Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Óluva Karin; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Smith, Christian

    2014-01-01

    in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more......Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface...

  9. Some Aspects of Surface Water Treatment Technology in Tirana Drinking Water Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    , Tania Floqi; , Aleksandër Trajçe; , Daut Vezi

    2009-01-01

    Tirana’s Bovilla treatment plant was the Şrst of its kind for Albania, which treats surface water. The input water comes from the Bovilla artiŞcial lake, around which, the presence of villages induces pollution in the surface water and therefore affects the efŞciency of treatment plant and consequently the quality of drinking water. The treatment plant is a simple conventional system and includes pre-oxidation, coagulation, şocculation & sedimentation, fast Şltration, post-oxidation. ...

  10. Fluctuations of water near extended hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Amish J.; Chandler, David

    2009-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the SPC-E model of liquid water to derive probability distributions for water density fluctuations in probe volumes of different shapes and sizes, both in the bulk as well as near hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. To obtain our results, we introduce a biased sampling of coarse-grained densities, which in turn biases the actual solvent density. The technique is easily combined with molecular dynamics integration algorithms. Our principal result is t...

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on surface of calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate particles play a key role in the air quality and the global climate, but the heterogeneous formation mechanism of sulfates on surfaces of atmospheric particles is not well established. Carbonates, which act as a reactive component in mineral dust due to their special chemical properties, may contribute significantly to the sulfate formation by heterogeneous processes. This paper presents a study on the oxidation of SO2 by O3 on CaCO3 particles. Using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS, the formation of sulfite and sulfate on the surface was identified, and the roles of O3 and water in oxidation processes were determined. The results showed that in the presence of O3, SO2can be oxidized to sulfate on the surface of CaCO3 particles. The reaction is first order in SO2 and zero order in O3. The reactive uptake coefficient for SO2 [(0.6–9.8×1014 molecule cm-3] oxidation by O3 [(1.2–12×1014 molecule cm-3] was determined to be (1.4±0.3×10-7 using the BET area as the reactive area and (7.7±1.6×10-4 using the geometric area. A two-stage mechanism that involves adsorption of SO2 followed by O3 oxidation is proposed and the adsorption of SO2 on the CaCO3 surface is the rate-determining step. The proposed mechanism can well explain the experiment results. The atmospheric implications were explored based on a box model calculation. It was found that the heterogeneous reaction might be an important pathway for sulfate formation in the atmosphere.

  12. Protein Exposed Hydrophobicity Reduces the Kinetic Barrier for Adsorption of Ovalbumin to the Air-Water Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, F.A.G.J.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air - water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption k

  13. Protein exposed hydrophobicity reduces the kinetic barrier for adsoption of ovalbumin to the air-water interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air-water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption kin

  14. Protein exposed hydrophobicity reduces the kinetic barrier for adsoption of ovalbumin to the air-water interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air-water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption

  15. A kinetic study of a poorly water soluble drug released from pectin microcapsules using diffusion/dissolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new microcapsular system for controlled drug delivery was developed from pectins obtained from various sources, with different molecular weight and degree of esterification. The release kinetics of a poorly water-soluble drug from the pectin microcapsules was investigated in simulated gastrointes...

  16. Monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available the surface. The chelated Pluronic-DMDDO ligand can be used for affinity purification of histidine tagged proteins. A regeneration formulation based on anionic SDS detergent desorbed pluronic modified polymeric membranes and the possibility of re... ingredients, household products and industrial chemicals. Surface waters are the main sink of said EDCs. Accurate EDC detection is usually via time consuming and costly ex situ LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. An important class of biosensors include those...

  17. Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2013-05-01

    By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle Θ = 108°) or perfluorosilane (Θ = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces.

  18. Coupled 3D neutron kinetics and thermalhydraulic characteristics of the Canadian supercritical water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, David William, E-mail: hummeld@mcmaster.ca; Novog, David Raymond

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • A coupled spatial kinetics and thermalhydraulics model of the PT-SCWR was created. • Positive power excursions were demonstrated during accident-like transients. • The reactor will inherently self-shutdown in such transients with some delay. • A fast-acting shutdown system would limit the consequences of the power pulse. - Abstract: The Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor concept, as an evolution of the CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactor, includes both pressure tubes and a low temperature heavy water moderator. The current Pressure Tube type SCWR (PT-SCWR) concept features 64-element fuel assemblies placed within High Efficiency Re-entrant Channels (HERCs) that connect to core inlet and outlet plena. Among current SCWR concepts the PT-SCWR is unique in that the HERC separates multiple coolant and moderator regions, giving rise to coupled neutronic-thermalhydraulic feedbacks beyond those present in CANDU or contemporary Light Water Reactors. The objective of this work was thus to model the coupled neutronic-thermal hydraulic properties of the PT-SCWR to establish the impact of these multiple regions on the core's transient behavior. To that end, the features of the PT-SCWR were first modeled with the neutron transport code DRAGON to create a database of homogenized and condensed cross-sections and thermalhydraulic feedback coefficients. These were used as input to a core-level neutron diffusion model created with the code DONJON. The behavior of the primary heat transport system was modeled with the thermalhydraulic system code CATHENA. A procedure was developed to couple the outputs of DONJON and CATHENA, facilitating three-dimensional spatial neutron kinetics and coupled thermalhydraulic analysis of the PT-SCWR core. Several postulated transients were initiated within the coupled model by changing the core inlet and outlet boundary conditions. Decreasing coolant density around the fuel was demonstrated to produce positive

  19. Nanofiltration in Transforming Surface Water into Healthy Water: Comparison with Reverse Osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Naidu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural surface water, especially available through rivers, is the main source of healthy water for the living beings throughout the world from ancient days as it consists of all essential minerals. With the advent of industrialization, gradually even the most prominent rivers have been polluted in all parts of the world. Although there are lots of technologies, nanofiltration (NF has been chosen to transform river water into healthy water due to its unique advantages of retaining optimum TDS (with essential minerals required for human body, consuming of lower energy, and no usage of any chemicals. The prominent parameters of surface water and macro/microminerals of treated water have been analyzed. It is shown that NF is better in producing healthy water with high flux by consuming low energy.

  20. Effects of water blanching on polyphenol reaction kinetics and quality of cocoa beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, A. S.; Hii, C. L.; Law, C. L.; Suzannah, S.; Djaeni, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have been reported on the potential health benefits of cocoa polyphenols. However, drying has an inhibitory effect on the substantial recovery of cocoa polyphenols. This is majorly because of the high degradation of polyphenol compounds as well as the enhanced activity of polyphenol oxidases; a pre-cursor for browning of polyphenols during drying. Pre-treatment technique such as water blanching (80° and 90°C for 5 min, 10 min and 15 min exposure times respectively) can inactivate the polyphenol oxidases enzyme and promote high percent of the polyphenol recovery in dried cocoa bean. The degradation kinetics of cocoa polyphenols during hot water blanching are analyzed; The rate constant for the polyphenol degradation after blanching was found to be ranging from 0.0208 to 0.0340 /min. The results for dried fresh cocoa beans showed an optimal level of polyphenol recovery (118 mg GAE/g) when blanched at 90°C for 5 minutes duration. The antioxidant activity is also analyzed using DPPH scavenging assay.