WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface states due

  1. Large apparent electric size of solid-state nanopores due to spatially extended surface conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Joly, Laurent; Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-08-08

    Ion transport through nanopores drilled in thin membranes is central to numerous applications, including biosensing and ion selective membranes. This paper reports experiments, numerical calculations, and theoretical predictions demonstrating an unexpectedly large ionic conduction in solid-state nanopores, taking its origin in anomalous entrance effects. In contrast to naive expectations based on analogies with electric circuits, the surface conductance inside the nanopore is shown to perturb the three-dimensional electric current streamlines far outside the nanopore in order to meet charge conservation at the pore entrance. This unexpected contribution to the ionic conductance can be interpreted in terms of an apparent electric size of the solid-state nanopore, which is much larger than its geometric counterpart whenever the number of charges carried by the nanopore surface exceeds its bulk counterpart. This apparent electric size, which can reach hundreds of nanometers, can have a major impact on the electrical detection of translocation events through nanopores, as well as for ionic transport in biological nanopores.

  2. Enhanced spin Seebeck effect signal due to spin-momentum locked topological surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zilong; Chang, Cui-Zu; Masir, Massoud Ramezani; Tang, Chi; Xu, Yadong; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Shi, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Spin-momentum locking in protected surface states enables efficient electrical detection of magnon decay at a magnetic-insulator/topological-insulator heterojunction. Here we demonstrate this property using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), that is, measuring the transverse thermoelectric response to a temperature gradient across a thin film of yttrium iron garnet, an insulating ferrimagnet, and forming a heterojunction with (BixSb1-x)2Te3, a topological insulator. The non-equilibrium magnon population established at the interface can decay in part by interactions of magnons with electrons near the Fermi energy of the topological insulator. When this decay channel is made active by tuning (BixSb1-x)2Te3 into a bulk insulator, a large electromotive force emerges in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization of yttrium iron garnet. The enhanced, tunable SSE which occurs when the Fermi level lies in the bulk gap offers unique advantages over the usual SSE in metals and therefore opens up exciting possibilities in spintronics.

  3. Benzene on Cu(111): II. Molecular assembly due to Lateral van der Waals and Surface-State-Mediated Indirect Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Berland, Kristian; Einstein, T. L.

    2010-03-01

    Experiments show that benzene condenses into two different structural phases: a compact and a sparse phase, both of approximately hexagonal symmetry. The vdW-DF calculations demonstrate that the denser benzene-overlayer phase, with lattice constant 6.74 ,s due to direct benzene-benzene vdW attraction. The structure of the second, sparser phase, with lattice spacing 10.24 ,s attributed to the indirect electronic interactions mediated by the well-known metallic surface state on Cu(111). To support this claim, we use a formal Harris-functional approach to evaluate nonperturbatively the asymptotic form of this indirect interaction. Our extended vdW-DF scheme---which combines calculations of molecular physisorption, of direct intermolecular vdW coupling, and of indirect electronic interactions between the molecular adsorbates---accounts well for the structural phases of benzene on Cu(111). Our preliminary vdW-DF study of acene and quinone interactions provides building blocks for modeling of anthraquinone assembly on Cu(111).footnotetextG. Pawin, , L. Bartels, Science 313 (2006) 961

  4. Faraday Rotation Due to Surface States in the Topological Insulator (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yinming; Post, Kirk W; Wu, Jhih-Sheng; Dai, Siyuan; Frenzel, Alex J; Richardella, Anthony R; Lee, Joon Sue; Samarth, Nitin; Fogler, Michael M; Balatsky, Alexander V; Kharzeev, Dmitri E; Basov, D N

    2017-02-08

    Using magneto-infrared spectroscopy, we have explored the charge dynamics of (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films on InP substrates. From the magneto-transmission data we extracted three distinct cyclotron resonance (CR) energies that are all apparent in the broad band Faraday rotation (FR) spectra. This comprehensive FR-CR data set has allowed us to isolate the response of the bulk states from the intrinsic surface states associated with both the top and bottom surfaces of the film. The FR data uncovered that electron- and hole-type Dirac Fermions reside on opposite surfaces of our films, which paves the way for observing many exotic quantum phenomena in topological insulators.

  5. Extremely large non-saturating magnetoresistance and ultrahigh mobility due to topological surface states in metallic Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, K; Chou, M; Graf, D.; Yang, H. D.; Lorenz, B.; Chu, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Weak antilocalization (WAL) effects in Bi2Te3 single crystals have been investigated at high and low bulk charge carrier concentrations. At low charge carrier density the WAL curves scale with the normal component of the magnetic field, demonstrating the dominance of topological surface states in magnetoconductivity. At high charge carrier density the WAL curves scale with neither the applied field nor its normal component, implying a mixture of bulk and surface conduction. WAL due to topolog...

  6. New experimental results on the interference of the states of the hydrogen atom due to long-range interaction with the metal surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kucheryaev, YA; Pal'chikov, VG; Pchelin, YA; Sokolov, YL; Yakovlev, VP

    2005-01-01

    The interference of the 2P state of the hydrogen atom due to unknown long-range interaction with the metal surface (Sokolov effect) has been studied by an atomic interferometer. In contrast to previous experiments, where an atomic beam passed through slits in metal plates, a beam in the presented ex

  7. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    insulator to flash was earlier in time for the cathode-half beam illumination case than the anode-half illumination case which led us to believe that the flashover mechanism for the UV illumination is initiated from the cathode side of the insulator. Qualitatively stated, the testing revealed that the shielding of the cathode triple point against UV is more important than the anode triple junction in the design of vacuum insulators and electrodes. The goal of this work was to acquire empirical data on critical UV fluence (energy per unit area) required to induce surface flashover of vacuum insulators for some candid insulator materials: High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex. This work was a clarification and extension of studies performed by C.L. Enloe, et. al. in the 80's [1-3]. Additionally, to gain an understanding of the physical mechanism of flashover, we experimented with UV illumination of a portion of the insulator's surface near the cathode and subsequently near the anode. The results of these experiments are covered in detail.

  8. Climatic change due to land surface alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchito, S.H.; Rao, V.B.

    1992-01-01

    A primitive equations global zonally averaged climate model is developed. The model includes biofeedback mechanisms. For the Northern Hemisphere the parameterization of biofeedback mechanisms is similar to that used by Gutman et al. For the Southern Hemisphere new parameterizations are derived. The model simulates reasonably well the mean annual zonally averaged climate and geobotanic zones. Deforestation, desertification, and irrigation experiments are performed. In the case of deforestation and desertification there is a reduction in the surface net radiation, evaporation, and precipitation and an increase in the surface temperature. In the case of irrigation experiment opposite changes occurred. In all the cases considered the changes in evapotranspiration overcome the effect of surface albedo modification. In all the experiments changes are smaller in the Southern Hemisphere.

  9. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  10. Surface states in photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtíšek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among many unusual and interesting physical properties of photonic crystals (PhC, in recent years, the propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along dielectric PhC boundaries have attracted considerable attention, also in connection to their possible applications. Such surfaces states, produced with the help of specialized defects on PhC boundaries, similarly to surfaces plasmons, are localized surfaces waves and, as such, can be used in various sensing applications. In this contribution, we present our recent studies on numerical modelling of surface states (SS for all three cases of PhC dimensionality. Simulations of these states were carried out by the use of plane wave expansion (PWE method via the MIT MPB package.

  11. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  12. Investigation of differential surface removal due to electropolishing at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Folkie, James [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Surface chemistry carried out for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities such as Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and Electropolishing (EP) aims to uniformly remove the internal surface of a cavity along the entire structure and within each cell from equator to iris in order to obtain an equally etched surface. A uniform removal, however, is not readily achievable due to the complex fluid flow and varying temperatures of the acid mixture, which can lead to differential etching. This needs to be considered when envisaging a certain surface damage removal throughout the interior. The process-specific differential etching influences the target frequency set at the manufacturing stage as well as the field flatness and length of the as-built cavity. We report on analyses of JLab's present EP system using experimental data for six nine-cell cavities that have been processed recently in the frame of the LCLS-II high-Q development plan. In conjunction with numerical simulations, the differential etching and the impact on field flatness is assessed.

  13. Surface water waves due to an oscillatory wavemaker in the presence of surface tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Mandal

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial value problem of generation of surface water waves by a harmonically oscillating plane vertical wavemaker in an infinite incompressible fluid under the action of gravity and surface tension is investigated. In the asymptotic evaluation of the free surface depression for large time and distance, the contribution to the integral by stationary phase method gives rise to transient component of the free surface depression while the contribution from the poles give rise to steady state component. It is observed that the presence of surface tension sometimes changes the qualitative nature of the transient component of free surface depression.

  14. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dutykh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion that govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced that is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It is also found that the finite fluid domain has a significant impact on the behavior of the wave run-up.

  15. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2013-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion which govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced which is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It also found that the fi...

  16. Exact Surface States in Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    We develop an analytical method to derive exact surface states in photonic superlattices. In a kind of infinite bichromatic superlattices satisfying some certain conditions, we analytically obtain their in-gap states, which are superpositions of finite numbers of unstable Bloch waves. By using the unstable in-gap states, we construct exactly several stable surface states in various photonic superlattices. We analytically explore the parametric dependence of these exact surface states. Our analysis provides an exact demonstration for the existence of surface states and would be also helpful to understand surface states in other lattice systems.

  17. SHAPE BIFURCATION OF AN ELASTIC WAFER DUE TO SURFACE STRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琨; 何陵辉; 刘人怀

    2003-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear analysis was proposed for the deformation of a freestanding elastically isotropic wafer caused by the surface stress change on one surface. Thelink between the curvature and the change in surface stress was obtained analytically fromenergetic consideration. In contrast to the existing linear analysis, a remarkableconsequence is that, when the wafer is very thin or the surface stress difference between thetwo major surfaces is large enough, the shape of the wafer will bifurcate.

  18. Surface state and normal layer effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.A.; Ledvij, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Liu, S.H. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-08-01

    In addition to the conducting CuO{sub 2} (S) layers, most high-T{sub c} superconductors also contain other conducting (N) layers, which are only superconducting due to the proximity effect. The combination of S and N layers can give rise to complicated electronic densities of states, leading to quasilinear penetration depth and NMR relaxation rate behavior at low temperatures. Surface states can also complicate the analysis of tunneling and, photoemission measurements. Moreover, geometrical considerations and in homogeneously trapped flux axe possible explanations of the paramagnetic Meissner effect and of corner and ring SQUID experiments. Hence, all of the above experiments could be consistent with isotropic s-wave superconductivity within the S layers.

  19. Accumulation of Microswimmers due to Their Collisions with a Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanglai

    2008-01-01

    In this letter we propose a kinematic model to show how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then swims away from the surface after some time, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming in confinement.

  20. Vibrational states on Pd surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1997-04-01

    We present the calculation of vibrational modes and lattice relaxation for the Pd(100), (110) and (111) surfaces. The surface phonon frequencies and polarizations are obtained using embedded-atom potentials. Comparison of the calculated frequency values with available experimental data gives agreement within 0.2 THz.

  1. Topological surface states scattering in antimony

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2012-11-05

    In this work we study the topologically protected states of the Sb(111) surface by using ab initio transport theory. In the presence of a strong surface perturbation we obtain standing-wave states resulting from the superposition of spin-polarized surface states. By Fourier analysis, we identify the underlying two dimensional scattering processes and the spin texture. We find evidence of resonant transmission across surface barriers at quantum well state energies and evaluate their lifetimes. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental findings. We also show that despite the presence of a step edge along a different high-symmetry direction, the surface states exhibit unperturbed transmission around the Fermi energy for states with near to normal incidence. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. Enhanced diffusion due to active swimmers at a solid surface

    CERN Document Server

    Miño, Gaston; Darnige, Thierry; Hoyos, Mauricio; Dauchet, Jeremy; Dunstan, Jocelyn; Soto, Rodrigo; Wang, Yang; Rousselet, Annie; Clement, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We consider two systems of active swimmers moving close to a solid surface, one being a living population of wild-type \\textit{E. coli} and the other being an assembly of self-propelled Au-Pt rods. In both situations, we have identified two different types of motion at the surface and evaluated the fraction of the population that displayed ballistic trajectories (active swimmers) with respect to those showing random-like behavior. We studied the effect of this complex swimming activity on the diffusivity of passive tracers also present at the surface. We found that the tracer diffusivity is enhanced with respect to standard Brownian motion and increases linearly with the activity of the fluid, defined as the product of the fraction of active swimmers and their mean velocity. This result can be understood in terms of series of elementary encounters between the active swimmers and the tracers.

  3. Topological semimetals with helicoid surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chen; Lu, Ling; Liu, Junwei; Fu, Liang

    2016-10-01

    We show that the surface dispersions of topological semimetals map to helicoidal structures, where the bulk nodal points project to the branch points of the helicoids whose equal-energy contours are Fermi arcs. This mapping is demonstrated in the recently discovered Weyl semimetals and leads us to predict new types of topological semimetals, whose surface states are represented by double- and quad-helicoid surfaces. Each helicoid or multi-helicoid is shown to be the non-compact Riemann surface representing a multi-valued holomorphic function (generating function). The intersection of multiple helicoids, or the branch cut of the generating function, appears on high-symmetry lines in the surface Brillouin zone, where surface states are guaranteed to be doubly degenerate by a glide reflection symmetry. We predict the heterostructure superlattice [(SrIrO3)2(CaIrO3)2] to be a topological semimetal with double-helicoid surface states.

  4. Vertical Crustal Displacements Due to Surface Fluid Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shiyu; ZHONG Min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model data for surface mass changes of the atmosphere, ocean, soil moisture and snow depth, the vertical crustal displacements of 25 ficual stations in China were calculated according to the loading theory. From the spectral analysis of the results, we can see that the periods of displacements are 12 months and the semi-periods are 6 months. The results also show that the maximum seasonal displacements can reach 20 mm and even larger. The covariance analyses and significance tests show that the coefficients of 96 percent of the stations are significant at the 0.1 significance level. The results show that one of the reasons of the vertical crustal displacements is the changing surface fluid loads.

  5. Measurement of Mode Interaction Due to Waveguide Surface Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Speed of Mode 1 over Wedge Roughness at 7813 Hz Due to Cycle Error q. 104 q cprI (mis) Cr r 100M% -2 335.33 6.94 -1 346.16 3.93 0 357.73 0.72 1370.07...4.4 Mode 2 Energy Attenuation Freq (Hz) Smooth (dB/m) Rough (dB/m) 7750 2.0 4.8 15750 2.8 10.5 23500 3.5 12.2 31250 4.3 10.1 110 c -c q CprI (m/s) .pr... cprI x 100(%)C pr -1 377.30 1.86 0 398.58 -3.68 Table 35. Change in Phase Speed of Mode I over Random Roughness at 7750 Hz Due to Cycle Error q. 124

  6. Accumulation of microswimmers near surface due to steric confinement and rotational Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Microscopic swimmers display some intriguing features dictated by Brownian motion, low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, and boundary confinement. We re-examine the reported accumulation of swimming bacteria or bull spermatozoa near the boundaries of a fluid chamber, and propose a kinematic model to explain how collision with surface, confinement and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then takes off and swims away from the surface after some time due to rotational Brownian motion. Based on this analysis, we obtain through computer simulation steady state density distributions that reproduce the ones measured for the small bacteria E coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming near surfaces. These results suggest strongly that Brownian dynamics and surface confinement are the dominant factors for the accumulation of microswimmers near a surface.

  7. Structural Changes in the Surface Layer of Deep Rolled Samples Due to Thermal Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strunk, R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep rolling processes initiate plastic deformations in the surface layer. The local characteristics of deformation are dependent on the induced stress expressed by the local stress tensor. Equivalent stresses above yield strength cause plastic deformation. Additionally the intrinsic energy, e. g. the dislocation density, is enhanced and the residual stress state is changed. The effects to a deep rolled surface from an increase in temperature are mainly dependent on the material, the microstructure, the initial residual stress state, the inclusion density, the distribution of soluted alloying elements and the plastic deformation. In the described experiments the interactions between deformation and temperature of the steel grade AISI 4140 (42 CrMo 4 used for all further experiments in a transregional Collaborative Research Center (CRC were to be examined. The most simple investigation methods were chosen deliberately to allow a better statistical support of correlations between introduced strains and material reactions for a wide variation of process parameters. Since the visual effects by light microscopy in AISI 4140 were very small, the experiments were repeated with german grade 18 CrNiMo 7-6 (comparable to AISI 4820. This paper focuses on the micro structural changes in defined deep rolled surface regions due to an increase in temperature. The work described is part of the Collaborative Research Center “Process Signatures”, collaboration between Bremen University, Technical University Aachen, Germany and Oklahoma State University Stillwater, USA.

  8. UNSTEADY WAVES DUE TO AN IMPULSIVE OSEENLET BENEATH THE CAPILLARY SURFACE OF A VISCOUS FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dong-qiang; CHEN Xiao-bo

    2008-01-01

    The two-dimensional free-surface waves due to a point force steadily moving beneath the capillary surface of an incompressible viscous fluid of infinite depth were analytically investigated. The unsteady Oseen equations were taken as the governing equations for the viscous flows. The kinematic and dynamic conditions including the combined effects of surface tension and viscosity were linearized for small-amplitude waves on the free-surface. The point force is modeled as an impulsive Oseenlet. The complex dispersion relation for the capillary-gravity waves shows that the wave patterns are characterized by the Weber number and the Reynolds number. The asymptotic expansions for the wave profiles were explicitly derived by means of Lighthill's theorem for the Fourier transform of a function with a finite number of singularities. Furthermore, it is found that the unsteady wave system consists of four families, that is, the steady-state gravity wave, the steady-state capillary wave, the transient gravity wave, and the transient capillary wave. The effect of viscosity on the capillary-gravity was analytically expressed.

  9. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    indicate that surface roughness undergoes continuous evolution during alternating contact loading and exposure to etchant. Surface roughness evolution is governed by the residual stress induced due to contact loading. Two different stress-assisted dissolution driven instabilities in roughness evolution have been identified. In order to investigate stressed surface damage by electrochemical reaction during active contact loading, in the first stage, surface failure due to sliding contact was investigated as a function of different residual stress states from compressive to tensile. Residual stress is usually developed during manufacturing process or former mechanical interactions playing an important role on service life of the surface. The wear mechanism of fatigue contact in the presence of residual stresses was explored by analytical model of fatigue crack growth by utilizing modified delamination wear theory with surface layer spalling model. Fatigue stress intensity factors (DeltaKI) loaded by contact stress and combined residual stress implied that buckling of subsurface crack with compressive residual stress opens crack-tip and consequently increase wear rate during sliding contact. As for the experimental verification of the modified delamination model, cyclic sliding contact experiment on metallic implant materials in ambient was conducted by utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) and four-point-bending set up by which well characterized pre-stress was established on rectangular specimen. In addition, complex mechanism of corrosion on the damaged surface illustrated strong stress-dependent effects on wear rate in repassivating environment and dissolution rates in reactive environment.

  10. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  12. Unsteady Free-surface Waves Due to a Submerged Body in Two-dimensional Oseen Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUDong-qiang; AllenT.CHWANG

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional unsteady free-surface waves due to a submerged body moving in an incompressible viscous fluid of infinite depth is considered.The disturbed flow is governed by the unsteadyOseen equations with the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions linearized for the free-surface waves.Accordingly, the body is mathematically simulated by an Oseenlet with a periodically oscillating strength.By means of Fourier transforms,the exact solution for the free-surface waves is expressed by an integral with a complex dispersion function, which explicitly shows that the wave dynamics is characterized by a Reynolds number and a Strouhal number.By applying Lighthill's theorem, asymptotic representations are derived for the far-field waves with a sub-critical and a super-critical Strouhal number. It is found that the generated waves due to the oscillating Oseenlet consist of the steady-state and transient responses. For the viscous flow with a sub-critical Strouhal number, there exist four waves: three propagate downstream while one propagates upstream.However, for the viscous flow with a super-critical Strouhal number, there exist two waves only,which propagate downstream.

  13. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Nikhiles

    2016-10-01

    Angle Resolved Photo Emission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a very effective tool to study the electronic states of solids, from simple metals to complex systems like cuprate superconductors. For photon energy in the range of 10 - 100 eV, it is a surface sensitive process as the free path of the photo emitted electrons is of the order of a few lattice parameters. However to interpret the experimental data one needs to have a theoretical foundation for the photoemission process. From the theory of photoemission it may be seen that one can get information about the state from which the electron has been excited. As the translational periodicity is broken normal to the surface, a new type of electron state in the forbidden energy gap can exist localized in the surface region. ARPES can reveal the existence and the property of such surface states. We shall also discuss briefly how the electromagnetic field of the photons are influenced by the presence of the surface and how one can try to take that into account in photoemission theory.

  14. Entangled States, Holography and Quantum Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapline, G F

    2003-08-13

    Starting with an elementary discussion of quantum holography, we show that entangled quantum states of qubits provide a ''local'' representation of the global geometry and topology of quantum Riemann surfaces. This representation may play an important role in both mathematics and physics. Indeed, the simplest way to represent the fundamental objects in a ''theory of everything'' may be as muti-qubit entangled states.

  15. Surface states in crystals with low-index surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王会平; 陶瑞宝

    2015-01-01

    For most of the conventional crystals with low-index surfaces, the hopping between the nearest neighbor (1NN) crystal planes (CPs) is dominant and the ones from the nNN (2≤n<∞) CPs are relatively weak, considered as small perturbations. The recent theoretical analysis [1] has demonstrated the absence of surface states at the level of the hopping approximation between the 1NN CPs when the original infinite crystal has the geometric reflection symmetry (GRS) for each CP. Meanwhile, based on the perturbation theory, it has also been shown that small perturbations from the hopping between the nNN (2≤n<∞) CPs and surface relaxation have no impact on the above conclusion. However, for the crystals with strong intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the dominant terms of intrinsic SOC associate with two 1NN bond hoppings. Thus SOC will significantly contribute the hoppings from the 1NN and/or 2NN CPs except the ones within each CP. Here, we will study the effect of the hopping between the 2NN CPs on the surface states in model crystals with three different type structures (Type I:“· · ·–P–P–P–P–· · ·”, Type II:“· · ·–P–Q–P–Q–· · ·”and Type III:“· · ·–P=Q–P=Q–· · ·”where P and Q indicate CPs and the signs“–”and“=”mark the distance between the 1NN CPs). In terms of analytical and numerical calculations, we study the behavior of surface states in three types after the symmetric/asymmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs is added. We analytically prove that the symmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs cannot induce surface states in Type I when each CP has only one electron mode. The numerical calculations also provide strong support for the conclusion, even up to 5NN. However, in general, the coupling from the 2NN CPs (symmetric and asymmetric) is favorable to generate surface states except Type I with single electron mode only.

  16. Insights from simple models for surface states in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Surface passivation is of great technological importance due to the increasing miniaturisation of electronic devices. It has been known for many years that under certain conditions surface states can form; when they do so in a quantum well (QW) the result is an unbound (i.e., evanescent) state in the QW. Such surface states are generally undesirable, so a good physical understanding of them is important. A simple single-p-orbital valence band model is used with two types of surface passivation to examine surface states in a QW: (1) an energy upshift added to the terminal atoms; and (2) explicit passivation by an s-orbital on each end of the QW. These models show these unbound/evanescent QW states can occur in both models; that in them the wavefunction is bound to the terminal atoms; and that the existence of these states is connected to the effective valence-band offset between the terminal atoms and the bulk QW.

  17. Surface modification of solid state gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ljuibov

    The phenomenon of electrical conductivity being controlled by the chemical state of a surface grafted reactive centre, resulting in a room temperature gas response, is demonstrated. The reactive centres can be chosen to be specific to a particular gas, providing a route to new types of gas detectors tailored for a particular application. Generalization of the phenomenon was verified. Surface grafting of Ti, Ru and Pt centres onto SnO2; Ti and Pt centres onto Ti02 ; and Pt centres onto BaSn0.97Sb0.03O3 resulted in a room temperature gas sensitivity specific to each system. Surface grafting of Ru centres onto SnO2 resulted in additional electronic states in the SnO2 band gap associated with surface Ru species, revealed by XPS and correlated with resistance increase of the material. An electronic interaction between grafted Ru centres and the SnO2 support was manifested in conductivity being controlled by the surface state of the Ru. Variations in the chemical state of the surface grafted Ru caused by gas chemisorption were revealed by XPS and this was correlated with conductivity change measured as gas response of the device at room temperature. The samples were characterized by EXAFS to confirm the structure of the surface Ru species, TPD, UV- visible spectroscopy, XPS and electrical measurements. DFT molecular cluster calculations were also performed to ascertain the origin of the gas response. The mechanism of the room temperature CO response of SnO2 decorated with small Pt particles was refined. In this case Pt was applied by common impregnation techniques. The conductivity was shown to be controlled by the surface state of the Pt. The CO response at room temperature was found to be specific to the presence of Pt(II) species. The mechanism was assigned to CO chemisorption onto Pt(II), resulting in charge transfer, measured as conductivity increase. The samples were characterized by XPS, TPD, SEM, mass spectrometry and electrical measurements. Comparison of the

  18. Variation in diffusion of gases through PDMS due to plasma surface treatment and storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Dmitry A; Lillie, Elizabeth M; Garbett, Shawn P; McCawley, Lisa J

    2014-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commonly used polymer in the fabrication of microfluidic devices due to such features as transparency, gas permeability, and ease of patterning with soft lithography. The surface characteristics of PDMS can also be easily changed with oxygen or low pressure air plasma converting it from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic state. As part of such a transformation, surface methyl groups are removed and replaced with hydroxyl groups making the exposed surface to resemble silica, a gas impermeable substance. We have utilized Platinum(II)-tetrakis(pentaflourophenyl)porphyrin immobilized within a thin (~1.5 um thick) polystyrene matrix as an oxygen sensor, Stern-Volmer relationship, and Fick's Law of simple diffusion to measure the effects of PDMS composition, treatment, and storage on oxygen diffusion through PDMS. Results indicate that freshly oxidized PDMS showed a significantly smaller diffusion coefficient, indicating that the SiO2 layer formed on the PDMS surface created an impeding barrier. This barrier disappeared after a 3-day storage in air, but remained significant for up to 3 weeks if PDMS was maintained in contact with water. Additionally, higher density PDMS formulation (5:1 ratio) showed similar diffusion characteristics as normal (10:1 ratio) formulation, but showed 60 % smaller diffusion coefficient after plasma treatment that never recovered to pre-treatment levels even after a 3-week storage in air. Understanding how plasma surface treatments contribute to oxygen diffusion will be useful in exploiting the gas permeability of PDMS to establish defined normoxic and hypoxic oxygen conditions within microfluidic bioreactor systems.

  19. 45 CFR 261.63 - When is a State's Work Verification Plan due?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When is a State's Work Verification Plan due? 261... When is a State's Work Verification Plan due? (a) Each State must submit its interim Work Verification Plan for validating work activities reported in the TANF Data Report and, if applicable, the...

  20. Damping of an ion acoustic surface wave due to surface currents

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J

    1999-01-01

    The well-known linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave has been obtained by including the linear surface current density J sub z parallel to the interface and by neglecting the linear surface current density J sub x perpendicular to the interface. The neglect of J sub x is questionable although it leads to the popular boundary condition that the tangential electric field is continuous. In this work, linear dispersion relation for an ion acoustic surface wave is worked out by including both components of the linear current density J . When that is done, the ion acoustic wave turns out to be heavily damped. If the electron mass is taken to be zero (electrons are Bolzmann-distributed), the perpendicular component of the surface current density vanishes, and we have the well-known ion acoustic surface wave eigenmode. We conclude that an ion acoustic surface wave propagates as an eigenmode only when its phase velocity is much smaller than the electron thermal velocity.

  1. Classical electromagnetic model of surface states in topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-01-01

    A topological insulator is classically modeled as an isotropic dielectric-magnetic with a magnetoelectric pseudoscalar $\\Psi$ existing in its bulk while its surface is charge-free and current-free. An alternative model is obtained by setting $\\Psi\\equiv0$ and incorporating surface charge and current densities characterized by an admittance $\\gamma$. Analysis of plane-wave reflection and refraction due to a topological-insulator half space reveals that the parameters $\\Psi$ and $\\gamma$ arise identically in the reflection and transmission coefficients, implying that the two classical models cannot be distinguished on the basis of any scattering scenario. However, as $\\Psi$ disappears from the Maxwell equations applicable to any region occupied by the topological insulator, and because surface states exist on topological insulators as protected conducting states, the alternative model must be chosen.

  2. Classical electromagnetic model of surface states in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Mackay, Tom G.

    2016-07-01

    A topological insulator is classically modeled as an isotropic material with a magnetoelectric pseudoscalar Ψ existing in its bulk while its surface is charge free and current free. An alternative model is obtained by setting Ψ≡0 and incorporating surface charge and current densities characterized by an admittance γ. Analysis of planewave reflection and refraction due to a topological-insulator half space reveals that the parameters Ψ and γ arise identically in the reflection and transmission coefficients, implying that the two classical models cannot be distinguished on the basis of any scattering scenario. However, as Ψ disappears from the Maxwell equations applicable to any region occupied by the topological insulator, and because surface states exist on topological insulators as protected conducting states, the alternative model must be chosen.

  3. Eta products, BPS states and K3 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang-Hui [Department of Mathematics, City University,London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); School of Physics, NanKai University,Tianjin, 300071 (China); Merton College, University of Oxford,Oxford, OX14JD (United Kingdom); McKay, John [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University,1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2014-01-22

    Inspired by the multiplicative nature of the Ramanujan modular discriminant, Δ, we consider physical realizations of certain multiplicative products over the Dedekind eta-function in two parallel directions: the generating function of BPS states in certain heterotic orbifolds and elliptic K3 surfaces associated to congruence subgroups of the modular group. We show that they are, after string duality to type II, the same K3 surfaces admitting Nikulin automorphisms. In due course, we will present identities arising from q-expansions as well as relations to the sporadic Mathieu group M{sub 24}.

  4. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to late

  5. Surface modification of solid state gas sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, L

    2000-01-01

    mechanism of the room temperature CO response of SnO sub 2 decorated with small Pt particles was refined. In this case Pt was applied by common impregnation techniques. The conductivity was shown to be controlled by the surface state of the Pt. The CO response at room temperature was found to be specific to the presence of Pt(ll) species. The mechanism was assigned to CO chemisorption onto Pt(ll), resulting in charge transfer, measured as conductivity increase. The samples were characterized by XPS, TPD, SEM, mass spectrometry and electrical measurements. Comparison of the results presented for Pt decorated BaSn sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 7 Sb sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 3 O sub 3 and BaFeO sub 3 demonstrated the phenomenon to be general providing that Pt particles act as surface traps, controlling the conductivity. The phenomenon of electrical conductivity being controlled by the chemical state of a surface grafted reactive centre, resulting in a room temperature gas response, is demonstrated. The reactive centres can ...

  6. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, B. S. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hsu, Y. -T. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zeng, B. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hatnean, M. Ciomaga [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Zhu, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hartstein, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kiourlappou, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Srivastava, A. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johannes, M. D. [Center for Computational Materials Science, Washington, DC (United States); Murphy, T. P. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Park, J. -H. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Balicas, L. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lonzarich, G. G. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Balakrishnan, G. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Sebastian, Suchitra E. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  7. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF ASTEROIDS HAVING SURFACE SHEDDING DUE TO ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi [Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sánchez, Diego Paul [Senior Research Associate, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States); Scheeres, Daniel J., E-mail: masatoshi.hirabayashi@colorado.edu [Richard Seebass Chair, Professor, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this paper we show the consistency of both approaches. Additionally, the SSDEM simulations show that the initial failure always occurs locally and not globally. In addition, as the core becomes larger, the size of lofted components becomes smaller. These results imply that if there is a strong core in a progenitor body, surface shedding is the most likely failure mode.

  8. Investigating the Impacts of Surface Temperature Anomalies Due to Wildfires in Northern Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbert, T.; Ichoku, C. M.; Matsui, T.; Capehart, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Sub-Saharan African region (NSSA) is an area of intense study due to the recent severe droughts that have dire consequences on the population, which relies mostly on rainfed agriculture for its food supply. This region's weather and hydrologic cycle are very complex and are dependent on the West African Monsoon. Different regional processes affect the West African Monsoon cycle and variability. One of the areas of current investigation is the water cycle response to the variability of land surface characteristics. Land surface characteristics are often altered in NSSA due to agricultural practices, grazing, and the fires that occur during the dry season. To better understand the effects of biomass burning on the hydrologic cycle of the sub-Saharan environment, an interdisciplinary team sponsored by NASA is analyzing potential feedback mechanisms due to the fires. As part of this research, this study focuses on the effects of land surface changes, particularly albedo and skin temperature, that are influenced by biomass burning. Surface temperature anomalies can influence the initiation of convective rainfall and surface albedo is linked to the absorption of solar radiation. To capture the effects of fire perturbations on the land surface, NASA's Unified Weather and Research Forecasting (NU-WRF) model coupled with NASA's Land Information System (LIS) is being used to simulate some of the fire-induced surface temperature anomalies and other environmental processes. In this presentation, we will report the strategy for these simulations, and show some preliminary results.

  9. Variation in surface fractal of graphite due to the adsorption of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Qingfeng [Research Center of Surface and Interface Chemical Engineering Technology, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu Xiancai [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposit Research, Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Xiandong [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposit Research, Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hu Baixing [Research Center of Surface and Interface Chemical Engineering Technology, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: houqingfeng@nju.org.cn; Lu Zhijun [State Key Laboratory of Mineral Deposit Research, Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Shen Jian [Research Center of Surface and Interface Chemical Engineering Technology, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2005-02-15

    The fractal analysis is carried out to study the influence of adsorption of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) on the surface properties of graphite. The surface fractal dimension (dSF), BET surface area (SBET) and pore size distribution (PSD) are calculated from low temperature nitrogen adsorption isotherms. The decline in the dSF of graphite surface is found as the adsorption amount of Tween 80 increases, which suggests that the adsorbed Tween 80 smoothes the graphite surface. Additionally, the observation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) proves that the original slit pores in pure graphite are blocked up and the step defect sites are screened by Tween 80, which may result in the reduction of graphite roughness. The PSD pattern of graphite changes after the adsorption due to the pore blocking effect. SBET of the graphite decreases as the adsorption amount of Tween 80 increases, which is attributed to both pore blocking effect and surface screening effect.

  10. Surface and Internal Waves due to a Moving Load on a Very Large Floating Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Kakinuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of surface/internal water waves with a floating platform is discussed with nonlinearity of fluid motion and flexibility of oscillating structure. The set of governing equations based on a variational principle is applied to a one- or two-layer fluid interacting with a horizontally very large and elastic thin plate floating on the water surface. Calculation results of surface displacements are compared with the existing experimental data, where a tsunami, in terms of a solitary wave, propagates across one-layer water with a floating thin plate. We also simulate surface and internal waves due to a point load, such as an airplane, moving on a very large floating structure in shallow water. The wave height of the surface or internal mode is amplified when the velocity of moving point load is equal to the surface- or internal-mode celerity, respectively.

  11. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SATURATED-UNSATURATED SEEPAGE FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASS DUE TO SURFACE INFILTRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Seepage flow in fractured rock mass due to surface infiltration is a saturated-unsaturated seepage process. Aimed at rock mass with large fracture density, which can be equivalent to continuum, a mathematical model for saturated-unsaturated seepage flow in fractured rock mass due to surface infiltration was established in this paper. The Galerkin finite element method was used in numerical simulation and a finite element program used to calculate saturated-unsaturated seepage flow due to surface infiltration was worked out. A model experiment was employed examine the reasonableness of the program. The results show that the proposed model and program are reasonable. The application of the analysis method in this paper in an engineering project shows that the method is reliable and feasible.

  12. Effect of the overconsolidation ratio of soils in surface settlements due to tunneling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Strokova

    2013-01-01

    Construction of urban tunnels requires the control of surface subsidence to minimize any disturbance to nearby buildings and services. Past study of surface subsidence has been limited to mainly empirical solutions based on field studies, and very few analytical studies have been carried out. The available analytical solutions are not sufficient to include complex ground conditions;hence, a comprehensive analytical solution coupled with numerical modeling is necessary to model the effect of surface subsidence due to tunneling. This paper presents the results of modeling of surface settlements due to tunneling using the finite element method. The effect of the overconsolidation ratio of soils expressed in terms of the co-efficient of earth pressure at rest (K0) on surface subsidence due to tunneling is investigated. It is demonstrated that surface settlements appear to be sensitive to K0 values, and for geotechnical calculations pertaining to overconsolidated sand and clay soil, K0 values of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively, are proposed.

  13. Internal Structure of Asteroids Having Surface Shedding due to Rotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Surface shedding of an asteroid is a failure mode where surface materials fly off due to strong centrifugal forces beyond the critical spin period, while the internal structure does not deform significantly. This paper proposes a possible structure of an asteroid interior that leads to such surface shedding due to rapid rotation rates. A rubble pile asteroid is modeled as a spheroid composed of a surface shell and a concentric internal core, the entire assembly called the test body. The test body is assumed to be uniformly rotating around a constant rotation axis. We also assume that while the bulk density and the friction angle are constant, the cohesion of the surface shell is different from that of the internal core. First, developing an analytical model based on limit analysis, we provide the upper and lower bounds for the actual surface shedding condition. Second, we use a Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) to study dynamical deformation of the test body due to a quasi-static spin-up. In this pa...

  14. Assessment, management rehabilitation of surface water losses due to longwall coal mining subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawkins, A.P. [Coffey Geosciences Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1999-07-01

    Subsidence due to longwall coal mining has generated notable effects on surface water and groundwater above numerous longwall coal mines in Queensland and NSW. This paper deals with the methods which can be used to assess, predict and rehabilitate the effects of longwall surface subsidence on surface water bodies. Aspects discussed cover the subsidence model, hydrological and hydrogeological assessment, hydrogeochemical changes and subsidence rehabilitation issues. The paper concludes that longwall surface subsidence can significantly affect the mine's local environment. However, with sufficient baseline data and a thorough assessment of site specific issues, longwalls can be planned to account for subsidence effects on surface water, and possible deleterious effects can be mitigated. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Limitations of Heat Conductivity in Cryogenic Sensors Due to Surface Roughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moktadir, Z.; Bruijn, M.P.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Ridder, M.; Mels, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    The limitation of heat conductivity in cryogenic sensors due to surface roughness was discussed. It was found that at macroscopic scale and high temperatures, the transport coefficients were characteristic properties of the material and were independent of the shape and size of specimen. An

  16. Interplay between surface and surface resonance states on height selective stability of fcc Dy(111) film at nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Ho, Kai-Ming; Thiel, Patricia A; Tringides, Michael C

    2016-11-16

    Using first-principles calculations we show that face-centered cubic Dy(111) ultrathin films exhibit height selective stability. The origin of such height selection can be attributed to the interplay between the localized surface states and surface resonance states due to electron confinement effects. Such effect could be utilized to manipulate the film thickness at the atomic level to achieve desirable film properties or to control the growth of nanostructures on the thin film for various applications.

  17. Spin wave surface states in one-dimensional planar magnonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Rychły, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated surface spin wave states in one-dimensional planar bi-component magnonic crystals, localized on the surfaces resulting from the breaking of the periodic structure. The two systems have been considered: the magnonic crystal with periodic changes of the anisotropy field in exchange regime and the magnonic crystal composed of Fe and Ni stripes in dipolar regime with exchange interactions included. We chose the symmetric unit cell for both systems to implement the symmetry related criteria for existence of the surface states. We investigated also the surface states induced by the presence of perturbation of the surface areas of the magnonic crystals. We showed, that the system with modulated anisotropy is a direct analog of the electronic crystal. Therefore, the surface states in both systems have the same properties. For surface states existing in magnonic crystals in dipolar regime we demonstrated that spin waves preserve distinct differences to the electronic crystals, which are due to lon...

  18. Image current heating on a metal surface due to charged bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintian E. Lin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available When charged particles pass through a metal pipe, they are accompanied by an image current on the metal surface. With intense short bunches passing near or even into the metal surface, the peak image current density can be very high. This current may result in substantial temperature rise on the surface, especially in high peak current, multibunch operation. In this paper, we derive an explicit formula for the surface temperature rise due to this previously unrecognized pulsed heating effect and show that this effect dominates the proposed linear coherent light source collimator spoiler and wire scanner heating. Without proper account, it can result in component and instrument failures. The result also applies to optical transition radiation screens, profile screens, wire scanners, exit windows, and targets, which the beam crosses.

  19. Enhanced charge recombination due to surfaces and twin defects in GaAs nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Evan; Sheng, Chunyang; Nakano, Aiichiro [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2015-02-07

    Power conversion efficiency of gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire (NW) solar cells is severely limited by enhanced charge recombination (CR) at sidewall surfaces, but its atomistic mechanisms are not well understood. In addition, GaAs NWs usually contain a high density of twin defects that form a twin superlattice, but its effects on CR dynamics are largely unknown. Here, quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations reveal the existence of an intrinsic type-II heterostructure at the (110) GaAs surface. Nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics (NAQMD) simulations show that the resulting staggered band alignment causes a photoexcited electron in the bulk to rapidly transfer to the surface. We have found orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the CR rate at the surface compared with the bulk value. Furthermore, QMD and NAQMD simulations show unique surface electronic states at alternating (111)A and (111)B sidewall surfaces of a twinned [111]-oriented GaAs NW, which act as effective CR centers. The calculated large surface recombination velocity quantitatively explains recent experimental observations and provides microscopic understanding of the underlying CR processes.

  20. Topological surface states on Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xie-Gang; Hofmann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Topological insulators support metallic surface states whose existence is protected by the bulk band structure. It has been predicted early that the topology of the surface state Fermi contour should depend on several factors, such as the surface orientation and termination and this raises...... the question to what degree a given surface state is protected by the bulk electronic structure upon structural changes. Using tight-binding calculations, we explore this question for the prototypical topological insulator Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$, studying different terminations of the (111) and (110) surfaces. We...... also consider the implications of the topological protection for the (110) surfaces for the semimetals Bi and Sb...

  1. Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE) insulation material due to tracking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sarathi; S Chandrasekar; V Sabari Giri; C Venkataseshaiah; R Velmurugan

    2004-06-01

    In the present work, tracking phenomena has been studied with HDPE material under a.c. voltage, with ammonium chloride as the contaminant. It is noticed that the tracking time depends on the conductivity and flow rate of the contaminant. The diffusion coefficient of the material was obtained. The thermal and chemical stability of the material were identified by carrying out a methodical experimental study. The physico-chemical analyses viz. wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), were carried out and it was concluded that the mechanism of tracking process is due to the surface degradation. The surface condition of the insulation structure was characterized for any surface discharges or tracking, using the leakage current measurement, utilizing the wavelet concepts.

  2. Surface Landau levels and spin states in bismuth (111) ultrathin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongjian; Sun, Xia; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jufeng; Tian, Mingyang; Zhao, Aidi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Bing; Hou, J G

    2016-03-11

    The development of next-generation electronics is much dependent on the discovery of materials with exceptional surface-state spin and valley properties. Because of that, bismuth has attracted a renewed interest in recent years. However, despite extensive studies, the intrinsic electronic transport properties of Bi surfaces are largely undetermined due to the strong interference from the bulk. Here we report the unambiguous determination of the surface-state Landau levels in Bi (111) ultrathin films using scanning tunnelling microscopy under magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface. The Landau levels of the electron-like and the hole-like carriers are accurately characterized and well described by the band structure of the Bi (111) surface from density functional theory calculations. Some specific surface spin states with a large g-factor are identified. Our findings shed light on the exploiting surface-state properties of Bi for their applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  3. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Land Surface Forms of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has generated land surface form classes for the contiguous United States. These land surface form classes were created as part of...

  4. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, J., E-mail: jochri@fotonik.dtu.dk; Willatzen, M. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Liang, Z. [College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-12-15

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  5. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  6. Ionization of Rydberg H atoms at band-gap metal surfaces via surface and image states

    CERN Document Server

    So, E; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    Wavepacket propagation calculations are reported for the interaction of a Rydberg hydrogen atom ($n=2-8)$ with Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces (represented by a Chulkov potential), in comparison with a Jellium surface. Both copper surfaces have a projected band gap at the surface in the energy range degenerate with some or all of the Rydberg energies. The charge transfer of the Rydberg electron to the surface is found to be enhanced for $n$ values at which there is a near-degeneracy between the Rydberg energy level and an image state or a surface state of the surface. The enhancement is facilitated by the strong overlap of the surface image-state orbital lying outside the surface and the orbital of the incoming Rydberg atom. These calculations point to the possibility of using Rydberg-surface collisions as a probe of surface electronic structure.

  7. Increased dose near the skin due to electromagnetic surface beacon transponder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Manger, Ryan; Halpern, Howard J; Aydogan, Bulent

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the increased dose near the skin from an electromagnetic surface beacon transponder, which is used for localization and tracking organ motion. The bolus effect due to the copper coil surface beacon was evaluated with radiographic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Various beam incidence angles were evaluated for both 6 MV and 18 MV experimentally. We performed simulations using a general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle) to supplement the experimental data. We modeled the surface beacon geometry using the actual mass of the glass vial and copper coil placed in its L-shaped polyethylene terephthalate tubing casing. Film dosimetry measured factors of 2.2 and 3.0 enhancement in the surface dose for normally incident 6 MV and 18 MV beams, respectively. Although surface dose further increased with incidence angle, the relative contribution from the bolus effect was reduced at the oblique incidence. The enhancement factors were 1.5 and 1.8 for 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively, at an incidence angle of 60°. Monte Carlo simulation confirmed the experimental results and indicated that the epidermal skin dose can reach approximately 50% of the dose at dmax at normal incidence. The overall effect could be acceptable considering the skin dose enhancement is confined to a small area (~ 1 cm2), and can be further reduced by using an opposite beam technique. Further clinical studies are justified in order to study the dosimetric benefit versus possible cosmetic effects of the surface beacon. One such clinical situation would be intact breast radiation therapy, especially large-breasted women.

  8. Spontaneous Emulsification of a Metal Drop Immersed in Slag Due to Dephosphorization: Surface Area Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Spooner, Stephen; Fruehan, Richard J.; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2015-04-01

    When a chemical reaction occurs between two immiscible liquids, mass transfer is continuously taking place at the liquid-liquid interface. Several studies have shown that if the species being exchanged between the two liquids are surface-active, a very pronounced decrease in interfacial tension can occur which can lead to a phenomenon called spontaneous emulsification. In steelmaking, this behavior has been observed for several reactions that involve the transfer of impurities from molten steel to a molten-oxide slag but little quantification has been made. This work focuses on spontaneous emulsification due to the dephosphorization of a Fe-P drop immersed in a basic oxygen furnace type slag. An Au-image furnace attached to a confocal scanning laser microscope was used to rapidly heat and cool the samples at different times, and X-ray computerized tomography was used to perform the surface area calculations of the samples where the slag/steel reaction was allowed to occur for distinct times. The results show that the surface area of the metal drop rapidly increases by over one order of magnitude during the first 60 seconds of the reaction while the chemical reaction is occurring at a fast rate. Once the reaction slows down, approximately after 60 seconds, the droplets start to coalesce back together minimizing the surface area and returning to a geometry close to its equilibrium shape.

  9. Surface uplift and time-dependent seismic hazard due to fluid-injection in eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzaei, M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    US states such as Texas and Oklahoma that produce high-volumes of unconventional oil and gas, are facing a sharp increase in seismicity. Observations of the associated surface deformation and accompanying physical models that unequivocally link the seismicity and waste water injection are scarce. Here, we find that the waste water injection in eastern Texas causes uplift, detectable using radar interferometric data. Combining the uplift and injection data through a poroelastic model allows for the resolution of a complex crustal distribution of hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. We find that the ~5 years pore pressure increase is capable of triggering the 17 May 2012, Mw 4.8 earthquake, the largest event recorded in east Texas. This study shows that surface deformation data are vital in order to constrain the spatiotemporal variations of the stress field in the vicinity of injection sites.

  10. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Liang, Z.; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne...... sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simu- lations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples...

  11. Decoherence in Superconducting Qubits from Surface Magnetic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, David; Sendelbach, Steven; Kittel, Achim; Mueck, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Unpaired spins in amorphous surface oxides can act as a source of decoherence in superconducting and other solid-state qubits. A density of surface spins can give rise to low-frequency magnetic flux noise, which in turn leads to dephasing of the qubit state. In addition, magnetic surface states can couple to high-frequency resonant magnetic fields, and thereby contribute to energy relaxation of the qubit. We present the results of low-frequency measurements of the nonlinear and imaginary spin susceptibility of surface magnetic states in superconducting devices at millikelvin temperatures. In addition, we describe high-frequency magnetic resonance measurements that directly probe the surface spin density of states. We present calculations that connect the measurement results to qubit energy relaxation and dephasing times.

  12. Ground Surface Deformation around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Fritz, J. F.; Cherry, J.

    2003-04-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  13. Robust Design Optimization Method for Centrifugal Impellers under Surface Roughness Uncertainties Due to Blade Fouling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yaping; ZHANG Chuhua

    2016-01-01

    Blade fouling has been proved to be a great threat to compressor performance in operating stage. The current researches on fouling-induced performance degradations of centrifugal compressors are based mainly on simplified roughness models without taking into account the realistic factors such as spatial non-uniformity and randomness of the fouling-induced surface roughness. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the robust design optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers with considerations of blade fouling. In this paper, a multi-objective robust design optimization method is developed for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling. A three-dimensional surface roughness map is proposed to describe the nonuniformity and randomness of realistic fouling accumulations on blades. To lower computational cost in robust design optimization, the support vector regression (SVR) metamodel is combined with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method to conduct the uncertainty analysis of fouled impeller performance. The analyzed results show that the critical fouled region associated with impeller performance degradations lies at the leading edge of blade tip. The SVR metamodel has been proved to be an efficient and accurate means in the detection of impeller performance variations caused by roughness uncertainties. After design optimization, the robust optimal design is found to be more efficient and less sensitive to fouling uncertainties while maintaining good impeller performance in the clean condition. This research proposes a systematic design optimization method for centrifugal compressors with considerations of blade fouling, providing a practical guidance to the design of advanced centrifugal compressors.

  14. Robust design optimization method for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yaping; Zhang, Chuhua

    2016-03-01

    Blade fouling has been proved to be a great threat to compressor performance in operating stage. The current researches on fouling-induced performance degradations of centrifugal compressors are based mainly on simplified roughness models without taking into account the realistic factors such as spatial non-uniformity and randomness of the fouling-induced surface roughness. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the robust design optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers with considerations of blade fouling. In this paper, a multi-objective robust design optimization method is developed for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling. A three-dimensional surface roughness map is proposed to describe the nonuniformity and randomness of realistic fouling accumulations on blades. To lower computational cost in robust design optimization, the support vector regression (SVR) metamodel is combined with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method to conduct the uncertainty analysis of fouled impeller performance. The analyzed results show that the critical fouled region associated with impeller performance degradations lies at the leading edge of blade tip. The SVR metamodel has been proved to be an efficient and accurate means in the detection of impeller performance variations caused by roughness uncertainties. After design optimization, the robust optimal design is found to be more efficient and less sensitive to fouling uncertainties while maintaining good impeller performance in the clean condition. This research proposes a systematic design optimization method for centrifugal compressors with considerations of blade fouling, providing a practical guidance to the design of advanced centrifugal compressors.

  15. Errors of five-day mean surface wind and temperature conditions due to inadequate sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface meteorological reports of wind components, wind speed, air temperature, and sea-surface temperature from buoys located in equatorial and midlatitude regions are used in a simulation of random sampling to determine errors of the calculated means due to inadequate sampling. Subsampling the data with several different sample sizes leads to estimates of the accuracy of the subsampled means. The number N of random observations needed to compute mean winds with chosen accuracies of 0.5 (N sub 0.5) and 1.0 (N sub 1,0) m/s and mean air and sea surface temperatures with chosen accuracies of 0.1 (N sub 0.1) and 0.2 (N sub 0.2) C were calculated for each 5-day and 30-day period in the buoy datasets. Mean values of N for the various accuracies and datasets are given. A second-order polynomial relation is established between N and the variability of the data record. This relationship demonstrates that for the same accuracy, N increases as the variability of the data record increases. The relationship is also independent of the data source. Volunteer-observing ship data do not satisfy the recommended minimum number of observations for obtaining 0.5 m/s and 0.2 C accuracy for most locations. The effect of having remotely sensed data is discussed.

  16. Stability of Cassie-Baxter wetting states on microstructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hao-Yuan; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-10-01

    A stable Cassie-Baxter (CB) wetting state is indispensable for the superhydrophobicity of solid surfaces. In this paper, we analyze the equilibrium and stability of CB wetting states. Using an energy approach, the stability criteria of CB wetting states are established for solid surfaces with either two- or three-dimensional symmetric microstructures. A generic method is presented to calculate the critical pressure at which the CB state on a microstructured solid surface collapses. The method holds for microstructures with arbitrary generatrix, and explicit solutions are derived for a few representative microstructures with a straight or circular generatrix. In addition, some possible strategies are proposed to design surface structures with stable CB wetting states from the viewpoints of geometry and chemistry.

  17. METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF STRESS-STRAIN STATE DUE TO SINGLE TWIN IN GRAIN OF VARIOUS FORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Drabysheuskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates a stress-strain state in a polycrystalline grain due to presence in its body of a single micro- twin in case of various grain boundary forms. A methodology for calculation of displacement and stress fields for the specified stress-strain state of a polygon-shaped grain has been developed in the paper. Nodal points in a polycrystalline grain that have a maximum stresses contributing to initiation of destruction have been revealed in the paper. The aim of this work has been to study the stress-strain state due to a single micro-twin in the polycrystalline grain and form of grain boundaries. The paper describes polycrystalline grains having a regular polygon shape and containing a single wedge twin in their body. Polycrystalline grain boundaries are presented as walls with complete dislocation. The investigated grains are located far from the surface of twinning material. The developed methodology for calculation of displacement and stresses created by wedge twin is based on the principle of superposition. Calculations on stress tensor components have been carried out for iron (Fe. The presented results of calculations for stress fields have indicated to validity of the used dislocation model. Twin and grain boundaries being stress concentrators are clearly visible on the obtained distributions of stress fields. Maximum normal stresses are observed on the twin boundaries; σxy maximum shear stresses are located at nodal points of the twin; σzy and σxz shear stresses are maximum on the grain boundaries. The conducted investigations have resulted in study of the stress-strain state due to a single wedge-shaped micro-twin in the polycrystalline grain and form of the grain boundaries. Zones of stress concentration in the polycrystalline grain have been identified in the presence of residual mechanical wedge twin. A method for evaluation of the given state has been developed in the paper.

  18. MHD Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in a Nanofluid due to a Permeable Shrinking Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahira Mansur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MHD homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction in a nanofluid flow due to a permeable shrinking surface is studied. The bvp4c program in MATLAB is used to obtain the numerical solutions for several values of parameters such as suction parameter, magnetic parameter, nanoparticle volume fraction, heterogeneous reaction and homogeneous reaction rates. The results show that dual solutions exist and the magnetic parameter and the nanoparticle volume fraction widen the range of the solution domain. Suction parameter, magnetic parameter and nanoparticle volume fraction cause the skin friction coefficient to increase and the velocity to decrease. The concentration increases as the nanoparticle volume fraction increases but decrease as the homogeneous reaction rate and heterogeneous reaction rate increase.

  19. Changes in extreme regional sea surface height due to an abrupt weakening of the Atlantic MOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-E. Brunnabend

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As an extreme scenario of dynamical sea level changes, regional sea surface height (SSH changes that occur in the North Atlantic due to an abrupt weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC are simulated. Two versions of the same ocean-only model are used to study the effect of ocean model resolution on these SSH changes: a high-resolution (HR strongly eddying version and a low-resolution (LR version in which the effect of eddies are parameterized. The weakening of the AMOC is induced in both model versions by applying strong freshwater perturbations around Greenland. A rapid decrease of the AMOC in the HR version induces much shorter return times of several specific regional and coastal extremes in North Atlantic SSH than in the LR version. This effect is caused by a change in main eddy pathways associated with a change in separation latitude of the Gulf Stream.

  20. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  1. Surface Wave Amplitude Anomalies in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, C.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    We determine maps of local surface wave amplitude factors across the Western United States for Rayleigh and Love waves at discrete periods between 25 and 125s. Measurements of raw amplitude anomalies are made from data recorded at 1161 USArray stations for minor arc arrivals of earthquakes with Mw>5.5 occurring between 2006 and 2010. We take the difference between high-quality amplitude anomaly measurements for events recorded on station pairs less than 2 degrees apart. The mean of these differences for each station pair is taken as the datum. Surface wave amplitudes are controlled by four separate mechanisms: focusing due to elastic structure, attenuation due to anelastic structure, source effects, and receiver effects. By taking the mean of the differences of amplitude anomalies for neighboring stations, we reduce the effects of focusing, attenuation, and the seismic source, thus isolating amplitude anomalies due to near-receiver amplitude effects. We determine local amplitude factors for each USArray station by standard linear inversion of the differential data set. The individual station amplitude factors explain the majority of the variance of the data. For example, derived station amplitude factors for 50s Rayleigh waves explain 92% of the variance of the data. We explore correlations between derived station amplitude factors and local amplitude factors predicted by crust and upper mantle models. Maps of local amplitude factors show spatial correlation with topography and geologic structures in the Western United States, particularly for maps derived from Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies. A NW-SE trending high in amplitude factors in Eastern California is evident in the 50s map, corresponding to the location of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. High amplitude factors are observed in Colorado and New Mexico in the 50s-125s maps in the location of the highest peaks of the Rocky Mountains. High amplitude factors are also seen in Southern Idaho and Eastern Wyoming in

  2. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  3. Temperature dependent surface modification of molybdenum due to low energy He{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Novakowski, T.J.; Joseph, G. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report on the temperature dependent surface modifications in molybdenum (Mo) samples due to 100 eV He{sup +} ion irradiation in extreme conditions as a potential candidate to plasma-facing components in fusion devices alternative to tungsten. The Mo samples were irradiated at normal incidence, using an ion fluence of 2.6 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} (with a flux of 7.2 × 10{sup 20} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Surface modifications have been studied using high-resolution field emission scanning electron-(SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy. At 773 K target temperature homogeneous evolution of molybdenum nanograins on the entire Mo surface were observed. However, at 823 K target temperature appearance of nano-pores and pin-holes nearby the grain boundaries, and Mo fuzz in patches were observed. The fuzz density increases significantly with target temperatures and continued until 973 K. However, at target temperatures beyond 973 K, counterintuitively, a sequential reduction in the fuzz density has been seen till 1073 K temperatures. At 1173 K and above temperatures, only molybdenum nano structures were observed. Our temperature dependent studies confirm a clear temperature widow, 823–1073 K, for Mo fuzz formation. Ex-situ high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Mo fuzzy samples show the evidence of MoO{sub 3} 3d doublets. This elucidates that almost all the Mo fuzz were oxidized during open air exposure and are thick enough as well. Likewise the microscopy studies, the optical reflectivity measurements also show a sequential reduction in the reflectivity values (i.e., enhancement in the fuzz density) up to 973 K and after then a sequential enhancement in the reflectivity values (i.e., reduction in the fuzz density) with target temperatures. This is in well agreement with microscopy studies where we observed clear temperature window for Mo fuzz growth.

  4. Wind flow modulation due to variations of the water surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomina, Olga; Ermakov, Stanislav; Kapustin, Ivan; Lazareva, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Air-ocean interaction is a classical problem in atmosphere and ocean physics, which has important geophysical applications related to calculation of vertical and horizontal humidity, aerosol and gas fluxes, development of global climate models and weather forecasts. The structure of wind flow over fixed underlying surfaces, such as forestry, buildings, mountains, is well described, while the interaction between a rough water surface and turbulent wind is far more complicated because of the presence of wind waves with different wavelength and amplitudes and propagating with different velocities and directions. The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally the variability of the wind profile structure due to variations of wave characteristics. The surface roughness variations were produced using a) surfactant films (oleic acid) spread on the water surface and b) mechanically generated waves superimposed on wind waves. The first case is related to oil slicks on sea surface, the second one - to the sea swell, which propagates into zones with lower wind velocities and interacts with wind flow. Laboratory experiments were conducted in the Oval Wind Wave Tank (OWWT) at the Institute of Applied Physics, cross-section of the wind channel is 30 cm x30 cm. Wave amplitude and the spectrum of surface waves were measured by a wire wave gauge, the wind speed was measured using a hot-wire anemometer DISA and a Pitot tube. In the experiments with surfactants, two frequencies of dripping of the oleic acid were studied, so that low concentration films with the elasticity parameters of about 19 mN/m and the high concentration ("thick") films with the elasticity of 34 mN/m were formed. In the experiments with mechanically generated waves (MGW) different regimes were studied with MGW amplitude of 3.4 mm and of 4.4 mm, and with MGW frequencies of 3.3 Hz and 3.7 Hz. It was shown, that: a) the mean velocity of the wind flow in the presence of surfactant and MGW can be described

  5. The apparent state of droplets on a rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XiaoLing; LU Tian

    2009-01-01

    The factors influencing the state and wetting transition of droplets on a rough surface are both complex and obscure. The change in wetting is directly reflected by changes under the contact condition of the droplets with the surface. The recent study about the wettability of the superhydrophobic surface under the condensing condition arouses the new understanding about the apparent state of droplets on a rough surface, in this work, to validate the existence of droplets in an intermediate state, a microscale pillar topological polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface was manufactured and its wettability under various conditions was studied. According to the experimental data, it is proposed that the wetting state of a rough surface may be embodied using the contact area ratio of a solid/liquid/gas droplet with the projective plane. A general calculation model for the apparent contact angle of droplets is given and expressed diagrammatically. It is found that the measured apparent contact angles of droplets at dif-ferent states on the surface falls within the range predicted by our proposed equation.

  6. The apparent state of droplets on a rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The factors influencing the state and wetting transition of droplets on a rough surface are both complex and obscure. The change in wetting is directly reflected by changes under the contact condition of the droplets with the surface. The recent study about the wettability of the superhydrophobic surface under the condensing condition arouses the new understanding about the apparent state of droplets on a rough surface. In this work, to validate the existence of droplets in an intermediate state, a microscale pillar topological polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface was manufactured and its wettability under various conditions was studied. According to the experimental data, it is proposed that the wetting state of a rough surface may be embodied using the contact area ratio of a solid/liquid/gas droplet with the projective plane. A general calculation model for the apparent contact angle of droplets is given and expressed diagrammatically. It is found that the measured apparent contact angles of droplets at dif- ferent states on the surface falls within the range predicted by our proposed equation.

  7. Classes of land-surface form in the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset describes classes of land-surface form in the conterminous United States. The source of the data is the map of land-surface form in the 1970...

  8. Surface code implementation of block code state distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Austin G.; Devitt, Simon J.; Jones, Cody

    2013-01-01

    State distillation is the process of taking a number of imperfect copies of a particular quantum state and producing fewer better copies. Until recently, the lowest overhead method of distilling states produced a single improved |A〉 state given 15 input copies. New block code state distillation methods can produce k improved |A〉 states given 3k + 8 input copies, potentially significantly reducing the overhead associated with state distillation. We construct an explicit surface code implementation of block code state distillation and quantitatively compare the overhead of this approach to the old. We find that, using the best available techniques, for parameters of practical interest, block code state distillation does not always lead to lower overhead, and, when it does, the overhead reduction is typically less than a factor of three. PMID:23736868

  9. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenio Cesar Nunes Ferrer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs. The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs and years lived with disability (YLDs. Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population, YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population, followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population. CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions.

  10. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2014-02-07

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  11. Microstructural changes due to laser surface melting of an AISI 304 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d?Oliveira A.S.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques can be used to improve surface properties. These can involve changes on the surface chemical composition (such as alloying and surface welding processes or on the surface microstructure, such as hardening and melting. In the present work surface melting with a 3kW CO2 cw laser was done to alter surface features of an AISI 304 stainless steel. Microstructure characterisation was done by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers and Knoop microhardness tests evaluated mechanical features after surface melting. Phase transformation during rapid solidification is analysed and discussed.

  12. Geocenter motion due to surface mass transport from GRACE satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, R. E. M.; van der Wal, W.; Lavallée, D. A.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of mass redistribution from satellite gravimetry are insensitive to geocenter motions. However, geocenter motions can be constrained by satellite gravity data alone if we partition mass changes between land and oceans, under the assumption that the ocean is passive (i.e., in gravitational equilibrium with the land load and the solid earth). Here, we make use of 8 years (2003-2010) of optimally filtered monthly GRACE-based solutions produced at TU Delft to determine changes in the land load and the corresponding geocenter motion, through an iterative procedure. We pay particular attention to correcting for signal leakage caused by the limited spatial resolution of GRACE. We also investigate how the choice of a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) affects the estimated geocenter motion trend due to present-day surface mass transport. Finally, we separate the contribution of ice masses from that of land hydrology and show how they have a different sensitivity to the chosen GIA model and observational time-span.

  13. Measuring surface state density and energy distribution in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Eliezer; Cohen, Gilad; Gross, Shahar; Henning, Alexander; Matok, Max; Rosenwaks, Yossi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kretinin, Andrey V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Shtrikman, Hadas [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Braun Center for Submicrometer Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-02-15

    Semiconducting nanowires are expected to have applications in various areas as transistors, sensors, resonators, solar cells, and thermoelectric systems. Understanding the surface properties is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance devices. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires, their surface electronic properties, like surface states, can a have a large effect on the performance of both electronic and optoelectronic devices. At present, determination of the surface state density depends on a combination of experimental measurements of the capacitance and/or drain current, in a nanowire field-effect transistor, and a fitting to simulation. This technique follows certain assumptions, which can severely harm the accuracy of the extracted density of states. In this report, we demonstrate a direct measurement of the surface state density of individual InAs and silicon nanowires. The method is based on measuring the surface potential of a nanowire field-effect transistor, with respect to a changing gate bias. The extracted density of states at the surface helps to explain various electronic phenomena in such devices. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Analytical study of surface states caused by the edge decoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuan-Yuan; Li Wei; Tao Rui-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Analytical studies of the effect of edge decoration on the energy spectrum of semi-infinite one-dimensional (1D) model and zigzag edged graphene (ZEG) are presented by means of transfer matrix method,in the frame of which the conditions for the existence of edge states are determined.For 1D model,the zero-energy surface state occurs regardless of whether the decorations exist or not,while the non-zero-energy surface states can be induced and manipulated through adjusting the edge decoration.On the other hand,the case for the semi-infinite ZEG model with nearestneighbour interaction is discussed in the analogous way.The non-zero-energy surface states can be induced by the edge decoration and moreover,the ratio between the edge hopping and the bulk hopping amplitudes should be within a certain threshold.

  15. Investigation of pyrite surface state by DFT and AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    先永骏; 聂琪; 文书明; 刘建; 邓久帅

    2015-01-01

    The surface states of pyrite (FeS2) were theoretically investigated using first principle calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate that both the (200) and (311) surfaces of pyrite undergo significant surface atom relaxation after geometry optimization, which results in a considerable distortion of the surface region. In the normal direction, i.e., perpendicular to the surface, S atoms in the first surface layer move outward from the bulk, while Fe atoms move toward the bulk, forming an S-rich surface. The surface relaxation processes are driven by electrostatic interaction, which is evidenced by a relative decrease in the surface energy after surface relaxation. Such a relaxation process is visually interpreted through the qualitative analysis of molecular mechanics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis reveals that only sulfur atom is visible on the pyrite surface. This result is consistent with the DFT data. Such S-rich surface has important influence on the flotation properties of pyrite.

  16. Modeling viscoelastic deformation of the earth due to surface loading by commercial finite element package - ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit Wong, Ching; Wu, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Wu (2004) developed a transformation scheme to model viscoelatic deformation due to glacial loading by commercial finite element package - ABAQUS. Benchmark tests confirmed that this method works extremely well on incompressible earth model. Bangtsson & Lund (2008),however, showed that the transformation scheme would lead to incorrect results if compressible material parameters are used. Their study implies that Wu's method of stress transformation is inadequate to model the load induced deformation of a compressible earth under the framework of ABAQUS. In light of this, numerical experiments are carried out to find if there exist other methods that serve this purpose. All the tested methods are not satisfying as the results failed to converge through iterations, except at the elastic limit. Those tested methods will be outlined and the results will be presented. Possible reasons of failure will also be discussed. Bängtsson, E., & Lund, B. (2008). A comparison between two solution techniques to solve the equations of glacially induced deformation of an elastic Earth. International journal for numerical methods in engineering, 75(4), 479-502. Wu, P. (2004). Using commercial finite element packages for the study of earth deformations, sea levels and the state of stress. Geophysical Journal International, 158(2), 401-408.

  17. Change of surface critical current in the surface superconductivity and mixed states of superconducting niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburas, Muhamad; Pautrat, Alain; Bellido, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    A systematic study of irreversible magnetization was performed in bulk niobium after different surface treatments. Starting with smooth surfaces and abrading them, a strong increase of the critical current is observed up to an apparent limiting value. An impressive change of the critical current is also observed in the surface superconductivity (SSC) state, reaching values of the same order of magnitude as in the mixed state. We explain also the observation of strong SSC for magnetic fields perpendicular to large facets in terms of nucleation of superconductivity along bumps of a corrugated surface.

  18. Observation of optically forbidden states in PC60BM due to interfacial distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hemant; Alphenaar, Bruce

    2011-03-01

    PCBM is a fullerene derivative used extensively in organic solar cells. PC60 BM shows strong absorbance at wavelengths below 400 nm. A series of sub-gap transitions exist, but are symmetry forbidden in C60 , and only weakly observed in the PC60 BM absorbance. Recent theoretical calculations predict that the symmetry rules for C60 can be lifted by the proximity of a metallic substrate due to perturbation of the electronic spatial distribution. Here we describe capacitive photocurrent measurements of PC60 BM in which the optically forbidden features are strongly observed. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, this is thought to be due to the influence of a high conductivity ITO layer in contact with the PC60 BM. The influence of the ITO is tested by introducing a thin insulator (Al 2 O3) of varying thickness between the PC60 BM and the ITO. The photocurrent due to the symmetry forbidden states drops strongly compared to the above gap photocurrent with increasing separation. Implications of these results on the polythiophene/fullerene blends will also be discussed. DOE-3048103802-08-073, NSF- DMR-0906961

  19. Probing physical and chemical changes in cortical bone due to osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Taylor, Amanda; Rendina, Beth; Smith, Brenda; Department of Physics Collaboration; Department of Nutritional Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Approximately 1.5 million fractures occur each year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis, which is characterized by decreased bone mineral density and deterioration of bone micro-architecture. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes also significantly increases fracture risks, despite having a normal or even higher bone mineral density. Solid-state NMR has been applied to bone tissues from normal and disease-inflicted mouse models to study structural and chemical dynamics as the disease progresses. Proton relaxation experiments were performed to measure water populations in the bone matrix and pores. Collagen-bound water has strong influence on bone resilience, while water content in the pores reveals amount and size of pores from micro- to millimeter range. Other biochemical and atomic-scale structural alterations in the mineral and organic phases and their interface were investigated by proton, phosphorus, and carbon NMR spectroscopy. Experiments were designed to individually detect different types of phosphorus environments: near the mineral surface, similar to hydroxyapatite, and deficient of hydrogens due to substitution of the hydroxyl group by other ions. A new method was also developed for accurate quantification of each phosphorus species. The authors appreciate financial support for this project from the College of Human Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University.

  20. Is the effect of a countermovement on jump height due to active state development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Casius, L J Richard

    2005-03-01

    To investigate whether the difference in jump height between countermovement jumps (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ) could be explained by a difference in active state during propulsion. Simulations were performed with a model of the human musculoskeletal system comprising four body segments and six muscles. The model's only input was STIM, the stimulation of muscles, which could be switched "off" or "on." After switching "on," STIM increased to its maximum at a fixed rate of change (dSTIM/dt). For various values of dSTIM/dt, stimulation switch times were optimized to produce a maximum height CMJ. From this CMJ, the configuration at the lowest height of the center of gravity (CG) was selected and used as static starting configuration for simulation of SJ. Next, STIM-switch times were optimized to find the maximum height SJ. Simulated CMJ and SJ closely resembled jumps of human subjects. Maximum jump height of the model was greater in CMJ than in SJ, with the difference ranging from 0.4 cm at infinitely high dSTIM/dt to about 2.5 cm at the lowest dSTIM/dt investigated. The greater jump height in CMJ was due to a greater work output of the hip extensor muscles. These muscles could produce more force and work over the first 30% of their shortening range in CMJ, due to the fact that they had a higher active state in CMJ than in SJ. The greater jump height in CMJ than in SJ could be explained by the fact that in CMJ active state developed during the preparatory countermovement, whereas in SJ it inevitably developed during the propulsion phase, so that the muscles could produce more force and work during shortening in CMJ.

  1. Surface deformation due to slow slip source considering a non-elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, N. K.; Malservisi, R.; Dixon, T. H.; Protti, M.

    2016-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are now recognized as a feature common in many subduction zones. They have been recognized in both the shallow part of subduction interface as well as deeper, beneath the seismogenic zone. While shallow events are difficult to image due to lack of resolution with onshore instrumentation, deep events appear to correlate well with seismic phenomena including tremor and low frequency events. However, uncertainty regarding source properties of the events and their surrounding medium remains high at these depths. Deep slow slip appears to be located between 60 and 25 km depth at many locations worldwide (Schwartz and Rokosky , 2007). This places the events at depths at or near the mantle wedge corner. Serpentinization of the mantle wedge is thought to be one source of fluids commonly attributed as the source of SSEs and tremor (Wada et al., 2008) but also leads to drastic changes in rheology of the down going slab and near by mantle. Traditionally, measured geodetic transients are inverted for slip distributions using a simple elastic "Okada" type models. Often the shape of these transients is attributed to variance in slip rate on the fault. Here we explore the response of the surrounding lithosphere to the transient stress propagation induced by SSE and the effects on observed surface deformation using varying rheologies within a finite element model. Understanding these effects allows a better estimation of the uncertainty in the geodetically derived slip distributions thus is important to consider when evaluating SSEs role in earthquake hazard as well as deciphering the relationship between tremor and slip.

  2. Thermal shock behaviour of blisters on W surface during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal shock behaviour of blister-covered W surfaces during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The W samples were first exposed to steady-state D plasma to induce blisters on the surface, and then the blistered surfaces were exposed to steady-state/pulsed plasma. Growth and cracking of blisters were observed after the exposure to the steady-state/pulsed plasma, while no obvious damage occurred on the surface area not covered with blisters. The results confirm that blisters induced by D plasma might represent weak spots on the W surface when exposed to transient heat load of ELMs. The cracks on blisters were different from the cracks due to the transient heat loads reported before, and they were assumed to be caused by stress and strain due to the gas expansion inside the blisters during the plasma pulses. Moreover, most of cracks were found to appear on the blisters formed on grains with surface orientation near [1 1 1].

  3. Emergent gauge field for a chiral bound state on curved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhe-Yu; Zhai, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Emergent physics is one of the most important concepts in modern physics, and one of the most intriguing examples is the emergent gauge field. Here we show that a gauge field emerges for a chiral bound state formed by two attractively interacting particles on a curved surface. We demonstrate explicitly that the center-of-mass wave function of such a deeply bound state is monopole harmonic instead of spherical harmonic, which means that the bound state experiences a magnetic monopole at the center of the sphere. This emergent gauge field is due to the coupling between the center-of-mass and the relative motion on a curved surface, and our results can be generalized to an arbitrary curved surface. This result establishes an intriguing connection between the space curvature and gauge field, and paves an alternative way to engineer a topological state with space curvature, and may be observed in a cold atom system.

  4. Determination of the bulk cobalt valence state of co-perovskites containing surface-adsorbed impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, O; Ludwig, Chr; Wokaun, A

    2006-10-15

    We used thermogravimetric hydrogen reduction and iodometric titration to determine the bulk valence state of cobalt in Co-perovskites containing surface carbonate hydroxide or hydroxyl groups. It could be shown that thermogravimetric hydrogen reduction experiments are very sensitive to volatile surface groups, but due to their volatility, they can be specified and the bulk valence state of cobalt can still be deduced from these experiments. The iodometric titration is less sensitive to small volatile surface impurities, but precaution has to be taken that oxygen or iodine does not escape from the solution during dissolution of the sample. Best results were obtained if the sample was titrated during dissolution in a closed argon floated titration apparatus. We tested the two methods using LaCoO3 perovskite as a sample with a known valence state. Both methods delivered satisfactory results, and the valence state could be determined with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  5. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  6. Resonance frequency shifts due to quantized electronic states in atomically thin NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    The classic picture of the force exerted on a parallel plate capacitor assumes infinite density of states (DOS), which implies identical electrochemical and electrostatic potential. However, such assumption can breakdown in low-dimensional devices where the DOS is finite or quantized. Here we consider the mechanical resonance shift of a nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) resonator with small DOS, actuated and detected capacitively at fixed electrochemical potential. We found three leading correction terms to the classical picture: the first term leads to the modulation of static force due to the variation in chemical potential, and the second and third terms are related to the static and dynamic changes in spring constants, caused by quantum capacitance. The theory agrees well with recent experimental findings from graphene resonator in quantum Hall regimes, where the chemical potential and quantum capacitance are tuned by magnetic field, while the gate voltage is kept constant.

  7. Spin-sensitive interference due to Majorana state on the interface between normal and superconducting leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barański, J.; Kobiałka, A.; Domański, T.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the subgap spectrum and transport properties of the quantum dot on the interface between the metallic and superconducting leads and additionally side-coupled to the edge of the topological superconducting (TS) chain, hosting the Majorana quasiparticle. Due to the chiral nature of the Majorana states only one spin component of the quantum dot electrons (say \\uparrow ) is directly affected, however the proximity induced on-dot pairing transmits its influence on the opposite spin as well. We investigate the unique interferometric patterns driven by the Majorana quasiparticle that are different for each spin component. We also address the spin-sensitive interplay with the Kondo effect manifested at the same zero-energy and we come to the conclusion that quantum interferometry can unambiguously identify the Majorana quasiparticle.

  8. Features of electromagnetic waves in a complex plasma due to surface plasmon resonances on macroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations significantly modifies plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The results are discussed in the context of dusty plasma experiments.

  9. Hydrogel Inverse Replicas of Breath Figures Exhibit Superoleophobicity Due to Patterned Surface Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Jaspreet Singh; Cremaldi, Joseph C; Holleran, Mary Kathleen; Ponnusamy, Thiruselvam; He, Jibao; Pesika, Noshir S; John, Vijay T

    2016-02-02

    The wetting behavior of a surface depends on both its surface chemistry and the characteristics of surface morphology and topography. Adding structure to a flat hydrophobic or oleophobic surface increases the effective contact angle and thus the hydrophobicity or oleophobicity of the surface, as exemplified by the lotus leaf analogy. We describe a simple strategy to introduce micropatterned roughness on surfaces of soft materials, utilizing the template of hexagonally packed pores of breath figures as molds. The generated inverse replicas represent micron scale patterned beadlike protrusions on hydrogel surfaces. This added roughness imparts superoleophobic properties (contact angle of the order of 150° and greater) to an inherently oleophobic flat hydrogel surface, when submerged. The introduced pattern on the hydrogel surface changes morphology as it swells in water to resemble morphologies remarkably analogous to the compound eye. Analysis of the wetting behavior using the Cassie-Baxter approximation leads to estimation of the contact angle in the superoleophobic regime and in agreement with the experimental value.

  10. Reduction of Liquid Clad Formation Due to Solid State Diffusion in Clad Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-12-01

    Warm forming operations have shown promise in expanding automotive heat exchanger designs by increasing forming limits of clad brazing sheet. The impact of isothermal holds below the clad melting temperature on subsequent brazeability has not previously been studied in detail. The effect of these holds on brazeability, as measured by the clad thickness loss due to solid state diffusion of Si out of the clad layer prior to clad melting, was assessed through parallel DSC and optical microscopy measurements, as well as through the use of a previously developed model. EPMA measurements were also performed to support the other measures. Overall, the same trends were predicted by DSC, microscopy, and the theoretical model; however, the DSC predictions were unable to accurately predict remaining clad thickness prior to melting, even after correcting the data for clad-core interactions. Microscopy measurements showed very good agreement with the model predictions, although there were slight discrepancies at short hold times due to the inability of the model to account for clad loss during heating to the brazing temperature. Further microscopy measurements showed that when the heating rate is set below a critical value, there is a reduction in the clad thickness from the as-received condition.

  11. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Emi K; Sileo, Louis; Green, D Earl; Meteyer, Carol U; McLaughlin, Grace S; Converse, Kathryn A; Docherty, Douglas E

    2007-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has affected many thousands of birds since it was first detected in North America in 1999, but the overall impact on wild bird populations is unknown. In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). Commonly reported clinical signs were nonspecific and included emaciation, lethargy, weakness, inability to perch, fly or stand, and nonresponse to danger. Raptor carcasses from 12 states were received, and diagnostic evaluation of 56 raptors implicated WNV infection in 40 (71%) of these cases. Histologically, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocarditis were the salient lesions (79% and 61%, respectively). Other causes of death included lead poisoning, trauma, aspergillosis, and Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. infections. The reason(s) for the reported increase in raptor mortality due to WNV in 2002 compared with the previous WNV seasons is unclear, and a better understanding of the epizootiology and pathogenesis of the virus in raptor populations is needed.

  12. Time-dependent inversion of surface subsidence due to dynamic reservoir compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kroon, I.C.; Fokker, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel, time-dependent inversion scheme for resolving temporal reservoir pressure drop from surface subsidence observations (from leveling or GPS data, InSAR, tiltmeter monitoring) in a single procedure. The theory is able to accommodate both the absence of surface subsidence estimates

  13. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovyov, VF; Ozaki, T; Atrei, A; Wu, LJ; Al-Mahboob, A; Sadowski, JT; Tong, X; Nykypanchuk, D; Li, Q

    2014-04-10

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis.

  14. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  15. Surface states in a 3D topological insulator: The role of hexagonal warping and curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repin, E. V.; Burmistrov, I. S., E-mail: burmi@itp.ac.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We explore a combined effect of hexagonal warping and a finite effective mass on both the tunneling density of electronic surface states and the structure of Landau levels of 3D topological insulators. We find the increasing warping to transform the square-root van Hove singularity into a logarithmic one. For moderate warping, an additional logarithmic singularity and a jump in the tunneling density of surface states appear. By combining the perturbation theory and the WKB approximation, we calculate the Landau levels in the presence of hexagonal warping. We predict that due to the degeneracy removal, the evolution of Landau levels in the magnetic field is drastically modified.

  16. Using Self-Similarity to Simulate Meniscus Evolution Around TMV Due to Surface Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Richard; Zhang, Yue; Fakhraai, Zahra

    It has been hypothesized that enhanced surface diffusion allows the formation of stable molecular glasses during physical vapor deposition. The improved properties of these glasses, such as increased density and kinetic stability can help improve material properties in pioneering fields of technology such as organic electronics and pharmaceutical drug delivery. While surface diffusion has been measured previously on the surfaces of organic glasses, direct measurements on the surface of vapor-deposited stable glasses has proven more challenging. This research focuses on a straightforward method for measuring the surface diffusion coefficients of molecular glasses through the use of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanorods as probe particles. In conjunction, mathematical models based on the thin film equation were used to simulate fast meniscus formation around the nanorods on the glassy surface. The evolution of the meniscus is self-similar, which allows quick quantification of the diffusion coefficient, by solving the time evolution for a single experiment. Experimental data were compared and fit to these simulations to derive a quantity for the surface diffusion coefficient, Ds. Nsf-CAREER DMR-1350044.

  17. Investigating the Impacts of Surface Temperature Anomalies due to Burned Area Albedo in Northern sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbert, T.; Matsui, T.; Capehart, W. J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Gatebe, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Sub-Saharan African region (NSSA) is an area of intense focus due to periodic severe droughts that have dire consequences on the growing population, which relies mostly on rain fed agriculture for its food supply. This region's weather and hydrologic cycle are very complex and are dependent on the West African Monsoon. Different regional processes affect the West African Monsoon cycle and variability. One of the areas of current investigation is the water cycle response to the variability of land surface characteristics. Land surface characteristics are often altered in NSSA due to agricultural practices, grazing, and the fires that occur during the dry season. To better understand the effects of biomass burning on the hydrologic cycle of the sub-Saharan environment, an interdisciplinary team sponsored by NASA is analyzing potential feedback mechanisms due to the fires. As part of this research, this study focuses on the effects of land surface changes, particularly albedo and skin temperature, that are influenced by biomass burning. Surface temperature anomalies can influence the initiation of convective rainfall and surface albedo is linked to the absorption of solar radiation. To capture the effects of fire perturbations on the land surface, NASA's Unified Weather and Research Forecasting (NU-WRF) model coupled with NASA's Land Information System (LIS) is being used to simulate burned area surface albedo inducing surface temperature anomalies and other potential effects to environmental processes. Preliminary sensitivity results suggest an altered surface radiation budget, regional warming of the surface temperature, slight increase in average rainfall, and a change in precipitation locations.

  18. Experimental studies of the streaming flow due to the adsorption of particles at a liquid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pushpendra; Musunuri, Naga; Fischer, Ian

    2016-11-01

    The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique is used to study the streaming flow that is induced when particles are adsorbed at a liquid surface. The flow develops within a fraction of second after the adsorption of the particle and persists for several seconds. The fluid directly below the particle rises upward, and near the surface, it moves away from the particle. The flow causes powders sprinkled on a liquid surface to disperse on the surface. The flow strength, and the volume over which it extends, decreases with decreasing particle size. The streaming flow induced by the adsorption of two or more particles is a combination of the flows which they induce individually. The work was supported by National Science Foundation.

  19. Numerical study on cavitating flow due to a hydrofoil near a free surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chen Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A numerical strategy is proposed for a viscous uniform flow past a 2-D partially cavitating hydrofoil placed at a finite depth from the free surface. The flow was modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS equations. A finite-volume method with the SIMPLE scheme and k-ε turbulence model were employed for computations. The “full cavitation model,” which included the effects of vaporization, noncondensible gases and compressibility, was incorporated in the computation of cavitating flow. The cavity shape and free surface were updated iteratively till a reasonable convergence was reached. As for the determination of the free surface, the VOF approach was adopted. The test cases show the accuracy and stability of our procedure to capture the cavitating flow near the free surface.

  20. Oxidation of the Martian surface - Constraints due to chemical processes in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Kong, T. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Dissociation of water in the Martian atmosphere may supply oxygen to the surface and may result in the formation of minerals such as goethite, as proposed by Huguenin. The supply rate is limited by chemical processes in the atmosphere which regulate the abundance of O2. The net surface sink for atmospheric oxygen can be as large as 33 million atoms per sq cm per sec which compares to the escape rate of 60 million atoms per sq cm per sec.

  1. Surface states and conductivity of silicon nano-wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Bhaskar, Umesh; Pardoen, Thomas; Passi, Vikram; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The transport characteristics of low dimensional semiconductors like silicon nano-wires (SiNWs) rarely conform to expectations from geometry and dopant density, exhibiting significant variations as a function of different surface terminations/conditions. The association of these mechanisms with surface states and their exact influence on practical SiNW devices still remains largely unclear. Herein, we report on the influence of surface state charge distributions on SiNW transport characteristics. For this study, p-type SiNW devices with widths of 50, 100, and 2000 nm are fabricated from 25, 50, and 200 nm-thick SOI wafers. A ˜five order difference in effective carrier concentration was observed in the initial SiNWs characteristics, when comparing SiNWs fabricated with and without a thermal oxide. The removal of the surface oxide by a hydrogen fluoride (HF) treatment results in a SiNW conductance drop up to ˜six orders of magnitude. This effect is from a surface depletion of holes in the SiNW induced by positive surface charges deposited as a result of the HF treatment. However, it is observed that this charge density is transient and is dissipated with the re-growth of an oxide layer. In summary, the SiNW conductance is shown to vary by several orders of magnitude, while comparing its characteristics for the three most studied surface conditions: with a native oxide, thermal oxide and HF induced H-terminations. These results emphasize the necessity to interpret the transport characteristics of SiNWs with respect to its surface condition, during future investigations pertaining to the physical properties of SiNWs, like its piezo-resistance. As a sequel, prospects for efficiently sensing an elementary reduction/oxidation chemical process by monitoring the variation of SiNW surface potential, or in practice the SiNW conductance, is demonstrated.

  2. [Multiple-Victimisation due to Armed Conflict and Emotional Distress in the State of Magdalena, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Sanabria, Adriana R; Ospino, Anyelly; Guerra, Valeria M; Caamaño, Beatriz H

    Emotional distress is common in Colombian armed conflict victims. Multiple-victimisation is associated with an increase in emotional distress than victimisation due a single event. However, the association between poly-victimisation and emotional distress among victims of the armed conflict in Colombia has not been documented. To study the association between multiple-victimisation and emotional distress in victims of armed conflict in the State of Magdalena, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was designed, with a secondary analysis of registration of the Psychosocial Care Program and Victim Integral Health (PAPSIVI) in the State of Magdalena, from 2013 to 2014. The profile formula grouped demographic variables, victimising events, and a set of symptoms of emotional distress (perceived discrimination, depressive and anxiety-stress). Odds ratio (OR, 95%CI) were established as measures of association. A total of 943 people were included, with 67.4% women, and ages between18 and 94 years (mean 47.9±14.2). A total of 109 (11.7%) suffered from multiple victimisation. Multiple victimisation events were associated with more emotional distress, depressive symptoms (OR=1.5; 95%CI, 1.3-1.8), perceived stigma (OR=1.3; 95%CI, 1.1-1.5), and anxiety-stress (OR=1.2; 95%CI 1.0-1.4) than a single event. There is more emotional distress in multiple victimisations than in a single victimisation event during armed conflict in this region of Colombia. Further studies are required on this topic. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. The Use of Numerical Modeling to Address Surface and Subsurface Water Contamination due to Fracwater Spills in Larry's Creek, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C. A.; Arjmand, S.; Abad, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Because of its relatively low carbon dioxide emissions, natural gas is considered to be more efficient and environmentally friendly than other non-renewable fuels. As a result of this, among other factors, in recent years natural gas has become one of the world's primary energy sources. In the United States, drilling to extract natural gas has substantially increased over the past few years. In the Marcellus Shale, unconventional gas is currently extracted by using two new techniques: horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Today, fracking fluids which have been applied as part of the hydraulic fracturing process to fracture the shale rock and release the gas, pose a major environmental concern. These fluids are highly contaminated with radionuclides and toxic metals and any exposure of this highly polluted water to surface water or soil could heavily contaminate the media. The area selected for the current study is the Larry's Creek, located in Lycoming County in Pennsylvania. Larry's Creek Watershed was adversely affected by coal and iron mines activities in the 19th century. Though, the water quality in this creek was considered to be good as of 2006. Recently, oil and gas drilling activities have raised concerns about the creek's water quality again. A major environmental hazard is the freshwater contamination by frac/flowback water. Drilling companies are using impoundments on site to keep fracwater, and to store and evaporate flowback water. However, these ponds may fail or leak due to construction problems and/or accidents. Close to Saladasburg, Larry's Creek's stream was observed running rich with clay in October 19, 2011. Historical measurements show very high turbidity during this period which has raised questions about water contamination by the gas industry activities in the upper stream of the watershed. An interstate watershed agency has reported spills in Wolf Run in different drilling sites in the Larry's Creek basin. The focus of this study

  4. Amplification of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Due to Substrate-Mediated Localized Surface Plasmons in Gold Nanodimers

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2017-03-28

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is ubiquitous in chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and identification. Maximizing SERS enhancement is a continuous effort focused on the design of appropriate SERS substrates. Here we show that significant improvement in a SERS signal can be achieved with substrates combining localized surface plasmon resonances and a nonresonant plasmonic substrate. By introducing a continuous gold (Au) film underneath Au nanodimers antenna arrays, an over 10-fold increase in SERS enhancement is demonstrated. Triangular, rectangle and disc dimers were studied, with bowtie antenna providing highest SERS enhancement. Simulations of electromagnetic field distributions of the Au nanodimers on the Au film support the observed enhancement dependences. The hybridization of localized plasmonic modes with the image modes in a metal film provides a straightforward way to improve SERS enhancement in designer SERS substrate.

  5. Computational simulation of surface waviness in graphite/epoxy woven composites due to initial curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Several models simulating plain weave, graphite/epoxy woven composites are presented, along with the effects that the simultaneous application of pressure and thermal loads have on their surfaces. The surface effects created by moisture absorption are also examined. The computational simulation consisted of using a two-dimensional finite element model for the composite. The properties of the finite element (FE) model are calculated by using the in-house composite mechanics computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer). MSC/NASTRAN is used for the FE analysis which yields the composite's top surface normalized displacements. These results demonstrate the importance of parameters such as the cure temperature (T sub o) and the resin content in the curing process of polymer-matrix composites. The modification of these parameters will help tailor the composite system to the desired requirements and applications.

  6. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the "surface term." The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun....

  7. Nanocrystals in compression: unexpected structural phase transition and amorphization due to surface impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Kong, Lingping; Yan, Jinyuan; Liu, Zhenxian; Zhang, Hengzhong; Lei, Pei; Xu, Tao; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Chen, Bin

    2016-06-01

    We report an unprecedented surface doping-driven anomaly in the compression behaviors of nanocrystals demonstrating that the change of surface chemistry can lead to an interior bulk structure change in nanoparticles. In the synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction experiments, titania nanocrystals with low concentration yttrium dopants at the surface are found to be less compressible than undoped titania nanocrystals. More surprisingly, an unexpected TiO2(ii) phase (α-PbO2 type) is induced and obvious anisotropy is observed in the compression of yttrium-doped TiO2, in sharp contrast to the compression behavior of undoped TiO2. In addition, the undoped brookite nanocrystals remain with the same structure up to 30 GPa, whereas the yttrium-doped brookite amorphizes above 20 GPa. The abnormal structural evolution observed in yttrium-doped TiO2 does not agree with the reported phase stability of nano titania polymorphs, thus suggesting that the physical properties of the interior of nanocrystals can be controlled by the surface, providing an unconventional and new degree of freedom in search for nanocrystals with novel tunable properties that can trigger applications in multiple areas of industry and provoke more related basic science research.We report an unprecedented surface doping-driven anomaly in the compression behaviors of nanocrystals demonstrating that the change of surface chemistry can lead to an interior bulk structure change in nanoparticles. In the synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction experiments, titania nanocrystals with low concentration yttrium dopants at the surface are found to be less compressible than undoped titania nanocrystals. More surprisingly, an unexpected TiO2(ii) phase (α-PbO2 type) is induced and obvious anisotropy is observed in the compression of yttrium-doped TiO2, in sharp contrast to the compression behavior of undoped TiO2. In addition, the undoped brookite nanocrystals remain with the same structure up to 30 GPa, whereas the yttrium

  8. Surface state conductivity in epitaxially grown Bi1-x Sb x (111) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Julian; Kröger, Philipp; Pfnür, Herbert; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Topologically non-trivial surface states were reported first on {{Bi}}1-xSb x bulk crystals. In this study we present transport measurements performed on thin {{Bi}}1-xSb x -films (up to 24 nm thickness) grown epitaxially on Si(111) with various Sb-concentrations (up to x = 0.22). The analysis of the temperature dependency allowed us to distinguish between different transport channels originating from surface and bulk bands as well as impurity states. At temperatures below 30 K the transport is mediated by surface states while at higher temperatures activated transport via bulk channels sets in. The surface state conductivity and bulk band gaps can be tuned by the Sb-concentration and film thickness, respectively. For films as thin as 4 nm the surface state transport is strongly suppressed in contrast to Bi(111) films grown under identical conditions. The impurity channel is of intrinsic origin due to the growth and alloy formation process and turns out to be located at the buried interface.

  9. Wetting transition on patterned surfaces: transition states and energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiqing

    2014-03-18

    We study the wetting transition on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces. We use the string method [J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164103; J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 134105] to accurately compute the transition states, the energy barriers, and the minimum energy paths for the wetting transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state. Numerical results are obtained for the wetting of a hydrophobic surface textured with a square lattice of pillars. It is found that the wetting of the solid substrate occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove, followed by lateral propagation of the liquid front. The propagation of the liquid front proceeds in a stepwise manner, and a zipping mechanism is observed during the infiltration of each layer. The minimum energy path for the wetting transition goes through a sequence of intermediate metastable states, whose wetted areas reflect the microstructure of the patterned surface. We also study the dependence of the energy barrier on the drop size and the gap between the pillars.

  10. Experimental Determination of Drag Modifications Due to Elastic Compliant Surfaces Using Quantitative Visual Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-27

    developed in the 5.49 mn by 0.4572 m by 0.1524 m test section of a recirculating liquid flow facility, in which deodorized kerosene was used as the...pulses. The aluminum and gelatin surfaces were reflective enough to result in a sharp reflection of the photochromic time line. The point at which the

  11. Investigation of reasons for small changes in energy of UCN due to their interaction with surface

    CERN Document Server

    Lychagin, E V; Nekhaev, G V; Strelkov, A V; Kartashov, D G; Nesvizhevsky, V V

    2002-01-01

    The nature of the phenomenon of small changes in energy of ultracold neutrons (UCN) has been investigated. This phenomenon occurs during collisions of UCN with a surface, which increase the UCN energy by approx 10 sup - sup 7 eV with a probability of 10 sup - sup 8 -10 sup - sup 5 per collision. Such neutrons are named VUCN. It was observed that the preliminary warming up of samples at 500-600 K leads to an increase of the small heating probability P sub V sub U sub C sub N by at least a factor of 100 for a surface of stainless steel and by a factor of 10 for a copper surface. Extremely intensive UCN small heating by a diamond nanopowder has been observed for the first time. The spectrum of these VUCN and the temperature dependence of their heating probability P sub V sub U sub C sub N are similar to those measured earlier for stainless steel, beryllium, and copper. It is not observed small UCN heating, nor nanoparticles on a monocrystalline sapphire surface. That leads to the conclusion that VUCN are produce...

  12. Assessment of Cold Welding Between Separable Contact Surfaces Due to Impact and Fretting under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merstallinger, A.; Sales, M.; Semerad, E.; Dunn, B. D.

    2009-11-01

    A common failure mode seen during the testing and operation of spacecraft is termed "cold welding". European laboratories refer to this as "adhesion", "sticking" or "stiction". This publication is intended to provide the space community with the most recent understanding of the phenomenon of "cold welding" in relation to spacecraft mechanisms with separable contact surfaces. It presents some basic theory and describes a test method and the required equipment. Cold welding between two contacting surfaces can occur under conditions of impact or fretting. These surfaces may be bare metals, or inorganically or organically coated metals and their alloys. Standard procedures for quantifying the propensity of material surface pairs to cold weld to each other are proposed. Of particular interest will be the contact data of different materials, which are presented in numerical form and as tables summarising contacts between materials that can be either recommended or considered unsuitable for use under vacuum. The data have been compiled in a database that can be accessed online.

  13. Quantification of the advected CO2 concentration due to upstream surface fluxes in aircraft vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, A.; Morguí, J.-A.; Curcoll, R.; Rodó, X.

    2009-04-01

    A model framework which couples the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) with the new global surface flux inversion CarbonTracker from NOAA-ESRL (2007B release) is used to quantify the advected CO2 concentration from outbound surface fluxes to measured vertical profiles carried out during different seasons in 2006 at La Muela site in Spain (LMU; 41.60°N, 1.1°W). The Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) calculates the influence of surface CO2 fluxes upwind of the study area, allowing us to identify those sources or sink areas that strongly modify the CO2 content of air masses that arrives at different altitudes of measured profiles. CarbonTracker is a new assimilation system that informs of global carbon fluxes at 1°x1° at 3 hours resolution. Coupling LPDM results with surface fluxes allows assessing the net CO2 contribution of identified areas to measured concentrations along the profiles above a reference or background concentration. Furthermore, it allows the quantification of the percentage of each component flux (biospheric, anthropogenic and oceanic) to each vertical layer. At LMU, biospheric fluxes account ~70% of total CO2 advection; fossil fuel ~25%; and ~5% is attributed to the oceanic ones. By far, late spring and summer profiles are largely influence by the biospheric component (~90%). Finally, the CO2 concentration above the background value of profiles measured on 22nd February, 13th October and 30th November 2006 are well explained by the advection of upstream surface fluxes. In other profiles examined, the variation of CO2 along the profile is partially explained by the advection of CO2 outbound fluxes.

  14. Electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole antenna laid on the surface of a two-layer medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    With applications to geophysical subsurface probings, electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole laid on the surface of a two-layer medium are solved by a combination of analytic and numerical methods. Interference patterns are calculated for various layer thickness. The results are interpreted in terms of normal modes, and the accuracies of the methods are discussed.

  15. A spectral formalism for computing three-dimensional deformations due to surface loads. 1: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1994-01-01

    We outline a complete spectral formalism for computing high spatial resolution three-dimensional deformations arising from the surface mass loading of a spherically symmetric planet. The main advantages of the formalism are that all surface mass loads are always described using a consistent mathematical representation and that calculations of deformation fields for various spatial resolutions can be performed by simpley altering the spherical harmonic degree truncation level of the procedure. The latter may be important when incorporating improved observational constraints on a particular surface mass load, when considering potential errors in the computed field associated with mass loading having a spatial scale unresolved by the observational constraints, or when treating a number of global surface mass loads constrained with different spatial resolutions. The advantages do not extend to traditional 'Green's function' approaches which involve surface element discretizations of the global mass loads. Another advantage of the spectral formalism, over the Green's function approach, is that a posteriori analyses of the computed deformation fields are easily performed. In developing the spectral formalism, we consider specific cases where the Earth's mantle is assumed to respond as an elastic, slightly anelastic, or linear viscoelastic medium. In the case of an elastic or slightly anelastic mantle rheology the spectral response equations incorporate frequency dependent Love numbers. The formalism can therefore be used, for example, to compute the potentially resonant deformational response associated with the free core nutation and Chandler wobble eigenfunctions. For completeness, the spectral response equations include both body forces, as arise from the gravitational attraction of the Sun and the Moon, and surface mass loads. In either case, and for both elastic and anelastic mantle rheologies, we outline a pseudo-spectral technique for computing the ocean

  16. Decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface-meltwater-induced acceleration of basal sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of the Greenland Ice Sheet are carried out with a high-resolution version of the ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS for several global-warming scenarios for the period 1990-2350. In particular, the impact of surface-meltwater-induced acceleration of basal sliding on the stability of the ice sheet is investigated. A parameterization for the acceleration effect is developed for which modelled and measured mass losses of the ice sheet in the early 21st century agree well. The main findings of the simulations are: (i) the ice sheet is generally very susceptible to global warming on time-scales of centuries, (ii) surface-meltwater-induced acceleration of basal sliding leads to a pronounced speed-up of ice streams and outlet glaciers, and (iii) this ice-dynamical effect accelerates the decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet as a whole significantly, but not catastrophically, in the 21st century and beyond.

  17. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)

    2015-06-20

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  18. Optical Conductivity of Topological Surface States with Emergent Supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak-Krempa, William; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Topological states of electrons present new avenues to explore the rich phenomenology of correlated quantum matter. Topological insulators (TIs) in particular offer an experimental setting to study novel quantum critical points (QCPs) of massless Dirac fermions, which exist on the sample's surface. Here, we obtain exact results for the zero- and finite-temperature optical conductivity at the semimetal-superconductor QCP for these topological surface states. This strongly interacting QCP is described by a scale invariant theory with emergent supersymmetry, which is a unique symmetry mixing bosons and fermions. We show that supersymmetry implies exact relations between the optical conductivity and two otherwise unrelated properties: the shear viscosity and the entanglement entropy. We discuss experimental considerations for the observation of these signatures in TIs.

  19. Surface/State Correspondence as a Generalized Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaji, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new duality relation between codimension two space-like surfaces in gravitational theories and quantum states in dual Hilbert spaces. This surface/state correspondence largely generalizes the idea of holography such that we do not need to rely on any existence of boundaries in gravitational spacetimes. The present idea is motivated by the recent interpretation of AdS/CFT in terms of the tensor networks so called MERA. Moreover, we study this correspondence from the viewpoint of entanglement entropy and information metric. The Cramer-Rao bound in quantum estimation theory implies that the quantum fluctuations of radial coordinate of the AdS is highly suppressed in the large N limit.

  20. Convection due to surface-tension gradients. [in reduced gravity spacecraft environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrach, S.

    1978-01-01

    The use of dimensionless parameters to study fluid motions that could occur in a reduced-gravity environment is discussed. The significance of the Marangoni instability is considered, and the use of dimensionless parameters to investigate problems such as thermo and diffusocapillary flows is described. Characteristics of fluid flow in space are described, and the relation and interaction of motions due to capillarity and buoyancy is examined.

  1. Spatially coherent surface resonance states derived from magnetic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Zeyong; Cao, Yang; Wu, Chao; Ren, Jinzhi; Hang, Zhihong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Daozhong; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    A thin metamaterial slab comprising a dielectric spacer sandwiched between a metallic grating and a ground plane is shown to possess spatially coherent surface resonance states that span a large frequency range and can be tuned by structural and material parameters. They give rise to nearly perfect angle-selective absorption and thus exhibit directional thermal emissivity. Direct numerical simulations show that the metamaterial slab supports spatially coherent thermal emission in a wide frequency range that is robust against structural disorder.

  2. Axions, Surface States, and the Post Constraint in Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-01

    After formulating the frequency-domain Maxwell equations for a homogeneous, linear, bianisotropic material occupying a bounded region, we found that the axionic piece vanishes from both the differential equations valid in the region and the boundary conditions, thereby vindicating the Post constraint. Our analysis indicates that characteristic effects that may be observed experimentally with magnetoelectric materials are not the consequences of the axionic piece but of an admittance that describes surface states.

  3. Modified Critical State Two-Surface Plasticity Model for Sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kris Wessel; Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Shajarati, Amir

    This article describes the outline of a numerical integration scheme for a critical state two-surface plasticity model for sands. The model is slightly modified by LeBlanc (2008) compared to the original formulation presented by Manzari and Dafalias (1997) and has the ability to correctly model...... calculations can be performed with the Forward Euler integration scheme. Furthermore, the model is formulated for a single point....

  4. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  5. Robust surface states in epitaxial Bi(111) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kai; Jin, Xiaofeng

    Bulk Bi a prototype semimetal with trivial electronic band topology. Unanticipatedly, we show the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak and Aharonov-Bohm effects in epitaxial Bi(111) thin films. Meanwhile, we clearly identify the interaction of the top and bottom surface states via quantum tunneling by the electrical conductance and weak anti-localization measurements. These results have significantly enriched our understanding about the electronic structure of Bi, which might be helpful for clearing up some of its longstanding subtle issues.

  6. Transition State Theory for dissipative systems without a dividing surface

    CERN Document Server

    Revuelta, F; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2015-01-01

    Transition State Theory is a central cornerstone in reaction dynamics. Its key step is the identification of a dividing surface that is crossed only once by all reactive trajectories. This assumption is often badly violated, especially when the reactive system is coupled to an environment. The calculations made in this way then overestimate the reaction rate and the results depend critically on the choice of the dividing surface. In this Letter, we study the phase space of a stochastically driven system close to an energetic barrier in order to identify the geometric structure unambiguously determining the reactive trajectories, which is then incorporated in a simple rate formula for reactions in condensed phase that is both independent of the dividing surface and exact.

  7. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions.

  8. Rotating flow of a nanofluid due to an exponentially stretching surface with suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Siti Nur Alwani; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md

    2017-08-01

    An analysis of the rotating nanofluid flow past an exponentially stretched surface with the presence of suction is studied in this work. Three different types of nanoparticles, namely, copper, titania and alumina are considered. The system of ordinary differential equations is computed numerically using a shooting method in Maple software after being transformed from the partial differential equations. This transformation has considered the similarity transformations in exponential form. The physical effect of the rotation, suction and nanoparticle volume fraction parameters on the rotating flow and heat transfer phenomena is investigated and has been described in detail through graphs. The dual solutions are found to appear when the governing parameters reach a certain range.

  9. Surface roughness due to residual ice in the use of low power deicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Bond, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    Thicknesses of residual ice are presented to provide information on surface contamination and associated roughness during deicing events. Data was obtained from low power ice protection systems tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) with nine different deicing systems. Results show that roughness associated with residual ice is not characterized by uniformly distributed roughness. Results also show that deicing systems require a critical mass of ice to generate a sufficient expelling force to remove the ice.

  10. Decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface-meltwater-induced acceleration of basal sliding

    OpenAIRE

    Greve, Ralf; SUGIYAMA, SHIN

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of the Greenland Ice Sheet are carried out with a high-resolution version of the ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS for several global-warming scenarios for the period 1990-2350. In particular, the impact of surface-meltwater-induced acceleration of basal sliding on the stability of the ice sheet is investigated. A parameterization for the acceleration effect is developed for which modelled and measured mass losses of the ice sheet in the early 21st century agree well. The main findings of...

  11. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE EFFECT ON CHINESE REGIONAL CLIMATE DUE TO SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAND SURFACE PARAMETERS (PART I)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙健; 李维亮; 周秀骥

    2001-01-01

    Sensitivity experiment is an important method to study the effect on regional climate due to seasonal variation of land surface parameters. Using China Regional Climate Model (CRCM)nested in CCM1, we first simulate Chinese regional climate, then two numerical sensitivity experiments on the effect of vegetation and roughness length are made. The results show that:(1) If the vegetation is replaced with the monthly data of 1997, precipitation and land-surface temperature are both changed clearly, precipitation decreases and land surface temperature increases, but there is no regional correspondence between these changes. And the results are much better than the results when climate average vegetation was used in the CRCM. (2) If the roughness length is replaced with the monthly data of 1997, there is significant change on land surface temperature, and there is very good regional correspondence between these changes. But the effect on precipitation is very small.

  12. Observation of Dirac surface states in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benia, H. M.; Rampi, E.; Trainer, C.; Yim, C. M.; Maldonado, A.; Peets, D. C.; Stöhr, A.; Starke, U.; Kern, K.; Yaresko, A.; Levy, G.; Damascelli, A.; Ast, C. R.; Schnyder, A. P.; Wahl, P.

    2016-09-01

    Materials with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have in recent years become a subject of intense research due to their potential applications in spintronics and quantum information technology. In particular, in systems which break inversion symmetry, SOC facilitates the Rashba-Dresselhaus effect, leading to a lifting of spin degeneracy in the bulk and intricate spin textures of the Bloch wave functions. Here, by combining angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with relativistic first-principles band structure calculations, we examine the role of SOC in single crystals of noncentrosymmetric BiPd. We report the detection of several Dirac surface states, one of which exhibits an extremely large spin splitting. Unlike the surface states in inversion-symmetric systems, the Dirac surface states of BiPd have completely different properties at opposite faces of the crystal and are not trivially linked by symmetry. The spin splitting of the surface states exhibits a strong anisotropy by itself, which can be linked to the low in-plane symmetry of the surface termination.

  13. Hydromechanical Simulations of Surface Uplift due to CO2 Injection at In Salah (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. P.; Hao, Y.; Foxall, W.; McNab, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    We present recent simulations of the hydromechanical response of the reservoir and overburden associated with CO2 injection at In Salah. Using the best available field data for the reservoir and fault network properties, we are able to demonstrate excellent agreement between simulation and observation. These results are providing new insight into the fate of the CO2 about one of the injectors where intriguing morphology was observed in surface uplift. Additionally, this work is helping to better establish the advantages and limitations of interpreting surface displacements to guide our understanding of fluid fate. The In Salah Project (a joint venture of BP, StatoilHydro and Sonatrach) includes a CO2 sequestration effort that has successfully injected millions of tons of CO2 into a deep saline formation close to a producing gas field in Algeria. We have been funded by the Joint Industry Project (A consortium consisting of BP, StatoilHydro and Sonatrach, hereafter the JIP) and the U.S. Department of Energy to investigate the role of injection induced mechanical deformation and geochemical alteration at the In Salah CO2 storage project. Here we focus upon the hydromechanical portion of the study. We have performed detailed simulations of the hydromechanical response in the vicinity of the KB-502 CO2 injector specifically because the morphology of the observed surface deformation differed from that above the other injectors at the field. First we performed a geomechanical analysis to predict which faults are flow conduits and which are flow barriers. NUFT simulations were performed based upon this information using permeability fields for the reservoir provided by the JIP. These results indicate that the presence of faults in the vicinity of the KB-502 injector may be responsible for the early breakthrough of CO2 observed at a nearby well, KB-5. We have simulated the mm-scale uplift of the overburden and compared the results with observed deformation using InSAR data

  14. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Emergent Conformal Symmetry and Geometric Transport Properties of Quantum Hall States on Singular Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T.; Chiu, Y. H.; Laskin, M.; Wiegmann, P.

    2016-12-01

    We study quantum Hall states on surfaces with conical singularities. We show that the electronic fluid at the cone tip possesses an intrinsic angular momentum, which is due solely to the gravitational anomaly. We also show that quantum Hall states behave as conformal primaries near singular points, with a conformal dimension equal to the angular momentum. Finally, we argue that the gravitational anomaly and conformal dimension determine the fine structure of the electronic density at the conical point. The singularities emerge as quasiparticles with spin and exchange statistics arising from adiabatically braiding conical singularities. Thus, the gravitational anomaly, which appears as a finite size correction on smooth surfaces, dominates geometric transport on singular surfaces.

  16. Surface-state enhancement of tunneling thermopower on the Ag(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro; Kelly, Simon J; Cerdá, Jorge I

    2014-12-23

    Thermoelectric effects in tunnel junctions are currently being revisited for their prospects in cooling and energy harvesting applications, and as sensitive probes of electron transport. Quantitative interpretation of these effects calls for advances in both theory and experiment, particularly with respect to the electron transmission probability across a tunnel barrier which encodes the energy dependence and the magnitude of tunneling thermopower. Using noble metal surfaces as clean model systems, we demonstrate a comparatively simple and quantitative approach where the transmission probability is directly measured experimentally. Importantly, we estimate not only thermovoltage, but also its energy and temperature dependencies. We have thus resolved surface-state enhancement of thermovoltage, which manifests as 10-fold enhancement of thermopower on terraces of the Ag(111) surface compared to single-atom step sites and surface-supported nanoparticles. To corroborate experimental analysis, the methodology was applied to the transmission probability obtained from first-principles calculations for the (111) surfaces of the three noble metals, finding good agreement between overall trends. Surface-state effects themselves point to a possibility of achieving competitive performance of all-metal tunnel junctions when compared to molecular junctions. At the same time, the approach presented here opens up possibilities to investigate the properties of nominally doped or gated thermoelectric tunnel junctions as well as temperature gradient in nanometer gaps.

  17. Electronic states localized at surface defects on Cu(755) studied by angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, K; Namba, H

    2003-01-01

    'Regularly stepped' and 'defective' surfaces of Cu(755) were prepared by low- and high-temperature annealing, respectively, of a clean specimen. Electronic states on both surfaces were studied by angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. On the defective Cu(755), we found a new photoelectron peak due to surface defects just below the Fermi level. The dispersion profile of the defect state is derived to be almost flat, which demonstrates the localized nature of the defects. High activity to oxygen adsorption of the defect state was revealed. (author)

  18. Numerical modelling of ground-borne noise and vibration in buildings due to surface rail traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, P.; Degrande, G.; Augusztinovicz, F.

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical computation of the structural and acoustic response of a building to an incoming wave field generated by high-speed surface railway traffic. The source model consists of a moving vehicle on a longitudinally invariant track, coupled to a layered ground modelled with a boundary element formulation. The receiver model is based on a substructuring formulation and consists of a boundary element model of the soil and a finite element model of the structure. The acoustic response of the building's rooms is computed by means of a spectral finite element formulation. The paper investigates the structural and acoustic response of a multi-story portal frame office building up to a frequency of 150 Hz to the passage of a Thalys high-speed train at constant velocity. The isolation performance of three different vibration countermeasures: a floating-floor, a room-in-room, and base-isolation, are examined.

  19. Second-Order Nonlinearity in Triangular Lattice Perforated Gold Film due to Surface Plasmas Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renlong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the excitation second-order nonlinearity through a triangular lattice perforated gold film instead of square lattice in many papers. Under the excitation of surface plasmas resonance effect, the second order nonlinearity exists in the noncentrosymmetric split-ring resonators arrays. Reflection of fundamental frequency wave through a triangular lattice perforated gold film is obtained. We also described the second harmonic conversion efficiencies in the second order nonlinear optical process with the spectra. Moreover, the electric field distributions of fundamental frequency above the gold film region are calculated. The light propagation through the holes results in the enhancement of the second order nonlinearity including second harmonic generation as well as the sum (difference frequency generation.

  20. Failure of man-made cavities in salt and surface subsidence due to sulfur mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, G.K.; Lee, C.A.; McClain, W.C.; Senseny, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    An engineering data base relevant to subsidence due to sulfur mining and to structural failure of cavities in salt is established, evaluated and documented. Nineteen failure events are discussed. Based on these documented failure events, capabilities of and inputs to a mathematical model of cavity failure are determined. Two failure events are adequately documented for use in model verification studies. A conclusion of this study that is pertinent to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is that cavity failures in dome salt are fairly rare, but that as the number of large cavities (especially those having large roof spans) increases, failures will probably be more common unless stability and failure mechanisms of cavities are better understood.

  1. Elevation change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Noël, B. P. Y.; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland Ice Sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, basal melt, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The last two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes compaction, meltwater percolation, and refreezing. The model is forced with surface mass fluxes and temperature from a regional climate model for the period 1960-2014. The model results agree with observations of surface density, density profiles from 62 firn cores, and altimetric observations from regions where ice-dynamical surface height changes are likely small. In areas with strong surface melt, the firn model overestimates density. We find that the firn layer in the high interior is generally thickening slowly (1-5 cm yr-1). In the percolation and ablation areas, firn and SMB processes account for a surface elevation lowering of up to 20-50 cm yr-1. Most of this firn-induced marginal thinning is caused by an increase in melt since the mid-1990s and partly compensated by an increase in the accumulation of fresh snow around most of the ice sheet. The total firn and ice volume change between 1980 and 2014 is estimated at -3295 ± 1030 km3 due to firn and SMB changes, corresponding to an ice-sheet average thinning of 1.96 ± 0.61 m. Most of this volume decrease occurred after 1995. The computed changes in surface elevation can be used to partition altimetrically observed volume change into surface mass balance and ice-dynamically related mass changes.

  2. Modeling nonlinear errors in surface electromyography due to baseline noise: a new methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Laura Frey; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Avin, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The surface electromyographic (EMG) signal is often contaminated by some degree of baseline noise. It is customary for scientists to subtract baseline noise from the measured EMG signal prior to further analyses based on the assumption that baseline noise adds linearly to the observed EMG signal. The stochastic nature of both the baseline and EMG signal, however, may invalidate this assumption. Alternately, "true" EMG signals may be either minimally or nonlinearly affected by baseline noise. This information is particularly relevant at low contraction intensities when signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) may be lowest. Thus, the purpose of this simulation study was to investigate the influence of varying levels of baseline noise (approximately 2-40% maximum EMG amplitude) on mean EMG burst amplitude and to assess the best means to account for signal noise. The simulations indicated baseline noise had minimal effects on mean EMG activity for maximum contractions, but increased nonlinearly with increasing noise levels and decreasing signal amplitudes. Thus, the simple baseline noise subtraction resulted in substantial error when estimating mean activity during low intensity EMG bursts. Conversely, correcting EMG signal as a nonlinear function of both baseline and measured signal amplitude provided highly accurate estimates of EMG amplitude. This novel nonlinear error modeling approach has potential implications for EMG signal processing, particularly when assessing co-activation of antagonist muscles or small amplitude contractions where the SNR can be low.

  3. The change in mutagenicity:study on surface water of Qiantang River due to tide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuNX; YangYM

    2002-01-01

    The Qiangtang River lies in Zhejiang Province of China.In this study,the genotoxicity of surface water samples from five sites along the river were detected using Ames test(TA98,TA100±S9),comet(SCGE) test and cytokinesis-block micronucleus(CBMN) tesdt(-S9) in the human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro.The results indicated that in upstream samples (first site) during falling-tide was found slight mutagenicity in TA98 strain with S9 and without S9.The mutagenicity of samples from the second to the fifth site was gradually stronger.Except the first site sample,the micronucleated cell rates of the other four samples during falling-tide significantly increased in CBMN test,and the extent of migration of DNA fragments of the four samples was found to be significantly different from control group.In the upstream(first site) samples during flow-tide were found no mutagen by three short-term tests.But the other four samples were found more stronger mutagenicity in TA98 strain with S9 than that during falling-tide.The micronucleated cell rates and the extent of migration of DNA fragments of the samples were sdignificantly high than that during falling-tide too.

  4. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubovský, Ivan; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm-2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  5. Interrogating surface state of isolated and agglomerated PbS quantum dots with solvent-induced stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Pin-Hao; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2017-04-01

    Applications of quantum dots (QDs) are often obstructed by the associated surface electronic states that quench photoluminescence (PL) and hinder charge transport. Preventing this is still largely being stymied owing to the lack of means to regulate their presence. Dispersing PbS QDs in toluene, we show that varying the solvent temperature offers a way of modulating their surface electronic state. A comprehensive energy-transfer model explains all the anomalous temperature-dependent behavior of the absorption and PL, explicitly revealing the PL quenching dynamics of isolated QDs due to the induced surface state by imposing solvent stress on their surface ligands. This study demonstrates that the local stress induced by a solvent can serve as a ‘switch’ for the surface electronic states of QDs, which is enabled by the well-studied thermo-physical properties of a liquid solvent.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Surface Deformation due to Magma Chamber Inflation/Deflation in a Heterogeneous Viscoelastic Half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, M.; Roy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting surface deformation patterns in terms of deeper processes in regions of active magmatism is challenging and inherently non-unique. This study focuses on interpreting the unusual sombrero-shaped pattern of surface deformation in the Altiplano Puna region of South America, which has previously been modeled as the effect of an upwelling diapir of material in the lower crust. Our goal is to investigate other possible interpretations of the surface deformation feature using a suite of viscoelastic models with varying material heterogeneity. We use the finite-element code PyLith to study surface deformation due to a buried time-varying (periodic) overpressure source, a magma body, at depth within a viscoelastic half-space. In our models, the magma-body is a penny-shaped crack, with a cylindrical region above the crack that is weak relative to the surrounding material. We initially consider a magma body within a homogeneous viscoelastic half-space to determine the effect of the free surface upon deformation above and beneath the source region. We observe a complex depth-dependent phase relationship between stress and strain for elements that fall between the ground surface and the roof of the magma body. Next, we consider a volume of weak material (faster relaxation time relative to background) that is distributed with varying geometry around the magma body. We investigate how surface deformation is governed by the spatial distribution of the weak material and its rheologic parameters. We are able to reproduce a "sombrero" pattern of surface velocities for a range of models with material heterogeneity. The wavelength of the sombrero pattern is primarily controlled by the extent of the heterogeneous region, modulated by flexural effects. Our results also suggest an "optimum overpressure forcing frequency" where the lifetime of the sombrero pattern (a transient phenomenon due to the periodic nature of the overpressure forcing) reaches a maximum. Through further

  7. Generation and protection of steady-state quantum correlations due to quantum channels with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Wang, Guo-you; Zeng, Ke

    2016-12-01

    We have proposed a scheme of the generation and preservation of two-qubit steady-state quantum correlations through quantum channels where successive uses of the channels are correlated. Different types of noisy channels with memory, such as amplitude damping, phase damping, and depolarizing channels, have been taken into account. Some analytical or numerical results are presented. The effect of channels with memory on dynamics of quantum correlations has been discussed in detail. The results show that steady-state entanglement between two initial qubits whose initial states are prepared in a specific family states without entanglement subject to amplitude damping channel with memory can be generated. The entanglement creation is related to the memory coefficient of channel μ . The stronger the memory coefficient of channel μ is, the more the entanglement creation is, and the earlier the separable state becomes the entangled state. Besides, we compare the dynamics of entanglement with that of quantum discord when a two-qubit system is initially prepared in an entangled state. We show that entanglement dynamics suddenly disappears, while quantum discord dynamics displays only in the asymptotic limit. Furthermore, two-qubit quantum correlations can be preserved at a long time in the limit of μ → 1.

  8. Generation and protection of steady-state quantum correlations due to quantum channels with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Wang, Guo-you; Zeng, Ke

    2016-09-01

    We have proposed a scheme of the generation and preservation of two-qubit steady-state quantum correlations through quantum channels where successive uses of the channels are correlated. Different types of noisy channels with memory, such as amplitude damping, phase damping, and depolarizing channels, have been taken into account. Some analytical or numerical results are presented. The effect of channels with memory on dynamics of quantum correlations has been discussed in detail. The results show that steady-state entanglement between two initial qubits whose initial states are prepared in a specific family states without entanglement subject to amplitude damping channel with memory can be generated. The entanglement creation is related to the memory coefficient of channel μ . The stronger the memory coefficient of channel μ is, the more the entanglement creation is, and the earlier the separable state becomes the entangled state. Besides, we compare the dynamics of entanglement with that of quantum discord when a two-qubit system is initially prepared in an entangled state. We show that entanglement dynamics suddenly disappears, while quantum discord dynamics displays only in the asymptotic limit. Furthermore, two-qubit quantum correlations can be preserved at a long time in the limit of μ → 1.

  9. Local solid-state modification of nanopore surface charges

    CERN Document Server

    Kox, Ronald; Chen, Chang; Arjmandi, Nima; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf; 10.1088/0957-4484/21/33/335703

    2012-01-01

    The last decade, nanopores have emerged as a new and interesting tool for the study of biological macromolecules like proteins and DNA. While biological pores, especially alpha-hemolysin, have been promising for the detection of DNA, their poor chemical stability limits their use. For this reason, researchers are trying to mimic their behaviour using more stable, solid-state nanopores. The most successful tools to fabricate such nanopores use high energy electron or ions beams to drill or reshape holes in very thin membranes. While the resolution of these methods can be very good, they require tools that are not commonly available and tend to damage and charge the nanopore surface. In this work, we show nanopores that have been fabricated using standard micromachning techniques together with EBID, and present a simple model that is used to estimate the surface charge. The results show that EBID with a silicon oxide precursor can be used to tune the nanopore surface and that the surface charge is stable over a...

  10. Potential Energy Surfaces of Nitrogen Dioxide for the Ground State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Ju-Xiang; ZHU Zheng-He; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy function of nitrogen dioxide with the C2v symmetry in the ground state is represented using the simplified Sorbie-Murrell many-body expansion function in terms of the symmetry of NO2. Using the potential energy function, some potential energy surfaces of NO2(C2v, X2A1), such as the bond stretching contour plot for a fixed equilibrium geometry angle θ and contour for O moving around N-O (R1), in which R1 is fixed at the equilibrium bond length, are depicted. The potential energy surfaces are analysed. Moreover, the equilibrium parameters for NO2 with the C2v, Cs and D8h symmetries, such as equilibrium geometry structures and energies, are calculated by the ab initio (CBS-Q) method.

  11. Elevation change of the Greenland ice sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Noël, B. P. Y.; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland ice sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The latter two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes compaction, meltwater percolation, and refreezing. The model is forced with surface mass fluxes and temperature from a regional climate model for the period 1960-2013. The model results agree with observations of surface density, density profiles from 62 firn cores, and altimetric observations from regions where ice-dynamical surface height changes are likely small. We find that the firn layer in the high interior is generally thickening slowly (1-5 cm yr-1). In the percolation and ablation areas, firn and SMB processes account for a surface elevation lowering of up to 20-50 cm yr-1. Most of this firn-induced marginal thinning is caused by an increase in melt since the mid-1990s, and partly compensated by an increase in the accumulation of fresh snow around most of the ice sheet. The total firn and ice volume change between 1980 and 2013 is estimated at -3900 ± 1030 km3 due to firn and SMB, corresponding to an ice-sheet average thinning of 2.32 ± 0.61 m. Most of this volume decrease occurred after 1995. The computed changes in surface elevation can be used to partition altimetrically observed volume change into surface mass balance and ice-dynamically related mass changes.

  12. In-gap states on the non-polar (110) surface of SmB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, J. D.; Jang, Sooyoung; Min, C.-H.; Reinert, F.; Kang, Boyoun; Cho, B.-K.; Kim, D. J.; Fisk, Z.; Allen, J. W.

    Mixed-valent SmB6 with a temperature-dependent bulk gap is the first candidate example of a new class of strongly correlated topological insulators with f- d band inversion. The topological origin of in-gap states on cleaved (001) surfaces as measured by angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) is not without controversy, since the X states span the full ~20 meV hybridization gap at low temperature without exhibiting any clear Dirac point. Furthermore, reports exist of band-bending due to the polarity of the (001) surface and depth-dependent deviations from bulk stoichiometry or Sm valency. In this work we explore ARPES of the non - polar (110) surface of SmB6 prepared by polishing and high-temperature annealing. We find in-gap states at X and Y points with very similar properties as the (001) X states. We discuss the relevance of these findings to the TI and other proposed models, and to the recent discrepancy between 2D and 3D interpretations of dHvA Fermi surface orbits. Supported by U.S. DOE at the Advanced Light Source (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  13. An FTIR study on the chlorophyll and apoprotein aggregation states in LHCII due to solvent effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis provides us with the most abundant and efficient light-harvesting systems found in nature. The photosynthetic process is very much dependent on the aggregation state of the chlorophylls and secondary conformational structure...

  14. Limitations Of The Current State Space Modelling Approach In Multistage Machining Processes Due To Operation Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán-Nebot, J. V.; Liu, J.; Romero, F.

    2009-11-01

    The State Space modelling approach has been recently proposed as an engineering-driven technique for part quality prediction in Multistage Machining Processes (MMP). Current State Space models incorporate fixture and datum variations in the multi-stage variation propagation, without explicitly considering common operation variations such as machine-tool thermal distortions, cutting-tool wear, cutting-tool deflections, etc. This paper shows the limitations of the current State Space model through an experimental case study where the effect of the spindle thermal expansion, cutting-tool flank wear and locator errors are introduced. The paper also discusses the extension of the current State Space model to include operation variations and its potential benefits.

  15. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saito, Emi K; Sileo, Louis; Green, D Earl; Meteyer, Carol U; McLaughlin, Grace S; Converse, Kathryn A; Docherty, Douglas E

    2007-01-01

    .... In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis...

  16. Emergent geometry, thermal CFT and surface/state correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Wen-Cong; Wu, Meng-He

    2016-01-01

    We study a conjectured correspondence between any codimension two convex surface and a quantum state (SS-duality for short). By generalizing thermofield double formalism to continuum version of the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (cMERA) and using the SS-duality, we propose a general framework to emerge the thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature. As an example, the case of $2d$ CFT is considered carefully. We calculate its information metric and show that it is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation.

  17. Emergent geometry, thermal CFT and surface/state correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Wen-Cong; Shu, Fu-Wen; Wu, Meng-He

    2017-09-01

    We study a conjectured correspondence between any codimension-two convex surface and a quantum state (SS-duality for short). By applying thermofield double formalism to the SS-duality, we show that thermal geometries naturally emerge as a result of hidden quantum entanglement between two boundary CFTs. We therefore propose a general framework to emerge the thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature, without knowing many details about the thermal CFT. As an example, the case of 2d CFT is considered. We calculate its information metric and show that it is either BTZ black hole or thermal AdS as expected.

  18. Investigating the surface state of graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shoujun; Shao, Jieren; Song, Yubin; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Du, Jianglin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Haiyu; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Junhu; Yang, Bai

    2015-04-01

    A universal route to GQDs is developed based on ``solution phase-based scissor'' methods. The PL centers of the GQDs are systematically studied and are proved to be the surface state. This is related to the hybridization structure of the edge groups and the connected partial graphene core. Through experiment and analysis, we have preliminarily proved that the efficient edge groups for green emission are mainly carboxyl, carbonyl and amide. This is indicated by the following three factors: firstly, the PL of GQDs is enhanced by UV exposure, during which partial -OH groups are converted into carboxyl groups; secondly, the PL properties of GQDs can be further improved by one-step solvothermal treatment, in which partial carboxyl groups are converted to amide groups and the surface state of the GQDs is enhanced; thirdly, reduced m-GQDs possess more -OH groups compared with reduced GQDs, resulting in more blue PL centers (the carboxyl, carbonyl and amide-based green centers are converted to -OH-based blue centers). The present work highlights a very important direction for the understanding of the PL mechanism of GQDs and other related carbon-based materials.A universal route to GQDs is developed based on ``solution phase-based scissor'' methods. The PL centers of the GQDs are systematically studied and are proved to be the surface state. This is related to the hybridization structure of the edge groups and the connected partial graphene core. Through experiment and analysis, we have preliminarily proved that the efficient edge groups for green emission are mainly carboxyl, carbonyl and amide. This is indicated by the following three factors: firstly, the PL of GQDs is enhanced by UV exposure, during which partial -OH groups are converted into carboxyl groups; secondly, the PL properties of GQDs can be further improved by one-step solvothermal treatment, in which partial carboxyl groups are converted to amide groups and the surface state of the GQDs is enhanced; thirdly

  19. Excitation of exciton states on a curved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silotia, Poonam; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Excitonic transitions on the surface of a sphere have been studied in he presence of external static electric and laser fields. The spectrum and the various coupling matrix elements, (for n = 1 , 2 , 3), between few states of exciton have been evaluated in the absence and presence of excitonic Coulombic interaction with different values of dielectric constant. Variation of various physical quantities: energy eigenvalues, transition probability, orientational and alignment parameter, has been shown to have strong dependence on the laser field and static electric field.

  20. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state

    OpenAIRE

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Hal...

  1. Health and ecological hazards due to natural radioactivity in soil from mining areas of Nasarawa State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Ibrahim, Umar; Akpa, Chidozie Timothy; Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi

    2015-01-01

    Nasarawa State is located in north central Nigeria and it is known as Nigeria's home of solid minerals. It is endowed with barite, copper, zinc, tantalite and granite. Continuous releases of mining waste and tailings into the biosphere may result in a build-up of radionuclides in air, water and soil. This work therefore aims to measure the activity concentration levels of primordial radionuclides in the soil/sediment samples collected from selected mines of the mining areas of Nasarawa State. The paper also assesses the radiological and radio ecological impacts of mining activities on the residents of mining areas and their environment. The activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) in the surface soils/sediment samples were determined using sodium iodide-thallium gamma spectroscopy. Seven major mines were considered with 21 samples taken from each of the mines for radiochemistry analysis. The human health hazard assessment was conducted using regulatory methodologies set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, while the radio ecological impact assessment was conducted using the ERICA tool v. 1.2. The result shows that the activity concentrations of (40)K in the water ways of the Akiri copper and the Azara barite mines are 60 and 67% higher than the world average value for (40)K, respectively. In all mines, the annual effective dose rates (mSv y(-1)) were less than unity, and a maximum annual gonadal dose of 0.58 mSv y(-1) is received at the Akiri copper mine, which is almost twice the world average value for gonadal dose. The external hazard indices for all the mines were less than unity. Our results also show that mollusc-gastropod, insect larvae, mollusc-bivalve and zooplankton are the freshwater biotas with the highest dose rates ranging from 5 to 7 µGy h(-1). These higher dose rates could be associated with zinc and copper mining at Abuni and Akiri, respectively. The most exposed

  2. Terahertz conductivity of topological surface states in Bi₁.₅Sb₀.₅Te₁.₈Se₁.₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi Sin; Xia, Bin; Zou, Xingquan; Chen, Shi; Ou, Hong-Wei; Wang, Lan; Rusydi, A; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Chia, Elbert E M

    2013-12-17

    Topological insulators are electronic materials with an insulating bulk and conducting surface. However, due to free carriers in the bulk, the properties of the metallic surface are difficult to detect and characterize in most topological insulator materials. Recently, a new topological insulator Bi₁.₅Sb₀.₅Te₁.₇Se₁.₃ (BSTS) was found, showing high bulk resistivities of 1-10 Ω.cm and greater contrast between the bulk and surface resistivities compared to other Bi-based topological insulators. Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS), we present complex conductivity of BSTS single crystals, disentangling the surface and bulk contributions. We find that the Drude spectral weight is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than in other Bi-based topological insulators, and similar to that of Bi₂Se₃ thin films, suggesting a significant contribution of the topological surface states to the conductivity of the BSTS sample. Moreover, an impurity band is present about 30 meV below the Fermi level, and the surface and bulk carrier densities agree with those obtained from transport data. Furthermore, from the surface Drude contribution, we obtain a ~98% transmission through one surface layer--this is consistent with the transmission through single-layer or bilayer graphene, which shares a common Dirac-cone feature in the band structure.

  3. Net Costs Due to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination--United States, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carias, Cristina; Reed, Carrie; Kim, Inkyu K; Foppa, Ivo M; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Meltzer, Martin I; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality across all age groups, and influenza vaccination was recommended in 2010 for all persons aged 6 months and above. We estimated the averted costs due to influenza vaccination, taking into account the seasonal economic burden of the disease. We used recently published values for averted outcomes due to influenza vaccination for influenza seasons 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09, and age cohorts 6 months-4 years, 5-19 years, 20-64 years, and 65 years and above. Costs were calculated according to a payer and societal perspective (in 2009 US$), and took into account medical costs and productivity losses. When taking into account direct medical costs (payer perspective), influenza vaccination was cost saving only for the older age group (65≥) in seasons 2005-06 and 2007-08. Using the same perspective, influenza vaccination resulted in total costs of $US 1.7 billion (95%CI: $US 0.3-4.0 billion) in 2006-07 and $US 1.8 billion (95%CI: $US 0.1-4.1 billion) in 2008-09. When taking into account a societal perspective (and including the averted lost earnings due to premature death) averted deaths in the older age group influenced the results, resulting in cost savings for all ages combined in season 07-08. Influenza vaccination was cost saving in the older age group (65≥) when taking into account productivity losses and, in some seasons, when taking into account medical costs only. Averted costs vary significantly per season; however, in seasons where the averted burden of deaths is high in the older age group, averted productivity losses due to premature death tilt overall seasonal results towards savings. Indirect vaccination effects and the possibility of diminished case severity due to influenza vaccination were not considered, thus the averted burden due to influenza vaccine may be even greater than reported.

  4. Net Costs Due to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination--United States, 2005-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Carias

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality across all age groups, and influenza vaccination was recommended in 2010 for all persons aged 6 months and above. We estimated the averted costs due to influenza vaccination, taking into account the seasonal economic burden of the disease.We used recently published values for averted outcomes due to influenza vaccination for influenza seasons 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09, and age cohorts 6 months-4 years, 5-19 years, 20-64 years, and 65 years and above. Costs were calculated according to a payer and societal perspective (in 2009 US$, and took into account medical costs and productivity losses.When taking into account direct medical costs (payer perspective, influenza vaccination was cost saving only for the older age group (65≥ in seasons 2005-06 and 2007-08. Using the same perspective, influenza vaccination resulted in total costs of $US 1.7 billion (95%CI: $US 0.3-4.0 billion in 2006-07 and $US 1.8 billion (95%CI: $US 0.1-4.1 billion in 2008-09. When taking into account a societal perspective (and including the averted lost earnings due to premature death averted deaths in the older age group influenced the results, resulting in cost savings for all ages combined in season 07-08.Influenza vaccination was cost saving in the older age group (65≥ when taking into account productivity losses and, in some seasons, when taking into account medical costs only. Averted costs vary significantly per season; however, in seasons where the averted burden of deaths is high in the older age group, averted productivity losses due to premature death tilt overall seasonal results towards savings. Indirect vaccination effects and the possibility of diminished case severity due to influenza vaccination were not considered, thus the averted burden due to influenza vaccine may be even greater than reported.

  5. Avian wildlife mortality events due to salmonellosis in the United States, 1985-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A.J.; Saito, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella spp. has long been recognized in avian wildlife, although its significance in causing avian mortality, and its zoonotic risk, is not well understood. This study evaluates the role of Salmonella spp. in wild bird mortality events in the United States from 1985 through 2004. Analyses were performed to calculate the frequency of these events and the proportional mortality by species, year, month, state, and region. Salmonellosis was a significant contributor to mortality in many species of birds; particularly in passerines, for which 21.5% of all mortality events involved salmonellosis. The proportional mortality averaged a 12% annual increase over the 20-yr period, with seasonal peaks in January and April. Increased salmonellosis-related mortality in New England, Southeastern, and Mountain-Prairie states was identified. Based on the results of this study, salmonellosis can be considered an important zoonotic disease of wild birds. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  6. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Half of the subjects trained in the fasted state (F; n = 10), while the others ingested ample carbohydrates before (∼160 g) and during (1 g·kg body wt⁻¹·h⁻¹) the training sessions (CHO; n = 10). The training similarly increased Vo(₂max) (+9%) and performance in a 60-min simulated time trial (+8%) in both groups (P Metabolic measurements were made during a 2-h constant-load exercise bout in the fasted state at ∼65% pretraining Vo(₂max). In F, exercise-induced intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) breakdown was enhanced in type I fibers (P Training did not affect IMCL breakdown in CHO. In addition, F (+21%) increased the exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal rate of fat oxidation more than did CHO (+6%) (P exercise-induced drop in blood glucose concentration (P exercise-induced net IMCL degradation. In addition, F but not CHO prevented drop of blood glucose concentration during fasting exercise.

  7. Update: New Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems Due Out Soon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielke, Catherine C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on several changes in the 2002 edition (forthcoming) of the federal government accounting handbook "Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems." Includes brief summary of "Emerging Issues" section of the handbook that addresses issues such as alternative revenues, charter schools, school safety and security,…

  8. Update: New Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems Due Out Soon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielke, Catherine C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on several changes in the 2002 edition (forthcoming) of the federal government accounting handbook "Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems." Includes brief summary of "Emerging Issues" section of the handbook that addresses issues such as alternative revenues, charter schools, school safety and security,…

  9. Net Costs Due to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination — United States, 2005–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carias, Cristina; Reed, Carrie; Kim, Inkyu K.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Meltzer, Martin I.; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality across all age groups, and influenza vaccination was recommended in 2010 for all persons aged 6 months and above. We estimated the averted costs due to influenza vaccination, taking into account the seasonal economic burden of the disease. Methods We used recently published values for averted outcomes due to influenza vaccination for influenza seasons 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09, and age cohorts 6 months-4 years, 5-19 years, 20-64 years, and 65 years and above. Costs were calculated according to a payer and societal perspective (in 2009 US$), and took into account medical costs and productivity losses. Results When taking into account direct medical costs (payer perspective), influenza vaccination was cost saving only for the older age group (65≥) in seasons 2005-06 and 2007-08. Using the same perspective, influenza vaccination resulted in total costs of $US 1.7 billion (95%CI: $US 0.3–4.0 billion) in 2006-07 and $US 1.8 billion (95%CI: $US 0.1–4.1 billion) in 2008-09. When taking into account a societal perspective (and including the averted lost earnings due to premature death) averted deaths in the older age group influenced the results, resulting in cost savings for all ages combined in season 07-08. Discussion Influenza vaccination was cost saving in the older age group (65≥) when taking into account productivity losses and, in some seasons, when taking into account medical costs only. Averted costs vary significantly per season; however, in seasons where the averted burden of deaths is high in the older age group, averted productivity losses due to premature death tilt overall seasonal results towards savings. Indirect vaccination effects and the possibility of diminished case severity due to influenza vaccination were not considered, thus the averted burden due to influenza vaccine may be even greater than reported. PMID:26230271

  10. Optical Sensing of Polarization States Changes in Meat due to the Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tománek, Pavel; Mikláš, Jan; Abubaker, Hamed Mohamed; Grmela, Lubomír

    2010-11-01

    Food materials or biological materials display large compositional variations, inhomogeneities, and anisotropic structures. The biological tissues consist of cells which dimensions are bigger than a wavelength of visible light, therefore Mie scattering of transmitted and reflected light occurs and different polarization states arise. The meat industry needs reliable meat quality information throughout the production process in order to guarantee high-quality meat products for consumers. The minor importance is still given to the food quality control and inspection during processing operations or storing conditions. The paper presents a quite simple optical method allowing measure the freshness or ageing of products. The principle is to study temporal characteristics of polarization states of forward or backward scattered laser light in the samples in function of meat ageing.

  11. Lower ground state due to counter-rotating wave interaction in trapped ion system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, T; Feng, M

    2007-01-01

    We consider a single ion confined in a trap under radiation of two traveling waves of lasers. In the strong-excitation regime and without the restriction of Lamb-Dicke limit, the Hamiltonian of the system is similar to a driving Jaynes-Cummings model without rotating wave approximation (RWA). The approach we developed enables us to present a complete eigensolutions, which makes it available to compare with the solutions under the RWA. We find that, the ground state in our non-RWA solution is energically lower than the counterpart under the RWA. If we have the ion in the ground state, it is equivalent to a spin dependent force on the trapped ion. Discussion is made for the difference between the solutions with and without the RWA, and for the relevant experimental test, as well as for the possible application in quantum information processing.

  12. Decay length of surface-state wave functions on Bi(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the decay length in surface normal direction of the surface-state wave functions on a clean Bi(1 1 1) surface as a function of two-dimensional (2D) wave vector \\mathbf{k} along the {\\bar Γ }-\\bar{M} line. For this purpose, we perform a first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculation for semi-infinite Bi(1 1 1) by employing the surface embedded Green’s function technique. The decay length of the two surface bands is found to be  ∼24 Bi bilayers at \\bar{M} , while it remains less than 5 Bi bilayers when \\mathbf{k} is away from \\bar{M} and {\\bar Γ } . At {\\bar Γ } , the degenerate surface bands are split from the upper boundary energy of the projected bulk valence bands only by 5 meV. In spite of this, the decay length of these bands at {\\bar Γ } is less than 10 Bi bilayers due to the large effective mass (small curvature) of the highest valence band in the surface normal direction.

  13. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Perea, Anna E; Pastula, Daniel M; Mead, Paul S

    2015-11-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions.

  14. A simple model for the assessment of indoor radionuclide Pb-210 surface contamination due to the presence of radon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrđa Dušan S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented, very simplified model provides a possibility for estimation of surface Pb-210 activity, depending on the changes of Rn-222 concentration during the long-term radon presence inside the closed room. This can be useful for retrospective assessment of the average indoor radon concentration for certain historical period, based on the surface contamination by the radionuclide Pb-210 in a closed or poorly ventilated room over a long period of time. However, the surface Pb-210 contamination depends on the pattern of radon concentration changes, and in this model is supposed that the change of indoor radon concentration, which periodically enters the room, is affected only by the radioactive decay and the inserted amount of radon in each entry. So, each radon entry can be comprehended as a “net amount” of radon, or excess which remains inside the room due to radon’s periodical in-out flow. It is shown, that under the conditions of the model, the achieved average value of radon concentration of 275 Bq/m3, implies that the saturated surface contamination by the Pb-210 of 160 Bq/m2 after approximately 150 years. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171002: Nuclear Methods Investigations of Rare Processes and Cosmic Rays i br. 43002: Biosensing Technologies and Global System for Continuous Research and Integrated Management of ecosystems

  15. Magnetic and nonmagnetic doping dependence of the conducting surface states in Sm B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, B. Y.; Min, Chul-Hee; Lee, S. S.; Song, M. S.; Cho, K. K.; Cho, B. K.

    2016-10-01

    Kondo insulator Sm B6 has attracted attention because it can realize new topological phenomena driven by the interplay between strong correlation effect and topology. However, its topological nature is still under debate. To examine the topological aspect, we demonstrate the nonmagnetic La and magnetic Ce doping dependence of the resistance of Sm B6 . Moreover, the resistance ratios of different thicknesses are analyzed to confirm the surface contribution. Lightly doped La samples show a purely conducting surface region at low temperature, whereas the lightly doped Ce samples do not have any conducting region at low temperature. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the electrical transport data of S m1 -xL axB6 (0.0 ≤x ≤1.0 ), an electronic phase diagram was found, composed of four regions: region I (0.0 ≤x ≤0.06 ), II (0.1 ≤x ≤0.15 ), III (x ≈0.2 ) , and IV (0.25 ≤x ≤1.0 ). Region I is characterized by the presence of conducting surface states, region II is characterized by the insulating phase due to the d -f hybridization gap without the conducting surface state, region III is characterized by the disappearance of the d -f hybridization gap and the existence of valence fluctuation, and region IV is a typical metallic state.

  16. Using gapped topological surface states of Bi2Se3 films in a field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifeng; Singh, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Three dimensional topological insulators are insulators with topologically protected surface states that can have a high band velocity and high mobility at room temperature. This suggests electronic applications that exploit these surface states, but the lack of a band gap poses a fundamental difficulty. We report a first principles study based on density functional theory for thin Bi2Se3 films in the context of a field effect transistor. It is known that a gap is induced in thin layers due to hybridization between the top and bottom surfaces, but it is not known whether it is possible to use the topological states in this type of configuration. In particular, it is unclear whether the benefits of topological protection can be retained to a sufficient degree. We show that there is a thickness regime in which the small gap induced by hybridization between the two surfaces is sufficient to obtain transistor operation at room temperature, and furthermore, that the band velocity and spin texture that are important for the mobility are preserved for Fermi levels of relevance to device application.

  17. Large enhancement of nonlinear Goos-Hänchen shifts and optical bistability due to surface plasmon excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihong

    2015-12-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift of p wave beams incident on a metal-nonlinear dielectric bilayer in the Kretschmann configuration is studied theoretically. The reflectance, the phase of the reflection coefficient and the Goos-Hänchen shift are calculated in a numerically precise manner by using the invariant imbedding method. The Goos-Hänchen shift has been found to be able to take both extremely large positive and negative values due to surface plasmon excitations and very strong bistability and unique hysteresis phenomena appear. In addition, several previous results on the intensity dependence of the Goos-Hänchen shift are pointed out to be erroneous.

  18. Aerosolization properties, surface composition and physical state of spray-dried protein powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquillon, Cynthia; Rouxhet, Paul G; Ahimou, François; Simon, Denis; Culot, Christine; Préat, Véronique; Vanbever, Rita

    2004-10-19

    Powder aerosols made of albumin, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a protein stabilizer (lactose, trehalose or mannitol) were prepared by spray-drying and analyzed for aerodynamic behavior, surface composition and physical state. The powders exited a Spinhaler inhaler as particle aggregates, the size of which depending on composition, spray-drying parameters and airflow rate. However, due to low bulk powder tap density (powders, respectively. Particle surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed a surface enrichment with DPPC relative to albumin for powders prepared under certain spray-drying conditions. DPPC self-organized in a gel phase in the particle and no sugar or mannitol crystals were detected by X-ray diffraction. Water sorption isotherms showed that albumin protected lactose from moisture-induced crystallization. In conclusion, a proper combination of composition and spray-drying parameters allowed to obtain dry powders with elevated fine particle fractions (FPFs) and a physical environment favorable to protein stability.

  19. Photon energy dependence of circular dichroism of the Au(111) surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ärrälä, M.; Nieminen, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Lindroos, M.

    2013-11-01

    Through relativistic photoemission calculations for the Au(111) surface state at the Fermi level, we study the photon energy dependence of circular dichroism. The dichromatic signal (DS) pattern changes 23 times with photon energies between 7 and 100 eV, and we have found 13 different patterns in the k∥ map at the Fermi level for the DS from the Au(111) surface state with normal incidence light. We show that the photon energy dependence of DS is very complex even in the simplest case. The sign change in the circular dichroism as a function of photon energy is related to the relative phases of the complex expansion coefficients of different outgoing partial waves in a time-reversed low-energy electron diffraction state. With off-normal incidence, the z component of the incoming photon field is dominant, and the fine structure seen in the DS in the normal incidence case is lost very rapidly, moving from a normal to an off-normal incidence. We also report that the Rashba split surface state of Au(111) has a significant component of d-type orbital due to relativistic effects and the computational setup used.

  20. Factors related to building loss due to wildfires in the conterminous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Patricia M; Stewart, Susan I; Keuler, Nicholas S; Clayton, Murray K; Mockrin, Miranda H; Bar-Massada, Avi; Syphard, Alexandra D; Radeloff, Volker C

    2016-10-01

    Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). Yet, when wildfires occur, typically only a small proportion of the buildings within the fire perimeter are lost, and the question is what determines which buildings burn. Our goal was to examine which factors are related to building loss when a wildfire occurs throughout the United States. We were particularly interested in the relative roles of vegetation, topography, and the spatial arrangement of buildings, and how their respective roles vary among ecoregions. We analyzed all fires that occurred within the conterminous United States from 2000 to 2010 and digitized which buildings were lost and which survived according to Google Earth historical imagery. We modeled the occurrence as well as the percentage of buildings lost within clusters using logistic and linear regression. Overall, variables related to topography and the spatial arrangement of buildings were more frequently present in the best 20 regression models than vegetation-related variables. In other words, specific locations in the landscape have a higher fire risk, and certain development patterns can exacerbate that risk. Fire policies and prevention efforts focused on vegetation management are important, but insufficient to solve current wildfire problems. Furthermore, the factors associated with building loss varied considerably among ecoregions suggesting that fire policy applied uniformly across the United States will not work equally well in all regions and that efforts to adapt communities to wildfires must be regionally tailored.

  1. Health risks due to pre-harvesting sugarcane burning in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leticia de Souza Paraiso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available After 2003, a new period of expansion of the sugarcane culture began in Brazil. Pre-harvesting burning of sugarcane straw is an agricultural practice that, despite the nuisance for the population and pollution generated, still persisted in over 70% of the municipalities of São Paulo State in 2010. In order to study the distribution of this risk factor, an ecological epidemiological study was conducted associating the rates of deaths and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, for each municipality in the State, with the exposure to the pre-harvesting burning of sugarcane straw. A Bayesian multivariate regression model, controlled for the possible effects of socioeconomic and climate (temperature, humidity, and rainfall variations, has been used. The effect on health was measured by the standardized mortality and morbidity ratio. The measures of exposure to the pre-harvesting burning used were: percentage of the area of sugarcane harvested with burning, average levels of aerosol, and number of outbreaks of burning. The autocorrelation between data was controlled using a neighborhood matrix. It was observed that the increase in the number of outbreaks of burning was significantly associated with higher rates of hospital admissions for respiratory disease in children under five years old. Pre-harvesting burning of sugarcane effectively imposes risk to population health and therefore it should be eliminated.

  2. Job creation due to nuclear power resurgence in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenley, C.R.; Klingler, R.D.; Plowman, C.M.; Soto, R.; Turk, R.J. [R and D Support Services, Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3419 (United States); Baker, R.L.; Close, S.A.; McDonnell, V.L.; Paul, S.W.; Rabideau, L.R.; Rao, S.S.; Reilly, B.P. [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD 21703 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a re-examination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current US industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the United States should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction. (author)

  3. Surface state of carbon nanotubes and Hansen solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detriche, S; Nagy, J B; Mekhalif, Z; Delhalle, J

    2009-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often described as insoluble or poorly soluble in organic solvents. In a recent study, we have reported that nonfunctionalized CNTs can be solubilized in suitably chosen organic solvents. Furthermore, their solubility could be understood in terms of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs). The present work addresses further the question of the CNTs solubility by considering a larger range of solvents. A second part is devoted to the application of the HSPs to two types of functionalized CNTs: oxidized and silanized. These results stress the critical role played by the surface state of the CNTs, on the one hand, and the interest in using the HSPs to guide solubility investigations, on the other hand.

  4. Superconducting quantum criticality of topological surface states at three loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerf, Nikolai; Lin, Chien-Hung; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of a 3D topological insulator is conjectured to exhibit an emergent N =2 supersymmetry, based on a one-loop renormalization group (RG) analysis in the ɛ expansion. We provide additional support for this conjecture by performing a three-loop RG analysis and showing that the supersymmetric fixed point found at this order survives the extrapolation to 2D. We compute critical exponents to order ɛ3, obtaining the more accurate value ν ≈0.985 for the correlation length exponent and confirming that the fermion and boson anomalous dimensions remain unchanged beyond one loop, as expected from non-renormalization theorems in supersymmetric theories. We further couple the system to a dynamical U(1) gauge field, and argue that the transition becomes fluctuation-induced first order in an appropriate type-I regime. We discuss implications of this result for quantum phase transitions between certain symmetry-preserving correlated surface states of 3D topological insulators.

  5. Projectile charge state dependent sputtering of solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hayderer, G

    2000-01-01

    dependence on the ion kinetic energy. This new type of potential sputtering not only requires electronic excitation of the target material, but also the formation of a collision cascade within the target in order to initiate the sputtering process and has therefore been termed kinetically assisted potential sputtering. In order to study defects induced by potential sputtering on the atomic scale we performed measurements of multiply charged Ar ion irradiated HOPG (highly oriented pyrolitic graphite) samples with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The only surface defects found in the STM images are protrusions. The mean diameter of the defects increases with projectile charge state while the height of the protrusions stays roughly the same indicating a possible pre-equilibrium effect of the stopping of slow multiply charged projectiles in HOPG. Total sputter yields for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on metal- (Au), oxide- (Al2O3, MgO) and alkali-halide surfaces (LiF) have been measured as a...

  6. First-principles study on adsorption structure and electronic state of stanene on α-alumina surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araidai, Masaaki; Kurosawa, Masashi; Ohta, Akio; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    The adsorption structure and electronic state of stanene on an α-Al2O3(0001) 1×1 surface were investigated by first-principles calculations. The variation in the electronic state of the adsorbed stanene from that of the free-standing one increased with the stanene-alumina distance, because the strength of the stanene-alumina interaction increased with the distance. The band splitting induced by the Rashba effect was observed in the electronic band structures. It was observed from the band structures with spin-orbit interactions that the degrees of band-gap opening due to the spin-orbit interactions were much lower than that due to the interaction between stanene and the α-alumina surface. By population analyses for chemical bonds, we revealed that the electronic state of stanene on the α-alumina surface was affected by Sn-O bonds with antibonding nature.

  7. Climate change. Projected increase in lightning strikes in the United States due to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romps, David M; Seeley, Jacob T; Vollaro, David; Molinari, John

    2014-11-14

    Lightning plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry and in the initiation of wildfires, but the impact of global warming on lightning rates is poorly constrained. Here we propose that the lightning flash rate is proportional to the convective available potential energy (CAPE) times the precipitation rate. Using observations, the product of CAPE and precipitation explains 77% of the variance in the time series of total cloud-to-ground lightning flashes over the contiguous United States (CONUS). Storms convert CAPE times precipitated water mass to discharged lightning energy with an efficiency of 1%. When this proxy is applied to 11 climate models, CONUS lightning strikes are predicted to increase 12 ± 5% per degree Celsius of global warming and about 50% over this century.

  8. Incidences of poisonings due to Chlorophyllum molybdites in the state of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André August Remi de Meijer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Three recent cases of poisoning by Chlorophyllum molybdites, including the first one known from Brazil, have been reported from the state of Paraná. A morphological description of the material causing the first poisoning was provided and the associated case history has been described in detail. An overview of this species' distribution in Brazil is given.Três casos recentes de envenenamento por Chlorophyllum molybdites, incluindo o primeiro caso conhecido para o Brasil, são relatados do Estado do Paraná. Uma descrição morfológica do material que causou o primeiro envenenamento é apresentada, assim como uma narrativa detalhada do respectivo caso clínico. É, ainda, fornecido um panorama da distribuição desta espécie no Brasil.

  9. Mirror-symmetry protected non-TRIM surface state in the weak topological insulator Bi2TeI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Isaeva, A.; Eremeev, S. V.; Koroteev, Yu. M.; Vergniory, M. G.; Echenique, P. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Strong topological insulators (TIs) support topological surfaces states on any crystal surface. In contrast, a weak, time-reversal-symmetry-driven TI with at least one non-zero v1, v2, v3 ℤ2 index should host spin-locked topological surface states on the surfaces that are not parallel to the crystal plane with Miller indices (v1 v2 v3). On the other hand, mirror symmetry can protect an even number of topological states on the surfaces that are perpendicular to a mirror plane. Various symmetries in a bulk material with a band inversion can independently preordain distinct crystal planes for realization of topological states. Here we demonstrate the first instance of coexistence of both phenomena in the weak 3D TI Bi2TeI which (v1 v2 v3) surface hosts a gapless spin-split surface state protected by the crystal mirror-symmetry. The observed topological state has an even number of crossing points in the directions of the 2D Brillouin zone due to a non-TRIM bulk-band inversion. Our findings shed light on hitherto uncharted features of the electronic structure of weak topological insulators and open up new vistas for applications of these materials in spintronics. PMID:26864814

  10. Mirror-symmetry protected non-TRIM surface state in the weak topological insulator Bi2TeI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Isaeva, A.; Eremeev, S. V.; Koroteev, Yu. M.; Vergniory, M. G.; Echenique, P. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    Strong topological insulators (TIs) support topological surfaces states on any crystal surface. In contrast, a weak, time-reversal-symmetry-driven TI with at least one non-zero v1, v2, v3 ℤ2 index should host spin-locked topological surface states on the surfaces that are not parallel to the crystal plane with Miller indices (v1 v2 v3). On the other hand, mirror symmetry can protect an even number of topological states on the surfaces that are perpendicular to a mirror plane. Various symmetries in a bulk material with a band inversion can independently preordain distinct crystal planes for realization of topological states. Here we demonstrate the first instance of coexistence of both phenomena in the weak 3D TI Bi2TeI which (v1 v2 v3) surface hosts a gapless spin-split surface state protected by the crystal mirror-symmetry. The observed topological state has an even number of crossing points in the directions of the 2D Brillouin zone due to a non-TRIM bulk-band inversion. Our findings shed light on hitherto uncharted features of the electronic structure of weak topological insulators and open up new vistas for applications of these materials in spintronics.

  11. Forced synchronization of large-scale circulation to increase predictability of surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mao-Lin; Keenlyside, Noel; Selten, Frank; Wiegerinck, Wim; Duane, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models are key tools in the projection of the future climate change. The lack of perfect initial condition and perfect knowledge of the laws of physics, as well as inherent chaotic behavior limit predictions. Conceptually, the atmospheric variables can be decomposed into a predictable component (signal) and an unpredictable component (noise). In ensemble prediction the anomaly of ensemble mean is regarded as the signal and the ensemble spread the noise. Naturally the prediction skill will be higher if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is larger in the initial conditions. We run two ensemble experiments in order to explore a way to reduce the SNR of surface winds and temperature. One ensemble experiment is AGCM with prescribing sea surface temperature (SST); the other is AGCM with both prescribing SST and nudging the high-level temperature and winds to ERA-Interim. Each ensemble has 30 members. Larger SNR is expected and found over the tropical ocean in the first experiment because the tropical circulation is associated with the convection and the associated surface wind convergence as these are to a large extent driven by the SST. However, small SNR is found over high latitude ocean and land surface due to the chaotic and non-synchronized atmosphere states. In the second experiment the higher level temperature and winds are forced to be synchronized (nudged to reanalysis) and hence a larger SNR of surface winds and temperature is expected. Furthermore, different nudging coefficients are also tested in order to understand the limitation of both synchronization of large-scale circulation and the surface states. These experiments will be useful for the developing strategies to synchronize the 3-D states of atmospheric models that can be later used to build a super model.

  12. Effective impedance for predicting the existence of surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Fang, Anan; Chan, C. T.

    2016-03-01

    We build an effective impedance for two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PCs) comprising a rectangular lattice of dielectric cylinders with the incident electric field polarized along the axis of the cylinders. In particular, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an effective impedance for the case where the Bloch wave vector is far away from the center of Brillouin zone, where the optical response of the PC is necessarily anisotropic, and hence the effective description becomes inevitably angle dependent. We employ the scattering theory and treat the 2D system as a stack of 1D arrays. We consider only the zero-order interlayer diffraction, and all the higher order diffraction terms of interlayer scattering are ignored. This approximation works well when the higher order diffraction terms are all evanescent waves and the interlayer distance is far enough for them to decay out. Scattering theory enables the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a finite-sized slab, and we extract the effective parameters such as the effective impedance (Ze) and the effective refractive index (ne) using a parameter retrieval method. We note that ne is uniquely defined only in a very limited region of the reciprocal space. (nek0a ≪1 , where k0 is the wave vector inside the vacuum and a is thickness of the slab for retrieval), but Ze is uniquely defined and has a well-defined meaning inside a much larger domain in the reciprocal space. For a lossless system, the effective impedance Ze is purely real for the pass band and purely imaginary in the band gaps. Using the sign of the imaginary part of Ze, we can classify the band gaps into two groups, and this classification explains why there is usually no surface state on the boundary of typical fully gapped PCs composed of a lattice of dielectric cylinders. This effective medium approach also allows us to predict the dispersion of surface states even when the surface wave vectors are well beyond the zone

  13. Polymer bilayer formation due to specific interactions between beta-cyclodextrin and adamantane: a surface force study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Eva; Kumpulainen, Atte; David, Christelle; Amiel, Catherine

    2004-11-23

    The purposes of this study are to utilize the interactions between an adamantane end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and a cationic polymer of beta-cyclodextrin to build polymer bilayers on negatively charged surfaces, and to investigate the interactions between such layers. The association of this system in solution has been studied by rheology, light scattering, and fluorescence measurements. It was found that the adamantane-terminated PEO (PEO-Ad) mixed with the beta-cyclodextrin polymer gives complexes where the interpolymer links are formed by specific inclusion of the adamantane groups in the beta-cyclodextrin cavities. This results in a higher viscosity of the solution and growth of intermolecular clusters. The interactions between surfaces coated with a cationized beta-cyclodextrin polymer across a water solution containing PEO-Ad polymers were studied by employing the interferometric surface force apparatus (SFA). In the first step, the interaction between mica surfaces coated with the cationized beta-cyclodextrin polymer in pure water was investigated. It was found that the beta-cyclodextrin polymer adsorbs onto mica and almost neutralizes the surface charge. The adsorbed layers of the beta-cyclodextrin polymer are rather compact, with a layer thickness of about 60 A (30 A per surface). Upon separation, a very weak attractive force is observed. The beta-cyclodextrin solution was then diluted by pure water by a factor of 3000 and a PEO-Ad polymer was introduced into the solution. Two different architectures of the PEO-Ad polymer were investigated: a four-arm structure and a linear structure. After the adsorption of the PEO polymer onto the beta-cyclodextrin layer reached equilibrium, the forces were measured again. It was found that the weak repulsive long-range force had disappeared and an attractive force caused the surfaces to jump into contact, and that the compressed layer thickness had increased. The attractive force is interpreted as being due to

  14. An Updated Estimation of Radiative Forcing due to CO2 and Its Effect on Global Surface Temperature Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; ZHANG Ruoyu; SHI Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    New estimations of radiative forcing due to CO2 were calculated using updated concentration data of CO2 and a high-resolution radiative transfer model.The stratospheric adjusted radiative forcing (ARF)due to CO2 from the year 1750 to the updated year of 2010 was found to have increased to 1.95 W m-2,which was 17% larger than that of the IPCC's 4th Assessment Report because of the rapid increase in CO2 concentrations since 2005.A new formula is proposed to accurately describe the relationship between the ARF of CO2 and its concentration.Furthermore,according to the relationship between the ARF and surface temperature change,possible changes in equilibrium surface temperature were estimated under the scenarios that the concentration of CO2 increases to 1.5,2,2.5,3,3.5 and 4 times that of the concentration in the year 2008.The result was values of +2.2℃,+3.8℃,+5.1℃,+6.2℃,+7.1℃ and +8.0℃ respectively,based on a middle-level climate sensitivity parameter of 0.8 K (W m-2)-1.Non-equilibrium surface temperature changes over the next 500 years were also calculated under two kinds of emission scenarios (pulsed and sustained emissions) as a comparison,according to the Absolute Global Temperature change Potential (AGTP) of CO2.Results showed that CO2 will likely continue to contribute to global warming if no emission controls are imposed,and the effect on the Earth-atmosphere system will be difficult to restore to its original level.

  15. Alteration of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition in the Martian surface rocks due to cosmic ray exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-06-01

    13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce 13C and 15N isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both 13C and 15N due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (15N/14N). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  16. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  17. Temperature rise in objects due to optical focused beam through atmospheric turbulence near ground and ocean surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneback, Matthew; Ishimaru, Akira; Reinhardt, Colin; Kuga, Yasuo

    2013-03-01

    We consider an optical beam propagated through the atmosphere and incident on an object causing a temperature rise. In clear air, the physical characteristics of the optical beam transmitted to the object surface are influenced primarily by the effect of atmospheric turbulence, which can be significant near the ground or ocean surface. We use a statistical model to quantify the expected power transfer through turbulent atmosphere and provide guidance toward the threshold of thermal blooming for the considered scenarios. The bulk thermal characteristics of the materials considered are used in a thermal diffusion model to determine the net temperature rise at the object surface due to the incident optical beam. These results of the study are presented in graphical form and are of particular interest to operators of high power laser systems operating over large distances through the atmosphere. Numerical examples include a CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) with: aperture size of 5 cm, varied pulse duration, and propagation distance of 0.5 km incident on 0.1-mm copper, 10-mm polyimide, 1-mm water, and 10-mm glass/resin composite targets. To assess the effect of near ground/ocean laser propagation, we compare turbulent (of varying degrees) and nonturbulent atmosphere.

  18. Is Asteroid 951 Gaspra in a Resonant State with Its Spin Increasing Due to YORP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rowlands, David D.; Ray, Richard D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Asteroid 951 Gaspra appears to be in an obliquity resonance with its spin increasing due to the YORP effect. Gaspra, an asteroid 5.8 km in radius, is a prograde rotator with a rotation period of 7.03 hours. A three million year integration indicates its orbit is stable over at least this time span. From its known shape and spin axis orientation and assuming a uniform density, Gaspra's axial precession period turns out to be nearly commensurate with its orbital precession period, which leads to a resonance condition with consequent huge variations in its obliquity. At the same time its shape is such that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack effect (YORP effect for short) is increasing its spin rate. The YORP cycle normally leads from spin-up to spin-down and then repeating the cycle; however, it appears possible that resonance trapping can at least temporarily interrupt the YORP cycle, causing spin-up until the resonance is exited. This behavior may partially explain why there is an excess of fast rotators among small asteroids. YORP may also be a reason for small asteroids entering resonances in the first place.

  19. Friction surface cladding: development of a solid state cladding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der Adrianus Anton

    2014-01-01

    Many industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, shipbuilding, offshore, railway and heavy equipment employ surface modification technologies to change the surface properties of a manufactured product. Often, the surface is covered (coated) with a dissimilar clad layer for this purpose

  20. Induced superconductivity in the surface state of mercury telluride (HgTe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Luis; Knott, Daniel; Ames, Christopher; Bruene, Christoph; Leubner, Philipp; Oostinga, Jeroen; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W. [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universitaet Wuerzburg, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    It has been recently shown that the strained epitaxial growth of bulk HgTe layers opens a band gap in the normally semi-metallic material. This means that strained HgTe meets all prerequisites of a topological insulator, i.e. surface states and an insulating bulk, which does not contribute to transport measurements. The interfaces between topological insulators and superconductors are especially interesting due to the possibility of creation and detection of majorana fermions. Our current work is focussing on investigating contacts between strained HgTe and Nb as a superconducting material. First results show proximity effect and multiple sub gap features which are discussed in detail.

  1. Comparison of pulse height spectra on CsI(T1)/PIN photodiode radiation detector due to surface encapsulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Soo; Ha, Jang Ho; Jeong, Man Hee; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Dong Jin; Cho, Woo Jin; Choi, Hyo Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seung Yeon [Environmental Health Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Scintillation crystal converts the energy deposited by an X-ray or gamma ray to light. Usually this scintillation light is collected, converted to electrons and amplified by an photomultiplier tube (PMT). The PMT has the drawbacks of being bulky and requiring a high voltage (HV) to operate it. This scinitllation light can also be collected in a solid state photo-detector, such as a silicon PIN photodiode and an avanlanche photodiode. PIN photodiode, which have 10 mm X 10 mm{sup 2} active area, were fabricated with anti-reflective coating and match with CsI(Tl) scintillator. In this study, radiation reasonabilities were compared with and without surface encapsulant epoxy. Silicon PIN Photodiodes were fabricated with AR coating. To match with CsI(Tl) scintillator, surface encapsulant was applied on the PIN photodiodes. Leakage currents for all the PIN photodiodes show several nA up to 100 V. The pulse height spectra and comparison of the CsI(Tl)PIN photodiode in case of surface encapsulation on PIN photodiode will be presented at the conference.

  2. First principles calculations of relationship between the Cu surface states and relaxations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yao-Ping; Luo Ying; Liu Shao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the surface relaxations and the electron density distributions of surface states of Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) surfaces is obtained by first-principles calculations. The calculations indicate that relaxations mainly occur in the layers at which the surface states electrons are localized, and the magnitudes of the multilayer relaxations correspond to the difference of electron density of surface states between adjacent layers. The larger the interlayer relaxation is, the larger the difference of electron density of surface states between two layers is.

  3. Emission of correlated electron pairs from Au(111) and Cu(111) surfaces under low-energy electron impact: Contribution of surface states, d-states and spin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, S., E-mail: samar@physics.uwa.edu.au [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artamonov, O.M. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Guagliardo, P. [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, UWA, Perth (Australia); Pravica, L. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Baraban, A. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schumann, F.O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Williams, J.F. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy (e,2e) was applied for studying surface states on Cu(111) and Au(111). • Relative (to d-states) contribution of surface states in the (e,2e) spectrum decreases exponentially when primary electron energy increases from 14 to 30 eV. • Spin asymmetry is readily observed in the spectra of Au(111) whereas in the spectra of Cu(111) the spin effect is negligible. - Abstract: The emission of correlated electron pairs excited from surfaces of Au(111) and Cu(111) by low-energy electrons is measured and analyzed. Energy and momentum conservation allows identification of electron pairs involving excitation of electrons from Shockley surface states and from valence d-states. The relative contributions of surface and d-states to the measured spectra of correlated electron pairs is shown to depend on the primary electron energy and is larger from surface states at relatively small primary energies. The use of a spin-polarized incident electron beam highlights the spin effects in producing an electron pair. Measurements show that spin effects are larger for the pair excitation from the valence d-states than for pairs excited from the surface states.

  4. Dependence of implantation sequence on surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J.H. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, H.Y.; Wu, C.W. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, C.M. [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon at room temperature. The H and He ion energies were 40 and 50 keV, respectively, so that their depth profiles were similar. The total implantation fluence for the H and He ions was 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} under various fluence fractions in the H ions. The implantation sequences under investigation were He + H and H + He. Dynamic optical microscopy (DOM) was employed in order to dynamically analyze surface blistering characteristics. This study used DOM data to construct so-called time–temperature–transformation (T–T–T) curves to easily predict blistering and crater transformation at specific annealing times and temperatures. The results revealed that the curves of blister initialization, crater initialization, and crater completion in the He + H implant occurred at a lower annealing temperature but with a longer annealing time compared to those in the H + He implant. Furthermore, the threshold annealing temperatures for blister and crater formation in the He + H implant were lower than they were in the H + He implant. The size distributions of the blisters and craters in the He + H implant extended wider than those in the H + He implant. In addition, the He + H implant exhibited larger blisters and craters compared to the ones in the H + He implant. Since the former has a higher percentage of exfoliation area than the latter, it is regarded as the more optimal implantation sequence.

  5. Spectral Dependent Degradation of the Solar Diffuser on Suomi-NPP VIIRS Due to Surface Roughness-Induced Rayleigh Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Shao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (SNPP uses a solar diffuser (SD as its radiometric calibrator for the reflective solar band calibration. The SD is made of Spectralon™ (one type of fluoropolymer and was chosen because of its controlled reflectance in the Visible/Near-Infrared/Shortwave-Infrared region and its near-Lambertian reflectance property. On-orbit changes in VIIRS SD reflectance as monitored by the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor showed faster degradation of SD reflectance for 0.4 to 0.6 µm channels than the longer wavelength channels. Analysis of VIIRS SD reflectance data show that the spectral dependent degradation of SD reflectance in short wavelength can be explained with a SD Surface Roughness (length scale << wavelength based Rayleigh Scattering (SRRS model due to exposure to solar UV radiation and energetic particles. The characteristic length parameter of the SD surface roughness is derived from the long term reflectance data of the VIIRS SD and it changes at approximately the tens of nanometers level over the operational period of VIIRS. This estimated roughness length scale is consistent with the experimental result from radiation exposure of a fluoropolymer sample and validates the applicability of the Rayleigh scattering-based model. The model is also applicable to explaining the spectral dependent degradation of the SDs on other satellites. This novel approach allows us to better understand the physical processes of the SD degradation, and is complementary to previous mathematics based models.

  6. Global crop yield reductions due to surface ozone exposure: 1. Year 2000 crop production losses and economic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Liu, Junfeng; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O 3) causes substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O 3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O 3 exposure appear likely to increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from 6 to 9 billion between 2000 and 2050. This study estimates year 2000 global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure using hourly O 3 concentrations simulated by the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 2.4 (MOZART-2). We calculate crop losses according to two metrics of ozone exposure - seasonal daytime (08:00-19:59) mean O 3 (M12) and accumulated O 3 above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40) - and predict crop yield losses using crop-specific O 3 concentration:response functions established by field studies. Our results indicate that year 2000 O 3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the metric used, from 8.5-14% for soybean, 3.9-15% for wheat, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth $11-18 billion annually (USD 2000). Our calculated yield reductions agree well with previous estimates, providing further evidence that yields of major crops across the globe are already being substantially reduced by exposure to surface ozone - a risk that will grow unless O 3-precursor emissions are curbed in the future or crop cultivars are developed and utilized that are resistant to O 3.

  7. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kayo, Issha [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: kashiwagi@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 μm and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ≡ (νL){sub 100} {sub μm}/(νL) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  8. Solid state chemistry of nitrogen oxides--part II: surface consumption of NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, S; Fedoseev, G; Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Linnartz, H

    2014-05-14

    Nitrogen oxides are considered to be important astrochemical precursors of complex species and prebiotics. However, apart from the hydrogenation of solid NO that leads to the surface formation of hydroxylamine, little is known about the full solid state reaction network involving both nitrogen and oxygen. Our study is divided into two papers, hereby called Part I and Part II. In the accompanying paper, we investigate the surface reactions NO + O/O2/O3 and NO + N with a focus on the formation of NO2 ice. Here, we complement this study by measurements of the surface destruction of solid NO2, e.g., NO2 + H/O/N. Experiments are performed in two separate ultra-high vacuum setups and therefore under different experimental conditions to better constrain the experimental results. Surface reaction products are monitored by means of Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) techniques using mass spectrometry. The surface destruction of solid NO2 leads to the formation of a series of nitrogen oxides such as NO, N2O, N2O3, and N2O4 as well as HNO, NH2OH, and H2O. When NO2 is mixed with an interstellar more relevant apolar (i.e., CO) ice, solid CO2 and HCOOH are also formed due to interactions between different reaction routes. The astrophysical implications of the full nitrogen and oxygen reaction network derived from Parts I and II are discussed.

  9. State injection, lattice surgery, and dense packing of the deformation-based surface code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Shota; Satoh, Takahiko; Van Meter, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Resource consumption of the conventional surface code is expensive, in part due to the need to separate the defects that create the logical qubit far apart on the physical qubit lattice. We propose that instantiating the deformation-based surface code using superstabilizers will make it possible to detect short error chains connecting the superstabilizers, allowing us to place logical qubits close together. Additionally, we demonstrate the process of conversion from the defect-based surface code, which works as arbitrary state injection, and a lattice-surgery-like controlled not (cnot) gate implementation that requires fewer physical qubits than the braiding cnot gate. Finally, we propose a placement design for the deformation-based surface code and analyze its resource consumption; large-scale quantum computation requires 25/d2+170 d +289 4 physical qubits per logical qubit, where d is the code distance of the standard surface code, whereas the planar code requires 16 d2-16 d +4 physical qubits per logical qubit, for a reduction of about 50%.

  10. Reported foodborne outbreaks due to fresh produce in the United States and European Union: trends and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, Raquel M; Rodríguez-Naranjo, M Isabel; Ubeda, Cristina; Hornedo-Ortega, Ruth; Garcia-Parrilla, M Carmen; Troncoso, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of fruit and vegetables continues to rise in the United States and European Union due to healthy lifestyle recommendations. Meanwhile, the rate of foodborne illness caused by the consumption of these products remains high in both regions, representing a significant public health and financial issue. This study addresses the occurrence of reported foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables consumption in the United States and European Union during the period 2004-2012, where data are available. Special attention is paid to those pathogens responsible for these outbreaks, the mechanisms of contamination, and the fresh produce vehicles involved. Norovirus is shown to be responsible for most of the produce-related outbreaks, followed by Salmonella. Norovirus is mainly linked with the consumption of salad in the United States and of berries in the European Union, as demonstrated by the Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). Salmonella was the leading cause of multistate produce outbreaks in the United States and was the pathogen involved in the majority of sprouts-associated outbreaks. As is reflected in the MCA, the pattern of fresh produce outbreaks differed in the United States and European Union by the type of microorganism and the food vehicle involved.

  11. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  12. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Fernandez, Vincent; Veenstra, Rick; Dukstiene, Nijole; Roberts, Adam; Fairley, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  13. Effect of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the 2016 Central Tottori Earthquake, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takao; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Shohei; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2017-08-01

    On October 21, 2016, an earthquake with Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) magnitude 6.6 hit the central part of Tottori Prefecture, Japan. This paper demonstrates two notable effects of the surface geology on strong ground motions due to the earthquake. One is a predominant period issue observed over a large area. A seismic intensity of 6 lower on the JMA scale was registered at three sites in the disaster area. However, the peak ground acceleration ranged from 0.3 to 1.4 G at the three sites because of the varying peak periods of observed strong ground motions. The spectral properties of the observations also reflect the damage around the sites. Three-component microtremors were observed in the area; the predominant ground period distributions based on horizontal to vertical spectral ratios were provided by the authors. The peak periods of the strong motion records agree well with predominant periods estimated from microtremor observations at a rather hard site; however, the predominant periods of the microtremors are slightly shorter than those of the main shock at the other two soft sites. We checked the nonlinear effect at the sites by comparing the site responses to small events and the main shock. The peak periods of the main shock were longer than those of the weak motions at the sites. This phenomenon indicates a nonlinear site effect due to large ground motions caused by the main shock. A horizontal component of the accelerogram showed rather pulsating swings that indicate cyclic mobility behavior, especially at a site close to a pond shore; ground subsidence of 20 cm was observed around the site. The peak periods of weak motions agree well with those of the microtremor observations. This implies an important issue that the predominant periods estimated by microtremors are not sufficient to estimate the effect of surface geology for disaster mitigation. We have to estimate the predominant periods under large ground motions considering the nonlinear site

  14. The crystal structure of Haloferax volcanii proliferating cell nuclear antigen reveals unique surface charge characteristics due to halophilic adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morroll Shaun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high intracellular salt concentration required to maintain a halophilic lifestyle poses challenges to haloarchaeal proteins that must stay soluble, stable and functional in this extreme environment. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a fundamental protein involved in maintaining genome integrity, with roles in both DNA replication and repair. To investigate the halophilic adaptation of such a key protein we have crystallised and solved the structure of Haloferax volcanii PCNA (HvPCNA to a resolution of 2.0 Å. Results The overall architecture of HvPCNA is very similar to other known PCNAs, which are highly structurally conserved. Three commonly observed adaptations in halophilic proteins are higher surface acidity, bound ions and increased numbers of intermolecular ion pairs (in oligomeric proteins. HvPCNA possesses the former two adaptations but not the latter, despite functioning as a homotrimer. Strikingly, the positive surface charge considered key to PCNA's role as a sliding clamp is dramatically reduced in the halophilic protein. Instead, bound cations within the solvation shell of HvPCNA may permit sliding along negatively charged DNA by reducing electrostatic repulsion effects. Conclusion The extent to which individual proteins adapt to halophilic conditions varies, presumably due to their diverse characteristics and roles within the cell. The number of ion pairs observed in the HvPCNA monomer-monomer interface was unexpectedly low. This may reflect the fact that the trimer is intrinsically stable over a wide range of salt concentrations and therefore additional modifications for trimer maintenance in high salt conditions are not required. Halophilic proteins frequently bind anions and cations and in HvPCNA cation binding may compensate for the remarkable reduction in positive charge in the pore region, to facilitate functional interactions with DNA. In this way, HvPCNA may harness its environment as

  15. Uncertainties in surface mass and energy flux estimates due to different eddy covariance sensors and technical set-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriga, Nicola; Fratini, Gerardo; Forgione, Antonio; Tomassucci, Michele; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    Eddy covariance is a well established and widely used methodology for the measurement of turbulent fluxes of mass and energy in the atmospheric boundary layer, in particular to estimate CO2/H2O and heat exchange above ecologically relevant surfaces (Aubinet 2000, Baldocchi 2003). Despite its long term application and theoretical studies, many issues are still open about the effect of different experimental set-up on final flux estimates. Open issues are the evaluation of the performances of different kind of sensors (e.g. open path vs closed path infra-red gas analysers, vertical vs horizontal mounting ultrasonic anemometers), the quantification of the impact of corresponding physical corrections to be applied to get robust flux estimates taking in account all processes concurring to the measurement (e.g. the so-called WPL term, signal attenuation due to air sampling system for closed path analyser, relative position of analyser and anemometer) and the differences between several data transmission protocols used (analogue, digital RS-232, SDM). A field experiment was designed to study these issues using several instruments among those most used within the Fluxnet community and to compare their performances under conditions supposed to be critical: rainy and cold weather conditions for open-path analysers (Burba 2008), water transport and absorption at high air relative humidity conditions for closed-path systems (Ibrom, 2007), frequency sampling limits and recorded data robustness due to different transmission protocols (RS232, SDM, USB, Ethernet) and finally the effect of the displacement between anemometer and analyser using at least two identical analysers placed at different horizontal and vertical distances from the anemometer. Aim of this experiment is to quantify the effect of several technical solutions on the final estimates of fluxes measured at a point in the space and if they represent a significant source of uncertainty for mass and energy cycle

  16. Modulation of aerosol radiative forcing due to mixing state in clear and cloudy-sky: A case study from Delhi National Capital Region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Parul; Dey, Sagnik; Srivastava, Atul K.; Singh, Sachchidanand; Tiwari, Suresh; Agarwal, Poornima

    2016-04-01

    .4, 2.2±1.1, -1.4±1.4, -0.15±0.13, while, surface ARF is -16.4±3.1, -7.6±1.7, -31.5±4.7, -17.1±8.4, respectively for the MAMJ, JAS, ON and DJF seasons. Post-monsoon and winter season shows negative values of TOA ARF, hence suggest 'cooling'. The associated heating rate profiles show higher values for 'WS-BC+Dust+WINS' case as compared to other cases, with relatively large values during the winter and post-monsoon seasons, while lower value was observed for 'BC-WINS+WS+Dust'. We examined the modulation of clear sky ARF by 'water-cloud' and 'ice-cloud' separately. The seasonal mean ARF for both water and ice clouds show nearly similar characteristics as observed for clear-sky case, with relatively large ARF at TOA and surface in water cloud case as compared to ice cloud during all the seasons. As a result, the associated heating rate is also relatively higher in water cloud case as compared to ice cloud. Such large modulation of ARF due to mixing state calls for a coordinated effort to create a mixing state database for this region to reduce the uncertainty in climate forcing.

  17. Tailoring surface states in WO{sub 3} photoanodes for efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Trilok; Müller, Ralf [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cologne, Greinstrasse-6, D-50939 Cologne (Germany); Singh, Jai [Institute of Advanced Materials Engineering, Department of Nano Science and Technology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Mathur, Sanjay, E-mail: sanjay.mathur@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cologne, Greinstrasse-6, D-50939 Cologne (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • WO{sub 3} thin films have been synthesized by reactive sputtering under oxygen atmosphere. • Surface treatment of WO{sub 3} influences the optical and photoelectrochemical properties. • Tailoring the surface properties by (i) hydrogen plasma treatment and (ii) anchoring plasmonic nanoparticles (Au and Ag) altered the light harvesting and charge separation/transport processes of WO{sub 3} photoanodes. - Abstract: The dynamics of photo-induced charge carriers are significantly influenced by the surface states of WO{sub 3} thin films, which were synthesized by reactive sputtering of tungsten substrates in oxygen plasma. Tailoring the surface properties by (i) hydrogen plasma treatment and (ii) anchoring plasmonic nanoparticles (Au and Ag) altered the light harvesting and charge separation/transport processes of WO{sub 3} photoanodes. Upon hydrogen plasma-treatment and coating of noble metal clusters, WO{sub 3} films showed enhanced visible light absorption and consequently higher photocurrent density (1.4 mA cm{sup −2}) compared to pristine WO{sub 3} (0.2 mA cm{sup −2}). Enhancement in hydrogen treated WO{sub 3} sample was found to be due to the reduction of W(VI) into W(V) centers, which produced substoichiometric WO{sub 3−x} phases, whereas noble metal particles contributed towards both resonant and non-resonant scattering of incident light thereby increasing photon-to-current conversion efficiency.

  18. The Band-Edge Behavior of the Density of Surfacic States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, Werner [Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Mathematik and SFB-TR 12 (Germany)], E-mail: werner.kirsch@rub.de; Klopp, Frederic [Universite de Paris-Nord, LAGA, UMR 7539 CNRS, Institut Galilee (France)], E-mail: klopp@math.univ-paris13.fr

    2006-05-15

    This paper is devoted to the asymptotics of the density of surfacic states near the spectral edges for a discrete surfacic Anderson model. Two types of spectral edges have to be considered: fluctuating edges and stable edges. Each type has its own type of asymptotics. In the case of fluctuating edges, one obtains Lifshitz tails the parameters of which are given by the initial operator suitably 'reduced' to the surface. For stable edges, the surface density of states behaves like the surface density of states of a constant (equal to the expectation of the random potential) surface potential. Among the tools used to establish this are the asymptotics of the surface density of states for constant surface potentials.

  19. Role of surface states in the Casimir force between semiconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Govoni, Marco; Benassi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We present results of first principle calculations of the Casimir force between Si films of nanometric size, which show that it depends significantly upon the configuration of the surface atoms, and give evidence of the importance of surface states.

  20. Structural, chemical surface and transport modifications of regenerated cellulose dense membranes due to low-dose {gamma}-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.I. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Heredia-Guerrero, J.A., E-mail: jose.alejandro@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Americo Vespuccio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Galan, P. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Benitez, J.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Americo Vespuccio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Benavente, J. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Low dose {gamma}-radiation causes slight structural, chemical and morphological changes on regenerated cellulose films. {yields} Induced structural changes increase the fragility of irradiated films. {yields} Structural modifications reduce ion permeability of films. - Abstract: Modifications caused in commercial dense regenerated cellulose (RC) flat membranes by low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (average photons energy of 1.23 MeV) are studied. Slight structural, chemical and morphological surface changes due to irradiation in three films with different RC content were determined by ATR-FTIR, XRD, XPS and AFM. Also, the alteration of their mechanical elasticity has been studied. Modification of membrane performance was determined from solute diffusion coefficient and effective membrane fixed charge concentration obtained from NaCl diffusion measurements. Induced structural changes defining new and effective fracture propagation directions are considered to be responsible for the increase of fragility of irradiated RC membranes. The same structural changes are proposed to explain the reduction of the membrane ion permeability through a mechanism involving either ion pathways elongation and/or blocking.

  1. Selection of conformational states in surface self-assembly for a molecule with eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli; Schultz-Falk, Vickie; Lind Cramer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a molecule with many distinct conformational states, resulting in eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers, is investigated on a Au(111) surface under UHV conditions. The complex molecule is equipped with alkyl and carboxyl moieties to promote controlled self-assembly of lamel...

  2. Termination-dependent topological surface states of the natural superlattice phase Bi4Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Q. D.; Schoop, L. M.; Weber, A. P.; Ji, Huiwen; Nadj-Perge, S.; Drozdov, I. K.; Beidenkopf, H.; Sadowski, J. T.; Fedorov, A.; Yazdani, A.; Valla, T.; Cava, R. J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe the topological surface states of Bi4Se3, a compound in the infinitely adaptive Bi2-Bi2Se3 natural superlattice phase series, determined by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Two observable cleavage surfaces, terminating at Bi or Se, are characterized by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, and modeled by ab initio density functional theory calculations. Topological surface states are observed on both surfaces, but with markedly different dispersions and Kramers point energies. Bi4Se3 therefore represents the only known compound with different topological states on differently terminated, easily distinguished and stable surfaces.

  3. Ground-state charge transfer as a mechanism for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.

    1984-03-01

    A model is presented for the contribution of ground-state charge transfer between a metal and adsorbate to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is shown that this contribution can be understood using the vibronic theory for calculating Raman intensities. The enhancement is due to vibronic coupling of the molecular ground state to the metal states, the coupling mechanism being a modulation of the ground-state charge-transfer energy by the molecular vibrations. An analysis of the coupling operator gives the selection rules for this process, which turn out to be dependent on the overall symmetry of the adsorbate-metal system, even if the charge transfer is small enough for the symmetry of the adsorbate to remain the same as that of the free molecule. It is shown that the model can yield predictions on the properties of SERS, e.g., specificity to adsorption geometry, appearance of forbidden bands, dependence on the applied potential, and dependence on the excitation wavelength. The predictions are in good agreement with experimental results. It is also deduced from this model that in many cases atomic-scale roughness is a prerequisite for the observation of SERS. A result on the magnitude of the enhancement can only be given in a crude approximation. Although in most cases an additional electromagnetic enhancement seems to be necessary to give an observable signal, this charge-transfer mechanism should be important in many SERS systems.

  4. Generation of Quantum Cluster States using Surface Acoustic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Mrittunjoy Guha

    2016-01-01

    One-way quantum computation, also known as Cluster State Quantum Computation, provides a robust and efficient tool to perform universal quantum computation using only single-qubit projective measurements, given a highly entangled cluster state. The cluster-state approach to quantum computation also leads to certain practical advantages such as robustness against errors. In this paper, we propose a SAW-driven One-Way Quantum Computation approach that is realizable using a mentioned architecture and elements.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Nanopatterned Surfaces on Wetting States of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Zhao, Yanping; Ouyang, Gang; Li, Xinlei

    2017-04-01

    An analytic thermodynamic model has been established to quantitatively investigate the wetting states of droplets on nanopatterned surfaces. Based on the calculations for the free energies of droplets with the Wenzel state and the Cassie-Baxter state, it is found that the size and shape of nanostructured surfaces play crucial roles in wetting states. In detail, for nanohole-patterned surfaces, the deep and thin nanoholes lead to the Cassie-Baxter state, and contrarily, the shallow and thick nanoholes result in the Wenzel state. However, the droplets have the Wenzel state on the patterned surfaces with small height and radii nanopillars and have the Cassie-Baxter state when the height and radii of nanopillars are large. Furthermore, the intuitive phase diagrams of the wetting states of the droplet in the space of surface geometrical parameters are obtained. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental observations and reveal physical mechanisms involved in the effects of nanopatterned surfaces on wetting states, which implies that these studies may provide useful guidance to the conscious design of patterned surfaces to control the wetting states of droplets.

  6. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  7. Intersections of potential energy surfaces of short-lived states: the complex analogue of conical intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbacher, Sven; Sommerfeld, Thomas; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2004-02-15

    Whereas conical intersections between potential energy surfaces of bound states are well known, the interaction of short-lived states has been investigated only rarely. Here, we present several systematically constructed model Hamiltonians to study the topology of intersecting complex potential energy surfaces describing short-lived states: We find the general phenomenon of doubly intersecting complex energy surfaces, i.e., there are two points instead of one as in the case of bound states where the potential energy surfaces coalesce. In addition, seams of intersections of the respective real and imaginary parts of the potential energy surfaces emanate from these two points. Using the Sigma* and Pi* resonance states of the chloroethene anion as a practical example, we demonstrate that our complete linear model Hamiltonian is able to reproduce all phenomena found in explicitly calculated ab initio complex potential energy surfaces.

  8. Challenges related to flotation cleaning of oil shales. Issues due to compositional and surface features and post-grinding surface behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun N. Emre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil shale is an important energy resource alternative. Despite its recognition as an unconventional oil source, oil shale is also considered as an important solid fossil fuel alternative to coal and lignites due to the solid form and remarkable extent of organic content. Utilization possibilites, similar to coal and lignites, have been considered in the past decades and direct use of oil shales in thermal power production has been possible in countries like Estonia and China. In the perspective of utilization of oil shales in a similar manner to coal and lignites, problems and restrictions related to the inorganic ash-making and potentially pollutant constituents are applied. In this respect, cleaning of this important energy source through mineral processing methods, particularly by flotation, is an outstanding option. However, on the basis of unique features and distinctive characteristics, treatment of oil shales like a type of coal is a big perception and may be highly misleading. This paper discusses specific challenges regarding flotation behavior of oil shales with reference to the surface characteristics and behavior of oil shale entities – probably the most important aspect that determines the efficiency and success of the flotation based cleaning process.

  9. A Surface-Mounted Rotor State Sensing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A surface-mounted instrumentation system for measuring rotor blade motions on rotorcraft, for use both in flight and in wind tunnel testing, is proposed for...

  10. Surface-hopping trajectories for OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}) + Kr: Extension to the 1A″ state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, T.; McCrudden, G.; Brouard, M., E-mail: mark.brouard@chem.ox.ac.uk [The Department of Chemistry, The Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Herráez-Aguilar, D.; Aoiz, F.J., E-mail: aoiz@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kłos, J., E-mail: jklos@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-04-14

    We present a new trajectory surface hopping study of the rotational energy transfer and collisional quenching of electronically excited OH(A) radicals by Kr. The trajectory surface hopping calculations include both electronic coupling between the excited 2{sup 2}A′ and ground 1{sup 2}A′ electronic states, as well as Renner-Teller and Coriolis roto-electronic couplings between the 1{sup 2}A′ and 1{sup 2}A″, and the 2{sup 2}A′ and 1{sup 2}A″ electronic states, respectively. The new calculations are shown to lead to a noticeable improvement in the agreement between theory and experiment in this system, particularly with respect to the OH(X) rotational and Λ-doublet quantum state populations, compared with a simpler two-state treatment, which only included the electronic coupling between the 2{sup 2}A′ and 1{sup 2}A′ states. Discrepancies between the predictions of theory and experiment do however remain, and could arise either due to errors in the potential energy surfaces and couplings employed, or due to the limitations in the classical treatment of non-adiabatic effects.

  11. Electronic states on the clean and oxygen-covered molybdenum (110) surface measured using time-of-flight momentum microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, Sergii

    2016-04-20

    Recent experiments discovered a new class of materials called topological insulators and started an extensive investigation in order to find more materials of such type and to understand and explore the opening perspectives in fundamental science and application. These materials exhibit a Dirac-type (massless) electronic state, bridging the fundamental band gap. Surprisingly, a strongly spin-polarized surface state with linear dispersion resembling that of Dirac type was found on the already well-investigated W(110) surface. This rose the question of the existence of the same non-trivial electron state on other metal surfaces. The present work describes the investigation of surface electronic states on the Mo(110) surface, their dispersion and transformation upon surface oxidation. This system is isoelectronic to the case of W(110) but due to the lower atomic number the spin-orbit interaction responsible for local band gap formation is substantially decreased by a factor of 5. The Mo(110) surface was shown to exhibit a linearly dispersing state quite similar to the one on W(110), but within a smaller energy range of 120 meV, with the Dirac point lying in the center of a local band gap in k-space. The experimental investigations were performed with the help of momentum microscopy, using a Ti:sapphire laser in the lab and synchrotron radiation at BESSY II, Berlin. The results show good agreement with theoretical calculations of the band structure and photoemission patterns for clean Mo(110). The fully parallel 3D acquisition scheme allowed to visualize the full surface Brillouin zone of the sample up to few eV binding energy within a single exposure of typically less than 30 min. This opens the door to future time-resolved experiments with maximum detection efficiency.

  12. Changes in albumin/platelet interaction with an artificial surface--due to a antibiotics, pyridoxal phosphate, and lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandy, T.; Sharma, C.P.

    1988-04-01

    Protein adsorption and platelet adhesion are two important biological processes arising at the blood prosthetic interface. The effect of certain antibiotics, namely, neomycin, gentamicin, ampicillin, penicillin-G, and streptomycin to modulate the albumin polycarbonate surface interaction was investigated using /sup 125/I albumin from a protein mixture in the presence and absence of isolated calf lymphocytes. This study also demonstrated the changes in platelet-surface adhesion with these antibiotics. The effect of pyridoxal phosphate to modulate the red blood cell-mediated platelet-surface attachment was also attempted. It appears from pyridoxal phosphate studies that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) could modify the surface-platelet attachment. It also inhibited the fibrinogen-induced platelet adhesion. It seems, the addition of antibiotics to the polymerprotein system increased the level of surface-bound albumin variably whereas lymphocytes incubated in the medium did not affect the surface-albumin concentration with time course. These antibiotics also inhibited the surface-induced platelet adhesion to variable degrees. Our earlier studies have indicated that certain antibiotics or antiplatelet drugs can inhibit the fibrinogen binding to an artificial surface. Therefore, it may be possible that the enhanced albumin-surface concentration or reduced fibrinogen-surface binding, in the presence of these antibiotics, may itself be one of the parameter for a reduced platelet-surface attachment, which may also improve the blood compatibility of the substrate. A better understanding of the mechanism of antibiotics is needed in in vivo conditions to correlate these findings.

  13. Restoring the natural state of the soil surface by biocrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Ungar, Eugene D.; Stavi, Ilan; Shuker, Shimshon; Knoll, Yaakov M.

    2017-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, with mean annual precipitation of 70-200 mm, the dominant component of the ground cover is biocrusts composed of cyanobacteria, moss and lichens. Biocrusts play a role in stabilizing the soil surface, which reduces erosion by water and wind. Human disturbances, such as heavy vehicular traffic, earthworks, overgrazing and land mining destroy the soil surface and promote erosion. The aim of the study was to evaluate restoration of the soil surface by the return of a biocrust layer. We examined the impact of disturbances on the creation of a stable crust and on the rate of recovery. Biocrust disturbance was studied in two sites in the northern Negev. The nine treatments included different rates of biocrust inoculum application and NPK fertilization. Recovery rates of the biocrusts were monitored for five years using chemical, physical and bio-physiological tests which determined infiltration rate, soil surface resistance to pressure, shear force of the soil surface, levels of chlorophyll, organic matter and polysaccharide, NDVI and aggregate stability. The results show that untreated disturbed biocrusts present long-term damage and a very slow rate of recovery, which may take decades, while most of the treatments showed a faster recovery. In particular, NDVI, polysaccharide levels and aggregate stability showed steady improvements over the research period.

  14. Kinetics deformation of current-voltage characteristics of the varistor oxide structures due to overcharging of the localized states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonkoshkur A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure of zinc oxide varistors to the electrical load leads to current-voltage characteristics (CVC deformation, which is associated with a change in the height and width of the intergranular barriers, which are main structural element of the varistors. Polarization phenomena in zinc oxide ceramics are studied in a number of works, but those are mainly limited to the study of the physics of the CVC deformation process and to determining the parameters of localized electronic states involved in this process. This paper presents the results on the simulation of the deformation of pulse CVC of a separate intergranular potential barrier at transient polarization/depolarization, associated with recharging of surface electronic states (SES, which cause this barrier. It is found that at high density of SES their degree of electron filling is small and the effect of DC voltage leads to a shift of pulse current-voltage characteristics into the region of small currents. Conversely, the low density SES are almost completely filled with electrons, and after crystallite polarization CVC is shifted to high currents. Experimental studies have confirmed the possibility of applying the discovered laws to ceramic varistor structures. The proposed model allows interpreting the «anomalous» effects (such as increase in the classification voltage and reduction of active losses power observed during the varistors accelerated aging test.

  15. Investigation on Adsorption State of Surface Adsorbate on Silicon Wafer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    An adsorption kinetics model for adsorbate on the specularly polished silicon wafer was suggested. The mathematical model of preferential adsorption and the mechanism controlling the adsorption state of adsorbate were discussed.

  16. Surface states of a system of Dirac fermions: A minimal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V. A., E-mail: volkov.v.a@gmail.com; Enaldiev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    A brief survey is given of theoretical works on surface states (SSs) in Dirac materials. Within the formalism of envelope wave functions and boundary conditions for these functions, a minimal model is formulated that analytically describes surface and edge states of various (topological and nontopological) types in several systems with Dirac fermions (DFs). The applicability conditions of this model are discussed.

  17. Possible correlation effects of surface state electrons on a solid hydrogen film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Albrecht, Uwe; Leiderer, Paul; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of surface state electrons on thin quench-condensed hydrogen films for various electron densities. The surface state electron mobility showed a continuous dependence on the plasma parameter Gamma in the range from 20 to 130, indicating a strong influence

  18. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2017-04-04

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  19. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2016-05-03

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  20. Changes in the surface electronic states of semiconductor fine particles induced by high energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asai, Keisuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    The changes in the surface electronic states of Q-sized semiconductor particles in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, induced by high energy ion irradiation, were examined by observation of ion induced emission and photoluminescence (PL). Various emission bands attributed to different defect sites in the band gap were observed at the initial irradiation stage. As the dose increased, the emissions via the trapping sites decreased in intensity while the band-edge emission developed. This suggests that the ion irradiation would remove almost all the trapping sites in the band gap. The low energy emissions, which show a multiexponential decay, were due to a donor-acceptor recombination between the deeply trapped carriers. It was found that the processes of formation, reaction, and stabilization of the trapping sites would predominantly occur under the photooxidizing conditions. (author)

  1. Description of a widespread outbreak of aseptic meningitis due to echovirus 30 in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Laerte Pinto Junior

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Echovirus 30 belongs to the genus Enterovirus and is widely associated with aseptic meningitis (AM outbreaks. In Brazil epidemics due to this serotype were reported in several states but in Rio de Janeiro, before this study, it was only involved in sporadic episodes. We retrospectively collected data from AM notifications charts and enterovirus isolation database from Rio de Janeiro State Health Department (RJSHD and Enterovirus Reference Laboratory in the year of 2005. An outbreak of AM was detected during March, April and May associated with a high cell culture isolation rate for echovirus 30 (17.4%. Male children with ages varying from 1 to 9 years were more affected. Of the 22 patients with confirmed echovirus 30 disease, clinical information was available in eight; fever, headache and vomiting were the most common manifestations. CSF analysis showed a typical pattern of viral infection with median of cellularity of 100 cells/mm³ and mononuclear cell predominance in 64.7% of the cases. The median of protein and glucose levels of 49 mg/dL and 56.5 mg/dL. The fatality rate was null. Despite its benign course and the lack of treatment options, aseptic meningitis surveillance is crucial for early identification of causative agents of outbreaks, which helps to avoid additional testing and inappropriate use of antimicrobials.

  2. Description of a widespread outbreak of aseptic meningitis due to echovirus 30 in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Laerte Pinto Junior

    Full Text Available Echovirus 30 belongs to the genus Enterovirus and is widely associated with aseptic meningitis (AM outbreaks. In Brazil epidemics due to this serotype were reported in several states but in Rio de Janeiro, before this study, it was only involved in sporadic episodes. We retrospectively collected data from AM notifications charts and enterovirus isolation database from Rio de Janeiro State Health Department (RJSHD and Enterovirus Reference Laboratory in the year of 2005. An outbreak of AM was detected during March, April and May associated with a high cell culture isolation rate for echovirus 30 (17.4%. Male children with ages varying from 1 to 9 years were more affected. Of the 22 patients with confirmed echovirus 30 disease, clinical information was available in eight; fever, headache and vomiting were the most common manifestations. CSF analysis showed a typical pattern of viral infection with median of cellularity of 100 cells/mm³ and mononuclear cell predominance in 64.7% of the cases. The median of protein and glucose levels of 49 mg/dL and 56.5 mg/dL. The fatality rate was null. Despite its benign course and the lack of treatment options, aseptic meningitis surveillance is crucial for early identification of causative agents of outbreaks, which helps to avoid additional testing and inappropriate use of antimicrobials.

  3. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    diameters and thermal histories. The bulk structural features in both compositions of glass fibers were identified using high-resolution 29Si, 27Al, and 11B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic measurements. In multi-component glasses, the determination of silicon, aluminum, and boron distributions becomes difficult due to the competitive nature of the network-modifying oxides among the network-forming oxides. In pure silicates, 29Si MAS NMR can often resolve resonances arising from silicate tetrahedron having varying numbers of bridging oxygens. In aluminoborosilicate glasses, aluminum is present in four-, five-, and six- coordination with oxygen as neighbors. The speciation of the aluminum can be determined using 27Al MAS NMR. The fraction of tetrahedral boron species in the glass fibers were measured using 11B MAS NMR, which is typically used to study the short-range structure of borate containing glasses such as alkali borate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses. While solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for elucidating bonding environments and coordination changes in the glass structure, it cannot quantitatively probe low to moderate surface area samples due to insufficient spins. Chemical probes either physisorbed or chemisorbed to the fiber's surface can increase the surface selectivity of NMR for analysis of samples with low surface areas and provide information about the local molecular structure of the reactive surface site. Common chemical probe molecules contain NMR active nuclei such as 19F or may be enriched with 13C. A silyating agent, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane (TFS), reacts with reactive surface hydroxyls, which can be quantified by utilizing the NMR active nucleus (19F) contained in the probe molecule. The observed 19F MAS NMR peak area is integrated and compared against a standard of known fluorine spins (concentration), allowing the number of reactive hydroxyl sites to be quantified. IGC is a method used to study the

  4. Decay rates of large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ions approaching solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Mirkovic, M. A.; Bozanic, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the ionization of large-l multiply charged Rydberg ions approaching solid surfaces within the framework of decay model and applying the etalon equation method. The radial coordinate rho of the active electron is treated as a variational parameter and therefore the parabolic symmetry is preserved in this procedure. The complex eigenenergies are calculated from which the energy terms and the ionization rates are derived. We find that the large-l Rydberg states decay at approximately the same ion-surface distances as the low-l states oriented toward the vacuum and considerably closer to the surface comparing to the low-l states oriented towards the surface.

  5. Elevation change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960–2014

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland Ice Sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, basal melt, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The last two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes compaction, meltwater percolation, and refreezing. The model is forced with surface mass fluxes and temperature from a regional climate model for the period 1960–2014. The model results...

  6. Characterization of Different on the Oxidation Behaviours Surface States and Its Effects of Alloy 690TT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 690TT samples with four kinds of surface states were prepared: 1) ground to 400 grit; 2) ground to 1500 grit; 3) mechanically polished (MP) and 4) electro-polished (EP). The surface morphologies and the surface skin layers' microstructures of these samples were characterized systematically using various methods and the effects of surface states on the oxidation behaviours of Alloy 690TT were also discussed. The results showed that surface roughness and micro-hardness decreased gradually from the ground to EP surfaces. The grains in the near-surface layers of the ground and MP surfaces had been refined and the residual strains were also very high. The dislocations on the ground surfaces were mainly parallel dislocation lines. The thickness of the superficial cold-worked layers decreased gradually from the ground surfaces to polished surfaces. The oxide morphologies and oxidation rate depended greatly on the surface states of samples. Cold-working by grinding treatments could benefit the outward diffusion of metallic atoms and the nucleation of surface oxides and then accelerate the growth of surface oxide films.

  7. Two challenges for U.S. irrigation due to climate change: increasing irrigated area in wet states and increasing irrigation rates in dry states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I McDonald

    Full Text Available Agricultural irrigation practices will likely be affected by climate change. In this paper, we use a statistical model relating observed water use by U.S. producers to the moisture deficit, and then use this statistical model to project climate changes impact on both the fraction of agricultural land irrigated and the irrigation rate (m³ ha⁻¹. Data on water withdrawals for US states (1985-2005 show that both quantities are highly positively correlated with moisture deficit (precipitation--PET. If current trends hold, climate change would increase agricultural demand for irrigation in 2090 by 4.5-21.9 million ha (B1 scenario demand: 4.5-8.7 million ha, A2 scenario demand: 9.1-21.9 million ha. Much of this new irrigated area would occur in states that currently have a wet climate and a small fraction of their agricultural land currently irrigated, posing a challenge to policymakers in states with less experience with strict regulation of agriculture water use. Moreover, most of this expansion will occur in states where current agricultural production has relatively low market value per hectare, which may make installation of irrigation uneconomical without significant changes in crops or practices by producers. Without significant increases in irrigation efficiency, climate change would also increase the average irrigation rate from 7,963 to 8,400-10,415 m³ ha⁻¹ (B1 rate: 8,400-9,145 m³ ha⁻¹, A2 rate: 9,380-10,415 m³ ha⁻¹. The irrigation rate will increase the most in states that already have dry climates and large irrigation rates, posing a challenge for water supply systems in these states. Accounting for both the increase in irrigated area and irrigation rate, total withdrawals might increase by 47.7-283.4 billion m³ (B1 withdrawal: 47.7-106.0 billion m³, A2 withdrawal: 117.4-283.4 billion m³. Increases in irrigation water-use efficiency, particularly by reducing the prevalence of surface irrigation, could eliminate the

  8. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  9. Antimicrobial surfaces for craniofacial implants: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Lisa; Gaviria, Laura; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2013-04-01

    In an attempt to regain function and aesthetics in the craniofacial region, different biomaterials, including titanium, hydroxyapatite, biodegradable polymers and composites, have been widely used as a result of the loss of craniofacial bone. Although these materials presented favorable success rates, osseointegration and antibacterial properties are often hard to achieve. Although bone-implant interactions are highly dependent on the implant's surface characteristics, infections following traumatic craniofacial injuries are common. As such, poor osseointegration and infections are two of the many causes of implant failure. Further, as increasingly complex dental repairs are attempted, the likelihood of infection in these implants has also been on the rise. For these reasons, the treatment of craniofacial bone defects and dental repairs for long-term success remains a challenge. Various approaches to reduce the rate of infection and improve osseointegration have been investigated. Furthermore, recent and planned tissue engineering developments are aimed at improving the implants' physical and biological properties by improving their surfaces in order to develop craniofacial bone substitutes that will restore, maintain and improve tissue function. In this review, the commonly used biomaterials for craniofacial bone restoration and dental repair, as well as surface modification techniques, antibacterial surfaces and coatings are discussed.

  10. Elevation change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S. R M; Noël, B. P Y; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland Ice Sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, basal melt, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The last two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes compac

  11. Response of the Shockley surface state on Cu(111) to an external electrical field: A density-functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Hyldgaard, Per; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-03-01

    We study the response of the Cu(111) Shockley surface state to an external electrical field E by combining a density-functional theory calculation for a finite slab geometry with an analysis of the Kohn-Sham wavefunctions to obtain a well-converged characterization. We find that the surface state displays isotropic dispersion, quadratic until the Fermi wave vector but with a significant quartic contribution beyond. We find that the shift in band minimum and effective mass depend linearly on E. Most change in electrostatic potential profile, and charge transfer occurs outside the outermost copper atoms, and most of the screening is due to bulk electrons. Our analysis is facilitated by a method used to decouple the Kohn-Sham states due to the finite slab geometry, using a rotation in Hilbert space. We discuss applications to tuning the Fermi wavelength and so the many patterns attributed to metallic surface states. Supported by (KB and PH) Swedish Vetenskapsrådet VR 621-2008-4346 and (TLE) NSF CHE 07-50334 & UMD MRSEC DMR 05-20471.

  12. Surface science investigations of SEI layer in Li-ion battery cathodes. Oxidation states and surface reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkashinin, G.; Ensling, D.; Schmid, S.; Bhuvaneswari, S.; Song, J.; Jacke, S.; Jaegermann, W. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachbereich Materialwissenschaft; Nikolowski, K.; Ehrenberg, H. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. for Complex Materials

    2010-07-01

    Surface electronic properties of the promising Li-ion cathode materials such as LiMo{sub 2} (Ni, Co, Mn) and LiFePO{sub 4} as well as evolution of electrolyte-cathode interfaces formed after contact to the electrolyte, due to electrochemical charging and after cycling were systematically studied using conventional electronic spectroscopy methods (XPS, UPS) and synchrotron photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS, XAS). To study fundamental surface properties of the oxides we investigated both thin film cathodes in-situ, where the surfaces are not contaminated by impurities, and synthesized powder cathodes used in industry. (orig.)

  13. Dynamics at Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces Volume 2 Fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bovensiepen, Uwe; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This two-volume work covers ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics of elementary processes at solid surfaces and interfaces, presenting the current status of photoinduced processes. Providing valuable introductory information for newcomers to this booming field of research, it investigates concepts and experiments, femtosecond and attosecond time-resolved methods, as well as frequency domain techniques.The whole is rounded off by a look at future developments.

  14. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  15. Instantaneous generation of charge-separated state on TiO₂ surface sensitized with plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2014-03-19

    Photoexcitation of the plasmon band in metallic nanoparticles adsorbed on a TiO2 surface initiates many important photovoltaic and photocatalytic processes. The traditional view on the photoinduced charge separation involves excitation of a surface plasmon, its subsequent dephasing into electron-hole pairs, followed by electron transfer (ET) from the metal nanoparticle into TiO2. We use nonadiabatic molecular dynamics combined with time-domain density functional theory to demonstrate that an electron appears inside TiO2 immediately upon photoexcitation with a high probability (~50%), bypassing the intermediate step of electron-hole thermalization inside the nanoparticle. By providing a detailed, atomistic description of the charge separation, energy relaxation, and electron-hole recombination processes, the simulation rationalizes why the experimentally observed ultrafast photoinduced ET in an Au-TiO2 system is possible in spite of the fast energy relaxation. The simulation shows that the photogenerated plasmon is highly delocalized onto TiO2, and thus, it is shared by the electron donor and acceptor materials. In the 50% of the cases remaining after the instantaneous photogeneration of the charge-separated state, the electron injects into TiO2 on a sub-100 fs time scale by the nonadiabatic mechanism due to high density of acceptor states. The electron-phonon relaxation parallels the injection and is slower, resulting in a transient heating of the TiO2 surface by 40 K. Driven by entropy, the electron moves further into TiO2 bulk. If the electron remains trapped at the TiO2 surface, it recombines with the hole on a picosecond time scale. The obtained ET and recombination times are in excellent agreement with the experiment. The delocalized plasmon state observed in our study establishes a novel concept for plasmonic photosensitization of wide band gap semiconductors, leading to efficient conversion of photons to charge carriers and to hybrid materials with a wide

  16. Study of the Material Transfer Characteristics and Surface Morphology Due to Arc Erosion of PtIr Contact Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Saibei; XIE Ming; YANG Youcai; ZHANG Jiming; CHEN Yongtai; LIU Manmen; YANG Yunfeng; HU Jieqiong; CUI Hao

    2012-01-01

    By means of breaking tests on PtIr contact materials via a JF04C contact material testing machine,it was attempted to elucidate the characterstics of the various surface morphology and material transfer after the arc erosion process caused by break arc.The material transfer characteristics appeared in the experiments were concluded and analyzed.Meanwhile,the morphology of the anode and cathode surface were observed and analyzed by SEM.

  17. Robustness of a Topologically Protected Surface State in a Sb2Te2Se Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Weng, Shih-Chang; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Yu, Shih-Hsun; Chou, Mitch Ming-Chi; Chang, Ching-Wen; Tu, Li-Wei; Yang, Hung-Duen; Luo, Chih-Wei; Gospodinov, Marin M.

    2016-11-01

    A topological insulator (TI) is a quantum material in a new class with attractive properties for physical and technological applications. Here we derive the electronic structure of highly crystalline Sb2Te2Se single crystals studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The result of band mapping reveals that the Sb2Te2Se compound behaves as a p-type semiconductor and has an isolated Dirac cone of a topological surface state, which is highly favored for spintronic and thermoelectric devices because of the dissipation-less surface state and the decreased scattering from bulk bands. More importantly, the topological surface state and doping level in Sb2Te2Se are difficult to alter for a cleaved surface exposed to air; the robustness of the topological surface state defined in our data indicates that this Sb2Te2Se compound has a great potential for future atmospheric applications.

  18. Superconducting quantum criticality of topological surface states at three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Zerf, Nikolai; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of a 3D topological insulator is conjectured to exhibit an emergent $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetry, based on a renormalization group (RG) analysis at one-loop order in the $\\epsilon$ expansion. We provide additional support for this conjecture by performing a three-loop RG analysis and showing that the supersymmetric fixed point found at this order survives the extrapolation to 2D. We compute critical exponents to order $\\epsilon^3$, obtaining the more accurate value $\

  19. Persistent coherence and spin polarization of topological surface states on topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.-H.; Vescovo, E.; Fedorov, A. V.; Gu, G. D.; Valla, T.

    2013-07-01

    Gapless surface states on topological insulators are protected from elastic scattering on nonmagnetic impurities, which makes them promising candidates for low-power electronic applications. However, for widespread applications, these states should remain coherent and significantly spin polarized at ambient temperatures. Here, we studied the coherence and spin structure of the topological states on the surface of a model topological insulator, Bi2Se3, at elevated temperatures in spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We found an extremely weak broadening and essentially no decay of spin polarization of the topological surface state up to room temperature. Our results demonstrate that the topological states on surfaces of topological insulators could serve as a basis for room-temperature electronic devices.

  20. Direct measurements of the energy flux due to chemical reactions at the surface of a silicon sample interacting with a SF6 plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Dussart, Remi; Pichon, Laurianne E; Bedra, Larbi; Semmar, Nadjib; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; 10.1063/1.2995988

    2008-01-01

    Energy exchanges due to chemical reactions between a silicon surface and a SF6 plasma were directly measured using a heat flux microsensor (HFM). The energy flux evolution was compared with those obtained when only few reactions occur at the surface to show the part of chemical reactions. At 800 W, the measured energy flux due to chemical reactions is estimated at about 7 W.cm\\^{-2} against 0.4 W.cm\\^{-2} for ion bombardment and other contributions. Time evolution of the HFM signal is also studied. The molar enthalpy of the reaction giving SiF4 molecules was evaluated and is consistent with values given in literature.

  1. Surface plasmon resonance phenomenon of the insulating state polyaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umiati, Ngurah Ayu Ketut, E-mail: ngurahayuketutumiati@gmail.com [Jurusan Fisika FMIPA UGM, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Jurusan Fisika FMIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Jalan Prof. Soedarto, SH Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia); Triyana, Kuwat; Kamsul [Jurusan Fisika FMIPA UGM, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) phenomenon of the insulating polyaniline (PANI) is has been observed. Surface Plasmon (SP) is the traveled electromagnetic wave that passes through the interface of dielectric metal and excited by attenuated total reflection (ATR) method in Kretschmannn configuration (Au-PANI prism). The resonance condition is observed through the angle of SPR in such condition that SP wave is coupled by the evanescent constant of laser beam. In this research, the laser beam was generated by He–Ne and its wavelength (λ) was 632,8 nm. SPR curve is obtained through observation of incidence angles of the laser beam in prism. SPR phenomenon at the boundary between Au – PANI layer has showed by reflection dip when the laser beam passes through the prism. In this early study, the observation was carried out through simulation Winspall 3.02 software and preliminary compared with some experimental data reported in other referred literatures. The results shows that the optimum layer of Au and polyaniline are 50 and 1,5 nm thick respectively. Our own near future experimental work would be further performed and reported elsewhere.

  2. Imbalance of Nature due to Greenhouse Gases from Land-Use Change and Forestry in the State of Sinaloa, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Galindo, T. D.; Plata Rocha, W. D.; Aguilar-Villegas, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The imbalance of nature in recent years has been highlighted throughout the world due to the consequences of population and economic growth and changes land use in general. These changes are the result of complex processes between the human and natural environment. This is a very important phenomenon, especially from the point of view of sustainability, as these changes have been considered as one of the most important components of global change (Plata et al., 2009). In the same way the process of deforestation and forest degradation as a result of human activities are a major source of emissions of greenhouse gases in Mexico (Masera et al., 1997). However, forests in Mexico have great potential to become carbon sinks by adopting appropriate support policies, and implementation of sustainable forestry management techniques to improve their production. From this perspective, forest management and reforestation of forests are presented as options for short and medium term climate change mitigation (Sheinbaum and Masera, 2000). Based on the foregoing, the research updates emissions from the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change (LCLUC) for the period 2000 to 2005 for the State of Sinaloa, Mexico, from activity data and national emission factors, reliable and updated to improve certainty and to determine the emissions of greenhouse gases for the sector. This paper examines the updated statewide LCLUC inventory using the gradation level 2 of the IPCC and recommends climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies.t;

  3. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, R. K.; Das, S.; Panda, A. K.; Sahu, T., E-mail: tsahu-bu@rediffmail.com [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National Institute of Science and Technology, Palur Hills, Berhampur-761 008, Odisha (India)

    2015-11-15

    We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  4. Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge,Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Solid-state nuclear track detectors, such as CR-39, are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. In the ICF experiments, the particles of interest, such as D{sup 3}He-protons, have ranges of order of the detector thickness. In this case, the dynamic range of the detector can be extended by recording data on both the front and back sides of the detector. Higher energy particles which are undetectable on the front surface can then be measured on the back of the detector. Studies of track formation under the conditions on the front and back of the detector reveal significant differences. Distinct front and back energy calibrations of CR-39 are therefore necessary and are presented for protons. Utilizing multiple surfaces with additional calibrations can extend the range of detectable energies on a single piece of CR-39 by up to 7-8 MeV. The track formation process is explored with a Monte Carlo code, which shows that the track formation difference between front and back is due to the non-uniform ion energy deposition in matter.

  5. Whispering gallery states of neutrons and anti-hydrogen atoms and their applications to fundamental and surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery

    2013-03-01

    The `whispering gallery' effect has been known since ancient times for sound waves in air, later in water and more recently for a broad range of electromagnetic waves: radio, optics, Roentgen and so on. It is intensively used and explored due to its numerous crucial applications. It consists of wave localization near a curved reflecting surface and is expected for waves of various natures, for instance, for neutrons and (anti)atoms. For (anti)matter waves, it includes a new feature: a massive particle is settled in quantum states, with parameters depending on its mass. In this talk, we present the first observation of the quantum whispering-gallery effect for matter particles (cold neutrons) 1-2. This phenomenon provides an example of an exactly solvable problem analogous to the `quantum bouncer'; it is complementary to recently discovered gravitational quantum states of neutrons3. These two phenomena provide a direct demonstration of the weak equivalence principle for a massive particle in a quantum state. Deeply bound long-living states are weakly sensitive to surface potential; highly excited short-living states are very sensitive to the wall nuclear potential shape. Therefore, they are a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. Analogous phenomena could be measured with atoms and anti-atoms 4-5.

  6. Electromyographic Activities of Trunk Muscles Due to Different Exercise Intensities during Pulley-based Shoulder Exercises on an Unstable Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae Yun; Shin, Doo Chul; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Myung Mo; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Song, Chang Ho

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationship between core stability and exercise intensity during a pulley-based shoulder exercise (PBSE) on an unstable support surface. [Subjects] Twenty healthy college students enrolled in this study. [Methods] Surface EMG was carried out in twenty healthy adult men. The electromyographic activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES), exercises with 14 kg or 26 kg of resistance and external oblique (EO) muscles during pulley-based shoulder on an unstable support surface (USS) were compared. [Results] The EMG signals of the RA, ES, and EO did not increase with increasing exercise resistance. [Conclusion] Increasing the exercise intensity to increase the core stability during PBSE on a USS may be ineffective.

  7. Free surface due to a flow driven by a rotating disk inside a vertical cylindrical tank: Axisymmetric configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, L.; Witkowski, L. Martin

    2014-07-01

    The flow driven by a rotating disk at the bottom of an open fixed cylindrical cavity is studied numerically and experimentally. The steady axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations projected onto a curvilinear coordinate system are solved by a Newton-Raphson algorithm. The free surface shape is computed by an iterative process in order to satisfy a zero normal stress balance at the interface. In previous studies, regarding the free surface deflection, there is a significant disagreement between a first-order approximation [M. Piva and E. Meiburg, "Steady axisymmetric flow in an open cylindrical container with a partially rotating bottom wall," Phys. Fluids 17, 063603 (2005)] and a full numerical simulation [R. Bouffanais and D. Lo Jacono, "Unsteady transitional swirling flow in the presence of a moving free surface," Phys. Fluids 21, 064107 (2009)]. For a small deflection, the first-order approximation matches with our numerical simulation and for a large deflection a good agreement is found with experimental measurements.

  8. Strengthened nonlinearity in liquid crystal panel with ZnSe aligning layers due to surface charge accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Xue, Tingyu; Fu, Jiayin; Zhang, Jingwen

    2015-09-01

    With ZnSe thin films as aligning layers in fabricating liquid crystal (LC) panel with pentylcyanobiphenyl doped with C60, the response time in writing holograms was shortened to milliseconds. When two laser beams were overlapped in an LC panel, 2D diffraction patterns were observed, along with exponential gain coefficient highly LC and ZnSe thickness dependent. In addition, energy transferring in subwavelength scale through surface grating was evident. By using a hybrid LC panel, it was found the energy transferring direction was voltage polarity and thickness dependent. Electrostatic modification based surface plasmon polariton excitation was proposed to explain all the findings

  9. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  10. Reduction of protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene surfaces due to coating with Complex Coacervate Core Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzozowska, A. M.; Hofs, B.; de Keizer, A.; Fokkink, R.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of protein adsorption by a polymer brush formed upon adsorption of Complex Coacervate Core Micelles (C3Ms), consisting of a charged copolymer containing a neutral block and an oppositely charged homopolymer, on silica and polystyrene surfaces has been studied in situ using fixed angle

  11. Nonlinear Goos-Haenchen shifts due to surface polariton resonance in Kretschmann configuration with a Kerr-type substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guoding, E-mail: guodingxu@163.co [Department of Physics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China); Zang Taocheng; Mao Hongmin; Pan Tao [Department of Physics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China)

    2010-07-26

    As the surface polaritons are excited in Kretschmann configuration with a Kerr-type substrate, the nonlinear Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts exhibit the optically hysteretic response to the intensity of incident light. For thicker metal films, the GH shifts become very sensitive to the intensity of incident light and the angle of incidence.

  12. Active gas replenishment and sensing of the wetting state in a submerged superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Ben P; Bartlett, Philip N; Wood, Robert J K

    2017-02-15

    Previously superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated effective drag reduction by trapping a lubricious gas layer on the surface with micron-sized hydrophobic features. However, prolonged reduction of drag is hindered by the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding water. This paper demonstrates a novel combination of superhydrophobic surface design and electrochemical control methods which allow quick determination of the wetted area and a gas replenishment mechanism to maintain the desirable gas filled state. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to measure the capacitance of the surface which is shown to be proportional to the solid/liquid interface area. To maintain a full gas coverage for prolonged periods the surface is held at an electrical potential which leads to hydrogen evolution. In the desired gas filled state the water does not touch the metallic area of the surface, however after gas has dissolved the water touches the metal which closes the electrochemical circuit causing hydrogen to be produced replenishing the gas in the surface and returning to the gas filled state; in this way the system is self-actuating. This type of surface and electrochemical control shows promise for applications where the gas filled state of superhydrophobic surfaces must be maintained when submerged for long periods of time.

  13. Corresponding-states principle and its practice thermodynamic, transport and surface properties of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Hong Wei

    2005-01-01

    The corresponding-states principle helps the understanding and calculating of thermodynamic, transport, and surface properties of substances in various states, required by our modern lifestyle. The Corresponding-States Principle and its Practice: Thermodynamic, Transport and Surface Properties of Fluids describes the origins and applications of the principle from a universal point of view with comparisons to experimental data where possible. It uses the universal theory to explain present theories. Emphasis is on the properties of pure systems, and the corresponding-states theory can also be e

  14. Volume changes of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, due to surface mass balance, ice flow, and subglacial melting at geothermal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Björnson, Helgi; Dall, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    We present observed changes in the geometry of western Vatnajökull over a period of about ten years which are caused by the surface mass balance, ice flow (both during surges and quiescent periods), and basal melting due to geothermal and volcanic activity. Comparison of two digital elevation...

  15. Hospitalization due to norovirus and genotypes of rotavirus in pediatric patients, state of Espírito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rua Ribeiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the leading cause for hospitalization due to gastroenteritis worldwide. Group A rotaviruses (RV are the most prevalent and are assorted in glycoproteins (G and protease sensitive (P dual genotypes based on polymorphic genes that encode the external VP7 and VP4 capsid proteins, respectively. Noroviruses (NoV have increasingly answered by sporadic gastroenteritis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of NoV and RV in 68 hospitalized children, between July 2004 and November 2006, at a pediatric hospital in Vitória city, state of Espírito Santo, Southeastern Brazil. Nucleic acid was extracted from fecal suspension following the guanidine-silica procedure. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were employed for NoV and RV detection, respectively. RV genotyping was accomplished using RT-PCR followed by heminested multiplex PCR with specific primers for the most prevalent types of G and P. Fecal samples were positive for NoV and RV in 39.7% (27/68 and 20.5% (14/68, respectively and together were responsible for 60% (41/68 of the cases. RV genotypes were: 50% G9P[8], 28.7% G2P[4], 7.1% G1P[8], G2P[8] and G?P[8]. Vomit was a prominent manifestation observed in 92% and 85% of the NoV and RV cases, respectively. The median hospitalization was 5 and 5.5 days for the patients infected with NoV and RV, respectively. The data showed that NoV prevailed over RV and it also corroborated the emergence of RV G9 genotype followed by G2P[4], reinforcing the need for RV genotype surveillance.

  16. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  17. Surface states on a topologically nontrivial semimetal: The case of Sb(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Marco; Guan, Dandan; Strózecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure of Sb(110) is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, revealing several electronic surface states in the projected bulk band gaps around the Fermi energy. The dispersion of the states can be interpreted in terms of a strong...... spin-orbit splitting. The bulk band structure of Sb has the characteristics of a strong topological insulator with a Z2 invariant ν0 = 1. This puts constraints on the existence of metallic surface states and the expected topology of the surface Fermi contour. However, bulk Sb is a semimetal......, not an insulator, and these constraints are therefore partly relaxed. This relation of bulk topology and expected surface-state dispersion for semimetals is discussed....

  18. The Partial Density of States of CO2 Molecules Adsorption on the Fe (111) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junfang

    2017-09-01

    The state of CO2 molecules adsorption on Fe (111) surface is studied by simulation with the software, the partial density of states the adsorption is obtained. Through the graphical distribution, the pseudogap and the partial density of states at the Fermi level of the CO2 molecules adsorption on the Fe (111) surface is analyzed and compared. The key mechanism of CO2 molecules adsorption on the Fe (111) surface is revealed. The results showed that the CO2 molecules adsorption on the bridge position of Fe (111) surface is stable. The main reason of O atom and Fe atom combining with the bonding is that the resonance of the density of states happed between the O 2p orbital and Fe 3d orbital.

  19. Excited state surfaces in density functional theory: a new twist on an old problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Paul; Williams, J A Gareth; Tozer, David J

    2009-09-07

    Excited state surfaces in density functional theory and the problem of charge transfer are considered from an orbital overlap perspective. For common density functional approximations, the accuracy of the surface will not be uniform if the spatial overlap between the occupied and virtual orbitals involved in the excitation has a strong conformational dependence; the excited state surface will collapse toward the ground state in regions where the overlap is very low. This characteristic is used to predict and to provide insight into the breakdown of excited state surfaces in the classic push-pull 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile molecule, as a function of twist angle. The breakdown is eliminated using a Coulomb-attenuated functional. Analogous situations will arise in many molecules.

  20. Structure-phase states of the nickel surface layers after electroexplosive carburizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Budovskikh; E.; A.; Bagautdinov; A.; Y.; Ivanov; Yu.; F.; Martusevich; E.; V.; Gromov; V.; E.

    2005-01-01

    The layer by layer study of the structure-phase states of the nickel surface layer carburizing with use the phenomena of the electrical explosion has conducted by the method TEM of the fine foils.……

  1. Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature state-space components

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-Space Decomposition of Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C....

  2. 100-Meter Resolution Impervious Surface of the Conterminous United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains impervious surface data for the conterminous United States, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection and at a resolution of 100 meters. The...

  3. The Acylation State of Surface Lipoproteins of Mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakova, Marina V.; Demina, Irina A.; Galyamina, Maria A.; Kondratov, Ilya G.; Ladygina, Valentina G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Acylation of the N-terminal Cys residue is an essential, ubiquitous, and uniquely bacterial posttranslational modification that allows anchoring of proteins to the lipid membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, acylation proceeds through three sequential steps requiring lipoprotein diacylglyceryltransferase, lipoprotein signal peptidase, and finally lipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The apparent lack of genes coding for recognizable homologs of lipoprotein N-acyltransferase in Gram-positive bacteria and Mollicutes suggests that the final step of the protein acylation process may be absent in these organisms. In this work, we monitored the acylation state of eight major lipoproteins of the mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii using a combination of standard two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein separation, blotting to nitrocellulose membranes, and MALDI-MS identification of modified N-terminal tryptic peptides. We show that for each A. laidlawii lipoprotein studied a third fatty acid in an amide linkage on the N-terminal Cys residue is present, whereas diacylated species were not detected. The result thus proves that A. laidlawii encodes a lipoprotein N-acyltransferase activity. We hypothesize that N-acyltransferases encoded by genes non-homologous to N-acyltransferases of Gram-negative bacteria are also present in other mollicutes and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21540185

  4. Hosting of surface states in spin-orbit induced projected bulk band gaps of W(1 1 0) and Ir(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmers, H. J.; Kutnyakhov, D.; Chernov, S. V.; Medjanik, K.; Fedchenko, O.; Zaporozhchenko-Zymakova, A.; Ellguth, M.; Tusche, C.; Viefhaus, J.; Schönhense, G.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-momentum locking of surface states has attracted great interest in recent years due to envisioned technological applications in the field of spintronics. Normal metal surfaces like W(1 1 0) and Ir(1 1 1) show surface states with energy dispersions and spin-polarization textures, which are reminiscent of topologically non-trivial surface states. In order to understand this phenomenon the connection of bulk and surface states has to be explored. Using time-of-flight momentum microscopy with soft x-ray excitation, we present a comprehensive analysis of the bulk bands of W and Ir. Surface states are determined by the same method with photon excitation in the vacuum ultraviolet region. The superposition of both spectral densities reveals the hosting of surface states within the gap structure of bulk bands projected on the surface Brillouin zone. Quantitative differences in the extension of experimental and theoretical local band gaps indicate an underestimation of electron correlation effects in theory.

  5. Instabilities and bifurcations due to buoyancy in a cylindrical container heated from below with and without a free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gallaf, Anas; Touihri, Ridha; Henry, Daniel; Ben Hadid, Hamda

    2009-11-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the buoyant convection in a cylindrical container heated from below are presented. Both the thresholds for the onset of the convection and the nonlinear evolution of this convection are calculated. The simulations concern two configurations: a cavity with a rigid upper surface (Rigid-Rigid case) and a cavity with a non-constrained free surface (Rigid-Free case). The results show a similar variation of the primary thresholds with the aspect ratio for the two configurations. In contrast, the nonlinear evolution of the convection is much changed between the two configurations. In particular, subcritical secondary branches with a very large subcriticity are obtained in the R-F case. To cite this article: A. El Gallaf et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  6. External magnetic field dependent shift of superparamagnetic blocking temperature due to core/surface disordered spin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan; Jang, Jung-tak; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Paek, Sun Ha; Bae, Seongtae

    2017-02-01

    Although the blocking temperature of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNPs) is crucial for various spintronics and biomedical applications, the precise determination of the blocking temperature is still not clear. Here, we present ‘intrinsic’ and ‘extrinsic’ characteristics of the blocking temperature in SPNP systems. In zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC-FC) curves, there was no shift of ‘intrinsic blocking temperature’ at different applied external (excitation) magnetic fields. However, ‘extrinsic blocking temperature’ shift is clearly dependent on the external (excitation) magnetic field. According to our newly proposed physical model, the ‘intermediate spin layer’ located between the core and surface disordered spin layers is primarily responsible for the physical nature of the shift of extrinsic blocking temperature. Our new findings offer possibilities for characterizing the thermally induced physical properties of SPNPs. Furthermore, these findings provide a new empirical approach to indirectly estimate the qualitative degree of the disordered surface spin status in SPNPs.

  7. Investigations of surface characterization of silicone rubber due to tracking phenomena under a.c. and d.c. voltages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uma Maheswar Rao; S S M S Abdul Majeed; C Venkataseshaiah; R Sarathi

    2002-11-01

    In the present work, tracking phenomena has been studied with silicone rubber material under the a.c. and d.c. voltages following IEC-587 standards. The surface condition of the tracked zone was analysed using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) studies. The tracking time was different for a.c. and d.c. voltages.

  8. Temperature-dependent surface modification of Ta due to high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, T. J.; Tripathi, J. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-12-01

    This work examines the response of Tantalum (Ta) as a potential candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in future nuclear fusion reactors. Tantalum samples were exposed to high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation at different temperatures in the range of 823-1223 K. The samples were irradiated at normal incidence with 100 eV He+ ions at constant flux of 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1 to a total fluence of 4.3 × 1024 ions m-2. An additional Ta sample was also irradiated at 1023 K using a higher ion fluence of 1.7 × 1025 ions m-2 (at the same flux of 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1), to confirm the possibility of fuzz formation at higher fluence. This higher fluence was chosen to roughly correspond to the lower fluence threshold of fuzz formation in Tungsten (W). Surface morphology was characterized with a combination of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These results demonstrate that the main mode of surface damage is pinholes with an average size of ∼70 nm2 for all temperatures. However, significantly larger pinholes are observed at elevated temperatures (1123 and 1223 K) resulting from the agglomeration of smaller pinholes. Ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provides information about the oxidation characteristics of irradiated surfaces, showing minimal exfoliation of the irradiated Ta surface. Additionally, optical reflectivity measurements are performed to further characterize radiation damage on Ta samples, showing gradual reductions in the optical reflectivity as a function of temperature.

  9. Quantum critical point due to nested Fermi surface: damping of quasi-particles, resistivity and Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, MC 4350-309 Keene Building, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)]. E-mail: schlottm@martech.fsu.edu

    2004-12-31

    The nesting of the Fermi surfaces of an electron pocket and a hole pocket separated by a wave vector Q and the interaction between electrons gives rise to spin- and charge-density waves. The order can gradually be suppressed by mismatching the nesting and a quantum critical point is obtained as the critical temperature tends to zero. We calculate the quasi-particle damping close to the quantum critical point and discuss its consequences on the resistivity and Hall effect.

  10. Nanostructures on GaAs surfaces due to 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, V., E-mail: vinay.venu@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Division of Physics, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 048 (India); Garg, Sandeep Kumar; Basu, Tanmoy [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Sinha, Om Prakash [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida 201 303 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-Univeristy Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Delhi 110 067 (India); Bhattacharyya, S.R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The effect of 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering on the surface topography of p-type GaAs(1 0 0) was investigated by varying angle of incidence of the ion (060 Degree-Sign ) with respect to substrate normal and the ion fluence (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}) at an ion flux of 3.75 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}-s. For normal incidence and at a fluence of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, holes and islands are observed with the former having an average size and density of 31 nm and 4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} holes/cm{sup 2}, respectively. For 30 Degree-Sign and 45 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence, in general, a smooth surface appears which is unaffected by increase of fluence. At 60 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence dots are observed while for the highest fluence of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} early stage of ripple formation along with dots is observed with amplitude of 4 nm. The applicability and limitations of the existing theories of ion induced pattern formation to account for the observed surface topographies are discussed.

  11. Error in Radar-Derived Soil Moisture due to Roughness Parameterization: An Analysis Based on Synthetical Surface Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard De Baets

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many studies on soil moisture retrieval from SAR demonstrated a poor correlation between the top layer soil moisture content and observed backscatter coefficients, which mainly has been attributed to difficulties involved in the parameterization of surface roughness. The present paper describes a theoretical study, performed on synthetical surface profiles, which investigates how errors on roughness parameters are introduced by standard measurement techniques, and how they will propagate through the commonly used Integral Equation Model (IEM into a corresponding soil moisture retrieval error for some of the currently most used SAR configurations. Key aspects influencing the error on the roughness parameterization and consequently on soil moisture retrieval are: the length of the surface profile, the number of profile measurements, the horizontal and vertical accuracy of profile measurements and the removal of trends along profiles. Moreover, it is found that soil moisture retrieval with C-band configuration generally is less sensitive to inaccuracies in roughness parameterization than retrieval with L-band configuration.

  12. Charged plate in asymmetric electrolytes: One-loop renormalization of surface charge density and Debye length due to ionic correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingnan; Lu, Bing-Sui; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-10-01

    Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) is used to study the mean potential near a charged plate inside a m :-n electrolyte. A perturbation series is developed in terms of g =4 π κ b , where b a n d 1 /κ are Bjerrum length and bare Debye length, respectively. To the zeroth order, we obtain the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For asymmetric electrolytes (m ≠n ), the first order (one-loop) correction to mean potential contains a secular term, which indicates the breakdown of the regular perturbation method. Using a renormalizaton group transformation, we remove the secular term and obtain a globally well-behaved one-loop approximation with a renormalized Debye length and a renormalized surface charge density. Furthermore, we find that if the counterions are multivalent, the surface charge density is renormalized substantially downwards and may undergo a change of sign, if the bare surface charge density is sufficiently large. Our results agrees with large MC simulation even when the density of electrolytes is relatively high.

  13. Strong Linear Dichroism in Spin-Polarized Photoemission from Spin-Orbit-Coupled Surface States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentmann, H.; Maaß, H.; Krasovskii, E. E.; Peixoto, T. R. F.; Seibel, C.; Leandersson, M.; Balasubramanian, T.; Reinert, F.

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive understanding of spin-polarized photoemission is crucial for accessing the electronic structure of spin-orbit coupled materials. Yet, the impact of the final state in the photoemission process on the photoelectron spin has been difficult to assess in these systems. We present experiments for the spin-orbit split states in a Bi-Ag surface alloy showing that the alteration of the final state with energy may cause a complete reversal of the photoelectron spin polarization. We explain the effect on the basis of ab initio one-step photoemission theory and describe how it originates from linear dichroism in the angular distribution of photoelectrons. Our analysis shows that the modulated photoelectron spin polarization reflects the intrinsic spin density of the surface state being sampled differently depending on the final state, and it indicates linear dichroism as a natural probe of spin-orbit coupling at surfaces.

  14. Presence of exotic electronic surface states in LaBi and LaSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, X. H.; Xu, D. F.; Bai, Y. H.; Song, Q.; Shen, X. P.; Xie, B. P.; Sun, Z.; Huang, Y. B.; Peets, D. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Extremely high magnetoresistance (XMR) in the lanthanum monopnictides La X (X =Sb ,Bi ) has recently attracted interest in these compounds as candidate topological materials. However, their perfect electron-hole compensation provides an alternative explanation, so the possible role of topological surface states requires verification through direct observation. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal multiple Dirac-like surface states near the Fermi level in both materials. Intriguingly, we have observed circular dichroism in both surface and near-surface bulk bands. Thus the spin-orbit-coupling-induced orbital and spin angular momentum textures may provide a mechanism to forbid backscattering in zero field, suggesting that surface and near-surface bulk bands may contribute strongly to XMR in La X . The extremely simple rocksalt structure of these materials and the ease with which high-quality crystals can be prepared suggest that they may be an ideal platform for further investigation of topological matter.

  15. Importance of bulk states for the electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces: implications for finite slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Nara, Jun; Bowler, David

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the influence of slab thickness on the electronic structure of the Si(1 0 0)- p([Formula: see text]) surface in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, considering both density of states and band structure. Our calculations, with slab thicknesses of up to 78 atomic layers, reveal that the slab thickness profoundly affects the surface band structure, particularly the dangling bond states of the silicon dimers near the Fermi level. We find that, to precisely reproduce the surface bands, the slab thickness needs to be large enough to completely converge the bulk bands in the slab. In the case of the Si(1 0 0) surface, the dispersion features of the surface bands, such as the band shape and width, converge when the slab thickness is larger than 30 layers. Complete convergence of both the surface and bulk bands in the slab is only achieved when the slab thickness is greater than 60 layers.

  16. The Influence of Surface Phonons on Polaron States in Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, A. Yu.; Proshina, O. V.; Rusina, A. N.

    2007-04-01

    The influence of the surface phonons on the polaron effect in a quantum dot is investigated. We consider the polar quantum dot embedded into the polar matrix. The polaron energy shift for the electron and hole ground states is calculated. It is shown that the contribution of the surface phonons may exceed the bulk phonon contribution.

  17. Large spin splitting of metallic surface-state bands at adsorbate-modified gold/silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, L V; Gruznev, D V; Yakovlev, A A; Tupchaya, A Y; Usachov, D; Vilkov, O; Fedorov, A; Vyalikh, D V; Eremeev, S V; Chulkov, E V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2013-01-01

    Finding appropriate systems with a large spin splitting of metallic surface-state band which can be fabricated on silicon using routine technique is an essential step in combining Rashba-effect based spintronics with silicon technology. We have found that originally poor structural and electronic properties of the Au/Si(111) √3 x √3 surface can be substantially improved by adsorbing small amounts of suitable species (e.g., Tl, In, Na, Cs). The resultant surfaces exhibit a highly-ordered atomic structure and spin-split metallic surface-state band with a momentum splitting of up to 0.052 Å(-1) and an energy splitting of up to 190 meV at the Fermi level. The family of adsorbate-modified Au/Si(111) √3 x √3 surfaces, on the one hand, is thought to be a fascinating playground for exploring spin-splitting effects in the metal monolayers on a semiconductor and, on the other hand, expands greatly the list of material systems prospective for spintronics applications.

  18. Changes in Temperature and Fate of Soil Organic Matter in an Andisol due to Soil Surface Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Atsuko; Nishimura, Taku; Mizoguchi, Masaru; Imoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    This is a print of a camera-ready Japanese manuscript for the Transactions of JSIDRE. This will provide an example and directions for the layout and font size/style to be used. Please refer to this when preparing the headings, figures/table and text of your manuscript. The manuscript should be submitted on A4 size. Changes in temperature, soil moisture, and carbon and nitrogen contents were measured in Andisol under soil surface burning. Soil samples were packed into an unglazed cylinder of 15 cm inner diameter and 30 cm high. Charcoal was burned for 6 hours on the surface of the soil column. During the burning soil surface temperature rose to between 600-700°C. In initially wet soil, rise in soil temperature was retarded for a while at around 95-100°C. On the other hand, in initially dry Toyoura sand showed more rapid temperature increase without retardation. The temperature retardation in the wet soil could be caused by consumption of latent heat by vaporization of soil water. Rate of proceeding of the 100°C front was proportional to square root of the burning time. This indicates that higher the initial volumetric water content, shallower the depth affected by burning. Soil samples suffered temperature above 500°C still had total carbon and nitrogen contents of over 20 and 1 g kg-1, respectively, whereas the soil that was heated up to over 500°C by muffle furnace contained less than 0.4 and 0.1 g kg-1 of the carbon and nitrogen.

  19. Thermophoresis and Brownian effects on the Blasius flow of a nanofluid due to a curved surface with thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, M.; Abbas, Z.; Sajid, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this analysis, we have discussed the Blasius flow of a nanofluid over a curved surface coiled in a circle of radius R . The physical situation is formulated in a mathematical model using a curvilinear coordinates system. The model is considered for the nanofluid including the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis in the presence of thermal radiation. A similarity solution of the developed ordinary differential equations is obtained numerically using the shooting method. The influence of the various involved parameters on the flow phenomena are analyzed through graphs and tables.

  20. Craters in concrete slabs due to detonation – drawbacks of material models with a Mohr-Coulomb yield surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Markus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations have been performed with a commercial distributed explicit FE-solver and the results have been compared with experiments. High explosive was placed in front of different concrete slabs with the dimension 100 × 100 × 16 cm. Some of the results of the simulations, in particular the profile of the craters, are not in agreement with the test results. Therefore the key characteristics of the constitutive equation based on Mohr-Coulomb yield surfaces and a damage evolution linked to the plastic strain has been reviewed.

  1. The response of surface ozone to climate change over the Eastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Racherla

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the response of surface ozone (O3 to future climate change in the eastern United States by performing simulations corresponding to present (1990s and future (2050s climates using an integrated model of global climate, tropospheric gas-phase chemistry, and aerosols. A future climate has been imposed using ocean boundary conditions corresponding to the IPCC SRES A2 scenario for the 2050s decade. Present-day anthropogenic emissions and CO2/CH4 mixing ratios have been used in both simulations while climate-sensitive emissions were allowed to vary with the simulated climate. The severity and frequency of O3 episodes in the eastern U.S. increased due to future climate change, primarily as a result of increased O3 chemical production. The 95th percentile O3 mixing ratio increased by 5 ppbv and the largest frequency increase occured in the 80–90 ppbv range; the US EPA's current 8-h ozone primary standard is 80 ppbv. The increased O3 chemical production is due to increases in: 1 natural isoprene emissions; 2 hydroperoxy radical concentrations resulting from increased water vapor concentrations; and, 3 NOx concentrations resulting from reduced PAN. The most substantial and statistically significant (p<0.05 increases in episode frequency occurred over the southeast and midatlantic U.S., largely as a result of 20% higher annual-average natural isoprene emissions. These results suggest a lengthening of the O3 season over the eastern U.S. in a future climate to include late spring and early fall months. Increased chemical production and shorter average lifetime are two consistent features of the seasonal response of surface O3, with increased dry deposition loss rates contributing most to the reduced lifetime in all seasons except summer. Significant interannual variability is observed in the frequency of O3

  2. Potential energy surfaces and approximate kinetic model for the excited state dynamics of Pigment Yellow 101

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, Katharyn; Dreuw, Andreas; Faraji, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Pigment Yellow 101 (PY101) exhibits a rich photochemistry in its S-1 state as it undergoes excited state intramolecular proton transfer and trans-cis isomerizations upon photoexcitation. Relaxed scans of its potential energy surface are thus computed along the reaction paths connecting the six most

  3. HerMES: A DEFICIT IN THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DUE TO GALAXY CLUSTER GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Bock, J.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blain, A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bethermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A.; Glenn, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conversi, L. [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Griffin, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Halpern, M.; Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Richard, J., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); and others

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I{sub 250{mu}m}>0.69{sub -0.03}{sup +0.03}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.11}(sys.) MJy sr{sup -1}, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.

  4. HerMES: A Deficit in the Surface Brightness of the Cosmic Infrared Background Due to Galaxy Cluster Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zemcov, M; Cooray, A; Bethermin, M; Bock, J; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Dowell, C D; Farrah, D; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Jullo, E; Kneib, J -P; Marsden, G; Nguyen, H T; Richard, S J Oliver J; Roseboom, I G; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Wardlow, J

    2013-01-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after subtracting sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I(250 microns) > 0.69_(-0.03)^(+0.03) (stat.)_(-0.06)^(+0.11) (sys.) MJy/sr, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe th...

  5. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag2Se quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S.; Román-Zamorano, J. F.; Flores-Valenzuela, J.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag2Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H8Si8Al8O12 represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag2Se) n represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  6. Laser-induced damage characteristics in fused silica surface due to mechanical and chemical defects during manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical and chemical defects incurred by grinding and polishing as well as post-processing have been recognized as the most influential culprits that hamper the elevation of laser power/energy in high peak power/energy laser systems. In order to find out the causes for limiting the operational power of laser systems, the effects of these defects on laser damage and removal and mitigation of the defects were investigated in detail in the article. Cracks and scratches were created, annealed, etched and damaged so as to reveal the likely effects of mechanical defects on damage and potential techniques to reduce their influence. The results show that HF-based etching can open and smooth cracks/scratches, improving laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at scratches by up to >250%. Thermal annealing did heal, to some extent, cracks but the LIDT is little improved. Both HF-etching and leaching proves to be effective in removing metallic contamination during polishing process and handling of optics, which can "contribute" to damage/damage density in fused silica. However, HF-based etching may degrade surface roughness, from 20 nm under some conditions when >20 μm material was etched away while the surface roughness was perceptibly altered by leaching (30 J/cm2 (355 nm @3 ns, beam diameter 400 μm @1/e2), a significant progress.

  7. Bound states of a negative test charge due to many-body effects in the two-dimensional electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, A.; Gold, A.

    1995-12-01

    Bound states of a negative test electron in the low-density regime of the two-dimensional electron gas are obtained when many-body effects (exchange and correlation) are incorporated in the screening function via the local-field correction. Using the Green's-function method and a variational method we determine the energies and the wave functions of the ground state and the excited states as functions of the electron density. For high electron density no bound state is found. Below a critical density the number and the energy of bound states increase with decreasing electron density. The ground state is described by the wave function ψ2s~r exp(-r/α).

  8. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  9. I «cinque giganti» e la genesi del welfare state in Europa tra le due guerre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rapini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay reconstructs the genesis of the welfare state during the early forties of the twentieth century. The welfare state is situated inside the European crisis caused by the Wall Street crash of 1929, by the fascisms and by the second world war. The essay focuses on the social policies of Fascism and Nazism, underlining their genetic connection with the war. The democracies decide to oppose the welfare state to warfare state of the fascisms to win not only the war, but, especially, to win the peace.

  10. Rashba splitting and dichroism of surface states in Bi/Ag surface alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Guang; Miller, T. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801-2902 (United States); Chiang, T.-C., E-mail: tcchiang@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801-2902 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Rashba effect plays an important role in various spin-related phenomena in two-dimensional electronic systems. In this work we present a theoretical analysis of the Rashba effect both analytically and numerically for the prototypical Rashba system Bi/Ag surface alloy, which shows a giant Rashba spin splitting. The results reveal the critical influence of atomic spin-orbit coupling and structural inversion asymmetry. In addition, we demonstrate a theoretical route to interpret the prominent circular dichroic patterns observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in this system. The results reveal a close connection between the experimentally observed dichroic patterns and the Rashba spin texture.

  11. Induced superconductivity in the topological surface state of mercury telluride (HgTe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Luis; Grimm, Manuel; Schueffelgen, Peter; Knott, Daniel; Ames, Christopher; Bruene, Christoph; Leubner, Philipp; Oostinga, Jeroen; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W. [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universitaet Wuerzburg, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    It has been recently demonstrated, that a strained grown layer of of HgTe is a 3D topological insulator (TI) exhibiting a single family of Dirac cone states at its surface. Since the bulk has nearly no carriers left, the transport through these structures is strongly dominated by the surface states. Because of the prediction of creation of Majorana bound states we are looking at a superconductor-TI interface. This talk presents our results on highly transparent S-TI-S junctions where we observe unusual behaviour in the Josephson current. Preliminary results of this project are published.

  12. Donor/Acceptor Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers for Realising a Multi-Redox-State Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Montenegro, Javier; Marchante, Elena; Crivillers, Núria; Rovira, Concepció; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2016-06-17

    Mixed molecular self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold, based on two types of electroactive molecules, that is, electron-donor (ferrocene) and electron-acceptor (anthraquinone) molecules, are prepared as an approach to realise surfaces exhibiting multiple accessible redox states. The SAMs are investigated in different electrolyte media. The nature of these media has a strong impact on the types of redox processes that take place and on the redox potentials. Under optimised conditions, surfaces with three redox states are achieved. Such states are accessible in a relatively narrow potential window in which the SAMs on gold are stable. This communication elucidates the key challenges in fabricating bicomponent SAMs as electrochemical switches.

  13. Tennis-ball state of a self-avoiding wormlike polymer on a spherical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu-Yang; Chen, Jeff Z. Y.

    2011-05-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations of a wormlike chain that contains the excluded-volume interaction, we demonstrate that a directionally anisotropic state exists at high surface coverage, when the chain is confined to a spherical surface. The isotropic-anisotropic transition has first-order characteristics and can be compared with the isotropic-nematic transition observed in lyotropic polymer systems, both driven by the excluded-volume interaction. Unlike a nematic state, the anisotropic state observed here displays the so-called tennis-ball conformation, coupling the polymer-segment orientation preference with positional order.

  14. Challenges related to flotation cleaning of oil shales. Issues due to compositional and surface features and post-grinding surface behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Altun N. Emre

    2016-01-01

    Oil shale is an important energy resource alternative. Despite its recognition as an unconventional oil source, oil shale is also considered as an important solid fossil fuel alternative to coal and lignites due to the solid form and remarkable extent of organic content. Utilization possibilites, similar to coal and lignites, have been considered in the past decades and direct use of oil shales in thermal power production has been possible in countries like Estonia and China. In the perspecti...

  15. Protein overexport in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant is not due to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, K I; Venkov, P V

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain MW11 is a temperature-sensitive mutant which exports twenty times more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental or wild-type strains do. To understand the mechanism underlying the protein overexport in the mutant the possibility of an altered cell-wall structure leading to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins was studied. Data on calcofluor white and zymolyase sensitivities, resistance to killer 1 toxin and determination of exported acid phosphatase and invertase did not provide evidence for alterations in the cell-wall structure that could explain the protein overexport phenotype. The results were obtained in experiments when transcription of mutated gene was discontinued which permits the full expression of the protein overexport phenotype.

  16. Surface-modified Wannier-Stark states in a 1D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, A; Gorza, M -P; Lambrecht, A; Guérout, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of atoms trapped in a vertical 1D optical lattice in close proximity to a reflective surface. We propose an effective model to describe the interaction between the atoms and the surface at any distance. Our model includes the long-range Casimir-Polder potential together with a short-range Lennard-Jones potential, which are considered non-perturbatively with respect to the optical lattice potential. We find an intricate energy spectrum which contains a pair of loosely-bound states localized close to the surface in addition to a surface-modified Wannier-Stark ladder at long distances. Atomic interferometry involving those loosely-bound atom-surface states is proposed to probe the adsorption dynamics of atoms on mirrors.

  17. Hot electron mediated desorption rates calculated from excited state potential energy surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for Desorption Induce by (Multiple) Electronic Transitions (DIET/DIMET) based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the Delta Self-Consistent Field extension of Density Functional Theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various transition metal surfaces, and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system, with parameters obtained from the excited state potential energy surface, and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics in both the DIET and DIMET regime, and reproduce the power law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong.

  18. Fermi surface and quantum well states of V(110) films on W(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupin, Oleg [MS 6-2100, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rotenberg, Eli [MS 6-2100, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kevan, S D [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2007-09-05

    Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we have measured the Fermi surface of V(110) films epitaxially grown on a W(110) substrate. We compare our results for thicker films to existing calculations and measurements for bulk vanadium and find generally very good agreement. For thinner films, we observe and analyse a diverse array of quantum well states that split and distort the Fermi surface segments. We have searched unsuccessfully for a thickness-induced topological transition associated with contact between the zone-centre jungle gym and zone-boundary hole ellipsoid Fermi surface segments. We also find no evidence for ferromagnetic splitting of any bands on this surface.

  19. Spherical MoS{sub 2} micro particles and their surface dispersion due to addition of cobalt promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M. A.; Flores, S.; Farias M, J. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Av. del Charro No. 610, 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Correa, V. [Metropolitan University, Chemistry Department, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Torres, B.; Chianelli, R. R., E-mail: manuel.ramos@uacj.m [Materials Research and Technology Institute, 500 W. University Av. Burges Hall No. 303, El Paso 79902, Texas (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We present here a hydrothermal synthesis on spherical shape molybdenum di-sulfide (MoS{sub 2}) micro particles using thio molybdate salts and sodium silicate as reducing agent. To understand the role of cobalt promoters on this particular MoS{sub 2} spherical shape a second reaction was carried out using same precursors plus addition of Co following same pressure and temperature conditions. Both products (before and after Co promoter) were characterized using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy analysis. From Sem measurements a spherical average size diameter of {approx} 2.855 {mu}m on pure MoS{sub 2} is observed and disperse surface once cobalt is incorporated into the reaction. From Tem observation and interlayer average distance of {approx} 0.63 nm is obtained for MoS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} slabs on samples with Co content. X-ray diffraction indicated principal crystallographic planes to be (002), (100), (101), (102), (103), (006), (105), and (110) for both MoS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}/Co samples. (Author)

  20. Zonal surface wind jets across the Red Sea due to mountain gap forcing along both sides of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Houshuo

    2009-01-01

    [1] Mesoscale atmospheric modeling over the Red Sea, validated by in-situ meteorological buoy data, identifies two types of coastal mountain gap wind jets that frequently blow across the longitudinal axis of the Red Sea: (1) an eastward-blowing summer daily wind jet originating from the Tokar Gap on the Sudanese Red Sea coast, and (2) wintertime westward-blowing wind-jet bands along the northwestern Saudi Arabian coast, which occur every 10-20 days and can last for several days when occurring. Both wind jets can attain wind speeds over 15 m s-1 and contribute significantly to monthly mean surface wind stress, especially in the cross-axis components, which could be of importance to ocean eddy formation in the Red Sea. The wintertime wind jets can cause significant evaporation and ocean heat loss along the northeastern Red Sea coast and may potentially drive deep convection in that region. An initial characterization of these wind jets is presented. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Time-Domain Pure-state Polarization Analysis of Surface Waves Traversing California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Walter, W R; Lay, T; Wu, R

    2003-11-04

    A time-domain pure-state polarization analysis method is used to characterize surface waves traversing California parallel to the plate boundary. The method is applied to data recorded at four broadband stations in California from twenty-six large, shallow earthquakes which occurred since 1988, yielding polarization parameters such as the ellipticity, Euler angles, instantaneous periods, and wave incident azimuths. The earthquakes are located along the circum-Pacific margin and the ray paths cluster into two groups, with great-circle paths connecting stations MHC and PAS or CMB and GSC. The first path (MHC-PAS) is in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS), and the second (CMB-GSC) traverses the Sierra Nevada Batholith parallel to and east of the SAFS. Both Rayleigh and Love wave data show refractions due to lateral velocity heterogeneities under the path, indicating that accurate phase velocity and attenuation analysis requires array measurements. The Rayleigh waves are strongly affected by low velocity anomalies beneath Central California, with ray paths bending eastward as waves travel toward the south, while Love waves are less affected, providing observables to constrain the depth extent of the anomalies. Strong lateral gradients in the lithospheric structure between the continent and the ocean are the likely cause of the path deflections.

  2. Influence of thickness on strain state and surface morphology of AlN grown by HVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maosong, Sun; Jicai, Zhang; Jun, Huang; Xuewei, Li; Linjun, Wang; Xuehua, Liu; Jianfeng, Wang; Ke, Xu

    2016-12-01

    AlN thick films were grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy at high temperature. The evolution of the strain state and crystal quality of AlN with increase of thickness were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra and atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the thickness increased, the stress in the epilayers decreased gradually, which was attributed to the reaction of dislocations at the first several microns in thickness. When the thickness was more than 20 μm, the stress was almost fully relaxed due to the formation of cracks. Wet etching experiments indicated that the dislocation density decreased with the increase of thickness. The AFM images showed that the density of dark spots on the surface obviously decreased and the atomic steps became straight as the thickness increased. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2012CB619305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61274127, 61474133, 61325022), and the CAS Project of Introduction of Outstanding Technical Talent.

  3. Engineering Topological Surface State of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 under external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Min; Lian, Ruqian; Yang, Yanmin; Xu, Guigui; Zhong, Kehua; Huang, Zhigao

    2017-03-01

    External electric field control of topological surface states (SSs) is significant for the next generation of condensed matter research and topological quantum devices. Here, we present a first-principles study of the SSs in the magnetic topological insulator (MTI) Cr-doped Bi2Se3 under external electric field. The charge transfer, electric potential, band structure and magnetism of the pure and Cr doped Bi2Se3 film have been investigated. It is found that the competition between charge transfer and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) will lead to an electrically tunable band gap in Bi2Se3 film under external electric field. As Cr atom doped, the charge transfer of Bi2Se3 film under external electric field obviously decreases. Remarkably, the band gap of Cr doped Bi2Se3 film can be greatly engineered by the external electric field due to its special band structure. Furthermore, magnetic coupling of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 could be even mediated via the control of electric field. It is demonstrated that external electric field plays an important role on the electronic and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 film. Our results may promote the development of electronic and spintronic applications of magnetic topological insulator.

  4. Vibrational states on vicinal surfaces of Al, Ag, Cu and Pd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1998-10-01

    We present the calculation of vibrational modes and lattice relaxation for the (110), (211), (311), (511), (331) and (221) surfaces of Al, Ag, Cu and Pd. The surface phonon frequencies and polarizations are obtained for relaxed and unrelaxed surfaces using embedded atom model potentials. On all surfaces studied step-localized vibrational modes and surface states localized on terrace atoms are found. It is shown that as the terrace width increases so does the number of surface phonons. It is found that interlayer relaxation leads to a shift in the frequencies of the surface states and to a change in the number and localization. In particular, it may cause the appearance or disappearance of step modes. It is shown that the character of relaxation on vicinal surfaces is determined by the number of atoms on a terrace. A comparison of the results with the available experimental data for the Al(221), Cu(211), and Cu(511) surfaces indicates that there is a good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  6. Volume changes of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, due to surface mass balance, ice flow, and subglacial melting at geothermal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Björnson, Helgi; Dall, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    We present observed changes in the geometry of western Vatnajökull over a period of about ten years which are caused by the surface mass balance, ice flow (both during surges and quiescent periods), and basal melting due to geothermal and volcanic activity. Comparison of two digital elevation...... models shows that from 1985 to 1998 the outlet glaciers have lost 14 ± 5 km3, on the average 1 m/yr...

  7. Impact of fire on global land surface air temperature and energy budget for the 20th century due to changes within ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Fire is a global phenomenon and tightly interacts with the biosphere and climate. This study provides the first quantitative assessment and understanding of fire’s influence on the global annual land surface air temperature and energy budget through its impact on terrestrial ecosystems. Fire impacts are quantified by comparing fire-on and fire-off simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Results show that, for the 20th century average, fire-induced changes in terrestrial ecosystems significantly increase global land annual mean surface air temperature by 0.18 °C, decrease surface net radiation and latent heat flux by 1.08 W m-2 and 0.99 W m-2, respectively, and have limited influence on sensible heat flux (-0.11 W m-2) and ground heat flux (+0.02 W m-2). Fire impacts are most clearly seen in the tropical savannas. Our analyses suggest that fire increases surface air temperature predominantly by reducing latent heat flux, mainly due to fire-induced damage to the vegetation canopy, and decreases net radiation primarily because fire-induced surface warming significantly increases upward surface longwave radiation. This study provides an integrated estimate of fire and induced changes in ecosystems, climate, and energy budget at a global scale, and emphasizes the importance of a consistent and integrated understanding of fire effects.

  8. A spectral formalism for computing three-dimensional deformations due to surface loads. 2: Present-day glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1994-01-01

    Using a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating, linear viscoelastic Earth model, we predict present-day three-dimensional surface deformation rates and baseline evolutions arising as a consequence of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles. In general, we use realistic models for the space-time geometry of the final late Pleistocene deglaciation event and incorporate a gravitationally self-consistent ocean meltwater redistribution. The predictions of horizontal velocity presented differ significantly, in both their amplitude and their spatial variation, from those presented in earlier analysis of others which adopted simplified models of both the late Pleistocene ice history and the Earth rheology. An important characteristic of our predicted velocity fields is that the melting of the Laurentide ice sheet over Canada is capable of contributing appreciably to the adjustment in Europe. The sensitivity of the predictions to variations in mantle rheology is investigated by considering a number of different Earth models, and by computing appropriate Frechet kernels. These calculations suggest that the sensitivity of the deformations to the Earth's rheology is significant and strongly dependent on the location of the site relative to the ancient ice sheet. The effects on the predictions of three-dimensional deformation rates of altering the ice history or adopting approximate models for the ocean meltwater redistribution have also been considered and found to be important (the former especially so). Finally, for a suite of Earth models we provide predictions of the velocity of a number of baselines in North America and Europe. We find that, in general, both radial and tangential motions contribute significantly to baseline length changes, and that these contributions are a strong function of the Earth model. We have, furthermore, found a set of Earth models which, together with the ICE-3G deglaciation chronology, produce predictions of baseline length changes that are

  9. Influence of surface states on deep level transient spectroscopy in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Zhu; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Wei-Wei, Chen; Bin, Hou; Jie-Jie, Zhu; Meng, Zhang; Li-Xiang, Chen; Yan-Rong, Cao; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a method to investigate deep traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been widely utilized. The DLTS measurements under different bias conditions are carried out in this paper. Two hole-like traps with active energies of E v + 0.47 eV, and E v + 0.10 eV are observed, which are related to surface states. The electron traps with active energies of E c - 0.56 eV are located in the channel, those with E c - 0.33 eV and E c - 0.88 eV are located in the AlGaN layer. The presence of surface states has a strong influence on the detection of electron traps, especially when the electron traps are low in density. The DLTS signal peak height of the electron trap is reduced and even disappears due to the presence of plentiful surface state. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00606), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0915), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002 and 61404097).

  10. Effect of fiber surface state on mechanical properties of C{sub f}/Si-O-C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Song [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)]. E-mail: wangsong0731@163.com; Chen Zhaohui [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma Qingsong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Hu Haifeng [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zheng Wenwei [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2005-10-25

    Three-dimensional braided carbon fiber reinforced silicon oxycarbide composites (3D-B C{sub f}/Si-O-C) were fabricated via a polysiloxane infiltration and pyrolysis route. The effects of fiber surface state on microstructure and mechanical properties of C{sub f}/Si-O-C composites were investigated. The change of carbon fiber surface state was achieved via heat treatment in vacuum. The results showed that heat treatment decreased carbon fiber surface activity due to the decrease of the amount of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. The C{sub f}/Si-O-C composites fabricated from the carbon fiber with low surface activity had excellent mechanical properties, which resulted from perfect interfacial bonding and good in situ fiber strength. The flexural strength and fracture toughness of the C{sub f}/Si-O-C composites from the treated fiber were 534 MPa and 23.4 MPa m{sup 1/2}, respectively, which were about 7 and 11 times more than those of the composites from the as-received carbon fiber, respectively.

  11. LDA+DMFT study of the Sn/Si(111)({radical}(3) x {radical}(3))R30 surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuwalow, Sergej; Boehnke, Lewin; Lechermann, Frank [I. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Experimental studies and LDA+U calculations for the Sn/Si(111)({radical}(3) x {radical}(3))R30 surface suggest a Mott-insulating surface state originating dominantly from strongly correlated Sn (5p) orbitals below about 70K. Interestingly, the Sn atoms form a 1/3 monolayer on an effective triangular lattice. Hence the issue of spin liquid physics may arise due to possible frustration effects. In the scope of this work, we have first obtained an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of this system in terms of maximally localized Wannier functions from LDA calculations. From there, we performed DMFT calculations for both a 1-band and a 3-band effective Hamiltonian to map out the temperature-dependent behavior of the spectral function close to the suggested metal-insulator transition and to investigate the importance of the different surface bands. In the case of the 3-band Hamiltonian, the full U matrix was used for the calculations. Finally, we compared the results of our dynamical approach to those obtained within the static LDA+U formalism.

  12. Loss of ecosystem services due to chronic pollution of forests and surface waters in the Adirondack region (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Colin M; Caputo, Jesse; Lawrence, Gregory B; Sullivan, Timothy J

    2017-04-15

    Sustaining recent progress in mitigating acid pollution could require lower emissions caps that will give rise to real or perceived tradeoffs between healthy ecosystems and inexpensive energy. Because most impacts of acid rain affect ecosystem functions that are poorly understood by policy-makers and the public, an ecosystem services (ES) framework can help to measure how pollution affects human well-being. Focused on the Adirondack region (USA), a global 'hot-spot' of acid pollution, we measured how the chronic acidification of the region's forests, lakes, and streams has affected the potential economic and cultural benefits they provide to society. We estimated that acid-impaired hardwood forests provide roughly half of the potential benefits of forests on moderate to well-buffered soils - an estimated loss of ∼ $10,000 ha(-1) in net present value of wood products, maple syrup, carbon sequestration, and visual quality. Acidic deposition has had only nominal impact - relative to the effects of surficial geology and till depth - on the capacity of Adirondack lakes and streams to provide water suitable for drinking. However, as pH declines in lakes, the estimated value of recreational fishing decreases significantly due to loss of desirable fish such as trout. Hatchery stocking programs have partially offset the pollution-mediated losses of fishery value, most effectively in the pH range 4.8-5.5, but are costly and limited in scope. Although any estimates of the monetary 'damages' of acid rain have significant uncertainties, our findings highlight some of the more tangible economic and cultural benefits of pollution mitigation efforts, which continue to face litigation and political opposition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed potential surfaces for six low-lying states of Ni3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1987-01-01

    Selected portions of the potential surfaces for six low lying states of Ni3 are the subject of the present SCF/CCI calculations using the effective core potentials developed by Hay and Wadt (1985); the four states are studied for near-equilateral triangle geometries are within 0.04 eV of each other. Two states are studied for linear geometries, of which the first is 0.16 eV higher than the corresponding near-equilateral triangle state and the second is estimated to be nearly degenerate with the near-equilateral triangle structures.

  14. Taking the Firn into Account: Elevation Change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to Surface Mass Balance and Firn Processes, 1960-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S.; Noel, B.; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; van den Broeke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland ice sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The latter two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes compaction, meltwater percolation, and refreezing. The model is forced with surface mass fluxes and temperature from a regional climate model for the period 1960-2014. The model results agree with observations of surface density, density profiles from 62 firn cores, and altimetric observations from regions where ice-dynamical surface height changes are likely small. We find that the firn layer in the high interior is generally thickening slowly (1-5 cm y-1). In the percolation and ablation areas, firn and SMB processes account for a surface elevation lowering of up to 20-50 cm y-1. Most of this firn-induced marginal thinning is caused by an increase in melt since the mid-1990s, and partly compensated by an increase in the accumulation of fresh snow around most of the ice sheet. The total firn and ice volume change between 1980 and 2013 is estimated at -3900 ± 1030 km3 due to firn and SMB, corresponding to an ice-sheet average thinning of 2.32 ± 0.61 m. Most of this volume decrease occurred after 1995. The computed changes in surface elevation can be used to partition altimetrically observed volume change into surface mass balance and ice-dynamically related mass changes.

  15. Anatomy of topological surface states: Exact solutions from destructive interference on frustrated lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Flore K.; Trescher, Maximilian; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2017-08-01

    The hallmark of topological phases is their robust boundary signature whose intriguing properties—such as the one-way transport on the chiral edge of a Chern insulator and the sudden disappearance of surface states forming open Fermi arcs on the surfaces of Weyl semimetals—are impossible to realize on the surface alone. Yet, despite the glaring simplicity of noninteracting topological bulk Hamiltonians and their concomitant energy spectrum, the detailed study of the corresponding surface states has essentially been restricted to numerical simulation. In this work, however, we show that exact analytical solutions of both topological and trivial surface states can be obtained for generic tight-binding models on a large class of geometrically frustrated lattices in any dimension without the need for fine-tuning of hopping amplitudes. Our solutions derive from local constraints tantamount to destructive interference between neighboring layer lattices perpendicular to the surface and provide microscopic insights into the structure of the surface states that enable analytical calculation of many desired properties including correlation functions, surface dispersion, Berry curvature, and the system size dependent gap closing, which necessarily occurs when the spatial localization switches surface. This further provides a deepened understanding of the bulk-boundary correspondence. We illustrate our general findings on a large number of examples in two and three spatial dimensions. Notably, we derive exact chiral Chern insulator edge states on the spin-orbit-coupled kagome lattice, and Fermi arcs relevant for recently synthesized slabs of pyrochlore-based Eu2Ir2O7 and Nd2Ir2O7 , which realize an all-in-all-out spin configuration, as well as for spin-ice-like two-in-two-out and one-in-three-out configurations, which are both relevant for Pr2Ir2O7 . Remarkably, each of the pyrochlore examples exhibit clearly resolved Fermi arcs although only the one

  16. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  17. Elastic scattering of surface states on three-dimensional topological insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Zhu Bang-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators as a new type of quantum matter materials are characterized by a full insulating gap in the bulk and gapless edge/surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry.We propose that the interference patterns caused by the elastic scattering of defects or impurities are dominated by the surface states at the extremal points on the constant energy contour.Within such a formalism,we summarize our recent theoretical investigations on the elastic scattering of topological surface states by various imperfections,including non-magnetic impurities,magnetic impurities,step edges,and various other defects,in comparison with the recent related experiments in typical topological materials such as BiSb alloys,Bi2Te3,and Bi2Se3 crystals.

  18. Existence of topological nontrivial surface states in strained transition metals: W, Ta, Mo, and Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonig, Danny; Rauch, Tomáš; Mirhosseini, Hossein; Henk, Jürgen; Mertig, Ingrid; Wortelen, Henry; Engelkamp, Bernd; Schmidt, Anke B.; Donath, Markus

    2016-10-01

    We show that a series of transition metals with strained body-centered cubic lattice—W, Ta, Nb, and Mo—hosts surface states that are topologically protected by mirror symmetry and, thus, exhibits nonzero topological invariants. These findings extend the class of topologically nontrivial systems by topological crystalline transition metals. The investigation is based on calculations of the electronic structures and of topological invariants. The signatures of a Dirac-type surface state in W(110), e.g., the linear dispersion and the spin texture, are verified. To further support our prediction, we investigate Ta(110) both theoretically and experimentally by spin-resolved inverse photoemission: unoccupied topologically nontrivial surface states are observed.

  19. Topologically Entangled Rashba-Split Shockley States on the Surface of Grey Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, J.-Z.; Ishida, Y.; Zhao, L.-X.; Xu, Q.-N.; Lv, B.-Q.; Yaji, K.; Chen, G.-F.; Weng, H.-M.; Dai, X.; Fang, Z.; Chen, X.-Q.; Fu, L.; Qian, T.; Ding, H.; Shin, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discover a pair of spin-polarized surface bands on the (111) face of grey arsenic by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In the occupied side, the pair resembles typical nearly-free-electron Shockley states observed on noble-metal surfaces. However, pump-probe ARPES reveals that the spin-polarized pair traverses the bulk band gap and that the crossing of the pair at Γ ¯ is topologically unavoidable. First-principles calculations well reproduce the bands and their nontrivial topology; the calculations also support that the surface states are of Shockley type because they arise from a band inversion caused by crystal field. The results provide compelling evidence that topological Shockley states are realized on As(111).

  20. Inelastic quasiparticle lifetimes of the Shockley surface state band on Ni(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Kai-Felix [Ohio University, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics and Astronomy Department, Athens, OH (United States); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Hla, Saw-Wai [Ohio University, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics and Astronomy Department, Athens, OH (United States); Samango GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    We present a study of the low-energy quasiparticle lifetimes of the Shockley surface state on the Ni(111) surface with scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. By measuring the coherence length of the decaying standing wave pattern at straight step edges electron and hole lifetimes have been determined. The values of the lifetime measured on this ferromagnetic surface show to be considerable smaller than the values obtained from noble metal surfaces. This is explained by differences in the electron density of states at the Fermi energy but has to include substantial spin-flip scattering. Furthermore hole lifetimes appear to be larger than electron lifetimes with the same excitation energy. Although only results for the majority spin component are presented, a spin-dependent selfenergy is expected. (orig.)

  1. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-05

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces.

  2. Laser flash photolysis study on 9-phenylxanthenium tetrafluoroborate: Identification of new features due to the triplet state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanghamitra Banerjee; Anunay Samanta

    2011-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis study on highly fluorescent and stable salt of 9-phenylxanthenium cation in neutral condition has been carried out for the first time. A new transient absorption band of this extensively studied system that perhaps remained buried under the fluorescence envelope and hitherto undetected has been identified and attributed to the triplet state of the system. This oxygen-insensitive triplet-triplet absorption band in the 480-600 nm range is expected to trigger new studies exploring the reactivity of the triplet state of this system, which has so far received very little attention.

  3. Can the 750 GeV diphoton LHC excess be due to a radion-dominated state?

    CERN Document Server

    Boos, Edward E; Volobuev, Igor P

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of interpreting the 125 GeV scalar boson and the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by the ATLAS and CMS experiments as a Higgs-dominated and a radion-dominated states respectively in a stabilized brane-world model. It is shown that in the simplest variant of the model, where only the gravitational degrees of freedom propagate in the bulk, the production cross section of the radion-dominated state with mass 750 GeV turns out to be too small in the allowed region of the model parameter space for explaining the nature of the excess in this approach.

  4. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, L; Montero-Cabrera, M E; Manjón-Collado, G; Colmenero-Sujo, L; Rentería-Villalobos, M; Cano-Jiménez, A; Rodríguez-Pineda, A; Dávila-Rangel, I; Quirino-Torres, L; Herrera-Peraza, E F

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222Rn, 226Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 microSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality.

  5. Composition, Physical State, and Distribution of Ices at the Surface of Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBergh, Catherine; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Owen, Tobias C.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Roush, Ted L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of near-infrared observations of the icy surface of Triton, recorded on 1995 September 7, with the cooled grating spectrometer CGS4 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (Mauna Kea, HI). This analysis was performed in two steps. The step consisted of identifying the molecules composing Triton's surface by comparing the observations with laboratory transmission spectra (direct spectral analysis ); this also gives information on the physical state of the components.

  6. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  7. A Modified Critical State Two-surface Plasticity Model for Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmar, Christian LeBlanc; Hededal, O.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides background information and documentation for the implementation of a robust plasticity model as a user-subroutine in the commercial finite difference code, FLAC3D by Itasca. The plasticity model presented is equal to the 3 dimensional critical state two-surface plasticity model...... for sands by Manzari et al., but uses a modified multi-axial surface formulation based on a versatile shape function prescribing a family of smooth and convex contours in the π-plane. The model is formulated within the framework of critical state soil mechanics and is capable of accurately simulating...

  8. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  9. Photonic realization of the relativistic Kronig-Penney model and relativistic Tamm surface states

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Photonic analogues of the relativistic Kronig-Penney model and of relativistic surface Tamm states are proposed for light propagation in fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) with phase defects. A periodic sequence of phase slips in the FBG realizes the relativistic Kronig-Penney model, the band structure of which being mapped into the spectral response of the FBG. For the semi-infinite FBG Tamm surface states can appear and can be visualized as narrow resonance peaks in the transmission spectrum of the grating.

  10. Compact surface Fano states embedded in the continuum of waveguide arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Weimann, Steffen; Keil, Robert; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Nolte, Stefan; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Szameit, Alexander; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-01-01

    We describe theoretically and observe experimentally the formation of a surface state in a semi-infnite waveguide array with side-coupled waveguide, designed to simultaneously achieve Fano and Fabry-Perot resonances. We demonstrate that the surface mode is compact, with all energy concentrated in few waveguides at the edge and no field penetration beyond the side-coupled waveguide position. Furthermore, we show that by broadening the spectral band in the rest of the waveguide array it is possible to suppress exponentially localized modes, whereas the Fano state having the eigenvalue embedded in the continuum is preserved.

  11. RELATIVE VULNERABILITY OF SELECTED CARIBBEAN STATES TO CHANGES IN FOOD SECURITY DUE TO TROPICAL STORMS AND HURRICANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlisle Pemberton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the determination of the relative vulnerability of selected Caribbean states to changes in their food security status because of the incidence of tropical storms and hurricanes required the aggregation of a composite indicator of the stability of food security and a risk indicator. Linear aggregation was utilized to derive the composite indicator of the stability of food security and this approach and Pareto ranking were used to aggregate this composite indicator and the risk indicator (Annual Frequency of Hurricanes and Storms to assess relative vulnerability. The most vulnerable states were the small island developing states (SIDS: St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, Dominica, Grenada and Antigua and Barbuda, supporting the position that SIDS are in a most precarious position. The least vulnerable states were Belize, Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica. Pareto rankings and linear aggregation produced similar relative vulnerability orderings. However, Pareto rankings had the advantage of imposing fewer restrictions, such as the continuity and linearity of aggregation functions and they were able to show graphically that several countries may have the same relative vulnerability status because of the impact of different vulnerability factors, a situation that is lost in the numerical values of linear aggregation.

  12. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  13. Tunable hybridization of electronic states of graphene and a metal surface

    OpenAIRE

    Gruneis, Alexander; Vyalikh, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to monitor and control the strength of the hybridization between electronic states of graphene and metal surfaces. Inspecting the distribution of the $\\pi$ band in a high-quality graphene layer synthesized on Ni(111) by angle-resolved photoemission, we observe a new "kink" feature which indicates a strong hybridization between $\\pi$ and \\textit{d} states of graphene and nickel, respectively. Upon deposition and gradual intercalation of potassium atoms into the graphene/...

  14. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  15. Quantum transport in the surface states of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kai; Wu, Lin; Gong, Xinxin; Xiao, Shunhao; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Although bulk Bi is a prototypical semimetal with a topologically trivial electronic band structure, we show by various quantum transport measurements that epitaxial Bi(111) thin films have unexpected and nontrivial properties. Not only the top and the bottom but also the side surfaces of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films are always robustly metallic while the interior has already become insulating. We identify the coupling between the top and the bottom surface states that drives the two originally independent surface conducting channels into a single connected one. The properties of Bi(111) thin films realized could lead to promising applications in spintronics.

  16. Collapse ratios of buildings due to the 1995 Kobe earthquake and interference between S-wave and the second surface wave at basin edge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhixin; XU Jiren; Ryuji Kubota; Wakizawa Yasuhiko; Kajikawa Syozo

    2004-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of collapse ratios of buildings in Kobe city due to the 1995 M7.2 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan (Kobe) earthquake and the interferences due to SH or P-SV and the second surface waves propagating in heterogeneous medium are discussed in this paper by using numerical simulation technique of wave equation. The staggered grid real value fast Fourier transform differentiation (SGRFFTD) is used in the pseudospectral method of ground motion simulations because of its speed, high stability and accuracy. The results show that the maximum amplitude of simulated acceleration waveforms on the ground coincides well with the complicated distributions of collapse ratios of buildings. The peak collapse ratio of buildings away from the earthquake fault also coincides well with the peak ground acceleration. The spatial interference process is analyzed by using the snap shots of seismic wave propagation. The peak ground acceleration is probably caused by the interferences due to the second surface wave transmitting from the bedrock to sedimentary basin and the upward body wave. Analyses of the interference process show that seismic velocity structure and geologic structure strongly influence the distribution of the maximum amplitude of acceleration waveforms. Interferences occurring near the basin boundary are probably the cause of the peak collapse ratio of buildings away from the fault. Therefore it is necessary to analyze wave propagations and interference process using numerical simulation strategy for studies on the seismic disasters.

  17. Splitting of ISGMR strength in the light-mass nucleus $^{24}$Mg due to ground-state deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Y K; Matta, J T; Patel, D; Peach, T; Hoffman, J; Yoshida, K; Itoh, M; Fujiwara, M; Hara, K; Hashimoto, H; Nakanishi, K; Yosoi, M; Sakaguchi, H; Terashima, S; Kishi, S; Murakami, T; Uchida, M; Yasuda, Y; Akimune, H; Kawabata, T; Harakeh, M N

    2015-01-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) strength distribution in $^{24}$Mg has been determined from background-free inelastic scattering of 386-MeV $\\alpha$ particles at extreme forward angles, including 0$^{\\circ}$. The ISGMR strength distribution has been observed for the first time to have a two-peak structure in a light-mass nucleus. This splitting of ISGMR strength is explained well by microscopic theory in terms of the prolate deformation of the ground state of $^{24}$Mg.

  18. Response to Comment on “Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Bates, Timothy S.; Cross, Eben S.; Davidovits, Paul; Hakala, Jani; Hayden, Katherine; Jobson, Bertram Thomas; Kolesar, K. R.; Lack, D. A.; Lerner, Brian M.; Li, Shao-Meng; Mellon, Daniel; Nuaaman, Ibraheem; Olfert, Jason N.; Petaja, Tuukka; Quinn, P. K.; Song, Chen; Subramanian, R.; Williams, Eric; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2013-01-25

    Jacobson argues that our statement that "many climate models may overestimate warming by BC" has not been demonstrated. Jacobson challenges our results on the basis that we have misinterpreted some model results, omitted optical focusing under high relative humidity conditions and by involatile components, and because our measurements consist of only two locations over short atmospheric time periods. We address each of these arguments, acknowledging important issues and clarifying some misconceptions, and stand by our direct observations, conclusions, and stated implications.

  19. Transition from Cassie to impaled state during drop impact on groove-textured solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikuntanathan, V; Sivakumar, D

    2014-05-07

    Liquid drops impacted on textured surfaces undergo a transition from the Cassie state characterized by the presence of air pockets inside the roughness valleys below the drop to an impaled state with at least one of the roughness valleys filled with drop liquid. This occurs when the drop impact velocity exceeds a particular value referred to as the critical impact velocity. The present study investigates such a transition process during water drop impact on surfaces textured with unidirectional parallel grooves referred to as groove-textured surfaces. The process of liquid impalement into a groove in the vicinity of drop impact through de-pinning of the three-phase contact line (TPCL) beneath the drop as well as the critical impact velocity were identified experimentally from high speed video recordings of water drop impact on six different groove-textured surfaces made from intrinsically hydrophilic (stainless steel) as well as intrinsically hydrophobic (PDMS and rough aluminum) materials. The surface energy of various 2-D configurations of liquid-vapor interface beneath the drop near the drop impact point was theoretically investigated to identify the locally stable configurations and establish a pathway for the liquid impalement process. A force balance analysis performed on the liquid-vapor interface configuration just prior to TPCL de-pinning provided an expression for the critical drop impact velocity, Uo,cr, beyond which the drop state transitions from the Cassie to an impaled state. The theoretical model predicts that Uo,cr increases with the increase in pillar side angle, α, and intrinsic hydrophobicity whereas it decreases with the increase in groove top width, w, of the groove-textured surface. The quantitative predictions of the theoretical model were found to show good agreement with the experimental measurements of Uo,cr plotted against the surface texture geometry factor in our model, {tan(α/2)/w}(0.5).

  20. Assessment of surface dryness due to deforestation using satellite-based temperature-vegetation dryness index (TVDI) in Rondônia, Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. H.; Cho, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Rondônia is the most deforested region in the Amazon due to human activities such as forest lumbering for the several decades. The deforestation affects to water cycle because evapotranspiration was reduced, and then soil moisture and precipitation will be changed. In this study, we assess surface dryness using satellite-based data such as moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), albedo, TRMM Multi-sensor Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation from 2002 to 2014, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) from 2007 to 2014. Temperature-vegetation dryness index (TVDI) was calculated using LST and NDVI to evaluate surface dryness during dry season (June-July). TVDI relatively represents the surface dryness on specific area and period. Forest, deforesting and deforested regions were selected in the Rondônia to assess the relative changes on surface dryness occurred from human activity. The relative TVDI (rTVDI) at deforesting region increased because of deforestation, it means that surface in deforesting region became more dryness. We also found that to assess the impact of deforestation using satellite-based precipitation and vegetation conditions such as NDVI and sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) is possible. The relative NDVI (rNDVI) and SIF decreased when TVDI increased, and two variables (rTVDI-rNDVI, rTVDI-SIF) had linear correlation. Thesis results can be helpful to comprehend impact of deforestation in Amazon, and to validate simulations of deforestation from hydrological models.

  1. Continuous Multiscale Entanglement Renormalization Ansatz as Holographic Surface-State Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Masamichi; Numasawa, Tokiro; Shiba, Noburo; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kento

    2015-10-01

    We present how the surface-state correspondence, conjectured by Miyaji and Takayanagi, works in the setup of AdS3/CFT2 by generalizing the formulation of a continuous multiscale entanglement renormalization group ansatz. The boundary states in conformal field theories play a crucial role in our formulation and the bulk diffeomorphism is naturally taken into account. We give an identification of bulk local operators which reproduces correct scalar field solutions on AdS3 and bulk scalar propagators. We also calculate the information metric for a locally excited state and show that it reproduces the time slice of AdS3.

  2. Continuous Multiscale Entanglement Renormalization Ansatz as Holographic Surface-State Correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Masamichi; Numasawa, Tokiro; Shiba, Noburo; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kento

    2015-10-23

    We present how the surface-state correspondence, conjectured by Miyaji and Takayanagi, works in the setup of AdS(3)/CFT(2) by generalizing the formulation of a continuous multiscale entanglement renormalization group ansatz. The boundary states in conformal field theories play a crucial role in our formulation and the bulk diffeomorphism is naturally taken into account. We give an identification of bulk local operators which reproduces correct scalar field solutions on AdS(3) and bulk scalar propagators. We also calculate the information metric for a locally excited state and show that it reproduces the time slice of AdS(3).

  3. Effect of activity state upon the production of lethalities due to the inhalation of the toxic pyrolysis products of polyacrylonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S.J.; Whitney, S.; Purser, C.; Hume, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is known to be produced upon the pyrolysis of the synthetic material polyacrylonitrile. Cyanide inhibits phosphorylation reactions, therefore, decreasing the amount of high energy bonds available for metabolic use. Since the energy requirements, as well as the respiratory minute volume, for an individual decrease with decreasing activity, it was of interest to investigate whether diminished physical activity would decrease the lethal potential of the pyrolysis products of polyacrylonitrile. In order to produce wide variations in physical activity, male ICR mice were pretreated with either 8.6 mg/kg dextroamphetamine sulfate ip 30 min prior to challenge, 75 mg/kg sodium pentobarbital ip 15 min prior to challenge, or 10 ml/kg of 70 proof ethyl alcohol ip 15 min prior to challenge. Control animals received injections of 10 ml/kg normal saline ip 15 min prior to challenge. Animals were subsequently challenged with the cooled/filtered smoke from the pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile fibers at 660 C. Increased physical activity decreased the exposure time necessary to produce death. Animals pretreated with amphetamine appear to die more rapidly than control animals due to an increase in respiratory minute volume. Animals pretreated with sodium pentobarbital or ethanol appear to survive through long periods of exposure to the toxic gases due to both a decrease in minute volume and a decrease in energy utilization.

  4. Splitting of ISGMR strength in the light-mass nucleus 24Mg due to ground-state deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.K. Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR strength distribution in 24Mg has been determined from background-free inelastic scattering of 386-MeV α particles at extreme forward angles, including 0∘. The ISGMR strength distribution has been observed for the first time to have a two-peak structure in a light-mass nucleus. This splitting of ISGMR strength is explained well by microscopic theory in terms of the prolate deformation of the ground state of 24Mg.

  5. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid-particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  6. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh, E-mail: rkm@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid–particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  7. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Bisson, Régis; Beck, Rainer D

    2013-05-01

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S(θ). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  8. Experimental evidences of topological surface states of β-Ag2Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaev, Azat; Ren, Peng; Xia, Bin; Lin, Qing Hua; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Han, Ming-Yong; Li, Zhi Peng; Zhu, Wei Guang; Wu, Qingyu; Feng, Yuan Ping; Shen, Lei; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Lan

    2013-03-01

    We present evidence of topological surface states in β-Ag2Te through first-principles calculations, periodic quantum interference effect and ambipolar electric field effect in single crystalline nanoribbon. Our first-principles calculations show that β-Ag2Te is a topological insulator with a gapless Dirac cone with strong anisotropy. To experimentally probe the topological surface state, we synthesized high quality β-Ag2Te nanoribbons and performed electron transport measurements. The coexistence of pronounced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and weak Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations clearly demonstrates coherent electron transport around the perimeter of β-Ag2Te nanoribbon and therefore the existence of topological surface states, which is further supported by the ambipolar electric field effect for devices fabricated by β-Ag2Te nanoribbons. The experimental evidences of topological surface states and the theoretically predicted anisotropic Dirac cone of β-Ag2Te suggest that the material may be a promising candidate of topological insulator for fundamental study and future spintronic devices.

  9. Reduction of fast surface states on p-type GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Wagner, R. S.; Pattillo, S.; Dunlavy, D.; Jervis, T.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Ireland, P. J.

    1982-04-01

    Native oxides and oxyfluorides were grown on GaAs by a glow discharge plasma process. Analysis of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures based on oxyfluoride dielectrics indicated vastly different interface properties compared to pure oxide dielectrics. Whereas oxide structures showed high densities of fast surface states, oxyfluorides showed no evidence of such effects.

  10. Ground states for a modified capillary surface equation in weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove a compact embedding theorem for the weighted Orlicz-Sobolev space of radially symmetric functions. Using the embedding theorem and critical points theory, we prove the existence of multiple radial solutions and radial ground states for the following modified capillary surface equation $$\\displaylines{ -\\operatorname{div}\\Big(\\frac{|\

  11. Literature Survey Concerning State of the Art and Surface Generation in High Speed Milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano

    This report constitutes a short description of a literature survey concerning the state of the art and latest achievements on the rather new and powerful technology of high speed milling and its modelling, particularly looking at modelling of the generated surfaces. This task has been conducted i...

  12. Friction surface cladding: An exploratory study of a new solid state cladding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.J.; Bor, T.C.; Stelt, van der A.A.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Kwakernaak, C.; Kooijman, A.M.; Mol, J.M.C.; Akkerman, R.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Friction surface cladding is a newly developed solid state cladding process to manufacture thin metallic layers on a substrate. In this study the influence of process conditions on the clad layer appearance and the mechanical properties of both the clad layer and the substrate were investigated. Thi

  13. Experimental evidences of topological surface states of β-Ag2Te

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat Sulaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present evidence of topological surface states in β-Ag2Te through first-principles calculations, periodic quantum interference effect and ambipolar electric field effect in single crystalline nanoribbon. Our first-principles calculations show that β-Ag2Te is a topological insulator with a gapless Dirac cone with strong anisotropy. To experimentally probe the topological surface state, we synthesized high quality β-Ag2Te nanoribbons and performed electron transport measurements. The coexistence of pronounced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and weak Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations clearly demonstrates coherent electron transport around the perimeter of β-Ag2Te nanoribbon and therefore the existence of topological surface states, which is further supported by the ambipolar electric field effect for devices fabricated by β-Ag2Te nanoribbons. The experimental evidences of topological surface states and the theoretically predicted anisotropic Dirac cone of β-Ag2Te suggest that the material may be a promising candidate of topological insulator for fundamental study and future spintronic devices.

  14. Quantum Fisher information of the GHZ state due to classical phase noise lasers under non-Markovian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zou, Jian; Yang, Zi-Yi; Li, Longwu; Li, Hai; Shao, Bin

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of N-qubit GHZ state quantum Fisher information (QFI) under phase noise lasers (PNLs) driving is investigated in terms of non-Markovian master equation. We first investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of the QFI of N-qubit GHZ state and show that when the ratio of the PNL rate and the system-environment coupling strength is very small, the oscillations of the QFIs decay slower which corresponds to the non-Markovian region; yet when it becomes large, the QFIs monotonously decay which corresponds to the Markovian region. When the atom number N increases, QFIs in both regions decay faster. We further find that the QFI flow disappears suddenly followed by a sudden birth depending on the ratio of the PNL rate and the system-environment coupling strength and the atom number N, which unveil a fundamental connection between the non-Markovian behaviors and the parameters of system-environment couplings. We discuss two optimal positive operator-valued measures (POVMs) for two different strategies of our model and find the condition of the optimal measurement. At last, we consider the QFI of two atoms with qubit-qubit interaction under random telegraph noises (RTNs).

  15. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: rogus@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Steski, Dannie; Kanesue, Takeshi [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, Shunsuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C{sup 6+} ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  16. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.

  17. Mobile load simulators - A tool to distinguish between the emissions due to abrasion and resuspension of PM10 from road surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, R.; Zeyer, K.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Poulikakos, L. D.; Furger, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2010-12-01

    Mechanically produced abrasion particles and resuspension processes are responsible for a significant part of the PM10 emissions of road traffic. However, specific differentiation between PM10 emissions due to abrasion and resuspension from road pavement is very difficult due to their similar elemental composition and highly correlated variation in time. In this work Mobile Load Simulators were used to estimate PM10 emission factors for pavement abrasion and resuspension on different pavement types for light and heavy duty vehicles. From the experiments it was derived that particle emissions due to abrasion from pavements in good condition are quite low in the range of only a few mg·km -1 per vehicle if quantifiable at all. Considerable abrasion emissions, however, can occur from damaged pavements. Resuspension of deposited dust can cause high and extremely variable particle emissions depending strongly on the dirt load of the road surface. Porous pavements seem to retain deposited dust better than dense pavements, thus leading to lower emissions due to resuspension compared to pavements with a dense structure (e.g. asphalt concrete). Tyre wear seemed not to be a quantitatively significant source of PM10 emissions from road traffic.

  18. Lateral photovoltaic effect in p-type silicon induced by surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Mei, Chunlian; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Wang, Hui

    2017-03-01

    A colossal lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) was observed at the surface of p-type silicon, which differs from the conventional thought that a large LPE is only observed in Schottky junctions and PN junctions consisting of several layers with different conductivities. It shows a high sensitivity of 499.24 mV/mm and an ultra-broadband spectral responsivity (from 405 nm to 980 nm) at room temperature, which makes it an attractive candidate for near-infrared detection. We propose that this phenomenon can be understood by considering the surface band bending near the surface of p-Si induced by charged surface states. The energy band diagrams of the samples are shown based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggesting the correlation between the LPE and surface band bending. The conjectures are validated by changing the surface states of p-type silicon using Ni nano-films. These findings reveal a generation mechanism of the LPE and may lead to p-Si based, broadband-responsivity, low-cost, and high-precision optical and optoelectronic applications.

  19. Emission enhancement in indium zinc oxide(IZO)/Ag/IZO sandwiched structure due to surface plasmon resonance of thin Ag film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Takayuki; Yanome, Kazuki; Kawamura, Midori; Abe, Yoshio; Kim, Kyung Ho; Takayama, Junichi; Murayama, Akihiro

    2016-12-01

    We report on a photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in IZO/Ag/IZO sandwiched structure via surface plasmonic effects of 14 nm-thick Ag film. In the presence of Ag thin film, the 2-8-fold enhancement was observed for the broad PL around 2.34 eV, which can be originated from defect states in amorphous IZO film. The results of time-resolved PL spectra suggested that the increase in radiative recombination rate, and the maximum Purcell factor of 19 was estimated from the analysis of the PL decay profiles. The comparison between the results of static- and dynamic-PL measurement suggests that the non-radiative process after the excitation of the surface plasmon of the silver film also affects the total efficiency of the emission enhancement.

  20. Phase-sensitive lock-in imaging of surface densities of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Martin; Mutombo, Pingo; Shukrinov, Pavel; Dudr, Viktor; Cháb, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    A new way of imaging the local density of states has been devised through a combination of the constant-height scanning tunnelling microscopy operational mode and lock-in techniques. We have obtained current images simultaneously with real space dynamical conductance maps (d I/d V) for energies around the Fermi level, on the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface. We reconstructed the normalized dynamical conductance spectra—(d I/d V)/(I/V). Since the (d I/d V)/(I/V) curves are closely related to the local densities of states, we compared their sum over the unit cell to photoelectron spectra and theoretical calculations. We find that the results are in good agreement. Consequently, the extent of localization of surface electronic states at lattice positions was determined.

  1. U.S. Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States — Volumes 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine M. Plowman

    2004-11-01

    The recent revival of interest in nuclear power is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. This study was conducted to provide an initial estimate of jobs to be gained in the U.S. through the repatriation of the nuclear manufacturing industry. In the course of the study, related job categories were also modeled to provide an additional estimate of the potential expansion of existing industries (i.e., plant construction and operations) in conjunction with the repatriation of manufacturing jobs.

  2. Evaluating the Burden of Lymphedema Due to Lymphatic Filariasis in 2005 in Khurda District, Odisha State, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Walsh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Over 1.1 billion people worldwide are at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF, and the global burden of LF-associated lymphedema is estimated at 16 million affected people, yet country-specific estimates are poor.A house-to-house morbidity census was conducted to assess the burden and severity of lymphedema in a population of 1,298,576 persons living in the LF-endemic district of Khurda in Odisha State, India. The burden of lymphedema in Khurda is widespread geographically, and 1.3% (17,036 of the total population report lymphedema. 51.3% of the patients reporting lymphedema were female, mean age 49.4 years (1-99. Early lymphedema (Dreyer stages 1 & 2 was reported in two-thirds of the patients. Poisson regression analysis was conducted in order to determine risk factors for advanced lymphedema (Dreyer stages 4-7. Increasing age was significantly associated with advanced lymphedema, and persons 70 years and older had a prevalence three times greater than individuals ages 15-29 (aPR: 3.21, 95% CI 2.45, 4.21. The number of adenolymphangitis (ADL episodes reported in the previous year was also significantly associated with advanced lymphedema (aPR 4.65, 95% CI 2.97-7.30. This analysis is one of the first to look at potential risk factors for advanced lymphedema using morbidity census data from an entire district in Odisha State, India.These data highlight the magnitude of lymphedema in LF-endemic areas and emphasize the need to develop robust estimates of numbers of individuals with lymphedema in order to identify the extent of lymphedema management services needed in these regions.

  3. Realization of Multi-Stable Ground States in a Nematic Liquid Crystal by Surface and Electric Field Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwag, Jin Seog; Kim, Young-Ki; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Owing to the significant price drop of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and the efforts to save natural resources, LCDs are even replacing paper to display static images such as price tags and advertising boards. Because of a growing market demand on such devices, the LCD that can be of numerous surface alignments of directors as its ground state, the so-called multi-stable LCD, comes into the limelight due to the great potential for low power consumption. However, the multi-stable LCD with industrial feasibility has not yet been successfully performed. In this paper, we propose a simple and novel configuration for the multi-stable LCD. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a battery of stable surface alignments can be achieved by the field-induced surface dragging effect on an aligning layer with a weak surface anchoring. The simplicity and stability of the proposed system suggest that it is suitable for the multi-stable LCDs to display static images with low power consumption and thus opens applications in various fields.

  4. Evidence for the intrinsic nature of band-gap states electrochemically observed on atomically flat TiO2(110) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Shintaro; Miura, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2014-12-07

    Using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) electrochemistry approach with pulsed laser deposition (PLD), we investigated the band-gap state for TiO2(110). In the PLD chamber, a TiO2(110) surface was cleaned by annealing in O2 enough for it to exhibit a sharp (1 × 1) reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern. The cleaned TiO2(110)-(1 × 1) sample then underwent electrochemical measurements without exposure to air, showing the band-gap state at -0.14 V vs. Ag by Mott-Schottky plot analysis. The band-gap state gradually disappeared under UV illumination at +0.6 V vs. Ag due to photoetching, and reappeared on reduction in a vacuum and/or deposition of a fresh TiO2 film. These results indicated that the electrochemically observed band-gap state for TiO2(110) was a defect state due to oxygen deficiency, most probably identical to that observed under UHV, which does not necessarily exist on the surface. A quantitative analysis of the defect density suggests that the origin of this defect state is not the surface bridging hydroxyls or oxygen vacancies, but rather the interstitial Ti(3+) ions in the subsurface region.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of MR angiographic image and brain surface image using steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takane, Atsushi; Tsuda, Munetaka (Hitachi Ltd., Katsuta, Ibaraki (Japan)); Koizumi, Hideaki; Koyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takeyuki

    1993-09-01

    Synthesis of a brain surface image and an angiographic image representing brain surface vasculatures can be useful for pre-operational contemplation of brain surgery. Both brain surface images and brain surface vasculature images were successfully acquired simultaneously utilizing both FID signals and time-reversed FID signals created under steady-state free precession (SSFP). This simultaneous imaging method has several advantages. No positional discrepancies between both images and prolongation of scan time are anticipated because of concurrent acquisition of the two kinds of image data. Superimposition and stereo-display of both images enable understanding of their spatial relationship, and therefore afford a useful means for pre-operational simulation of brain surgery. (author).

  6. Effect of Microscale Contact State of Polyurethane Surface on Adhesion and Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Min; Ji Ai-hong; Dai Zhen-dong

    2006-01-01

    The effect of microscale contact of rough surfaces on the adhesion and friction under negative normal forces was experimentally investigated. The adhesive force of single point contact - sapphire ball to flat polyurethane did not vary with the normal force. With rough surface contact, which was assumed to be a great number of point contacts, the adhesive force increased logarithmically with the normal force. Under negative normal force adhesive state, the tangential force (more than hundred mN)were much larger than the negative normal force (several mN) and increased with the linear decrease of negative normal force.The results reveal why the gecko's toe must slide slightly on the target surface when it makes contact on a surface and suggest how a biomimetic gecko foot might be designed.

  7. Non-Linear Trans-Planckian Corrections of Spectra due to the Non-trivial Initial States

    CERN Document Server

    Yusofi, E

    2014-01-01

    Recent Planck results motivated us to use non-Bunch-Davies vacuum. In this paper, we use the excited-de Sitter mode as non-linear initial states during inflation to calculate the corrected spectra of the initial fluctuations of the scalar field. First, we consider the field in de Sitter space-time as background field and for the non-Bunch-Davies mode, we use the perturbation theory to the second order approximation. Also, unlike conventional renormalization method, we offer de Sitter space-time as the background instead Minkowski space-time. This approach preserve the symmetry of curved space-time and stimulate us to use excited mode. By taking into account this alternative mode and the effects of trans-Planckian physics, we calculate the power spectrum in standard approach and Danielsson argument. The calculated power spectrum with this method is finite, corrections of it is non-linear, and in de Sitter limit corrections reduce to linear form that obtained from several previous conventional methods.

  8. Fragmentation and desorption from condensed alcohols due to soft X-rays: relevance to solid state astrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, G.C.; Rocco, M.L.M.; Boechat-Roberty, H.M.; Nazareth, A.M.; Amaral, L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Andrade, D.P.P.; Bergantini, A. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Methanol and ethanol, the simplest organic alcohols, are important precursors of more complex prebiotic species and are found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust. These molecules have been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some low- and high-mass protostars, such as W33A and RAFGL 7009, and also in comets, as Hale-Bopp and other Solar system bodies, such as the Centaur 5145 Pholus grains. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some kind of ionizing agents, such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). The aim of this work is to experimentally study the ionization, dissociation and ion desorption processes induced by photons and electrons on alcohols, CH{sub 3}OH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, as part of a systematic experimental study of condensed (ice phase) prebiotic molecules. We have employed soft X-ray photons at the oxygen K edge and variable electron energies to simulate the effects of stellar radiation field on the astrophysics ices. These results were also compared with effects produced by charged particles from cosmic rays. Ion photodesorption experiments on the icy surface were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS), using the Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) beam line, operated in the single-bunch mode of the storage ring, with a period of 311 ns and bunch width of 60ps. Several fragments such as CH{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, H{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} have been identified and their desorption rates per impact were determined and compared with previous results obtained using different ionization agents, such as electrons, heavy ions and photons at different energies in order to provide data to astrochemical models. (author)

  9. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  10. Electrowetting-based control of static droplet states on rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Vaibhav; Garimella, Suresh V

    2007-04-24

    Electrowetting (EW) is a powerful tool to control fluid motion at the microscale and has promising applications in the field of microfluidics. The present work analyzes the influence of an electrowetting voltage in determining and altering the state of a static droplet resting on a rough surface. An energy-minimization-based modeling approach is used to analyze the influence of interfacial energies, surface roughness parameters, and electric fields in determining the apparent contact angle of a droplet in the Cassie and Wenzel states under the influence of an EW voltage. The energy-minimization-based approach is also used to analyze the Cassie-Wenzel transition under the influence of an EW voltage and estimate the energy barrier to transition. The results obtained show that EW is a powerful tool to alter the relative stabilities of the Cassie and Wenzel states and enable dynamic control of droplet morphology on rough surfaces. The versatility and generalized nature of the present modeling approach is highlighted by application to the prediction of the contact angle of a droplet on an electrowetted rough surface consisting of a dielectric layer of nonuniform thickness.

  11. Intrinsic conduction through topological surface states of insulating Bi2Te3 epitaxial thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Katharina; Becker, Christoph; Rata, Diana; Swanson, Jesse; Thalmeier, Peter; Tjeng, L H

    2014-10-21

    Topological insulators represent a novel state of matter with surface charge carriers having a massless Dirac dispersion and locked helical spin polarization. Many exciting experiments have been proposed by theory, yet their execution has been hampered by the extrinsic conductivity associated with the unavoidable presence of defects in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 bulk single crystals, as well as impurities on their surfaces. Here we present the preparation of Bi2Te3 thin films that are insulating in the bulk and the four-point probe measurement of the conductivity of the Dirac states on surfaces that are intrinsically clean. The total amount of charge carriers in the experiment is of the order of 10(12) cm(-2) only, and mobilities up to 4,600 cm(2)/Vs have been observed. These values are achieved by carrying out the preparation, structural characterization, angle-resolved and X-ray photoemission analysis, and temperature-dependent four-point probe conductivity measurement all in situ under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. This experimental approach opens the way to prepare devices that can exploit the intrinsic topological properties of the Dirac surface states.

  12. Surface Irregularity Factor as a Parameter to Evaluate the Fatigue Damage State of CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Zuluaga-Ramírez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an optical non-contact technique to evaluate the fatigue damage state of CFRP structures measuring the irregularity factor of the surface. This factor includes information about surface topology and can be measured easily on field, by techniques such as optical perfilometers. The surface irregularity factor has been correlated with stiffness degradation, which is a well-accepted parameter for the evaluation of the fatigue damage state of composite materials. Constant amplitude fatigue loads (CAL and realistic variable amplitude loads (VAL, representative of real in- flight conditions, have been applied to “dog bone” shaped tensile specimens. It has been shown that the measurement of the surface irregularity parameters can be applied to evaluate the damage state of a structure, and that it is independent of the type of fatigue load that has caused the damage. As a result, this measurement technique is applicable for a wide range of inspections of composite material structures, from pressurized tanks with constant amplitude loads, to variable amplitude loaded aeronautical structures such as wings and empennages, up to automotive and other industrial applications.

  13. Measurement of the topological surface state optical conductance in bulk-insulating Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bing; Wu, Liang; Kushwaha, S. K.; Cava, R. J.; Armitage, N. P.

    2016-11-01

    Topological surface states have been extensively observed via optics in thin films of topological insulators. However, in typical thick single crystals of these materials, bulk states are dominant and it is difficult for optics to verify the existence of topological surface states definitively. In this Rapid Communication, we study the charge dynamics of the newly formulated bulk-insulating Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S crystal by using time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. This compound shows much better insulating behavior than any other bulk-insulating topological insulators reported previously. The transmission can be enhanced an amount which is 5 % of the zero-field transmission by applying magnetic field to 7 T, an effect which we believe is due to the suppression of topological surface states. This suppression is essentially independent of the thicknesses of the samples, showing the two-dimensional nature of the transport. The suppression of surface states in field allows us to use the crystal slab itself as a reference sample to extract the surface conductance, mobility, charge density, and scattering rate. Our measurements set the stage for the investigation of phenomena out of the semiclassical regime, such as the topological magnetoelectric effect.

  14. Spatial response surface modelling in the presence of data paucity for the evaluation of potential human health risk due to the contamination of potable water resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; McGree, James; Hayes, John F; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-10-01

    Potential human health risk from waterborne diseases arising from unsatisfactory performance of on-site wastewater treatment systems is driven by landscape factors such as topography, soil characteristics, depth to water table, drainage characteristics and the presence of surface water bodies. These factors are present as random variables which are spatially distributed across a region. A methodological framework is presented that can be applied to model and evaluate the influence of various factors on waterborne disease potential. This framework is informed by spatial data and expert knowledge. For prediction at unsampled sites, interpolation methods were used to derive a spatially smoothed surface of disease potential which takes into account the uncertainty due to spatial variation at any pre-determined level of significance. This surface was constructed by accounting for the influence of multiple variables which appear to contribute to disease potential. The framework developed in this work strengthens the understanding of the characteristics of disease potential and provides predictions of this potential across a region. The study outcomes presented constitutes an innovative approach to environmental monitoring and management in the face of data paucity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating effect of surface state density at the interfaces in degraded bulk heterojunction organic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Swati, E-mail: drswatia@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zakir Husain College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110002 (India); Singh, Vinamrita [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Arora, Manoj [Department of Physics, Ramjas College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Pal Tandon, Ram [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2012-08-01

    Degradation and short shelf life have been observed experimentally in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based blend solar cells. Both dark and illuminated current-voltage characteristics could be explained quantitatively with a proposed single model for a typical degraded organic solar cell-glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al. It has been found that surface state density, interface thickness, tunneling coefficient and occupation probabilities of the interface states becomes important with the passage of time. To look into the problem the activity at ITO/PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM/Al interfaces are studied using realistic values of the interfaces. The experimental J-V characteristics is well explained with the inclusion of tunneling current through these surface states and becomes the dominant current component for the degraded cell. It is also found that surface state density increases to 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}, which has been verified with C-V measurements and also is in agreement with our proposed model for BHJ solar cell after 150 h of fabrication.

  16. Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces of Polyenes and Protonated Schiff Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Send, Robert; Sundholm, Dage; Johansson, Mikael P; Pawłowski, Filip

    2009-09-08

    The potential energy surface of the (1)Bu and (1)A' states of all-trans-polyenes and the corresponding protonated Schiff bases have been studied at density functional theory and coupled cluster levels. Linear polyenes and protonated Schiff bases with 4 to 12 heavy atoms have been investigated. The calculations show remarkable differences in the excited state potential energy surfaces of the polyenes and the protonated Schiff bases. The excited states of the polyenes exhibit high torsion barriers for single-bond twists and low torsion barriers for double-bond twists. The protonated Schiff bases, on the other hand, are very flexible molecules in the first excited state with low or vanishing torsion barriers for both single and double bonds. Calculations at density functional theory and coupled cluster levels yield qualitatively similar potential energy surfaces. However, significant differences are found for some single-bond torsions in longer protonated Schiff bases, which indicate a flaw of the employed time-dependent density functional theory methods. The close agreement between the approximate second and third order coupled cluster levels indicates that for these systems calculations at second order coupled cluster level are useful in the validation of results based on time-dependent density functional theory.

  17. Role of the oxidation state of cerium on the ceria surfaces for silicate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jihoon; Moon, Jinok; Kim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Kangchun; Hwang, Junha; Yoon, Heesung; Yi, Dong Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we have investigated the role of the Ce oxidation state (Ce3+/Ce4+) on the CeO2 surfaces for silicate adsorption. In aqueous medium, the Ce3+ sites lead to the formation of -OH groups at the CeO2 surface through H2O dissociation. Silicate ions can adsorb onto the CeO2 surface through interaction with the -OH groups (-Ce-OH- + -Si-O- ↔ -Ce-O-Si- + OH-). As the Ce3+ concentration increased from 19.3 to 27.6%, the surface density of -OH group increased from 0.34 to 0.72 OH/nm2. To evaluate the adsorption behaviors of silicate ions onto CeO2 NPs, we carried out an adsorption isothermal analysis, and the adsorption isotherm data followed the Freundlich model. The Freundlich constant for the relative adsorption capacity (KF) and adsorption intensity (1/n) indicated that CeO2 NPs with high Ce3+ concentration show higher adsorption affinity with silicate ions. As a result, we have demonstrated that the Ce oxidation state (Ce3+/Ce4+) on the CeO2 surface can have a significant influence on the silicate adsorption.

  18. The Use of Oceanic Indices Variations Due to Climate Change to Predict Annual Discharge Variations in Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, R.; Shaw, S. B.; Chandler, D. G.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Climatic change affects streamflow in watersheds with winter snowpack and an annual snowmelt hydrograph. In the northeastern US, changes in streamflow are driven by both the advanced timing of snowmelt and increasing summer precipitation. Projections of climate for the region in the 21st century is for warmer winters and wetter summers. Water planners need to understand future changes in flow metrics to determine if the current water resources are capable of fulfilling future demands or adapting to future changes in climate. The study of teleconnection patterns between oceanic indices variations and hydrologic variables may help improve the understanding of future water resources conditions in a watershed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between oceanic indices and discharge variations in the Merrimack Watershed. The Merrimack Watershed is the fourth largest basin in New England which drains much of New Hampshire and northeastern portions of Massachusetts, USA. Variations in sea surface temperature (SST) and sea level pressure (SLP) are defined by the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), respectively. We hypothesize that temporal changes in discharge are related to AMO and NAO variations since precipitation and discharge are highly correlated in the Merrimack. The Merrimack Watershed consists of undisturbed (reference) catchments and disturbed (developed) basins with long stream gauge records (> 100 years). Developed basins provide an opportunity to evaluate the impacts of river regulation and land development on teleconnection patterns as well as changing climate. Time series of AMO and NAO indices over the past 150 years along with Merrimack annual precipitation and discharge time series have shown a 1 to 2-year watershed hydrologic memory; higher correlation between Merrimack‎ annual precipitation and discharge with AMO and NAO are observed when a 1 to 2-year lag is given to AMO and NAO

  19. Super-resolution Imaging by Evanescent Wave Coupling to Surface States on Effective Gain Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Prateek; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Higher resolution demands for semiconductor lithography may be fulfilled by higher numerical aperture (NA) systems. However, NAs more than the photoresist refractive index (~1.7) cause surface confinement of the image. In this letter we describe how evanescent wave coupling to effective gain medium surface states beneath the imaging layer can counter this problem. At {\\lambda}=193 nm a layer of sapphire on SiO2 counters image decay by an effective-gain-medium resonance phenomena allowing evanescent interferometric lithography to create high aspect ratio structures at NAs of 1.85 (26-nm) and beyond.

  20. Magnon nodal-line semimetals and drumhead surface states in anisotropic pyrochlore ferromagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mook, Alexander; Mertig, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of topological magnon matter: the magnonic pendant to electronic nodal-line semimetals. Magnon spectra of anisotropic pyrochlore ferromagnets feature twofold degeneracies of magnon bands along a closed loop in reciprocal space. These magnon nodal lines are topologically protected by the coexistence of inversion and time-reversal symmetry; they require the absence of spin-orbit interaction (no Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction). We calculate the topological invariants of the nodal lines and show that details of the associated magnon drumhead surface states depend strongly on the termination of the surface. Magnon nodal-line semimetals complete the family of topological magnons in three-dimensional ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Effect of Surface Defect States on Valence Band and Charge Separation and Transfer Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Teng, Yiran; Teng, Fei

    2016-09-01

    Both energy band and charge separation and transfer are the crucial affecting factor for a photochemical reaction. Herein, the BiOCl nanosheets without and with surface bismuth vacancy (BOC, V-BOC) are prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. It is found that the new surface defect states caused by bismuth vacancy have greatly up-shifted the valence band and efficiently enhanced the separation and transfer rates of photogenerated electron and hole. It is amazing that the photocatalytic activity of V-BOC is 13.6 times higher than that of BOC for the degradation methyl orange (MO). We can develop an efficient photocatalyst by the introduction of defects.

  2. Efficient out-coupling and beaming of Tamm optical states via surface plasmon polariton excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Garcia, M.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Taverne, M. P. C.; Chen, L.-F.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Bristol, Faculty of Engineering, Queen' s Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Murshidy, M. M. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, HU6 7RX Hull (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan (Egypt); Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, The American University in Cairo (Egypt); Edwards, A. P.; Adawi, A. M. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, HU6 7RX Hull (United Kingdom); Serry, M. Y. [Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, The American University in Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-06-09

    We present evidence of optical Tamm states to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling. We experimentally demonstrate that for a Bragg stack with a thin metal layer on the surface, hybrid Tamm-SPP modes may be excited when a grating on the air-metal interface is introduced. Out-coupling via the grating to free space propagation is shown to enhance the transmission as well as the directionality and polarization selection for the transmitted beam. We suggest that this system will be useful on those devices, where a metallic electrical contact as well as beaming and polarization control is needed.

  3. A hybrid state vector approach to aeroelastic analysis with application to composite lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A computational technique has been developed for performing preliminary design aeroelastic analyses of large aspect ratio lifting surfaces. This technique, applicable to both fixed and rotating wing configurations, is based upon a formulation of the structural equilibrium equations in terms of a hybrid state vector containing generalized force and displacement variables. An integrating matrix is employed to solve these equations for divergence and flutter eigenvalues and steady aeroelastic deformation. Results are presented for simple examples which verify the technique and demonstrate how it can be applied to analyze lifting surfaces, including those constructed from composite materials.

  4. The Rashba-split surface state of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}(0 0 0 1) and its interaction with bulk states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibel, Christoph; Maaß, Henriette [Experimentelle Physik VII and Röntgen Research Center for Complex Materials (RCCM), Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Bentmann, Hendrik, E-mail: Hendrik.Bentmann@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Experimentelle Physik VII and Röntgen Research Center for Complex Materials (RCCM), Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Braun, Jürgen [Department Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Universität München, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 München (Germany); Sakamoto, Kazuyuki [Department of Nanomaterials Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 2-313, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Minár, Jan [Department Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Universität München, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 München (Germany); New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Ebert, Hubert [Department Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Universität München, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 München (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a spin–orbit split surface state on the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}(0 0 0 1) surface. • The spin-splitting and dispersion follow the Rashba model at small wave vectors. • At higher wave vectors the spin-splitting shows an unsual non-monotonic evolution. • The spin-polarized surface bands connect with different bulk bands at the gap edge. - Abstract: The electronic structure of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}(0 0 0 1) surface exhibits a spin–orbit split surface state in a local energy gap of the projected bulk valence band continuum. We investigate this surface state by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), spin-resolved ARPES and relativistic one-step photoemission calculations. At low wave vectors the dispersion and spin splitting are well-captured by the predictions of the Rashba model for a two-dimensional electron system. With increasing wave vectors, however, the surface state dispersion becomes more complex and the spin splitting size exhibits an unusual non-monotonic evolution. These deviations from the Rashba model arise from the influence of bulk continuum states near the edge of the projected gap. The spin polarization of the surface state remains intact despite the coupling to bulk states.

  5. Analysis and determination of susceptibility Risk from slope instability at Colima State Mexico due to the accelerators factors of rain and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Slope instability is presented each year in the mountain region of the Colima State, Mexico. It occurs due to the combination of different factors existing in this area as: Precipitation, topography contrast, type and mechanical properties of deposits that constitute the rocks and soils of the region and the erosion due to the elimination of vegetation deck to develop and grow urban areas. To these geological factors we can extend the tectonic activity of the Western part of Mexico that originate high seismicity by the interaction of Cocos plate and North America plate forming the region of Graben de Colima, were is located our study area. Here we will present a Zonification and determination of the Susceptibility maps of slope instability due to the rain and seismicity accelerators factors. The North part of the State Colima is covered by deposits of the Volcan de Colima with an elevation of 3860 masl. It is the area of major precipitation yearly with more than 1200 mm in comparison to the average precipitation of about 900 mm of the State of Colima. Using a SIG system and the mapping of more than 30 sites we realize a zonification and analysis of the Risk using a methodology developed by CENAPRED. The susceptibility map developed in this area in combination with erosion factors permit us to determine an approximation of the Risk considering some limitations that will be present in this study.

  6. Impact of interactive vegetation phenology on the simulated pan-Arctic land surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Bernardo; Sushama, Laxmi

    2016-04-01

    The pan-Arctic land surface is undergoing rapid changes in a warming climate, with near-surface permafrost projected to degrade significantly during the 21st century. This can have important impacts on the regional climate and hydrology through various feedbacks, including vegetation-related feedbacks. In this study, the impact of interactive phenology on the land surface state, including near-surface permafrost, is assessed by comparing two simulations of the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) - one with interactive phenology, modelled using the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM), and the other with prescribed phenology. These simulations are performed for the 1979-2012 period, using atmospheric forcing from ECMWF's ERA-Interim reanalysis. The impact of interactive phenology on projected changes to the land surface state are also assessed by comparing two simulations of CLASS (with and without interactive phenology), spanning the 1961-2100 period, driven by atmospheric forcing from a transient climate change simulation of the 5th generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) for the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). Comparison of the CLASS coupled to CTEM simulation with available observational estimates of plant area index, primary productivity, spatial distribution of permafrost and active layer thickness suggests that the model captures reasonably well the general distribution of vegetation and permafrost. Significant differences in evapotranspiration, leading to differences in runoff, soil temperature and active layer thickness are noted when comparing CLASS simulations with and without interactive phenology. Furthermore, the CLASS simulations with and without interactive phenology for RCP8.5 show extensive near-surface permafrost degradation by the end of the 21st century, with slightly accelerated degradation of permafrost in the simulation with interactive phenology, pointing towards a positive feedback of changes in

  7. Surface soil factors and soil characteristics in geo-physical milieu of Kebbi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study Soil factors and surface soil characteristics are important components of agricultural environment. They support surface and subsurface soils to perform many functions to agriculture and economic human developments. Understanding these factors would aid to the recognition of the values that our soil and land offered to humanity. It is therefore, aim of this study to visualise and examine the soil factors and surface soil characteristics in Kebbi State Nigeria. An Integrated Surface Soil Approach (ISSA was used in the classification and description of soil environment in the study region. The factors constituted in the ISSA are important components of soil science that theories and practice(s noted to provide ideas on how soil environment functioned. The results indicate that the surface soil environments around Arewa, Argungu, Augie, Birnin Kebbi and Dandi are physically familiar with the following surface soil characteristics: bad-lands, blown-out-lands, cirque-lands, fertile-lands, gullied-lands, miscellaneous and rock-outcrops.The major soil factors observed hat played an important role in surface soil manipulations and soil formation are alluvial, colluvial, fluvial and lacustrine; ant, earthworms and termite; and various forms of surface relief supported by temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind. Overall, the surface soil environment of the region was describe according to their physical appearance into fadama clay soils, fadama clay-loam soils, dryland sandy soils, dryland sandy-loam soils, dryland stony soils and organic-mineral soils.

  8. Observation and modeling of land surface state and convective activity over the Qinghai - Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Colin, J.; Jia, L.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Sobrino, J. A.; Wang, J.; Shen, X.; Ueno, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Qinghai - Tibet Plateau is characterized by a significant intra-annual variability and spatial heterogeneity of surface conditions. Snow and vegetation cover, albedo, surface temperature and wetness change very significantly during the year and from place to place. The influence of temporal changes on convective events and the onset of the monsoon has been documented by ground based measurements of land - atmosphere exchanges of heat and water. The state of the land surface over the entire Plateau can be determined by space observation of surface albedo, temperature, snow and vegetation cover and soil moisture. This provides spatial patterns in the land surface drivers of atmospheric instability: radiative forcing, land surface temperature and soil moisture contribute to trigger convective events. Heat and vapour fluxes at the land surface have been mapped at high spatial resolution and over periods of time representative of seasonal variability using MODIS and AATSR multispectral radiometric data. The response of surface temperature to vegetation phenology has been studied by using 25 years of AVHRR observations. Snow cover has been monitored by improving and re-calibrating the MODIS snow cover product. The snow water equivalent has been monitored over a period of 28 years using SMMR and SSM/I 18 and 37 GHz data and an improved algorithm. Linkages between land surface conditions, convective events and the onset of the Asian Monsoon have been investigated using two Numerical Weather Prediction Models: GRAPES in China and WRF in Japan to analyze a set of case-studies. These first experiments were aimed at evaluating the linkages of land surface conditions with intense rainfall events in the region. Using the modeling and data assimilation system GRAPES a series of experiments was performed to assess the sensitivity to different types of Land Surface Models. Combined use of medium resolution thermal infrared sensors like AATSR or MODIS with GRAPES in a Multi

  9. Surface Equation of State for Pure Phospholipid Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾作祥; 陈琼; 薛为岚; 聂飞

    2004-01-01

    A surface equation of state, applicable to liquid-expanded (LE) monolayers, was derived by analyzing the Helmholtz free energy of the LE monolayers. Based on this equation, a general equation was obtained to describe all states of single-component phospholipid monolayers during comprassion. To verify the applicability of the equation, π-A isotherms of 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and 1,2-dimyristoyphosphatildylcholine (DMPC) were measured. The comparison between model and experimental values indicates that the equation can describe the behavior of pure phospholipid monolayers.

  10. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans

    2014-01-01

    Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...... and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging...

  11. Interference of spin states in photoemission from Sb/Ag(111) surface alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Fabian; Osterwalder, Juerg; Hugo Dil, J [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Petrov, Vladimir [St Petersburg Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya Street, 195251 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mirhosseini, Hossein; Henk, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Patthey, Luc, E-mail: jan-hugo.dil@psi.ch [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-02-23

    Using a three-dimensional spin polarimeter we have gathered evidence for the interference of spin states in photoemission from the surface alloy Sb/Ag(111). This system features a small Rashba-type spin splitting of a size comparable to the momentum broadening of the quasiparticles, thus causing an intrinsic overlap between states with orthogonal spinors. Besides a small spin polarization caused by the spin splitting, we observe a large spin polarization component in the plane normal to the quantization axis of the Rashba effect. Strongly suggestive of coherent spin rotation, this effect is largely independent of the photon energy and photon polarization. (fast track communication)

  12. Composition and solution properties of fluorinated block copolymers and their surface structures in the solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A series of diblock copolymers composed of methyl methacrylate and 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacry-late(PMMA144-b-PFMAn) with various PFMA block lengths were prepared by atom transfer radical po-lymerization(ATRP).The surface structures and properties of these polymers in the solid state and in solution were investigated using contact angle measurement,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS),sum frequency generation(SFG) vibrational spectroscopy,surface tension and dynamic laser light scattering(DLS).It was found that with increasing PFMA block length,water and oil repellency de-creased,the ratio of F/C increased with increasing film depth,and the degree of ordered packing of the perfluoroalkyl side chains at the surface decreased.When the number of PFMA block units reached 10,PMMA segments were detected at the copolymer surface,which was attributed to the PFMA block length affecting molecular aggregation structure of the copolymer in the solution and the interfacial structure at the air/liquid interface,which in turn affects surface structure formation during solution solidification.The results suggest that copolymer solution properties play an important role in struc-ture formation on the solid surface.

  13. Composition and solution properties of fluorinated block copolymers and their surface structures in the solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI HuaGang; XUE DongWu; WANG XiaoFang; ZHANG Wei; WANG XinPing; SHEN ZhiQuan

    2009-01-01

    A series of diblock copolymers composed of methyl methacrylate and 2-perfluorooctylethyl methacry-late (PMMA144-b-PFMAn) with various PFMA block lengths were prepared by atom transfer radical po-lymerization (ATRP). The surface structures and properties of these polymers in the solid state and in solution were investigated using contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, surface tension and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS). It was found that with increasing PFMA block length, water and oil repellency de-creased, the ratio of F/C increased with increasing film depth, and the degree of ordered packing of the perfluoroalkyl side chains at the surface decreased. When the number of PFMA block units reached 10, PMMA segments were detected at the copolymer surface, which was attributed to the PFMA block length affecting molecular aggregation structure of the copolymer in the solution and the interfacial structure at the air/liquid interface, which in turn affects surface structure formation during solution solidification. The results suggest that copolymer solution properties play an important role in struc-ture formation on the solid surface.

  14. Surface Plasmon States in Inhomogeneous Media at Critical and Subcritical Metal Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyayani Seal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Semicontinuous metal-dielectric films are composed of a wide range of metal clusters of various geometries—sizes as well as structures. This ensures that at any given wavelength of incident radiation, clusters exist in the film that will respond resonantly, akin to resonating nanoantennas, resulting in the broad optical response (absorption that is a characteristic of semicontinuous films. The physics of the surface plasmon states that are supported by such systems is complex and can involve both localized and propagating plasmons. This chapter describes near-field experimental and numerical studies of the surface plasmon states in semicontinuous films at critical and subcritical metal concentrations and evaluates the local field intensity statistics to discuss the interplay between various eigenmodes.

  15. Analysis of thermomechanical states in single-pass GMAW surfaced steel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winczek, Jerzy; Gawronska, Elzbieta; Murcinkova, Zuzana; Hatala, Michal; Pavlenko, Slavko; Makles, Krzysztof

    2017-03-01

    In the paper the model of temperature field, phase changes and stress states calculation during single-pass arc weld surfacing have been presented. In temperature field solution the temperature changes caused by the heat of weld and by electric arc have been taken into consideration. Kinetics of phase changes during heating is limited by temperature values at the beginning and at the end of austenitic transformation, while progress of phase transformations during cooling has been determined on the basis of time-temperature-transformation (TTT) - welding diagram. The analysis of stress state has been presented for S235 steel flat assuming planar section hypothesis and using integral equations of stress equilibrium. It has enabled a clear interpretation of influence of temperature field and phase transformation on stresses caused by surfacing using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) method.

  16. Ambipolar surface state transport in nonmetallic stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syers, Paul; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-01-01

    Achieving true bulk insulating behavior in Bi2Se3 , the archetypal topological insulator with a simplistic one-band electronic structure and sizable band gap, has been prohibited by a well-known self-doping effect caused by selenium vacancies, whose extra electrons shift the chemical potential into the bulk conduction band. We report a synthesis method for achieving stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals that exhibit nonmetallic behavior in electrical transport down to low temperatures. Hall-effect measurements indicate the presence of both electron- and holelike carriers, with the latter identified with surface state conduction and the achievement of ambipolar transport in bulk Bi2Se3 crystals without gating techniques. With carrier mobilities surpassing the highest values yet reported for topological surface states in this material, the achievement of ambipolar transport via upward band bending is found to provide a key method to advancing the potential of this material for future study and applications.

  17. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  18. Surface chemical state of Ti powders and its alloys: Effect of storage conditions and alloy composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryha, Eduard; Shvab, Ruslan; Bram, Martin; Bitzer, Martin; Nyborg, Lars

    2016-12-01

    High affinity of titanium to oxygen in combination with the high surface area of the powder results in tremendous powder reactivity and almost inevitable presence of passivation oxide film on the powder surface. Oxide film is formed during the short exposure of the powder to the environment at even a trace amount of oxygen. Hence, surface state of the powder determines its usefulness for powder metallurgy processing. Present study is focused on the evaluation of the surface oxide state of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powders in as-atomized state and after storage under air or Ar for up to eight years. Powder surface oxide state was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR SEM). Results indicate that powder in as-atomized state is covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer with the thickness of ∼2.9 nm for Ti, ∼3.2 nm and ∼4.2 nm in case of Ti6Al4V and NiTi powders, respectively. Exposure to the air results in oxide growth of about 30% in case of Ti and only about 10% in case of NiTi and Ti6Al4V. After the storage under the dry air for two years oxide growth of only about 3-4% was detected in case of both, Ti and NiTi powders. NiTi powder, stored under the dry air for eight years, indicates oxide thickness of about 5.3 nm, which is about 30% thicker in comparison with the as-atomized powder. Oxide thickness increase of only ∼15% during the storage for eight years in comparison with the powder, shortly exposed to the air after manufacturing, was detected. Results indicate a high passivation of the Ti, Ti6Al4V and NiTi powder surface by homogeneous layer of Ti-oxide formed even during short exposure of the powder to the air.

  19. Dispersion states and surface characteristics of physically blended polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polymer hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul

    Control of dispersion and segregation states of nanostructured additives is one of the biggest challenges in realizing the optimum potential of high performance hybrid polymer nanocomposites. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanostructured chemicals, with their hybrid organic-inorganic nature and flexible functionalization with a variety of organic substituents, yield possibilities to control dispersion and tune compatibility in a wide range of polymer systems. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the fundamental parameters that influence the dispersion and segregation states of POSS nanostructured chemicals, and to understand chain dynamics and conformations in physically blended POSS hybrid polymer nanocomposites (HPNC's). Multiple structural and mechanical factors influencing macro to nano scale surface and bulk properties were successfully investigated and correlated. A strategy based on thermodynamic principles for selective control of POSS dispersion states in a given polymer matrix is developed and discussed. This dissertation consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides a detailed introduction about the development and current research interest in POSS/polymer nanocomposites. This chapter also discusses limitations of current advanced nanoprobe techniques. Chapter 2 establishes the overall goal of this research and specific research ii objectives. Chapter 3 establishes the preferential surface migration behavior of physically dispersed, non-reactive, closed cage octaisobutyl POSS (Oib-POSS) in a non-polar polypropylene matrix. Furthermore, influence of POSS surface segregation on the surface properties, especially nano-tribomechanical behavior is also discussed. Chapter 4 expands the studies by melt blending two different types of POSS molecules, a non-reactive, closed cage Oib-POSS and an open cage trisilanolphenyl POSS (Tsp-POSS), in a nylon 6 matrix. This chapter discusses the morphology, nano-dispersion and macro- to

  20. Passivating surface states on water splitting hematite photoanodes with alumina overlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Le Formal, Florian

    2011-01-24

    Hematite is a promising material for inexpensive solar energy conversion via water splitting but has been limited by the large overpotential (0.5-0.6 V) that must be applied to afford high water oxidation photocurrent. This has conventionally been addressed by coating it with a catalyst to increase the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction. However, surface recombination at trapping states is also thought to be an important factor for the overpotential, and herein we investigate a strategy to passivate trapping states using conformal overlayers applied by atomic layer deposition. While TiO2 overlayers show no beneficial effect, we find that an ultra-thin coating of Al2O3 reduces the overpotential required with state-of-the-art nano-structured photo-anodes by as much as 100 mV and increases the photocurrent by a factor of 3.5 (from 0.24 mA cm-2 to 0.85 mA cm-2) at +1.0 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) under standard illumination conditions. The subsequent addition of Co2+ ions as a catalyst further decreases the overpotential and leads to a record photocurrent density at 0.9 V vs. RHE (0.42 mA cm-2). A detailed investigation into the effect of the Al2O3 overlayer by electrochemical impedance and photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals a significant change in the surface capacitance and radiative recombination, respectively, which distinguishes the observed overpotential reduction from a catalytic effect and confirms the passivation of surface states. Importantly, this work clearly demonstrates that two distinct loss processes are occurring on the surface of high-performance hematite and suggests a viable route to individually address them. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  1. Experimental observation of robust surface states on photonic crystals possessing single and double Weyl points

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a time-reversal invariant Weyl photonic crystal that possesses single Weyl nodes with topological charge of 1 and double Weyl nodes with a higher topological charge of 2. Using numerical simulations and microwave experiment, nontrivial band gaps with nonzero Chern numbers for a fixed kz was demonstrated. The robustness of the surface state between the Weyl photonic crystal and PEC against kz-conserving scattering was experimentally observed.

  2. Surface states and photovoltaic effects in CdSe quantum dot films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronik, L.; Ashkenasy, N.; Leibovitch, M.; Fefer, E.; Shapira, Y. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Ramat-Aviv (Israel). Dept. of Electrical Engineering-Physical Electronics; Gorer, S.; Hodes, G. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Materials and Interfaces

    1998-05-01

    Photovoltaic effects in CdSe quantum dot (QD) films have been studied using surface photovoltage spectroscopy and complementary methods. The results show that, contrary to previous studies, nonnegligible electric fields can exist in QD films. As a result, driftlike currents must be considered, in addition to the well-known diffusion like currents. However, it is found that the specific case of photovoltage sign reversal, observed after etching highly quantized CdSe QD films, is governed by diffusion like transport. The latter is highly influenced by preferential trapping of one type of charge carrier. The preferential trapping is shown to be surface localized and is strongly ambient dependent. It is shown that the photovoltaic properties of these CdSe QD films are dominated by their surface state distribution.

  3. The Helium Field Effect Transistor (I): Storing Surface State Electrons on Helium Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashari, M.; Rees, D. G.; Kono, K.; Scheer, E.; Leiderer, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present investigations of surface state electrons on liquid helium films in confined geometry, using a suitable substrate structure microfabricated on a silicon wafer, similar to a Field Effect Transistor (FET). The sample has a source and drain region, separated by a gate structure, which consists of two gold electrodes with a narrow gap (channel) through which the transport of the surface state electrons takes place. The sample is illuminated to provide a sufficient number of free carriers in the silicon substrate, such that a well-defined potential distribution is achieved. The eventual goal of these experiments is to study the electron transport through a narrow channel in the various states of the phase diagram of the 2D electron system. In the present work we focus on storing the electrons in the source area of the FET, and investigate the spatial distribution of these electrons. It is shown that under the influence of a potential gradient in the silicon substrate the electrons accumulate in front of the potential barrier of the gate. The electron distribution, governed by Coulomb repulsion and by the substrate potential, is determined experimentally. The result is found to be in good agreement with a parallel-plate capacitor model of the system, developed with the aid of a finite element calculation of the surface potential profile of the device.

  4. Interpreting current-induced spin polarization in topological insulator surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Several recent experiments on three-dimensional topological insulators claim to observe a large charge current-induced nonequilibrium ensemble spin polarization of electrons in the helical surface state. We present a comprehensive criticism of such claims, using both theory and experiment: First, we clarify the interpretation of quantities extracted from these measurements by deriving standard expressions from a Boltzmann transport equation approach in the relaxation-time approximation at zero and finite temperature to emphasize our assertion that, despite high in-plane spin projection, obtainable current-induced ensemble spin polarization is minuscule. Second, we use a simple experiment to demonstrate that magnetic field-dependent open-circuit voltage hysteresis (identical to those attributed to current-induced spin polarization in topological insulator surface states) can be generated in analogous devices where current is driven through thin films of a topologically trivial metal. This result ipso facto discredits the naive interpretation of previous experiments with TIs, which were used to claim observation of helicity, i.e., spin-momentum locking in the topologically protected surface state.

  5. The importance of Fe surface states for spintronic devices based on magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantis, Athanasios N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In this article we give a review of our recent theoretical studies of the influence of Fe(001) surface (interface) states on spin-polarized electron transport across magnetic tunnel junctions with Fe electrodes. We show that minority-spin surface (interface) states are responsible for at least two effects which are important for spin electronics. First, they can produce a sizable tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single Fe electrode. The effect is driven by a Rashba shift of the resonant surface band when the magnetization changes direction. This can introduce a new class of spintronic devices, namely, tunneling magnetoresistance junctions with a single ferromagnetic electrode. Second, in Fe/GaAs(001) magnetic tunnel junctions minority-spin interface states produce a strong dependence of the tunneling current spin polarization on applied electrical bias. A dramatic sign reversal within a voltage range of just a few tenths of an eV is predicted. This explains the observed sign reversal of spin polarization in recent experiments of electrical spin injection in Fe/GaAs(001) and related reversal of tunneling magnetoresistance through vertical Fe/GaAs/Fe trilayers.

  6. Anisotropic surface-state-mediated RKKY interaction between adatoms on a hexagonal lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive an expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. Our analysis is based on a stationary phase approximation. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that, in general, the corresponding Fermi wave vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface-state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the projection of this kF (corresponding to vF) onto the direction of R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work. However, for metals with surface-state dispersions similar to Be(101¯0), we show that the RKKY interaction should have considerable anisotropy.

  7. Spin to Charge Interconversion Phenomena in the Interface and Surface States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yuichiro; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    In 1985, Johnson and Silsbee realized the creation of a spin current in nonmagnetic metals, which inspired a vast number of studies related to the spin current until now. Creation of the spin current has been realized in metals, semiconductors, and insulators to date and has provided a fruitful research field. Spin-dependent conductance and spin torque paved a new way for spintronic application, and highly efficient interconversion between spin information and an industrially used one, such as charge current, light, magnetic moment and heat current, became a central topic. In the early stage, the main field of such interconversion was bulk materials; the focus then gradually shifted to surface and interface states. The properties of surface and interface states became pronounced in nanoscale spintronics devices, and a variety of functions have been realized at the interface between two materials, enabling limitless possibilities for spin functions. This review provides an overview of the recent progress of the spin-charge interconversion in the surface and interface states. We also introduce several spurious effects that should be paid careful attention for quantitative investigations.

  8. Degradation of topological surface state by nonmagnetic S doping in SrxBi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Gu, Juanjuan; Tan, Min; Wang, Qinglong; Ji, Ping; Hu, Xueyou

    2017-01-01

    Research on possible topological superconductivity has grown rapidly over the past several years, from fundamental studies to the development of next generation technologies. Recently, it has been reported that the SrxBi2Se3 exhibits superconductivity with topological surface state, making this compound a promising candidate for investigating possible topological superconductivity. However, whether or not the topological surface state is robust against impurities is not clear in this system. Here we report a detailed investigation on the lattice structure, electronic and magnetic properties, as well as the topological superconducting properties of SrxBi2Se3−ySy samples. It is found that the superconducting transition temperature keeps nearly unchanged in all samples, despite of a gradual decrease of the superconducting shielding volume fraction with increasing S doping content. Meanwhile, the Shubnikov-de Hass oscillation results of the SrxBi2Se3−ySy samples reveal that the topological surface states are destroyed in S doped samples, suggesting the topological character is degraded by nonmagnetic dopants. PMID:28358021

  9. Surface-Functionalization of Nanostructured Cellulose Aerogels by Solid State Eumelanin Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzella, Lucia; Melone, Lucio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Rossi, Bianca; Pastori, Nadia; Perfetti, Marco; D'Errico, Gerardino; Punta, Carlo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-02-08

    Bioinspired aerogel functionalization by surface modification and coating is in high demand for biomedical and technological applications. In this paper, we report an expedient three-step entry to all-natural surface-functionalized nanostructured aerogels based on (a) TEMPO/NaClO promoted synthesis of cellulose nanofibers (TOCNF); (b) freeze-drying for aerogel preparation; and (c) surface coating with a eumelanin thin film by ammonia-induced solid state polymerization (AISSP) of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) previously deposited from an organic solution. Scanning electron microscopy showed uniform deposition of the dark eumelanin coating on the template surface without affecting porosity, whereas solid state (13)C NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy confirmed the eumelanin-type character of the coatings. DHI melanin coating was found to confer to TOCNF templates a potent antioxidant activity, as tested by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays as well as strong dye adsorption capacity, as tested on methylene blue. The unprecedented combination of nanostructured cellulose and eumelanin thin films disclosed herein implements an original all-natural multifunctional aerogel biomaterial realized via an innovative coating methodology.

  10. Effects of QD surface coverage in solid-state PbS quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-06-01

    Lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ on nanoporous TiO 2 by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) and by atomic layer deposition (ALD), to fabricate solid-state quantum-dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). With the ultimate goal of increasing QD surface coverage, this work compares the impact of these two synthetic routes on the light absorption and electrical properties of devices. A higher current density was observed in the SILAR-grown QD devices under reverse bias, as compared to ALD-grown QD devices, attributed to injection problems of the lower-band-gap QDs present in the SILAR-grown QD device. To understand the effects of QD surface coverage on device performance, particularly interfacial recombination, electron lifetimes were measured for varying QD deposition cycles. Electron lifetimes were found to decrease with increasing SILAR cycles, indicating that the expected decrease in recombination between electrons in the TiO2 and holes in the hole-transport material, due to increased QD surface coverage, is not the dominant effect of increased deposition cycles. © 2013 IEEE.

  11. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bantz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bio–nano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i negatively charged silica particles and (ii poly(organosiloxane particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated. It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties.

  12. Crossing the dividing surface of transition state theory. IV. Dynamical regularity and dimensionality reduction as key features of reactive trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    The atom-diatom interaction is studied by classical mechanics using Jacobi coordinates (R, r, θ). Reactivity criteria that go beyond the simple requirement of transition state theory (i.e., PR* > 0) are derived in terms of specific initial conditions. Trajectories that exactly fulfill these conditions cross the conventional dividing surface used in transition state theory (i.e., the plane in configuration space passing through a saddle point of the potential energy surface and perpendicular to the reaction coordinate) only once. Furthermore, they are observed to be strikingly similar and to form a tightly packed bundle of perfectly collimated trajectories in the two-dimensional (R, r) configuration space, although their angular motion is highly specific for each one. Particular attention is paid to symmetrical transition states (i.e., either collinear or T-shaped with C2v symmetry) for which decoupling between angular and radial coordinates is observed, as a result of selection rules that reduce to zero Coriolis couplings between modes that belong to different irreducible representations. Liapunov exponents are equal to zero and Hamilton's characteristic function is planar in that part of configuration space that is visited by reactive trajectories. Detailed consideration is given to the concept of average reactive trajectory, which starts right from the saddle point and which is shown to be free of curvature-induced Coriolis coupling. The reaction path Hamiltonian model, together with a symmetry-based separation of the angular degree of freedom, provides an appropriate framework that leads to the formulation of an effective two-dimensional Hamiltonian. The success of the adiabatic approximation in this model is due to the symmetry of the transition state, not to a separation of time scales. Adjacent trajectories, i.e., those that do not exactly fulfill the reactivity conditions have similar characteristics, but the quality of the approximation is lower. At higher

  13. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  14. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  15. Differential Susceptibility of Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) and Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries) Neutrophils to Mannheimia haemolytica Leukotoxin is not due to Differential Expression of Cell Surface CD18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Liu, Weiguo; Casas, Eduardo; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2017-07-01

    Bighornsheep ( Ovis canadensis ) are more susceptible to pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica than are domestic sheep ( Ovis aries ). Leukotoxin produced by M. haemolytica is the principal virulence factor involved in pneumonia pathogenesis. Although leukotoxin is cytolytic to all subsets of ruminant leukocytes, neutrophils are the most susceptible subset. Bighorn sheep neutrophils are four- to eightfold more susceptible to leukotoxin-induced cytolysis than are domestic sheep neutrophils. We hypothesized that the higher susceptibility of bighorn sheep neutrophils, in comparison to domestic sheep neutrophils, is due to higher expression of CD18, the receptor for leukotoxin on leukocytes. Our objective was to quantify CD18 expression on neutrophils of bighorn sheep and domestic sheep. Cell-surface CD18 expression on bighorn sheep and domestic sheep neutrophils was measured as antibody binding capacity of cells by flow cytometric analysis with two fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies (BAQ30A and HUH82A) and microspheres. Contrary to our expectations, CD18 expression was higher (Psheep neutrophils in comparison to bighorn sheep neutrophils. These findings suggest that the higher in vitro susceptibility to leukotoxin of bighorn sheep neutrophils compared to domestic sheep neutrophils is not due to higher expression of the leukotoxin receptor CD18 on bighorn sheep neutrophils.

  16. cMERA as Surface/State Correspondence in AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaji, Masamichi; Shiba, Noburo; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kento

    2015-01-01

    We present how the surface/state correspondence, conjectured in arXiv:1503.03542, works in the setup of AdS3/CFT2 by generalizing the formulation of cMERA. The boundary states in conformal field theories play a crucial role in our formulation and the bulk diffeomorphism is naturally taken into account. We give an identification of bulk local operators which reproduces correct scalar field solutions on AdS3. We also calculate the information metric for a locally excited state and show that it is given by that of 2d hyperbolic manifold, which is argued to describe the time slice of AdS3.

  17. Coupling a Surface Acoustic Wave to an Electron Spin in Diamond via a Dark State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Andrew Golter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of quantum acoustics explores interactions between acoustic waves and artificial atoms and their applications in quantum information processing. In this experimental study, we demonstrate the coupling between a surface acoustic wave (SAW and an electron spin in diamond by taking advantage of the strong strain coupling of the excited states of a nitrogen vacancy center while avoiding the short lifetime of these states. The SAW-spin coupling takes place through a Λ-type three-level system where two ground spin states couple to a common excited state through a phonon-assisted as well as a direct dipole optical transition. Both coherent population trapping and optically driven spin transitions have been realized. The coherent population trapping demonstrates the coupling between a SAW and an electron spin coherence through a dark state. The optically driven spin transitions, which resemble the sideband transitions in a trapped-ion system, can enable the quantum control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom and potentially a trapped-ion-like solid-state system for applications in quantum computing. These results establish an experimental platform for spin-based quantum acoustics, bridging the gap between spintronics and quantum acoustics.

  18. The characteristics of MBE-grown InxAl1-xN/GaN surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wenyuan; Kong, Wei; Li, Jincheng; Collar, Kristen; Kim, Tong-Ho; Losurdo, Maria; Brown, April S.

    2016-08-01

    The density and energy distribution of InxAl1-xN/GaN surface donor states are studied for InxAl1-xN structures with varying indium compositions. The results support a surface states model with a constant energy distribution of 2.17-2.63 eV below the conduction band minimum and a concentration of 4.64-8.27 × 1013 cm-2 eV-1. It is shown that the properties of the surface states are affected by the surface indium composition xs, as opposed to the bulk composition, xb (InxAl1-xN). Higher surface indium composition xs increases the density of surface states and narrows their energy distribution.

  19. Assessing the spatial variability of constraints on groundwater abstractions due to potential adverse resource impacts on surface water ecosystems - a GIS based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K. A.; Mayer, A. S.; Reeves, H. W.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater contributions to streams, particularly in periods of low flow, can be critical to sustaining aquatic ecosystems. Groundwater abstractions in areas where the groundwater is in hydraulic connection with the surface water can deplete these flows potentially causing adverse resource impacts. In particular, the passage of the Great Lakes—St. Lawrence Basin Water Resources Compact in 2008 has brought increasing awareness to this issue in the Great Lakes Basin. As a requirement of this legislation, each of the Great Lakes States must take steps to limit water withdrawals that may potentially impact water-dependent natural resources. The State of Michigan has developed an automated “Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool” to assist in this process. By using the methodology as developed for the Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool, this study examines spatial variations in maximum allowable pumping rates under these constraints. The pumping rates are constrained either by the local hydrogeology or concerns related to adverse impacts to the surface water ecosystems. A simple analytical model is used to calculate streamflow depletion as a function of hypothetical groundwater abstraction rates and positions. The inputs to this model are obtained from a GIS database including such spatially relevant information as aquifer characteristics, streamflows, and a stream network. The maximum pumping rates are averaged over the HUC-8 watershed scale. We explore the characteristics that play the largest role in the variability of maximum pumping rates, such as hydrogeologic parameters, stream density, and stream flows. We also discuss limitations of the analytical approach to assessing water availability. Understanding how these restrictions on adverse resource impacts constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions have important water resources policy and management

  20. Nanoscale surface modifications of medically relevant metals: state-of-the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variola, Fabio; Brunski, John B.; Orsini, Giovanna; Tambasco de Oliveira, Paulo; Wazen, Rima; Nanci, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Evidence that nanoscale surface properties stimulate and guide various molecular and biological processes at the implant/tissue interface is fostering a new trend in designing implantable metals. Cutting-edge expertise and techniques drawn from widely separated fields, such as nanotechnology, materials engineering and biology, have been advantageously exploited to nanoengineer surfaces in ways that control and direct these processes in predictable manners. In this review, we present and discuss the state-of-the-art of nanotechnology-based approaches currently adopted to modify the surface of metals used for orthopedic and dental applications, and also briefly consider their use in the cardiovascular field. The effects of nanoengineered surfaces on various in vitro molecular and cellular events are firstly discussed. This review also provides an overview of in vivo and clinical studies with nanostructured metallic implants, and addresses the potential influence of nanotopography on biomechanical events at interfaces. Ultimately, the objective of this work is to give the readership a comprehensive picture of the current advances, future developments and challenges in the application of the infinitesimally small to biomedical surface science. We believe that an integrated understanding of the in vitro and particularly of the in vivo behavior is mandatory for the proper exploitation of nanostructured implantable metals and, indeed, of all biomaterials.

  1. Ab initio potential energy surface and excited vibrational states for the electronic ground state of Li2H

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢国森; 先晖; 谢代前

    1997-01-01

    A 285-pomt multi-reference configuration-interaction involving single and double excitations ( MRS DCI) potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of L12H is determined by using 6-311G (2df,2pd)basis set.A Simons-Parr-Finlan polynomial expansion is used to fit the discrete surface with a x2 of 4.64×106 The equn librium geometry occurs at Rc=0.172 nm and,LiHL1=94.10°.The dissociation energy for reaction I2H(2A)→L12(1∑g)+H(2S) is 243.910 kJ/mol,and that for reaction L12H(2A’)→HL1(1∑) + L1(2S) is 106.445 kl/mol The inversion barrier height is 50.388 kj/mol.The vibrational energy levels are calculated using the discrete variable representation (DVR) method.

  2. Surface state of the dual topological insulator Bi0.91Sb0.09 (11 2 bar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, I.; Yaji, K.; Taskin, A. A.; D'angelo, M.; Yukawa, R.; Ohtsubo, Y.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Yoshizawa, S.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Kakizaki, A.; Ando, Yoichi; Komori, F.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of a Bi0.91Sb0.09 single crystal was elucidated at a bisectrix (11 2 bar) surface by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using microbeam synchrotron radiation. A Dirac-cone-like dispersion of the surface state was observed at the Γ bar point. The detected surface-state band likely corresponds to the one observed in previous quantum transport research (Taskin and Ando, 2009) [14].

  3. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: anne-sophie.mamede@ensc-lille.fr [University Lille, CNRS, ENSCL, Centrale Lille, University Artois, UMR 8181 – UCCS – Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, F-59000 Lille (France); Nuns, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.nuns@univ-lille1.fr [University Lille, CNRS, ENSCL, Centrale Lille, University Artois, UMR 8181 – UCCS – Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, F-59000 Lille (France); Cristol, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.cristol@ec-lille.fr [University Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, Arts et Métiers Paris Tech, FRE 3723 – LML – Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille, F-59000 Lille (France); Cantrel, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.cantrel@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES, Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Laboratoire de Recherche Commun IRSN-CNRS-Lille 1: «Cinétique Chimique, Combustion, Réactivité» (C3R), Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Souvi, Sidi, E-mail: sidi.souvi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES, Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Laboratoire de Recherche Commun IRSN-CNRS-Lille 1: «Cinétique Chimique, Combustion, Réactivité» (C3R), Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); and others

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutitechnique characterisation of oxidised 304L. • Oxidation at high temperature under steam and air conditions of 304L stainless steel. • Chromium and manganese oxides formed in the outer layer. • Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. - Abstract: In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8–12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  4. Simulating Land Surface Hydrology at a 30-meter Spatial Resolution over the Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. F.; Pan, M.; Cai, X.; Chaney, N.

    2016-12-01

    Big data, high performance computing, and recent advances in hydrologic similarity present a unique opportunity for macroscale hydrology: the land surface hydrology can be modeled at field scales over continental extents while ensuring computational efficiency to enable robust ensemble frameworks. In this presentation we will illustrate this potential breakthrough in macroscale hydrology by discussing results from a 30-meter simulation over the contiguous United States using the HydroBlocks land surface model. HydroBlocks is a novel land surface model that represents field-scale spatial heterogeneity of land surface processes through interacting hydrologic response units (HRUs) [Chaney et al., 2016]. The model is a coupling between the Noah-MP land surface model and the Dynamic TOPMODEL hydrologic model. The HRUs are defined by clustering proxies of the drivers of spatial heterogeneity using hyperresolution land data. For the simulations over CONUS, HydroBlocks is run at every HUC10 catchment using 100 HRUs per catchment between 2004 and 2014. The simulations are forced with the 4 km Stage IV radar rainfall product and a spatially downscaled version of NLDAS-2. We will show how this approach to macroscale hydrology ensures computational efficiency while providing field-scale hydrologic information over continental extents. We will illustrate how this approach provides a novel approach in both the application and validation of macroscale land surface and hydrologic models. Finally, using these results, we will discuss the important role that big data and high performance computing can play in providing solutions to longstanding challenges to not only flood and drought monitoring systems but also to numerical weather prediction, seasonal forecasting, and climate prediction. References Chaney, N., P. Metcalfe, and E. F. Wood (2016), HydroBlocks: A Field-scale Resolving Land Surface Model for Application Over Continental Extents, Hydrological Processes, (in press.)

  5. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  6. Effect of dangling bonds of ultra-thin silicon film surface on electronic states of internal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji, E-mail: sueoka@c.oka-pu.ac.jp [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    We investigate how dangling bonds at the surface of ultra-thin films affect electronic states inside the film by first principles calculation. In the calculation models, dangling bonds at the surface are directly treated, and the impact on the electronic states of the internal atoms was estimated. Models with a H-terminated surface at both sides have no state in the bandgap. Whereas, new states appear at around the midgap by removing terminated H at surfaces of one or both sides. These mid-gap states appear at all layers, the states of which decrease as the layer moves away from the surface with dangling bonds. The sum of local DOS corresponds to the number of dangling bonds of the model. If the activation rate is assumed as 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, which is an ordinary value of thermal oxide passivation on Si (1 0 0) surface, volume concentration and surface concentration at the 18th layer from the surface in a 36-layer model are estimated to be 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, respectively. These numbers are comparable to the values, especially the dopant volume concentration of Si substrate used in current VLSI technology ({approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}). Therefore, the midgap states inside ultra-thin films may degrade performance of the FinFETs.

  7. Kondo Hybridization and the Origin of Metallic States at the (001 Surface of SmB_{6}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Frantzeskakis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available SmB_{6}, a well-known Kondo insulator, has been proposed to be an ideal topological insulator with states of topological character located in a clean, bulk electronic gap, namely, the Kondo-hybridization gap. Since the Kondo gap arises from many-body electronic correlations, SmB_{6} would be placed at the head of a new material class: topological Kondo insulators. Here, for the first time, we show that the k-space characteristics of the Kondo-hybridization process is the key to unraveling the origin of the two types of metallic states experimentally observed by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES in the electronic band structure of SmB_{6}(001. One group of these states is essentially of bulk origin and cuts the Fermi level due to the position of the chemical potential 20 meV above the lowest-lying 5d-4f hybridization zone. The other metallic state is more enigmatic, being weak in intensity, but represents a good candidate for a topological surface state. However, before this claim can be substantiated by an unequivocal measurement of its massless dispersion relation, our data raise the bar in terms of the ARPES resolution required, as we show there to be a strong renormalization of the hybridization gaps by a factor 2–3 compared to theory, following from the knowledge of the true position of the chemical potential and a careful comparison with the predictions from recent local-density-approximation (LDA+Gutzwiller calculations. All in all, these key pieces of evidence act as triangulation markers, providing a detailed description of the electronic landscape in SmB_{6} and pointing the way for future, ultrahigh-resolution ARPES experiments to achieve a direct measurement of the Dirac cones in the first topological Kondo insulator.

  8. Manipulation of the surface density of states of Ag(111) by means of resonators: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J.; Moro-Lagares, María; Serrate, D.; Aligia, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the density of surface Shockley states of Ag(111) probed by the differential conductance G (V )=d I /d V by a scanning-tunneling microscope (STM) can be enhanced significantly at certain energies and positions introducing simple arrays of Co or Ag atoms on the surface, in contrast to other noble-metal surfaces. Specifically we have studied resonators consisting of two parallel walls of five atoms deposited on the clean Ag(111) surface. A simple model in which the effect of the adatoms is taken into account by an attractive local potential and a small hybridization between surface and bulk at the position of the adatoms explains the main features of the observed G (V ) and allows us to extract the proportion of surface and bulk states sensed by the STM tip. These results might be relevant to engineer the surface spectral density of states, to study the effects of surface states on the Kondo effect, and to separate bulk and surface contributions in STM studies of topological surface states.

  9. Quantum states of hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padama, Allan Abraham B.; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    The quantum states of adsorbed hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0) surface are investigated in this work. From the calculated potential energy surface (PES) of hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0), the wave functions and eigenenergies in the ground and few excited states of protium (H) and deuterium (D) are calculated. Localized wave functions of hydrogen atom exist on pseudo-threefold and long bridge sites of Pd(1 1 0). The short bridge site is a local minimum from the result of PES, however, quantum behavior of hydrogen revealed that its vibration would allow it to hop to other pseudo-threefold site (that crosses the short bridge site) than to stay on the short bridge site. Exchange of ordering of the wave functions between H and D is attributed to the difference in their masses. The calculated eigenenergies are found to be in fair agreement with experimental data based from the identified vibrations of hydrogen with component perpendicular to the surface. The activation barriers measured from the eigenenergies are in better agreement with experimental findings in comparison to the data gathered from PES.

  10. Synthesis of high surface area nanometer magnesia by solid-state chemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hongbo; WANG Pei; ZHAO Biying; ZHU Yuexiang; XIE Youchang

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer MgO samples with high surface area,small crystal size and mesoporous texture were synthesized tion process accelerated the sintering of MgO,and MgO with calcining its precursor in flowing dry nitrogen at 520℃ for 4 h.The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption,transmission electron microscopy,thermogravimetry,and differential thermal analysis.The as-prepared MgO was composed of nanocrystals with a size of about 4-5 nm and formed a wormhole-like porous structure.The MgO also had good thermal stability,and its surface areas remained at 357 and 153 m2.g-1 after calcination at 600 and 800℃ for 2 h,respectively.Compared with the MgO sample prepared by the precipitation method,MgO prepared by solid-state chemical reaction has uniform pore size distribution,surface area,and crystal size.The solid-state chemical method has the advantages of low cost,low pollution,and high yield,therefore it appears to be a promising method in the industrial manufacture of nanometer MgO.

  11. Topologically protected surface states in a centrosymmetric superconductor β-PdBi2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, M; Okawa, K; Kanou, M; Sanjo, H; Okuda, T; Sasagawa, T; Ishizaka, K

    2015-01-01

    The topological aspects of electrons in solids can emerge in real materials, as represented by topological insulators. In theory, they show a variety of new magneto-electric phenomena, and especially the ones hosting superconductivity are strongly desired as candidates for topological superconductors. While efforts have been made to develop possible topological superconductors by introducing carriers into topological insulators, those exhibiting indisputable superconductivity free from inhomogeneity are very few. Here we report on the observation of topologically protected surface states in a centrosymmetric layered superconductor, β-PdBi2, by utilizing spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Besides the bulk bands, several surface bands are clearly observed with symmetrically allowed in-plane spin polarizations, some of which crossing the Fermi level. These surface states are precisely evaluated to be topological, based on the Z2 invariant analysis in analogy to three-dimensional strong topological insulators. β-PdBi2 may offer a solid stage to investigate the topological aspect in the superconducting condensate.

  12. Anisotropic Surface State Mediated RKKY Interaction Between Adatoms on a Hexagonal Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Theodore; Patrone, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive a far-field expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states on a (111) FCC surface, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that in general, the corresponding Fermi wave-vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the component of the aforementioned kF that is parallel to R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work.

  13. Crossing the dividing surface of transition state theory. III. Once and only once. Selecting reactive trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorquet, J. C., E-mail: jc.lorquet@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Sart-Tilman (Bâtiment B6), B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The purpose of the present work is to determine initial conditions that generate reacting, recrossing-free trajectories that cross the conventional dividing surface of transition state theory (i.e., the plane in configuration space passing through a saddle point of the potential energy surface and perpendicular to the reaction coordinate) without ever returning to it. Local analytical equations of motion valid in the neighborhood of this planar surface have been derived as an expansion in Poisson brackets. We show that the mere presence of a saddle point implies that reactivity criteria can be quite simply formulated in terms of elements of this series, irrespective of the shape of the potential energy function. Some of these elements are demonstrated to be equal to a sum of squares and thus to be necessarily positive, which has a profound impact on the dynamics. The method is then applied to a three-dimensional model describing an atom-diatom interaction. A particular relation between initial conditions is shown to generate a bundle of reactive trajectories that form reactive cylinders (or conduits) in phase space. This relation considerably reduces the phase space volume of initial conditions that generate recrossing-free trajectories. Loci in phase space of reactive initial conditions are presented. Reactivity is influenced by symmetry, as shown by a comparative study of collinear and bent transition states. Finally, it is argued that the rules that have been derived to generate reactive trajectories in classical mechanics are also useful to build up a reactive wave packet.

  14. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  15. Excited state potential energy surfaces of bistridentate RuII complexes - A TD-DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österman, Tomas; Persson, Petter

    2012-10-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have been used to investigate low-energy singlet and triplet excited state potential energy surfaces (PES) of two prototype RuII-bistridentate complexes: [RuII(tpy)2]2+ (tpy is 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and [RuII(dqp)2]2+ (dqp is 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine). Solvent effects were considered using a self-consistent reaction field scheme. The calculations provide information about the excited state manifold along pathways for activated decay of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited states via metal-centered (MC) states for the two complexes. Significant differences in the energy profiles of the investigated PESs are explained through characterization of the electronic properties of the involved states calculated by the TD-DFT calculations. Finally, implications of the computational results for the design of octahedral metal complexes utilizing ligand field splitting (LFS) strategies for efficient light-harvesting in photochemical applications such as artificial photosynthesis are discussed.

  16. Oxidation state of chromium associated with cell surfaces of Shewanella oneidensis during chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Lowe, Kristine; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2002-12-30

    Employing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that in both aerobic and anaerobic culture Shewanella oneidensis cells are capable of chromate reduction. No Cr(VI) or Cr(V) species were identified at the cell surfaces in Cr 2p{sub 3/}ore photoelectron spectra. More chromium was associated with cell surfaces recovered from anaerobic medium than aerobic. Multiplet-splitting models derived for Cr(III) and Cr(IV) were employed to determine contributions from each ion to Cr 2p{sub 3/2} photopeaks collected from the various cell treatments. Whilst in all cases Cr(III) was the major ion associated with cell surfaces, a significant contribution was identified due to Cr(IV) in anaerobically grown cells. The Cr(IV) contribution was far less when cells were grown aerobically. Moreover, when anaerobically grown cells were exposed to oxygen very little re-oxidation of Cr-precipitates occurred, the precipitates were again identified as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(IV). A positive relationship was observed between amounts of chromium and phosphorous associated with cell surfaces resulting from the various treatments, suggesting the precipitates included Cr(III)-phosphate. The fact that Cr(IV) remained associated with precipitates following re-oxidation suggests that under anaerobic conditions the intermediate ion is afforded sufficient stability to be incorporated within the precipitate matrix and thus conferred a degree of protection from oxidation.

  17. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  18. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface and Internal Torsional-Wagging States of Hydroxylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz; Kreglewski; Senent

    1997-11-01

    The two-dimensional potential energy surface describing the interaction of the large-amplitude torsional and wagging motions in hydroxylamine has been determined from ab initio calculations. This surface has been sampled by a large set of grid points from a two-dimensional configuration space spanned by the torsional and wagging coordinates. At each grid point, the geometry optimization has been performed using the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory with the basis set 6-311 + G(2d, p). At the optimized geometry, the single-point calculation of the electronic energy has been carried out using a larger basis set 6-311 + G(3df, 2p). This method was verified to yield the results comparable to those obtained by a direct optimization of the geometry with the basis set 6-311 + G(3df, 2p) which had been used by A. Chung-Phillips and K. A. Jebber (1995. J. Chem. Phys. 102, 7080-7087) to calculate the energies of only three points in the potential energy surface of hydroxylamine. The trans and cis local minima have been found on the determined potential energy surface. The localization features of the torsional-wagging states have been studied by solving the two-dimensional Schrodinger equation for the coupled torsional and wagging motions. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  19. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  20. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time.

  1. In-situ XMCD evaluation of ferromagnetic state at FeRh thin film surface induced by 1 keV Ar ion beam irradiation and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, T. [Research Organization for the 21st Century, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Aikoh, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Sakamaki, M.; Amemiya, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Surface ferromagnetic state of FeRh thin films irradiated with 1 keV Ar ion-beam has been investigated by using soft X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD). It was revealed that the Fe atoms of the samples were strongly spin-polarized after Ar ion-beam irradiation. Due to its small penetration depth, 1 keV Ar ion-beam irradiation can modify the magnetic state at subsurface of the samples. In accordance with the XMCD sum rule analysis, the main component of the irradiation induced ferromagnetism at the FeRh film surface was to be effective spin magnetic moment, and not to be orbital moment. We also confirmed that the surface ferromagnetic state could be produced by thermal annealing of the excessively ion irradiated paramagnetic subsurface of the FeRh thin films. This novel magnetic modification technique by using ion irradiation and subsequent annealing can be a potential tool to control the surface magnetic state of FeRh thin films.

  2. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  3. Interpretation of the X(3872) as a charmonium state plus an extra component due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-07-01

    We present a quark model calculation of the charmonium spectrum with self-energy corrections due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within the relativized quark model by Godfrey and Isgur. The strong decay widths of 3S, 2P, 1D, and 2D cc¯ states are also calculated, to set the values of the 3P0 pair-creation model's parameters we use to compute the vertex functions of the loop integrals. Finally, the nature of the X(3872) resonance is analyzed and the main possibilities (cc¯ state or DD¯* molecule) are discussed. According to our results, the X(3872) is compatible with the meson χc1(2P), with JPC=1++, and is thus interpreted as a cc¯ core plus higher Fock components due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. These JPC=1++ quantum numbers are in agreement with the experimental results found by the LHCb collaboration. In our view, the X(3872)'s mass is lower than the quark model's predictions because of self-energy shifts.

  4. A thin rivulet or ridge subject to a uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Sullivan, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the lubrication approximation to analyze three closely related problems involving a thin rivulet or ridge (i.e., a two-dimensional droplet) of fluid subject to a prescribed uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow, namely a rivulet draining under gravity down a vertical substrate, a rivulet driven by a longitudinal shear stress at its free surface, and a ridge on a horizontal substrate, and find qualitatively similar behaviour for all three problems. We show that, in agreement with previous numerical studies, the free surface profile of an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with pinned contact lines is skewed as the shear stress is increased from zero, and that there is a maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with prescribed semi-width is possible. In practice, one or both of the contact lines will de-pin before this maximum value of the shear stress is reached, and so we consider situations in which the rivulet/ridge de-pins at one or both contact lines. In the case of de-pinning only at the advancing contact line, the rivulet/ridge is flattened and widened as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a second maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with a prescribed advancing contact angle is possible. In contrast, in the case of de-pinning only at the receding contact line, the rivulet/ridge is thickened and narrowed as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a solution with a prescribed receding contact angle for all values of the shear stress. In general, in the case of de-pinning at both contact lines there is a critical "yield" value of the shear stress beyond which no equilibrium solution is possible and the rivulet/ridge will evolve unsteadily. In the Appendix, we show that an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with prescribed flux/area is quasi-statically stable to two-dimensional perturbations. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Surface States and Transitions of Si(111)-7x7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    TRANSTONS OF Si(Il1)-7x7 by J. E. Demuth, B. N. J. Persson and A. J. Scheil-Sorokin Prepared for Publication in Physical Review Letters IBM T. J. Watson...NUMBER 24 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 12 DEiEMiER 1983 Temperature-Dependent Surface States and Transitions of Si(11l)-7x7 J. E. Demuth, B. N. J. Persson...8217 ’ " " " .. . .; " ’ " ’ " " " " "h " - -’ ; - ’ . . ": - - VOLUME 51, NUMBER 24 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 12

  6. Preparation of cluster states with trapped electrons on a liquid helium surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Ling-Yan; Shi Yan-Li; Zhang Zhi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for the preparation of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) cluster states with electrons trapped on a liquid helium surface and driven by a classical laser beam.The two lowest levels of the vertical motion of the electron act as a two-level system,and the quantized vibration of the electron along one of the parallel directions (the x direction) serves as the bosonic mode.The degrees of freedom of the vertical and parallel motions of the trapped electron can be coupled together by a classical laser field.With the proper frequency of the laser field,the cluster states can be realized.

  7. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  8. Modeling and Extended State Observer Based Dynamic Surface Control for Cold Rolling Mill System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and control problems are investigated for cold rolling mill system. Firstly, we establish a monitor automatic gauge control (MAGC model for a practical cold rolling mill system. The new model is with mismatched uncertainties. Then, an extended state observer (ESO is developed to estimate uncertainties. In the general high-order systems, the ESO is also used to estimate states. By dynamic surface control method, we design the controller to guarantee stabilization of the cold rolling mill system. Furthermore, we extend proposed method to general high-order systems, in which we analyze the difference from cold rolling mill system. Finally, simulation results for MAGC system are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  9. Topological states at the (001) surface of SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, Manali; Goerbig, Mark O.; Gabay, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Defect-free SrTiO3 (STO) is a band insulator but angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments have demonstrated the existence of a nanometer thin two-dimensional electron liquid (2DEG) at the (001) oriented surface of this compound. The bulk is a trivial insulator, but our theoretical study reveals that the parity of electronic wave functions in this 2DEG is inverted in the vicinity of special points in reciprocal space where the low-energy dispersion consists of four gapped Dirac cones with a tilted and anisotropic shape. This gives rise to linearly dispersing topological edge states at the one-dimensional boundary. We propose to probe these modes by measuring the Josephson radiation from gapless bound Andreev states in STO based junctions, as it is predicted that they display distinctive signatures of topology.

  10. Low-Temperature Softening Due to Vacancy Orbital with Γ8 Quartet Ground State in Boron-Doped Floating Zone Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Shotaro; Akatsu, Mitsuhiro; Mitsumoto, Keisuke; Komatsu, Satoru; Horie, Kunihiko; Nemoto, Yuichi; Yamada-Kaneta, Hiroshi; Goto, Terutaka

    2013-08-01

    We have carried out low-temperature ultrasonic measurements using shear-mode ultrasound to clarify the quantum state of a vacancy orbital in boron-doped silicon grown by the floating zone (FZ) method. The elastic constants (C11-C12)/2 and C44 of the transverse mode exhibit considerable softening below 2 and 5 K down to the base temperature of 30 mK, respectively. The elastic constant C44 measured by the three ultrasonic modes (kx,uy), (kz,ux), and (kx,uz) shows the different magnetic field dependences among the configurations under applied magnetic fields along the z-axis. The elastic softening and the magnetic field dependence of the elastic constants are accounted for by the quadrupole susceptibility based on the energy level scheme of the vacancy orbital with a Γ8 quartet ground state and Γ7 doublet excited state located at an energy of 1 K. The difference in C44 between the two ultrasonic modes (kz,ux) and (kx,uz) at fields along the z-axis indicates that the Γ8 quartet ground state is slightly split by local strain in the silicon sample. The quantum state of the vacancy orbital is expected to be sensitive to strain because of the extremely large quadrupole-strain coupling energy of gΓ≈ 105 K due to the extensively spreading orbital radius of r≈ 1 nm. The differences in variation of the low-temperature softening and magnetic field dependence among eight samples cut out from different locations of the present boron-doped FZ silicon ingot evidence the inhomogeneous distribution of the vacancy concentration.

  11. The Potential Energy Surface for the Electronic Ground State of H 2Se Derived from Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P.; Kozin, I. N.

    1993-07-01

    The present paper reports a determination of the potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of the hydrogen selenide molecule through a direct least-squares fitting to experimental data using the MORBID (Morse oscillator rigid bender internal dynamics) approach developed by P. Jensen [ J. Mol. Spectrosc.128, 478-501 (1988); J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 284, 1315-1340 (1988)]. We have fitted a selection of 303 rotation-vibration energy spacings of H 280Se, D 280Se, and HD 80Se involving J ≤ 5 with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.0975 cm -1 for the rotational energy spacings and 0.268 cm -1 for the vibrational spacings. In the fitting, 14 parameters were varied. On the basis of the fitted potential surface we have studied the cluster effect in the vibrational ground state of H 2Se, i.e., the formation of nearly degenerate, four-member groups of rotational energy levels [see I. N. Kozin, S. Klee, P. Jensen, O. L. Polyansky, and I. M. Pavlichenkov. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 158, 409-422 (1993), and references therein]. The cluster formation becomes more pronounced with increasing J. For example, four-fold clusters formed in the vibrational ground state of H 280Se at J = 40 are degenerate to within a few MHz. Our predictions of the D 280Se energy spectrum show that for this molecule, the cluster formation is displaced towards higher J values than arc found for H 280Se. In the vibrational ground state, the qualitative deviation from the usual rigid rotor picture starts at J = 12 for H 280Se and at J = 18 for D 280Se, in full agreement with predictions from semiclassical theory. An interpretation of the cluster eigenstates is discussed.

  12. Mortality due to cardiovascular disease in women during the reproductive age (15 to 49 years, in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 to 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib Haddad

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in women during the reproductive age (15 to 49 years in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 to 1995. METHODS: A list of all deaths and their underlying causes, coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, multiple causes of death, and estimates of the female population according to age groups were provided by the SEADE Foundation. Specific coefficients for 100 thousand women for each year as well as the medians of these coefficients related to 5 years, and the percentage of death by subgroups were calculated. RESULTS: Cerebrovascular diseases have the highest coefficients (14.24 for 100 thousand females, followed by ischemic heart disease (7.37, other heart diseases (6.39, hypertensive disease (3.03, chronic rheumatic heart disease (1.58, pulmonary vascular diseases (1.29, and active rheumatic fever (0.05. Systemic arterial hypertension, as an associated cause, occurred in 55.3% to 57.8% of all the deaths due to intracerebral hemorrhage and in 30.4% to 30.8% due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSION: The significance of cerebrovascular diseases, coronary artery disease, and systemic arterial hypertension as causes of mortality suggests the need to emphasize preventive actions for young women who have the potential to reproduce to avoid possible complications in future pregnancies, and premature mortality.

  13. Proximity induced ferromagnetism, superconductivity, and finite-size effects on the surface and edge states of topological insulator nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Parijat; Kubis, Tillmann; Tan, Yaohua; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ and Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ are well known 3D-topological insulators. Films made of these materials exhibit metal-like surface states with a Dirac dispersion and possess high mobility. The high mobility metal-like surface states can serve as channel material for TI-based field effect transistors. While such a transistor offers superior terminal characteristics, they suffer from an inherent zero band gap problem. The absence of a band gap for the surface states prevents an easy turn-...

  14. Ultrafast Optical Excitation of a Persistent Surface-State Population in the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, Jonathan

    2012-03-14

    Using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we investigated the nonequilibrium dynamics of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We studied p-type Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, in which the metallic Dirac surface state and bulk conduction bands are unoccupied. Optical excitation leads to a meta-stable population at the bulk conduction band edge, which feeds a nonequilibrium population of the surface state persisting for >10 ps. This unusually long-lived population of a metallic Dirac surface state with spin texture may present a channel in which to drive transient spin-polarized currents.

  15. Nonlinear optical responses to circularly polarized lights of the surface state of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Tetsuro; Yokoyama, Takehito; Murakami, Shuichi

    2012-02-01

    Recent photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have revealed the presence of the Dirac cone on the surface of the topological insulator and its spin-splitting due to the spin-orbit interaction. In general, on spin-orbit coupled systems, electric fields induce spin polarizations as linear and nonlinear responses. Here we investigate the inverse Faraday effect on the surface of the topological insulator. The inverse Faraday effect is a non-linear optical effect where a circularly polarized light induces a dc spin polarization. We employ the Keldysh Green's function method to calculate the induced spin polarization and discuss its frequency dependence. In particular, in the low frequency limit, our analytical result gives the spin polarization proportional to the frequency and the square of the lifetime. As for the finite frequency regime, we employ numerical methods to discuss the resonance due to interband transitions. We also discuss the photogalvanic effect, where an illumination of a circular polarized light generates the dc charge current. Lastly, we evaluate those quantities with realistic parameters.[4pt] [1] T. Misawa, T. Yokoyama, S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. B84, 165407 (2011).

  16. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer to carbon atoms: nonadiabatic surface-hopping dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-21

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) between two highly electronegative atoms, for example, oxygen and nitrogen, has been intensely studied experimentally and computationally, whereas there has been much less theoretical work on ESIPT to other atoms such as carbon. We have employed CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, RI-ADC(2), OM2/MRCI, DFT, and TDDFT methods to study the mechanistic photochemistry of 2-phenylphenol, for which such an ESIPT has been observed experimentally. According to static electronic structure calculations, irradiation of 2-phenylphenol populates the bright S1 state, which has a rather flat potential in the Franck-Condon region (with a shallow enol minimum at the CASSCF level) and may undergo an essentially barrierless ESIPT to the more stable S1 keto species. There are two S1/S0 conical intersections that mediate relaxation to the ground state, one in the enol region and one in the keto region, with the latter one substantially lower in energy. After S1 → S0 internal conversion, the transient keto species can return back to the S0 enol structure via reverse ground-state hydrogen transfer in a facile tautomerization. This mechanistic scenario is verified by OM2/MRCI-based fewest-switches surface-hopping simulations that provide detailed dynamic information. In these trajectories, ESIPT is complete within 118 fs; the corresponding S1 excited-state lifetime is computed to be 373 fs in vacuum. Most of the trajectories decay to the ground state via the S1/S0 conical intersection in the keto region (67%), and the remaining ones via the enol region (33%). The combination of static electronic structure computations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations is expected to be generally useful for understanding the mechanistic photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  17. Surface Gap Soliton Ground States for the Nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Dohnal, Tomáš; Reichel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation $(-\\Delta +V(x))u = \\Gamma(x) |u|^{p-1}u$, $x\\in \\R^n$ with $V(x) = V_1(x) \\chi_{\\{x_1>0\\}}(x)+V_2(x) \\chi_{\\{x_10\\}}(x)+\\Gamma_2(x) \\chi_{\\{x_1<0\\}}(x)$ and with $V_1, V_2, \\Gamma_1, \\Gamma_2$ periodic in each coordinate direction. This problem describes the interface of two periodic media, e.g. photonic crystals. We study the existence of ground state $H^1$ solutions (surface gap soliton ground states) for $0<\\min \\sigma(-\\Delta +V)$. Using a concentration compactness argument, we provide an abstract criterion for the existence based on ground state energies of each periodic problem (with $V\\equiv V_1, \\Gamma\\equiv \\Gamma_1$ and $V\\equiv V_2, \\Gamma\\equiv \\Gamma_2$) as well as a more practical criterion based on ground states themselves. Examples of interfaces satisfying these criteria are provided. In 1D it is shown that, surprisingly, the criteria can be reduced to conditions on the linear Bloch waves of the operators $-\\tfrac{d^2}{dx^2} +V_1(x)$ an...

  18. Formation and decay of the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions interacting with solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, M A; Nedeljkovic, N N; Bozanic, D K, E-mail: gmirkomarko@sezampro.rs

    2010-11-01

    Processes of formation and decay of the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions escaping solid surfaces with intermediate velocities (v {approx} 1 a.u.) represent complex quantum events that require a detailed quantum description. We have developed a two-state vector model for the population process, with the functions {Psi}{sub 1} and {Psi}{sub 2} for definition of the state of a single active electron. The electron exchange between the solid and the moving ion is described by a mixed flux through a plane positioned between them. For the low values of the angular momentum quantum numbers l the radial electronic coordinate {rho} can be neglected, whereas for the large-l values a wide space region around the projectile trajectory was taken into account. The reionization of the previously populated states is considered as a decay of the wave function {Psi}{sub 2}. The corresponding decay rates are obtained by an appropriate etalon equation method: in the large-l case the radial electronic coordinate {rho} is treated as a variational parameter. The theoretical predictions based on that population-reionization mechanism are compared with the available beam-foil experimental data, as well as the experimental data obtained in the interaction of multiply charged ions with micro-capillary foil. Generally, the model reproduces the experimentally observed non-linear trend of the l distributions from l = 0 to l{sub max} = n - 1.

  19. Evolution of Structural-Phase States in TiNi Surface Layers Synthesized by Electron Beam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Meisner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of X-ray diffraction analysis of nonequilibrium structural and elastic stress states in TiNi surface layers irradiated by low-energy electron beams. It is found that a surface layer with a mixed (2D columnar and 3D equiaxial submicrocrystalline structure is formed on the irradiated side of the TiNi specimens, and the volume fractions of the two structure types depend on the beam energy parameters and number of pulses. The B2 phase synthesized in the layer is characterized by lattice microstrain due to stresses of the first and second kinds (εI≈±1%, εII=0.25%, and the layer as such is an internal stress concentrator for underlying layers of the material. In the intermediate layer beneath the stress concentrator, relaxation of irradiation-induced internal stress takes place. It is shown that the main mechanism of the relaxation is partial B2→B19′ martensite transformation. The B19′ martensite phase in the intermediate layer decreases the microstrain in the conjugate B2 phase. The thickness of the layer in which the relaxation processes develop through the B2→B19′ martensite transformation is 10–15 μm.

  20. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the Au(1 1 1) Shockley surface state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntwiler, Matthias E-mail: m.muntwiler@physik.unizh.ch; Hoesch, Moritz; Petrov, Vladimir N.; Hengsberger, Matthias; Patthey, Luc; Shi Ming; Falub, Mihaela; Greber, Thomas; Osterwalder, Juerg

    2004-07-01

    The spin character of the splitting of the Shockley surface state on Au(111) is directly verified by measurements of the in-plane and out-of-plane spin polarizations in angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The two parabolic sub-bands that are momentum-shifted with respect to each other, reveal a distinct, opposite spin polarization that within the errors lies in the surface plane. The measured in-plane orientation of the spin vectors is consistent with the simple spin structure expected from a nearly-free-electron model, where the polarization axis is tangential to the Fermi surface of the surface state.