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Sample records for surface smos bermuda

  1. Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Bermuda's population characteristics, history, government, political situation, economy, and foreign relations were briefly described. Bermuda, a parliamentary British colony, is situated on a group of island in the Atlantic Ocean, about 650 miles east of North Carolina. Bermuda was discovered by the Spaniards in 1503; however, it was the British who founded the 1st settlement on the islands in 1612. The current population size is 56,652, and the annual rate of growth is 0.3%. About 2/3 of the population is of African descent, and the remaining inhabitants are of British, American, Portuguese, or Caribbean descent. The literacy rate is 98%, and school enrollment is universal and compulsory for 12 years. The infant mortality rate is 7.1/1000 live births and life expectancy is 69 years for men and 76 years for women. Although Bermuda is a British colony, it was granted considerable internal autonomy in 1968. A governor, appointed by the British Crown, is in charge of external affairs, defense, and the country's internal security. Under the constitution, adopted in 1968, the internal affairs of the country are conducted by an elected bicameral legislative body and a premier who represents the majority party in the lower legislative house. The current premier is John W. D. Swan of the United Bermuda Party (UBP). The UBP is supported mainly by the white minority and by a few blacks. The Progressive Labor Party (PLP) is supported primarily by the black majority. The UBP has retained power since it was established in 1965, but at each election, its winning margin decreased. Although there is universal suffrage, only a small proportion of the public participates in elections. Despite the fact that the governor was assassinated in 1972 and there was civil unrest in 1977, the country is politically stable. This political stability is due in part to the government's efforts since the 1950s to promote racial equality, to the government's willingness to recognize labors' right

  2. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  3. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Misawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    OS ADJ A151678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE ISMOS ) ’/4 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND DETACHMENT ASHEVILLE NC MAR...34 ... , , ,, . - Ali A151 678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE iSMOs ) 414 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND . DETACHMENT

  4. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  5. SMOS Sea Surface Salinity Validation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In November 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the first soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) satellite, which represented the first use of spaceborne remote sensing tools to probe global sea surface salinity (SSS). The SMOS satellite carries a microwave imaging radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) for detection in the microwave L-band as the only payload. The MIRAS instrument is expected to provide a global SSS distribution with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 km and an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 practical salinity units (psu). The South China Sea is semi-enclosed, and the sea conditions are relatively complex. The suitability of ESA SMOS salinity products for the South China Sea has not been validated. Therefore, using SSS data measured during an expedition in the South China Sea, which was sponsored by China Natural Science Foundation and conducted in the fall of 2011, this paper validated the SSS products released by ESA, which were retrieved using three sea surface roughness models. To analyze the effect of the spatial resolution on the weekly average SMOS SSS distribution, the weekly average salinity data were averaged to reduce the spatial resolution to 0.25 ° x 0.25°. These average data were then compared to the measured data, followed by an analysis of the error variation. In addition, the effects of the orbital track (ascending or descending) on the SSS retrieval were analyzed.

  6. Validation of SMOS with Malaspina surface drifter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Turiel, A.; Salvador, J.; Fernández, P.; Font, J.

    2014-12-01

    During the Spanish Malaspina oceanic expedition, a total of 20 surface drifting buoys, manufactured by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM) of the Spanish Council of Scientific Research (CSIC), were deployed. First developed in 2005, the various prototypes of these drifting buoys have been characterized by: 1) take measurements as close as 40 cm below the sea surface; 2) transmitting in real-time through several satellite networks; 3) long-lasting (about two years) energy source; 4) modular structure designed to host several sensors; 5) low-cost; and 6) small size. Since the mid 2000s, the deployment of the Argo automatic buoys is providing a quasi-global picture of the subsurface temperature and salinity structure. Currently, more than 3300 automatic profilers gather more than 9000 vertical profiles each month. However, few data just below the surface is being gathered by Argo because, to reduce the risk of sensor fouling, the pumping mechanism is switched off few meters before reaching the surface. Recently, two satellite missions (the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, SMOS, of the European Space Agency, and Aquarius of National Aeronautics and Space Administration) have become a promising strategy to recover information about the sea surface salinity (SSS). Both instruments exploit the fact that significant information on sea surface dielectric properties (related to salinity) can be retrieved from ocean microwave emissions, particularly on L-band. With them, a new set of data may provide reliable information of the skin-depth surface salinity (Font et al. 2011). Three gridded products are currently being produced by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC): i) binned weighted-average, ii) optimal interpolation; iii) Data fusion with OSTIA SST. In the SMOS -BEC, the validation of the SMOS salinity products has been carried out exclusively using Argo data. To fill the bridge between the skin depth (one cm penetration depth) of the satellite measurements and

  7. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The mean SSS −0.1 bias observed in the Tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS rainy events, as detected on SSMIs rain rates, are removed from the SMOS-ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSMIs rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with rainy ARGO measurements collocated with non rainy SMOS measurements, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  8. Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity and Analysis of Possible Causes for the Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; Le Vine, D. M.; Waldteufel, P.; Vergely, J. -L.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and some components of the retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  9. A new method to retrieve salinity profiles from sea surface salinity observed by SMOS satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tingting; CHEN Zhongbiao; HE Yijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to retrieve salinity profiles from the sea surface salinity (SSS) observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The main vertical patterns of the salinity profiles are firstly extracted from the salinity profiles measured by Argo using the empirical orthogonal function. To determine the time coefficients for each vertical pattern, two statistical models are developed. In the linear model, a transfer function is proposed to relate the SSS observed by SMOS (SMOS_SSS) with that measured by Argo, and then a linear relationship between the SMOS_SSS and the time coefficient is established. In the nonlinear model, the neural network is utilized to estimate the time coefficients from SMOS_SSS, months and positions of the salinity profiles. The two models are validated by comparing the salinity profiles retrieved from SMOS with those measured by Argo and the climatological salinities. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the linear and nonlinear model are 0.08–0.16 and 0.08–0.14 for the upper 400 m, which are 0.01–0.07 and 0.01–0.09 smaller than the RMSE of climatology. The error sources of the method are also discussed.

  10. Preliminary validation of SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Dong, Qing; He, Mingxia

    2015-01-01

    The SMOS (soil moisture and ocean salinity) mission undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) has provided sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements at global scale since 2009. Validation of SSS values retrieved from SMOS data has been done globally and regionally. However, the accuracy of SSS measurements by SMOS in the China seas has not been examined in detail. In this study, we compared retrieved SSS values from SMOS data with in situ measurements from a South China Sea (SCS) expedition during autumn 2011. The comparison shows that the retrieved SSS values using ascending pass data have much better agreement with in situ measurements than the result derived from descending pass data. Accuracy in terms of bias and root mean square error (RMS) of the SSS retrieved using three different sea surface roughness models is very consistent, regardless of ascending or descending orbits. When ascending and descending measurements are combined for comparison, the retrieved SSS using a semi-empirical model shows the best agreement with in situ measurements, with bias -0.33 practical salinity units and RMS 0.74. We also investigated the impact of environmental conditions of sea surface wind and sea surface temperature on accuracy of the retrieved SSS. The SCS is a semi-closed basin where radio frequencies transmitted from the mainland strongly interfere with SMOS measurements. Therefore, accuracy of retrieved SSS shows a relationship with distance between the validation sites and land.

  11. Enhancing agricultural forecasting using SMOS surface soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the onset of data availability from the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (Kerr and Levine, 2008) and the expected 2015 launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission (Entekhabi et al., 2010), the next five years should see a significant expansion in our ab...

  12. The complementary role of SMOS sea surface salinity observations for estimating global ocean salinity state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zeting; Cheng, Lijing; Zhu, Jiang; Lin, Renping

    2016-06-01

    Salinity is a key ocean state property, changes in which reveal the variation of the water cycle and the ocean thermohaline circulation. However, prior to this century, in situ salinity observations were extremely sparse, which decreased the reliability of simulations of ocean general circulation by ocean and climate models. In 2009, sea surface salinity (SSS) observations covered the global ocean via the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, and several versions of global SSS products were subsequently released. How can these data benefit model performance? Previous studies found contradictory results. In this work, we assimilated SMOS-SSS data into the LASG/IAP Climate system Ocean Model (LICOM) using the Ensemble Optimum Interpolation (EnOI) assimilation scheme. To assess and quantify the contribution of SMOS-SSS data to model performance, several tests were conducted. The results indicate that the CECOS/CATDS 2010.V02 SMOS-SSS product can significantly improve model simulations of sea surface/subsurface salinity fields. This study provides the basis for the future assimilation of SMOS-SSS data for short-range climate forecasting.

  13. The Impact of Dielectric Constant Model and Surface Reference on Differences Between SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; LeVine, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  14. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days, 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO (Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The averaged negative SSS bias (−0.1 observed in the tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS observations concomitant with rain events, as detected from SSM/Is (Special Sensor Microwave Imager rain rates, are removed from the SMOS–ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSM/Is rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with ARGO measurements concomitant with rain events collocated with SMOS measurements under no rain, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  15. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Lemoore, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    D ; 𔄃 ŕ e. 0103 . 0" 3 -1* 91 - 0 L 4500 " 93.. 9302 9~3.2 3a. V3. 73.1I V3.6 93.6 4 A. # .I T VIh 1.?&Qj .16 c "! ~ S4000 74, 9 39 93 q 414, 46... OrAL NUI OP O.S9VA9IONS 1) T DIRNA VOCEANMET SMOS tN .. ) • 3300"++ , 4 1 1200虡) 91 :~ f Ic 0 L 1 1 l.O.Flf: it z.:1

  16. Using SMOS brightness temperature and derived surface-soil moisture to characterize surface conditions and validate land surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcher, Jan; Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS satellite, operated by ESA, observes the surface in the L-band. On continental surface these observations are sensitive to moisture and in particular surface-soil moisture (SSM). In this presentation we will explore how the observations of this satellite can be exploited over the Iberian Peninsula by comparing its results with two land surface models : ORCHIDEE and HTESSEL. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies. When comparing the surface-soil moisture of the models with the product derived operationally by ESA from SMOS observations similar results are found. The spatial correlation over the IP between SMOS and ORCHIDEE SSM estimates is poor (ρ 0.3). A single value decomposition (SVD) analysis of rainfall and SSM shows that the co-varying patterns of these variables are in reasonable agreement between both products. Moreover the first three SVD soil moisture patterns explain over 80% of the SSM variance simulated by the model while the explained fraction is only 52% of the remotely sensed values. These results suggest that the rainfall-driven soil moisture variability may not account for the poor spatial correlation between SMOS and ORCHIDEE products. Other reasons have to

  17. Assessment Of Sea Surface Salinity Obtain From SMOS And Aquarius Satellites Over Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, O. P. N.; Dadhich, Harendra Kumar; Singhal, Shruti

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, assessment is done of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) obtained from both SMOS and Aquarius satellites for couple of months over Indian Ocean (IO). The SSS values of the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO) are being investigated as the North Indian Ocean (NIO) is found much corrupted with the Radio Frequency Interference and even due to large variability of SSS in IO; the study area has been divided into different sub regions. The data of both the satellites at same location and of same processing level that is Level-2 have been procured and evaluated. The resolution factor is also being taken care for both onboard sensors. The resolution of SMOS L2 data products [1] is 15 X 15 Km and for Aquarius there are three different resolutions according to the BEAM's. BEAM 1 has a resolution of 76 X 94 Km, BEAM 2 has 84X120Km and BEAM3 has 96X156Km. The data have been averaged of SMOS [2] in the same way so as to match up with Aquarius resolution. By this paper we want to convince the readers that measuring SSS from space is a practical idea. SSS remote sensing now bears no more scientific perils than other remote sensing techniques did in their formative years. Advancing technology with proper resources has significantly reduced the errors.

  18. Assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures or soil moisture retrievals into a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2016-12-01

    Three different data products from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated separately into the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) to improve estimates of surface and root-zone soil moisture. The first product consists of multi-angle, dual-polarization brightness temperature (Tb) observations at the bottom of the atmosphere extracted from Level 1 data. The second product is a derived SMOS Tb product that mimics the data at a 40° incidence angle from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The third product is the operational SMOS Level 2 surface soil moisture (SM) retrieval product. The assimilation system uses a spatially distributed ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with seasonally varying climatological bias mitigation for Tb assimilation, whereas a time-invariant cumulative density function matching is used for SM retrieval assimilation. All assimilation experiments improve the soil moisture estimates compared to model-only simulations in terms of unbiased root-mean-square differences and anomaly correlations during the period from 1 July 2010 to 1 May 2015 and for 187 sites across the US. Especially in areas where the satellite data are most sensitive to surface soil moisture, large skill improvements (e.g., an increase in the anomaly correlation by 0.1) are found in the surface soil moisture. The domain-average surface and root-zone skill metrics are similar among the various assimilation experiments, but large differences in skill are found locally. The observation-minus-forecast residuals and analysis increments reveal large differences in how the observations add value in the Tb and SM retrieval assimilation systems. The distinct patterns of these diagnostics in the two systems reflect observation and model errors patterns that are not well captured in the assigned EnKF error parameters. Consequently, a localized optimization of the EnKF error parameters is needed to further improve Tb or SM retrieval

  19. Usage of satellite data SMOS in order to characterize Sea Surface Salinity in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Robins, Lotem; Olmedo Casal, Estrella

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the level of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is a principle component in order to understand climate processes that occur today and for better understanding of climate change in the future; Different processes create different salt concentration in different places in the oceans. This different salinity level had a role in determining the vertical and horizontal water fluxes. As the first three meters of the ocean surface contain more heat than that in the whole atmosphere, the influence of the salinity level on the layering of the different water levels and the different fluxes, thus, it is an important factor determining air sea interaction. An existing problem in predicting the oceans is the lack of salinity samples in the oceans. While Sea surface Temperature (SST) could be evaluated easier from remote sensed devices, analyzing data at the Near Infra-Red and Visual wavelength. Measuring and locating salinity spectral signature was an obstacle. This lack of data caused problems running different models that describe different parameters of the ocean, both in depth and surface. One of the main goals of a program called: Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), is to deliver data on a global scale concerning the sea surface salinity (SSS). The main idea of the SMOS technology is based on the differences between the electro-magnetic properties (spectral signatures) of distilled water and salted water. High concentration of salt revealed by analyzing the energy emitted from the ocean's surface, using detectors that are sensitive for the wavelength at the range of 21 cm (L-band: 1.4 GHz). One of the main problems, measuring this wavelength, is that it requires very large antennas. In order to solve this problem, a Y shaped satellite was built, on each of its arms, 69 antennas were attached, with equal distances between each antenna. Each antenna is 165 mm on the diameter and their height is 19 mm. This antenna transmits all the information they receive to a

  20. SMOS: The Challenging Sea Surface Salinity Measurement From Space

    OpenAIRE

    Font, Jordi; Camps, Adriano; Borges, A; Martin-Neira, Manuel; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reul, Nicolas; Kerr, Yann; Hahne, A.; Mecklenburg, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, European Space Agency, is the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring sea surface salinity from space. It uses an L-band microwave interferometric radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) that generates brightness temperature images, from which both geophysical variables are computed. The retrieval of salinity requires very demanding performances of the instrument in terms of calibration and stability. This paper highlights the importa...

  1. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) Beaufort, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

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  2. Analysis of SMOS brightness temperature and vegetation optical depth data with coupled land surface and radiative transfer models in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlenz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS L1c brightness temperature and L2 optical depth data are analysed with a coupled land surface (PROMET and radiative transfer model (L-MEB. The coupled models are validated with ground and airborne measurements under contrasting soil moisture, vegetation and land surface temperature conditions during the SMOS Validation Campaign in May and June 2010 in the SMOS test site Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany. The brightness temperature root-mean-squared errors are between 6 K and 9 K. The L-MEB parameterisation is considered appropriate under local conditions even though it might possibly be further optimised. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data are processed and analysed in the Upper Danube Catchment using the coupled models in 2011 and during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010 together with airborne L-band brightness temperature data. Only low to fair correlations are found for this comparison (R between 0.1–0.41. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data do not show the expected seasonal behaviour and are positively biased. It is concluded that RFI is responsible for a considerable part of the observed problems in the SMOS data products in the Upper Danube Catchment. This is consistent with the observed dry bias in the SMOS L2 soil moisture products which can also be related to RFI. It is confirmed that the brightness temperature data from the lower SMOS look angles and the horizontal polarisation are less reliable. This information could be used to improve the brightness temperature data filtering before the soil moisture retrieval. SMOS L2 optical depth values have been compared to modelled data and are not considered a reliable source of information about vegetation due to missing seasonal behaviour and a very high mean value. A fairly strong correlation between SMOS L2 soil moisture and optical depth was found (R = 0.65 even though the two variables are considered independent in the

  3. Inter-Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity: Effects of the Dielectric Constant and Vicarious Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Boutin, Jacqueline; Yin, Xiaobin; Le Vine, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Two spaceborne instruments share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometry to retrieve SSS. We find that SSS retrieved by SMOS is generally lower than SSS retrieved by Aquarius, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is higher overall. The spatial distribution of the differences in SSS is similar to the distribution of sea surface temperature. There are several differences in the retrieval algorithm that could explain the observed SSS differences. We assess the impact of the dielectric constant model and the ancillary sea surface salinity used by both missions for calibrating the radiometers and retrieving SSS. The differences in dielectric constant model produce differences in SSS of the order of 0.3 psu and exhibit a dependence on latitude and temperature. We use comparisons with the Argo in situ data to assess the performances of the model in various regions of the globe. Finally, the differences in the ancillary sea surface salinity products used to perform the vicarious calibration of both instruments are relatively small (0.1 psu), but not negligible considering the requirements for spaceborne remote sensing of SSS.

  4. SMOS Cal/Val Activities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Kerr, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is to observe soil moisture over land and sea surface salinity over oceans with new technology (2D interferometry radiometer).Since its launch in November 2009, SMOS observations are being perturbed by radio frequency interferences (RFIs) that jeopardize part of its scientific retrieval in certain areas.In this paper, we describe calibration activities of SMOS and multiple years of SMOS data has been analyzed to validate the SMOS soil moisture products which shows good behavior of the instrument and algorithms. The results indicate that SMOS long term stability is within 1K and SMOS retrievals are with a high correlation coefficient (0.82) and closest to the ground measurements with a low average root mean square error within 0.04 m 3·m‑3 for the morning overpass at places, which represents an improvement by a factor of 2–3 compared with the other products.

  5. Seasonal variability in sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Tropical Atlantic from SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzi, E.; Gommenginger, C. P.; Srokosz, M.; Josey, S.

    2012-12-01

    A natural indicator of changes in the hydrological cycle, salinity variations in recent decades have been linked to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) strength, and the tropics/subtropics are considered important regions in relation to the reversal of northern N. Atlantic freshening and MOC recovery. Benefiting from the advent of satellite SSS maps, this study focuses on the seasonal variability of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS in the tropical Atlantic between 20°N-20°S. Encompassing both Precipitation-dominated (P) and Evaporation-dominated (E) regimes, this region features the influence of the ITCZ as well as large freshwater outflow from the Amazon/Orinoco and Niger/Congo river systems. Therefore, SSS is characterized by very strong variability through the year appearing as two "poles" in the western and eastern tropical Atlantic basin, respectively. Here, we examine how the area-weighted mean SSS in this tropical band 20°N-20°S relates to seasonal changes in riverine outflow and to the ITCZ movement north and south of the equator. By considering both the whole tropical region and the two basins separately, the analyses explore how the SSS seasonal cycle differs in each region, looking for e.g. differences in magnitude, speed of occurrence and spread, and timing of the strongest SSS changes between the eastern and western basins during the year. Accordingly, we relate this to the role of controlling mechanisms, particularly of E-P (using NCEP, OAFlux and GPCP datasets), on the seasonal variability of SSS, and the contribution of surface freshwater forcing in the different regions of the tropical Atlantic. Finally, this work contributes to a regional validation of SSS measurements from satellites and determines the value of satellite SSS data to help understand freshwater fluxes and SSS variability in the tropical Atlantic.

  6. Modelling the passive microwave signature from land surfaces: a review of recent results and application to the SMOS & SMAP soil moisture retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009....

  7. The SMOS ocean salinity retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, J.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) will be, from spring 2009, the first space mission attempting the determination of sea surface salinity using microwave L-band radiometry. The SMOS aperture synthesis technique poses strict requirements to instrument calibration and stability for a successful brightness temperature image reconstruction. Besides this, the low sensitivity of Tb to salinity, even at L-band, and the still not fully developed/validated emissivity models at this frequency taking into account all the physical processes that impact on it, mainly the effects of surface roughness, plus the need of removing from the recorded signal the contributions of scattered radiation from external sources (sun, galaxy) result in a really challenging salinity determination by SMOS. In this presentation we review the approach implemented in SMOS for salinity retrieval from the calibrated brightness temperature maps. The different processing steps are summarily described, as well as their implementation status and validation in the SMOS level 2 salinity processor.

  8. Long Term Global Surface Soil Moisture Fields Using an SMOS-Trained Neural Network Applied to AMSR-E Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemesio J. Rodríguez-Fernández

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A method to retrieve soil moisture (SM from Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer—Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E observations using Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Level 3 SM as a reference is discussed. The goal is to obtain longer time series of SM with no significant bias and with a similar dynamical range to that of the SMOS SM dataset. This method consists of training a neural network (NN to obtain a global non-linear relationship linking AMSR-E brightness temperatures ( T b to the SMOS L3 SM dataset on the concurrent mission period of 1.5 years. Then, the NN model is used to derive soil moisture from past AMSR-E observations. It is shown that in spite of the different frequencies and sensing depths of AMSR-E and SMOS, it is possible to find such a global relationship. The sensitivity of AMSR-E T b ’s to soil temperature ( T s o i l was also evaluated using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Interim/Land re-analysis (ERA-Land and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications-Land (MERRA-Land model data. The best combination of AMSR-E T b ’s to retrieve T s o i l is H polarization at 23 and 36 GHz plus V polarization at 36 GHz. Regarding SM, several combinations of input data show a similar performance in retrieving SM. One NN that uses C and X bands and T s o i l information was chosen to obtain SM in the 2003–2011 period. The new dataset shows a low bias (<0.02 m3/m3 and low standard deviation of the difference (<0.04 m3/m3 with respect to SMOS L3 SM over most of the globe’s surface. The new dataset was evaluated together with other AMSR-E SM datasets and the Climate Change Initiative (CCI SM dataset against the MERRA-Land and ERA-Land models for the 2003–2011 period. All datasets show a significant bias with respect to models for boreal regions and high correlations over regions other than the tropical and boreal forest. All of the global SM datasets including AMSR-E NN were also

  9. The ESA SMOS+SOS Project: Oceanography using SMOS for innovative air-sea exchange studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Chris; Gommenginger, Christine; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reul, Nicolas; Martin, Matthew; Ash, Ellis; Reverdin, Gilles; Donlon, Craig

    2013-04-01

    We report on the work plan of the SMOS+Surface Ocean Salinity and Synergy (SMOS+SOS) project. SMOS+SOS is funded through the Support to Science Element (STSE) component of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Earth Observation Envelope Programme. The SMOS+SOS consortium consists of four organisations namely the National Oceanography Centre (UK), the LOCEAN/IFREMER/CATDS research team (France), the Met Office (UK) and Satellite Oceanographic Consultants Ltd (UK). The end of the SMOS+SOS project will be marked by a final open workshop most likely hosted by the UK Met Office in September/October 2014. The project is concerned with demonstrating the performance and scientific value of SMOS Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) products through a number of well-defined case studies. The case studies include: Amazon/Orinoco plumes (freshwater outflow); Agulhas and Gulf Stream (strong water mass boundary); Tropical Pacific/Atlantic (strong precipitation regime); sub-tropical North Atlantic (ie SPURS; strong evaporative regime); and Equatorial Pacific (equatorial upwelling). With SMOS measuring the SSS in the top cm of the ocean, validating SMOS against in situ salinity data taken typically at a few meters depth introduces assumptions about the vertical structure of salinity in the upper ocean. To address these issues, the project will examine and quantify discrepancies between SMOS and in situ surface salinity data at various depths in different regions characterised by strong precipitation or evaporation regimes. Equally, data editing and spatio-temporal averaging play a central role in determining the quality, errors and correlations in SMOS SSS data. The project will explore various processing and spatio-temporal averaging choices to define the SMOS SSS products that best address the needs of the oceanographic and data assimilation user community. One key aspect of this project is to determine how one can achieve useful accuracy/uncertainty in SSS without jeopardising SMOS's ability

  10. Modelling the Passive Microwave Signature from Land Surfaces: A Review of Recent Results and Application to the L-Band SMOS SMAP Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneron, J.-P.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.; De Lannoy, G.; De Rosnay, P.; Walker, J. P.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Mironov, V.; Bircher, S.; Grant, J. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009. The SMAP sensor, based on a large mesh reflector 6 m in diameter providing a conically scanning antenna beam with a surface incidence angle of 40deg, was launched in January of 2015. Over the last decade, an intense scientific activity has focused on the development of the SM retrieval algorithms for the two missions. This activity has relied on many field (mainly tower-based) and airborne experimental campaigns, and since 2010-2011, on the SMOS and Aquarius space-borne L-band observations. It has relied too on the use of numerical, physical and semi-empirical models to simulate the microwave brightness temperature of natural scenes for a variety of scenarios in terms of system configurations (polarization, incidence angle) and soil, vegetation and climate conditions. Key components of the inversion models have been evaluated and new parameterizations of the effects of the surface temperature, soil roughness, soil permittivity, and vegetation extinction and scattering have been developed. Among others, global maps of select radiative transfer parameters have been estimated very recently. Based on this intense activity, improvements of the SMOS and SMAP SM inversion algorithms have been proposed. Some of them have already been implemented, whereas others are currently being investigated. In this paper, we present a review of the significant progress which has been made over the last decade in this field of research with a focus on L-band, and a discussion on possible applications to the SMOS and SMAP soil moisture retrieval approaches.

  11. Coincident Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using SMOS and STARRS During the 2011 COSSAR Airborne Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, D. M.; Wesson, J. C.; Wang, D. W.; Hwang, P. A.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) using L-band radiometers has been practiced for over a decade. However, aircraft range has limited mapping to coastal regions with occasional extended offshore transects. With 2-years of successful SMOS operation and the launch of NASA's Aquarius mission on 10 June 2011, open ocean SSS remote sensing has become an operational reality. The spatial resolution of the L-band radiometers is limited by deployable antenna size, but the relatively fine (35 km) resolution of SMOS at nadir, provides unprecedented opportunities to study SSS variations in marginal seas. Here, the relatively high signal to noise ratio produced by freshwater inflows at the coast allows the averaging period needed to map open ocean SSS variations to be reduced; improving temporal resolution without significantly compromising sensitivity. We describe an airborne campaign that combined the high-resolution coastal mapping capabilities of NRL's airborne Salinity Temperature and Roughness Remote Scanner (STARRS) with the open ocean mapping capabilities of SMOS. The Color Surface Salinity and Roughness (COSSAR) airborne campaign was conducted under summertime conditions, by flying STARRS over the Northern Gulf of Mexico during 2-13 June, 2011. Campaign objectives were to map SSS over the continental shelf and fly offshore transects coincident with SMOS overpasses. The campaign started immediately following a record flood crest in the Mississippi River, with flows exceeding 42,500 m^3/s. This necessitated large diversions into the Atchafalaya River and Lake Ponchartrain, to avoid catastrophic flooding of New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The flood, and its diversion, produced large plumes from both rivers, which were observed by STARRS. Line transects crossing the plumes were flown along three ascending SMOS groundtracks and a descending one, at times coincident with satellite overpasses. Shorter zig-zag transects were flown along the coast. Intensive mapping

  12. Building a Learning Database for the Neural Network Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from SMOS Brightness Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, Adel; Obligis, Estelle; Crépon, Michel; Thiria, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with an important aspect of the neural network retrieval of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs). The neural network retrieval method is an empirical approach that offers the possibility of being independent from any theoretical emissivity model, during the in-flight phase. A Previous study [1] has proven that this approach is applicable to all pixels on ocean, by designing a set of neural networks with different inputs. The present study focuses on the choice of the learning database and demonstrates that a judicious distribution of the geophysical parameters allows to markedly reduce the systematic regional biases of the retrieved SSS, which are due to the high noise on the TBs. An equalization of the distribution of the geophysical parameters, followed by a new technique for boosting the learning process, makes the regional biases almost disappear for latitudes between 40{\\deg}S and 40{\\deg}N, while the global standard deviation remains between 0.6 psu (at t...

  13. Performance evaluation of WRF-Noah Land surface model estimated soil moisture for hydrological application: Synergistic evaluation using SMOS retrieved soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika; Dai, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the performance of soil moisture data from the global European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA interim reanalysis datasets using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather model coupled with the Noah Land surface model for hydrological applications. For evaluating the performance of WRF for soil moisture estimation, three domains are taken into account. The domain with best performance is used for estimating the soil moisture deficit (SMD). Further, several approaches are presented in this study to evaluate the efficiency of WRF simulated soil moisture for SMD estimation and compared against Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) downscaled and non-downscaled soil moisture. In this study, the first approach is based on the empirical relationship between WRF soil moisture and the SMD on a continuous time series basis, while the second approach is focused on the vegetation cover impact on SMD retrieval, depicted in terms of growing and non-growing seasons. The linear growing and non-growing seasonal model in combination performs well with the NSE = 0.79, RMSE = 0.011 m; Bias = 0.24 m, in comparison to linear model (NSE = 0.70, RMSE = 0.013 m; Bias = 0.01 m). The performance obtained using WRF soil moisture is comparable to SMOS level 2 product but lower than the downscaled SMOS datasets. The results indicate that methodologies could be useful for modelers working in the field of soil moisture information system and SMD estimation at a catchment scale. The study could be useful for ungauged basins that pose a challenge to hydrological modeling due to unavailability of datasets for proper model calibration and validation.

  14. The mean sea surface height and geoid along the Geosat subtrack from Bermuda to Cape Cod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Joyce, Terrence M.; Schubert, David M.; Caruso, Michael J.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of near-surface velocity and concurrent sea level along an ascending Geosat subtrack were used to estimate the mean sea surface height and the Earth's gravitational geoid. Velocity measurements were made on three traverses of a Geosat subtrack within 10 days, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). A small bias in the ADCP velocity was removed by considering a mass balance for two pairs of triangles for which expendable bathythermograph measurements were also made. Because of the large curvature of the Gulf Stream, the gradient wind balance was used to estimate the cross-track component of geostrophic velocity from the ADCP vectors; this component was then integrated to obtain the sea surface height profile. The mean sea surface height was estimated as the difference between the instantaneous sea surface height from ADCP and the Geosat residual sea level, with mesoscale errors reduced by low-pass filtering. The error estimates were divided into a bias, tilt, and mesoscale residual; the bias was ignored because profiles were only determined within a constant of integration. The calculated mean sea surface height estimate agreed with an independent estimate of the mean sea surface height from Geosat, obtained by modeling the Gulf Stream as a Gaussian jet, within the expected errors in the estimates: the tilt error was 0.10 m, and the mesoscale error was 0.044 m. To minimize mesoscale errors in the estimate, the alongtrack geoid estimate was computed as the difference between the mean sea level from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission and an estimate of the mean sea surface height, rather than as the difference between instantaneous profiles of sea level and sea surface height. In the critical region near the Gulf Stream the estimated error reduction using this method was about 0.07 m. Differences between the geoid estimate and a gravimetric geoid were not within the expected errors: the rms mesoscale difference was 0.24 m rms.

  15. A new space technology for ocean observation: the SMOS mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Font

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Capability for sea surface salinity observation was an important gap in ocean remote sensing in the last few decades of the 20th century. New technological developments during the 1990s at the European Space Agency led to the proposal of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, an Earth explorer opportunity mission based on the use of a microwave interferometric radiometer, MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis. SMOS, the first satellite ever addressing the observation of ocean salinity from space, was successfully launched in November 2009. The determination of salinity from the MIRAS radiometric measurements at 1.4 GHz is a complex procedure that requires high performance from the instrument and accurate modelling of several physical processes that impact on the microwave emission of the ocean’s surface. This paper introduces SMOS in the ocean remote sensing context, and summarizes the MIRAS principles of operation and the SMOS salinity retrieval approach. It describes the Spanish SMOS high-level data processing centre (CP34 and the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, and presents a preliminary validation of global sea surface salinity maps operationally produced by CP34.

  16. SMOS data and extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Yann; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Mahmoodi, Ali; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parrens, Marie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Bircher, Simone; Molero-rodenas, Beatriz; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite was successfully launched in November 2009. This ESA led mission for Earth Observation is dedicated to provide soil moisture over continental surface (with an accuracy goal of 0.04 m3/m3), vegetation water content over land, and ocean salinity. These geophysical features are important as they control the energy balance between the surface and the atmosphere. Their knowledge at a global scale is of interest for climatic and weather researches, and in particular in improving model forecasts. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission has now been collecting data for over 7 years. The whole data set has been reprocessed (Version 620 for levels 1 and 2 and version 3 for level 3 CATDS) while operational near real time soil moisture data is now available and assimilation of SMOS data in NWP has proved successful. After 7 years it seems important to start using data for having a look at anomalies and see how they can relate to large scale events. We have also produced a 15 year soil moisture data set by merging SMOS and AMSR using a neural network approach. The purpose of this communication is to present the mission results after more than seven years in orbit in a climatic trend perspective, as through such a period anomalies can be detected. Thereby we benefit from consistent datasets provided through the latest reprocessing using most recent algorithm enhancements. Using the above mentioned products it is possible to follow large events such as the evolution of the droughts in North America, or water fraction evolution over the Amazonian basin. In this occasion we will focus on the analysis of SMOS and ancillary products anomalies to reveal two climatic trends, the temporal evolution of water storage over the Indian continent in relation to rainfall anomalies, and the global impact of El Nino types of events on the general water storage distribution. This presentation shows in detail the use of long term data sets

  17. Binned level-3 Sea Surface Salinity from the European Space Agency Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) in support of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) data quality monitoring system (DQMS) from 2010-06-01 to 2016-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0151732)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data quality monitoring system (DQMS) for the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites level-2 sea surface salinity (SSS) swath data was developed by the...

  18. The NAFE'05/CoSMOS Data Set: Toward SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval, Downscaling, and Assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Rocco; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2008-01-01

    -resolution data from SMOS; and 3) testing its assimilation into land surface models for root zone soil moisture retrieval. This paper describes the NAFE'05 and COSMOS airborne data sets together with the ground data collected in support of both aircraft campaigns. The airborne L-band acquisitions included 40 km x...... was to provide simulated Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) observations using airborne L-band radiometers supported by soil moisture and other relevant ground data for the following: 1) the development of SMOS soil moisture retrieval algorithms; 2) developing approaches for downscaling the low....... The L-band data were accompanied by airborne thermal infrared and optical measurements. The ground data consisted of continuous soil moisture profile measurements at 18 monitoring sites throughout the 40 km x 40 km study area and extensive spatial near-surface soil moisture measurements concurrent...

  19. Validation of SMOS Satellite Soil Moisture Products over Tropical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi; Siang, Kang Chuen

    2016-07-01

    Calibration and validation (cal/val) activities on Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite derived soil moisture products has been conducted worldwide since the data has become available but not over the tropical region . This study focuses on the installation of a soil moisture data collection network over an agricultural site in a tropical region in Peninsular Malaysia, and the validation of SMOS soil moisture products. The in-situ data over one year period was analysed and validation of SMOS Soil Moisture products with these in-situ data was conducted.Bias and root mean square errors (RMSE) were computed between SMOS soil moisture products and the in-situ surface soil moisture collected at the satellite passing time (6 am and 6 pm local time). Due to the known limitations of SMOS soil moisture retrieval over vegetated areas with vegetation water content higher than 5 kgm-2, overestimation of SMOS soil moisture products to in-situ data was noticed in this study. The bias is ranging from 0.064 to 0.119 m3m-3 and the RMSE is from 0.090 to 0.158 m3m-3, when both ascending and descending data were validated. This RMSE was found to be similar to a number of studies conducted previously at different regions. However a wet bias was found during the validation, while previous validation activities at other regions showed dry biases. The result of this study is useful to support the continuous development and improvement of SMOS soil moisture retrieval model, aims to produce soil moisture products with higher accuracy, especially in the tropical region.

  20. First soil moisture values from SMOS over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, Claire; Kerr, Yann; de Rosnay, Patricia; Pellarin, Thierry; Grippa, Manuela

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable which influences the land surface processes. Numerous studies shown microwaves at low frequency are particularly performed to access to soil moisture values. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), launched the November 2th 2009, is the first space mission dedicated to soil moisture observations. Before SMOS, several soil moisture products were provided, based on active or passive microwaves measurements. Gruhier et al. (2010) analyse five of them over a Sahelian area. The results show that the range of volumetric soil moisture values obtained over Sahel is drastically different depending on the remote sensing approach used to produce soil moisture estimates. Although microwave bands currently available are not optimal, some products are in very good agreement with ground data. The main goal of this study is to introduce the first soil moisture maps from SMOS over West Africa. A first analyse of values over a Sahelian region is investigated. The study area is located in Gourma region in Mali. This site has been instrumented in the context of the AMMA project (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) and was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture. SMOS soil moisture values was analysed with ground knowledge and placed in the context of previous soil moisture products. The high sensitivity of the L-band used by SMOS should provide very accurate soil moisture values.

  1. Preparing for SMOS: Sea Salinity Campaigns and Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of sea surface salinity, based on L-band radiometric measurements, is presently investigated as a preparation for space missions. Special concern is on correction for effects caused by the sea surface roughness, and this paper will address two campaigns, LOSAC and CoSMOS, with the aim...

  2. SMOS validation in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone

    model. This dissertation is not only a valuable contribution to SMOS validation, but can also be supportive for upcoming space missions such as NASA’s Soil Moisture Active and Passive, SMAP. Knowing the current caveats the use of SMOS data in regional and global modeling of water resources and climate......Soil moisture is a key variable for water resources management, weather and climate predictions as well as hazard analysis. It is highly variable in space and time across scales, and thus difficult to assess. The European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite...... with a passive L-band microwave radiometer on board is the first mission dedicated to surface soil moisture monitoring from space with global coverage every three days. By means of a complex retrieval algorithm, soil moisture is derived from the acquired brightness temperatures. Currently, data validation...

  3. The German SMOS project office - CAL/VAL activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittebrand, A.; Stammer, D.; Dransfeld, S.

    2009-04-01

    The SMOS remote sensing mission planned to be launched in July 2009 is part of the opportunity missions of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Earth Explorer programme. The role of the German SMOS project office (funded by the BMBF/DLR) is to inform the scientific community and the public about the current mission status as well as to promote the use of the SMOS data products within Germany. Within the framework of the project office scientific studies for the calibration and validation (cal/val) of the SMOS data are also supported. Our work includes the analysis of model-, shiptrack- and climatology determined salinity data as well as satellite, drifter and float measurements. The first comprehensive in situ data set suitable for global investigations of SSS characteristics is that provided by ARGO temperature and salinity profiles since 2000. The global ARGO float system (Gould et al., 2004) consisting of 3000 floats that provide temperature and salinity profiles, globally, from the top 2000 m every 10 days on approximately a 3 degree global grid. For our study we extract the near-surface values from ARGO salinity and temperature profiles to form a data set of near-surface salinity and temperature covering the years 2002 until 2008. All those ARGO data points are located at a depth of 0 to 5 m. Of importance for the justification of the SMOS mission is the deviation of the Argo-Measurements from climatologies, based on the bulk of the past global in situ salt content measurements, which renders the temporal condition of world oceans. Additionally a deployment of 25 drifters is planned in parallel to the SMOS launch, collecting data of temperature and salinity in the GIN SEA and the western Pacific.

  4. Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雅骧

    2004-01-01

    The Bernmda Triangle is also called Devil's Triangle. It is an imaginary area in the Atlantic Ocean. It extends more than one-million square kilometers between the island of Bermuda, the coast of southern Florida

  5. DOMECair: An Airborne Campaign in Antarctica Supporting SMOS Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2013-01-01

    In search for a stable, well characterized terrestrial calibration target for SMOS, an airborne campaign was carried out in January 2013 over the Dome C area of Antarctica, and the surface was measured by an L-band radiometer. The focus was on homogeneity, and an area of 350 × 350 km around...

  6. SMOS Measurements Preliminary Validation: Objectives and Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Gourrion, Jerome; Gabarró, Carolina; Talone, Marco; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Lopez de Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Camps, Adriano; Monerris, Alessandra; Font, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    The Earth Explorer Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was successfully launched on November 2nd, 2009, in the framework of the European Space Agency Living Planet programme. It will provide long-awaited remotely-sensed Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) maps over the oceans with a 3-day revisiting time [1]. The SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC) in Barcelona, Spain, will be involved in several activities at different levels of the salinity retrieval processing chain, which are classified according to the objectives/issues being addressed. In particular, those described hereafter refer to the validation of the products and the consolidation/improvement of the salinity retrieval procedure itself [2]. This will be carried out by performing specific comparisons against modelled brightness temperatures (TB) or external salinity data sources. Due to start at the beginning of the Commissioning Phase, the post-launch 6-month checkout and calibration period, these studies will continue through the nominal satellite operation phase. They will support the choice of an optimal data selection strategy in regard to the existing trade-off, for instance the Ascending/Descending tracks selection, the AF-FOV/EAF-FOV (Alias-Free Field Of View/Extended Alias-Free Field Of View) selection, and some possible across-track data filtering. Moreover, they will help in the definition of an optimal processing configuration (separated polarization retrieval versus first Stokes parameter retrieval). Concerning the TB, the approach is to perform inter-comparisons of the TB departures (SMOS TB minus modelled TB, assuming knowledge of auxiliary information and proper TB direct modelling). The TB departures statistics analysis will be performed at both Antenna and Earth-surface levels. In order to obtain the latter product, a surface TB module is being derived taking into account the various TB perturbing sources. The comparison with forward-modelled TB will help to devise an optimum

  7. Arctic sea ice concentration observed with SMOS during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Martinez, Justino; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is under profound transformation. Observations and model predictions show dramatic decline in sea ice extent and volume [1]. A retreating Arctic ice cover has a marked impact on regional and global climate, and vice versa, through a large number of feedback mechanisms and interactions with the climate system [2]. The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, in 2009, marked the dawn of a new type of space-based microwave observations. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [3,4], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric sciences by measuring the thin ice thickness [5,6]. SMOS carries an L-band (1.4 GHz), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution, continuous multi-angle viewing, large wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but more frequently at the poles. A novel radiometric method to determine sea ice concentration (SIC) from SMOS is presented. The method uses the Bayesian-based Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) approach to retrieve SIC. The advantage of this approach with respect to the classical linear inversion is that the former takes into account the uncertainty of the tie-point measured data in addition to the mean value, while the latter only uses a mean value of the tie-point data. When thin ice is present, the SMOS algorithm underestimates the SIC due to the low opacity of the ice at this frequency. However, using a synergistic approach with data from other satellite sensors, it is possible to obtain accurate thin ice thickness estimations with the Bayesian-based method. Despite its lower spatial resolution relative to SSMI or AMSR-E, SMOS-derived SIC products are little affected by the atmosphere and the snow (almost transparent at L-band). Moreover L-band measurements are more robust in front of the

  8. SMOS L1C and L2 Validation in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiger, Christoph; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kerr, Yann H.; Mialon, Arnaud; Merlin, Olivier; Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive airborne field campaigns (Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiments for SMOS - AACES) were undertaken during the 2010 summer and winter seasons of the southern hemisphere. The purpose of those campaigns was the validation of the Level 1c (brightness temperature) and Level 2 (soil moisture) products of the ESA-led Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. As SMOS is the first satellite to globally map L-band (1.4GHz) emissions from the Earth?s surface, and the first 2-dimensional interferometric microwave radiometer used for Earth observation, large scale and long-term validation campaigns have been conducted world-wide, of which AACES is the most extensive. AACES combined large scale medium-resolution airborne L-band and spectral observations, along with high-resolution in-situ measurements of soil moisture across a 50,000km2 area of the Murrumbidgee River catchment, located in south-eastern Australia. This paper presents a qualitative assessment of the SMOS brightness temperature and soil moisture products.

  9. Invasive ants of Bermuda revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Wetterer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For 60+ years, two of the world’s most widespread and destructive invasive ant species, the African big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala from tropical Africa and the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile from subtropical South America, have been engaged in an epic battle on the islands of Bermuda. Both species are completely intolerant of the other and are also well-known for killing off native invertebrates, particularly other ants. Here I surveyed sites across Bermuda in 2016, including resurveys of the locations previously surveyed in 1963, 1966, 1973, 1986, and 2002, to provide an update on this conflict. The status of all other ant species present in the islands, including previous records from literature, is also provided. In addition, I surveyed ants nesting in red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle trees to evaluate whether this arboreal habitat may serve as a refuge for previously overlooked ant species. In 2016, L. humile occurred at most surveyed sites in Bermuda, including all ten resurveyed sites. Pheidole megacephala was present at only two resurveyed sites, a lower proportion of sites than any of the five earlier surveys. Still, P. megacephala occupied substantial areas, particularly in and around Hamilton, the capital of Bermuda. This survey increased the number of ant species with verified records from Bermuda to 25, including four exotic species recorded for the first time: Cardiocondyla minutior, Pheidole navigans, Strumigenys emmae, and Strumigenys membranifera. I found five ant species nesting in mangroves: L. humile plus four Old World exotics, C. minutior, Cardiocondyla obscurior, Monomorium floricola, and Plagiolepis alluaudi. It appears that L. humile may be better suited to the subtropical climate of Bermuda than P. megacephala, except perhaps in warmer and sunnier habitats, such as plantings along urban streets and in open parks, where P. megacephala may hold the advantage. The dataset on the new ant records from 2016 is

  10. Overview on Processing and Applying on the SMOS Satellite Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Salinity Products%SMOS卫星遥感海表盐度资料处理应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建; 张韧; 安玉柱; 马强; 杨代恒

    2013-01-01

    土壤湿度和海洋盐度卫星首次提供了覆盖全球的高频率、高精度、业务化的海表盐度产品,但其处理和延伸应用仍处于初级阶段,后续校准校正工作还将持续数年,如何及时把握其发展轨迹成为一个重要的科学问题.本研究从SMOS计划、数据概况、盐度反演算法、格点产品制作、多源数据融合和产品应用等方面,介绍和评述了SMOS计划及其海表盐度产品应用研究进展,着重分析了反演算法中的各种误差来源,对在轨2 a的运行情况进行了回顾、对未来的发展重点进行了展望,旨在为开发和应用SMOS产品提供参考.%SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite has,for the first time,provided operational global-scale sea surface salinity products with high-frequency and high-precision,but their processing and application are still in a preliminary stage and the relevant calibration / validation may be sustained for several years.How to grasp the current status and future tendency has been an important scientific issue.An overview of SMOS project is given from several aspects,including general context,release products,inversion algorithm,gridding process,multi-source data fusion and application,and the analysis of error sources in the inversion algorithm are emphasized.Finally,the running performances of the products during the past two years are reviewed and their future development is prospected,aiming at offering valuable references for developing and applying the SMOS products.

  11. A Bermuda Triangle of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelsas, John

    2006-01-01

    The Bermuda Triangle is famous for the unexplained disappearances of ships and aircraft, and for strange meteorological phenomena that allegedly have occurred within its boundaries. This article presents an activity wherein students are asked to create their own geographical triangles to research, but instead of focusing on the unexplainable,…

  12. A downscaling approach for SMOS land observations: evaluation of high-resolution soil moisture maps over the Iberian Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    Piles Guillem, Maria; Sanchez, Nilda; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Martinez Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Justino; González Gambau, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is the first satellite devoted to measure the Earth's surface soil moisture. It has a spatial resolution of similar to 40 km and a 3-day revisit. In this paper, a downscaling algorithm is presented as a new ability to obtain multiresolution soil moisture estimates from SMOS using visible-to-infrared remotely sensed observations. This algorithm is applied to combine 2 years of SMOS and MODIS Terra/Aqua data over the Iberian Peninsula in...

  13. Benefits of assimilating thin sea ice thickness from SMOS into the TOPAZ system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiping; Counillon, François; Bertino, Laurent; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Kaleschke, Lars

    2016-11-01

    An observation product for thin sea ice thickness (SMOS-Ice) is derived from the brightness temperature data of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. This product is available in near-real time, at daily frequency, during the cold season. In this study, we investigate the benefit of assimilating SMOS-Ice into the TOPAZ coupled ocean and sea ice forecasting system, which is the Arctic component of the Copernicus marine environment monitoring services. The TOPAZ system assimilates sea surface temperature (SST), altimetry data, temperature and salinity profiles, ice concentration, and ice drift with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). The conditions for assimilation of sea ice thickness thinner than 0.4 m are favorable, as observations are reliable below this threshold and their probability distribution is comparable to that of the model. Two parallel Observing System Experiments (OSE) have been performed in March and November 2014, in which the thicknesses from SMOS-Ice (thinner than 0.4 m) are assimilated in addition to the standard observational data sets. It is found that the root mean square difference (RMSD) of thin sea ice thickness is reduced by 11 % in March and 22 % in November compared to the daily thin ice thicknesses of SMOS-Ice, which suggests that SMOS-Ice has a larger impact during the beginning of the cold season. Validation against independent observations of ice thickness from buoys and ice draft from moorings indicates that there are no degradations in the pack ice but there are some improvements near the ice edge close to where the SMOS-Ice has been assimilated. Assimilation of SMOS-Ice yields a slight improvement for ice concentration and degrades neither SST nor sea level anomaly. Analysis of the degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) indicates that the SMOS-Ice has a comparatively small impact but it has a significant contribution in constraining the system (> 20 % of the impact of all ice and ocean

  14. Smos Land Product Validation Activities at the Valencia Anchor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    ABSTRACT Soil moisture is a key parameter controlling the exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere. In spite of being important for weather and climate modeling, this parameter is not well observed at a global scale. The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) Mission was designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to measure soil moisture over continental surfaces as well as surface salinity over the oceans. Since 2001, the Valencia Anchor Station is currently being prepared for the validation of SMOS land products, namely soil moisture content and vegetation water content. The site has recently been selected by the Mission as a core validation site, mainly due to the reasonable homogeneous characteristics of the area which make it appropriate to undertake the validation of SMOS Level 2 land products during the Mission Commissioning Phase, before attempting more complex areas. Close to SMOS launch, ESA has defined and designed a SMOS V alidation Rehearsal C ampaign P lan which purpose is to repeat the Commissioning Phase execution with all centers, all tools, all participants, all structures, all data available, assuming all tools and structures are ready and trying to produce as close as possible the post-launch conditions. The aim is to test the readiness, the ensemble coordination and the speed of operations, and to avoid as far as possible any unexpected deficiencies of the plan and procedure during the real C ommissioning P hase campaigns. For the rehearsal activity, a control area of 10 x 10 km2 has been chosen at the Valencia Anchor Station study area where a network of ground soil moisture measuring stations is being set up based on the definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units, attending to climatic, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. These stations are linked via a wireless communication system to a master post accessible via internet. The ground soil moisture stations will also be used

  15. Comparison Between AQUARIUS and SMOS brightness temperatures for Heterogeneous Land Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch, Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Tenjo, Carolina; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    Intercomparison between Aquarius and SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs) over land surfaces is more challenging than over oceans because land footprints are more heterogeneous. In this work we are comparing Aquarius and SMOS TBs under coherente conditions obtained both by considering similar areas, according to land uses and by stratifying by means of TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index) that accounts for the dynamics of the vegetation instead of assuming static characteristics as in the previous approches. The area of study was chosen in central Spain where we could get a significant number of matches between both instruments. The study period corresponded to 2012-2014. SMOS level-3 data were obtained from the Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS (CATDS) and Aquarius' from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PODAAC). Land uses were obtained from the Spanish SIOSE facility (Sistema de Informacion de Ocupacion del Suelo en España) that uses a scale of 1:25.000 and polygon geometrical structure layer. SIOSE is based on panchromatic and multispectral 2.5 m resolution SPOT-5 images together with Landsat-5 images and orthophotos from the Spanish Nacional Plan of Aerial Orthophotography (PNOA). TVDI values were obtained from MODIS operational products of land surface temperature and NDVI. SMOS ascending TBs were compared to inner-beam Aquarius descending half-orbit TBs coinciding over the study area at 06:00 h. The Aquarius inner beam has an incidence angle of 28,7º and SMOS data were considered for the 27,5º incidence angle. The SMOS products corresponded to version 2.6x (data before 31st Oct 2013) and version 2.7x (data after 1st Jan 2014). Intersections between both footprints were analysed under conditions of similar areas, land uses and TVDI values. For the latter (land uses/TVDI), a linear combination of SMOS land uses/TVDI was obtained to match the larger Aquarius footprint. A more physical approach is also under way

  16. 2000 days of SMOS at the Barcelona Expert Centre: a tribute to the work of Jordi Font

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Turiel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS is the first satellite mission capable of measuring sea surface salinity and soil moisture from space. Its novel instrument (the L-band radiometer MIRAS has required the development of new algorithms to process SMOS data, a challenging task due to many processing issues and the difficulties inherent in a new technology. In the wake of SMOS, a new community of users has grown, requesting new products and applications, and extending the interest in this novel brand of satellite services. This paper reviews the role played by the Barcelona Expert Centre under the direction of Jordi Font, SMOS co-principal investigator. The main scientific activities and achievements and the future directions are discussed, highlighting the importance of the oceanographic applications of the mission.

  17. Snow thickness retrieval using SMOS satellite data: Comparison with airborne IceBridge and buoy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, N.; Kaleschke, L.; Tian-Kunze, X.

    2015-12-01

    The passive microwave mission SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) provides daily coverage of the polar regions and its data have been used to retrieve thin sea ice thickness up to about one meter. In addition, there has been an attempt to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic multi-year ice, which is a crucial parameter for the freeboard-based estimation of (thick) sea ice thickness from lidar and radar altimetry. SMOS provides measurements at a frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band) at horizontal and vertical polarization for a range of incidence angles (0 to 60°). The retrieval of ice or snow parameters from SMOS measurements is based on an emission model that describes the 1.4 GHz brightness temperature of (snow-covered) sea ice as a function of the ice and snow thicknesses and the permittivities of these media, which are mainly determined by ice temperature and salinity and snow density, respectively. In the first attempts to retrieve snow thickness from SMOS data, these parameters were assumed to be constant in the emission model, and the resulting maps were compared with airborne ice and snow thickness measurements taken during NASA's Operation IceBridge mission in spring 2012. The present approach to produce SMOS snow thickness maps is more elaborate. For example, available information on the ice surface temperature from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite images or from the IceBridge campaign itself are used, and the ice in the retrieval model is described by temperature and salinity profiles instead of using bulk values. As a first step we have produced (winter/spring) snow thickness maps of the Arctic, from 3-day-averages up to monthly means, using the available SMOS data from 2010 on. Here, we show how our spatial snow thickness distributions compare with IceBridge campaign data in the western Arctic from spring 2011 to 2015. In addition, we show how the temporal evolution of SMOS-retrieved snow thickness compares with snow

  18. The SMOS Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band characterisation EXperiment (MELBEX-I) over natural shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Aurelio; Saleh, Kauzar; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of ESA's SMOS mission (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), many studies have been carried out over different land surface types to model their microwave emission at L-band (1.4GHz). Results of these studies have been integrated in the emission model L-MEB (L-Band Microwave Emission...... of the Biosphere), which is the core of the SMOS Level 2 soil moisture retrieval algorithm. The Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band characterisation EXperiment (MELBEX-I) was carried out at the SMOS validation site near Valencia in autumn 2005. The main objective of MELBEX-I was to calibrate L-MEB over Mediterranean...... between 0.035m3m−3 (if only SM was retrieved) and 0.057m3m−3 (if SM, optical depth and a roughness parameter were simultaneously retrieved). Finally, no modelling improvements were observed when coarse estimates of the fraction of exposed rocks were accounted for in the model....

  19. A soil moisture and temperature network for SMOS validation in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Jensen, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    SMOS pixel (44 × 44 km), which is representative of the land surface conditions of the catchment and with minimal impact from open water (2) arrangement of three network clusters along the precipitation gradient, and (3) distribution of the stations according to respective fractions of classes...... capacitance sensors was established in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark. The objectives of this article are to describe a method to implement a network suited for SMOS validation, and to present sample data collected by the network to verify the approach. The design phase included (1) selection of a single...

  20. Bermuda Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Bermuda Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  1. SMOS Level 3 and Level 4 Research Products Provided by the Barcelona Expert Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Martinez, Justino; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Piles, Maria; Umbert, Marta; Perez, Fernando; Turiel, Antonio; Font, Jordi; Portabella, Marcos; Huoareau, Nina; Olmedo, Estrella

    2013-04-01

    More than three years have passed since the launch, on November 2, 2009, of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite carrying a microwave synthetic aperture radiometer working at 1.4 GHz. The aim of the mission is to provide Sea Surface Salinity and Soil Moisture observations, with a spatial resolution of 30-50 km, and an accuracy suited for climate studies. From the brightness temperature observations, experimental sea surface salinity (SSS) and Soil Moisture (SM) maps are being developed and distributed at the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (SMOS-BEC) to take the most out of SMOS observations. Data are distributed in NetCDF format using THREDDS and maps are served through a Web Map Service (ncWMS), both at the SMOS-BEC distribution data website (http://cp34-bec.cmima.csic.es/). For ocean applications the following SSS products are being served at spatial resolution of 0.25°: • Level 3 maps by spatial and temporal weighted average of level 2 SSS data. Three- and nine-day averaged maps are produced every 3 days. Monthly, seasonal and annual maps are also computed. • Level 3 maps from optimal interpolation of level 2 SSS data. Nine-day averaged maps are produced every 3 days, as well as monthly, seasonal and annual maps. • Level 4 maps from SMOS SSS fused with satellite-derived SST [1]. Similar to Level 3 data, nine-day averaged maps are produces every 3 days, as well as monthly, seasonal and annual maps. • Singularity Exponents products obtained by applying singularity analysis [1] on OSTIA SST products (http://myocean.eu/) are also served. Three versions of each product are generated using ascending passes, descending passes, and full orbit passes (i.e., ascending + descending). Both absolute salinity value and its anomaly (difference between the absolute value and climatology data (WOA 2009)) are stored in the product. L3 and L4 maps are validated with near-surface measurements provided by Argo profilers, and

  2. 78 FR 52099 - Onions Other Than Bermuda-Granex-Grano/Creole; Bermuda-Granex-Grano

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 51 Onions Other Than Bermuda-Granex-Grano/Creole; Bermuda-Granex- Grano AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule... Type Onions which were issued under the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946. The Agricultural...

  3. RFI in SMOS data detected by polarimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, has been found to suffer much more from radio frequency interference (RFI) than expected, and methods for detecting RFI in SMOS data are of vital importance. This paper describes a method using the 3rd and 4th Stokes parameters for the purpose....... Obvious hot-spots are detected, but also smaller, yet still detrimental RFI, spreading out over for example the ocean, is detected. It is also discussed how detected and flagged samples statistically deviate from their surroundings....

  4. An Intercomparison of RADARSAT-2, SMOS and Field Measured Soil Moisture in the Berambadi Watershed, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, S. K.; Al Bitar, A.; Sekhar, M.; Merlin, O.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents an intercomparison of the RADARSAT-2 derived soil moisture, SMOS derived soil moisture and field measured soil moisture in the Berambadi watershed, South India. Seventeen images of RADARSAT-2, SMOS products, and field data collected in the 50 field plots during 2010-2011 were used. The data were collected from field campaigns in the framework of AMBHAS project. A non parametric algorithm was developed based on the CDF transformation to retrieve the soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 backscatter coefficient at a spatial resolution of 100 m based on the measured soil moisture. The developed algorithm to retrieve surface soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 provided a good estimate of the field plot soil moisture with a RMSE of 0.05 cm3 cm-3. The average soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 and field measured soil moisture were compared to SMOS derived soil moisture at the watershed scale. Several averaging strategies were considered to take into account the surface heterogeneity and SMOS antenna patterns. Results were analysed by taking into consideration the soil texture heterogeneity, radio frequency interference effect and climatic effect. SMOS underestimated the soil moisture in compare to both RADARSAT-2 and field averaged soil moisture. A bias correction for the SMOS data is suggested using Clayton copula. SMOS showed a better correlation with the RADARSAT-2 watershed averaged soil moisture than directly averaged field soil moisture, as field campaign covered a smaller region of the watershed than RADARSAT-2 data. This shows the potential synergy between the use of active/passive microwave soil moisture for upscalling/downscalling soil moisture.

  5. Bermuda 1 arc-second Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Bermuda DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM encompasses the islands of Bermuda...

  6. Bermuda 3 arc-second Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Bermuda DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM encompasses the islands of Bermuda...

  7. Impact of SMOS soil moisture data assimilation on NCEP-GFS forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X.; Zheng, W.; Meng, J.; Dong, J.; Ek, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is one of the few critical land surface state variables that have long memory to impact the exchanges of water, energy and carbon between the land surface and atmosphere. Accurate information about soil moisture status is thus required for numerical weather, seasonal climate and hydrological forecast as well as for agricultural production forecasts, water management and many other water related economic or social activities. Since the successful launch of ESA's soil moisture ocean salinity (SMOS) mission in November 2009, about 2 years of soil moisture retrievals has been collected. SMOS is believed to be the currently best satellite sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. Therefore, it becomes interesting to examine how the collected SMOS soil moisture data are compared with other satellite-sensed soil moisture retrievals (such as NASA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer -AMSR-E and EUMETSAT's Advanced Scatterometer - ASCAT)), in situ soil moisture measurements, and how these data sets impact numerical weather prediction models such as the Global Forecast System of NOAA-NCEP. This study implements the Ensemble Kalman filter in GFS to assimilate the AMSR-E, ASCAT and SMOS soil moisture observations after a quantitative assessment of their error rate based on in situ measurements from ground networks around contiguous United States. in situ soil moisture measurements from ground networks (such as USDA Soil Climate Analysis network - SCAN and NOAA's U.S. Climate Reference Network -USCRN) are used to evaluate the GFS soil moisture simulations (analysis). The benefits and uncertainties of assimilating the satellite data products in GFS are examined by comparing the GFS forecasts of surface temperature and rainfall with and without the assimilations. From these examinations, the advantages of SMOS soil moisture data products over other satellite soil moisture data sets will be evaluated. The next step toward operationally assimilating soil moisture

  8. Optimization of a Radiative Transfer Forward Operator for Simulating SMOS Brightness Temperatures over the Upper Mississippi Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, H.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Martens, B.; VanDenBerg, M. J.; Bitar, A. Al; Tomer, S. Kumar; Merlin, O.; Cabot, F.; Kerr, Y.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Drusch, M.; Hendricks-Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.; Pan, M.; Wood, E. F.; Dumedah, G.; Walker, J. P.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission is routinely providing global multi-angular observations of brightness temperature (TB) at both horizontal and vertical polarization with a 3-day repeat period. The assimilation of such data into a land surface model (LSM) may improve the skill of operational flood forecasts through an improved estimation of soil moisture (SM). To accommodate for the direct assimilation of the SMOS TB data, the LSM needs to be coupled with a radiative transfer model (RTM), serving as a forward operator for the simulation of multi-angular and multi-polarization top of atmosphere TBs. This study investigates the use of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) LSM coupled with the Community Microwave Emission Modelling platform (CMEM) for simulating SMOS TB observations over the Upper Mississippi basin, USA. For a period of 2 years (2010-2011), a comparison between SMOS TBs and simulations with literature-based RTM parameters reveals a basin averaged bias of 30K. Therefore, time series of SMOS TB observations are used to investigate ways for mitigating these large biases. Specifically, the study demonstrates the impact of the LSM soil moisture climatology in the magnitude of TB biases. After CDF matching the SM climatology of the LSM to SMOS retrievals, the average bias decreases from 30K to less than 5K. Further improvements can be made through calibration of RTM parameters related to the modeling of surface roughness and vegetation. Consequently, it can be concluded that SM rescaling and RTM optimization are efficient means for mitigating biases and form a necessary preparatory step for data assimilation.

  9. Monitoring the mesoscale circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea using SSS derived from SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The circulation in the Mediterranean Sea is characterized by the inflow of fresh waters from the Atlantic Ocean through the Strait of Gibraltar. These waters, characterized by their lower salinity, create baroclinic instabilities that spawn eddies with sizes of the order of 100 km. These eddies have been widely analyzed using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations. Recent improvements in the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) retrieval and bias correction methodologies applied to the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite data have led, for the first time, to the generation of SSS maps that capture the signature of these structures. This opens the door for the generation of high spatial and temporal density maps in the Mediterranean, which can be used in a wide variety of oceanographic applications. In particular, the signature of the Alboran gyre and the eddy propagation across the Algerian coast are well reproduced, allowing for the first time to characterize the baroclinicity of the flow. The SMOS data are strongly affected by Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and land-sea contamination in the Mediterranean Sea. Two important SSS retrieval algorithm improvements are proposed in this study. First, with more than six years of SMOS data acquisitions, there is enough data to empirically characterize and correct systematic biases. Second, the filtering criterion has been modified to account for the statistical distributions of SSS at each ocean grid point. This allows retrieving a value of SSS which is less affected by outliers originated from RFI and other effects. In this study, high level (spatio-temporally consistent) SSS maps are obtained by averaging the SMOS SSS retrievals using a classical objective analysis scheme and then combining the resulting maps with Sea Surface Temperature (SST) maps by means of multifractal fusion. The SSS fused maps contain well-defined spatial structures, suitable for studying the mesoscale activity in the Western

  10. Improving terrestrial evaporation estimates over continental Australia through assimilation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, B.; Miralles, D.; Lievens, H.; Fernández-Prieto, D.; Verhoest, N. E. C.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial evaporation is an essential variable in the climate system that links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land. Despite this crucial importance, it remains one of the most uncertain components of the hydrological cycle, mainly due to known difficulties to model the constraints imposed by land water availability on terrestrial evaporation. The main objective of this study is to assimilate satellite soil moisture observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission into an existing evaporation model. Our over-arching goal is to find an optimal use of satellite soil moisture that can help to improve our understanding of evaporation at continental scales. To this end, the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) is used to simulate evaporation fields over continental Australia for the period September 2010-December 2013. SMOS soil moisture observations are assimilated using a Newtonian Nudging algorithm in a series of experiments. Model estimates of surface soil moisture and evaporation are validated against soil moisture probe and eddy-covariance measurements, respectively. Finally, an analogous experiment in which Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) soil moisture is assimilated (instead of SMOS) allows to perform a relative assessment of the quality of both satellite soil moisture products. Results indicate that the modelled soil moisture from GLEAM can be improved through the assimilation of SMOS soil moisture: the average correlation coefficient between in situ measurements and the modelled soil moisture over the complete sample of stations increased from 0.68 to 0.71 and a statistical significant increase in the correlations is achieved for 17 out of the 25 individual stations. Our results also suggest a higher accuracy of the ascending SMOS data compared to the descending data, and overall higher quality of SMOS compared to AMSR-E retrievals over Australia. On the other hand, the effect of soil moisture data

  11. An overview of new insights from 6 years of salinity data from SMOS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of salt held in surface seawater are becoming ever-more important for oceanographers and climatologists to gain a deeper understanding of ocean circulation and Earth's water cycle. ESA's SMOS mission is proving essential for this aim. Launched in 2009, SMOS has provided the longest continuous record (now ~6 years) of sea-surface salinity measurements from space. The salinity of surface seawater is controlled largely by the balance between evaporation and precipitation, but freshwater from rivers and the freezing and melting of ice also cause changes in concentrations. Along with temperature, salinity drives ocean circulation - the thermohaline circulation - which, in turn, plays a key role in the global climate. With a wealth of salinity data from SMOS now in hand complemented by measurements from the NASA-CONAE Aquarius satellite, which uses a different measuring technique. In this talk we shall provide an overview of how the SMOS mission - now celebrating 6 years in orbit - is providing detailed global measurements of SSS. An ensemble of key ocean processes for climate and biochemistry can now be determined and monitored for the first time from space : the detailed salinity structure of tropical instability waves along the equator and the salt exchanged across major oceanic current fronts, the occurrences of large-scale salinity anomalies in the Pacific and Indian oceans related to important climate indexes are also well-evidenced in the six year-long data. In addition, the dispersal of freshwater into the ocean from the major large tropical rivers (Amazon, Orinoco and Congo), their impact on tropical cyclone (TC) intensification and the oceanic imprints of the intense rainfall in the ITCZ and under TC can now be regularly monitored to better understand the variability of the oceanic part of the global water cycle. We will present how SMOS data, along with concurrent in situ Argo ocean-profile data, other satellite observations of sea-surface

  12. Assimilation of SMOS Retrieved Soil Moisture into the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Case, Jonathan; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) instrument are assimilated into the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS). Before assimilation, SMOS retrievals are bias-corrected to match the model climatological distribution using a Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) matching approach. Data assimilation is done via the Ensemble Kalman Filter. The goal is to improve the representation of soil moisture within the LSM, and ultimately to improve numerical weather forecasts through better land surface initialization. We present a case study showing a large area of irrigation in the lower Mississippi River Valley, in an area with extensive rice agriculture. High soil moisture value in this region are observed by SMOS, but not captured in the forcing data. After assimilation, the model fields reflect the observed geographic patterns of soil moisture. Plans for a modeling experiment and operational use of the data are given. This work helps prepare for the assimilation of Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) retrievals in the near future.

  13. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration after 3 Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Castro, Rita; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Anterrieu, Eric; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Buenadicha, Guillermo; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2013-04-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for already over 3 years which has allowed the calibration and data processing team consolidating both the calibration strategy and the Level-1 processor which transforms the raw visibility samples into polarimetric brightness temperature images. The payload on board SMOS, MIRAS, is quite unique in that it is the first microwave radiometer in space ever capable to generate wide field of view images at every snapshot measurement. This means that most of the calibration as well as image processing techniques are being developed for the first time with little heritage from any previous space mission. Issues intrinsically attached to its wide field of view such as spatial ripples across the snapshot images are particular to MIRAS and to no other earlier radiometer. Even the fundamental theory behind the instrument was put at test, first on ground inside an electromagnetic compatibility chamber, and now in orbit when imaging the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of the cold sky. A groundbreaking effort is being carried out by the SMOS project team to understand and master all calibration and image reconstruction issues of this novel microwave interferometer payload. MIRAS in-orbit performance is driven by the amplitude of spatial ripples across the image and orbital and seasonal radiometer stability. Spatial ripples are unique to interferometric radiometers and are produced by (a) a limited knowledge of the antenna patterns and, in general, of the model of the instrument, (b) some fundamental limitations related to the inverse problem of image reconstruction in undetermined conditions and (c) subtle data processing inconsistencies which are discovered and corrected. To reduce the spatial ripples sea surface salinity retrievals are performed by first removing the brightness temperature spatial errors using a uniform region of the Pacific Ocean. However soil moisture retrievals cannot benefit of

  14. Evaluation of soil and vegetation response to drought using SMOS soil moisture satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piles, Maria; Sánchez, Nilda; Vall-llossera, Mercè; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Martínez, Justino; Martínez-Fernández, José; Camps, Adriano; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in determining the likelihood of droughts and floods that may affect an area. Knowledge of soil moisture distribution as a function of time and space is highly relevant for hydrological, ecological and agricultural applications, especially in water-limited or drought-prone regions. However, measuring soil moisture is challenging because of its high variability; point-scale in-situ measurements are scarce being remote sensing the only practical means to obtain regional- and global-scale soil moisture estimates. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the first satellite mission ever designed to measuring the Earth's surface soil moisture at near daily time scales with levels of accuracy previously not attained. Since its launch in November 2009, significant efforts have been dedicated to validate and fine-tune the retrieval algorithms so that SMOS-derived soil moisture estimates meet the standards required for a wide variety of applications. In this line, the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) is distributing daily, monthly, and annual temporal averages of 0.25-deg global soil moisture maps, which have proved useful for assessing drought and water-stress conditions. In addition, a downscaling algorithm has been developed to combine SMOS and NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data into fine-scale (stress conditions. In previous research, SMOS-derived Soil Moisture Anomalies (SSMA), calculated in a ten-day basis, were shown to be in close relationship with well-known drought indices (the Standardized Precipitation Index and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index). In this work, SSMA have been calculated for the period 2010-2013 in representative arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid areas across global land biomes. The SSMA reflect the cumulative precipitation anomalies and is known to provide 'memory' in the climate and hydrological system; the water retained in the soil

  15. A soil miosture and temperature network for SMOS validation in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2012-01-01

    pixel (44 x 44 km), which is representative of the land surface conditions of the catchment and with minimal impact from open water (2) arrangement of three network clusters along the precipitation gradient, and (3) distribution of the stations according to respective fractions of classes representing......The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission (SMOS) acquires surface soil moisture data of global coverage every three days. Product validation for a range of climate and environmental conditions across continents is a crucial step. For this purpose, a soil moisture and soil temperature sensor...

  16. Validation of SMOS L1C and L2 Products and Important Parameters of the Retrieval Algorithm in the Skjern River Catchment, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Kerr, Yann H.

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite with a passive L-band radiometer monitors surface soil moisture. In addition to soil moisture, vegetation optical thickness tau(NAD) is retrieved (L2 product) from brightness temperatures (T-B, L1C product) using an algorithm based on the L...... and the most sensitive algorithm parameters were analyzed by network and airborne campaign data collected within one SMOS pixel (44 km diameter). The SMOS retrieval is based on the prevailing low vegetation class. For the L1C comparison, T-B's were calculated from in situ soil moisture using L-MEB. Consistent......-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model with initial guesses on the two parameters (derived from ECMWF products and ECOCLIMAP Leaf Area Index, respectively) and other auxiliary input. This paper presents the validation work carried out in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark. L1C/L2 data...

  17. Naise võim Bermudas : kubjas kukutati / Allan Espenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Espenberg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Suurbritanniale kuuluva Bermuda saare parlamendivalimised vallandasid sündmuste ahela, mis võivad muuta asumaa poliitikat. Ametist tagandati peaminister Jennifer Meredith Smith ja uueks peaministriks sai senine tööminister William Alexander Scott

  18. Naise võim Bermudas : kubjas kukutati / Allan Espenberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Espenberg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Suurbritanniale kuuluva Bermuda saare parlamendivalimised vallandasid sündmuste ahela, mis võivad muuta asumaa poliitikat. Ametist tagandati peaminister Jennifer Meredith Smith ja uueks peaministriks sai senine tööminister William Alexander Scott

  19. Severe Marine Weather Studies using SMOS L-band Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides multi-angular L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature images of the Earth. Because upwelling radiation at 1.4 GHz is significantly less affected by rain and atmospheric effects than at higher microwave frequencies, the SMOS measurements offer unique opportunities to complement existing ocean satellite high wind observations that are often erroneous in these extreme conditions. In this talk, we shall provide an overview of the results of an ESA project which aims to exploit the identified capability of SMOS L1 Brightness Temperatures to monitor wind speed and whitecap statistical properties beneath Tropical Cyclones and severe storms. We shall present an overview of these new capabilities and of the potential of the synergy between L-band and C-band sensor data for severe marine weather monitoring. In particular, we will show the results from SMOS for several Hurricanes and Typhoons since 2010 and an analysis of the combined SMOS and AMSR-2 data acquired during the passage of the Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest tropical storms to date and the second-deadliest Philippine typhoon on record.

  20. Synergies of the European Microwave Remote Sensing Missions SMOS and ASCAT for Monitoring Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipal, K.; Wagner, W.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of global soil moisture observations is one of the most glaring and pressing deficiencies in current research activities of related fields, from climate monitoring and ecological applications to the quantification of biogeophysical fluxes. This has implications for important issues of the international political agenda like managing global water resources, securing food production and studying climate change. Currently it is held that only microwave remote sensing offers the potential to produce reliable global scale soil moisture information economically. Recognising the urgent need for a soil moisture mission several international initiatives are planning satellite missions dedicated to monitor the global hydrological cycle among them two European microwave satellites. ESA is planning to launch the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission SMOS, in 2006. SMOS will measure soil moisture over land and ocean salinity over the oceans. The mission rests on a passive microwave sensor (radiometer) operated in L-band which is currently believed to hold the largest potential for soil moisture retrieval. One year before (2005) EUMETSAT will launch the Meteorological Operational satellite METOP which carries the active microwave system Advanced Scatterometer ASCAT on board. ASCAT has been designed to retrieve winds over the oceans but recent research has established its capability to retrieve soil moisture. Although currently it is hold that, using active microwave techniques, the effect of surface roughness dominates that of soil moisture (while the converse is true for radiometers), the ERS scatterometer was successfully used to derive global soil moisture information at a spatial resolution of 50 km with weekly to decadal temporal resolution. The quality of the soil moisture products have been assessed by independent experts in several pilot projects funded by the European Space Agency. There is evidence to believe that both missions will provide a flow of

  1. Meltwater pulse recorded in Last Interglacial mollusk shells from Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelstern, Ian Z.; Rowe, Mark P.; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Defliese, William F.; Petersen, Sierra V.; Brewer, Aaron W.

    2017-02-01

    The warm climate of Bermuda today is modulated by the nearby presence of the Gulf Stream current. However, iceberg scours in the Florida Strait and the presence of ice-rafted debris in Bermuda Rise sediments indicate that, during the last deglaciation, icebergs discharged from the Laurentide Ice Sheet traveled as far south as subtropical latitudes. We present evidence that an event of similar magnitude affected the subtropics during the Last Interglacial, potentially due to melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Using the clumped isotope paleothermometer, we found temperatures 10°C colder and seawater δ18O values 2‰ lower than modern in Last Interglacial Cittarium pica shells from Grape Bay, Bermuda. In contrast, Last Interglacial shells from Rocky Bay, Bermuda, record temperatures only slightly colder and seawater δ18O values similar to modern, likely representing more typical Last Interglacial conditions in Bermuda outside of a meltwater event. The significantly colder ocean temperatures observed in Grape Bay samples illustrate the extreme sensitivity of Bermudian climate to broad-scale ocean circulation changes. They indicate routine meltwater transport in the North Atlantic to near-equatorial latitudes, which would likely have resulted in disruption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. These data demonstrate that future melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet, a potential source of the Last Interglacial meltwater event, could have dramatic climate effects outside of the high latitudes.

  2. Use of Physio-Hydrological Units for SMOS Validation at the Valencia Anchor Station Study Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Scheiding, C.; Antolín, C.; Marco, J.; Soriano, M. P.; Torre, E.; Requena, F.; Carbó, E.; Cano, A.; Lopez-Baeza, E.

    2009-04-01

    The SMOS space mission will soil moisture over the continents and ocean surface salinity with the sufficient resolution to be used in global climate change studies. With the aim of validating SMOS land data and products at the Valencia Anchor Station site (VAS) in a Mediterranean Ecosystem area of Spain, we have designed a sample methodology using a subdivision of the landscape in environmental units related to the spatial variability of soil moisture (Millán-Scheiding, 2006; Lopez-Baeza, et al. 2008). These physio-hydrological units are heterogeneously structured entities which present a certain degree of internal uniformity of hydrological parameters. The units are delimited by integrating areas with the same physio-morphology, soil type, vegetation, geology and topography (Flugel, et al 2003; Millán-Scheiding et al, 2007). Each of these units presented over the same pedological characteristics, vegetation cover, and landscape position should have a certain degree of internal uniformity in its hydrological parameters and therefore similar soil moisture (SM). The main assumption for each unit is that the dynamical variation of the hydrological parameters within one unit should be minimum compared to the dynamics of another unit. This methodology will hopefully provide an effective sampling design consisting of a reduced number of measuring points, sparsely distributed over the area, or alternatively, using SM validation networks where each sampling point is located where it is representative of the mean soil moisture of a complete unit area. The Experimental Plan for the SMOS Validation Rehearsal Campaign at the VAS area of April-May 2008 used this environmental subdivision in the selection and sampling of over 21.000 soil moisture points in a control area of 10 x 10 km2. The ground measurements were carried out during 4 nights corresponding to a drying out period of the soil. The sampling consisted of 700 plots with 4 volumetric SM cylinders and 7 Delta-T Theta

  3. Sun L-Band Brightness Temperature Estimate from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission: A Potential New Space Weather Applications for SMOS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Capolongo, Emiliano; Bigazzi, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a validation study to assess the potentiality of the Level-1b (L1b) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Sun Brightness Temperature (BT) as a valuable L-band radio signal useful in the space weather context. The validation exercise, done for both eruptive and quite/active Sun, focused on SMOS data availability, coverage and statistical analysis with respect to the United States Air Force (USAF) Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN) recorded data. In both cases the comparison of the two data sets has shown a strong timing correlation and an impressive burst amplitude correspondence. The paper also presents main advantages and some caveats in the use of the SMOS dataset. The results obtained encourage to pursue further studies both on the SMOS L1 processing algorithm refinement and on the usage of SMOS BT as an additional, independent and important source of information for space weather applications.

  4. Soil moisture modelling of a SMOS pixel: interest of using the PERSIANN database over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities, this study addresses the use of the PERSIANN-CCS1database in hydrological applications to accurately simulate a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over a wide area (50×50 km2. The study focuses on the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, which is one of the main SMOS Cal/Val sites in Europe.

    A faithful representation of the soil moisture distribution at SMOS pixel scale (50×50 km2 requires an accurate estimation of the amount and temporal/spatial distribution of precipitation. To quantify the gain of using the comprehensive PERSIANN database instead of sparsely distributed rain gauge measurements, comparisons between in situ observations and satellite rainfall data are done both at point and areal scale. An overestimation of the satellite rainfall amounts is observed in most of the cases (about 66% but the precipitation occurrences are in general retrieved (about 67%.

    To simulate the high variability in space and time of surface soil moisture, a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT model – ISBA (Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere is used. The interest of using satellite rainfall estimates as well as the influence that the precipitation events can induce on the modelling of the water content in the soil is depicted by a comparison between different soil moisture data. Point-like and spatialized simulated data using rain gauge observations or PERSIANN – CCS database as well as ground measurements are used. It is shown that a good adequacy is reached in most part of the year, the precipitation differences having less impact upon the simulated soil moisture. The behaviour of simulated surface soil moisture at SMOS scale is verified by the use of remote sensing data from the Advanced

  5. Long time series of soil moisture obtained using neural networks: application to AMSR-E and SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio J.; Kerr, Yann H.; de Jeu, Rcihard A. M.; van der Schalie, Robin; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Ayaari, Amen al; Dolman, Han; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Sussane

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is the first mission specifically designed to measure soil moisture (hereafter SM) from space. The instrument on-board SMOS is a L-band aperture synthesis radiometer, with full-polarization and multi-angular capabilities (Mecklenburg et al. 2012). The operational SM retrieval algorithm is based on a physical model (Kerr et al. 2012). In addition, Rodriguez-Fernandez et al. (2014) have recently implemented an inverse model based in neural networks using the approach of Aires & Prigent (2006), which consists in training the neural networks with numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, Balsamo et al. 2009). In the context of an ESA funded project (de Jeu et al, this conference, session CL 5.7), we have studied this neural network approach to create a consistent soil moisture dataset from 2003 to 2014 using NASA/JAXA Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) and ESA SMOS radiometers as input data. Two neural networks algorithms have been defined and optimized using AMSR-E or SMOS as input data in the periods 2003-Oct 2011 and 2010-2014, respectively. The two missions overlapping period has been used to demonstrate the consistency of the SM dataset produced with both algorithms by comparing monthly averages of SM and by comparing with time series of in situ measurements at selected locations and other SM products such as the SMOS operational SM, ECMWF model SM, and AMSR-E LPRM SM (Owe et al. 2008). Finally, the long time series of SM obtained with neural networks will be compared to in-situ measurements and ECMWF ERA-Interim SM at selected locations. This long-term soil moisture dataset can be used for hydrological and climate applications and it is the first step towards a longer dataset which will include additional sensors. References Aires, F. & Prigent, C. Toward a new generation of satellite surface products? Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984--2012), Wiley Online Library, 2006, 11

  6. Population Structure of Montastraea cavernosa on Shallow versus Mesophotic Reefs in Bermuda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley

    Full Text Available Mesophotic coral reef ecosystems remain largely unexplored with only limited information available on taxonomic composition, abundance and distribution. Yet, mesophotic reefs may serve as potential refugia for shallow-water species and thus understanding biodiversity, ecology and connectivity of deep reef communities is integral for resource management and conservation. The Caribbean coral, Montastraea cavernosa, is considered a depth generalist and is commonly found at mesophotic depths. We surveyed abundance and size-frequency of M. cavernosa populations at six shallow (10m and six upper mesophotic (45m sites in Bermuda and found population structure was depth dependent. The mean surface area of colonies at mesophotic sites was significantly smaller than at shallow sites, suggesting that growth rates and maximum colony surface area are limited on mesophotic reefs. Colony density was significantly higher at mesophotic sites, however, resulting in equal contributions to overall percent cover. Size-frequency distributions between shallow and mesophotic sites were also significantly different with populations at mesophotic reefs skewed towards smaller individuals. Overall, the results of this study provide valuable baseline data on population structure, which indicate that the mesophotic reefs of Bermuda support an established population of M. cavernosa.

  7. Error attribution and validation of SMOS high-level salinity products with Argo data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, Joaquim

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the E-AIMS project (7FP Project No. 284391), the role and suggested improvements of the Argo array in the validation of SMOS sea surface salinity (SSS) have been investigated. Here, a summary of the main results is shown and discussed. The Argo array continues to be the sole component of the ocean observing system to provide routine observations of temperature and salinity profiles at global scale with a time sampling period of about ten days. The observations provided by an Argo profiler are publicly available a few days from being taken (Real Time Mode) after application of automatic quality control filters. Scientific quality data (Delayed Mode) is generated after a human supervised quality control. In this study, the highest quality, delayed mode, near-the-surface data are being used to validate the SSS Level 3 and Level 4 products generated by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (http://cp34-bec.cmima.csic.es). The products being validated here are the weighted binned average (L3), an Optimal Interpolation (OI), and a data fused product exploiting the spatial variability of OSTIA SST. An Argo profile is considered if its quality flags of position and time are equal to one (good), two (probably good), five (value changes) or eight (value interpolated). However, temperature, salinity and pressure data are used only if their quality flags are equal to one (good). The uppermost (but deeper than 0.5 m) salinity measurement is taken as an approximation of the in-situ SSS, but only if the salinity profile allows a robust interpolation of the salinity at 7.5 m (this additional requirement is introduced to ensure that the salinity profile is properly sampled near the surface). At the moment of performing this study, the main drawbacks have been the lag in the Delayed Mode processing, and the lack of salinity observations in the first five meters below the ocean surface. While 5500 profiles in Delayed Mode were available for January 2011, about 1000 were

  8. Satellite-scale Estimates of the "b Parameter" Relating Vegetation Water Content and SMOS Optical Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J. C.; Hornbuckle, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave radiation emitted by Earth's land surface is primarily determined by soil moisture and vegetation. One of the effects of vegetation on surface microwave emissions is often termed the "vegetation optical thickness" or "vegetation opacity" and is often abbreviated as tau. Retrievals of soil moisture from microwave radiometer measurements requires knowledge of tau. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite measures microwave radiation at multiple incidence angles, enabling the simultaneous retrieval of soil moisture and tau. Other soil moisture satellites, such as the upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, only measure at single incidence angles and may need auxiliary sources of tau data in order to retrieve soil moisture. One proposed method for estimating tau for these satellites is by relating reflectance data, e.g. the normalized difference vegetation index, to vegetation water content (VWC), then relating VWC to tau. VWC and tau can be related through the b parameter, i.e. tau = b x VWC. Values of b for different land cover types have been estimated from tower (~1 m) and airplane (~10-100 m) data, but have not been measured at the satellite scale (~10 km). Estimating b at the satellite scale from measurements at smaller scales is difficult because the effective value of b in a satellite pixel may not be well represented by linear weighted average based on the fraction of each land cover type in the pixel. However, by relating county crop yields, estimated by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, to measurements of SMOS tau, and by using certain allometric relationships, such as the ratio of water to dry matter and the harvest index of crops, we can estimate b at the satellite scale. We have used this method to estimate b for each Iowa county for the years 2010-2012. Initial results suggest that b may change year to year; our current estimates for b in Iowa range from 0.065 in 2010 to 0.100 in 2012. These

  9. The CoSMOS L-band experiment in Southeast Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, K.; Kerr, Y.H.; Boulet, G.

    2007-01-01

    The CoSMOS (Campaign for validating the Operation of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) campaign was conducted during November of 2005 in the Goulburn River Catchment, in SE Australia. The main objective of CoSMOS was to obtain a series of L-band measurements from the air in order...

  10. SMOS calibration and validation activities with airborne interferometric radiometer HUT-2D during spring 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Sievinen, P.;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present calibration and validation activities of European Space Agency’s SMOS mission, which utilize airborne interferomentric L-band radiometer system HUT-2D of the Aalto University. During spring 2010 the instrument was used to measure three SMOS validation target areas, one in...

  11. Towards an improved soil moisture retrieval for organic-rich soils from SMOS passive microwave L-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Richaume, Philippe; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Demontoux, François; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Andreasen, Mie; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Ikonen, Jaakko; Schwank, Mike; Drusch, Mattias; Kerr, Yann H.

    2017-04-01

    From the passive L-band microwave radiometer onboard the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) space mission global surface soil moisture data is retrieved every 2 - 3 days. Thus far, the empirical L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) radiative transfer model applied in the SMOS soil moisture retrieval algorithm is exclusively calibrated over test sites in dry and temperate climate zones. Furthermore, the included dielectric mixing model relating soil moisture to relative permittivity accounts only for mineral soils. However, soil moisture monitoring over the higher Northern latitudes is crucial since these regions are especially sensitive to climate change. A considerable positive feedback is expected if thawing of these extremely organic soils supports carbon decomposition and release to the atmosphere. Due to differing structural characteristics and thus varying bound water fractions, the relative permittivity of organic material is lower than that of the most mineral soils at a given water content. This assumption was verified by means of L-band relative permittivity laboratory measurements of organic and mineral substrates from various sites in Denmark, Finland, Scotland and Siberia using a resonant cavity. Based on these data, a simple empirical dielectric model for organic soils was derived and implemented in the SMOS Soil Moisture Level 2 Prototype Processor (SML2PP). Unfortunately, the current SMOS retrieved soil moisture product seems to show unrealistically low values compared to in situ soil moisture data collected from organic surface layers in North America, Europe and the Tibetan Plateau so that the impact of the dielectric model for organic soils cannot really be tested. A simplified SMOS processing scheme yielding higher soil moisture levels has recently been proposed and is presently under investigation. Furthermore, recalibration of the model parameters accounting for vegetation and roughness effects that were thus far only

  12. The Bermuda Triangle mysteries: an explanation based on the diffraction of heat waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Njau, E.C. [Dar es Salaam Univ. (Tanzania, United Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    Studies based on actual meteorological records [E.C. Njau, Nuovo Cimento 15C, 17-23 (1992)] as well as analytical methods [E.C. Njau, Proc. Ind. Natn. Sci. Acad., 61A (4) (1995); Renewable Energy 4, 261-263 (1994)] have established the continuous existence of a series of large-scale, Eastward-moving heat waves along the Earth`s surface, whose individual crests and troughs are stretched approximately along the geographical North-South direction. In moving across the American continent, these waves encounter a line of physical barriers formed by the lofty Rocky and Andes ranges of mountains, which is continuous except for a significant gap or opening between Colombia and Mexico. This line of physical barriers consistently maintains a maximum height of 3000-4000 m between latitudes 40{sup o}S and 55{sup o}N except for a significant opening or slit located between Mexico and Colombia where the maximum height hardly exceeds 600 m. The Eastward-moving heat waves are thus incident obliquely on an approximately single-slit barrier when crossing the American continent and those parts of the waves which filter through this single slit essentially form some kind of single-slit diffraction (heat) patterns in, around and past the Bermuda Triangle. These diffraction heat patterns give rise to corresponding weather and ocean patterns which, to a large extent, account for the mysteries already noted in the Bermuda region. (Author)

  13. The global SMOS Level 3 daily soil moisture and brightness temperature maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mialon, Arnaud; Kerr, Yann H.; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Quesney, Arnaud; Mahmoodi, Ali; Tarot, Stéphane; Parrens, Marie; Al-Yaari, Amen; Pellarin, Thierry; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the multi-orbit (MO) surface soil moisture (SM) and angle-binned brightness temperature (TB) products for the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission based on a new multi-orbit algorithm. The Level 3 algorithm at CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) makes use of MO retrieval to enhance the robustness and quality of SM retrievals. The motivation of the approach is to make use of the longer temporal autocorrelation length of the vegetation optical depth (VOD) compared to the corresponding SM autocorrelation in order to enhance the retrievals when an acquisition occurs at the border of the swath. The retrieval algorithm is implemented in a unique operational processor delivering multiple parameters (e.g. SM and VOD) using multi-angular dual-polarisation TB from MO. A subsidiary angle-binned TB product is provided. In this study the Level 3 TB V310 product is showcased and compared to SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) TB. The Level 3 SM V300 product is compared to the single-orbit (SO) retrievals from the Level 2 SM processor from ESA with aligned configuration. The advantages and drawbacks of the Level 3 SM product (L3SM) are discussed. The comparison is done on a global scale between the two datasets and on the local scale with respect to in situ data from AMMA-CATCH and USDA ARS Watershed networks. The results obtained from the global analysis show that the MO implementation enhances the number of retrievals: up to 9 % over certain areas. The comparison with the in situ data shows that the increase in the number of retrievals does not come with a decrease in quality, but rather at the expense of an increased time lag in product availability from 6 h to 3.5 days, which can be a limiting factor for applications like flood forecast but reasonable for drought monitoring and climate change studies. The SMOS L3 soil moisture and L3 brightness temperature products are delivered using an open licence and

  14. Assimilation of SMOS-derived soil moisture in a fully integrated hydrological and soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridler, Marc-Etienne Francois; Madsen, Henrik; Stisen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    in Denmark. The objective is to determine if any additional gains can be achieved by SMOS surface soil moisture assimilation beyond the optimized model. A series of assimilation experiments were designed to (1) determine how effectively soil moisture corrections propagate downward in the soil column, (2...... cover classes. Assimilation also brought modest gains in R2 at 25 cm depth but slightly degraded the correlation at 50 cm depth. Assimilation overcorrected discharge peaks....

  15. Assessment of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval Parameters Using Tau-Omega Algorithms for Soil Moisture Deficit Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika

    2014-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the latest mission which provides flow of coarse resolution soil moisture data for land applications. However, the efficient retrieval of soil moisture for hydrological applications depends on optimally choosing the soil and vegetation parameters. The first stage of this work involves the evaluation of SMOS Level 2 products and then several approaches for soil moisture retrieval from SMOS brightness temperature are performed to estimate Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). The most widely applied algorithm i.e. Single channel algorithm (SCA), based on tau-omega is used in this study for the soil moisture retrieval. In tau-omega, the soil moisture is retrieved using the Horizontal (H) polarisation following Hallikainen dielectric model, roughness parameters, Fresnel's equation and estimated Vegetation Optical Depth (tau). The roughness parameters are empirically calibrated using the numerical optimization techniques. Further to explore the improvement in retrieval models, modifications have been incorporated in the algorithms with respect to the sources of the parameters, which include effective temperatures derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-NOAH Land Surface Model and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) while the s is derived from MODIS Leaf Area Index (LAI). All the evaluations are performed against SMD, which is estimated using the Probability Distributed Model following a careful calibration and validation integrated with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The performance obtained after all those changes indicate that SCA-H using WRF-NOAH LSM downscaled ECMWF LST produces an improved performance for SMD estimation at a catchment scale.

  16. A weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data record from merged CryoSat-2 and SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; King, Jennifer; Haas, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Sea-ice thickness on a global scale is derived from different satellite sensors using independent retrieval methods. Due to the sensor and orbit characteristics, such satellite retrievals differ in spatial and temporal resolution as well as in the sensitivity to certain sea-ice types and thickness ranges. Satellite altimeters, such as CryoSat-2 (CS2), sense the height of the ice surface above the sea level, which can be converted into sea-ice thickness. Relative uncertainties associated with this method are large over thin ice regimes. Another retrieval method is based on the evaluation of surface brightness temperature (TB) in L-band microwave frequencies (1.4 GHz) with a thickness-dependent emission model, as measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. While the radiometer-based method looses sensitivity for thick sea ice (> 1 m), relative uncertainties over thin ice are significantly smaller than for the altimetry-based retrievals. In addition, the SMOS product provides global sea-ice coverage on a daily basis unlike the altimeter data. This study presents the first merged product of complementary weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data records from the CS2 altimeter and SMOS radiometer. We use two merging approaches: a weighted mean (WM) and an optimal interpolation (OI) scheme. While the weighted mean leaves gaps between CS2 orbits, OI is used to produce weekly Arctic-wide sea-ice thickness fields. The benefit of the data merging is shown by a comparison with airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounding measurements. When compared to airborne thickness data in the Barents Sea, the merged product has a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of about 0.7 m less than the CS2 product and therefore demonstrates the capability to enhance the CS2 product in thin ice regimes. However, in mixed first-year (FYI) and multiyear (MYI) ice regimes as in the Beaufort Sea, the CS2 retrieval shows the lowest bias.

  17. Correcting satellite-based precipitation products from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation using two models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Pellarin, Thierry; Gibon, François

    2017-04-01

    Real-time precipitation information at the global scale is quite useful information for many applications. However, satellite-based precipitation products in real time are known to be biased from real values observed in situ. On the other hand, the information about precipitation contained in soil moisture data can be very useful to improve precipitation estimation, since the evolution of this variable is highly influenced by the amount of rainfall at a certain area after a rain event. In this context, the soil moisture data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used to correct the precipitation provided by real-time satellite-based products such as CMORPH, TRMM-3B42RT or PERSIANN. In this work, we test an assimilation algorithm based on the data assimilation of SMOS measurements in two models of different complexity: a simple hydrological model (Antecedent Precipitation Index (API)) and a state-of-the-art complex land-surface model (Surface Externalisée (SURFEX)). We show how the assimilation technique, based on a particle filter method, leads to the improvement of correlation and root mean squared error (RMSE) of precipitation estimates, with slightly better results for the simpler (and less expensive computationally) API model. This methodology has been evaluated for six years in ten sites around the world with different features, showing the limitations of the methodology in regions affected by mountainous terrain or by high radio-frequency interferences (RFI), which notably affect the quality of the soil moisture retrievals from brightness temperatures by SMOS. The presented results are promising for a potential near-real time application at the global scale.

  18. Communities of constructional lips and cup reef rims in Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Martin L. H.; Stevens, Jo-Anne

    1991-01-01

    Constructional lips and cup reef rims are little studied reef features typical of very turbulent conditions. The relatively low diversity community of these structures consists of three components, and algal mat dominated by Herposiphonia secunda, an encrusting calcareous biota characterised by crustose coralline algae and the vermetid gastropod Dendropoma corrodens, which together are the main hermatypic components, and an endolithic component with very abundant boring sponges, polychaetes, crustaceans and sipunculids. In northerly areas of Bermuda, the hydrozoan Millepora alcicornis is a prominent member of the community while to the south the urchin Echinometra lucunter is abundant. On the south side of Bermuda the community traps sediment which is deposited in the void spaces. The environment shows reduced grazing and this may account for the presence of several relict and rare species.

  19. Natural gas hydrates and the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruy, H.J.

    1998-03-01

    Natural gas hydrates occur on the ocean floor in such great volumes that they contain twice as much carbon as all known coal, oil and conventional natural gas deposits. Releases of this gas caused by sediment slides and other natural causes have resulted in huge slugs of gas saturated water with density too low to float a ship, and enough localized atmospheric contamination to choke air aspirated aircraft engines. The unexplained disappearances of ships and aircraft along with their crews and passengers in the Bermuda Triangle may be tied to the natural venting of gas hydrates. The paper describes what gas hydrates are, their formation and release, and their possible link to the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle.

  20. Vitamin A intoxication from reef fish liver consumption in Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewailly, E; Rouja, P; Schultz, E; Julien, P; Tucker, T

    2011-09-01

    We report three historical cases of severe vitamin A intoxication in anglers who had consumed reef fish liver caught in Bermuda. The subsequent analyses of 35 fish livers from seven different fish species revealed that very high concentrations of vitamin A exist in tropical fish liver, even in noncarnivorous fish species. Large variations in concentrations were observed between specimens and between species. The angling population and (especially) pregnant women should be advised of this potential health threat.

  1. Feedbacks and responses of coral calcification on the Bermuda reef system to seasonal changes in biological processes and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Amat, A.; Andersson, A. J.

    2010-08-01

    Despite the potential impact of ocean acidification on ecosystems such as coral reefs, surprisingly, there is very limited field data on the relationships between calcification and seawater carbonate chemistry. In this study, contemporaneous in situ datasets of seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification rates from the high-latitude coral reef of Bermuda over annual timescales provide a framework for investigating the present and future potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems in their natural environment. A strong correlation was found between the in situ rates of calcification for the major framework building coral species Diploria labyrinthiformis and the seasonal variability of [CO32-] and aragonite saturation state Ωaragonite, rather than other environmental factors such as light and temperature. These field observations provide sufficient data to hypothesize that there is a seasonal "Carbonate Chemistry Coral Reef Ecosystem Feedback" (CREF hypothesis) between the primary components of the reef ecosystem (i.e., scleractinian hard corals and macroalgae) and seawater carbonate chemistry. In early summer, strong net autotrophy from benthic components of the reef system enhance [CO32-] and Ωaragonite conditions, and rates of coral calcification due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2. In late summer, rates of coral calcification are suppressed by release of CO2 from reef metabolism during a period of strong net heterotrophy. It is likely that this seasonal CREF mechanism is present in other tropical reefs although attenuated compared to high-latitude reefs such as Bermuda. Due to lower annual mean surface seawater [CO32-] and Ωaragonite in Bermuda compared to tropical regions, we anticipate that Bermuda corals will experience seasonal periods of zero net calcification within the next decade at [CO32-] and Ωaragonite thresholds of ~184 μmoles kg-1 and 2.65. However, net autotrophy of the reef

  2. Feedbacks and responses of coral calcification on the Bermuda reef system to seasonal changes in biological processes and ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bates

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential impact of ocean acidification on ecosystems such as coral reefs, surprisingly, there is very limited field data on the relationships between calcification and seawater carbonate chemistry. In this study, contemporaneous in situ datasets of seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification rates from the high-latitude coral reef of Bermuda over annual timescales provide a framework for investigating the present and future potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO2 levels and ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems in their natural environment. A strong correlation was found between the in situ rates of calcification for the major framework building coral species Diploria labyrinthiformis and the seasonal variability of [CO32-] and aragonite saturation state Ωaragonite, rather than other environmental factors such as light and temperature. These field observations provide sufficient data to hypothesize that there is a seasonal "Carbonate Chemistry Coral Reef Ecosystem Feedback" (CREF hypothesis between the primary components of the reef ecosystem (i.e., scleractinian hard corals and macroalgae and seawater carbonate chemistry. In early summer, strong net autotrophy from benthic components of the reef system enhance [CO32-] and Ωaragonite conditions, and rates of coral calcification due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2. In late summer, rates of coral calcification are suppressed by release of CO2 from reef metabolism during a period of strong net heterotrophy. It is likely that this seasonal CREF mechanism is present in other tropical reefs although attenuated compared to high-latitude reefs such as Bermuda. Due to lower annual mean surface seawater [CO32-] and Ωaragonite in Bermuda compared to tropical regions, we anticipate that Bermuda corals will experience seasonal periods

  3. AEROCE - 10 Years of Atmospheric Chemistry at Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    The Atmosphere/Ocean Chemistry Experiment (AEROCE) was a comprehensive multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional research program that focused on a number of aspects of the atmospheric chemistry over the North Atlantic Ocean (NAO). These included: ozone and the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere; aerosol physical and chemical properties (especially for sulfur and nitrogen species and mineral aerosol) and related precipitation chemistry; the role of aerosols in climate; and chemical air/sea exchange. Two major themes of AEROCE research were designed to (1) understand the role of anthropogenic emissions and natural processes in the ozone budget and oxidizing capacity of the troposphere over the North Atlantic Ocean (NAO) and (2) characterize the physical and chemical properties of aerosols that are important to the radiative properties of the atmosphere and to climate; to study the processes that affect these properties; and to assess the relative importance of natural and human sources. AEROCE focused on the atmosphere over the NAO because it is the ocean region that is most likely to be affected by atmospheric transport from the continents. The AEROCE station at Bermuda was an extremely important part of this program. Bermuda is the recipient of relatively clean marine air from the central North Atlantic as well as pollutants and natural continental materials from North America, Europe, and Africa. Seasonally, the highest ozone concentrations occur during the spring and are associated with transport off the North American continent. The highest daily ozone values occur under conditions of large-scale subsidence from the mid-troposphere in association with the passage of cold fronts across Bermuda. During the 1996 spring intensive field experiment, AEROCE researchers found that these high ozone concentrations resulted from a combination of downmixing from the stratosphere and production from precursors associated with North American pollution. The highest

  4. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ soil moisture measurements: 6 years survey of SMOS data and agrometeorological stations in Eastern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlazak, Radoslaw; Rojek, Edyta; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Slominski, Jan; Sagan, Joanna; Gluba, Lukasz; Usowicz, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Long term measurements of soil moisture on a large scale provide important information about not only periodical changes in water content, but also its contribute to better understanding of water cycle in environment. In addition, if in the studied area occurred extreme weather conditions or even anomalies, it is scientifically challenging to compare and validate data from two such different techniques like remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The aim of our research was to compare data of independent soil moisture measurements from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite and 9 agrometeorological stations installed on Eastern Poland (Polesie and Podlasie regions). Those regions have similar climatic and topographic conditions, however, different vegetation covers and soil properties. Radiometric SMOS data contain surface water content values (approx. 45 km) for the area corresponding to the positions of chosen agrometeorological stations. For the purpose of those studies only morning satellite overpasses (ascending) were used. In-situ sensors in stations measure precisely soil moisture at 5-10 cm depth, but each only in one point. Both datasets were 7-days averaged in order to standardize. Analysis of a long term data is very interesting, especially because of occurrence of flood and drought events during the analyzed period of time. For example, the analyses revealed clear rainfall trend between ground and satellite data. Some shifts between SMOS and ground measurements were also observed, what may be explained by impact of different depths of SMOS measurements (Government of Poland through an ESA-PECS contract (Plan for European Cooperating States). 2) "Technical Support for the fabrication and deployment of the radiometer ELBARA-III in Bubnow, Poland" No. 4000113360/15/NL/FF/gp

  5. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  6. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the Science preparation for SMOS, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. In this framework, the paper presents an approach consisting in accurately simulating a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over the wide VAS surface (50×50 km2. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface - module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model are performed using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency is reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements are made.

    Actually, an important challenge in remote sensing approaches concerns product validation. In order to obtain an representative soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method is applied. For verification, a comparison between the simulated spatialized soil moisture and remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-SCAT is performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the

  7. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Imperial Beach, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    64 ’ 5 .8 onu1n 9 6 . 6 . Z. 46.9l ill7ll"q. P11041 .1MARI Of d(IFOO IAt OBSFRVAIIONS SURFACF ISMOS 34 H PRIAI MACH CA IFRNIAIUI NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY...72. 72.7 73.1 730;1 73.,1 7:3.1t 73.1 73.1 73.1 ’-"*1 73.1 t ismo 4*o 6S.4.-3 68.’ 71.3 72.1 72.3 13.1 73.4 71.4 73.4 73.4 73.4 73.4 7 3 .’.# 7 . 14...69.31 9,00 i ismo 43.2 63*4 71.2 75.6 83.6 64.7 87o2 39.. 89*0 3 9. 3 *1 a :"sv:; 89.3 59.3 $.3 a ie t 300o 41 66.1 73.O 77.6 85.4 86.5 89.0 90.8 90S9

  8. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), New River, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    0000000000000000000 ,aa z a- wim oieia N a z O.a -aaf0 W~~aC 0: OD00 0 0 0,o00 0 0 N Zha _I WW w ft a., u L W % 3 LACA 0: 00 EZW ~ ~ ~ ~ C P:N~ ’ m~-0 0 x xhad 0...1 01 0. CP9 0. O. 01 0.0 0’ 0. 0 01 000 4A p4.4.4 LD z - on M rP.00o 0*Y . In) ’P 0 - 0 N0Il4 4 0 0. z ka N 0 1 4X o :11 A 1 ZNC; 4O A f- D 1D N inOD0...0 0 A) 1 1D - 1- r -r 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 CY 0 0IN 0 0 0’ 01 0’ 0- In * V 011 𔃺 IAlll’ I-r -1- 010 .00’U*𔃺PI00-.t000 F., Ii %4 1 1 1 0000 0: 4! 9 6.9

  9. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Quantico, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    PuOrOGRAl 1TMM AND iUNnxo EN40DAC OMc~~ nAu.~n~ *WIN shmo SUMARY OF oMETORIGIA OSERATION SUFCE S TATION: #13773 Quantleo, TA - 1E DAILY 2/45-1:2/82 OJoe no...3. 95go 91.6 98.5 o o 96. . 500 15.9 515 Goes .9o 97.1 95. 98.0 996 98.5 00.0 00.00 0000.0g 00.00 o.o 4" ’S ss a5. Ojos ALI** 91 95.: 121 to. d 96...34 . . , + ,.+ °_ " ..+ ,- ,, , ,-,, .,,-+, + "A ;+ " + + ’g " "’" ’ VE SERVICE DETACHMENT. ASHEVILLE NC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY SYATTm 51 mal man son

  10. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Moffett Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    0* 0. e N W I a U 3 - 01, 0.~C Of CI 0. N I ILA LUz C6 I .. a Ia . . . a a a a . 0 * .al 0.. A I21, 11% 9- -4 CL) for 0n In~ %.AI D4 1a ,’ .24 o o0 0...Di N i Ci3 i-4 0 𔃺 L 0 0 4.0 0 iO .in cp. 4.0 .1I 4 - Dn D in D in Din D&n D In DiL in;i k- -4 o in- 00. Z D N Oi#AN N4 co N .4 cINe n N N N 0 At 0

  11. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) Mayport, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    8217 a c, o ’ , a- o’ 1.. , L0* ; 1 .0.0.0 - ADNN N Cc0 ’C’ a a ’D ’ ’ ’ a0 cr z a. L 11 .. cr N~ N em - q N N m N N N N N "’ N N N r4 N N " cj eq NA N ’ N

  12. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Midway Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    7Ld VARK 1I.1 21 .. 4-." . ’. _ _. _ __ __ I -.- inZ. TOTAL. NUIt Of OI ONS ’ NWs....L ..... n. a ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ANL...CEILING VISIBILITY (STATUTE MilLES ) -CEILING _____7__6.293 . -r -s,.77 (P"? ’, .) I ~ ~~ ",,. 1,. ?46, . ., .. .I , , o. 1 49 &1 4. ,,, 1 ?8;oz 𔃻...CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY ST ti ~flH Ig11 V.A.. nuIT . PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE . 9 (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) CE N VISISILITY (STATUTE MILES

  13. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Patuxent River, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) SIm WTAT I@N M&IE VtlIM * 0KK ,L L LAT- - SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 1-3 4•6 7.10 11 -16 17 -21 22 • 27 28 - 33 34 -40 41...A• td * E.ŕ,I*2 __ ___ NAvAL WEATHER SERVICE DETACHW.!NT. ASHEVILLE. NC CEILING VERSUS

  14. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Diego Garcia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    8217- P1 (d 9’-- w’ In.t -- eo 0’~ - .4) ta o-w 0 ni w2- 14 +0 (d0 ~~~~ .00 00 𔃺 .. nwd2- 0i 0-+ pa - w w .0 0-. 3. .01 4c4 >~ n >n-- - wv inA 4’ >> ,0...C00 0 0 CL 0 r-r- - - WW M WOD lo, 01()1 0000’ 0CL00 0 N0 .0t- - 0 r- W Q i 0, 0 0 0 00’ 0 P 0 C 0 0 000 0 0 0’a a A .0 ~ r- 0 P1 .- 0 w- .0 I’- t 0...01 ,L A L c acca , 0O𔃺 0O 0: 1- U 0I 0IDJ - cc C aj Go w Go )co 000) Goaaa a0 7 ,0, 0101 a,01 0 ’C a W I u ( 011 -.) U 0 mN 010 0 n00mmwonr -ma w

  15. Teaching and learning apheresis medicine: The Bermuda Triangle in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookston, Kendall P; Richter, Deana M

    2010-01-01

    Apheresis Medicine has evolved markedly due to an explosion of knowledge and technology, whereas the time available for training has shrunk as curricula have become increasingly overloaded. Apheresis teaching has inherited a strong clinical context where real patient problems are used in a hands-on environment. To optimize instruction, those involved in the education of apheresis professionals need to have (1) knowledge of how clinical laboratory medicine education has developed as a field, (2) an understanding of what is known from theory and research about how people learn, and (3) the skills to design teaching/learning activities in ways consistent with literature-based principles of adult education. These developments in education provide a context for curriculum projects currently underway by the American Society for Apheresis. Teachers must determine which competencies are central to the essence of a trained professional. Specific, robust, learning objectives targeted toward the development of higher levels of thinking, professional attitudes, and requisite skills are formulated to guide the learner toward mastering those competencies. Curriculum is developed for each objective, consisting of content and the best teaching/learning methods to help learners attain the objective. Appropriate assessment strategies are identified to determine whether the objective is being achieved. The integration of objectives, curriculum, and assessment creates The Bermuda Triangle of Education (Richter, The Circle of Learning and Bermuda Triangle in Education, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, 2004). When educators do not effectively navigate The Bermuda Triangle of Education, learning may disappear into the murky depths of confusion and apathy. When successfully navigated, the result will be a significant learning experience that leads to transformation through education. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    OpenAIRE

    Huntemann, M.; G. Heygster; Kaleschke, L.; T. Krumpen; M. Mäkynen; M. Drusch

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference bet...

  17. SMOS and climate data applicability for analyzing forest decline and forest fires

    OpenAIRE

    Chaparro Danon, David; Vayreda, Jordi; Martínez Vilalta, Jordi; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Banque, Mireia; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Piles Guillem, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Forests partially reduce climate change impact but, at the same time, this climate forcing threatens forest's health. In recent decades, droughts are becoming more frequent and intense implying an increase of forest decline episodes and forest fires. In this context, global and frequent soil moisture observations from the ESA's SMOS mission could be useful in controlling forest exposure to decline and fires. In this paper, SMOS observations and several climate variables are analyzed together ...

  18. Fresh Water River discharges as observed by SMOS in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) are two peculiar regions in the Indian Ocean exhibiting a wide range of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) values. In the BoB, the strong summer monsoon rainfall and the continental run-offs into these semi-enclosed basins result in an intense dilution of the surface seawater in the northern part of the Bay, thereby inducing some of the lowest SSS water masses found in the tropical belt. In the AS, because of the intense variability associated with the monsoon cycle, water mass structure in the upper layers of the AS shows enormous variability in the space and time. As such, the role of the salinity in these regions is crucial in the ocean dynamics of these regions. After more than 7 years in orbit, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission [1] continues to provide a series of salinity data that could be used to monitor the SSS variations in these climatically relevant regions, provided that systematic errors due to land contamination are reduced. Recently-developed algorithms for SSS retrieval [2] have improved the filtering criteria and the mitigation of the systematic bias, providing coherent SSS retrievals close to the land masses. In this work we have analyzed the SSS in 2-degree boxes located at the mouth of the main rivers in the BoB: Ganges-Brahmaputra, Irrawady, Mahanadi, Godovari; and in the AS: Indus. We have first tried to validate the SMOS salinity retrievals with in situ measurements. Since there is few available in situ data, we have also compared the climatological SSS behavior derived from SMOS with the ones provided by the World Ocean Atlas [3]. We have also compared the SMOS SSS data with historical data of discharges [4] and [5], ocean currents from the Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real-time (OSCAR) [6], Sea Surface Temperature from Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) [7],[8] and [9] and Chlorophyll data [10]. The conclusion of this work is that, when the proper

  19. On the synergy of SMOS and Terra/Aqua MODIS: high resolution soil moisture maps in near real-time

    OpenAIRE

    Piles Guillem, Maria; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Sanchez, Nilda; Martinez Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Justino; Gonzalez Gambau, Verónica; Riera, R.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative downscaling approach to obtain fine-scale soil moisture estimates from 40 km SMOS observations has been developed. It optimally blends SMOS multi-angular and full-polarimetric information with MODIS visible/data into high resolution soil moisture maps. The core of the algorithm is a model that linksmicrowave/optical sensitivity to soilmoisture and linearly relates the two instruments across spatial scales. This algorithm has been implemented at SMOS-BEC facilities and near real-...

  20. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the preparation for this mission over land, the Valencia Anchor Station experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for the SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface-module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere so as to simulate the surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model was made using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency was reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements were made. In order to obtain an accurate soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method has been applied. To validate the approach, a comparison with remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-Scat was performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the polarization ratio a better agreement is obtained. ERS-Scat soil moisture products were also used to be compared with the simulated spatialized soil moisture. The seasonal variations were well reproduced. However, the lack of soil moisture data over the area (45 observations for one year was a limit into completely understanding the soil moisture variability.

  1. Towards an estimation of water masses formation areas from SMOS-based TS diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockmann, Marlene; Sabia, Roberto; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Temperature-Salinity (TS) diagrams emphasize the mutual variability of ocean temperature and salinity values, relating them to the corresponding density. Canonically used in oceanography, they provide a means to characterize and trace ocean water masses. In [1], a first attempt to estimate surface-layer TS diagrams based on satellite measurements has been performed, profiting from the recent availability of spaceborne salinity data. In fact, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [2]) and the Aquarius/SAC-D [3] satellite missions allow to study the dynamical patterns of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) for the first time on a global scale. In [4], given SMOS and Aquarius salinity estimates, and by also using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA, [5]) effort, experimental satellite-based TS diagrams have been routinely derived for the year 2011. They have been compared with those computed from ARGO-buoys interpolated fields, referring to a customised partition of the global ocean into seven regions, according to the water masses classification of [6]. In [7], moreover, besides using TS diagrams as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the temporal variation of SST and SSS (and their corresponding density) as estimated by satellite measurements, the emphasis was on the interpretation of the geographical deviations with respect to the ARGO baseline (aiming at distinguishing between the SSS retrieval errors and the additional information contained in the satellite data with respect to ARGO). In order to relate these mismatches to identifiable oceanographic structures and processes, additional satellite datasets of ocean currents, evaporation/precipitation fluxes, and wind speed have been super-imposed. Currently, the main focus of the study deals with the exploitation of these TS diagrams as a prognostic tool to derive water masses formation areas. Firstly, following the approach described in [8], the surface

  2. Is chronic groin pain a Bermuda triangle of sports medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebečić, Božidar; Japjec, Mladen; Janković, Saša; Vencel Čuljak; Dojčinović, Bojan; Starešinić, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Chronic groin pain is one the most complex conditions encountered in the field of sports medicine. Conservative treatment is long lasting and the result of treatment is often uncer- tain and symptom recurrences are common, which can be very frustrating for both the patient and the physician. The complex etiology and uncertainties during treatment of chronic groin pain is the reason why some authors call it the Bermuda Triangle of sports medicine. In our prospective, 7-year study, 114 athletes with chronic groin pain resistant to conservative therapy were treated surgically. In 109 athletes with sports hernia, we performed nerve neurolysis along with resection of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve and we also reinforced the posterior wall of inguinal canal using a modified Shouldice technique. In 26 athletes that had concomitant adductor tendinosis and in 5 athletes with isolated tendinosis we performed tenotomy. Eighty-one of 83 patients with isolated sports hernia returned to sports within a mean of 4.4 (range, 3-16) weeks. Thirty-one athletes with adductor tenotomy returned to sports activity within a mean of 11.8 (range, 10-15) weeks. If carefully diagnosed using detailed history taking, physical examination and correct imaging techniques, chronic groin pain can be treated very successfully and quickly, so it need not be a Bermuda Triangle of sports medicine.

  3. Precipitation fields interpolated from gauge stations versus a merged radar-gauge precipitation product: influence on modelled soil moisture at local scale and at SMOS scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. dall'Amico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of coarse resolution soil moisture products from missions such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission, hydrological modelling of soil moisture is an important tool. The spatial distribution of precipitation is among the most crucial input data for such models. Thus, reliable time series of precipitation fields are required, but these often need to be interpolated from data delivered by scarcely distributed gauge station networks. In this study, a commercial precipitation product derived by Meteomedia AG from merging radar and gauge data is introduced as a novel means of adding the promising area-distributed information given by a radar network to the more accurate, but point-like measurements from a gauge station network. This precipitation product is first validated against an independent gauge station network. Further, the novel precipitation product is assimilated into the hydrological land surface model PROMET for the Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany, one of the major SMOS calibration and validation sites in Europe. The modelled soil moisture fields are compared to those obtained when the operational interpolation from gauge station data is used to force the model. The results suggest that the assimilation of the novel precipitation product can lead to deviations of modelled soil moisture in the order of 0.15 m3 m−3 on small spatial (∼1 km2 and short temporal resolutions (∼1 day. As expected, after spatial aggregation to the coarser grid on which SMOS data are delivered (~195 km2, these differences are reduced to the order of 0.04 m3 m−3, which is the accuracy benchmark for SMOS. The results of both model runs are compared to brightness temperatures measured by the airborne L-band radiometer EMIRAD during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010. Both comparisons yield equally good correlations, confirming the model's ability to

  4. Root-zone plant available water estimation using the SMOS-derived soil water index

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zamora, Ángel; Sánchez, Nilda; Martínez-Fernández, José; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Currently, there are several space missions capable of measuring surface soil moisture, owing to the relevance of this variable in meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. However, the Plant Available Water (PAW), which in some fields of application could be more important than the soil moisture itself, cannot be directly measured by remote sensing. Considering the root zone as the first 50 cm of the soil, in this study, the PAW at 25 cm and 50 cm and integrated between 0 and 50 cm of soil depth was estimated using the surface soil moisture provided by the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. For this purpose, the Soil Water Index (SWI) has been used as a proxy of the root-zone soil moisture, involving the selection of an optimal T (Topt), which can be interpreted as a characteristic soil water travel time. In this research, several tests using the correlation coefficient (R), the Nash-Sutcliffe score (NS), several error estimators and bias as predictor metrics were applied to obtain the Topt, making a comprehensive study of the T parameter. After analyzing the results, some differences were found between the Topt obtained using R and NS as decision metrics, and that obtained using the errors and bias, but the SWI showed good results as an estimator of the root-zone soil moisture. This index showed good agreement, with an R between 0.60 and 0.88. The method was tested from January 2010 to December 2014, using the database of the Soil Moisture Measurements Stations Network of the University of Salamanca (REMEDHUS) in Spain. The PAW estimation showed good agreement with the in situ measurements, following closely the dry-downs and wetting-up events, with R ranging between 0.60 and 0.92, and error values lower than 0.05 m3m-3. A slight underestimation was observed for both the PAW and root-zone soil moisture at the different depths; this could be explained by the underestimation pattern observed with the SMOS L2 soil moisture product, in line with previous

  5. Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery between 20110607 and 20110627

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the three week NOAA Ocean Exploration project, Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery, our four member deep team, aided by numerous assistants,...

  6. A Novel Bias Correction Method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Soil Moisture: Retrieval Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bias correction is a very important pre-processing step in satellite data assimilation analysis, as data assimilation itself cannot circumvent satellite biases. We introduce a retrieval algorithm-specific and spatially heterogeneous Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV bias correction method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS soil moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to present the probabilistic presentation of SMOS soil moisture using retrieval ensembles. We illustrate that retrieval ensembles effectively mitigated the overestimation problem of SMOS soil moisture arising from brightness temperature errors over West Africa in a computationally efficient way (ensemble size: 12, no time-integration. In contrast, the existing method of Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF matching considerably increased the SMOS biases, due to the limitations of relying on the imperfect reference data. From the validation at two semi-arid sites, Benin (moderately wet and vegetated area and Niger (dry and sandy bare soils, it was shown that the SMOS errors arising from rain and vegetation attenuation were appropriately corrected by ensemble approaches. In Benin, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs decreased from 0.1248 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.0678 m3/m3 for the proposed ensemble approach. In Niger, the RMSEs decreased from 0.14 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.045 m3/m3 for the ensemble approach.

  7. Canadian Oceans and Coaastal Socio-Econimic Initiatives Using Envisat, SMOS, CryoSat-2 and RADARSAT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aube, Guy; Crevier, Yves

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has been involved in the support of scientific initiatives, demonstration projects and operational activities related to oceans and coastal research, monitoring and management. Through the Government Related Initiatives Program (GRIP) and the Earth Observation Application Development Program (EOADP), the CSA and its public and private sector partners have fostered the development of Earth Observation (EO) information and services to monitor, understand and manage Canadian oceans (i.e. coastal zone, oil spills, ship detection, ocean colour, algae bloom, sea surface salinity, illegal fishing, etc.). The CSA understands the tremendous role and value that space-based EO systems and information have regarding oceans management and its environmental and socio-economic impacts and benefits. The proposed poster will provide a brief description of the Canadian EO initiatives and activities (i.e. ENVISAT/ MERIS & ASAR; SMOS, RADARSAT-2; etc.) affecting our oceans, focusing on existing EO programs, coordinated activities and assets.

  8. Validation of SMOS Brightness Temperatures During the HOBE Airborne Campaign, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    of SMOS L1C brightness temperatures $T_{B}$ of the selected node. Data is stepwise compared from point via EMIRAD to SMOS scale. From ground soil moisture samples, $T_{B}$'s are pointwise estimated through the L-band microwave emission of the biosphere model using land cover specific model settings...... accordance on the single day where comparison is not prevented by strong radio-frequency interference (RFI) (May 2, avg. $hbox{RMSE} = 9.7 hbox{K}$). While the advantages of solid data sets of- - high spatial coverage and density throughout spatial scales for SMOS validation could be clearly demonstrated...... vegetation and higher open water fractions at surrounding grid nodes....

  9. Overview of SMOS L4 products under development and implementation at CATDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann; Merlin, Olivier; Tomer, Sat; Molero, Beatriz; Chone, Audrey; Cabot, François; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Cherchali, Selma

    2014-05-01

    Higher end level 4 products for EOS (Earth observation satellites) are products obtained from the combination of sensors data with other sensors or models. Those products are obtained from the extension of remote sensing application studies to wider conditions and regions. This study concerns the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) level 4 products. Several level 4 products using the SMOS data are under development in the framework of the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS), the French national effort into the development of level 3 (time synthesis) and level 4 (higher-end products). Those products can be divided into two groups: Enhanced resolution products: Higher resolution products obtained from the combination of optical, thermal and microwave remote sensing products, Synergetic higher resolution products obtained from the combination of radar and microwave soil moisture products over India. Extreme event products: Global drought index obtained from the insertion of SMOS soil moisture L3 products and climate data from NCEP and ECMWF into a double bucket model, Flood prediction and monitoring at large scale based on the use of forecast precipitation data and SMOS soil moisture data before and during the flood events. A selection of those products like enhance drought index, Dispatch products, enhanced rainfall products are being implemented in an operational context . In this study the different algorithms behind each product are presented and detailed. Synthetic validation results and demonstration studies are shown, and quantitative comparison to other products are shown. Keywords: SMOS, SMAP, microwave, level 4, soil moisture, flooding, drought, Dispatch, disaggregation

  10. Validation of SMOS sea ice thickness retrieval in the northern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Maaß

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission observes brightness temperatures at a low microwave frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band with a daily coverage of the polar regions. L-band radiometry has been shown to provide information on the thickness of thin sea ice. Here, we apply a new emission model that has previously been used to investigate the impact of snow on thick Arctic sea ice. The model has not yet been used to retrieve ice thickness. In contrast to previous SMOS ice thickness retrievals, the new model allows us to include a snow layer in the brightness temperature simulations. Using ice thickness estimations from satellite thermal imagery, we simulate brightness temperatures during the ice growth season 2011 in the northern Baltic Sea. In both the simulations and the SMOS observations, brightness temperatures increase by more than 20 K, most likely due to an increase of ice thickness. Only if we include the snow in the model, the absolute values of the simulations and the observations agree well (mean deviations below 3.5 K. In a second comparison, we use high-resolution measurements of total ice thickness (sum of ice and snow thickness from an electromagnetic (EM sounding system to simulate brightness temperatures for 12 circular areas. While the SMOS observations and the simulations that use the EM modal ice thickness are highly correlated (r 2=0.95, the simulated brightness temperatures are on average 12 K higher than observed by SMOS. This would correspond to an 8-cm overestimation of the modal ice thickness by the SMOS retrieval. In contrast, if the simulations take into account the shape of the EM ice thickness distributions (r 2=0.87, the mean deviation between simulated and observed brightness temperatures is below 0.1 K.

  11. Soil moisture variability over Odra watershed: Comparison between SMOS and GLDAS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Kędzior, Mateusz

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of temporal and spatial soil moisture variability is an important issue, both from practical and scientific point of view. It is well known that passive, L-band, radiometric measurements provide best soil moisture estimates. Unfortunately as it was observed during Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, which was specially dedicated to measure soil moisture, these measurements suffer significant data loss. It is caused mainly by radio frequency interference (RFI) which strongly contaminates Central Europe and even in particularly unfavorable conditions, might prevent these data from being used for regional or watershed scale analysis. Nevertheless, it is highly awaited by researchers to receive statistically significant information on soil moisture over the area of a big watershed. One of such watersheds, the Odra (Oder) river watershed, lies in three European countries - Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic. The area of the Odra river watershed is equal to 118,861 km2 making it the second most important river in Poland as well as one of the most significant one in Central Europe. This paper examines the SMOS soil moisture data in the Odra river watershed in the period from 2010 to 2012. This attempt was made to check the possibility of assessing, from the low spatial resolution observations of SMOS, useful information that could be exploited for practical aims in watershed scale, for example, in water storage models even while moderate RFI takes place. Such studies, performed over the area of a large watershed, were recommended by researchers in order to obtain statistically significant results. To meet these expectations, Centre Aval de Traitement des Donnes SMOS (CATDS), 3-days averaged data, together with Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Oregon State University/Air Force/Hydrologic Research Lab (NOAH) model 0.25 soil moisture values were used for statistical analyses and mutual

  12. Dissolved organic matter in anoxic pore waters from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Spiker, E. C.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter and dissolved inorganic chemical species in anoxic pore water from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda sediments were studied to evaluate the role of pore water in the early diagenesis of organic matter. Dissolved sulphate, titration alkalinity, phosphate, and ammonia concentration versus depth profiles were typical of many nearshore clastic sediments and indicated sulphate reduction in the upper 100 cm of sediment. The dissolved organic matter in the pore water was made up predominantly of large molecules, was concentrated from large quantities of pore water by using ultrafiltration and was extensively tudied by using elemental and stable carbon isotope analysis and high-resolution, solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that this material has a predominantly polysaccharide-like structure and in addition contains a large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g., carboxyl groups). The 13C nulcear magnetic resonance spectra of the high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter resemble those of the organic matter in the surface sediments of Mangrove Lake. We propose that this high-molecular-weight organic matter in pore waters represents the partially degraded, labile organic components of the sedimentary organic matter and that pore waters serve as a conduit for removal of these labile organic components from the sediments. The more refractory components are, thus, selectively preserved in the sediments as humic substances (primarily humin). ?? 1986.

  13. Bermuda Triangle for the liver: alcohol, obesity, and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Samir

    2013-08-01

    Despite major progress in understanding and managing liver disease in the past 30 years, it is now among the top 10 most common causes of death globally. Several risk factors, such as genetics, diabetes, obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, viral infection, gender, immune dysfunction, and medications, acting individually or in concert, are known to precipitate liver damage. Viral hepatitis, excessive alcohol consumption, and obesity are the major factors causing liver injury. Estimated numbers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects worldwide are staggering (370 and 175 million, respectively), and of the 40 million known human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects, 4 and 5 million are coinfected with HBV and HCV, respectively. Alcohol and HCV are the leading causes of end-stage liver disease worldwide and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States and Europe. In addition, the global obesity epidemic that affects up to 40 million Americans, and 396 million worldwide, is accompanied by an alarming incidence of end-stage liver disease, a condition exacerbated by alcohol. This article focuses on the interactions between alcohol, viral hepatitis, and obesity (euphemistically described here as the Bermuda Triangle of liver disease), and discusses common mechanisms and synergy.

  14. Bermuda as an evolutionary life raft for an ancient lineage of endangered lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandley, Matthew C; Wang, Yuezhao; Guo, Xianguang; Nieto Montes de Oca, Adrián; Fería Ortíz, Manuel; Hikida, Tsutomu; Ota, Hidetoshi

    2010-06-30

    Oceanic islands are well known for harboring diverse species assemblages and are frequently the basis of research on adaptive radiation and neoendemism. However, a commonly overlooked role of some islands is their function in preserving ancient lineages that have become extinct everywhere else (paleoendemism). The island archipelago of Bermuda is home to a single species of extant terrestrial vertebrate, the endemic skink Plestiodon (formerly Eumeces) longirostris. The presence of this species is surprising because Bermuda is an isolated, relatively young oceanic island approximately 1000 km from the eastern United States. Here, we apply Bayesian phylogenetic analyses using a relaxed molecular clock to demonstrate that the island of Bermuda, although no older than two million years, is home to the only extant representative of one of the earliest mainland North American Plestiodon lineages, which diverged from its closest living relatives 11.5 to 19.8 million years ago. This implies that, within a short geological time frame, mainland North American ancestors of P. longirostris colonized the recently emergent Bermuda and the entire lineage subsequently vanished from the mainland. Thus, our analyses reveal that Bermuda is an example of a "life raft" preserving millions of years of unique evolutionary history, now at the brink of extinction. Threats such as habitat destruction, littering, and non-native species have severely reduced the population size of this highly endangered lizard.

  15. Bermuda as an evolutionary life raft for an ancient lineage of endangered lizards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Brandley

    Full Text Available Oceanic islands are well known for harboring diverse species assemblages and are frequently the basis of research on adaptive radiation and neoendemism. However, a commonly overlooked role of some islands is their function in preserving ancient lineages that have become extinct everywhere else (paleoendemism. The island archipelago of Bermuda is home to a single species of extant terrestrial vertebrate, the endemic skink Plestiodon (formerly Eumeces longirostris. The presence of this species is surprising because Bermuda is an isolated, relatively young oceanic island approximately 1000 km from the eastern United States. Here, we apply Bayesian phylogenetic analyses using a relaxed molecular clock to demonstrate that the island of Bermuda, although no older than two million years, is home to the only extant representative of one of the earliest mainland North American Plestiodon lineages, which diverged from its closest living relatives 11.5 to 19.8 million years ago. This implies that, within a short geological time frame, mainland North American ancestors of P. longirostris colonized the recently emergent Bermuda and the entire lineage subsequently vanished from the mainland. Thus, our analyses reveal that Bermuda is an example of a "life raft" preserving millions of years of unique evolutionary history, now at the brink of extinction. Threats such as habitat destruction, littering, and non-native species have severely reduced the population size of this highly endangered lizard.

  16. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: a comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is used...

  17. Assimilation of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrievals in the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Cae, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable for weather prediction because of its influence on evaporation. It is of critical importance for drought and flood monitoring and prediction and for public health applications. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) has implemented a new module in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) to assimilate observations from the ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. SMOS Level 2 retrievals from the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument are assimilated into the Noah LSM within LIS via an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The retrievals have a target volumetric accuracy of 4% at a resolution of 35-50 km. Parallel runs with and without SMOS assimilation are performed with precipitation forcing from intentionally degraded observations, and then validated against a model run using the best available precipitation data, as well as against selected station observations. The goal is to demonstrate how SMOS data assimilation can improve modeled soil states in the absence of dense rain gauge and radar networks.

  18. CoSMOS: Performance of Kurtosis Algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference Detection and Mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misra, Sidharth; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Skou, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a previously developed algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation is experimentally evaluated. Results obtained from CoSMOS, an airborne campaign using a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer are analyzed for this purpose. Data is collected using two...

  19. Mitigation of biases in SMOS Level 2 soil moisture retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Ali; Richaume, Philippe; Kerr, Yann

    2017-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) relies on the L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) radiative transfer models to retrieve soil moisture (SM). These models require, as input, parameters which characterize the target like soil water content and temperature. The Soil Water Volume at Level 1 (SWVL1) from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) is used in the SMOS Level 2 SM algorithms as both an initial guess for SM in the iterative retrieval process and to compute fixed contributions from the so called "default" fractions. In case of mixed fractions of nominal (low vegetation land) and forest, retrieval is performed over one fraction while the contribution of the other is assumed to be fixed and known based on ECMWF data. Studies have shown that ECMWF SWVL1 is biased when compared to SMOS SM and represents values at a deeper layer of soil ( 7 cm) than that represented by SMOS ( 2 to 5 cm). This study uses a well know bias reduction technique based on matching of the Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDF) of the two distributions to help reduce the biases. Early results using a linear matching method provide very encouraging results. A complication with respect to performing CDF matching is that SMOS SM values are not available where they are needed, i.e. over the default fractions. In order to remedy this, we treat mixed fractions as homogeneous targets to retrieve SM over the whole target. The obtained values are then used to derive the CDF matching coefficients. A set of CDF coefficients derived using average and standard deviation of soil moisture values for 2014 has been used in reprocessing SMOS data for 2014 and 2015, as well as over selected sites (with in-situ data) over a longer period. The 2014 was selected due to its lower Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) contamination in comparison with other years. The application of CDF coefficients has lead to a wetter SM for

  20. Mangrove Retreat with Rising Sea-level, Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Joanna C.

    1993-07-01

    Low island mangroves keep up with slow sea-level rise by peat accumulation. Holocene stratigraphic records show that they maintain the same pace as sea-level rise at rates up to 9 cm/100 years. Tide gauge records from Bermuda since 1932 show sea-level rise at a rate of 28 cm/100 years. The largest mangrove area (6·26 acres) at Hungry Bay has for the last 2000 years been building peat at a rate of 8·5 to 10·6 cm/100 years. Retreat of the seaward edge has caused loss of 2·24 acres of mangroves, commencing in the last few hundred years, with a second dieback between 1900 and 1947, and a third dieback in the last decade. The substrate elevation of the seaward margin of mangroves is below mean sea-level, the normal lower limit for mangroves. Present dieback shows problems of erosion indicating that the Bruun Rule of beach erosion with sea-level rise is also appropriate for mangrove swamps. Stratigraphy shows that before 4000 BP sea-level rose at a rate of 25 cm/100 years, from 4000 to 1000 years BP the rate of sea-level rise declined to 6 cm/100 years during which time mangroves established, and in the last 1000 years there was an increase to 14·3 cm/100 years, during which time the mangroves died back. This study indicates that low island mangroves will experience problems with the rates of sea-level rise predicted for the next 50 years.

  1. SURFEX modeling of soil moisture fields over the Valencia Anchor Station and their comparison to different SMOS products and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Samiro Khodayar-Pardo, D.

    2016-07-01

    Soil moisture is a difficult variable to obtain proper representation because of its high temporal and spatial variability. It is a significant parameter in agriculture, hydrology, meteorology and related disciplines. {it SVAT (Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer)} models can be used to simulate the temporal behaviour and spatial distribution of soil moisture in a given area. In this work, we use the {bf SURFEX (Surface Externalisée)} model developed at the {it Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM)} at Météo-France (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/surfex/) to simulate soil moisture at the {bf Valencia Anchor Station}. SURFEX integrates the {bf ISBA (Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère}; surfaces with vegetation) module to describe the land surfaces (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/isbadoc/model.html) that have been adapted to describe the land covers of our study area. The Valencia Anchor Station was chosen as a core validation site for the {it SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity)} mission and as one of the hydrometeorological sites for the {it HyMeX (HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment)} programme. This site represents a reasonably homogeneous and mostly flat area of about 50x50 km2. The main cover type is vineyards (65%), followed by fruit trees, shrubs, and pine forests, and a few small scattered industrial and urban areas. Except for the vineyard growing season, the area remains mostly under bare soil conditions. In spite of its relatively flat topography, the small altitude variations of the region clearly influence climate. This oscillates between semiarid and dry sub-humid. Annual mean temperatures are between 12 ºC and 14.5 ºC, and annual precipitation is about 400-450 mm. The duration of frost free periods is from May to November, with maximum precipitation in spring and autumn. The first part of this investigation consists in simulating soil moisture fields over the Valencia Anchor Station to be compared with SMOS level-2

  2. Rainfall estimation over-land using SMOS soil moisture observations: SM2RAIN, LMAA and SMART algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Kerr, Yann; Crow, Wade; Cascon, Carlos; Ciabatta, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in the measurement of precipitation from space have provided estimates at scales that are commensurate with the needs of the hydrological and land-surface model communities. However, as demonstrated in a number of studies (Ebert et al. 2007, Tian et al. 2007, Stampoulis et al. 2012) satellite rainfall estimates are characterized by low accuracy in certain conditions and still suffer from a number of issues (e.g., bias) that may limit their utility in over-land applications (Serrat-Capdevila et al. 2014). In recent years many studies have demonstrated that soil moisture observations from ground and satellite sensors can be used for correcting satellite precipitation estimates (e.g. Crow et al., 2011; Pellarin et al., 2013), or directly estimating rainfall (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014). In this study, we carried out a detailed scientific analysis in which these three different methods are used for: i) estimating rainfall through satellite soil moisture observations (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014); ii) correcting rainfall through a Land surface Model Assimilation Algorithm (LMAA) (an improvement of a previous work of Crow et al. 2011 and Pellarin et al. 2013) and through the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART, Crow et al. 2011). The analysis is carried within the ESA project "SMOS plus Rainfall" and involves 9 sites in Europe, Australia, Africa and USA containing high-quality hydrometeorological and soil moisture observations. Satellite soil moisture data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are employed for testing their potential in deriving a cumulated rainfall product at different temporal resolutions. The applicability and accuracy of the three algorithms is investigated also as a function of climatic and soil/land use conditions. A particular attention is paid to assess the expected limitations soil moisture based rainfall estimates such as soil saturation, freezing/snow conditions, SMOS RFI, irrigated areas

  3. Vernon Bermuda Workshop: A Course in Sub-tropical Island Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    More than 30 years ago, educators in central Connecticut developed the Vernon Bermuda Workshop as a means of introducing middle- and high-school students to subtropical island ecology. Each year, after months of classroom preparation, approximately 20 top students spend one week at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (St. George's, Bermuda) studying the local flora and fauna in both the field and laboratory. The curriculum includes an additional array of activities, ranging from historical and ecological tours to spelunking, and culminates in a series of field-observation-related presentations. I am responsible for the meteorological and oceanographic components of the curriculum. In the field, my students collect time-series of biophysical variables over the course of a day, which they use to interpret diurnal patterns and interactions amongst the variables. I also add remote-sensing and phytoplankton biology components to the curriculum - in previous years, my students have studied time-series of Sea WIFS imagery collected at Bermuda during our trip. I have been an Instructor for this Workshop since 2003. The Workshop provides an outreach activity for GSFC Code 616.

  4. Comparison of measured brightness temperatures from SMOS with modelled ones from ORCHIDEE and H-TESSEL over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Polcher, Jan; de Rosnay, Patricia; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    L-band radiometry is considered to be one of the most suitable techniques to estimate surface soil moisture (SSM) by means of remote sensing. Brightness temperatures are key in this process, as they are the main input in the retrieval algorithm which yields SSM estimates. The work exposed compares brightness temperatures measured by the SMOS mission to two different sets of modelled ones, over the Iberian Peninsula from 2010 to 2012. The two modelled sets were estimated using a radiative transfer model and state variables from two land-surface models: (i) ORCHIDEE and (ii) H-TESSEL. The radiative transfer model used is the CMEM. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations at the moment. Further hypotheses are proposed and will be explored in a forthcoming paper. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies.

  5. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntemann, M.; Heygster, G.; Kaleschke, L.; Krumpen, T.; Mäkynen, M.; Drusch, M.

    2013-08-01

    Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  6. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  7. SMOS sea ice product: Operational application and validation in the Barents Sea marginal ice zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Maaß, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Brightness temperatures at 1.4. GHz (L-band) measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission have been used to derive the thickness of sea ice. The retrieval method is applicable only for relatively thin ice and not during the melting period. Hitherto, the availability of ground...... truth sea ice thickness measurements for validation of SMOS sea ice products was mainly limited to relatively thick ice. The situation has improved with an extensive field campaign in the Barents Sea during an anomalous ice edge retreat and subsequent freeze-up event in March 2014. A sea ice forecast...... system for ship route optimisation has been developed and was tested during this field campaign with the ice-strengthened research vessel RV Lance. The ship cruise was complemented with coordinated measurements from a helicopter and the research aircraft Polar 5. Sea ice thickness was measured using...

  8. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: A comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Crow, Wade T.; Ciabatta, Luca; Massari, Christian; Ryu, Dongryeol; Su, Chun-Hsu; Rüdiger, Christoph; Kerr, Yann

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used for improving satellite rainfall estimates obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission multisatellite precipitation analysis product (TMPA) using three different "bottom up" techniques: SM2RAIN, Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool, and Antecedent Precipitation Index Modification. The implementation of these techniques aims at improving the well-known "top down" rainfall estimate derived from TMPA products (version 7) available in near real time. Ground observations provided by the Australian Water Availability Project are considered as a separate validation data set. The three algorithms are calibrated against the gauge-corrected TMPA reanalysis product, 3B42, and used for adjusting the TMPA real-time product, 3B42RT, using SMOS soil moisture data. The study area covers the entire Australian continent, and the analysis period ranges from January 2010 to November 2013. Results show that all the SMOS-based rainfall products improve the performance of 3B42RT, even at daily time scale (differently from previous investigations). The major improvements are obtained in terms of estimation of accumulated rainfall with a reduction of the root-mean-square error of more than 25%. Also, in terms of temporal dynamic (correlation) and rainfall detection (categorical scores) the SMOS-based products provide slightly better results with respect to 3B42RT, even though the relative performance between the methods is not always the same. The strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm and the spatial variability of their performances are identified in order to indicate the ways forward for this promising research activity. Results show that the integration of bottom up and top down approaches

  9. Comparison of NOAA-CREST Soil Moisture Measurements with SMOS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Forbes, A.

    2014-12-01

    In October 2014, the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission (SMAP) will launch into a near-polar and sun- synchronous orbit. SMAP includes the first 3 KM resolution product, by both radar and radiometer sensors which will transmit useful information concentrating on the global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw cycles. NOAA- CREST (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology) deploys a series of in-situ devices into the soil, and an L-BAND Radiometer close to the site ground at the Cary Institute in Millbrook, NY. The site is important for future validation of SMAP mission. Comparing mathematical and ground based remote sensing of soil moisture is beneficial to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. The focus of this research is to analyze and compare soil moisture from ESA- SMOS (Europe Space Agency- Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) mission and the Cary Institute's soil moisture measurements within the same time period, and location. In the interest of establishing superb authentication; comparing SMOS and ground measurements will justify the accuracy of the newly launch satellite. Discrepancies can be found between field point measurement and relatively large footprint of SMOS, which affects comparison and validation. Several techniques and statistical methods will provide a more meaningful comparison to analyze soil moisture data. The results of this project will help to provide a useful method to compare the NOAA-CREST soil moisture measurements and SMAP measurements. In conclusion, the SMAP advance technology will provide more accurate feedback for modeling numerical weather and climate models. Keywords: Soil Moisture, Precipitation, CREST-SMART, Cary Institute, In-situ, Remote Sensors Accurate Soil Moisture Data, Millbrook, N.Y., CATDS, Hydrology is the branch of science concerning properties of earth's water especially its movement in relation to land. SMOS MIRAS, SMAP, Sensors (Underground)

  10. SMOS derived sea ice thickness: algorithm baseline, product specifications and initial verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tian-Kunze

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the launch of ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean salinity (SMOS mission it has been shown that brightness temperatures at a low microwave frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band are sensitive to sea ice properties. In a first demonstration study, sea ice thickness has been derived using a semi-empirical algorithm with constant tie-points. Here we introduce a novel iterative retrieval algorithm that is based on a sea ice thermodynamic model and a three-layer radiative transfer model, which explicitly takes variations of ice temperature and ice salinity into account. In addition, ice thickness variations within a SMOS footprint are considered through a statistical thickness distribution function derived from high-resolution ice thickness measurements from NASA's Operation IceBridge campaign. This new algorithm has been used for the continuous operational production of a SMOS based sea ice thickness data set from 2010 on. This data set is compared and validated with estimates from assimilation systems, remote sensing data, and airborne electromagnetic sounding data. The comparisons show that the new retrieval algorithm has a considerably better agreement with the validation data and delivers a more realistic Arctic-wide ice thickness distribution than the algorithm used in the previous study.

  11. Long-term trends in aerosol and precipitation composition over the western North Atlantic Ocean at Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, W. C.; Moody, J. L.; Galloway, J. N.; Prospero, J. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Eckhardt, S.; Maben, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    greater than those in near surface aerosol, which implies that, for these flow regimes, precipitation is a better indicator of overall anthropogenic impacts on the lower troposphere. Particulate nss SO42- under African flow also decreased significantly (34%) whereas the corresponding decrease in nss SO42- associated with precipitation was insignificant. We infer that these trends were driven in part by reductions in the emissions and transport of oxidized S compounds from Europe. The lack of significant trends in NO3- associated with aerosols and precipitation under NEUS/SEUS flow is notable in light of the large decrease (37%) in NOx emissions in the US and Canada over the period of record. Rapid chemical processing of oxidized N in marine air contributed to this lack of correspondence. Decreasing ratios of nss SO42- to NH4+ and the significant decreasing trend in precipitation acidity (37%) indicate that the total amount of acidity in the multiphase gas-aerosol system in the western NAO troposphere decreased over the period of record. Decreasing aerosol acidities would have shifted the phase partitioning of total NH3 (NH3 + particulate NH4+ towards the gas phase thereby decreasing the atmospheric lifetime of total NH3 against wet plus dry deposition. The trend of increasing NH4+ in precipitation at Bermuda over the period of record suggests that NH3 emissions from surrounding continents also increased. Decreasing particulate nss SO42- in near-surface air under NEUS/SEUS flow over the period of record implies that the corresponding shortwave scattering and absorption by nss S and associated aerosols constituents also decreased. These changes in radiative transfer suggest a corresponding lower limit for net warming over the period in the range of 0.1-0.3 W m-2.

  12. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  13. Molecular characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpaka, Patrick Eberechi; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Wilson, Clyde; Jayaratne, Padman; Smith, Ashley; Golding, George R.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular characteristics of vancomycin resistant enterococci isolates from Bermuda Island is currently unknown. This study was conducted to investigate phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of VRE isolates from Bermuda Island using the chromogenic agar, E-tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eighteen E. faecium isolates were completely analyzed and were all resistant to vancomycin, susceptible to linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin, positive for vanA and esp genes. The MLST analysis confirmed most isolates were of the sequence types linked to clonal complex 17 (CC17) that is widely associated with outbreaks in hospitals. Infection control measures, antibiotic stewardship, and surveillance activities will continue to be a priority in hospital on the Island. PMID:28267763

  14. Genetic ancestry and indigenous heritage in a Native American descendant community in Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, Jill B; Owings, Amanda C; Vilar, Miguel G; Dulik, Matthew C; Gaieski, David F; Gittelman, Rachel M; Lindo, John; Gau, Lydia; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-11-01

    Discovered in the early 16th century by European colonists, Bermuda is an isolated set of islands located in the mid-Atlantic. Shortly after its discovery, Bermuda became the first English colony to forcibly import its labor by trafficking in enslaved Africans, white ethnic minorities, and indigenous Americans. Oral traditions circulating today among contemporary tribes from the northeastern United States recount these same events, while, in Bermuda, St. David's Islanders consider their histories to be linked to a complex Native American, European, and African past. To investigate the influence of historical events on biological ancestry and native cultural identity, we analyzed genetic variation in 111 members of Bermuda's self-proclaimed St. David's Island Native Community. Our results reveal that the majority of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplotypes are of African and West Eurasian origin. However, unlike other English-speaking New World colonies, most African mtDNA haplotypes appear to derive from central and southeast Africa, reflecting the extent of maritime activities in the region. In light of genealogical and oral historical data from the St. David's community, the low frequency of Native American mtDNA and NRY lineages may reflect the influence of genetic drift, the demographic impact of European colonization, and historical admixture with persons of non-native backgrounds, which began with the settlement of the islands. By comparing the genetic data with genealogical and historical information, we are able to reconstruct the complex history of this Bermudian community, which is unique among New World populations.

  15. Evaluation of random cascade hierarchical and statistical arrangement model in disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.; Magagi, R.; Goita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology that can be derived from remote sensing. In different studies, it was shown that optical-thermal, active and passive microwave remote sensing data can be used for soil moisture estimation. However, the most promising approach to estimate soil moisture in large areas is passive microwave radiometry. Global estimation of soil moisture is now operational by using remote sensing techniques. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave radiometers that were lunched on 2002 and 2009 respectively along with the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite that was planned to be lunched in the time frame of 2014-2015 make remote sensing to be more useful in soil moisture estimation. However, the spatial resolutions of AMSR-E, SMOS and SMAP are 60 km, 40 km and 10 km respectively. These very low spatial resolutions can not show the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture in field or small scales. So, using disaggregation methods is required to efficiently using the passive microwave derived soil moisture information in different scales. The low spatial resolutions of passive microwave satellites can be improved by using disaggregation methods. Random Cascade (RC) model (Over and Gupta, 1996) is used in this research to downscale the 40 km resolution of SMOS satellite. By using this statistical method, the SMOS soil moisture resolutions are improved to 20 km, 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km, respectively. The data that were measured during Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) field campaign are used to do the experiments. Totally the ground data and SMOS images that were obtained during 13 different days from 7-June-2012 to 13-July-2012 are used. By comparison with ground soil moisture, it is observed that the SMOS soil moisture is underestimated for all the images and so bias amounts

  16. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maaß

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.9 K to 4.7 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Although dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness under cold Arctic conditions. The brightness temperatures' dependence on snow thickness can be explained by the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.1 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 5.5 cm, and the coefficient of determination is r2 = 0.58.

  17. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maaß

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.0 K to 4.4 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Under cold Arctic conditions we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness. Because dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, this brightness temperature's dependence on snow thickness origins from the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.7 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 6.3 cm, and the correlation coefficient is r2 = 0.55.

  18. Comparison of SMAP and SMOS Measurements to PALS Airborne Acquisitions in 2015 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, Andreas; Misra, Sidharth; Chae, Chunsik; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Powers, Jarrett; McNairn, Heather; Bullock, Paul; Berg, Aaron; Magagi, Ramata; Kerr, Yann; Yueh, Simon

    2017-04-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state using L-band radiometer measurements. Well characterized sites with calibrated in situ soil moisture measurements are used to determine the quality of the soil moisture data products; these sites are designated as core validation sites (CVS). To support the CVS based validation airborne field experiments are used to provide high-fidelity validation data and to improve the SMAP retrieval algorithms. The SMAP project and NASA coordinated airborne field experiments at three CVS locations in 2015 and 2016. SMAP Validation Experiment 2015 (SMAPVEX15) was conducted around the Walnut Gulch CVS in Arizona in August, 2015. SMAPVEX16 was conducted at the South Fork CVS in Iowa and Carman CVS in Manitoba, Canada from May to August 2016. The main objective of SMAPVEX15 was to understand the effects and contribution of heterogeneity on the soil moisture retrievals, whereas the main objective of SMAPVEX16 was to understand the anomalous retrieval behavior observed over the South Fork and Carman CVS. Each campaign featured the airborne PALS (Passive Active L-band Sensor) instrument. PALS mapped the SMAPVEX15 experiment area 7 times and the SMAPVEX16 domains were each mapped 12 times. This makes altogether 30 coincidental measurements with SMAP. ESA's SMOS mission is another satellite making L-band brightness temperature measurements. The PALS flights coincided with 26 SMOS overpasses during these experiments. The area covered by PALS, at about 1 km resolution, was three adjacent SMAP pixels in SMAPVEX15 and one SMAP pixel over both of the domains in SMAPVEX16 (about 36 km). The spatial resolution of SMOS is similar to SMAP. Each field experiment was accompanied with intensive ground sampling regime consisting of manual sampling and augmentation of the CVS soil moisture

  19. Influence of the Bermuda High on interannual variability of summertime ozone in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Jia, Beixi; Wang, Sing-Chun; Estes, Mark; Shen, Lu; Xie, Yuanyu

    2016-12-01

    The Bermuda High (BH) quasi-permanent pressure system is the key large-scale circulation pattern influencing summertime weather over the eastern and southern US. Here we developed a multiple linear regression (MLR) model to characterize the effect of the BH on year-to-year changes in monthly-mean maximum daily 8 h average (MDA8) ozone in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) metropolitan region during June, July, and August (JJA). The BH indicators include the longitude of the BH western edge (BH-Lon) and the BH intensity index (BHI) defined as the pressure gradient along its western edge. Both BH-Lon and BHI are selected by MLR as significant predictors (p control whether or not low-ozone maritime air from the Gulf of Mexico can enter southeastern Texas and affect air quality. This mechanism also applies to other coastal urban regions along the Gulf Coast (e.g., New Orleans, LA, Mobile, AL, and Pensacola, FL), suggesting that the BH circulation pattern can affect surface ozone variability through a large portion of the Gulf Coast.

  20. 百慕大保险市场结构研究%Study on the Structure of Bermuda Insurance Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘璐; 王晓曦

    2015-01-01

    百慕大与美国以及欧洲保险市场并称为世界三大保险市场,在全球保险以及再保险市场具有举足轻重的地位。论文对百慕大保险市场现状和结构进行研究,首先回顾了百慕大保险市场的发展历程,而后阐述了百慕大保险市场监管和税收方面优势和特征以及这些优势对保险公司组建的积极影响,进而利用翔实地统计数据分析了百慕大保险市场的公司数量、公司类型和公司规模。对于百慕大保险市场在全球再保险市场中的地位和作用以及百慕大保险市场经营绩效和信用评级状况,论文也给予了详细论述。%Bermuda insurance market, US insurance market and the European insurance are the three most important insurance markets in the world. This article provides an economic review and statistical analysis of the Bermuda in-surance market. It begins with a brief history of the Bermuda market to set the stage for the subsequent discussions. The discussion then turns to the Bermuda regulatory and tax systems and their effects on company formation in Ber-muda. The advantages of Bermuda as an insurance domicile are then outlined. The statistical analysis provides an overview of the structure of the Bermuda market in terms of the number, type, and size of firms. The role of Ber-muda insurers in the global reinsurance market is discussed and analyzed. The article also analyzes the performance and the financial ratings of Bermuda ( re) insurance companies.

  1. Inversion model validation of ground emissivity. Contribution to the development of SMOS algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Ruffié, Gilles; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Grant, Jennifer; Hernandez, Daniel Medina

    2007-01-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), is the second mission of 'Earth Explorer' to be developed within the program 'Living Planet' of the European Space Agency (ESA). This satellite, containing the very first 1.4GHz interferometric radiometer 2D, will carry out the first cartography on a planetary scale of the moisture of the grounds and the salinity of the oceans. The forests are relatively opaque, and the knowledge of moisture remains problematic. The effect of the vegetation can be corrected thanks a simple radiative model. Nevertheless simulations show that the effect of the litter on the emissivity of a system litter + ground is not negligible. Our objective is to highlight the effects of this layer on the total multi layer system. This will make it possible to lead to a simple analytical formulation of a model of litter which can be integrated into the calculation algorithm of SMOS. Radiometer measurements, coupled to dielectric characterizations of samples in laboratory can enable us to characterize...

  2. A Tensile Strength of Bermuda Grass and Vetiver Grass in Terms of Root Reinforcement Ability Toward Soil Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorasyikin, M. N.; Zainab, M.

    2016-07-01

    An examination on root characteristics and root properties has been implemented in this study. Two types of bioengineering were chose which are Vetiver grass and Bermuda grass as these grasses were widely applied for slope stabilization. The root samples were taken to the laboratory to investigate its classification, characteristics and strength. The root of both grasses was found grow with fibrous root matrix system. In terms of root anchorage, the root matrix system of Vetiver grass was exhibits more strengthen than the Bermuda grass. However, observation on root image from Scanning Electron Microscope test reveals that the root of Vetiver grass becomes non-porous as the moisture content reduced. Meanwhile, the root tensile strength of Bermuda grass was obtained acquired low value with higher percentage of moisture content, root morphology and bonding strength. The results indicated that the root tensile strength is mainly influence by percentage of moisture content and root morphology.

  3. Effects of wet deposition on optical properties of the atmosphere over Bermuda and Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Deborah L.; Keene, William C.; Moody, Jennie L.; Maring, Hal; Galloway, James N.

    2003-02-01

    Substantial spatial and temporal variabilities in chemical and physical properties of aerosols complicate attempts to model associated influences on global climate. Although wet deposition is the major mechanism by which most aerosols are removed from the atmosphere, direct effects of precipitation on radiative properties of the atmosphere are not well understood. To address this issue, attenuation coefficients for total insoluble constituents (ACt) and for nonvolatile (at 500°C) insoluble constituents (ACnv; primarily crustal dust) of precipitation at Bermuda and Barbados were measured at six wavelengths between 414 and 859 nm. Coefficients for volatile (at 500°C) insoluble constituents (ACv; primarily carbonaceous species) were calculated by difference. Between April and September, ACt at Bermuda was dominated by mineral constituents transported from North Africa, whereas carbonaceous species from North America were relatively low and exhibited no systematic seasonal variability. ACt and ACnv at Barbados were dominated by mineral dust, especially between April and September. Relative to ACv, ACnv decreased more rapidly with increasing wavelength. The wavelength dependencies of ACs for volatile and nonvolatile constituents at Bermuda were statistically indistinguishable from those at Barbados. The optical and chemical characteristics of precipitation were compared with scattering and absorption by ambient aerosols in associated air parcels to evaluate the influence of scavenging on the radiative properties of air. Although discernible relationships were evident, the small number of cases limited their applicability as reliable empirical predictors. However, these data do provide useful constraints for validating models of aerosol scavenging and wet removal on the optical properties of the troposphere.

  4. Evaluation of a public health intervention to lower mercury exposure from fish consumption in Bermuda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dewailly

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of a public health intervention to reduce blood mercury (Hg concentration levels in pregnant Bermudian women. METHODS: In 2003, we conducted a study entitled "Prenatal exposure of the Bermudian Population to Environmental Contaminants" which provided Bermuda's first baseline data on prenatal exposure to several environmental contaminants, including Hg. The mean Hg concentration from 42 healthy newborns measured in umbilical cord blood was 41.3 nmol/L, ranging from 5-160 nmol/L. This concentration was much higher than expected, being approximately 8 times the general levels found in Canada and the U.S. Furthermore, we estimated that 85% of total Hg measured was in the form of methylmercury (MeHg, indicating that seafood consumption was the primary source of Hg exposure during pregnancy in Bermuda. Locally sourced seafood was identified as the most significant possible contributory source of Hg exposure. In 2005 the authors began a complementary research programme to study the levels of Hg in local commercial fish species. Coming out of this research were specific local fish consumption guidelines issued by the Department of Health advising pregnant women to avoid those local fish species found to be high in Hg while still encouraging consumption of fish species having lower Hg levels. RESULTS: In 2010, under another research initiative, we returned to Bermuda to carry out another evaluation of Hg in human blood. Hg was measured in the blood of 49 pregnant women. The arithmetic mean Hg blood concentration was 6.6 nmol/L and the geometric mean 4.2 nmol/L. The maximum concentration found was 24 nmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: Hg exposure of Bermudian pregnant women has dropped significantly by a factor of around 5 since the foetal cord blood study in 2003.

  5. Cloning and functional identification of stress-resistant BeDREB genes from Bermuda grass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yongli; WANG Zizhang; LIU Qiang; ZHANG Shuping

    2006-01-01

    Dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB)proteins,specifically binding to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE),have been identified as a group of important transcription activators of plants which regulate the expression of genes in response to drought,high-salt and low- temperature stresses.Two DREB-like genes from Bermuda grass that are induced by low-temperature or high-salt stresses were cloned using RT-PCR and RACE methods,and were named BeDREB1 and BeDREB2,respectively (GenBank accession No:AY462117 and AY462118).They contained an ORF of 753 bp encoding 251 amino acids,showing the typical characteristics of the DREB gene family.Interestingly,these two genes isolated from Bermuda grass induced either by low-temperature stress or high-salt stress shared 97.8% homology.Furthermore,it was demonstrated that both BeDREB1 and BeDREB2 could bind to the wild-type DRE element to activate the transcription of the reporter gene HIS3,driven by a promoter carrying DRE cis-element in yeast strain 4721,in the presence of 3-AT.RT-PCR showed that BeDREB1 and BeDREB2 genes could be greatly induced by low-temperature and high-salt stresses,respectively.Their expressions were changed following the inducible time.In conclusion,all results indicate that BeDREB1 and BeDREB2 genes isolated from treated Bermuda grass are new members'of the DREB transcription activator family,which may play very important roles in signal transduction related to stresses.

  6. New Chemical, Bio-Optical and Physical Observations of Upper Ocean Response to the Passage of a Mesoscale Eddy off Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J. D.; Jannasch, H. W.; Dickey, T.; McGillicuddy, D.; Brzekinski, M.; Sakamoto, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale eddy advected across the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site over a 30-day period centered on July 14, 1995. Temperature and current measurements along with biogeochemical measurements were used to characterize the biological response of the upper ocean associated with the introduction of nitrate into the euphoric layer due to the doming of isotherms associated with the eddy. Complementary shipboard data showed an anomalous water mass, which extended from a depth of approximately 50 to 1000 m, manifesting as a cold surface expression and warm anomaly at depth. Although mesoscale eddies are frequently observed in the Sargasso Sea, the present observations are particularly unique because of the high-temporal-resolution measurements of the new instrumentation deployed on the mooring. Analyzers that measure nitrate plus nitrite were placed at depths of 80 and 200 m and bio-optical sensors were located at depths of 20, 35, 45, 71, and 86 m. Peak nitrate values of nearly 3.0 microns at 80 m and chlorophyll alpha values of 1.4 mg/cu m at 71 m were observed, as well as a 25- to 30-meter shoaling of the 1% light level depth. A Doppler shift from the inertial period (22.8 hours) to 25.2 hours was observed in several time series records due to the movement of the eddy across the mooring. Inertial pumping brought cold, nutrient-rich waters farther into the euphotic zone than would occur solely by isothermal lifting. Silicic acid was depleted to undetectable levels owing to the growth of diatoms within the eddy. The chlorophyll alpha values associated with the eddy appear to be the largest recorded during the 8 years of the ongoing U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Study (BATS) program.

  7. Investigating Bermuda's pollution history through stable isotope analyses of modern and museum-held gorgonian corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David M; Murdoch, Thaddeus J T; Conti-Jerpe, Inga; Fogel, Marilyn

    2017-01-15

    For centuries, Bermuda has been challenged with wastewater management for the protection of human and environmental health. By quantifying the δ(15)N of the common sea fan Gorgonia ventalina sampled from 30 sites throughout Bermuda we show that sewage-derived nitrogen is detectable on nearshore coral reefs and declines across the lagoon to the outer rim. We also sampled gorgonians from two museum collections representing a 50y time-series (1958-2008). These samples revealed an increase in δ(15)N of >4.0‰ until the mid-1970s, after which δ(15)N values slowly declined by ~2.0‰. A δ(15)N chronology from a gorgonian skeleton exhibited a similar decline over the last 30-40years of approximately 0.6‰. We conclude that policies have been effective in reducing sewage impacts to Bermudian reefs. However, significant sources of sewage pollution persist and are likely have a strong impact on harbor and nearshore coral communities and human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of microbiological quality of drinking water from household tanks in Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, B; Pereg, D; Watkinson, E; Maguire, J S; Bissonnette, L; Gingras, S; Rouja, P; Bergeron, M G; Dewailly, E

    2008-06-01

    Bermuda residents collect rainwater from rooftops to fulfil their freshwater needs. The objective of this study was to assess the microbiological quality of drinking water in household tanks throughout Bermuda. The tanks surveyed were selected randomly from the electoral register. Governmental officers visited the selected household (n = 102) to collect water samples and administer a short questionnaire about the tank characteristics, the residents' habits in terms of water use, and general information on the water collecting system and its maintenance. At the same time, water samples were collected for analysis and total coliforms and Escherichia coli were determined by 2 methods (membrane filtration and culture on chromogenic media, Colilert kit). Results from the 2 methods were highly correlated and showed that approximately 90% of the samples analysed were contaminated with total coliforms in concentrations exceeding 10 CFU/100 mL, and approximately 66% of samples showed contamination with E. coli. Tank cleaning in the year prior to sampling seems to protect against water contamination. If rainwater collection from roofs is the most efficient mean for providing freshwater to Bermudians, it must not be considered a source of high quality drinking water because of the high levels of microbial contamination.

  9. Assemblages of hydroids (Cnidaria) from three seamounts near Bermuda in the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Dale R.

    2000-06-01

    Three seamounts flanking the oceanic island of Bermuda were sampled for hydroids. Collecting was undertaken by submersible (SDL-1) and by dredge at depths between 48 and 107 m on the summits of Argus and Challenger banks. A shallower collection (rhodoliths, limestone reefs, and areas of calcareous sand. Hydroids were ubiquitous, but quite sparse, on firm substrata. None was collected on sandy bottoms. Of 45 species identified from the two oceanic banks, over half (25) were found on both. On Bowditch Seamount, samples were obtained at depths between 1285 and 1381 m by dredge and grab. Of four species found, only one ( Filellum serratum) occurred in shallower collections from Argus and Challenger banks. Most species (43 of 48) from the three seamounts have been reported elsewhere in the Western Atlantic Tropical region, and many (38 of 48) are known from Bermuda. No endemics were discovered, and no relicts or exotics were recognized. Gonophores in >70% of the species are fixed sporosacs instead of free medusae. This conforms with a hypothesis that invertebrates of oceanic islands and seamounts tend to have short-lived pelagic larval stages, ensuring the greatest retention and conservation of propagules.

  10. Sessile invertebrate coelobite communities from reefs of Bermuda: Species composition and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, A.; Mathers, S. M.; Thomas, M. L. H.

    1984-04-01

    Sessile invertebrate coelobite communities attached to the walls and roof of cavities in coralgal reefs on the annular rim of the Bermuda platform near North Rock (4 sites) and in the algal cup reef tract on the south shore (3 sites) have been studied by belt photo-transects and direct sampling. Irradiance measurements reveal a light gradient which appears to exert a strong influence on the composition, relative coverage and zonation of the attached biotic communities. Two main communities are recognised from cluster analysis and relative areal coverage data. Near the cavity entrances is a community dominated by crustose coralline algae, with subsidiary ascidians, demosponges, bryozoans and Foraminifera. Species richness is high and there is total biotic coverage of walls and roof. This community grades laterally into an exclusively animal community characterised by encrusting sponges and Foraminifera, with subsidiary bryozoans and unidentified branching organisms. Coverage varies from 100% to 30%, the substrate often exhibiting high micro-relief from the branching growth forms of the Foraminifera. Species richness is high at North Rock sites, less so on the south shore. The distribution of coelobite species is compared with that described from previous studies in Bermuda, Grand Cayman and Madagascar.

  11. Assimilation of neural network soil moisture in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clement; Aires, Filipe; Prigent, Catherine; Kerr, Yann; Richaume, Philippe; Muñoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Drusch, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In this study a set of land surface data assimilation (DA) experiments making use of satellite derived soil moisture (SM) are presented. These experiments have two objectives: (1) to test the information content of satellite remote sensing of soil moisture for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and (2) to test a simplified assimilation of these data through the use of a Neural Network (NN) retrieval. Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data were used. The SMOS soil moisture dataset was obtained specifically for this project training a NN using SMOS brightness temperatures as input and using as reference for the training European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) H-TESSEL SM fields. In this way, the SMOS NN SM dataset has a similar climatology to that of the model and it does not present a global bias with respect to the model. The DA experiments are computed using a surface-only Land Data Assimilation System (so-LDAS) based on the HTESSEL land surface model. This system is very computationally efficient and allows to perform long surface assimilation experiments (one whole year, 2012). SMOS NN SM DA experiments are compared to ASCAT SM DA experiments. In both cases, experiments with and without 2 m air temperature and relative humidity DA are discussed using different observation errors for the ASCAT and SMOS datasets. Seasonal, geographical and soil-depth-related differences between the results of those experiments are presented and discussed. The different SM analysed fields are evaluated against a large number of in situ measurements of SM. On average, the SM analysis gives in general similar results to the model open loop with no assimilation even if significant differences can be seen for specific sites with in situ measurements. The sensitivity to observation errors to the SM dataset slightly differs depending on the networks of in situ measurements, however it is relatively low for the tests

  12. Function-Based Intervention for an Adolescent with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Bermuda: Moving across Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Amina M.; Umbreit, John; Liaupsin, Carl J.; Bartley, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Saida, a 16-year-old girl in Bermuda, attended a special alternative high school program for students with serious behavior problems. She had been receiving special education for her behavioral problems since the age of 5. Saida regularly used profanity in response to teacher directives, particularly in social studies class. A functional…

  13. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze-up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval algorithm sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. The algorithm shows high correlation with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze-up period.

  14. Geotechnical properties of sediments from North Pacific and Northern Bermuda Rise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A J; Laine, E P; Lipkin, J; Heath, G R; Akers, S A

    1980-01-01

    Studies of geotechnical properties for the Sub-seabed Disposal Program have been oriented toward sediment characterization related to effectiveness as a containment media and determination of detailed engineering behavior. Consolidation tests of the deeper samples in the North Pacific clays indicate that the sediment column is normally consolidated. The in-situ coefficient of permeability (k) within the cored depth of 25 meters is relatively constant at 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. Consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxial tests indicate stress-strain properties characteristic of saturated clays with effective angles of friction of 35/sup 0/ for smectite and 31/sup 0/ for illite. These results are being used in computer modeling efforts. Some general geotechnical property data from the Bermuda Rise are also discussed.

  15. Sharing Data to Build a Medical Information Commons: From Bermuda to the Global Alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ankeny, Rachel A; Maxson Jones, Kathryn

    2017-08-31

    The Human Genome Project modeled its open science ethos on nematode biology, most famously through daily release of DNA sequence data based on the 1996 Bermuda Principles. That open science philosophy persists, but daily, unfettered release of data has had to adapt to constraints occasioned by the use of data from individual people, broader use of data not only by scientists but also by clinicians and individuals, the global reach of genomic applications and diverse national privacy and research ethics laws, and the rising prominence of a diverse commercial genomics sector. The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health was established to enable the data sharing that is essential for making meaning of genomic variation. Data-sharing policies and practices will continue to evolve as researchers, health professionals, and individuals strive to construct a global medical and scientific information commons.

  16. Temporal patterns and behavioral characteristics of aggregation formation and spawning in the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Richard S.; Kadison, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Reef fish spawning aggregations are important life history events that occur at specific times and locations and represent the primary mode of reproduction for many species. This paper provides detailed descriptions of aggregation formation and mass spawning of the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix). Spawning coloration and gamete release of K. sectatrix were observed and filmed at the Grammanik Bank, a deep spawning aggregation site used by many different species located on the southern edge of the Puerto Rican shelf 10 km south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Underwater visual surveys using technical Nitrox and closed circuit re-breathers were conducted from December 2002 to March 2013 and documented spatial and temporal patterns of movement and aggregation formation along 1.5 km of mesophotic reef. The largest aggregations of K. sectatrix (>200 fish) were observed on the Grammanik Bank January to March from 0 to 11 d after the full moon with peak abundance from 60 to 80 d after the winter solstice across all survey years. Aggregation formation of K. sectatrix coincided with the spawning season of Nassau ( Epinephelus striatus) and yellowfin ( Mycteroperca venenosa) groupers. These spatial and temporal patterns of aggregation formation and spawning suggest that K. sectatrix, an herbivore, may also be a transient aggregating species. On several occasions, chubs were observed both pair spawning and mass spawning. Color patterns and behaviors associated with aggregation and spawning are described and compared to spawning characteristics observed in other species, many of which are similar but others that appear unique to K. sectatrix. This represents the first report of a kyphosid species aggregating to spawn and illuminates a portion of the poorly understood life history of the Bermuda chub.

  17. Gravid Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto avoid ovipositing in Bermuda grass hay infusion and it’s volatiles in two choice egg-count bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Eneh, LK; Okal, MN; Borg-Karlson, AK; Fillinger, U; Lindh, JM

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of mosquito species in the Culex and Aedes genera prefer to lay eggs in Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) hay infusions compared to water alone. These mosquitoes are attracted to volatile compounds from the hay infusions making the infusions effective baits in gravid traps used for monitoring vectors of arboviral and filarial pathogens. Since Bermuda grass is abundant and widespread, it is plausible to explore infusions made from it as a potential low cost bait for outdoor ...

  18. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Santa Ana, California/Tustin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    marks beginning sometime in 1945, but few stations have punched data prior to 1948. This summary will, of course , be limited to period of available data...0 •3 ,7•? r. ,78, - -7 ’.?•U.77 7.7 ,’ 200__7 7..j 7~Z t2 i, 7 o3 79o3 79*7 afu. n 1 c9Dt .r, spoc spec ag~og bc o.O -soo t 910 18000 I.7 ś -7. 3.3

  19. Observations and analyses of upper ocean responses to tropical storms and hurricanes in the vicinity of Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W. J.; Dickey, T. D.

    2008-08-01

    A circular region within a radius of 400 km of Bermuda has been struck by 188 tropical storms or hurricanes from 1851 through 2005 and by 20 since 1995. Here we describe new direct and remote sensing observations and analyses of recent events near the Bermuda Testbed Mooring including Hurricane Fabian (2003), Tropical Storm Harvey (2005) and Hurricane Nate (2005). The most impressive upper ocean response of the recent events was produced by Hurricane Fabian when SST cooling exceeded 3.5°C, vertical mixing occurred to a depth of greater than 130 m, and upper ocean currents reached 100 cm s-1. Fabian also triggered an ocean color event visible in SeaWiFS satellite images. Related implications include improved estimates of the roles of tropical cyclones in driving meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and testing of hypotheses concerning warming of the tropical oceans which could cause more intense tropical storms and hurricanes.

  20. Feedbacks and responses of coral calcification on the Bermuda reef system to seasonal changes in biological processes and ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, N.R.; Amat, A.; Andersson, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the potential impact of ocean acidification on ecosystems such as coral reefs, surprisingly, there is very limited field data on the relationships between calcification and seawater carbonate chemistry. In this study, contemporaneous in situ datasets of seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification rates from the high-latitude coral reef of Bermuda over annual timescales provide a framework for investigating the present and future potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO

  1. MIRAS characterization and monitoring during the SMOS In-Orbit Commissioning Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Martin-Neira, M.; Duffo, N.; González-Gambau, V.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.

    2009-04-01

    1 Introduction The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) is the single payload of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The instrument was completed in early 2007 and thoroughly tested both in anechoic chamber and vacuum thermal chamber during 2007. It was integrated to the platform in early 2008 and re-tested, including compatibility, during 2008. At present, the whole satellite is stowed and waiting to be launched during 2009. In two weeks after launch, the satellite will be in the final orbit with all deployments completed. Then the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase will start, having an estimated duration of 5.5 months. During this phase, the instrument modes of operation will be systematically checked and the calibration parameters will be fully characterized in real conditions. Also, the first brightness temperature images will be obtained in order to assess the overall retrieval procedures including inversion. In the end, the objective of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is to provide verification that the payload meets the scientific requirements of the mission. The general design and planning of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is given in [1]. This abstract presents the foreseen activities to be performed during this phase by the UPC team. Just after the start of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase, the instrument will be commanded to perform a sequence of operations oriented at providing a full characterization in terms of calibration parameters. The idea is to reproduce the results obtained during the tests carried out on ground [2]. In particular, the following issues will be covered: Thermal Stability: To provide understanding of both the intra-orbit and inter-orbit temperature variations. The instrument will be continuously operating during a number of orbits while all temperature sensors being monitored. Electrical Stability: To re-compute all internal calibration parameters (gains, offsets, receiver noise temperatures

  2. Connection between charge fluctuations and the coherent temperature in the heavy-fermion system SmOs4Sb12: a {121, 123}Sb NQR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, H; Hidaka, H; Kobayashi, T C; Kikuchi, D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2007-10-12

    We report {121, 123}Sb nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements under pressure in a novel heavy fermion (HF) system SmOs4Sb12. The nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T{2} exhibits a distinct peak near the coherent temperature of the Kondo effect. The isotope effect of 121Sb and 123Sb indicates that the peak in 1/T{2} is electrical in origin. The connection between the peak in 1/T{2} and the development of coherency of the Kondo effect is robust even under pressure. It is conjectured that charge fluctuation plays an important role in forming the HF state in SmOs4Sb12.

  3. C : N : P stoichiometry at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study station in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P availability determine the strength of the ocean's carbon (C uptake, and variation in the N : P ratio in inorganic nutrients is key to phytoplankton growth. A similarity between C : N : P ratios in the plankton biomass and deep-water nutrients was observed by Alfred C. Redfield around 80 years ago and suggested that biological processes in the surface ocean controlled deep ocean chemistry. Recent studies have emphasized the role of inorganic N : P ratios in governing biogeochemical processes, particularly the C : N : P ratio in suspended particulate organic matter (POM, with somewhat less attention given to exported POM and dissolved organic matter (DOM. Herein, we extend the discussion on ecosystem C : N : P stoichiometry but also examine temporal variation of stoichiometric relationships. We have analysed elemental stoichiometry in the suspended POM and total (POM + DOM organic matter (TOM pools in the upper 100 m, and in the exported POM and sub-euphotic zone (100–500 m inorganic nutrient pools from the monthly data collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site located in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean. C : N : P ratios in the TOM pool were more than twice that in the POM pool. Observed C : N ratios in suspended POM were approximately equal to the canonical Redfield Ratio (C : N : P = 106 : 16 : 1, while N : P and C : P ratios in the same pool were more than twice the Redfield Ratio. Average N : P ratios in the subsurface inorganic nutrient pool were ~ 26 : 1, squarely between the suspended POM ratio and the Redfield ratio. We have further linked variation in elemental stoichiometry with that of phytoplankton cell abundance observed at the BATS site. Findings from this study suggest that the variation elemental ratios with depth in the euphotic zone was mainly due to different growth rates of cyanobacterial cells. These time-series data have also allowed us to examine the

  4. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Turiel, Antonio; Elosegui, Pedro; Pla-Resina, Joaquim A.; Portabella, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring sea ice concentration is required for operational and climate studies in the Arctic Sea. Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting. In the last years, L-band radiometry has been successfully used to study some properties of sea ice, remarkably sea ice thickness. However, the potential of satellite L-band observations for obtaining sea ice concentration had not yet been explored. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence showing that data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission can be used to estimate sea ice concentration. Our method, based on a maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE), exploits the marked difference in the radiative properties of sea ice and seawater. In addition, the brightness temperatures of 100 % sea ice and 100 % seawater, as well as their combined values (polarization and angular difference), have been shown to be very stable during winter and spring, so they are robust to variations in physical temperature and other geophysical parameters. Therefore, we can use just two sets of tie points, one for summer and another for winter, for calculating sea ice concentration, leading to a more robust estimate. After analysing the full year 2014 in the entire Arctic, we have found that the sea ice concentration obtained with our method is well determined as compared to the Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) dataset. However, when thin sea ice is present (ice thickness ≲ 0.6 m), the method underestimates the actual sea ice concentration. Our results open the way for a systematic exploitation of SMOS data for monitoring sea ice concentration, at least for specific seasons. Additionally, SMOS data can be synergistically combined with data from other sensors to monitor pan-Arctic sea ice conditions.

  5. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  6. Parrotfish sex ratios recover rapidly in Bermuda following a fishing ban

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Shay; Luckhurst, Brian E.; Box, Stephen J.; Mumby, Peter J.

    2016-06-01

    Parrotfishes are an ecologically and commercially important teleost group whose grazing contributes to maintaining coral-dominated states on hermatypic reefs. However, overfishing has skewed sex ratios of Atlantic parrotfishes because fishing has disproportionate impacts on larger individuals, and males are generally larger than females. Whether protection from fishing may allow sex ratios to return to equilibrium is unknown, as fishing can induce irreversible ecological and/or evolutionary shifts. Bermuda banned trap fishing in 1990, creating a unique opportunity to analyse long-term responses of Atlantic parrotfishes to release from fishing. We found that sex ratios of four common parrotfishes were initially skewed, with male proportions ranging from 0.04 to 0.18. However, male proportions rebounded within 3-4 yr, equilibrating at values ranging from 0.36 to 0.54, similar to those reported at unfished sites in the region. Our results are encouraging for regional efforts to recover lost grazing function by restoring overfished herbivore populations.

  7. Chemical contamination of a coral reef by the grounding of a cruise ship in Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross J

    2007-07-01

    Bulk metal analyses of surficial sediments collected around the Norwegian Crown cruise ship grounding site in Bermuda indicated significant but localized contamination of reef sediments by copper and zinc, caused by the stripping of the tri-butyltin (TBT)-free antifouling (AF) paint (Intersmooth 460) from the underside of the hull. Highest copper and zinc values were found in heavily compacted and red-pigmented sediments inside the impact scar and were comparable to levels found close to slip ways of local boat yards where AF paints from hull stripping and cleaning processes are washed into the sea. The re-distribution of AF contaminated sediments by storms and deposition on nearby reefs constitutes a significant ecological risk that could delay recovery processes and reduce the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Whilst the ecotoxicological effects of AF paint particles interspersed with sediment is unknown, and in need of further study, it is argued that the significance of AF paint contamination of grounding sites has been overlooked.

  8. Centre of Excellence in Observational Oceanography: Nippon Foundation and POGO Supported Programme at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, F. G.; Sathyendranath, S.; Frouin, R.; Knap, T.

    2008-05-01

    Building on previous experience in capacity building for ocean observations, the Nippon Foundation (NF) and the Partnership for Observations of the Global Oceans (POGO) have announced a new Centre of Excellence (C of E) at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS). The goals of the C of E are to expand the world-wide capacity and expertise to observe the oceans and to expand capacity-building projects and promote international collaboration and networking in ocean sciences. Over the past 104 years, BIOS has built a global reputation in blue-water oceanography, coral reef ecology, and the relationships between ocean health and human health coupled with high quality education programmes that provide direct, hands-on experience with BIOS-based research. The C of E at BIOS will build upon this model to establish a new, graduate-level education and training programme in operational oceanography. The 10 month Programme will offer course modules in ocean disciplines with a focus on observatory sciences complemented by hands-on training in observational methods and techniques based on the multi-disciplinary expertise of BIOS and BIOS-affiliated scientists who direct ongoing, ocean observational programmes such as: - Hydrostation S, since 1954; - Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study, since 1988; - Oceanic Flux Program sediment trap time-series, since 1978; - Bermuda Test-Bed and Science Mooring, since 1994; - Bermuda Microbial Observatory, since 1997; - Bermuda Bio-Optics Program, since 1992; - Atmospheric chemistry and air-sea fluxes, since 1990 Additional areas of BIOS research expertise will be incorporated in the C of E to broaden the scope of education and training. These include the nearshore observational network of the BIOS Marine Environmental Program and the environmental air-water chemistry network of the Bermuda Environmental Quality Program. A key resource of the C of E is the newly acquired 168 ft. research vessel, the RV Atlantic Explorer, which was

  9. Mapping of IgE-binding regions on recombinant Cyn d 1, a major allergen from Bermuda Grass Pollen (BGP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Prem L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon; subfamily Chloridoideae is an important source of seasonal aeroallergens in warm tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. Improved approaches to diagnosis and therapy of allergic diseases require a thorough understanding of the structure and epitopes on the allergen molecule that are crucial for the antigen-antibody interaction. This study describes the localization of the human IgE-binding regions of the major group 1 pollen allergen Cyn d 1 from Bermuda grass. Methods A cDNA library was constructed from Bermuda grass pollen (BGP using a Lambda gt11 expression vector. The gene encoding the Cyn d 1 allergen was isolated by screening the library with a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against grass group 1 allergen. In order to characterize the IgE epitopes on Cyn d 1, seven overlapping fragments and three deletion mutants were cloned and over-expressed in E. coli. The recombinant fragments and deletion mutants were evaluated for their comparative IgE reactivity with sera of non atopic individuals and grass pollen allergic patients by ELISA and a dot-blot assay. Results Analysis of IgE binding regions by overlapping fragments and deletion mutants identified two major allergenic regions corresponding to amino acids 120–170 and 224–244. Deletion of either or both regions led to a significant reduction in IgE binding, emphasizing the importance of the C-terminal region on Cyn d 1 in epitope-IgE interaction. Conclusion Anti-Cyn d 1 IgE antibodies from allergic human sera recognize two epitopes located at the C-terminal end of the molecule. These data will enable the design of improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for BGP hypersensitivity.

  10. Integrating SMOS brightness temperatures with a new conceptual spatially distributed hydrological model for improving flood and drought predictions at large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, Renaud; Rains, Dominik; Chini, Marco; Lievens, Hans; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Matgen, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    , SUPERFLEX is capable of predicting runoff, soil moisture, and SMOS-like brightness temperature time series. Such a model is traditionally calibrated using only discharge measurements. In this study we designed a multi-objective calibration procedure based on both discharge measurements and SMOS-derived brightness temperature observations in order to evaluate the added value of remotely sensed soil moisture data in the calibration process. As a test case we set up the SUPERFLEX model for the large scale Murray-Darling catchment in Australia ( 1 Million km2). When compared to in situ soil moisture time series, model predictions show good agreement resulting in correlation coefficients exceeding 70 % and Root Mean Squared Errors below 1 %. When benchmarked with the physically based land surface model CLM, SUPERFLEX exhibits similar performance levels. By adapting the runoff routing function within the SUPERFLEX model, the predicted discharge results in a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency exceeding 0.7 over both the calibration and the validation periods.

  11. Organic geochemistry and pore water chemistry of sediments from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Neumann, A.C.; Thorstenson, D.C.; Gerchakov, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Mangrove Lake, Bermuda, is a small coastal, brackish-water lake that has accumulated 14 m of banded, gelatinous, sapropelic sediments in less than 104 yr. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Mangrove Lake's sedimentary environment has undergone three major depositional changes (peat, freshwater gel, brackish-water gel) as a result of sea level changes. The deposits were examined geochemically in an effort to delineate sedimentological and diagenetic changes. Gas and pore water studies include measurements of sulfides, ammonia, methane, nitrogen gas, calcium, magnesium, chloride, alkalinity, and pH. Results indicate that sulfate reduction is complete, and some evidence is presented for bacterial denitrification and metal sulfide precipitation. The organic-rich sapropel is predominantly algal in origin, composed mostly of carbohydrates and insoluble macromolecular organic matter called humin with minor amounts of proteins, lipids, and humic acids. Carbohydrates and proteins undergo hydrolysis with depth in the marine sapropel but tend to be preserved in the freshwater sapropel. The humin, which has a predominantly aliphatic structure, increases linearly with depth and composes the greatest fraction of the organic matter. Humic acids are minor components and are more like polysaccharides than typical marine humic acids. Fatty acid distributions reveal that the lipids are of an algal and/or terrestrial plant source. Normal alkanes with a total concentration of 75 ppm exhibit two distribution maxima. One is centered about n-C22 with no odd/even predominance, suggestive of a degraded algal source. The other is centered at n-C31 with a distinct odd/even predominance indicative of a vascular plant origin. Stratigraphic changes in the sediment correlate to observed changes in the gas and pore water chemistry and the organic geochemistry. ?? 1982.

  12. What do we learn about the impact of extreme hydrological events on tropical wetlands from the synergistic use of altimetry from Sentinel-3/SARAL-Altika and L-Band radiometry from SMOS/SMAP ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bitar, Ahmad; Parrens, Marie; Frappart, Frederic; Cauduro Dias de Paiva, Rodrigo; Papa, Fabrice; Kerr, Yann

    2017-04-01

    What do we learn about the impact of extreme hydrological events on tropical wetlands from the synergistic use of altimetry from Sentinel-3/SARAL-Altika and L-Band radiometry from SMOS/SMAP ? The question of the contribution of the tropical basins to the carbon and water cycle remains an open question in the science community. The tropical basins are highly impact by the wetlands dynamics but the also the link with extreme events like El-Nino are yet to be clarified. The main reason to this uncertainty is that the monitoring of inland water surfaces via remote sensing over tropical areas is a difficult task because of impact of vegetation and cloud cover. The most common solution is to use microwave remote sensing. In this study we combine the use of L-band microwave brightness temperatures and altimetric data from SARAL/ALTIKA and Sentinel-3 to derive water storage maps at relatively high (7days) temporal frequency. This study concerns the Amazon and Congo basin. The water fraction in inland are estimated by inversing a first order radiative model is used to derive surface water over land from the brightness temperature measured by ESA SMOS and SMAP mission at coarse resolution (25 km x 25 km) and 7-days frequency. The product is compared to the static land cover map such as ESA CCI and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and also dynamic maps from GIEMS and SWAPS products. Water storage is then obtained by combining the altimetric data from SARAL/ALTIKA and Sentinel-3 to the water surface fraction using an hypsometric approach. The water surfaces and water storage products are then compared to precipitation data from GPM TRMM datasets and river discharge data from field data. The amplitudes and time shifts of the signals is compared based on the sub-basin definition from Hydroshed database. The dataset is then divided into years of strong and weak El-Nino signal and the anomaly is between the two dataset is compared. The results show a strong

  13. 百慕大投资基金监管法律制度解析%Analysis of Bermuda Legal Regime of Investment Fund Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛彦国

    2015-01-01

    Bermuda is the preferred domicile to a wide range of hedge funds, private equity funds, trust funds and mutual funds. The relevant laws of Bermuda investment fund regulation include Monetary Authority Act, Invest-ment Funds Act, Companies Act, Limited Partnership, Exempted Partnerships Act and Partnership Act, etc. The Bermuda Monetary Authority is the principal regulator of investment fund in Bermuda. There are three main structures used for investment fund formation in Bermuda:company,partnership and unit trust. Bermuda investment fund regu-lation includes investment fund regulation and fund related parties regulation. Bermuda investment fund should meet regulation requirement,ongoing. In addition,there are regulation requirement for funds not domiciled in Bermuda too.%百慕大是众多对冲基金、私募股权基金、信托基金和共同基金的理想设立地。与百慕大投资基金监管有关的法律主要包括《金融监管局法》、《投资基金法》、《公司法》、《有限合伙企业法》、《豁免合伙企业法》和《合伙企业法》等。百慕大金融管理局是百慕大投资基金的主要监管机构。百慕大投资基金的组织形式主要有三种:公司、合伙和单位信托;监管包括对基金的监管和对基金有关当事人的监管。百慕大投资基金还要符合持续性监管要求,此外,对境外投资基金也有一定监管要求。

  14. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: the importance of African dust transport and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (N/YbN, GdN/YbN that can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past –500 ka.

  15. METHODS OF TAXATION IN THE TAX HAVENS. EXAMPLES OF TAXATION IN THE BAHAMAS, BERMUDA AND THE CAYMAN ISLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENEA CONSTANTIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We should never trust appearances: "the drum, with all the noise it makes is not only filled with wind"[1]. This old oriental proverb perfectly illustrates our proposal regarding the "true false" tax havens. Only at the beginning of this century, learned before firms to exercise their activity in the national territory, returned to international trade. The continuous search for new outlets to escape the growing production, export them first and then they were implanted overseas sales platforms and then installing production. Zero Haven sites or havens with zero tax consisting essentially of small economies, the British colonies (Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, dependent territories of the Commonwealth (Bermuda or territories became independent (Antigua, Bahamas 1963 or Vanuatu 1980. Our study will analyze tax havens most common: Bahamas, Bermuda or the Cayman Islands, where we find all models of reception that can be viewed in other areas zero-haven: International Business Companies (Antigua, the Virgin Islands, Nevis exemption schemes to insurance companies or banks (Barbados, Vanuatu. The subject of tax evasion subject of much debate, targeting both the domestic economic space and the world. Unlike their concerns globally, domestic concerns to reduce tax evasion resumes, especially on taxation of small businesses, avoiding knowingly scope of tax havens.

  16. Using SMOS for validation and parameter estimation of a large scale hydrological model in Paraná river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colossi, Bibiana; Fleischmann, Ayan; Siqueira, Vinicius; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Paiva, Rodrigo; Fan, Fernando; Ruhoff, Anderson; Pontes, Paulo; Collischonn, Walter

    2017-04-01

    Large scale representation of soil moisture conditions can be achieved through hydrological simulation and remote sensing techniques. However, both methodologies have several limitations, which suggests the potential benefits of using both information together. So, this study had two main objectives: perform a cross-validation between remotely sensed soil moisture from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) L3 product and soil moisture simulated with the large scale hydrological model MGB-IPH; and to evaluate the potential benefits of including remotely sensed soil moisture for model parameter estimation. The study analyzed results in South American continent, where hydrometeorological monitoring is usually scarce. The study was performed in Paraná River Basin, an important South American basin, whose extension and particular characteristics allow the representation of different climatic, geological, and, consequently, hydrological conditions. Soil moisture estimated with SMOS was transformed from water content to a Soil Water Index (SWI) so it is comparable to the saturation degree simulated with MGB-IPH model. The multi-objective complex evolution algorithm (MOCOM-UA) was applied for model automatic calibration considering only remotely sensed soil moisture, only discharge and both information together. Results show that this type of analysis can be very useful, because it allows to recognize limitations in model structure. In the case of the hydrological model calibration, this approach can avoid the use of parameters out of range, in an attempt to compensate model limitations. Also, it indicates aspects of the model were efforts should be concentrated, in order to improve hydrological or hydraulics process representation. Automatic calibration gives an estimative about the way different information can be applied and the quality of results it might lead. We emphasize that these findings can be valuable for hydrological modeling in large scale South American

  17. Differences in Academic Achievement of Students Involved in Extracurricular Activities in Seventh-Day Adventist Schools in the United States and Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Anderson P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in the academic performance of students in grades 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 in Seventh-day Adventist schools in the United States and Bermuda based on their level of involvement in school music organizations--band or choir--and school sports--varsity or intramural--as measured by standardized achievement and ability tests.…

  18. The Multilateral Disarmament Process. Conference on the United Nations of the Next Decade (16th, Warwick, Bermuda, June 21-26, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    This is a report of a conference held in Bermuda in 1981 to discuss a multilateral approach to disarmament. The conference was an informal, off-the-record exchange of ideas and opinions among 24 diplomats and scholars from 18 countries and two international agencies. Participants considered current disarmament concepts, assessed UN disarmament…

  19. An Intercomparison of Dissolved Iron Speciation at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) Site: Results from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, K.N.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The organic complexation of dissolved iron (Fe) was determined in depth profile samples collected from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A, the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site, as part of the Dutch and U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic programs in June 2010 and November 2011, respectively. The

  20. An analysis on the error structure and mechanism of soil moisture and ocean salinity remotely sensed sea surface salinity products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian; ZHANG Ren; WANG Huizan; AN Yuzhu; WANG Luhua; WANG Gongjie

    2014-01-01

    For the application of soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) remotely sensed sea surface salinity (SSS) products, SMOS SSS global maps and error characteristics have been investigated based on quality control information. The results show that the errors of SMOS SSS products are distributed zonally, i.e., relatively small in the tropical oceans, but much greater in the southern oceans in the Southern Hemisphere (negative bias) and along the southern, northern and some other oceanic margins (positive or negative bias). The physical elements responsible for these errors include wind, temperature, and coastal terrain and so on. Errors in the southern oceans are due to the bias in an SSS retrieval algorithm caused by the coexisting high wind speed and low temperature;errors along the oceanic margins are due to the bias in a brightness temperature (TB) reconstruction caused by the high contrast between L-band emissivities from ice or land and from ocean; in addition, some other systematic errors are due to the bias in TB observation caused by a radio frequency interference and a radiometer receivers drift, etc. The findings will contribute to the scientific correction and appropriate application of the SMOS SSS products.

  1. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  2. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A; Tsika, Elpida; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2009-06-05

    While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD) as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  3. The roles of temperature and light in black band disease (BBD) progression on corals of the genus Diploria in Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Kristin; Jones, Ross; Gibbs, David; Richardson, Laurie

    2011-03-01

    On Bermuda reefs the brain coral Diploria labyrinthiformis is rarely documented with black band disease (BBD), while BBD-affected colonies of Diploria strigosa are common. D. labyrinthiformis on these reefs may be more resistant to BBD or less affected by prevailing environmental conditions that potentially diminish host defenses. To determine whether light and/or temperature influence BBD differently on these two species, infection experiments were conducted under the following experimental treatments: (1) 26 °C, ambient light; (2) 30 °C, ambient light; (3) 30 °C, low light; and (4) 30 °C, high light. A digital photograph of the affected area of each coral was taken each day for 7 days and analyzed with ImageJ image processing software. The final affected area was not significantly different between species in any of the four treatments. BBD lesions were smaller on both species infected under ambient light at 26 °C versus 30 °C. Low light at 30 °C significantly reduced the lesion size on both species when compared to colonies infected at the same temperature under ambient light. Under high light at 30 °C, BBD lesions were larger on colonies of D. strigosa and smaller on colonies of D. labyrinthiformis when compared to colonies infected under ambient light at the same temperature. The responses of both species suggests that BBD progression on both D. strigosa and D. labyrinthiformis is similarly influenced by a combination of light and temperature and that other factors present before infections become established likely contribute to the difference in BBD prevalence in Bermuda. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  5. Brightness Temperature and Soil Moisture Validation at Different Scales During the SMOS Validation Campaign in the Rur and Erft Catchments, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montzka, Carsten; Bogena, Heye R.; Weihermüller, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    -band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere model. Measurements of the airborne L-band sensors EMIRAD and HUT-2D on-board a Skyvan aircraft as well as ground-based mobile measurements performed with the truck mounted JÜLBARA L-band radiometer were analyzed for calibration of the simulated brightness temperature...... developed an approach to validate spatial and temporal SMOS brightness temperature products. An area-wide brightness temperature reference was generated by using an area-wide modeling of top soil moisture and soil temperature with the WaSiM-ETH model and radiative transfer calculation based on the L...

  6. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  7. On-site hydrolytic enzymes production from fungal co-cultivation of Bermuda grass and corn cob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Reyes, Aldo; Gracida, Jorge; Huizache-Peña, Nelson; Elizondo-García, Norberto; Salazar-Martínez, José; García Almendárez, Blanca E; Regalado, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Solid state fermentation (SSF) is used to produce industrial enzymes. The objective of this study was to use a co-culture of Aspergillus niger GS1 and Trichoderma reesei, grown on a mixture of Bermuda grass and corn cob to obtain fermented forage (FF) rich in hydrolytic enzymes, as a value added ingredient for animal feed. FPase, amylase and xylanase productivities (dry matter, DM) were 8.8, 181.4, and 42.1Ug(-1)h(-1), respectively (1U=reducing sugars released min(-1)), after 12-16h of SSF with C/N=60. Cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin decreased 1.6-, 2.7- and 1.9-fold (DM), respectively. In vitro ruminal and true digestibility of DM was improved 2.4- and 1.4-fold. Ruminal digestion of FF reduced 1.32-fold the acetate:propionate ratio, which may reduce the environmental impact of ruminants feeding. On-site hydrolytic enzymes productivity using SSF without enzymes extraction could be of economic potential for digestibility improvement in animal feed.

  8. Water type and irrigation time effects on microbial metabolism of a soil cultivated with Bermuda-grass Tifton 85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Furlan Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial metabolism in Bermuda-grass Tifton 85 areas after potable-water and effluent irrigation treatments. The experiment was carried out in Lins/SP with samples taken in the rainy and dry seasons (2006 after one year and three years of irrigation management, and set up on an entirely randomized block design with four treatments: C (control, without irrigation or fertilization, PW (potable water + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1; TE3 and TE0 (treated effluent + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1 for three years and one year, respectively. The parameters determined were: microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, and metabolic quotient. Irrigation with wastewater after three years indicated no alteration in soil quality for C and ET3; for PW, a negative impact on soil quality (microbial biomass decrease suggested that water-potable irrigation in Lins is not an adequate option. Microbial activity alterations observed in TE0 characterize a priming effect.

  9. Apparent oxygen utilization rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Stanley

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present three years of Apparent Oxygen Utilization Rates (AOUR estimated from oxygen and tracer data collected over the ocean thermocline at monthly resolution between 2003 and 2006 at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site. We estimate water ages by calculating a transit time distribution from tritium and helium-3 data. The vertically integrated AOUR over the upper 500 m, which is a regional estimate of export, during the three years is 3.1 ± 0.5 mol O2 m−2 yr−1. This is comparable to previous AOUR-based estimates of export production at the BATS site but is several times larger than export estimates derived from sediment traps or 234Th fluxes. We compare AOUR determined in this study to AOUR measured in the 1980s and show AOUR is significantly greater today than decades earlier because of changes in AOU, rather than changes in ventilation rates. The changes in AOU may be a methodological artefact associated with problems with early oxygen measurements.

  10. Apparent oxygen utilization rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Stanley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present three years of Apparent Oxygen Utilization Rates (AOUR estimated from oxygen and tracer data collected over the ocean thermocline at monthly resolution between 2003 and 2006 at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site. We estimate water ages by calculating a transit time distribution from tritium and helium-3 data. The vertically integrated AOUR over the upper 500 m, which is a regional estimate of export, during the three years is 3.1 ± 0.5 mol O2 m−2 yr−1. This is comparable to previous AOUR-based estimates of export production at the BATS site but is several times larger than export estimates derived from sediment traps or 234Th fluxes. We compare AOUR determined in this study to AOUR measured in the 1980s and show AOUR is significantly greater today than decades earlier because of changes in AOU, rather than changes in ventilation rates. The changes in AOU are likely a methodological artefact associated with problems with early oxygen measurements.

  11. Field comparison of Bermuda-hay infusion to infusions of emergent aquatic vegetation for collecting female mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Mullen, Gary R

    2007-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted in east-central Alabama in 2003 and 2004 to compare the attractiveness of selected gravid-trap infusions to ovipositing female mosquitoes. Comparisons were made among infusions of the following plants: Bermuda hay, Cynodon dactylon, and 3 species of emergent aquatic plants typical of Culex larval habitats, i.e., soft rush, Juncus effusus; a common sedge, Rhynchospora corniculata; and broad-leaf cattail, Typha latifolia. Experiments were conducted at a site in Lee County, AL, with an abundance of common nuisance mosquitoes, including Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes albopictus. Carbon dioxide-baited miniature light traps were operated concurrently with gravid traps to provide an activity index of mosquito species at the site. Gravid traps with hay infusion collected the greatest numbers of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Culex restuans females (2003). The results indicate that hay infusion is highly attractive to Cx. quinquefasciatus and is the infusion of choice for collecting females of this species in gravid traps. In the case of Ae. albopictus, infusions were not determined to be significantly different from one another in their attractiveness to gravid females. In general, females of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. restuans demonstrated selectivity when choosing an oviposition site, whereas Ae. albopictus females did not. Factors associated with the oviposition biology of the latter species most likely account for their lack of preference for any single infusion type.

  12. Climatological Factors Affecting Electromagnetic Surface Ducting in the Aegean Sea Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    19  x Figure 11.  The Azores or Bermuda High and southwest and south-central Asia thermal low tend to produce a...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing

  13. Appendix to the contribution by G.B. Engelen on the origin of the Bermuda Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemmelen, R.W. van

    1964-01-01

    The basic concepts of the contribution, according to the undation theory as it stands presently are as follows. The earth’s surface is not a pure ellipsoid of rotation, but a geoid which shows extensive bulges and depressions (geo-undations). The physico-chemical processes disturb the theostatic and

  14. Appendix to the contribution by G.B. Engelen on the origin of the Bermuda Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemmelen, R.W. van

    The basic concepts of the contribution, according to the undation theory as it stands presently are as follows. The earth’s surface is not a pure ellipsoid of rotation, but a geoid which shows extensive bulges and depressions (geo-undations). The physico-chemical processes disturb the theostatic

  15. Variation in larval properties of the Atlantic brooding coral Porites astreoides between different reef sites in Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Putron, Samantha J.; Lawson, Julia M.; White, Kascia Q. L.; Costa, Matthew T.; Geronimus, Miriam V. B.; MacCarthy, Anne

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has documented phenotypic differences among larvae released from corals with a brooding reproductive mode, both among species and within broods from a single species. We studied larvae released from the common Atlantic coral Porites astreoides in Bermuda to further evaluate phenotypic variability. Inter-site differences were investigated in larvae from conspecifics at a rim and patch reef site. Larvae were collected daily for one lunar cycle from several colonies per site each year over 5 yr. Larval volume varied with reef site of origin, with colonies from the rim reef site producing larger larvae than colonies from the patch reef site. This inter-site variation in larval size could not be explained by corallite size and may be a response to different environmental conditions at the sites. Larvae from both reef sites also varied in size depending on lunar day of release over 4 yr of study. Regardless of site of origin, smaller larvae were released earlier in the lunar cycle. Over 1 yr of study, lipid and zooxanthellae content and settlement success after 48 h covaried with larval size. However, there may be a trade-off between larger larvae and reduced fecundity. Overall, larvae released from colonies from the rim reef site were larger and had greater settlement success than those from colonies from the patch reef site. This study documents larval phenotypic variability and a distinct inter-site difference in larval ecology among conspecifics within the same geographic area, which may have implications for recruitment success, population dynamics, and resilience.

  16. ONE AND TWO STAGE AUTOHYDROLYSIS PRETREATMENTS FOR ENZYME HYDROLYSIS OF COASTAL BERMUDA GRASS TO PRODUCE FERMENTABLE SUGARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Myoung Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Coastal Bermuda grass (CBG is an agricultural residue with considerable potential as a feedstock for lignocellulosic-based ethanol. The treatment of biomass with water at high temperature, termed autohydrolysis, can be used to recover sugars in the filtrate and to improve enzyme digestibility of the pretreated solids. The effect of a two- stage autohydrolysis process with respect to total sugar recovery relative to a one stage process was investigated. CBG was subjected to lab scale one-stage (150, 160, and 170 C and two-stage (150/170 C and 160/170 C isothermal autohydrolysis processes followed by enzyme hydrolysis on the residual solids with different loadings (5 to 30 FPU/g. Two-stage autohydrolysis (160/170 C solubilized 94.2% of the hemicellulose based on the original CBG material but only 17.7% of the cellulose and 30.4% of the lignin. Increases in the severity factor (a combination of time and temperature of autohydrolysis pretreatments decreased the recoverable carbohydrates and total solids. Two-stage autohydrolysis enhanced enzyme digestibility of the cellulose in pretreated solids relative to one-stage autohydrolysis, especially at higher values of FPU/g. The overall total theoretical sugar recovery achievable by the two stage process was 57.8% and for the one stage process only 51.6% with 30 FPU/g. This marginal increase would have to be considered relative to increased complexity of operations when deciding whether to implement one or two stage autohydrolysis.

  17. Estimating the potential impacts of large mesopredators on benthic resources: integrative assessment of spotted eagle ray foraging ecology in Bermuda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Ajemian

    Full Text Available Declines of large sharks and subsequent release of elasmobranch mesopredators (smaller sharks and rays may pose problems for marine fisheries management as some mesopredators consume exploitable shellfish species. The spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari is the most abundant inshore elasmobranch in subtropical Bermuda, but its predatory role remains unexamined despite suspected abundance increases and its hypothesized specialization for mollusks. We utilized a combination of acoustic telemetry, benthic invertebrate sampling, gut content analysis and manipulative experiments to assess the impact of spotted eagle rays on Bermudian shellfish resources. Residency and distribution of adult spotted eagle rays was monitored over two consecutive summers in Harrington Sound (HS, an enclosed inshore lagoon that has historically supported multiple recreational and commercial shellfish species. Telemetered rays exhibited variable fidelity (depending on sex to HS, though generally selected regions that supported relatively high densities of potential mollusk prey. Gut content analysis from rays collected in HS revealed a diet of mainly bivalves and a few gastropods, with calico clam (Macrocallista maculata representing the most important prey item. Manipulative field and mesocosm experiments with calico clams suggested that rays selected prey patches based on density, though there was no evidence of rays depleting clam patches to extirpation. Overall, spotted eagle rays had modest impacts on local shellfish populations at current population levels, suggesting a reduced role in transmitting cascading effects from apex predator loss. However, due to the strong degree of coupling between rays and multiple protected mollusks in HS, ecosystem-based management that accounts for ray predation should be adopted.

  18. Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site: 13-23 August 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Dickey, T. D.; Doney, S. C.; Price, J. F.; Yu, X.; Mellor, G. L.

    2002-12-01

    The center of Hurricane Felix passed 85 km to the southwest of the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM; 31°44'N, 64°10'W) site on 15 August 1995. Data collected in the upper ocean from the BTM during this encounter provide a rare opportunity to investigate the physical processes that occur in a hurricane's wake. Data analyses indicate that the storm caused a large increase in kinetic energy at near-inertial frequencies, internal gravity waves in the thermocline, and inertial pumping, mixed layer deepening, and significant vertical redistribution of heat, with cooling of the upper 30 m and warming at depths of 30-70 m. The temperature evolution was simulated using four one-dimensional mixed layer models: Price-Weller-Pinkel (PWP), K Profile Parameterization (KPP), Mellor-Yamada 2.5 (MY), and a modified version of MY2.5 (MY2). The primary differences in the model results were in their simulations of temperature evolution. In particular, when forced using a drag coefficient that had a linear dependence on wind speed, the KPP model predicted sea surface cooling, mixed layer currents, and the maximum depth of cooling closer to the observations than any of the other models. This was shown to be partly because of a special parameterization for gradient Richardson number (RgKPP) shear instability mixing in response to resolved shear in the interior. The MY2 model predicted more sea surface cooling and greater depth penetration of kinetic energy than the MY model. In the MY2 model the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is parameterized as a function of a locally defined Richardson number (RgMY2) allowing for a reduction in dissipation rate for stable Richardson numbers (RgMY2) when internal gravity waves are likely to be present. Sensitivity simulations with the PWP model, which has specifically defined mixing procedures, show that most of the heat lost from the upper layer was due to entrainment (parameterized as a function of bulk Richardson number RbPWP), with the

  19. Crop yield monitoring in the Sahel using root zone soil moisture anomalies derived from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, François; Pellarin, Thierry; Alhassane, Agali; Traoré, Seydou; Baron, Christian

    2017-04-01

    West Africa is greatly vulnerable, especially in terms of food sustainability. Mainly based on rainfed agriculture, the high variability of the rainy season strongly impacts the crop production driven by the soil water availability in the soil. To monitor this water availability, classical methods are based on daily precipitation measurements. However, the raingauge network suffers from the poor network density in Africa (1/10000km2). Alternatively, real-time satellite-derived precipitations can be used, but they are known to suffer from large uncertainties which produce significant error on crop yield estimations. The present study proposes to use root soil moisture rather than precipitation to evaluate crop yield variations. First, a local analysis of the spatiotemporal impact of water deficit on millet crop production in Niger was done, from in-situ soil moisture measurements (AMMA-CATCH/OZCAR (French Critical Zone exploration network)) and in-situ millet yield survey. Crop yield measurements were obtained for 10 villages located in the Niamey region from 2005 to 2012. The mean production (over 8 years) is 690 kg/ha, and ranges from 381 to 872 kg/ha during this period. Various statistical relationships based on soil moisture estimates were tested, and the most promising one (R>0.9) linked the 30-cm soil moisture anomalies from mid-August to mid-September (grain filling period) to the crop yield anomalies. Based on this local study, it was proposed to derive regional statistical relationships using 30-cm soil moisture maps over West Africa. The selected approach was to use a simple hydrological model, the Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), forced by real-time satellite-based precipitation (CMORPH, PERSIANN, TRMM3B42). To reduce uncertainties related to the quality of real-time rainfall satellite products, SMOS soil moisture measurements were assimilated into the API model through a Particular Filter algorithm. Then, obtained soil moisture anomalies were

  20. Towards a robust evaporation-based disaggregation method of SMOS soil moisture by combining high-resolution shortwave/thermal and available meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiana Stefan, Vivien; Merlin, Olivier; José Escorihuela, Maria; AïtHssaine, Bouchra; Molero, Beatriz; Ezzahar, Jamal; Er-Raki, Salah; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann

    2016-04-01

    The majority of hydrological and agricultural applications require high-resolution soil moisture (SM) information. To improve the spatial resolution of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) SM, a downscaling algorithm is applied to the 40 km resolution SMOS level 3 product using 1 km resolution MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) shortwave and thermal data. The DISPATCH (DISaggregation based on a Physical and Theoretical Scale CHange) algorithm converts soil temperature data into SM data using a soil evaporative efficiency (SEE) model and a first order Taylor series expansion. The current version of DISPATCH is contextual, meaning that the MODIS-derived SEE is a function of temperature endmembers (Tends), which are determined from the image-based trapezoid method. However, limitations concerning the estimation of Tends arise when fully dry and fully wet conditions are not met within the scene at the observation resolution. Therefore, in order to improve DISPATCH's robustness in such conditions, the aim of this paper is to estimate Tends independently of shortwave/thermal data using an energy balance model forced by meteorological data. As a mean to evaluate the new algorithm, results are analyzed in terms of both disaggregated SM with respect to in situ 0-5 cm measurements and DISPATCH-derived SEE with respect to theoretical models. The approach is tested over a mixed irrigated and dry land area located in Catalunya, Spain, spanning 2011 and 2012. When comparing 40 km SMOS and 1 km disaggregated SM data with the in situ measurements, results indicate that DISPATCH improves the spatio-temporal correlation with in situ measurements. Moreover, disaggregation results are further improved by integrating the energy balance model in the methodology. The representation of SEE is also enhanced, proving that meteorological data foster the physical link between shortwave/thermal and SM data within the disaggregation method. The synergy between SEE modeling

  1. Water quality, isoscapes and stoichioscapes of seagrasses indicate general P limitation and unique N cycling in shallow water benthos of Bermuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Fourqurean

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Striking spatial patterns in stable isotope ratios (isoscapes and elemental ratios (stoichioscapes of seagrass leaves and the water column nutrients indicate general P-limitation of both water column and benthic primary productivity on the Bermuda Platform, and they highlight the role of the Bermuda Islands as a source of N and P. We found consistent differences among the four seagrass species (Syringodium filiforme, Thalassia testudinum, Halodule sp. and Halophila decipiens in the N, P, δ13C and δ15N of leaf tissues. The δ15N of seagrass leaves was especially variable, with values from −10.1 to 8.8‰, greatly expanding the reported range of values for all seagrass species globally. Spatial patterns from both the water column and the seagrass leaves indicated that P availability was higher near shore, and δ15N values suggest this was likely a result of human waste disposal. Spatially-contiguous areas of extremely depleted seagrass δ15N suggest unique N sources and cycling compared to other seagrass-dominated environments. Seagrass N : P values were not as far from the stoichiometric balance between N and P availability as in the water column, and there were no strong relationships between the water column N : P and the seagrass N : P. Such isoscapes and stoichioscapes provide valuable ecogeochemical tools to infer ecosystem processes as well as provide information that can inform food web and animal movement studies.

  2. Modelisation Des Effets De la Rugosite Sur L'Etude De L'Humidite Des Sols Par Radiometrie Micro-Ondes. Application a la Mission Spatiale Smos

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Wigneron, Jean Pierre

    2009-01-01

    As part of the SMOS mission (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) IMS and EPHYSE laboratories are involved in the study and validation of the inversion algorithm LMEB. In the framework of this study, we developed a model using the numerical modeling software-HFSS ANSOFT. It allows the computation of the emissivity of multilayer systems (soil-litter for example). We have improved our approach to incorporate new parameters that can have a significant effect on the measurements. Indeed, so far the effect of soil roughness associated with the litter has not been studied. Moreover, the thickness of litter is never constant and we must therefore introduce a realistic profile of litter thickness. This article presents our work to integrate these profiles in our numerical model. These profiles may be derived from measurements (litter thickness profiles or soil roughness profiles) or calculations (roughness profile). In both cases the input data of our model are files of XYZ points representing our profile.

  3. Comparing Chemistry and Census-based Estimates of Net Ecosystem Calcification on a Rim Reef in Bermuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis A Courtney

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef net ecosystem calcification (NEC has decreased for many Caribbean reefs over recent decades primarily due to a combination of declining coral cover and changing benthic community composition. Chemistry-based approaches to calculate NEC utilize the drawdown of seawater total alkalinity (TA combined with residence time to calculate an instantaneous measurement of NEC. Census-based approaches combine annual growth rates with benthic cover and reef structural complexity to estimate NEC occurring over annual timescales. Here, NEC was calculated for Hog Reef in Bermuda using both chemistry and census-based NEC techniques to compare the mass-balance generated by the two methods and identify the dominant biocalcifiers at Hog Reef. Our findings indicate close agreement between the annual 2011 census-based NEC 2.35±1.01 kg CaCO3•m-2•y-1 and the chemistry-based NEC 2.23±1.02 kg CaCO3•m-2•y-1 at Hog Reef. An additional record of Hog Reef TA data calculated from an autonomous CO2 mooring measuring pCO2 and modeled pHtotal every 3-hours highlights the dynamic temporal variability in coral reef NEC. This ability for chemistry-based NEC techniques to capture higher frequency variability in coral reef NEC allows the mechanisms driving NEC variability to be explored and tested. Just four coral species, Diploria labyrinthiformis, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Millepora alcicornis, and Orbicella franksi, were identified by the census-based NEC as contributing to 94±19% of the total calcium carbonate production at Hog Reef suggesting these species should be highlighted for conservation to preserve current calcium carbonate production rates at Hog Reef. As coral cover continues to decline globally, the agreement between these NEC estimates suggest that either method, but ideally both methods, may serve as a useful tool for coral reef managers and conservation scientists to monitor the maintenance of coral reef structure and ecosystem services.

  4. Orbital science's 'Bermuda Triangle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Thomas J.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of a part of the inner Van Allen belt lying closest to the earth, known as the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) upon spacecraft including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are discussed. The area consists of positively charged ions and electrons from the Van Allen Belt which become trapped in the earth's dipole field. Contor maps representing the number of protons per square centimeter per second having energies greater than 10 million electron volts are presented. It is noted that the HST orbit causes it to spend about 15 percent of its time in the SAA, but that, unlike the experience with earlier spacecraft, the satellite's skin, internal structure, and normal electronic's packaging provides sufficient protection against eletrons, although some higher energy protons still get through. Various charged particle effects which can arise within scientific instruments including fluorescence, Cerenkov radiation, and induced radioactivity are described.

  5. 《大学英语》课程中”The Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon”课堂教学设计案例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温柔新; 林昊

    2015-01-01

    在任务型教学法基本理念的指导下,对《新视"大学英语院读写教程3》中的第十单元Section A:The Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon进行课堂设计.围绕教学目的,设计出由浅入深、环环相扣的任务链.使学生通过对目标语言的使用来完成学习任务,最终达到学习语言和掌握语言的目的,充分体现了学生的主体性以及注重协作学习的理念.

  6. 《大学英语》课程中“The Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon”课堂教学设计案例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温柔新; 林昊

    2015-01-01

    在任务型教学法基本理念的指导下,对《新视野大学英语:读写教程3》中的第十单元Section A: The Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon进行课堂设计。围绕教学目的,设计出由浅入深、环环相扣的任务链。使学生通过对目标语言的使用来完成学习任务,最终达到学习语言和掌握语言的目的,充分体现了学生的主体性以及注重协作学习的理念。

  7. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  8. Measuring Total Surface Moisture with the COSMOS Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman, B. B.; Zreda, M.; Franz, T. E.; Rosolem, R.

    2012-12-01

    The COSMOS rover is the mobile application of the cosmic-ray soil moisture probe. By quantifying the relative amount of the hydrogen molecules within the instrument's support volume (~335 m radius in air, 10-70 cm depth in soil) the instrument makes an area-average surface moisture measurement. We call this measurement "total surface moisture". Quantifying hydrogen in all major stocks (soils, infrastructure, vegetation, and water vapor) allows for an isolation of the volumetric fraction of the exchangeable surface moisture. By isolating the hydrogen molecule we can measure the exchangeable surface moisture over all land cover types including those with built-up infrastructure and dense vegetation; two environments which have been challenging to existing technologies. . The cosmic-ray rover has the capability to improve hydrologic, climate, and weather models by parameterizing the exchangeable surface moisture status over complex landscapes. It can also fill a gap in the verification and development processes of surface moisture satellite missions, such as SMOS and SMAP. In our current research program, 2D transects are produced twice a week and 3D maps are produced once a week during the 2012 monsoon season (July-September) within the Tucson Basin. The 40 km x 40 km area includes four land cover classes; developed, scrub (natural Sonoran Desert), crops, and evergreen forest. The different land cover types show significant differences in their surface moisture behavior with irrigation acting as the largest controlling factor in the developed and crop areas. In addition we investigated the use of the cosmic-ray rover data to verify/compare with satellite derived soil moisture. A Maximum Entropy model is being used to create soil moisture profiles from shallow surface measurements (SMOS data). With the cosmic-ray penetration depth and weighting function known, the satellite measurement can be interpolated, weighted and compared with the cosmic-ray measurement when the

  9. SMOS salinity in the subtropical North Atlantic salinity maximum. Part II: Two-dimensional horizontal thermohaline variability

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Hernandez, Olga; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reverdin, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The horizontal thermohaline seasonal variability of the surface ocean is investigated in the subtropical North Atlantic Surface Salinity Maximum (SSSmax) region. Satellite sea surface temperature and salinity are used, along with high-resolution thermosalinograph data, and Argo interpolated products, to study the horizontal two-dimensional field of density and thermohaline variability. During late winter, compensated temperature and salinity gradients at large and meso...

  10. An intercomparison of dissolved iron speciation at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site: Results from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Nicolle Buck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The organic complexation of dissolved iron (Fe was determined in depth profile samples collected from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A, the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site, as part of the Dutch and U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic programs in June 2010 and November 2011, respectively. The two groups employed distinct competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdCSV methods, and resulting ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants from each profile were compared. Excellent agreement was found between the total ligand concentrations determined in June 2010 and the strongest, L1-type, ligand concentrations determined in November 2011. Yet a primary distinction between the datasets was the number of ligand classes observed: a single ligand class was characterized in the June 2010 profile while two ligand classes were observed in the November 2011 profile. To assess the role of differing interpretation approaches in determining final results, analysts exchanged titration data and accompanying parameters from the profiles for reinterpretation. The reinterpretation exercises highlighted the considerable influence of the sensitivity (S parameter applied on interpretation results, consistent with recent intercalibration work on interpretation of copper speciation titrations. The potential role of titration data structure, humic-type substances, differing dissolved Fe concentrations, and seasonality are also discussed as possible drivers of the one versus two ligand class determinations between the two profiles, leading to recommendations for future studies of Fe-binding ligand cycling in the oceans.

  11. Downward export of respiratory carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen by diel-migrant mesozooplankton at the JGOFS Bermuda time-series station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Hans G.; Roman, Michael R.; Youngbluth, Marsh J.

    1995-07-01

    Published calculations suggest that downward fluxes of respiratory carbon (RC) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) associated with diel-migrant zooplankton are significant forms of export production. In this study, we examined variability in downward fluxes of RC and DIN due to diel-migrant mesozooplankton (200-2000 μm) on seven occasions between 25 March and 8 April 1990 at the JGOFS (Joint Global Ocean Flux Study) station off Bermuda. Downward fluxes due to migrators crossing 150 m ranged from 6 to 41 mgC m -2 day -1 (RC) and 2 to 5 mgN m -2 day -1 (DIN). In comparison to gravitational fluxes of POC and PON measured with particle traps at 150m during the same period, mesozooplankton RC flux was 18-70% of POCflux and mesozooplankton DIN flux was 17-82% of PON flux. If the RC and DIN fluxes due to migrators are considered in calculations of export production, the percentage of the production exported below 150 m over the study period would increase by an average of 25% for carbon and 21% for nitrogen. These results support the contention that metabolic activities of diel-migrant zooplankton should be included in calculations of export of carbon and nitrogen out of the mixed layer.

  12. Re-description of Echiniscus cavagnaroi Schuster & Grigarick, 1966 (Tardigrada: Heterotardigrada: Echiniscoidea: Echiniscidae) from type material, with new records from Hawaii and Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Harry A

    2016-06-13

    The description of Echiniscus cavagnaroi Schuster & Grigarick, 1966 (Tardigrada: Heterotardigrada: Echiniscoidea: Echiniscidae) is emended with new morphometric measurements of the holotype and eleven paratypes. The length of Cirrus A in the holotype (25.2 μm) was only half the 50 μm reported in the original description. Moreover, the largest values for Cirrus A length and Cirrus A to body length ratio for any specimen (40.6 μm, 21%) were also lower than in the original description. Variation in the presence or absence of spines was considerably greater than originally described. Spines C, Dd and E were not present on all specimens (C present in 67%, Dd in 67%, E in 50%). The length of spines Dd and E, when present, varied greatly among specimens. The geographical range of E. cavagnaroi is expanded by new records from the Hawaiian Islands and Bermuda. The species has been reported from southern China; however, the published description of these specimens differs markedly from type specimens in several respects. The presence of E. cavagnaroi sensu stricto in China needs to be confirmed. The high variability in presence or absence and length of spines in Echiniscus cavagnaroi underscores the importance of assessing variability in these characteristics when identifying unknown specimens or describing new species in the genus. This requires using as many specimens as possible and fully reporting variability.

  13. Assimilation of SMOS soil moisture into a distributed hydrological model and impacts on the water cycle variables over the Ouémé catchment in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Delphine J.; Pellarin, Thierry; Vischel, Théo; Cohard, Jean-Martial; Gascon, Tania; Gibon, François; Mialon, Arnaud; Galle, Sylvie; Peugeot, Christophe; Seguis, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation forcing is usually the main source of uncertainty in hydrology. It is of crucial importance to use accurate forcing in order to obtain a good distribution of the water throughout the basin. For real-time applications, satellite observations allow quasi-real-time precipitation monitoring like the products PERSIANN (Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) or CMORPH (CPC (Climate Prediction Center) MORPHing). However, especially in West Africa, these precipitation satellite products are highly inaccurate and the water amount can vary by a factor of 2. A post-adjusted version of these products exists but is available with a 2 to 3 month delay, which is not suitable for real-time hydrologic applications. The purpose of this work is to show the possible synergy between quasi-real-time satellite precipitation and soil moisture by assimilating the latter into a hydrological model. Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) soil moisture is assimilated into the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) model. By adjusting the soil water content, water table depth and streamflow simulations are much improved compared to real-time precipitation without assimilation: soil moisture bias is decreased even at deeper soil layers, correlation of the water table depth is improved from 0.09-0.70 to 0.82-0.87, and the Nash coefficients of the streamflow go from negative to positive. Overall, the statistics tend to get closer to those from the reanalyzed precipitation. Soil moisture assimilation represents a fair alternative to reanalyzed rainfall products, which can take several months before being available, which could lead to a better management of available water resources and extreme events.

  14. Assessment of seasonal and year-to-year surface salinity signals retrieved from SMOS and Aquarius missions in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Akhil, V.P.; Lengaigne, M.; Durand, F.; Vialard, J.; Chaitanya, A.V.S.; Keerthi, M.G.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Boutin, J.; de Boyer, M.C.

    for the application of satellite-derived SSS measurements because of the potential pollution of the SSS signal by radio frequency interference (RFI) and land-induced contamination in this semi-enclosed basin. The present study validates recent level-3 monthly gridded...

  15. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  16. Determining temporal scales of the soil moisture variations by Empirical Mode Decompositions and wavelet methods and its use for validation of SMOS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Jerzy, B.; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy; Lukowski, Mateusz I.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the time series analysis of the soil moisture observed at two test sites Podlasie, Polesie, in the Cal/Val AO 3275 campaigns in Poland, during the interval 2006-2009. The test sites have been selected on a basis of their contrasted hydrological conditions. The region Podlasie (Trzebieszow) is essentially drier than the wetland region Polesie (Urszulin). It is worthwhile to note that the soil moisture variations can be represented as a non-stationary random process, and therefore appropriate analysis methods are required. The so-called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method has been chosen, since it is one of the best methods for the analysis of non-stationary and nonlinear time series. To confirm the results obtained by the EMD we have also used the wavelet methods. Firstly, we have used EMD (analyze step) to decompose the original time series into the so-called Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) and then by grouping and addition similar IMFs (synthesize step) to obtain a few signal components with corresponding temporal scales. Such an adaptive procedure enables to decompose the original time series into diurnal, seasonal and trend components. Revealing of all temporal scales which operates in the original time series is our main objective and this approach may prove to be useful in other studies. Secondly, we have analyzed the soil moisture time series from both sites using the cross-wavelet and wavelet coherency. These methods allow us to study the degree of spatial coherence, which may vary in various intervals of time. We hope the obtained results provide some hints and guidelines for the validation of ESA SMOS data. References: B. Usowicz, J.B. Usowicz, Spatial and temporal variation of selected physical and chemical properties of soil, Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lublin 2004, ISBN 83-87385-96-4 Rao, A.R., Hsu, E.-C., Hilbert-Huang Transform Analysis of Hydrological and Environmental Time Series

  17. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  18. Salinity Effect on Ocean Surface Carbon Dioxide Fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) measured by Aquarius and the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) over global ocean is used to characterize the change of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide at sea (pCO2sea). A statistical model on satellite retrieval of pCO2sea is used to examine the relation between the two parameters over two selected regions. One is the tropical western Atlantic, where hydrological forcing by Amazon River discharge causes major changes, and the other is the equatorial eastern Pacific, where ocean thermodynamics is more important. In both regions, pCO2sea tracks SSS closely in seasonal and year-to-year changes. In the Pacific, tropical instability wave is a major factor in the high frequency changes of both parameters. The manifestations of this relation in ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange and ocean acidification are explored.

  19. WISE 2000 campaign: sea surface salinity and wind retrievals from L-band radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Adriano; Corbella, Ignasi; Font, Jordi; Etchetto, Jacqueline; Duffo, Nuria; Vall-llossera, Merce; Bara, Javier; Torres, Francisco; Wursteisen, Patrick; Martin-Neira, Manuel

    2000-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) has been recognized as a key parameter in climatological studies. SSS can be measured by passive microwave remote sensing at L band, where the sensitivity of the brightness temperatures shows a maximum and the atmosphere is almost transparent. To provide global coverage of this basic parameter with a 3-day revisit time, the SMOS mission was recently selected by ESA within the frame of the Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions. The SMOS mission will carry the MIRAS instrument, the first 2D L-band aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer. To address new challenges that this mission presents, such as incidence angle variation with pixel, polarization mixing, effect of wind and foam and others, a measurement campaign has been sponsored by ESA under the name of WISE 2000 and it is scheduled for October-November 2000. Two L-band radiometers, a video, a IR and a stereo-camera and four oceanographic and meteorological buoys will be installed in the oil platform 'Casablanca' located at 40 Km off the coast of Tarragona, where the sea conditions are representative of the Mediterranean open sea with periodic influence of the Ebro river fresh water plume.

  20. Computer-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the anatomy of Microhedyle remanei (Marcus, 1953), an interstitial acochlidian gastropod from Bermuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neusser, Timea P; Hess, Martin; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Schrödl, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the highly enigmatic and aberrant acochlidian opisthobranch gastropods is mainly hindered by the lack of reliable anatomical data. Due to their small size, marine interstitial acochlidian species are not suitable for anatomical investigations by dissecting. The tinyness and complexity of, e.g., opisthobranch central nervous and reproductive systems make data derived from older paraffin-based histology and interpretation by hand-based graphical reconstruction questionable. In a former study, a hermaphroditic member of the basal acochlidian genus Hedylopsis ("Hedylopsacea") has been examined in detail. The present study uses the gonochoric Microhedyle remanei (Microhedylidae) as a model organism of the other traditional major acochlidian subgroup, the "Microhedylacea." More than 20 specimens with up to 2 mm body length were extracted from coarse subtidal sand near Castle Roads, Bermuda Islands. Their central nervous, digestive, circulatory, excretory, and genital systems were reconstructed three-dimensionally from serial semithin histological sections using AMIRA software. The radula was analyzed by SEM. Our specimens closely resemble the original description of M. remanei (Marcus, 1953; as Unela) from Brazil; apparent differences regarding the number of visceral loop ganglia or details of male genitalia are assumed to be due to oversights by the former author or because of different ontogenetic stages. Microhedyle remanei differs from all congeners due to the lack (vs. presence) of eyes; further distinguishing features are discussed. In contrast to members of the hedylopsacean Hedylopsidae, Acochlidiidae, and Tantulidae, M. remanei shows a nervous system with numerous precerebral accessory "ganglia" that are not differentiated into cortex and medulla. While all Microhedylidae previously were thought to lack a heart, M. remanei shows a two-chambered heart, as is usual for opisthobranchs. The oocytes of M. remanei are yolky and large in

  1. Overview of the US JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS): a decade-scale look at ocean biology and biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Carlson, Craig A.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Johnson, Rodney J.; Michaels, Anthony F.; Knap, Anthony H.

    The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) commenced monthly sampling in October 1988 as part of the US Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) program. The goals of the US JGOFS time-series research are to better understand the basic processes that control ocean biogeochemistry on seasonal to decadal time-scales, determine the role of the oceans in the global carbon budget, and ultimately improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on ecosystems. The BATS program samples the ocean on a biweekly to monthly basis, a strategy that resolves major seasonal patterns and interannual variability. The core cruises last 4-5 d during which hydrography, nutrients, particle flux, pigments and primary production, bacterioplankton abundance and production, and often complementary ancillary measurements are made. This overview focuses on patterns in ocean biology and biogeochemistry over a decade at the BATS site, concentrating on seasonal and interannual changes in community structure, and the physical forcing and other factors controlling the temporal dynamics. Significant seasonal and interannual variability in phytoplankton and bacterioplankton production, biomass, and community structure exists at BATS. No strong relationship exists between primary production and particle flux during the 10 yr record, with the relationship slightly improved by applying an artificial lag of 1 week between production and flux. The prokaryotic picoplankton regularly dominate the phytoplankton community; diatom blooms are rare but occur periodically in the BATS time series. The increase in Chl a concentrations during bloom periods is due to increases by most of the taxa present, rather than by any single group, and there is seasonal succession of phytoplankton. The bacterioplankton often dominate the living biomass, indicating the potential to consume large amounts of carbon and play a major ecological role within the microbial food web. Bacterial biomass, production, and

  2. The Bermuda Triangle of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Yves

    The pedagogical triangle of teacher, learner, and subject matter has in its center a fourth element: the communication system. Each feature of the pedagogical triangle, and the communication system as well, relies on a very important cultural component. Problems occur when communication processes in a classroom are fragmented and related to…

  3. MONOGENEA OF EXOTIC FISHES I.DESCRIPTION OF Salsuginus bermudae FROM Gambusia affinis FOR THE FIRST TIME IN CHINA%外来鱼类单殖吸虫研究Ⅰ.食蚊鱼寄生百慕大伴盐虫Salsuginus bermudae首次在我国检出

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊向英; 丁雪娟

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a newly recorded monogenean in China, Salsuginus bermudae Rand & Wiles, 1987, found on the gills of an exotic fish, Gambusia affinis Baird and Girard, from Guangzhou, Guangdong Province. The shape of our specimens basically agrees with the original description except for the dimensions of the whole worms, the shape of the connective bars and the number of the marginal hooks.%记录采自广东广州食蚊鱼Gambusia-affinis鳃上的1种单殖吸虫——百慕大伴盐虫Salsuginus bermudae Rand & Wiles,1987.所获标本与Rand & Wiles的原始描述基本一致,但在量度、边缘小钩数量、联结片的结构上略有差异.伴盐虫属及百慕大伴盐虫均为我国首次报道.

  4. Etude D'Un Modele D'Inversion Liant L'Emissivite a L'Humidite Des Sols. Contribution a la Mise Au Point De L'Algorithme De la Mission Smos

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Ruffié, Gilles; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Grant, Jennifer; Lawrence, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The work which we present takes place within the framework of mission SMOS of the ESA which will consist to send a radiometer (1.4 GHz) in space. The goal of the research which we propose is the improvement of the comprehension of the effects of structure soil and litter. The effects of the litter and heterogeneities of the ground are probably important but still ignored. Its effect can be corrected via a simple radiative model. It is thus necessary to set up an analytical model which would make it possible to correct the effect of this additional layer. The objective of this article is to present the analytical models which we retained to correct the effect of the vegetation and the litter in order to know the emissivity of the bare soil. We developed a numerical model (with software HFSS) of calculation of the emissivity of multi-layer systems in order to validate the results of the forward inversion models. Ranges of permittivity are introduced with the model in order to take account of the disturbances re...

  5. Multi-Temporal Evaluation of Soil Moisture and Land Surface Temperature Dynamics Using in Situ and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Pablos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture (SM is an important component of the Earth’s surface water balance and by extension the energy balance, regulating the land surface temperature (LST and evapotranspiration (ET. Nowadays, there are two missions dedicated to monitoring the Earth’s surface SM using L-band radiometers: ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP. LST is remotely sensed using thermal infrared (TIR sensors on-board satellites, such as NASA’s Terra/Aqua MODIS or ESA & EUMETSAT’s MSG SEVIRI. This study provides an assessment of SM and LST dynamics at daily and seasonal scales, using 4 years (2011–2014 of in situ and satellite observations over the central part of the river Duero basin in Spain. Specifically, the agreement of instantaneous SM with a variety of LST-derived parameters is analyzed to better understand the fundamental link of the SM–LST relationship through ET and thermal inertia. Ground-based SM and LST measurements from the REMEDHUS network are compared to SMOS SM and MODIS LST spaceborne observations. ET is obtained from the HidroMORE regional hydrological model. At the daily scale, a strong anticorrelation is observed between in situ SM and maximum LST (R ≈ − 0.6 to −0.8, and between SMOS SM and MODIS LST Terra/Aqua day (R ≈ − 0.7. At the seasonal scale, results show a stronger anticorrelation in autumn, spring and summer (in situ R ≈ − 0.5 to −0.7; satellite R ≈ − 0.4 to −0.7 indicating SM–LST coupling, than in winter (in situ R ≈ +0.3; satellite R ≈ − 0.3 indicating SM–LST decoupling. These different behaviors evidence changes from water-limited to energy-limited moisture flux across seasons, which are confirmed by the observed ET evolution. In water-limited periods, SM is extracted from the soil through ET until critical SM is reached. A method to estimate the soil critical SM is proposed. For REMEDHUS, the critical SM is estimated to be ∼0

  6. Produção de forragem em pastagem de bermuda sobre-semeada com aveia e azevém Forage production on bermudagrass sod seeding with oat and ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Elgalise Techio Pereira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar dois sistemas forrageiros manejados com vacas da raça Holandesa. Os sistemas foram constituídos por pastagem de bermuda (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers cv. "Coastcross" sobre-semeada com aveia preta (Avena strigosa Schreb. cv. "Comum" e azevém (Lolium multiflorum Lam. cv. "Comum" e aveia e azevém em cultivo estreme. Foram conduzidos oito pastejos (de 09/06/04 a 13/10/04 e de 02/08/05 a 29/10/05, sendo avaliada a massa de forragem pré e pós-pastejo, a taxa de acúmulo diário de matéria seca (MS, a produção total de forragem, a oferta de forragem, a composição botânica, a biomassa total de lâminas foliares e carga animal. Não foram observadas diferenças significativas (P>0,05 para os referidos parâmetros. A produção total de MS, a taxa de acúmulo diário de MS e a carga animal foram de 8467,9; 7105,7kg de MS ha-1; 54,1 e 69,2kg de MS ha-1 dia-1; 1050,8 e 925,5kg de peso vivo ha-1, para a pastagem de bermuda sobre-semeada com aveia e azevém e para a pastagem anual, respectivamente. Houve maior participação de lâminas foliares de aveia na pastagem constituída por aveia e azevém (P0,05 entre os sistemas forrageiros quanto à produção total de biomassa de lâminas foliares. Estes resultados indicam que o sistema forrageiro constituído por bermuda sobre-semeada com aveia e azevém, utilizada no período hibernal, pode ser usada em condições climáticas similares às do presente estudo.This study was aimed at comparing two pasture-based systems grazed by Holstein cows. The systems were sod seeding of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. cv. Common and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. cv. Common in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers cv. Coastcross and oat and ryegrass mixture in extreme cultivation. From 06/09/04 to 10/13/04 and 08/02/05 to 10/29/05, in eight grazing periods, the pregraze and postgraze herbage mass, dry matter (DM daily acumulation rate, total dry matter production

  7. Application of endocrine disruptor screening program fish short-term reproduction assay: Reproduction and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to Bermuda pond sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Bacon, Jamie P

    2015-06-01

    A modified tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 21-d fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) was used to evaluate the effects of sediment exposure from freshwater and brackish ponds in Bermuda on reproductive fecundity and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Reproductively active male and female fish were exposed to control sediment and sediment from 2 freshwater ponds (fathead minnow) and 2 marine ponds (killifish) contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals via flow-through exposure for 21 d. Reproductive fecundity was monitored daily. At termination, the status of the reproductive endocrine system was assessed by the gonadosomatic index, gonadal histology, plasma steroids (estrogen [E2], testosterone [T], and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), steroidogenic enzymes (aromatase and combined 3β/17β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3β/17β-HSD]), and plasma vitellogenin (VTG). Decreased reproductive fecundity, lower male body weight, and altered endocrinological measures of reproductive status were observed in both species. Higher plasma T levels in female minnows and 11-KT levels in both male and female minnows and female killifish exposed to freshwater and brackish sediments, respectively. Decreased female E2 and VTG levels and gonadal cytochrome P19 (aromatase) activity were also found in sediment exposed females from both species. No effect on female 3β/17β-HSD activity was found in either species. The FSTRA provided a robust model capable of modification to evaluate reproductive effects of sediment exposure in fish.

  8. Structures that should be Described in Higher-Symmetry,Centrosymmetric Space Groups. Part 1. The Disordered Structures of [(CH3CH2)4N]3{[(SCH2CH2S)MoS3]2Fe},[(CH3CH2)4N]2{[S2CN(C2H5)2]4Fe4S4} and[(CH3CH2)4N]3{[(SCH2CH2S)MoS3]2Fe}·1/4CH3CN,and the Ordered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The space groups of [ (CH3CH2)4N]3 { [(SCH2CH2S)MoS3]2Fe} and [ (CH3CH2)4N]2 { [S2CN(C2H5)2 ]4Fe4S4 } are revised from Cc to C2/c by solving the C2/c structure from the structure factorsthat are calculated from the Cc structure. The structures are both disordered in one of the tetraethylammonium cations. The space P21/c; because of the severe disorder in the cations that was not addressed in the original refinements, only the atomic coordinates of the metal-cluster anions could be re(originally described in P1) is re-assigned to C2/c. The general descriptions of the structures are unchanged in the higher-symmetry settings. The revised coordinates are given.

  9. The Evaluation of Single-Sensor Surface Soil Moisture Anomalies over the Mainland of the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Parinussa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, different space agencies have launched satellite missions that carry passive microwave instruments on-board that can measure surface soil moisture. Three currently operational missions are the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission developed by the European Space Agency (ESA, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA, and the Microwave Radiation Imager (MWRI from China’s National Satellite Meteorological Centre (NSMC. In this study, the quality of surface soil moisture anomalies derived from these passive microwave instruments was sequentially assessed over the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. First, the impact of a recent update in the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM was assessed for MWRI observations. Then, the soil moisture measurements retrieved from the X-band observations of MWRI were compared with those of AMSR2, followed by an internal comparison of the multiple frequencies of AMSR2. Finally, SMOS retrievals from two different algorithms were also included in the comparison. For each sequential step, processing and verification chains were specifically designed to isolate the impact of algorithm (version, observation frequency or instrument characteristics. Two verification techniques are used: the statistical Triple Collocation technique is used as the primary verification tool, while the precipitation-based Rvalue technique is used to confirm key results. Our results indicate a consistently better performance throughout the entire study area after the implementation of an update of the LPRM. We also find that passive microwave observations in the AMSR2 C-band frequency (6.9 GHz have an advantage over the AMSR2 X-band frequency (10.7 GHz over moderate to densely vegetated regions. This finding is in line with theoretical expectations as emitted soil radiation will become masked under a dense canopy with stricter thresholds

  10. The SMOS Validation Campaign 2010 in the Upper Danube Catchment: A Data Set for Studies of Soil Moisture, Brightness Temperature, and Their Spatial Variability Over a Heterogeneous Land Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. dall' Amico, Johanna; Schlenz, Florian; Loew, Alexander;

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission has been launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in November 2009. It is the worldwide first satellite dedicated to retrieve soil moisture information at the global scale, with a high temporal resolution, and from spaceborne L-band radiometry...... as of meteorological parameters such as air temperature and humidity, precipitation, wind speed, and radiation. All data have undergone thorough postprocessing and quality checking. Their values and trends fit well among each other and with the theoretically expected behavior. The aim of this paper is to present...... these data which may contribute to potential further studies of soil moisture, brightness temperature, and their spatial variability. The presented data are available to the scientific community upon request to ESA....

  11. Crescimento de folhas do capim-bermuda tifton 85 submetido à adubação nitrogenada após o corte Leaf growth of tifton 85 bermudagrass submitted to nitrogen fertilization after cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Monica Premazzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência de doses e épocas de aplicação de nitrogênio após o corte no fator de correção de área foliar, na taxa de alongamento de folhas e no comprimento e área da lâmina foliar do capim-bermuda tifton 85 (Cynodon spp foram conduzidos dois experimentos em casa de vegetação. Ambos os experimentos foram estabelecidos em vasos com capacidade para 7 kg de terra, com solo classificado como Neossolo Quartzarênico Órtico típico, em esquema fatorial 4 × 2, para avaliação de quatro doses de nitrogênio (0, 80, 160 e 240 mg kg-1 de solo e duas épocas de aplicação (imediatamente após o corte e sete dias após o corte das plantas. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos completos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. Com o fornecimento de nitrogênio, observou-se diminuição no fator de correção de área foliar. O nitrogênio proporciona variação positiva no comprimento foliar, na área da lâmina foliar e na taxa de alongamento da folha, variações que ocorreram em maior grandeza entre a não-aplicação de nitrogênio e a dose de 80 mg kg-1 de solo.With the objective of evaluating the influence of nitrogen rates and application time after cutting on correction factor for leaf area, on leaf elongation rate and on blade leaf length and area of tifton 85 bermudagrass (Cynodon spp, two experiments were carried out in a greenhouse. Both experiments were established in pots with capacity for 7 kg of soil classified as Entisol, in a 4 × 2 factorial scheme, for evaluation of four nitrogen rates (0, 80, 160 and 240 mg kg-1 of soil and two application times (immediately after cutting and seven days after cutting of the plants. It was used a complete randomized block design, with four replications. As nitrogen was supplied, it was observed a decrease in the correction factor for leaf area. There is a predominance of positive effects of nitrogen on leaf length, on leaf blade area and on leaf elongation rate

  12. Effect of low temperature on phytohormones and carbohydrates metabolism in Ber-muda grass%低温胁迫对狗牙根激素和碳水化合物代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勇; 娄燕宏; 杨知建; 向佐湘; 徐庆国; 胡龙兴

    2016-01-01

    以杂交狗牙根品种天堂419,天堂328,老鹰草,运动百慕大和普通狗牙根品种保定狗牙根为试验材料,分析了人工模拟昼夜温度为适温(30℃/25℃)、亚适温(18℃/10℃)、冷害(8℃/4℃)和冻害(4℃/-4℃)等4种梯度降温冷驯化条件下,低温胁迫对狗牙根叶片细胞膜稳定性、叶绿素含量、内源激素(ABA、IAA,GA3和 tZR)以及可溶性糖、淀粉、果聚糖、总非结构性糖等碳水化合物代谢的影响。结果表明:随着温度的降低,狗牙根叶片的电导率显著升高,叶绿素含量下降,内源激素 ABA 含量升高,而 IAA,GA3和 tZR 含量均下降;碳水化合物中可溶性糖、果糖和总非结构性糖含量在5个品种中均呈不同程度的升高,但不同品种在冷驯化过程中不同温度处理下其变化差异较大,如天堂328、老鹰草和运动百慕大的淀粉含量下降;天堂419的淀粉含量变化不大,而保定狗牙根的淀粉含量则呈上升趋势。综合分析各生理指标的变化,5个狗牙根品种的抗寒能力强弱为:保定狗牙根最弱,而天堂419,老鹰草、天堂328和运动百慕大耐寒能力依次较强。低温胁迫下积累或维持较高的内源激素 ABA、GA3、IAA、tZR和碳水化合物可溶性糖和果聚糖可能是耐寒性较强的主要原因,这些代谢物的积累或维持有助于狗牙根细胞内渗透平衡和细胞膜稳定性的维持,延缓叶片的枯黄衰老和诱导抗性相关基因或蛋白的表达从而提高了狗牙根品种的抗寒能力。%To investigate the effects of modulated cold acclimation on the leaf membrane stability,chlorophyll content,endogenous hormones (ABA,IAA,GA3 ,tZR),and carbohydrate (soluble sugars,starch,fructan, total nonstructural carbohydrates)metabolism,five Bermuda grass cultivars,Tifway,Tifgreen,Tifsport, Tifeagle and Baoding were selected and treated under a range of temperatures

  13. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  14. CAROLS SMOS CAL/VAL Campaigns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, M.; Pardé, M.; Boutin, J.

    2011-01-01

    The CAROLS \\Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" L band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling corre- lation radiometer. CAROLS is instal...

  15. CAROLS SMOS CAL/VAL Campaigns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, M.; Pardé, M.; Boutin, J.

    2011-01-01

    The CAROLS \\Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" L band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling corre- lation radiometer. CAROLS is instal...

  16. Educational Research and the 'Bermuda Triangle.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    In answer to the suggestion that policymakers, researchers, and teachers unanimously agree that research is hardly taken into account by its potential users, the author provides an overview of educational research in Western Europe. Projects involve disciplines, history of education, and curriculum. (KC)

  17. 3D Dynamics of the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Presence of Freshwater Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater inflow due to convective rains or river runoff produces lenses of freshened water in the near surface layer of the ocean. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. The gravity current head can include the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows with vertical density inversions. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the pollution transport including oil spills. The near-surface data from the field experiments in the Gulf of Mexico during the SCOPE experiment were available for validation of numerical simulations. In particular, we observed a freshwater layer within a few-meter depth range and, in some cases, a density inversion at the edge of the freshwater lens, which is consistent with the results of numerical simulations. In conclusion, we discuss applicability of these results to the interpretation of Aquarius and SMOS sea surface salinity satellite measurements. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of the near-surface layer of the ocean are essential in the presence of freshwater inflow.

  18. Inhibiton of Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L. and Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers by a Mulch Derived from Rye (Secale cereale L. in grapevines Inhibición del Crecimiento de Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. y Pasto Bermuda (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers. con mulch Vegetal Proveniente de Centeno (Secale cereale L. en Vides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ormeño-Núñez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Two field trials (Los Andes 1998-1999 and Santiago 2004-2005 were carried out to determine growth inhibition of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L. and bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers., growing on the plantation row, by mulch derived from a rye (Secale cereale L. cover crop established between grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. rows on overhead (cv. Flame Seedless and vertical (cv. Cabernet Sauvignon training. Spring mowing of the rye sown in the fall allowed for developing a thick and long lasting mulch along the grape rows. Nutsedge and bermudagrass control was 81 and 82%, respectively, and was more effective than conventional chemical (in the row + mechanical (between rows control. Glyphosate at 2% for nutsedge and 1% for bermudagrass control, applied twice (October and December, was insufficient to control either perennial weed adequately. Total broadleaved and grass/sedge weed control was 67.3 and 43.0% more effective with the rye mulch than with conventional treatments at Los Andes and Santiago, respectively. Perennial weed control levels could be explained as the new foliage of yellow nutsedge and bermudagrass was particularly susceptible to the shading provided by the rye mulch assembled prior to mid spring shoot emergence, and this effect remained active up until the beginning of autumn. The subsequent rye foliage mowing at the vegetative stage fully expressed the allelopathic effect produced by this local rye cultivar. The use of rye cover crop management and mulch could be applied as an effective weed control technique in conventional, as well as organic deciduous tree orchards.En dos ensayos de campo (Los Andes 1998-1999 y Santiago 2004-2005 se determinó el efecto inhibitorio sobre chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. y pasto bermuda (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers. de residuos de centeno (Secale cereale L. establecido en otoño entre las hileras de vides (Vitis vinifera L. en parronal (cv. Flame Seedless y espaldera (cv. Cabernet Sauvignon

  19. Aquarius Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface. [29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel Phillippe; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  20. L-Band Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GigaHertz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  1. Comparison of near surface and column-integrated atmospheric aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rudra Prasad

    Optical and chemical properties of size-resolved aerosols in near-surface air at Tudor Hill, Bermuda were measured between July 2006 and June 2009. Vertical distributions of aerosol backscattering and column-averaged aerosol optical properties were characterized with a Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) and a CIMEL automated sun-sky radiometer. The chemical species in size-segregated aerosols in marine air were compared with the surface level aerosol optical properties. The aerosol concentration, along with chemical components, was compared with the surface level wind speed and showed a significant correlation with the sea salt components. The non-sea salt components such as non-sea salt sulfate and ammonium did not show a correlation with the surface level wind speed. A comparison between scattering data at surface level with the extinction coefficient at the lowest altitude bin (75m) from the lidar inversion shows a consistent correlation but is quantitatively different. This quantitative discrepancy was explained based on the hygroscopic growth due to differences in relative humidity in measurement conditions. Aerosol optical properties measured near the surface were often significantly correlated with those averaged over the column. These include scattering by near-surface bulk aerosol at 530 nm versus column aerosol optical depth (AOD), near-surface sub-microm scattering fraction versus column averaged sub-microm scattering fraction, and the average angstrom exponent over column and lidar ratio derived using column integrated size distribution and complex refractive index. We also found that the single scattering albedo (ω o) measured at the surface by combining daily averages of the aerosol absorption and aerosol light scattering were in the same range as the instantaneous ω o retrieved for the column. The relative contribution of submicron aerosol light scattering to total aerosol light scattering is slightly higher in the column relative to the surface. Surface

  2. The role of sea surface salinity in ENSO related water cycle anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqing; Yueh, Simon

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the water cycle anomaly associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The 2015-16 El Niño, one of the strongest ENSO events observed in centuries, coincident with unprecedented coverage of spacebased remote sensing of SSS over global oceans. We analyze three SSS data sets: from the NASA's missions of SMAP and Aquarius, and the ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS). One typical characteristics of an ENSO event is the zonal displacement of the Western equatorial Pacific Fresh Pool (WPFP). The edge of the pool extends eastward during El Niño, retreats westward during La Niña. For super El Niño, the eastern edge of WPFP extends much more east across the equatorial Pacific. Indeed, SSS from SMAP reveals much stronger eastward migration of WPFP starting in April 2015. The eastern edge of WPFP reached 140°W in March 2016, about 40° more eastward extension than Aquarius observed in previous years. In the following months from March to June 2016, WPFP retreated westward, coincident with the ending of this strong El Niño event [WMO, El Nino/La Nina update, 2016]. SMOS data shows similar feature, confirming that there is no systematic biases between SMAP and Aquarius retrievals. We examine the linkage between the observed SSS variation and ENSO related water cycle anomaly by integrated analysis of SSS data sets in conjunction with other satellite and in situ measurements on rain, wind, evaporation and ocean currents. Based on the governing equation of the mixed layer salt budget, the freshwater exchange between air-sea interfaces is estimated as residual of the mixed-layer salinity (MLS) temporal change and advection (Focean), as an alternative to evaporation minus precipitation (FE-P). We analyzed the spatial and temporal variation of Focean and FE-P to explore the anomalous signature in the oceanic and atmospheric branches of the water cycle associated with 2015/16 ENSO. The maximum

  3. The emission and scattering of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces and wind speed measurements from the Aquarius sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    2014-09-01

    In order to achieve the required accuracy in sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements from L-band radiometers such as the Aquarius/SAC-D or SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, it is crucial to accurately correct the radiation that is emitted from the ocean surface for roughness effects. We derive a geophysical model function (GMF) for the emission and backscatter of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces. The analysis is based on radiometer brightness temperature and scatterometer backscatter observations both taken on board Aquarius. The data are temporally and spatially collocated with wind speeds from WindSat and F17 SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder) and wind directions from NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System). This GMF is the basis for retrieval of ocean surface wind speed combining L-band H-pol radiometer and HH-pol scatterometer observations. The accuracy of theses combined passive/active L-band wind speeds matches those of many other satellite microwave sensors. The L-band GMF together with the combined passive/active L-band wind speeds is utilized in the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm for the surface roughness correction. We demonstrate that using these L-band wind speeds instead of NCEP wind speeds leads to a significant improvement in the SSS accuracy. Further improvements in the roughness correction algorithm can be obtained by adding VV-pol scatterometer measurements and wave height (WH) data into the GMF.

  4. CAROLS: a new airborne L-band radiometer for ocean surface and land observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer-STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity.

  5. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Baeza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera. Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity.

  6. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  7. Superamphiphobic Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalli, A.; Mugele, F.; Brutin, David

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent trends in the development, fabrication, and characterization of superamphiphobic surfaces. An amphiphobic surface repels both polar liquids, such as water, and nonpolar (oily) liquids, and has therefore useful technological application in microfluidics devices, protecti

  8. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  9. Surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, T

    2006-10-01

    Surface analysis techniques are important tools to use in the verification of surface cleanliness and medical device functionality. How these techniques can be employed and some example applications are described.

  10. Ocean circulation and biogeochemistry moderate interannual and decadal surface water pH changes in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathalie F. Goodkin,; Bo-Shian Wang,; Chen-Feng You,; Konrad Hughen,; Prouty, Nancy G.; Bates, Nicholas; Scott Doney,

    2015-01-01

    The oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, lowering surface ocean pH, a concern for calcifying marine organisms. The impact of ocean acidification is challenging to predict as each species appears to respond differently and because our knowledge of natural changes to ocean pH is limited in both time and space. Here we reconstruct 222 years of biennial seawater pH variability in the Sargasso Sea from a brain coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis. Using hydrographic data from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study and the coral-derived pH record, we are able to differentiate pH changes due to surface temperature versus those from ocean circulation and biogeochemical changes. We find that ocean pH does not simply reflect atmospheric CO2 trends but rather that circulation/biogeochemical changes account for >90% of pH variability in the Sargasso Sea and more variability in the last century than would be predicted from anthropogenic uptake of CO2 alone.

  11. Surface reconstructions

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known, even at the most elementary level of scientific knowledge, that free surfaces have properties which make them differ from the underlying bulk material. In the case of liquids, it is common knowledge - even among laymen - that the liquid surface acts as though it were a distinct skin-like material. At a slightly more advanced level, it is known that the liquid surface will seek to minimize its total surface energy by minimizing its surface area; thereby affecting its local vapor-pressure and adsorption behavior. In the case of solids too, it has long been known that different

  12. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  13. Sea Surface Signature of Tropical Cyclones Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    due to the ionosphere and troposphere, which have to be compensated for, and components due to the galactic and cosmic background radiation those...and corrections for sun glint, galactic and cosmic background radiation, and Stokes effects of the ionosphere. The accuracy of a given retrieval...sampled the TMI data which is independently located closest to negative SMOS ∆SSS data within a 6NM radius on 27, 28 Aug.2012. To see the accumulated

  14. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  15. Spherical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David

    2015-01-01

    We study surfaces of constant positive Gauss curvature in Euclidean 3-space via the harmonicity of the Gauss map. Using the loop group representation, we solve the regular and the singular geometric Cauchy problems for these surfaces, and use these solutions to compute several new examples. We gi...

  16. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  17. Surface boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-22

    In this paper, we introduce a surface boxplot as a tool for visualization and exploratory analysis of samples of images. First, we use the notion of volume depth to order the images viewed as surfaces. In particular, we define the median image. We use an exact and fast algorithm for the ranking of the images. This allows us to detect potential outlying images that often contain interesting features not present in most of the images. Second, we build a graphical tool to visualize the surface boxplot and its various characteristics. A graph and histogram of the volume depth values allow us to identify images of interest. The code is available in the supporting information of this paper. We apply our surface boxplot to a sample of brain images and to a sample of climate model outputs.

  18. Surface phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Wette, Frederik

    1991-01-01

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the detection of surface phonons owing to considerable improvements in inelastic rare gas scattering tech­ niques and electron energy loss spectroscopy. With these methods it has become possible to measure surface vibrations in a wide energy range for all wave vectors in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone and thus to deduce the complete surface phonon dispersion curves. Inelastic atomic beam scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy have started to play a role in the study of surface phonons similar to the one played by inelastic neutron scattering in the investigation of bulk phonons in the last thirty years. Detailed comparison between experimen­ tal results and theoretical studies of inelastic surface scattering and of surface phonons has now become feasible. It is therefore possible to test and to improve the details of interaction models which have been worked out theoretically in the last few decades. At this point we felt that a concise, co...

  19. Modelling the spring ozone maximum and the interhemispheric asymmetry in the remote marine boundary layer 1. Comparison with surface and ozonesonde measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kuo-Ying; Pyle, John A

    2008-01-01

    Here we report a modelling study of the spring ozone maximum and its interhemispheric asymmetry in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL). The modelled results are examined at the surface and on a series of time-height cross sections at several locations spread over the Atlantic, the Indian, and the Pacific Oceans. Comparison of model with surface measurements at remote MBL stations indicate a close agreement. The most striking feature of the hemispheric spring ozone maximum in the MBL can be most easily identified at the NH sites of Westman Island, Bermuda, and Mauna Loa, and at the SH site of Samoa. Modelled ozone vertical distributions in the troposphere are compared with ozone profiles. For the Atlantic and the Indian sites, the model generally produces a hemispheric spring ozone maximum close to those of the measurements. The model also produces a spring ozone maximum in the northeastern and tropical north Pacific close to those measurements, and at sites in the NH high latitudes. The good agreement betw...

  20. Surfacing Moves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    such as schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring these different ‘spatial-timings’. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desks of ethnographic analysis....

  1. Attack surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruschka, Nils; Jensen, Meiko

    2010-01-01

    The new paradigm of cloud computing poses severe security risks to its adopters. In order to cope with these risks, appropriate taxonomies and classification criteria for attacks on cloud computing are required. In this work-in-progress paper we present one such taxonomy based on the notion...... of attack surfaces of the cloud computing scenario participants. © 2010 IEEE....

  2. Surfacing Moves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    such as schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring these different ‘spatial-timings’. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desks of ethnographic analysis....

  3. Describing Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    York. Do Carmo , Manfredo P, [1976], Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, Prent- ice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Faugeras, 0. D., et. al, [1982...lightbulb. It is well-known (for exam~ple, do Carmo "" "..-’,.’.V .. .V...i ra I s ; ul ing-.. "’. Figure 11. The helicoid of a single blade. (Reproduced from [do Carmo 1976, Figure 2-27 Page 94]) where m and 1 are assumed

  4. Assimilation of gridded terrestrial water storage observations from GRACE into a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Manuela; De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Observations of terrestrial water storage (TWS) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have a coarse resolution in time (monthly) and space (roughly 150,000 km2 at midlatitudes) and vertically integrate all water storage components over land, including soil moisture and groundwater. Data assimilation can be used to horizontally downscale and vertically partition GRACE-TWS observations. This work proposes a variant of existing ensemble-based GRACE-TWS data assimilation schemes. The new algorithm differs in how the analysis increments are computed and applied. Existing schemes correlate the uncertainty in the modeled monthly TWS estimates with errors in the soil moisture profile state variables at a single instant in the month and then apply the increment either at the end of the month or gradually throughout the month. The proposed new scheme first computes increments for each day of the month and then applies the average of those increments at the beginning of the month. The new scheme therefore better reflects submonthly variations in TWS errors. The new and existing schemes are investigated here using gridded GRACE-TWS observations. The assimilation results are validated at the monthly time scale, using in situ measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture across the U.S. The new assimilation scheme yields improved (although not in a statistically significant sense) skill metrics for groundwater compared to the open-loop (no assimilation) simulations and compared to the existing assimilation schemes. A smaller impact is seen for surface and root-zone soil moisture, which have a shorter memory and receive smaller increments from TWS assimilation than groundwater. These results motivate future efforts to combine GRACE-TWS observations with observations that are more sensitive to surface soil moisture, such as L-band brightness temperature observations from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) or Soil Moisture Active Passive

  5. DOMECair: An Airborne Campaign in Antarctica Supporting SMOS Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2013-01-01

    the Concordia station was surveyed using grid, star, and circular flight patterns. Significant and maybe surprising dynamics in brightness temperature is observed. An East-West line through Concordia displays almost 10 K variations, and in specific cases a slope of almost 1 K per km. It is concluded that use...

  6. ESA's Soil Moisture dnd Ocean Salinity Mission - Contributing to Water Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, S.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in November 2009, is the European Space Agency's (ESA) second Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. The scientific objectives of the SMOS mission directly respond to the need for global observations of soil moisture and ocean salinity, two key variables used in predictive hydrological, oceanographic and atmospheric models. SMOS observations also provide information on the characterisation of ice and snow covered surfaces and the sea ice effect on ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes and dynamics, which affects large-scale processes of the Earth's climate system. The focus of this paper will be on SMOS's contribution to support water resource management: SMOS surface soil moisture provides the input to derive root-zone soil moisture, which in turn provides the input for the drought index, an important monitoring prediction tool for plant available water. In addition to surface soil moisture, SMOS also provides observations on vegetation optical depth. Both parameters aid agricultural applications such as crop growth, yield forecasting and drought monitoring, and provide input for carbon and land surface modelling. SMOS data products are used in data assimilation and forecasting systems. Over land, assimilating SMOS derived information has shown to have a positive impact on applications such as NWP, stream flow forecasting and the analysis of net ecosystem exchange. Over ocean, both sea surface salinity and severe wind speed have the potential to increase the predictive skill on the seasonal and short- to medium-range forecast range. Operational users in particular in Numerical Weather Prediction and operational hydrology have put forward a requirement for soil moisture data to be available in near-real time (NRT). This has been addressed by developing a fast retrieval for a NRT level 2 soil moisture product based on Neural Networks, which will be available by autumn 2015. This paper will focus on presenting the

  7. Editorial cognition, neurology, psychiatry: golden triangle or bermuda triangle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, A D

    1996-08-01

    Cognitive neuropsychiatry occupies the comparatively neglected research region that lies between neurology, psychiatry, and cognitive psychology. Reasons for this neglect are discussed, together with arguments as to why it may be timely to focus on this intellectual no man's land.

  8. Clinical use of medical devices in the 'Bermuda Triangle'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Larry; Ramsey, Scott D; Tunis, Sean; Sullivan, Sean D

    2004-01-01

    The pace of medical technological development shows no sign of abating. Analyzing the effect of major federal health agencies on the availability of such technology is critical. This paper describes functions of three government health agencies: the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Certain medical technologies fall into gaps between these agencies, which pose challenges in today's era of demand for evidence-based medicine. We suggest new policy and pragmatic strategies that can close the gaps and move decision making relevant to technology forward more rapidly than is now the case.

  9. The Bermuda Triangle of cocaine-induced neuroadaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marina E

    2010-09-01

    Activation of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens is critical for goal-directed behaviors including cocaine seeking. Studies in cocaine-experienced rodents have revealed three major categories of neuroadaptations that influence the ability of glutamate inputs to activate MSNs: changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels, changes in extracellular non-synaptic glutamate levels and changes in MSN intrinsic membrane excitability. Most studies have focused on one of these adaptations. This review will consider the possibility that they are causally related and speculate about how time-dependent changes in their interactions may regulate MSN output during early and late withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure.

  10. Italian, French, Polish: in the Bermuda Triangle of linguistic interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Balicka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing contacts between nations make people learn foreign languages. Unfortunately, the use of more than one language system may cause errors due to linguistic interference. In the present paper we consider different definitions of this phenomenon and describe the conditions reąuired for its presence, along with proposals on how to eliminate interference mistakes. A specific case is false friends, words similar in form but different in meaning, which can lead to misunderstandings or even disgrace. As interference implies the knowledge of at least two languages, bilingualism is another problem discussed in the paper. We present different approaches to interference and study the relation between bilingualism and interference. Finally, we discuss loanwords as one of the results of interference. With all these considerations in mind we can make a specific study of interference mistakes made by Polish students of Italian philology.

  11. The Bermuda Triangle of Cocaine-Induced Neuroadaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Marina E Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Activation of medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the nucleus accumbens is critical for goal-directed behaviors including cocaine seeking. Studies in cocaine-experienced rodents have revealed three major categories of neuroadaptations that influence the ability of glutamate inputs to activate MSN: changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels, changes in extracellular non-synaptic glutamate levels, and changes in MSN intrinsic membrane excitability. Most studies have focused on one of these adaptations....

  12. Italian, French, Polish: in the Bermuda Triangle of linguistic interference

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Balicka

    2009-01-01

    Increasing contacts between nations make people learn foreign languages. Unfortunately, the use of more than one language system may cause errors due to linguistic interference. In the present paper we consider different definitions of this phenomenon and describe the conditions reąuired for its presence, along with proposals on how to eliminate interference mistakes. A specific case is false friends, words similar in form but different in meaning, which can lead to misunderstandings or even ...

  13. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease : A Bermuda Triangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the complex relationship between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus (DM), and periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). It was observed that a substantial number of suspected new DM patients could be fo

  14. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease : A Bermuda Triangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the complex relationship between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus (DM), and periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). It was observed that a substantial number of suspected new DM patients could be

  15. Tillering of Tifton 85 bermudagrass in response to nitrogen rates and time of application after cutting Perfilhamento em Capim-bermuda cv. Tifton 85 em resposta a doses e ao momento de aplicação do nitrogênio após o corte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Monica Premazzi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is determinant for pasture productivity, as it results in increasing forage yield and is associated with the growth physiology of forage plants. An experiment was carried out in a greenhouse to evaluate the effects of nitrogen rates and times of application after cutting on Tifton 85 Bermuda grass (Cynodon spp. tillering. Plants were grown in a Typic Quartzipsamment soil and nitrogen rates were 0, 80, 160 and 240 mg kg-1 of soil; times of application were immediately after and seven days after cutting. A 4 x 2 factorial experiment was set in a completely randomized block design (n= 4. Plants were evaluated in two sequential growth periods - 39 and 41 days. Nitrogen rates affected tiller density, considering the initial number of tillers in the second growth and the emerged and final number of tillers at the end of the growth periods. Tiller weight increased up to the nitrogen rate of 201 and 185 mg kg-1 of soil in the first and second growth periods, and the correlation coefficients between the final number of tillers and dry matter yields in the top part of the plant for these periods were 0.92 and 0.94, respectively. The rate of tiller development, evaluated in each of the seven-day periods, was affected by nitrogen rates and time of application. There was an effect of rates and time of application in the first and a significant interaction between rates and time in the second growth period.A adubação nitrogenada é fator determinante na produtividade das pastagens, pois aumenta a produção de massa e está associada à fisiologia de crescimento das plantas forrageiras. Um experimento foi conduzido com a gramínea Tifton 85 (Cynodon spp., em casa-de-vegetação num solo Neossolo Quartzarênico, com o objetivo de avaliar a influência de doses e momentos de aplicação de nitrogênio após o corte no perfilhamento desta planta forrageira. Foram definidas quatro doses e dois momentos de aplicação de nitrogênio ap

  16. Analysis of CO2 convection mechanisms associated to surface heating, by combining remote sensing data and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Marivi; Curcoll, Roger; Font, Anna; Morgu, Josep Anton; Rod, Xavier

    Assessing the mechanisms involved in the variability of carbon fluxes is crucial for the under-standing of the changing earth dynamics. In that sense, the aim of this work is to analyze CO2 convection mechanisms at a regional scale in the boundary layer and the lower troposphere by means of cross correlation of land surface temperature data, radio-soundings, wind speeds and in situ measurements of CO2 atmospheric mixing ratios. Since data is easier to acquire, ground level horizontal CO2 fluxes have been widely studied. In the contrary, vertical ones are still subject to uncertainties, even if they are necessary to understand 3D CO2 variability in the atmosphere. In particular, this paper focuses on the relationship between surface heating, convection and CO2 concentrations at different heights and, more generally, on the energy transfer between the surface and the air. The monitored area corresponds to a region on the North Eastern Iberian Peninsula, mainly devoted to agricultural activities. Different types of land covers are observed. On the one hand, in situ data has been collected by several flights during 2007 along the parallel 42o N following the "Crown" aircraft sampling approach [1] that integrates CO2 data obtained through horizontal transects and vertical profiles. This particular configuration is especially well suited for the evaluation of both horizontal and vertical CO2 fluxes. On the other hand, the radiometric land surface temperatures are obtained from the MODIS instrument onboard the Terra and the Aqua satellites. Besides, a flight campaign with an airborne sensor along the same transect in the parallel 42o N has been proposed in the scope of the MIDAS-6 project recently submitted. This project plans to improve soil moisture and ocean salinity products of the SMOS sensor recently launched and to demonstrate its applications. This will allow the study of moisture patterns in the monitored area at two different scales: that of the data collected

  17. Similarity in microbial amino acid uptake in surface waters of the North and South Atlantic (sub-)tropical gyres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Polly G.; Mary, Isabelle; Purdie, Duncan A.; Zubkov, Mikhail V.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth’s most extensive biomes - the oceanic subtropical gyres - are considered to be expanding with current surface ocean warming. Although it is well established that microbial communities control gyre biogeochemistry, comparisons of their metabolic activities between gyres are limited. In order to estimate metabolic activities including production of microbial communities, the uptake rates of amino acids leucine, methionine and tyrosine at ambient concentrations were estimated in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean using radioisotopically labelled tracers. Data were acquired during six research cruises covering main oceanic provinces herein termed: North and South Atlantic Gyres, Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS), Equatorial region, and Mauritanian Upwelling (off Cape Blanc). Data were divided between provinces, the extents of which were identified by ocean colour data, in order to achieve provincial mean uptake rates. Leucine and methionine uptake rates did not differ between sampling periods, and were comparable between the North and South subtropical gyres. Furthermore, variation in uptake rates measured throughout the two oligotrophic gyres, where sampling covered ∼4 × 10 6 km 2, was considerably lower than that measured within the Mauritanian Upwelling and Equatorial regions, and even at the BATS site. Tyrosine was generally the slowest of the amino acids to be taken up, however, it was assimilated faster than methionine within the Mauritanian Upwelling region. Thus, we propose that one value for leucine (12.6 ± 3.2 pmol L -1 h -1) and methionine (10.0 ± 3.3 pmol L -1 h -1) uptake could be applied to the oligotrophic subtropical gyres of the Atlantic Ocean. However, with the significantly lower uptake rates observed at the BATS site, we would not advise extrapolation to the Sargasso Sea.

  18. Surface texture metrology for high precision surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces some of the challenges related to surface texture measurement of high precision surfaces. The paper is presenting two case studies related to polished tool surfaces and micro part surfaces. In both cases measuring instrumentation, measurement procedure and the measurement...

  19. Surface texture metrology for high precision surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces some of the challenges related to surface texture measurement of high precision surfaces. The paper is presenting two case studies related to polished tool surfaces and micro part surfaces. In both cases measuring instrumentation, measurement procedure and the measurement re...

  20. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  1. Representing Quadric Surfaces Using NURBS Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦开怀

    1997-01-01

    A method for representing quadrc surfaces using NURBS is presented.By means of the necessary and sufficient conditons for NURBS curves to precisely represent circular arcs and other conics,quadric surfaces can be represented by NURBS surfaces with fewer control vertices.The method can be used not only for NURBS surface representation of quadric surfaces,but also for rounding polyhedrons.Many examples are given in the paper.

  2. Multiangular L-band Datasets for Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval Measured by Airborne HUT-2D Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Seppänen, J.; Hallikainen, M.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS is the European Space Agency's next Earth Explorer satellite due for launch in 2009. It aims for global monitoring of soil moisture and ocean salinity utilizing a new technology concept for remote sensing: two-dimensional aperture synthesis radiometry. The payload of SMOS is Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis, or MIRAS. It is a passive instrument that uses 72 individual L-band receivers for measuring the brightness temperature of the Earth. From each acquisition, i.e. integration time or snapshot, MIRAS provides two-dimensional brightness temperature of the scene in the instrument's field of view. Thus, consecutive snapshots provide multiangular measurements of the target once the instrument passes over it. Depending on the position of the target in instrument's swath, the brightness temperature of the target at incidence angles from zero up to 50 degrees can be measured with one overpass. To support the development MIRAS instrument, its calibration, and soil moisture and sea surface salinity retrieval algorithm development, Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) has designed, manufactured and tested a radiometer which operates at L-band and utilizes the same two-dimensional methodology of interferometery and aperture synthesis as MIRAS does. This airborne instrument, called HUT-2D, was designed to be used on board the University's research aircraft. It provides multiangular measurements of the target in its field of view, which spans up to 30 degrees off the boresight of the instrument, which is pointed to the nadir. The number of independent measurements of each target point depends on the flight speed and altitude. In addition to the Spanish Airborne MIRAS demonstrator (AMIRAS), HUT-2D is the only European airborne synthetic aperture radiometer. This paper presents the datasets and measurement campaigns, which have been carried out using the HUT-2D radiometer and are available for the scientific community. In April 2007 HUT-2D participated

  3. Brain surface parameterization using Riemann surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Chan, Tony F; Thompson, Paul M; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2005-01-01

    We develop a general approach that uses holomorphic 1-forms to parameterize anatomical surfaces with complex (possibly branching) topology. Rather than evolve the surface geometry to a plane or sphere, we instead use the fact that all orientable surfaces are Riemann surfaces and admit conformal structures, which induce special curvilinear coordinate systems on the surfaces. Based on Riemann surface structure, we can then canonically partition the surface into patches. Each of these patches can be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable. To illustrate the technique, we computed conformal structures for several types of anatomical surfaces in MRI scans of the brain, including the cortex, hippocampus, and lateral ventricles. We found that the resulting parameterizations were consistent across subjects, even for branching structures such as the ventricles, which are otherwise difficult to parameterize. Compared with other variational approaches based on surface inflation, our technique works on surfaces with arbitrary complexity while guaranteeing minimal distortion in the parameterization. It also offers a way to explicitly match landmark curves in anatomical surfaces such as the cortex, providing a surface-based framework to compare anatomy statistically and to generate grids on surfaces for PDE-based signal processing.

  4. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, s.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G(1) surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G(r) NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produce...... robust approximation of given scattered data. The presented technique can be applied in computer aided manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. (C) 1999 Academic Press....

  5. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, S.

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G_1 surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G_r NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produce...... robust approximation of given scattered data. The presented technique can be applied in computer aided manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding....

  6. Bias estimation and assessment of satellite sea surface salinity gridded products based on in situ salinity measurements%基于现场观测资料的卫星海表盐度网格化 产品误差分析与质量评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍森亮; 张韧; 王辉赞; 王公杰; 张明

    2016-01-01

    With the launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS)and American Aquarius,different seasurface salinity (SSS)gridded products have been developed by several institutions,including SMOS Locean L3 data released by the Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS (CATDS )in France,SMOS BEC L4 data releasedby the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC)in Spain and Aquarius V3.0 CAP L3 data released by NASA JetPropulsion Laboratory(JPL).Based oninsitu salinity measurements,this paper assesses the performances of threesatellite products on their accuracy and ability to depict ocean phenomena.The results show as follows:(1 )Interms of accuracy of products,Aquarius CAP data are of best quality and have stable and low mean bias andRMSE,which have reached the design accuracy in some regions.The deviation of SMOS products is less stable,becoming abnormal in some months.SMOS products data are of relatively high quality in open ocean and low latitudes,but there are great errors in high latitudes,which needs further improvement.(2 )The study of depictingphysical phenomena shows that Aquarius data perform best in depicting the eastern edge of warm pool salinityfront,SMOS BEC data take second place.SMOS Locean data are full of noise in the tropical Pacific,and describethe physical phenomena in poor performance.%自欧洲土壤湿度和盐度卫星SMOS和美国宝瓶座盐度卫星Aquarius相继发射之后,多个数据中心发布了两颗卫星的海表盐度网格化产品,其中包括法国海洋研究院SMOS卫星数据小组发布SMOS Locean L3盐度产品、西班牙巴塞罗那专家中心发布SMOS BEC L4盐度产品和美国宇航局喷气动力实验室发布AquariusV3.0 CAP L3盐度产品.本文利用精确盐度现场观测资料从产品精度和模拟海洋现象能力两个方面对以上3种产品质量进行了评估.研究表明:(1)在精度方面,与盐度现场资料相比,Aquarius CAP产品质量最高,产品盐度偏差和均方根误差全年稳定且偏差

  7. A Proposed Extension to the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Level 2 Algorithm for Mixed Forest and Moderate Vegetation Pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, Rocco; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kalma, Jetse; Kim, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS)mission, launched in November 2009, provides global maps of soil moisture and ocean salinity by measuring the L-band (1.4 GHz) emission of the Earth's surface with a spatial resolution of 40-50 km.Uncertainty in the retrieval of soilmoisture over large heterogeneous areas such as SMOS pixels is expected, due to the non-linearity of the relationship between soil moisture and the microwave emission. The current baseline soilmoisture retrieval algorithm adopted by SMOS and implemented in the SMOS Level 2 (SMOS L2) processor partially accounts for the sub-pixel heterogeneity of the land surface, by modelling the individual contributions of different pixel fractions to the overall pixel emission. This retrieval approach is tested in this study using airborne L-band data over an area the size of a SMOS pixel characterised by a mix Eucalypt forest and moderate vegetation types (grassland and crops),with the objective of assessing its ability to correct for the soil moisture retrieval error induced by the land surface heterogeneity. A preliminary analysis using a traditional uniform pixel retrieval approach shows that the sub-pixel heterogeneity of land cover type causes significant errors in soil moisture retrieval (7.7%v/v RMSE, 2%v/v bias) in pixels characterised by a significant amount of forest (40-60%). Although the retrieval approach adopted by SMOS partially reduces this error, it is affected by errors beyond the SMOS target accuracy, presenting in particular a strong dry bias when a fraction of the pixel is occupied by forest (4.1%v/v RMSE,-3.1%v/v bias). An extension to the SMOS approach is proposed that accounts for the heterogeneity of vegetation optical depth within the SMOS pixel. The proposed approach is shown to significantly reduce the error in retrieved soil moisture (2.8%v/v RMSE, -0.3%v/v bias) in pixels characterised by a critical amount of forest (40-60%), at the limited cost of only a crude estimate of the

  8. Open algebraic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miyanishi, Masayoshi

    2000-01-01

    Open algebraic surfaces are a synonym for algebraic surfaces that are not necessarily complete. An open algebraic surface is understood as a Zariski open set of a projective algebraic surface. There is a long history of research on projective algebraic surfaces, and there exists a beautiful Enriques-Kodaira classification of such surfaces. The research accumulated by Ramanujan, Abhyankar, Moh, and Nagata and others has established a classification theory of open algebraic surfaces comparable to the Enriques-Kodaira theory. This research provides powerful methods to study the geometry and topology of open algebraic surfaces. The theory of open algebraic surfaces is applicable not only to algebraic geometry, but also to other fields, such as commutative algebra, invariant theory, and singularities. This book contains a comprehensive account of the theory of open algebraic surfaces, as well as several applications, in particular to the study of affine surfaces. Prerequisite to understanding the text is a basic b...

  9. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  10. Surface reconstruction by offset surface filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Chen-shi; WANG Guo-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The problem of computing a piecewise linear approximation to a surface from its sample has been a focus of research in geometry modeling and graphics due to its widespread applications in computer aided design. In this paper, we give a new algorithm, to be called offset surface filtering (OSF) algorithm, which computes a piecewise-linear approximation of a smooth surface from a finite set of cloud points. The algorithm has two main stages. First, the surface normal on every point is estimated by the least squares best fitting plane method. Second, we construct a restricted Delaunay triangulation, which is a tubular neighborhood of the surface defined by two offset surfaces. The algorithm is simple and robust. We describe an implementation of it and show example outputs.

  11. Surfaces with Natural Ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Markvorsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We discuss surfaces with singularities, both in mathematics and in the real world. For many types of mathematical surface, singularities are natural and can be regarded as part of the surface. The most emblematic example is that of surfaces of constant negative Gauss curvature, all of which...

  12. Surfaces with Natural Ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Markvorsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We discuss surfaces with singularities, both in mathematics and in the real world. For many types of mathematical surface, singularities are natural and can be regarded as part of the surface. The most emblematic example is that of surfaces of constant negative Gauss curvature, all of which...

  13. Approximation by Cylinder Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    We present a new method for approximation of a given surface by a cylinder surface. It is a constructive geometric method, leading to a monorail representation of the cylinder surface. By use of a weighted Gaussian image of the given surface, we determine a projection plane. In the orthogonal...

  14. Fast disinfecting antimicrobial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Ahmad E; Dabkowski, Jeffery M; Nusslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2009-01-20

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the "grafting from" technique. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied.

  15. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  16. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  17. Nanofluids mediating surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2012-11-01

    Fluids containing nanostructures, known as nanofluids, are increasingly found in a wide array of applications due to their unique physical properties as compared with their base fluids and larger colloidal suspensions. With several tuneable parameters such as the size, shape and surface chemistry of nanostructures, as well as numerous base fluids available, nanofluids also offer a new paradigm for mediating surface forces. Other properties such as local surface plasmon resonance and size dependent magnetism of nanostructures also present novel mechanisms for imparting tuneable surface interactions. However, our fundamental understanding, experimentally and theoretically, of how these parameters might affect surface forces remains incomplete. Here we review recent results on equilibrium and dynamic surface forces between macroscopic surfaces in nanofluids, highlighting the overriding trends in the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise nanofluids and the surface forces they mediate. We also discuss the challenges that confront existing surface force knowledge as a result of this new paradigm.

  18. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  19. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  20. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  1. Reactions at Solid Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ertl, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Expanding on the ideas first presented in Gerhard Ertl's acclaimed Baker Lectures at Cornell University, Reactions at Solid Surfaces comprises an authoritative, self-contained, book-length introduction to surface reactions for both professional chemists and students alike. Outlining our present understanding of the fundamental processes underlying reactions at solid surfaces, the book provides the reader with a complete view of how chemistry works at surfaces, and how to understand and probe the dynamics of surface reactions. Comparing traditional surface probes with more modern ones, and brin

  2. Characterization of Rape Field Microwave Emission and Implications to Surface Soil Moisture Retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Loew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission calibration and validation activities, a ground based L-band radiometer ELBARA II was situated at the test site Puch in Southern Germany in the Upper Danube Catchment. The experiment is described and the different data sets acquired are presented. The L-band microwave emission of the biosphere (L-MEB model that is also used in the SMOS L2 soil moisture algorithm is used to simulate the microwave emission of a winter oilseed rape field in Puch that was also observed by the radiometer. As there is a lack of a rape parameterization for L-MEB the SMOS default parameters for crops are used in a first step which does not lead to satisfying modeling results. Therefore, a new parameterization for L-MEB is developed that allows us to model the microwave emission of a winter oilseed rape field at the test site with better results. The soil moisture retrieval performance of the new parameterization is assessed in different retrieval configurations and the results are discussed. To allow satisfying results, the periods before and after winter have to be modeled with different parameter sets as the vegetation behavior is very different during these two development stages. With the new parameterization it is possible to retrieve soil moisture from multiangular brightness temperature data with a root mean squared error around 0.045–0.051 m³/m³ in a two parameter retrieval with soil moisture and roughness parameter Hr as free parameters.

  3. On log surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Fujino, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an announcement of the minimal model theory for log surfaces in all characteristics and contains some related results including a simplified proof of the Artin-Keel contraction theorem in the surface case.

  4. Apollo Surface Panoramas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Apollo Surface Panoramas is a digital library of photographic panoramas that the Apollo astronauts took while exploring the Moon's surface. These images provide a...

  5. Laser textured surface gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  6. Developable algebraic surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dongren; WANG Guojin

    2004-01-01

    An algebraic surface can be defined by an implicit polynomial equation F(x,y,z)=0. In this paper, general characterizations of developable algebraic surfaces of arbitrary degree are presented. Using the shift operators of the subscripts of Bézier ordinates, the uniform apparent discriminants of developable algebraic surfaces to their Bézier ordinates are given directly. To degree 2 algebraic surfaces, which are widely used in computer aided geometric design and graphics, all possible developable surface types are obtained. For more conveniently applying algebraic surfaces of high degree to computer aided geometric design, the notion of ε-quasi-developable surfaces is introduced, and an example of using a quasi-developable algebraic surface of degree 3 to interpolate three curves of degree 2 is given.

  7. Bonnet Ruled Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filiz KANBAY

    2005-01-01

    We consider the Bonnet ruled surfaces which admit only one non-trivial isometry that preserves the principal curvatures. We determine the Bonnet ruled surfaces whose generators and orthogonal trajectories form a special net called an A-net.

  8. Surface Bubble Nucleation Stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Kooij, Ernst S.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has revealed several different techniques for nanoscopic gas nucleation on submerged surfaces, with findings seemingly in contradiction with each other. In response to this, we have systematically investigated the occurrence of surface nanobubbles on a hydrophobized silicon substrate

  9. Biomaterials surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  10. PSC: protein surface classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  11. Triangular bubble spline surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapl, Mario; Byrtus, Marek; Jüttler, Bert

    2011-11-01

    We present a new method for generating a [Formula: see text]-surface from a triangular network of compatible surface strips. The compatible surface strips are given by a network of polynomial curves with an associated implicitly defined surface, which fulfill certain compatibility conditions. Our construction is based on a new concept, called bubble patches, to represent the single surface patches. The compatible surface strips provide a simple [Formula: see text]-condition between two neighboring bubble patches, which are used to construct surface patches, connected with [Formula: see text]-continuity. For [Formula: see text], we describe the obtained [Formula: see text]-condition in detail. It can be generalized to any [Formula: see text]. The construction of a single surface patch is based on Gordon-Coons interpolation for triangles.Our method is a simple local construction scheme, which works uniformly for vertices of arbitrary valency. The resulting surface is a piecewise rational surface, which interpolates the given network of polynomial curves. Several examples of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]-surfaces are presented, which have been generated by using our method. The obtained surfaces are visualized with reflection lines to demonstrate the order of smoothness.

  12. Surface and Interface Characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  13. Architectural Knitted Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    WGSN reports from the Architectural Knitted Surfaces workshop recently held at ShenkarCollege of Engineering and Design, Tel Aviv, which offered a cutting-edge insight into interactive knitted surfaces. With the increasing role of smart textiles in architecture, the Architectural Knitted Surfaces...

  14. Surface for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Rathbone, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Make Microsoft's Surface work-and play-just the way you want it to Microsoft's Surface tablet has the features and personality you're looking for, with a robust environment for business computing that doesn't skimp on fun. Surface for Dummies, 2nd Edition explains how Windows 8.1 Pro and Windows RT differ, and helps you decide which Surface model is best for you. Step by step, this book walks you through both the hardware and software features of the Surface, including the touch cover and type cover, Windows RT and Windows 8.1 Pro operating systems, and the coveted Office Home & Student 2013 s

  15. Approximation by Cylinder Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    We present a new method for approximation of a given surface by a cylinder surface. It is a constructive geometric method, leading to a monorail representation of the cylinder surface. By use of a weighted Gaussian image of the given surface, we determine a projection plane. In the orthogonal...... projection of the surface onto this plane, a reference curve is determined by use of methods for thinning of binary images. Finally, the cylinder surface is constructed as follows: the directrix of the cylinder surface is determined by a least squares method minimizing the distance to the points...... in the projection within a tolerance given by the reference curve, and the rulings are lines perpendicular to the projection plane. Application of the method in ship design is given....

  16. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  17. On rationally supported surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.; Sir, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the class of surfaces which are equipped with rational support functions. Any rational support function can be decomposed into a symmetric (even) and an antisymmetric (odd) part. We analyze certain geometric properties of surfaces with odd and even rational support functions....... In particular it is shown that odd rational support functions correspond to those rational surfaces which can be equipped with a linear field of normal vectors, which were discussed by Sampoli et al. (Sampoli, M.L., Peternell, M., Juttler, B., 2006. Rational surfaces with linear normals and their convolutions...... with rational surfaces. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 23, 179-192). As shown recently, this class of surfaces includes non-developable quadratic triangular Bezier surface patches (Lavicka, M., Bastl, B., 2007. Rational hypersurfaces with rational convolutions. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 24, 410426; Peternell, M...

  18. Positrons in surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positrons are used to probe the outermost electrons of the surface. Furthermore, in fundamental research the preparation of well defined surfaces tailored for the production of bound leptonic systems plays an outstanding role. In this report, it is envisaged to cover both the fundamental aspects of positron surface interaction and the present status of surface studies using modern positron beam techniques.

  19. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  20. On orbit surfacing of thermal control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Substrates to be contaminated and contamination source were prepared. Additional information on paint spray method apparatus was obtained. Silver teflon second surface mirror samples and S 13 GLO paint samples were mounted, photographed under the microscope and measured to establish baseline data. Atomic oxygen cleaning and spray painting are being considered. Electrostatic powder and plasma spray coating systems appear to have serious drawbacks.

  1. Laser-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  2. Superhydrophobicity from microstructured surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lijun; WU Xuedong; LOU Zeng; WU Dan

    2004-01-01

    Superhydrophobicity is referred to the wettability of a solid surface which has a water apparent contact angle greater than 150°. It has attracted great interest in both fundamental researches and practical applications. This paper discusses two models: Wenzel model and Cassie model, to describe the superhydrophobic states of surface. The effectsof surface morphology and microstructure on superhydrophobicity are discussed, and the internal relationship between Wenzel and Cassie states is presented. These two su perhydrophobic states can coexist and they present different properties on contact angle hysteresis. It is reported that the irreversible transition can be realized from Cassie state to Wenzel state under some certain conditions. This paper also gives a review of recent progresses in the strategies of fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces by designing microstructured or microtextured surfaces. Finally, the fundamental research and applications of superhydrophobic surfaces are prospected.

  3. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  4. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  5. Positrons in Surface Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positron...

  6. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  7. Ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2011-10-30

    A Laguerre minimal surface is an immersed surface in ℝ 3 being an extremal of the functional ∫ (H 2/K-1)dA. In the present paper, we prove that the only ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces are up to isometry the surfaces ℝ (φλ) = (Aφ, Bφ, Cφ + D cos 2φ) + λ(sin φ, cos φ, 0), where A,B,C,D ε ℝ are fixed. To achieve invariance under Laguerre transformations, we also derive all Laguerre minimal surfaces that are enveloped by a family of cones. The methodology is based on the isotropic model of Laguerre geometry. In this model a Laguerre minimal surface enveloped by a family of cones corresponds to a graph of a biharmonic function carrying a family of isotropic circles. We classify such functions by showing that the top view of the family of circles is a pencil. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Impact of surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  9. Impact of surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  10. Geodesics on Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We study geodesics on surfaces in the setting of classical differential geometry. We define the curvature of curves and surfaces in three-space and use the fundamental forms of a surface to measure lengths, angles, and areas. We follow Riemann and adopt a more abstract approach, and use tensor notation to discuss Gaussian curvature, Gauss's Theorema Egregium, geodesic curves, and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. Properties of geodesics are proven by variational methods, showing the connection betwee...

  11. Running surface couplings

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the renormalization group improved effective action and running surface couplings in curved spacetime with boundary. Using scalar self-interacting theory as an example, we study the influence of the boundary effects to effective equations of motion in spherical cap and the relevance of surface running couplings to quantum cosmology and symmetry breaking phenomenon. Running surface couplings in the asymptotically free SU(2) gauge theory are found.

  12. Encyclopedia of analytical surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Krivoshapko, S N

    2015-01-01

    This encyclopedia presents an all-embracing collection of analytical surface classes. It provides concise definitions  and description for more than 500 surfaces and categorizes them in 38 classes of analytical surfaces. All classes are cross references to the original literature in an excellent bibliography. The encyclopedia is of particular interest to structural and civil engineers and serves as valuable reference for mathematicians.

  13. Cleaning and surface properties

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M

    2007-01-01

    Principles of precision cleaning for ultra high vacuum applications are reviewed together with the techniques for the evaluation of surface cleanliness. Methods to verify the effectiveness of cleaning procedures are discussed. Examples are presented to illustrate the influence of packaging and storage on the recontamination of the surface after cleaning. Finally, the effect of contamination on some relevant surface properties, like secondary electron emission and wettability is presented.

  14. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Philip S. Brown; Bharat Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials t...

  15. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  16. Surface finish measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of stylus instruments for measuring the topography of National Transonic Facility (NTF) model surfaces both for monitoring during fabrication and as an absolute measurement of topography was evaluated. It was found that the shop-grade instruments can damage the surface of models and that their use for monitoring fabrication procedures can lead to surface finishes that are substantially out of range in critical areas of the leading edges. The development of a prototype light-scattering instrument which would allow for rapid assessment of the surface finish of a model is also discussed.

  17. Surface science an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, John

    1991-01-01

    The whole field of surface science is covered in this work. Starting with a description of the structure and thermodynamics of clean surfaces, the book goes on to discuss kinetic theory of gases and molecular beam formation. This is followed by a largesection on gas-surface interactions, and another major section on energetic particle-surface interactions. The final chapter provides the background to crystal nucleation and growth. The approach adopted is interdisciplinary and slanted towards theexperimental side, with practical analytical techniques being used to illustrate general princi

  18. Surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-07-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains on immersed substrates which can survive for days. They were first speculated to exist about 20 years ago, based on stepwise features in force curves between two hydrophobic surfaces, eventually leading to the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) image in 2000. While in the early years it was suspected that they may be an artifact caused by AFM, meanwhile their existence has been confirmed with various other methods, including through direct optical observation. Their existence seems to be paradoxical, as a simple classical estimate suggests that they should dissolve in microseconds, due to the large Laplace pressure inside these nanoscopic spherical-cap-shaped objects. Moreover, their contact angle (on the gas side) is much smaller than one would expect from macroscopic counterparts. This review will not only give an overview on surface nanobubbles, but also on surface nanodroplets, which are nanoscopic droplets (e.g., of oil) on (hydrophobic) substrates immersed in water, as they show similar properties and can easily be confused with surface nanobubbles and as they are produced in a similar way, namely, by a solvent exchange process, leading to local oversaturation of the water with gas or oil, respectively, and thus to nucleation. The review starts with how surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets can be made, how they can be observed (both individually and collectively), and what their properties are. Molecular dynamic simulations and theories to account for the long lifetime of the surface nanobubbles are then reported on. The crucial element contributing to the long lifetime of surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets is pinning of the three-phase contact line at chemical or geometric surface heterogeneities. The dynamical evolution of the surface nanobubbles then follows from the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation, and Henry's law. In particular, one obtains stable surface nanobubbles when the gas influx from

  19. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  20. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  1. Anodized dental implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  2. Microbiological surface sampling cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile sampling cart automatically swabs surfaces for the recovery of microorganisms. Unit operates without human involvement and provides for control of swabbing speed, rotation of cotton swab, and the pressure and angle applied to swab. Capability of reverse direction is also available. Sampling cart use is limited to flat surfaces.

  3. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  4. Pseudospherical surfaces with singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David

    2016-01-01

    We study a generalization of constant Gauss curvature −1 surfaces in Euclidean 3-space, based on Lorentzian harmonic maps, that we call pseudospherical frontals. We analyse the singularities of these surfaces, dividing them into those of characteristic and non-characteristic type. We give methods...

  5. Environmental surface asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Charles John

    2005-09-01

    Environmental surface disinfection is easily accomplished with precleaning and disinfection techniques, and prepared surfaces or difficult-to-clean items can be covered with impermeable barriers. When carried out effectively, both practitioners and patients are protected from exposure to microorganisms that transmit disease and cause illness.

  6. Isotopic Implicit Surface Meshing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boissonnat, Jean-Daniel; Cohen-Steiner, David; Vegter, Gert

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of piecewise linear approximation of implicit surfaces. We first give a criterion ensuring that the zero-set of a smooth function and the one of a piecewise linear approximation of it are isotopic. Then, we deduce from this criterion an implicit surface meshing algor

  7. Formation on grain surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazaux, S; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    The most abundant interstellar molecule, H-2, is generally thought to form by recombination of H atoms on grain surfaces. On surfaces, hydrogen atoms can be physisorbed and chemisorbed and their mobility can be governed by quantum mechanical tunneling or thermal hopping. We have developed a model fo

  8. Physical chemistry of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers surface chemistry and selected aspects f colloid chemistry. The text covers such areas as structure and thermodynamics of liquid interfaces; electrical aspects of surface chemistry; microscopy and spectroscopy of solid interfaces; nucleation; contact angle; adsorption from solution; friction and adhesion; lubrication; and chemisorption and catalysis.

  9. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Lang, R. H.; Wentz, F. J.; Meissner, T.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.2 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest. Second, observations from Aquarius are being used to develop a model for the effect of wind-driven roughness (waves) on the emissivity in the open ocean. This is done by comparing the measured

  10. Workbench surface editor of brain cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Serra, Luis

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a 3D reach-in tool to manually reconstruct 3D cortical surface patches from 2D brain atlas images. The first application of our cortex editor is building 3D functional maps, specifically Brodmann's areas. This tool may also be useful in clinical practice to adjust incorrectly mapped atlas regions due to the deforming effect of lesions. The cortex editor allows a domain expert to control the correlation of control points across slices. Correct correlation has been difficult for 3D reconstruction algorithms because the atlas slices are far apart and because of the complex topology of the cortex which differs so much from slice to slice. Also, higher precision of the resulting surfaces is demanded since these define 3D brain atlas features upon which future stereotactic surgery may be based. The cortex editor described in this paper provides a tool suitable for a domain expert to use in defining the 3D surface of a Brodmann's area.

  11. Real estate surfaces appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ciuna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the appraisal of the market value of the properties are applied two important surface indexes: the market surface ratio of the secondary surfaces and the ratio of the site value to total value (allocation method. The measure of both these indexes can be revealed difficult: the data collection of the surface trade ratio in the market can get different results and in practice often the valuer refolds on the fixed coefficients brought in the handbooks and in the circulars of the public administration; the appraisal of the ratio of the site, especially in the central zones and for ancient buildings, where besides the incidence is higher, is developed extrapolating the ratios from the peripheral zones for new building or falling back on the publications of real estate sector.For the market comparison methods are proposed a series of test of surface trade ratio and land value ratio to foresee the effect on the appraisal result.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  13. Rough Surface Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the contact of general rough curved surfaces having nearly identical geometries, assuming the contact at each differential area obeys the model proposed by Greenwood and Williamson. In order to account for the most general gross geometry, principles of differential geometry of surface are applied. This method while requires more rigorous mathematical manipulations, the fact that it preserves the original surface geometries thus makes the modeling procedure much more intuitive. For subsequent use, differential geometry of axis-symmetric surface is considered instead of general surface (although this “general case” can be done as well in Chapter 3.1. The final formulas for contact area, load, and frictional torque are derived in Chapter 3.2.

  14. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. The extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the fantastically low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration, prototyping basi...

  15. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  16. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  17. Multibeam collection for BermudaCaves2009: Multibeam data collected aboard Endurance from 2009-09-05 to 2009-09-30, departing from Flatts Village, Bermuda and returning to Flatts Village, Bermuda

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. de Sitter Extremal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, K

    2015-01-01

    We study extremal surfaces in de Sitter space in the Poincare slicing in the upper patch, anchored on spatial subregions at the future boundary ${\\cal I}^+$, restricted to constant boundary Euclidean time slices (focussing on strip subregions). We find real extremal surfaces of minimal area as the boundaries of past lightcone wedges of the subregions in question: these are null surfaces with vanishing area. We find also complex extremal surfaces as complex extrema of the area functional, and the area is not always real-valued. In $dS_4$ the area is real and has some structural resemblance with entanglement entropy in a dual $CFT_3$. There are parallels with analytic continuation from the Ryu-Takayanagi expressions for holographic entanglement entropy in $AdS$. We also discuss extremal surfaces in the $dS$ black brane and the de Sitter "bluewall" studied previously. The $dS_4$ black brane complex surfaces exhibit a real finite cutoff-independent extensive piece. In the bluewall geometry, there are real surface...

  19. Dynamics at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  20. Surface modes in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sernelius, Bo E

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic surface modes are present at all surfaces and interfaces between material of different dielectric properties. These modes have very important effects on numerous physical quantities: adhesion, capillary force, step formation and crystal growth, the Casimir effect etc. They cause surface tension and wetting and they give rise to forces which are important e.g. for the stability of colloids.This book is a useful and elegant approach to the topic, showing how the concept of electromagnetic modes can be developed as a unifying theme for a range of condensed matter physics. The

  1. Advanced Surface Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make......, nitriding, carbonitriding, and many other lesser-known thermochemical processes used for solving technological problems. The book is richly illustrated with pictures and figures showing how the technology creates new innovative solutions for industry and how surfaces are becoming integral to the function...

  2. Nonlinear surface electromagnetic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ponath, H-E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the physics of electromagnetic surface phenomena has developed rapidly, evolving into technologies for communications and industry, such as fiber and integrated optics. The variety of phenomena based on electromagnetism at surfaces is rich and this book was written with the aim of summarizing the available knowledge in selected areas of the field. The book contains reviews written by solid state and optical physicists on the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves at and with surfaces and films. Both the physical phenomena and some potential applications are

  3. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  4. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, JM

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and up to the minute review of the techniques used to determine the nature and composition of surfaces. Originally published as a special issue of the Pergamon journal Vacuum, it comprises a carefully edited collection of chapters written by specialists in each of the techniques and includes coverage of the electron and ion spectroscopies, as well as the atom-imaging methods such as the atom probe field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope. Surface science is an important area of study since the outermost surface layers play a crucial role

  5. Architectural Knitted Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    WGSN reports from the Architectural Knitted Surfaces workshop recently held at ShenkarCollege of Engineering and Design, Tel Aviv, which offered a cutting-edge insight into interactive knitted surfaces. With the increasing role of smart textiles in architecture, the Architectural Knitted Surfaces...... workshop brought together architects and interior and textile designers to highlight recent developments in intelligent knitting. The five-day workshop was led by architects Ayelet Karmon and Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen, together with Amir Cang and Eyal Sheffer from the Knitting Laboratory, in collaboration...... with Amir Marcowitz and Yair Reshef for their expertise in interaction design....

  6. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  7. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  8. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  9. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  10. Characterisation of Functional Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonardo, P.M.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bruzzone, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterisation of surfaces is of fundamental importance to control the manufacturing process and the functional performance of the part. Many applications concern contact and tribology problems, which include friction, wear and lubrication. This paper presents the techniques and instruments for...

  11. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  12. Superhydrophobic Porous Silicon Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo NENZI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an inexpensive technique to produce superhydrophobic surfaces from porous silicon. Superhydrophobic surfaces are a key technology for their ability to reduce friction losses in microchannels and their self cleaning properties. The morphology of a p-type silicon wafer is modified by a electrochemical wet etch to produce pores with controlled size and distribution and coated with a silane hydrophobic layer. Surface morphology is characterized by means of scanning electron microscope images. Large contact angles are observed on such surfaces and the results are compared with classical wetting models (Cassie and Wenzel suggesting a mixed Wenzel-Cassie behavior. The presented technique represents a cost-effective means for friction reduction in microfluidic applications, such as lab-on-a-chip.

  13. Triangulation of NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for triangulation of NURBS surfaces. This technique is built upon an advancing front technique combined with grid point projection. This combined approach has been successfully implemented for structured and unstructured grids.

  14. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  15. CHEMILUMINESCENCE ON OXIDE SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    L. I. IVANKIV; O. V. DZYUPYN; O.A. Balitskii

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the oxygen adsorption properties on magnesium oxide surface. The results are compared with theoretical adsorption kinetics. Temperature and time dependences of adsorption mechanisms and chemiluminescence are discussed.

  16. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando-IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd-CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  17. Triangulation of NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for triangulation of NURBS surfaces. This technique is built upon an advancing front technique combined with grid point projection. This combined approach has been successfully implemented for structured and unstructured grids.

  18. Analyzing earth's surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. J.; Elifrits, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Manual discusses simple inexpensive image analysis technique used to interpret photographs and scanner of data of Earth's surface. Manual is designed for those who have no need for sophisticated computer-automated analysis procedures.

  19. Lunar Surface Navigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To support extended lunar operations, precision localization and route mapping is required for planetary EVA, manned rovers and lunar surface mobility units. A...

  20. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  1. Biological surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemo, Bengt

    2002-03-01

    Biological surface science (BioSS), as defined here is the broad interdisciplinary area where properties and processes at interfaces between synthetic materials and biological environments are investigated and biofunctional surfaces are fabricated. Six examples are used to introduce and discuss the subject: Medical implants in the human body, biosensors and biochips for diagnostics, tissue engineering, bioelectronics, artificial photosynthesis, and biomimetic materials. They are areas of varying maturity, together constituting a strong driving force for the current rapid development of BioSS. The second driving force is the purely scientific challenges and opportunities to explore the mutual interaction between biological components and surfaces. Model systems range from the unique water structures at solid surfaces and water shells around proteins and biomembranes, via amino and nucleic acids, proteins, DNA, phospholipid membranes, to cells and living tissue at surfaces. At one end of the spectrum the scientific challenge is to map out the structures, bonding, dynamics and kinetics of biomolecules at surfaces in a similar way as has been done for simple molecules during the past three decades in surface science. At the other end of the complexity spectrum one addresses how biofunctional surfaces participate in and can be designed to constructively participate in the total communication system of cells and tissue. Biofunctional surfaces call for advanced design and preparation in order to match the sophisticated (bio) recognition ability of biological systems. Specifically this requires combined topographic, chemical and visco-elastic patterns on surfaces to match proteins at the nm scale and cells at the micrometer scale. Essentially all methods of surface science are useful. High-resolution (e.g. scanning probe) microscopies, spatially resolved and high sensitivity, non-invasive optical spectroscopies, self-organizing monolayers, and nano- and microfabrication

  2. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær;

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special......, the existence of these surface waves in specific material examples is analyzed, discussing the challenge posed by their experimental observation....

  3. Large Curved Surface Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement principle of large curved surface through theodolite industry survey system is introduced. Two methods are suggested with respect to the distribution range of curved surface error. The experiments show that the measurement precision can be up to 0.15mm with relative precision of 3×10-5. Finally, something needed paying attention to and the application aspects on theodolite industry survey system are given.

  4. Triangulating Trimmed NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Curve and Surface Design: Saint-Malo 1999 381 Pierre-Jean Laurent, Paul Sablonnibre, and Larry L. Schumaker ( eds .), pp. 381-388. Copyright 0 2000 by...the boundary of its neighboring surface. References 1. Baehmann, P. L., S. L. Wittchen , M. S. Shephard, K. R. Grice and M. A. Yerry, Robust...and D. Eppstein, Mesh generation and optimal triangulation, in Computing in Euclidean Geometry, 2nd ed ., D.-Z. Du and F. K. Hwang, ( eds .), World

  5. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1989-02-09

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation and display of surfaces, interpolating to given information, in three or more dimensions. In a typical problem, we wish to create a surface from some discrete information. If this information is itself on another surface, the problem is to determine a surface defined on a surface,'' which is discussed below. Often, properties of an already constructed surface are desired: such geometry processing'' is described below. The Summary of Proposed Research from our original proposal describes the aims of this research project. This Summary and the Table of Contents from the original proposal are enclosed as an Appendix to this Progress Report. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through algorithms and computer graphics displays is utilized in the research. The wide range of activity, directed in both theory and applications, makes this project unique. Last month in the first Ardent Titan delivered in the State of Arizona came to our group, funded by the DOE and Arizona State University. Although the Titan is a commercial product, its newness requires our close collaboration with Ardent to maximize results. During the past year, four faculty members and several graduate research assistants have worked on this DOE project. The gaining of new professionals is an important aspect of this project. A listing of the students and their topics is given in the Appendix. The most significant publication during the past year is the book, Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design, by Dr. Gerald Farin. This 300 page volume helps fill a considerable gap in the subject and includes many new results on Bernstein-Bezier curves and surfaces.

  6. Surface Mediated Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Bipolar Photoelectrodes," M.A. Fox, Nouv. J. Chim. 1987, II, 129. 4. "Effect of Cosolvent Additives on Relative Rates of Photooxidation on...Semiconductor Surfaces," D.D. Sackett, M.A. Fox, J. Phys. Org. Chem, 19_8, in press. 5. "Selectivity in the Semiconductor-Mediated Photooxidation of Polyols ...surfaced properties of the heteropolytungstates were varied. The conceptual mechanistic picture involved in the heteropolyoxo induced photooxidations

  7. Multifunctional thin film surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  8. Biochemically responsive smart surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Fabian; Smirnov, Sergei

    2009-04-01

    A design of smart surfaces responsive to biochemical analytes is demonstrated in the example of mixed monolayers of biotin/fluorocarbon. The contact angle of aqueous solutions on such surfaces decreases upon streptavidin binding and can be used in detecting this protein. The specificity of the effect is confirmed by the lack of a contact angle change by streptavidin blocked with biotin and by bovine serum albumin.

  9. Counting curves on surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider an elementary, and largely unexplored, combinatorial problem in low-dimensional topology. Consider a real 2-dimensional compact surface $S$, and fix a number of points $F$ on its boundary. We ask: how many configurations of disjoint arcs are there on $S$ whose boundary is $F$? We find that this enumerative problem, counting curves on surfaces, has a rich structure. For instance, we show that the curve counts obey an effective recursion, in the general framework of to...

  10. Ocean surface wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for improved surface wind and wind stress data is discussed. The collection of wind data using ship reports, research buoys, and cloud motion vectors is examined. The need for data on surface-wind stress fields is emphasized. Accurate stress data are required for studying: (1) the normal seasonal cycle and the intraannual events; (2) wind stress curls and the forcing of ocean circulation; (3) El Nino events; and (4) the low response of the midlatitude ocean circulation.

  11. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  12. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  13. Surface chemistry theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bikerman, J J

    2013-01-01

    Surface Chemistry Theory and Applications focuses on liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-gas, solid-liquid, and solid-solid surfaces. The book first offers information on liquid-gas surfaces, including surface tension, measurement of surface tension, rate of capillarity rise, capillary attraction, bubble pressure and pore size, and surface tension and temperature. The text then ponders on liquid-liquid and solid-gas surfaces. Discussions focus on surface energy of solids, surface roughness and cleanness, adsorption of gases and vapors, adsorption hysteresis, interfacial tension, and interfacial t

  14. Theory of Digitized Conjugate Surface and Solution to Conjugate Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Lai-yuan; Liao Dao-xun; Yi Chuan-yun

    2004-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of designing and processing digitized surfaces, the method to spreading digitized surface has been proposed. The key technique is to solve the problem of digitized conjugate surface. In the paper, the digitized conjugate surface was theoretically investigated, and the solution of conjugate surface based on digitized surface was also studied. The digitized conjugate surface theory was then proposed, and applied to build the model of solving conjugate surface based on digitized surface. A corresponding algorithm was developed. This paper applies the software Conjugater-1.0 that is developed by ourselves to compute the digitized conjugate surfaces of the drum-tooth surface. This study provides theoretical and technical bases for analyzing engagement of digitized surface, simulation and numerical processing technique.

  15. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Impact of Land-Surface Heterogeneity on Soil Moisture Retrieval and Validation of Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Gaur, Nandita; Maheshwari, Neelam

    2016-04-01

    developed for a variety of heterogeneous conditions found in 3 regions (Arizona, Iowa and Oklahoma) with different hydro-climates and 3 footprint scales (0.8 km, 1.6 km and 3.2 km). Results indicate that the spatial variance of moisture redistribution can be effectively modeled as a function of the most dominant physical control (minimum mean R2 = 0.8 and maximum mean RMSE = 0.119). In order to make the validation scheme potentially transferable to regions with heterogeneity that is different from the data used, the validation scheme was extended by exploiting the relationship between soil moisture, scale and land-surface heterogeneity through a conceptualized scale-wetness-heterogeneity (SWHET) cuboid. The SWHET cuboid is described by a wetness index, scale index and a newly defined heterogeneity index which can adequately quantify the land-surface heterogeneity across scales. The proposed SWHET cuboid can potentially serve as a look-up graph to model the spatial variance of footprint scale moisture redistribution as a function of the dominant physical controls and is being validated using SMOS data for the Winnipeg region in Canada.

  16. Multibeam collection for RC2511: Multibeam data collected aboard Robert Conrad from 1984-09-13 to 1984-10-14, departing from Bermuda and returning to Bermuda

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. Molecular chirality at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Organic Chemistry Institute, University Zurich, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    With the adsorption of larger molecules being increasingly tackled by surface scientists, the aspect of chirality often plays a role. This paper gives a topical review of molecular chirality at surfaces and gives a phenomenological overview of different aspects of adsorption and self-assembly of chiral and prochiral molecules and the principles of mirror-symmetry breaking at a surface. After a brief introduction into the history of molecular chirality and the important role it played for understanding the spatial structure of molecules, definitions of chirality are presented. Topics treated here are principle ways to create single chiral adsorbates, chiral ensembles, and monolayers by achiral molecules, adsorption of intrinsically chiral molecules at achiral and chiral surfaces, long-range symmetry breaking in two-dimensional (2D) crystals due to additional chiral bias, chiral restructuring of solid surfaces under the influence of chiral molecules, switching the handedness of adsorbates, and chirality at the liquid/air interface. An outlook onto further potential research directions and recommendations for further reading, including nonsurface-related sources of chiral topics completes this paper. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Stability of surface nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Shantanu; van der Hoef, Martin; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the stability and dissolution of surface nanobubbles on the chemical heterogenous surface by performing Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of binary mixture consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. Recently our group has derived the exact expression for equilibrium contact angle of surface nanobubbles as a function of oversaturation of the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of bubble. It has been showed that the contact line pinning and the oversaturation of gas concentration in bulk liquid is crucial in the stability of surface nanobubbles. Our simulations showed that how pinning of the three-phase contact line on the chemical heterogenous surface lead to the stability of the nanobubble. We have calculated the equilibrium contact angle by varying the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of the bubble. Our results showed that the equilibrium contact angle follows the expression derived analytically by our group. We have also studied the bubble dissolution dynamics and showed the ''stick-jump'' mechanism which was also observed experimentally in case of dissolution of nanodrops.

  19. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  20. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  1. Wetting and Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, C; Wiese, K J; Bachas, Constantin; Doussal, Pierre Le; Wiese, Kay Joerg

    2006-01-01

    We study minimal surfaces which arise in wetting and capillarity phenomena. Using conformal coordinates, we reduce the problem to a set of coupled boundary equations for the contact line of the fluid surface, and then derive simple diagrammatic rules to calculate the non-linear corrections to the Joanny-de Gennes energy. We argue that perturbation theory is quasi-local, i.e. that all geometric length scales of the fluid container decouple from the short-wavelength deformations of the contact line. This is illustrated by a calculation of the linearized interaction between contact lines on two opposite parallel walls. We present a simple algorithm to compute the minimal surface and its energy based on these ideas. We also point out the intriguing singularities that arise in the Legendre transformation from the pure Dirichlet to the mixed Dirichlet-Neumann problem.

  2. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  3. Surface modification of bioceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkawa, Akira

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp] is a major inorganic component of bone and teeth tissues and has the excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity. The interactions between HAp and protein or cell have been studied. The HAp related bioceramics such as bone substitute, coating substance of metal implants, inorganic-polymer composites, and cell culture. We described two methods; (1) surface modification of HAp using organosilane; (2) fabrication of HAp ultra-thin layer on gold surface for protein adsorption analyzed with QCM-D technique. The interfacial interaction between collagen and HAp in a nano-region was controlled by depositing the organosilane of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS: -CH3) or aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS: -NH2) with a chemical vapor deposition method. The morphologies of collagen adsorbed on the surfaces of HAp and HAp deposited with APTS were similar, however that of the surface with ODS was apparently different, due to the hydrophobic interaction between the organic head group of -CH3 and residual groups of collagen. We present a method for coating gold quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor with ultra-thin layer of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals evenly covering and tightly bound to the surface. The hydroxyapatite sensor operated in liquid with high stability and sensitivity. The in-situ adsorption mechanism and conformational change of fibrinogen on gold, titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces were investigated by QCM-D technique and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The study indicates that the hydroxyapatite sensor is applicable for qualitative and conformational analysis of protein adsorption.

  4. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  5. Photochemistry on solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, T

    1989-01-01

    The latest developments in photochemistry on solid surfaces, i.e. photochemistry in heterogeneous systems, including liquid crystallines, are brought together for the first time in a single volume. Distinguished photochemists from various fields have contributed to the book which covers a number of important applications: molecular photo-devices for super-memory, photochemical vapor deposition to produce thin-layered electronic semiconducting materials, sensitive optical media, the control of photochemical reactions pathways, etc. Photochemistry on solid surfaces is now a major field and this

  6. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  7. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  8. Surface and nanomolecular catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Using new instrumentation and experimental techniques that allow scientists to observe chemical reactions and molecular properties at the nanoscale, the authors of Surface and Nanomolecular Catalysis reveal new insights into the surface chemistry of catalysts and the reaction mechanisms that actually occur at a molecular level during catalysis. While each chapter contains the necessary background and explanations to stand alone, the diverse collection of chapters shows how developments from various fields each contributed to our current understanding of nanomolecular catalysis as a whole. The

  9. Solid lubricants and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Braithwaite, E R

    1964-01-01

    Solid Lubricants and Surfaces deals with the theory and use of solid lubricants, particularly in colloidal form. Portions of this book are devoted to graphite and molybdenum disulfides, which are widely used solid lubricants in colloidal form. An extensive literature on the laboratory examination of hundreds of solids as potential lubricants is also provided in this text. Other topics discussed include the metals and solid lubricants; techniques for examining surfaces; other solid lubricants; metal shaping; and industrial uses of solid-lubricant dispersions. This publication is beneficial to e

  10. Quantizing Earth surface deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Bowin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global analysis of Bowin (2010 used the global 14 absolute Euler pole set (62 Myr history from Gripp and Gordon (1990 and demonstrated that plate tectonics conserves angular momentum. We herein extend that analysis using the more detailed Bird (2003 52 present-day Euler pole set (relative to a fixed Pacific plate for the Earth's surface, after conversion to absolute Euler poles. Additionally, new analytical results now provide new details on upper mantle mass anomalies in the outer 200 km of the Earth, as well as an initial quantizing of surface deformations.

  11. Surface-Mediated Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-04

    Photocatalysis 6. AUTHOR(S) DIMarye Anne Fox E -LECTE ’ / 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AD ES). 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of...Form 298 (Rev 2-89) Prescr d bv ANJ std Z39.1s 291-102 j Final Report on Surface-Mediated Photocatalysis "a,. . ARO Proposal No. 28298-CH u - Work from...Produced by Anodic Oxidation and by Photoelectrochemical Activation of TiO2 ," Marye Anne Fox and Karl L. Worthen, Chem. Mater. 1991, 3, 253. "Surface

  12. Review of the CALIMAS Team Contributions to European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission Calibration and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sabia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes the activities carried out by the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Barcelona Expert Center (SMOS-BEC team in conjunction with the CIALE/Universidad de Salamanca team, within the framework of the European Space Agency (ESA CALIMAS project in preparation for the SMOS mission and during its first year of operation. Under these activities several studies were performed, ranging from Level 1 (calibration and image reconstruction to Level 4 (land pixel disaggregation techniques, by means of data fusion with higher resolution data from optical/infrared sensors. Validation of SMOS salinity products by means of surface drifters developed ad-hoc, and soil moisture products over the REMEDHUS site (Zamora, Spain are also presented. Results of other preparatory activities carried out to improve the performance of eventual SMOS follow-on missions are presented, including GNSS-R to infer the sea state correction needed for improved ocean salinity retrievals and land surface parameters. Results from CALIMAS show a satisfactory performance of the MIRAS instrument, the accuracy and efficiency of the algorithms implemented in the ground data processors, and explore the limits of spatial resolution of soil moisture products using data fusion, as well as the feasibility of GNSS-R techniques for sea state determination and soil moisture monitoring.

  13. Biofunctional surface engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceRegulatory issuesSterilization of combination devicesPolyelectrolyte monolayers (I)Polyelectrolyte monolayers (II)Surface modificationsThree dimensional characterization of immobilized biomolecules Aptamers for biofunctionalization of stentsCoating of implants with antibioticsMicroneedles and nanopatchesfor vaccinationMicrochips for antibody binding analysesBiofunctionalized wound dressingsExtracorporeal device for trapping circulating tumor cellsOutlook

  14. Predictive Surface Complexation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2016-11-29

    Surface complexation plays an important role in the equilibria and kinetics of processes controlling the compositions of soilwaters and groundwaters, the fate of contaminants in groundwaters, and the subsurface storage of CO2 and nuclear waste. Over the last several decades, many dozens of individual experimental studies have addressed aspects of surface complexation that have contributed to an increased understanding of its role in natural systems. However, there has been no previous attempt to develop a model of surface complexation that can be used to link all the experimental studies in order to place them on a predictive basis. Overall, my research has successfully integrated the results of the work of many experimentalists published over several decades. For the first time in studies of the geochemistry of the mineral-water interface, a practical predictive capability for modeling has become available. The predictive correlations developed in my research now enable extrapolations of experimental studies to provide estimates of surface chemistry for systems not yet studied experimentally and for natural and anthropogenically perturbed systems.

  15. Characterisation of Functional Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonardo, P.M.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bruzzone, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    for characterisation of surfaces, discussing their operating principles and metrological properties. A review of the conventional 2D and new 3D roughness parameters is given, considering both the current standards and new proposals for texture quantification, with a particular attention to the methods orientated...

  16. Copernicus: Lunar surface mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Frank J.; Anderson, Shaun D.

    1992-01-01

    The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements for the Copernicus LSM are to produce a digital map of the lunar surface with an overall resolution of 12 meters (39.4 ft). It will also identify specified local surface features/areas to be mapped at higher resolutions by follow-on missions. The mapping operation will be conducted from a 300 km (186 mi) lunar-polar orbit. Although the entire surface should be mapped within six months, the spacecraft design lifetime will exceed one year with sufficient propellant planned for orbit maintenance in the anomalous lunar gravity field. The Copernicus LSM is a small satellite capable of reaching lunar orbit following launch on a Conestoga launch vehicle which is capable of placing 410 kg (900 lb) into translunar orbit. Upon orbital insertion, the spacecraft will weigh approximately 233 kg (513 lb). This rather severe mass constraint has insured attention to component/subsystem size and mass, and prevented 'requirements creep.' Transmission of data will be via line-of-sight to an earth-based receiving system.

  17. Multiband frequency selective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te-Kao

    1998-10-01

    This paper addresses the similarity of microwave/millimeter wave frequency selective surfaces (FSS) to optical filters. Specifically, the design approaches of the 4-band FSSs developed for NASA's CASSINI high gain antenna are described in detail. Representative RF test results are given to demonstrate the validity of these designs. These design approaches are very general and can be applied to multiband optical filters.

  18. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  19. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  20. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π–π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings. PMID:27301422

  1. Designing Superoleophobic Surfaces (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-07

    recent experiments show that even the wax on the lotus leaf surface is weakly hydrophilic with q ≈ 74° (29). The superhydrophobic state of these...fibers (14), and spherical arrays of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) ( PTFE ) particles (17), as well as superhydrophobicity obtained on a hydrophilic substrate

  2. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they d

  3. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  4. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  5. Dyakonov surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special conditi...

  6. Effective Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapalparvi, Ramesh; Protas, Bartosz

    2010-11-01

    In this investigation we introduce the concept of an "effective free surface" arising as a solution of time--averaged equations in the presence of free boundaries. This work is motivated by applications of optimization theory to problems involving free surfaces, such as droplets impinging on the weld pool surface in welding processes. In such problems the time--dependent governing equations lead to technical difficulties, many of which are alleviated when methods of optimization are applied to a steady problem with effective free surfaces. The corresponding equations are obtained by performing the Reynolds decomposition and averaging of the time--dependent free--boundary equations based on the volume--of--fluid (VoF) formalism. We identify the terms representing the average effect of fluctuating free boundaries which, in analogy with the Reynolds stresses in classical turbulence models, need to be modelled and propose some simple algebraic closures for these terms. We argue that effective free boundaries can be computed using methods of shape optimization and present some results.

  7. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  8. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-06-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π–π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings.

  9. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months.

  10. Surface Traffic Management Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo Chul

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discusses an overview of the surface traffic management research conducted by NASA Ames. The concept and human-in-the-loop simulation of the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA), an integrated decision support tool for the tower controllers and airline ramp operators, is also discussed.

  11. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  12. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  13. Fluoroalkylated Silicon-Containing Surfaces - Estimation of Solid Surface Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    oleophobicity , solid surface energy, Zisman analysis, Girifalco-Good method 4 Introduction In the recent past, there have been a number of reports on...surfaces that are not wetted by liquid droplets, i. e. superhydrophobic,1-4 oleophobic ,5-15 hygrophobic,16 omniphobic7, 12 surfaces. These surfaces have

  14. Contact of surfaces and contact characteristics of offset surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixin CAO; Hu GONG; Jian LIU

    2008-01-01

    Based on differential geometry, the contact problems of two surfaces are discussed in this paper. The relationship between the contact status of two sur-faces and that of offset surfaces are also analyzed. For a 5-axis NC machining, some research such as optimization of cutter location and calculation of the geometrical cusp height are important. The research results indicate that the relative normal curvature is an important geometrical invariant for describing the contact state of two surfaces. For point contact two surfaces, the calculation equation for the second order remained error is given. For line contact two surfaces, the condition of the second order line contact is that the principal directions and curvatures of the two surfaces are the same along the contact curve. If two surfaces keep the second order line contact, their two offset surfaces will also keep the second order line contact, and their third order remained errors are also uniform with that of the two offset surfaces.

  15. L-MEB Model Calibration Over the Valencia Anchor Station Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of ESA's SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) Mission, several studies are being carried out over different types of land surfaces to study their microwave L-band emission (1.4 GHz). These studies are being integrated in the SMOS emission model (L-MEB, L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere, Wigneron et al. 2007), which is the core of the SMOS algorithm for the retrieval of land surface parameters from SMOS data. To contribute to Cal/Val activities at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) area (Caudete de las Fuentes, Valencia, Spain), one of the primary validation areas for SMOS land data and products (ESA SMOS Cal/Val AO, Project ID 3252, Lopez-Baeza et al., 2005), a number of experiments have been carried out to study the vegetation influence over the L-band emission proceeding from the soil surface. In the VAS area, a reduced number of homogeneous units have been defined according to the type and use of the soil, mainly, shrubs, vineyards, orchards (almond-and olive-trees) and Mediterranean pine forests. In order to implement the SMOS algorithm over this reference area, it is necessary to characterize and calibrate the L-MEB model for the different cover types. This work is significantly contributing to the definition of the VAS site as a validation area for SMOS land products of the size of a SMOS pixel (SMOS reference pixel). Shrubs and vineyards are the two most significant vegetation types which cover a large percentage of the area and for which very little information at L-band is available in the literature. These two types of vegetation covers have been studied in two separate dedicated experiments under the common name of MELBEX (Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band characterisation EXperiment). The first one (MELBEX-I) took place over a shrub area characterised by a significant proportion of bare soil with superficial stones. The second one (MELBEX-II) was carried out from March to December 2007 over a large vineyard area. During the time

  16. Introduction to Theoretical Surface Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    111), (100) and (110) surfaces in the fcc structure even for the hcp metals Y, Zr, Tc and Ru and for the bcc metals Nb and Mo. (a) surface energy in eV...surface energies have been calculated for the fcc structure , even for the hcp metals Y, Zr, Tc and Ru and for the bcc metals Nb and Mo. The surface

  17. Drop Impact on Superheated Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Prosperetti, A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2012-01-01

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid’s boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface (“contact boiling”), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (“gentle film

  18. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  19. Approximation of Surfaces by Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    We present a new method for approximation of a given surface by a cylinder surface. It is a constructive geometric method, leading to a monorail representation of the cylinder surface. By use of a weighted Gaussian image of the given surface, we determine a projection plane. In the orthogonal...

  20. Hydrological land surface modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridler, Marc-Etienne Francois

    to imperfect model forecasts. It remains a crucial challenge to account for system uncertainty, so as to provide model outputs accompanied by a quantified confidence interval. Properly characterizing and reducing uncertainty opens-up the opportunity for risk-based decision-making and more effective emergency...... and disaster management. The objective of this study is to develop and investigate methods to reduce hydrological model uncertainty by using supplementary data sources. The data is used either for model calibration or for model updating using data assimilation. Satellite estimates of soil moisture and surface...... temperature are explored in a multi-objective calibration experiment to optimize the parameters in a SVAT model in the Sahel. The two satellite derived variables were effective at constraining most land-surface and soil parameters. A data assimilation framework is developed and implemented with an integrated...

  1. Surface Plasmon Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    The development of advanced dielectric photonic structures has enabled tremendous control over the propagation and manipulation of light. Structures such as waveguides, splitters, mixers, and resonators now play a central role in the telecommunications industry. This book will discuss an exciting new class of photonic devices, known as surface plasmon nanophotonic structures. Surface plasmons are easily accessible excitations in metals and semiconductors and involve a collective motion of the conduction electrons. These excitations can be exploited to manipulate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies ("light") in new ways that are unthinkable in conventional dielectric structures. The field of plasmon nanophotonics is rapidly developing and impacting a wide range of areas including: electronics, photonics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The book will highlight several exciting new discoveries that have been made, while providing a clear discussion of the underlying physics, the nanofabrication issues...

  2. Anatomically Correct Surface Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    using the learned statistics. A quantitative evaluation is performed on a data set of 10 laser scans of ear canal impressions with minimal noise and artificial holes. We also present a qualitative evaluation on authentic partial scans from an actual direct in ear scanner prototype. Compared to a state......We present a method for 3D surface recovery in partial surface scans. The method is based on an Active Shape Model, which is used to predict missing data. The model is constructed using a bootstrap framework, where an initially small collection of hand-annotated samples is used to fit...... to and register unknown samples, resulting in an extensive statistical model. The statistical recovery uses a multivariate point prediction, where the distribution of the points is given by the Active Shape Model. We show how missing data in a partial scan, once point correspondence is achieved, can be predicted...

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). This is an optical device consisting if one waveguide that is split into two waveguide arms which are assembled again later on. By applying the mechanical field from a SAW the light in the two arms can be modulated and interfere constructively and destructively......The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model...

  4. Surfaces on African sculpture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mack

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, and Pascal James Imperato (eds in collaboration with Charles Bordogna and Bolaji Campbell with an introduction by Patrick McNaughton, Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture, Indiana University Press, 2009.The book reviewed here has potential interest to a wide range of readers, whether researchers and academics, museum, curators, conservators or connoisseurs. It examines the perception of surface as an aspect of the indigenous understanding of sculpted objects in sub-Saharan Africa, treating of questions of materials, patination, colouration and use. It includes both survey essays and case studies (on the Bamana of Mali and the Yoriuba of Nigeria in a compendium which has suggestive implications beyond the immediate field of the Africanists to whom it is principally addressed.

  5. Secure surface identification codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekhof, F.; Voloshynovskiy, S.; Koval, O.; Villan, R.; Pun, T.

    2008-02-01

    This paper introduces an identification framework for random microstructures of material surfaces. These microstructures represent a kind of unique fingerprints that can be used to track and trace an item as well as for anti-counterfeiting. We first consider the architecture for mobile phone-based item identification and then introduce a practical identification algorithm enabling fast searching in large databases. The proposed algorithm is based on reference list decoding. The link to digital communications and robust perceptual hashing is shown. We consider a practical construction of reference list decoding, which comprizes computational complexity, security, memory storage and performance requirements. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated on experimental data obtained from natural paper surfaces.

  6. Localization on Hopf surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Assel, Benjamin; Martelli, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We discuss localization of the path integral for supersymmetric gauge theories with an R-symmetry on Hermitian four-manifolds. After presenting the localization locus equations for the general case, we focus on backgrounds with S^1 x S^3 topology, admitting two supercharges of opposite R-charge. These are Hopf surfaces, with two complex structure moduli p,q. We compute the localized partition function on such Hopf surfaces, allowing for a very large class of Hermitian metrics, and prove that this is proportional to the supersymmetric index with fugacities p,q. Using zeta function regularisation, we determine the exact proportionality factor, finding that it depends only on p,q, and on the anomaly coefficients a, c of the field theory. This may be interpreted as a supersymmetric Casimir energy, and provides the leading order contribution to the partition function in a large N expansion.

  7. Surface Plasmon Singularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Martínez-Niconoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to compare the physical features of the electromagnetic field, we describe the synthesis of optical singularities propagating in the free space and on a metal surface. In both cases the electromagnetic field has a slit-shaped curve as a boundary condition, and the singularities correspond to a shock wave that is a consequence of the curvature of the slit curve. As prototypes, we generate singularities that correspond to fold and cusped regions. We show that singularities in free space may generate bifurcation effects while plasmon fields do not generate these kinds of effects. Experimental results for free-space propagation are presented and for surface plasmon fields, computer simulations are shown.

  8. Pocked surface neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  9. Anionic surface binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljaž-Rožič Mateja

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The MELAMIN Chemical Factory in Kočevje manufactures synthetic resins and binders for the paper industry. Binders based on AKD (alkyl ketene dimer are produced which are used for binding paper and cardboard in the range of neutral and partially basic pH. Cationic and, lately, anionic binders are mostly used for the bulk binding of paper and board. The possibility of using AKD binders on paper or board surfaces is presented. In this case partially cationic AKD binders may be applied. When optical whiteners are used, the application of AKD binders is recommended. In the case of paper it is possible to substitute acrylate binders by AKD binders. The best results are obtained when the paper is first partly treated in bulk and subsequently surface treated.

  10. Helical surface structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Brandenburg, Axel; Blackman, Eric G.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest in helical magnetic field structures seen at the solar surface, in coronal mass ejections, as well as in the solar wind. Although there is a great deal of randomness in the data, on average the extended structures are mostly left-handed on the northern hemisphere and right-handed on the southern. Surface field structures are also classified as dextral (= right bearing) and sinistral (= left bearing) occurring preferentially in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. Of particular interest here is a quantitative measurement of the associated emergence rates of helical structures, which translate to magnetic helicity fluxes. In this review, we give a brief survey of what has been found so far and what is expected based on models. Particular emphasis is put on the scale dependence of the associated fields and an attempt is made to estimate the helicity flux of the mean field vs. fluctuating field.

  11. Weather types across the Caribbean basin and their relationship with rainfall and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Vincent; Gouirand, Isabelle; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Eight weather types (WTs) are computed over 98.75°W-56.25°W, 8.75°N-31.25°N using cluster analysis of daily low-level (925 hPa) winds and outgoing longwave radiation, without removing the mean annual cycle, by a k-means algorithm from 1979 to 2013. The WTs can be firstly interpreted as snapshots of the annual cycle with a clear distinction between 5 "wintertime" and 3 "summertime" WTs, which account together for 70 % of the total mean annual rainfall across the studied domain. The wintertime WTs occur mostly from late November to late April and are characterized by varying intensity and location of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and transient synoptic troughs along the northern edge of the domain. Large-scale subsidence dominates the whole basin but rainfall can occur over sections of the basin, especially on the windward shores of the troughs associated with the synoptic waves. The transition between wintertime and summertime WTs is rather abrupt, especially in May. One summertime WT (WT 4) is prevalent in summer, and almost exclusive around late July. It is characterized by strong NASH, fast Caribbean low level jet and rainfall mostly concentrated over the Caribbean Islands, the Florida Peninsula, the whole Central America and the tropical Eastern Pacific. The two remaining summertime WTs display widespread rainfall respectively from Central America to Bermuda (WT 5) and over the Eastern Caribbean (WT 6). Both WTs combine reduced regional scale subsidence and weaker Caribbean low-level jet relatively to WT 4. The relationships between WT frequency and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events are broadly linear. Warm central and eastern ENSO events are associated with more WT 4 (less WT 5-6) during boreal summer and autumn (0) while this relationship is reversed during boreal summer (+1) for central events only. In boreal winter, the largest anomalies are observed for two WTs consistent with negative (WT 2) and positive (WT 8) phases of the

  12. Minimal surfaces for architectural constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velimirović Ljubica S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal surfaces are the surfaces of the smallest area spanned by a given boundary. The equivalent is the definition that it is the surface of vanishing mean curvature. Minimal surface theory is rapidly developed at recent time. Many new examples are constructed and old altered. Minimal area property makes this surface suitable for application in architecture. The main reasons for application are: weight and amount of material are reduced on minimum. Famous architects like Otto Frei created this new trend in architecture. In recent years it becomes possible to enlarge the family of minimal surfaces by constructing new surfaces.

  13. Tensor Impedance Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ELECTROMAGNEETIC SURFACE IMPEDANCE PROPERTIES FA9550-09-C-0198 DR. ADOUR KABAKIAN HUGHES RESEARCH LABS AFOSR / RSE 875 North Randolph Street, Suit...325 Room 3112 Arlington, Virginia 22203-1768 AFOSR / RSE AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2012-0770 Distribution A We have investigated and determined how the tensor...the case of a TM wave, which favors propagation along the shorter principal axis. Standard terms apply U U U UU Arje Nachman RSE (Program Manager

  14. From Loops to Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, H

    2010-01-01

    The generating function for all antisymmetric characters of a Wilson loop matrix in SU(N) Yang Mills theory is the partition function of a fermion living on the curve describing the loop. This generalizes to fermion subsystems living on higher dimensional submanifolds, for example, surfaces. This write-up also contains some extra background, in response to some questions raised during the oral presentation.

  15. Riemann surface and quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelkin, E. E.; Sadovnikov, B. I.; Inozemtseva, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach of the unified consideration of classical and quantum mechanics from the standpoint of the complex analysis effects. It turns out that quantization can be interpreted in terms of the Riemann surface corresponding to the multivalent LnΨ function. A visual interpretation of "trajectories" of the quantum system and of the Feynman's path integral is presented. A magnetic dipole having a magnetic charge that satisfies the Dirac quantization rule was obtained.

  16. Surface electrical properties experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Gene; Strangway, David; Annan, Peter; Baker, Richard G.; Bannister, Lawrence; Brown, Raymon; Cooper, William; Cubley, Dean; deBettencourt, Joseph; England, Anthony W.; Groener, John; Kong, Jin-Au; LaTorraca, Gerald; Meyer, James; Nanda, Ved; Redman, David; Rossiter, James; Tsang, Leung; Urner, Joseph; Watts, Raymond

    1973-01-01

    The surface electrical properties (SEP) experiment was used to explore the subsurface material of the Apollo 17 landing site by means of electromagnetic radiation. The experiment was designed to detect electrical layering, discrete scattering bodies, and the possible presence of water. From the analysis of the data, it was expected that values of the electrical properties (dielectric constant and loss tangent) of lunar material in situ would be obtained.

  17. Water on graphene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  18. Music Mixing Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we...... discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we propose and evaluate solutions to these challenges....

  19. Surface Mapping using Quadcopter

    OpenAIRE

    Haugen, Kenneth Eide

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to perform ice managementin the Arctic Ocean by gathering information about and physically control the iceenvironment. Such a system is needed for safety reasons as marine operations aremoving further north. In order to gather information about the ice environment, aUAV will be used for surface mapping. The quadcopter Parrot AR. Drone 2.0 will be used as a testbed for implementing proposed strategies for guidance, navigation and control ...

  20. Surface modification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wonbaek; Yu, Hyosin; Chung, Inwha; Rhee, Kang In; Choi, Good Sun; Lee, Chulkyung; Youn, In Ju; Chung, Jinki; Suh, Chang Youl; Yang, Dong Hyo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Domestic production of rare metals has not been achieved due to the low metal content in their ores in the nation. For these reasons, a strategy for the value addition of rare metal sponges by processes like vacuum melting should be seek to meet the growing domestic demand for titanium metals and alloys. However, current domestic market appears not to be sufficient enough for the large scale investment for the expensive vacuum-melting equipment. Besides, related ingot-processing technologies like rolling, extrusion, and forging of titanium should be prepared in advance. In the mean time, the attempt to recycle expensive titanium scraps produced in our nation would be worthwhile in view of the reduction of import from foreign countries and of saving valuable secondary resources. The objectives for this research is to develop a multipurpose inductively-coupled plasma enhanced-surface modification (ICPESM) process to upgrade powder products. Stable plasma was obtained by the impedance harmonization between plasma generator and matching networks maintaining the reflected power at near zero. The chamber vacuum went down to 10{sup -3} torr offering no difficulties to maintain 1.0 torr at which the present experiments were conducted. However, the fluidization in the chamber was unstable when operated in vacuum. The gas distributor and chamber design may need modifications. Argon plasma treatment on the titanium powders changed the surface morphology slightly even though the effect was not significant due possibly to the short treatment duration of 60 minutes. Oxygen plasma oxidized the surface of titanium powders to TiO{sub 2} as confirmed by XRD. The carbon black powders were clustered during oxidation treatment by the fluidization or surface activation by the high power of low temperature plasma. (author). 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  1. The geometry of surfaces contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegl J.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with a geometrical exact description of contact between two given surfaces which are defined by the vector functions. These surfaces are substituted at a contact point by approximate surfaces of the second order in accordance with the Taylor series and consequently there is derived a differential surface of these second order surfaces. Knowledge of principal normal curvatures, their directions and the tensor (Dupin indicatrix of this differential surface are necessary for description of contact of these surfaces. For description of surface geometry the first and the second surface fundamental tensor and a further methods of the differential geometry are used. A geometrical visualisation of obtained results of this analysis is made. Method and results of this study will be applied to contact analysis of tooth screw surfaces of screw machines.

  2. Single Crystal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Santillan, Joaquin

    2014-06-01

    The present work studies (0001) Al2O3 and (111) Al2MgO4 wetting with pure molten Al by the sessile drop technique from 1073 K to 1473 K (800 °C to 1200 °C) under Ar at PO2 10-15 Pa. Al pure liquid wets a smooth and chemically homogeneous surface of an inert solid, the wetting driving force ( t, T) can be readily studied when surface solid roughness increases in the system. Both crystals planes (0001) Al2O3 and (111) Al2MgO4 have crystallographic surfaces with identical O-2 crystalline positions however considering Mg2+ content in Al2MgO4 structure may influence a reactive mode. Kinetic models results under similar experimental conditions show that Al wetting on (0001) Al2O3 is less reactive than (111) Al2MgO4, however at >1273 K (1000 °C) (0001) Al2O3 transformation occurs and a transition of wetting improves. The (111) Al2MgO4 and Al system promotes interface formations that slow its wetting process.

  3. Origamizing polyhedral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first practical method for "origamizing" or obtaining the folding pattern that folds a single sheet of material into a given polyhedral surface without any cut. The basic idea is to tuck fold a planar paper to form a three-dimensional shape. The main contribution is to solve the inverse problem; the input is an arbitrary polyhedral surface and the output is the folding pattern. Our approach is to convert this problem into a problem of laying out the polygons of the surface on a planar paper by introducing the concept of tucking molecules. We investigate the equality and inequality conditions required for constructing a valid crease pattern. We propose an algorithm based on two-step mapping and edge splitting to solve these conditions. The two-step mapping precalculates linear equalities and separates them from other conditions. This allows an interactive manipulation of the crease pattern in the system implementation. We present the first system for designing three-dimensional origami, enabling a user can interactively design complex spatial origami models that have not been realizable thus far.

  4. Surface analysis in microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, S

    1995-10-01

    The contribution given by surface analysis to solve some problems encountered in the production of electronic power devices have been discussed. Mainly two types of problems have been faced. One of these deal with interfacial chemistry. Three examples have been investigated. The first applies to the improvement of the quality and the reliability of plastic packages through the optimization of the resin/metal and resin/die adhesion. The second relies to the adhesion between polyimide and silicon nitride used in the multilevel technology. The third example refers to the so called die-attach process and related problems. Another area of interest in microelectronics is that of the erosion of various types of surfaces and the possibility of wrong etching. A few examples of the application of surface analytical techniques for these problems will be presented. XPS and SIMS working in imaging and multipoint analysis mode, scanning acoustic microscopy, contact angle measurements as well as peeling and tensile strength measurements are the main tools used to obtain useful data.

  5. Antifungal nanoparticles and surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vidal, Maria; Ferreira, Lino S

    2010-10-11

    Nosocomial fungal infections, an increasing healthcare concern worldwide, are often associated with medical devices. We have developed antifungal nanoparticle conjugates that can act in suspension or attach to a surface, efficiently killing fungi. For that purpose, we immobilized covalently amphotericin B (AmB), a potent antifungal agent approved by the FDA, widely used in clinical practice and effective against a large spectrum of fungi, into silica nanoparticles. These antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are fungicidal against several strains of Candida sp., mainly by contact. In addition, they can be reused up to 5 cycles without losing their activity. Our results show that the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are more fungistatic and fungicidal than 10 nm colloidal silver. The antifungal activity of the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates is maintained when they are immobilized on a surface using a chemical adhesive formed by polydopamine. The antifungal nanocoatings have no hemolytic or cytotoxic effect against red blood cells and blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Surfaces coated with these antifungal nanoparticle conjugates can be very useful to render medical devices with antifungal properties.

  6. Amphoteric surface active agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa, A.M. F.

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available 2-[trimethyl ammonium, triethyl ammonium, pyridinium and 2-amino pyridinium] alkanoates, four series of surface active agents containing carbon chain C12, C14, C16 and C18carbon atoms, were prepared. Their structures were characterized by microanalysis, infrared (IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Surface and interfacial tension, Krafft point, wetting time, emulsification power, foaming height and critical micelle concentration (cmc were determined and a comparative study was made between their chemical structure and surface active properties. Antimicrobial activity of these surfactants was also determined.

    Se prepararon cuatro series de agentes tensioactivos del tipo 2-[trimetil amonio, trietil amonio, piridinio y 2-amino piridinio] alcanoatos, que contienen cadenas carbonadas con C12, C14, C16 y C18 átomos de carbono.
    Se determinaron la tensión superficial e interfacial, el punto de Krafft, el tiempo humectante, el poder de emulsionamiento, la altura espumante y la concentración critica de miscela (cmc y se hizo un estudio comparativo entre la estructura química y sus propiedades tensioactivas. Se determinó también la actividad antimicrobiana de estos tensioactivos. Estas estructuras se caracterizaron por microanálisis, infrarrojo (IR y resonancia magnética nuclear (RMN.

  7. Surface imaging microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  8. Hemocompatibility of polymeric nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S; Popat, Ketul C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin (ALB) adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen (FIB) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG) adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces.

  9. Surface stress, surface elasticity, and the size effect in surface segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, M.; Hofer, W.; Varga, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Surface stress and surface elasticity of low-index fcc surfaces have been studied using effective-medium theory potentials. In addition to total-energy calculations giving stress components and elastic data for the surface as a whole, the use of artificial atoms with modified size allows us...

  10. Essential Closed Surfaces in a Class of Surface Sum of I-Bundle of Closed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Xin WANG; Rui Feng QIU

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we will characterize all types of essential closed surfaces in a class of surface sum of I-bundle of closed surfaces,and give an application of the classification in the surface sum of two 3-manifolds.

  11. Conversion from surface wave to surface wave on reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the reflection and transmission of an incident surface wave to a pure surface wave state at another interface. This is allowed only for special media parameters: at least one of the media must be magnetic. We found such material characteristics that the obliquely incident surface wave...... can be transmitted without changing its direction (nevertheless the amplitude varies). For other media parameters, only normally incident surface waves can be converted to surface waves. We propose applications of the predicted conversion as a beam splitter and polarization filter for surface waves....

  12. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Drew F., E-mail: Drew.Parsons@anu.edu.au; Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  13. Theory of Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    A~ —~ on 022 CAMBRIDGE UNIV (ENGLAND) CAVEND ISH LAB —. FIG 20/12 —“1THEORY OF SOLID SURFACES .(U) MAY 76 ~J C INKS ON, P W ANDERSON AF AFOSR...A~ D. ~ tLC .7~ ~~~~~~~ I In f or ~a t i oL O f f i c e r 111111 __________ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ _________________ - -ii~ s ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Abstract

  14. Surface effects in nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2016-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory (CNT) concept of a nucleus as a fragment of the bulk new phase fails for nanosized nuclei. An extension of CNT taking into account the properties of the transition region between coexisting bulk phases is proposed. For this purpose, the finite-thickness layer method which is an alternative to the Gibbs one is used; the transition region is considered as a separate (surface) phase. An equation for the nucleation work is derived which is basic for the multivariable theory of nucleation.

  15. Surface-Shading Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessel, Todd

    1991-01-01

    Surface Shading computer program, SURF, developed in support of work of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Part of CFD graphics software. Accepts input in form of grid and solution files otherwise normally fed to Ames Research Center's version of PLOT3D software from "flow solver" programs. Interactively creates wire-frame, shaded, and function-map parts viewed and then transferred to Ames Research Graphic (ARCGRAPH) standard files, animated with GAS (COSMIC Program ARC-12379). Written in C programming language and requires Silicon Graphics "include" files (e.g., stdio.h, gl.h).

  16. Surface Production of Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-26

    Hill, New York 1938) p. 60-64. 21. S. Dushman, Scientific Foundations of Vacuum Technique, Second Edition (John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1962) p. 91...hydrogen atom (or H + ion) from a metal surface is of funda- Liouville equation, whose solution involves the coupling ma- ’ Jonh . mental interest both from a...Appi. Phys. 50 (4), April 1979 IsB Chapman Glow Discharge Processes John Wiley and Sons New York, 1980 pp 114-115. -H. L. Cui, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. A 9

  17. Spacecraft Surface Charging Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Briet, and A. L. Vampola of Aerospace Corporation , H. R. Anderson, A. Holman, and J. Manderesse of SAIC, L. Levy of CERT, R. Viswanathan, G. Barbay, P...camWat a8n truss piece comnat Proper truss to not possible, so eftend res and en OCYA"O axis 0 0 0 0 0 1 width 6 side 2 surface teflon surftce - teflon...p. 62, 1974. Rudie, N. J., et a]., Design Support Guide fior Radiation Hardening oif Space Electronics Svsitems. I RT Corporation , I RT 6409-001, 198

  18. Semiconductor surface protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method and a product for protecting semiconductor surfaces is disclosed. The protective coating material is prepared by heating a suitable protective resin with an organic solvent which is solid at room temperature and converting the resulting solution into sheets by a conventional casting operation. Pieces of such sheets of suitable shape and thickness are placed on the semiconductor areas to be coated and heat and vacuum are then applied to melt the sheet and to drive off the solvent and cure the resin. A uniform adherent coating, free of bubbles and other defects, is thus obtained exactly where it is desired.

  19. Comparative study of the surface layer density of liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, E.; Fernández, E. M.; Duque, D.; Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Tarazona, P.

    2009-11-01

    Capillary wave fluctuations blur the inherent structure of liquid surfaces in computer simulations. The intrinsic sampling method subtracts capillary wave fluctuations and yields the intrinsic surface structure, leading to a generic picture of the liquid surface. The most relevant magnitude of the method is the surface layer density ns that may be consistently determined from different properties: the layering structure of the intrinsic density profiles, the turnover rate for surface layer particles, and the hydrodynamic damping rate of capillary waves. The good agreement among these procedures provides evidence for the physical consistency of the surface layering hypothesis, as an inherent physical property of the liquid surfaces. The dependence of the surface compactness, roughness, and exchange rate with temperature is analyzed for several molecular interaction models.

  20. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.