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Sample records for surface resonances srs

  1. Constitutive expression and characterization of a surface SRS (NcSRS67) protein of Neospora caninum with no orthologue in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos Alexandre; Pereira, Luiz Miguel; Bononi, Aline; Biella, Carla Agostino; Baroni, Luciana; Pollo-Oliveira, Leticia; Yatsuda, Ana Patrícia

    2017-04-01

    Neospora caninum is a parasite of the Apicomplexa phylum responsible for abortion and losses of fertility in cattle. As part of its intracellular cycle, the first interaction of the parasite with the target cell is performed with the surface proteins known as the SRS superfamily (Surface Antigen Glycoprotein - Related Sequences). SAG related or SRS proteins have been a target of intense research due to its immunodominant pattern, exhibiting potential as diagnostic and/or vaccine candidates. The aim of this study was the cloning, expression and characterization of the gene NcSRS67 of N. caninum using a novel designed plasmid. The coding sequence of NcSRS67 (without the signal peptide and the GPI anchor) was cloned and expressed constitutively instead of the ccdB system of pCR-Blunt II-TOPO. The protein was purified in a nickel sepharose column and identified by mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The constitutive expression did not affect the final bacterial growth, with a similar OD 600nm compared to the non-transformed strains. The recombinant NcSRS67 was over expressed and the native form was detected by the anti-rNcSRS67 serum on 1D western blot as a single band of approximately 38kDa as predicted. On an in vitro assay, the inhibitory effect of the polyclonal antiserum anti-rNcSRS67 was nearly 20% on adhesion/invasion of host cells. The NcSRS67 native protein was localised on part of the surface of N. caninum tachyzoite when compared to the nucleus by confocal immunofluorescence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-E-J-221: Advantages of a New Surface Imaging Calibration Method for SRS Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, A; Manger, R; Pawlicki, T; Kim, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present calibration method used for the AlignRT surface imaging system relies on the placement of a calibration plate at the linac isocenter using isocenter surrogates (crosshairs, room lasers, etc.). This work investigated the potential advantages of a new calibration method that shifts the AlignRT isocenter to be coincident with the linac MV beam isocenter. Methods: To quantify the potential uncertainties associated with the present calibration method for SRS treatments, the calibration plate was intentionally shifted away from isocenter +/−3mm in the longitudinal and lateral directions and +/−1mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. A head phantom was placed in a mock SRS treatment position and monitored with the AlignRT system. The AlignRT-indicated offsets were recorded at 270, 315, 0, 45, and 90° couch angles for each intentional calibration misalignment. The new isocenter calibration was applied after each misalignment, and the measurements were repeated and compared to the previous results. Results: With intentional longitudinal and lateral shifts of +/−3mm and +/−1mm in the calibration plate, the average indicated offsets at couch rotations of +/−90° were 4.3mm and 1.6mm, respectively. This was in agreement with the theoretical offset of sqrt(2)*(intentional shift of the calibration plate). Since vertical shifts were along the rotation axis of the couch, these shifts had little effect on the offsets with changing couch angle. When the new calibration was applied, the indicated offsets were all within 0.5mm for all couch angles. These offsets were in agreement with the known magnitude of couch walkout. Conclusion: The potential pitfalls of the present calibration method have been established, and the advantages of the new calibration method have been demonstrated. This new calibration method effectively removes the potential miscalibration artifacts of the present calibration method, giving the AlignRT user more

  3. Spectra of resonance surface photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G. [Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The theory of nonactivated electron transfer between atoms interacting reasonantly with coherent radiation and a metal surface is developed. The spectral resonances in photoabsorption and surface photoionization are found to be related to nonlinear interference effects in the interaction between discrete atomic levels and the continuum formed by the quasi-continuous electron spectrum of a normal metal. The asymmetry in the resonance surface photoionization spectrum is shown to have a shape typical of the Fano autoionization resonances. 18 refs.

  4. SU-D-BRA-02: Motion Assessment During Open Face Mask SRS Using CBCT and Surface Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, BB; Fox, CJ; Hartford, AC; Gladstone, DJ [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Lebanon)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the robustness of immobilization using open-face mask technology for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with multiple non-coplanar arcs via repeated CBCT acquisition, with comparison to contemporaneous optical surface tracking data. Methods: 25 patients were treated in open faced masks with cranial SRS using 3–4 non-coplanar arcs. Repeated CBCT imaging was performed to verify the maintenance of proper patient positioning during treatment. Initial patient positioning was performed based on prescribed shifts and optical surface tracking. Positioning refinements employed rigid 3D-matching of the planning CT and CBCT images and were implemented via automated 6DOF couch control. CBCT imaging was repeated following the treatment of all non-transverse beams with associated couch kicks. Detected patient translations and rotations were recorded and automatically corrected. Optical surface tracking was applied throughout the treatments to monitor motion, and this contemporaneous patient positioning data was recorded to compare against CBCT data and 6DOF couch adjustments. Results: Initial patient positions were refined on average by translations of 3±1mm and rotations of ±0.9-degrees. Optical surface tracking corroborated couch corrections to within 1±1mm and ±0.4-degrees. Following treatment of the transverse and subsequent superior-oblique beam, average translations of 0.6±0.4mm and rotations of ±0.4-degrees were reported via CBCT, with optical surface tracking in agreement to within 1.1±0.6mm and ±0.6-degrees. Following treatment of the third beam, CBCT indicated additional translations of 0.4±0.2mm and rotations of ±0.3-degrees. Cumulative couch corrections resulted in 0.7 ± 0.4mm average magnitude translations and rotations of ±0.4-degrees. Conclusion: Based on CBCT measurements of patients during SRS, the open face mask maintained patient positioning to within 1.5mm and 1-degree with >95% confidence. Patient positioning

  5. Fano resonance Rabi splitting of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Li, Jiafang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-14

    Rabi splitting and Fano resonance are well-known physical phenomena in conventional quantum systems as atoms and quantum dots, arising from strong interaction between two quantum states. In recent years similar features have been observed in various nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic systems. Yet, realization of strong interaction between two or more Fano resonance states has not been accomplished either in quantum or in optical systems. Here we report the observation of Rabi splitting of two strongly coupled surface plasmon Fano resonance states in a three-dimensional plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vertical asymmetric split-ring resonators. The plasmonic system stably supports triple Fano resonance states and double Rabi splittings can occur between lower and upper pairs of the Fano resonance states. The experimental discovery agrees excellently with rigorous numerical simulations, and is well explained by an analytical three-oscillator model. The discovery of Fano resonance Rabi splitting could provide a stimulating insight to explore new fundamental physics in analogous atomic systems and could be used to significantly enhance light-matter interaction for optical sensing and detecting applications.

  6. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on

  7. SRL in-situ tests in the United Kingdom: Part 2, Surface analyses of SRS waste glass buried for one and two years in limestone at Ballidon, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namboodri, C.G. Jr.; Wicks, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A multiphase experimental program to assess and understand waste glass behavior under a wide range of conditions has been in progress at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for over a decade. An important part of this experimental effort is to assess the effects of repository relevant conditions on performance of SRS waste glass, in both controlled laboratory tests, as well as in actual field experiments. In laboratory test, SRS waste glass, simulated and in many cases also fully radioactive, has been tested in environments of salt, basalt, shale, granite, clay and tuff. In field experiments, there are four joint international programs being conducted in four different countries, involving burial of SRS simulated waste glass in granite, limestone, clay and salt geologies. This report discusses the SRS waste glass studies in limestone at Ballidon, UK

  8. Stochastic resonance in a surface dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinsalu, E., E-mail: els@ifisc.uib-csic.es [IFISC, Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (CSIC-UIB), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Raevala 10, 15042 Tallinn (Estonia); Patriarca, M. [IFISC, Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (CSIC-UIB), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Raevala 10, 15042 Tallinn (Estonia); Marchesoni, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2010-10-05

    The dynamics of a neutral dipole diffusing on a one-dimensional symmetric periodic substrate is numerically investigated in the presence of an ac electric field. It is observed that the amplitude of the forced oscillations of the dipole can be enhanced by tuning the noise strength, i.e., the substrate temperature. Such a manifestation of stochastic resonance turns out to be extremely sensitive to the mechanical properties of the dipole. This phenomenon has immediate applications in surface physics and nanodevice technology.

  9. Multiplexed infrared plasmonic surface lattice resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutha, Rithvik R.; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Sharp, Christina; Wing, Waylin J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that arrays of flat gold nanodisks with rectangular lattices can support a tunable hybrid frequency gap formed by the surface lattice resonances in the substrate ((+1, 0)sub) and the superstrate ((-1, 0)sup). For a certain polarization, rotation of the arrays reduces this gap, forming a band crossing (degenerate state) wherein both surface lattice resonances happen around a single wavelength (˜1300 nm). This highlights a situation wherein hybridization of the Rayleigh anomaly with localized surface plasmon resonances with different multipolar natures happens around the same wavelength. We demonstrate that for a different polarization of the incident light the arrays support the formation of a photonic-plasmonic state at about 1650 nm. Our results show that as the projection of the wave vector of the incident light on the planes of the nanodisk arrays increases, within a given wavelength range, the (+1, 0) mode of this state becomes amplified. Under this condition, this mode can undergo a significant blue shift without broadening, while its amplitude increases.

  10. Prediction and Migration of Surface-related Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Surface-related resonant multiples can be migrated to achieve better resolution than migrating primary reflections. We now derive the formula for migrating surface-related resonant multiples, and show its super-resolution characteristics. Moreover, a method is proposed to predict surface-related resonant multiples with zero-offset primary reflections. The prediction can be used to indentify and extract the true resonant multiple from other events. Both synthetic and field data are used to validate this prediction.

  11. Multi-analyte surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Vaisocherová, Hana; Dostálek, Jakub; Piliarik, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 1 (2005), s. 26-36 ISSN 1046-2023 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0249; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/1326; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0633 Grant - others:European Commision(XE) QLK4-CT-2002-02323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.591, year: 2005

  12. Resonant surface acoustic wave chemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Robert W.; Brocato, Terisse; Stotts, Larry G.

    2017-08-08

    Apparatus for chemical detection includes a pair of interdigitated transducers (IDTs) formed on a piezoelectric substrate. The apparatus includes a layer of adsorptive material deposited on a surface of the piezoelectric substrate between the IDTs, where each IDT is conformed, and is dimensioned in relation to an operating frequency and an acoustic velocity of the piezoelectric substrate, so as to function as a single-phase uni-directional transducer (SPUDT) at the operating frequency. Additionally, the apparatus includes the pair of IDTs is spaced apart along a propagation axis and mutually aligned relative to said propagation axis so as to define an acoustic cavity that is resonant to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the operating frequency, where a distance between each IDT of the pair of IDTs ranges from 100 wavelength of the operating frequency to 400 wavelength of the operating frequency.

  13. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  14. A 'rational' explanation of resonant surfaces in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.C.

    1983-05-01

    Resonant surfaces are of fundamental importance in toroidal plasmas, particularly in relation to stability theory. A simple explanation as to why these surfaces are 'resonant' is given in terms of the propagation of localized torsional Alfven and ion acoustic wave packets. These packets are guided along helical field lines in toroidal plasmas, leading to the formation of unstable standing waves on those field lines which close on themselves after one or more toroidal revolutions

  15. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Centre for Sustainable Energy, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  16. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  17. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  18. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there

  19. Nucleic acid detection with surface plasmon resonance using cationic latex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.F.A.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; van der Plas, J.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    An affinity sensor based on Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was used to detect nucleic acids. SPR is an optical technique that is able to detect small changes in the refractive index of the immediate vicinity of a metal surface. After a specific amplification of DNA, achieved using the polymerase

  20. Theory and Applications of Surface Plasmon Resonance, Resonant Mirror, Resonant Waveguide Grating, and Dual Polarization Interferometry Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy W. Day

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors have been used extensively in the scientific community for several purposes, most notably to determine association and dissociation kinetics, protein-ligand, protein-protein, or nucleic acid hybridization interactions. A number of different types of biosensors are available in the field, each with real or perceived benefits over the others. This review discusses the basic theory and operational arrangements of four commercially available types of optical biosensors: surface plasmon resonance, resonant mirror, resonance waveguide grating, and dual polarization interferometry. The different applications these techniques offer are discussed from experiments and results reported in recently published literature. Additionally, recent advancements or modifications to the current techniques are also discussed.

  1. Stimulated resonant scattering at stressed fused silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, Philippe; Reymermier, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The radiative emission in CO 2 laser heated stressed fused silica is radically modified when gold microspheres are on the surface. At high heating rates, the emission dynamics changes from thermoluminescence to stimulated resonant scattering with an emission rate that is increased tenfold and the near infrared (NIR) spectrum is red-shifted. We show that the dynamic tensile stress that rises in heated silica is coupled with a fluctuating electromagnetic field that enables electromagnetic friction between moving OH emitters from silica bulk and NIR resonant scatterers at the silica surface. (paper)

  2. Surface resonance on the NiFe(001) alloy surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráček, Martin; Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Redinger, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2006), s. 69-74 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Surface Physics /10./. Praha, 11.07.2005-15.07.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : NiFe alloy * surface electronic structure * surface geometry * density functional calculation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  3. Resonant Excitation of Terahertz Surface Plasmons in Subwavelength Metal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of experimental studies of resonant excitation of terahertz surface plasmons in two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength metal holes. Resonant transmission efficiency higher than unity was recently achieved when normalized to the area occupied by the holes. The effects of hole shape, hole dimensions, dielectric function of metals, polarization dependence, and array film thickness on resonant terahertz transmission in metal arrays were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. In particular, extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated in arrays of subwavelength holes made even from Pb, a generally poor metal, and having thickness of only one-third of skin depth. Terahertz surface plasmons have potential applications in terahertz imaging, biosensing, interconnects, and development of integrated plasmonic components for terahertz generation and detection.

  4. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Wearable or implantable devices combining microfluidic control of sample and reagent flow and micro-cavity surface plasmon resonance sensors functionalized with surface treatments or coatings capable of specifically binding to target analytes, ligands, or molecules in a bodily fluid are provided. The devices can be used to determine the presence and concentration of target analytes in the bodily fluids and thereby help diagnose, monitor or detect changes in disease conditions.

  5. Doubly localized surface plasmon resonance in bimodally distributed silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, M

    2012-06-01

    Growth of bimodally distributed silver nanoparticles using sequential physical vapour deposition (PVD) is reported. Growth conditions of nanoparticles are defined in the following three steps: In the first step, nanoparticles are grown at a heated substrate and then exposed to atmosphere, in the second step, nanoparticles are vacuum annealed and finally re-deposition of silver is performed in the third step. This special way of deposition leads to the formation of bimodally distributed nanoparticles. It has been investigated that by changing the deposition time, different sets of bimodally distributed nanoparticles can be grown. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of such bimodally distributed nanoparticles generates double plasmon resonance peaks with overlapped absorption spectra. Double plasmon resonance peaks provide a quick indication of the existence of two sets of nanoparticles. LSPR spectra of such bimodally distributed nanoparticles could be modeled with double Lorentz oscillator model. Inclusion of double Lorentz oscillator model indicates that there exist two sets of non-interacting nanoparticles resonating at different plasma frequencies. It is also reported that silver nanoparticles grown at a heated substrate, again attain the new shape while being exposed to atmosphere, followed by vacuum annealing at the same temperature. This is because of physisorption of oxygen at the silver surface and change in surface free energy. The re-shaping due to the adsorbed oxygen on the surface is responsible for bimodal size distribution of nanoparticles.

  6. Surface and temperature effects in isovector giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using the liquid droplet model (LDM) we investigate three different sum rules for the isovector dipole and monopole excitations. Analytical formulae are derived for the excitation energies of these resonances and the predictions are compared with experiments. The role of the surface and the effects of temperature are explicitly discussed. (orig.)

  7. Surface plasmon resonance optical cavity enhanced refractive index sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Gagliardi, G.; Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; Iodice, M.; Adam, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 11 (2013), s. 1951-1953 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Resonators * Surface plasmons * Optical sensing and sensors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  8. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    -, č. 773 (2013), s. 9-23 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Nucleic acid * Biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 4.517, year: 2013

  9. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunobiosensor for Detection of Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    In this study we focused on the development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor for Phytophthora infestans detection. The fungus-like organism is the cause of potato late blight and is a major problem in potato growing regions of the world. Efficient control is dependent on early...

  10. Resonant Absorption of Surface Sausage and Surface Kink Modes under Photospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dae Jung; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Goossens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    We study the effect of resonant absorption of surface sausage and surface kink modes under photospheric conditions where the slow surface sausage modes undergo resonant damping in the slow continuum and the surface kink modes in the slow and Alfvén continua at the transitional layers. We use recently derived analytical formulas to obtain the damping rate (time). By considering linear density and linear pressure profiles for the transitional layers, we show that resonant absorption in the slow continuum could be an efficient mechanism for the wave damping of the slow surface sausage and slow surface kink modes while the damping rate of the slow surface kink mode in the Alfvén continuum is weak. It is also found that the resonant damping of the fast surface kink mode is much stronger than that of the slow surface kink mode, showing a similar efficiency as under coronal conditions. It is worth noting that the slow body sausage and kink modes can also resonantly damp in the slow continuum for those linear profiles.

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  12. Theory of inelastic effects in resonant atom-surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The progress of theoretical and experimental developments in atom-surface scattering is briefly reviewed. The formal theory of atom-surface resonant scattering is reviewed and expanded, with both S and T matrix approaches being explained. The two-potential formalism is shown to be useful for dealing with the problem in question. A detailed theory based on the S-matrix and the two-potential formalism is presented. This theory takes account of interactions between the incident atoms and the surface phonons, with resonant effects being displayed explicitly. The Debye-Waller attenuation is also studied. The case in which the atom-surface potential is divided into an attractive part V/sub a/ and a repulsive part V/sub r/ is considered at length. Several techniques are presented for handling the scattering due to V/sub r/, for the case in which V/sub r/ is taken to be the hard corrugated surface potential. The theory is used to calculate the scattered intensities for the system 4 He/LiF(001). A detailed comparison with experiment is made, with polar scans, azimuthal scans, and time-of-flight measurements being considered. The theory is seen to explain the location and signature of resonant features, and to provide reasonable overall agreement with the experimental results

  13. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashan, M A M; Kalavally, V; Ramakrishnan, N; Lee, H W

    2016-01-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface. (paper)

  14. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashan, M. A. M.; Kalavally, V.; Lee, H. W.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface.

  15. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  16. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šípová, Hana [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, Prague (Czech Republic); Homola, Jiří, E-mail: homola@ufe.cz [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-04-22

    Highlights: ► Advances of nucleic acid (NA) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors are presented. ► Bioanalytical applications of NA SPR biosensors are reviewed. ► Applications for study of molecular interactions involving NAs are also discussed. -- Abstract: Biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a central tool for the investigation and quantification of biomolecules and their interactions. Nucleic acids (NAs) play a vital role in numerous biological processes and therefore have been one of the major groups of biomolecules targeted by the SPR biosensors. This paper discusses the advances of NA SPR biosensor technology and reviews its applications both in the research of molecular interactions involving NAs (NA–NA, NA–protein, NA–small molecule), as well as for the field of bioanalytics in the areas of food safety, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  17. Monitoring RAYT activity by surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bocková, Markéta; Špringer, Tomáš; Nečasová, Iva; Nunvář, Jaroslav; Schneider, Bohdan; Homola, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 14 (2015), s. 3985-3993 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/1801 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Biosensor * REP-associated tyrosine transposase Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (BTO-N) Impact factor: 3.125, year: 2015

  18. Detection of foodborne pathogens using surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, Vendula; Brynda, Eduard; Karasová, L.; Škvor, J.; Homola, Jiří; Dostálek, Jakub; Tobiška, Petr; Rošický, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 74, 1/3 (2001), s. 100-105 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA AV ČR KSK2055603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : optical sensors * surface plasmon resonance * immunosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  19. Detection of foodborne pathogens using surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, Vendula; Brynda, Eduard; Krasová, B.; Škvor, J.; Homola, Jiří; Dostálek, Jakub; Tobiška, Petr; Rošický, Jiří

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 100-105 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optical sensors * surface plasmon resonance * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  20. Scattering-Type Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Seshadri, Suresh

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors of a proposed type would exploit scattering of light by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Related prior biosensors exploit absorption of light by SPR. Relative to the prior SPR biosensors, the proposed SPR biosensors would offer greater sensitivity in some cases, enough sensitivity to detect bioparticles having dimensions as small as nanometers. A surface plasmon wave can be described as a light-induced collective oscillation in electron density at the interface between a metal and a dielectric. At SPR, most incident photons are either absorbed or scattered at the metal/dielectric interface and, consequently, reflected light is greatly attenuated. The resonance wavelength and angle of incidence depend upon the permittivities of the metal and dielectric. An SPR sensor of the type most widely used heretofore includes a gold film coated with a ligand a substance that binds analyte molecules. The gold film is thin enough to support evanescent-wave coupling through its thickness. The change in the effective index of refraction at the surface, and thus the change in the SPR response, increases with the number of bound analyte molecules. The device is illuminated at a fixed wavelength, and the intensity of light reflected from the gold surface opposite the ligand-coated surface is measured as a function of the angle of incidence. From these measurements, the angle of minimum reflection intensity is determined

  1. Resonance surface enhanced Raman optical activity of myoglobin as a result of optimized resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Johannessen, Christian; Nygaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Using Surface enhanced ROA (SEROA), novel results are achieved by combining Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and resonance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERRS), applied on myoglobin. The novelty of this work is ascribed the first time reporting on chiral results of a study performed on a protein...... has shown that the SERS effect behaves consequently, depending on the concentration ratio of each component, i.e., myoglobin, Ag colloids and NaCl. Accordingly, it is shown here that SERS intensity has its maximum at certain concentration of these components, whereas below or above this value...

  2. Wastewaters at SRS where heavy metals are a potential problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this report is to identify and prioritize heavy metal-containing wastewaters at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in terms of their suitability for testing of and clean-up by a novel bioremediation process being developed by SRTC. This process involves the use of algal biomass for sequestering heavy metal and radionuclides from wastewaters. Two categories of SRS wastewaters were considered for this investigation: (1) waste sites (primarily non-contained wastes managed by Environmental Restoration), and (2) waste streams (primarily contained wastes managed by Waste Management). An attempt was made to evaluate all sources of both categories of waste throughout the site so that rational decisions could be made with regard to selecting the most appropriate wastewaters for present study and potential future treatment. The investigation included a review of information on surface and/or groundwater associated with all known SRS waste sites, as well as waters associated with all known SRS waste streams. Following the initial review, wastewaters known or suspected to contain potentially problematic concentrations of one or more of the toxic metals were given further consideration

  3. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  4. Trends in interfacial design for surface plasmon resonance based immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan); Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan)

    2007-12-07

    Immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a promising tool in sensor technology for biomedical, food, environmental, industrial and homeland security applications. SPR is a surface sensitive optical technique, suitable for real-time and label-free analysis of biorecognition events at functional transducer surfaces. Fabrication of highly active and robust sensing surfaces is an important part in immunoassays because the quality, quantity, chemistry and topography of the interfacial biomembranes play a major role in immunosensor performance. Eventually, a variety of immobilization methods such as physical adsorption, covalent coupling, Langmuir-Blodgett film, polymer thin film, self-assembly, sol-gel, etc, have been introduced over the years for the immobilization of biomolecules (antibody or antigen) on the transducer surfaces. The selection of an immobilization method for an immunoassay is governed by several factors such as nature and stability of the biomolecules, target analyte, application, detection principle, mode of signal transduction, matrix complexity, etc. This paper provides an overview of the various surface modification methods for SPR based immunosensor fabrication. The preparation, structure and application of different functional interfacial surfaces have been discussed along with a brief introduction to the SPR technology, biomolecules and detection principles. (review article)

  5. Trends in interfacial design for surface plasmon resonance based immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Miura, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a promising tool in sensor technology for biomedical, food, environmental, industrial and homeland security applications. SPR is a surface sensitive optical technique, suitable for real-time and label-free analysis of biorecognition events at functional transducer surfaces. Fabrication of highly active and robust sensing surfaces is an important part in immunoassays because the quality, quantity, chemistry and topography of the interfacial biomembranes play a major role in immunosensor performance. Eventually, a variety of immobilization methods such as physical adsorption, covalent coupling, Langmuir-Blodgett film, polymer thin film, self-assembly, sol-gel, etc, have been introduced over the years for the immobilization of biomolecules (antibody or antigen) on the transducer surfaces. The selection of an immobilization method for an immunoassay is governed by several factors such as nature and stability of the biomolecules, target analyte, application, detection principle, mode of signal transduction, matrix complexity, etc. This paper provides an overview of the various surface modification methods for SPR based immunosensor fabrication. The preparation, structure and application of different functional interfacial surfaces have been discussed along with a brief introduction to the SPR technology, biomolecules and detection principles. (review article)

  6. Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigens Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fengyu; Xu, Chunye; Taya, Minoru; Murayama, Kimie; Shinohara, Yasuro; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an oncofoetal cell-surface glycoprotein that serves as an important tumor marker for colorectal and some other carcinomas. In this work, a CEA immunoassay using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor has been developed. SPR could provide label-free, real-time detection with high sensitivity, though its ability to detect CEA in human serum was highly dependent on the analytical conditions employed. We investigated the influences of various analytical conditions including immobilization methods for anti-CEA antibody and composition of sensor surface on the selective and sensitive detection of CEA. The results show that anti-CEA antibody immobilized via Protein A or Protein G caused a large increase in the resonance signal upon injection of human serum due to the interactions with IgGs in serum, while direct covalent immobilization of anti-CEA antibody could substantially reduce it. An optimized protocol based on further kinetic analysis and the use of 2nd and 3rd antibodies for the sandwich assay allowed detecting spiked CEA in human serum as low as 25 ng/mL. Furthermore, a self-assembled monolayer of mixed ethylene-glycol terminated alkanethiols on gold was found to have a comparable ability in detecting CEA as CM5 with thick dextran matrix and C1 with short flat layer on gold. PMID:27879935

  7. Nanostructure-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špašková, Barbora; Lynn, Nicholas S.; Slabý, Jiří Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    There remains a need for the multiplexed detection of biomolecules at extremely low concentrations in fields of medical diagnostics, food safety, and security. Surface plasmon resonance imaging is an established biosensing approach in which the measurement of the intensity of light across a sensor chip is correlated with the amount of target biomolecules captured by the respective areas on the chip. In this work, we present a new approach for this method allowing for enhanced bioanalytical performance via the introduction of nanostructured sensing chip and polarization contrast measurement, which enable the exploitation of both amplitude and phase properties of plasmonic resonances on the nanostructures. Here we will discuss a complex theoretical analysis of the sensor performance, whereby we investigate aspects related to both the optical performance as well as the transport of the analyte molecules to the functionalized surfaces. This analysis accounts for the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured sensing surface, the properties of functional coatings, and parameters related to the detection assay. Based on the results of the theoretical analysis, we fabricated sensing chips comprised of arrays of gold nanoparticles (by electron-beam lithography), which were modified by a biofunctional coating to allow for the selective capturing of the target biomolecules in the regions with high sensitivity. In addition, we developed a compact optical reader with an integrated microfluidic cell, allowing for the measurement from 50 independent sensing channels. The performance of this biosensor is demonstrated through the sensitive detection of short oligonucleotides down to the low picomolar level.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance for detecting clenbuterol: Influence of monolayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance sensor equipped with a fabricated immunosensor chip is used for detecting clenbuterol in this study. Since clenbuterol is a small analyte, indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay is employed. For fabricating the immunosurface, the Au-chip was functionalized by succinimidyl-terminated alkanethiol, and the terminal N-hydroxysuccinimide group of the self-assembled monolayer was either replaced with clenbuterol or blocked with ethanolamine. Scanning tunneling microscope experiments and electrochemical measurements depicted the domain structures of the succinimide group of succinimidyl-terminated propanethiol monolayer. The surface concentration and the orientation of succinimide group was significantly dependent on the concentration of dithiobis(succinimidyl) propionate (DSP) used in fabricating the monolayer. Furthermore, the structure of monolayer significantly influenced both the surface concentration and the orientation of clenbuterol on the sensor surface. Consequently, high coverage and standing-up configuration of clenbuterol showed high affinity for clenbuterol antibody. However, high affinity constant exhibited by the sensor surface was coupled with a low sensitivity. By contrast, lowest concentration of DSP solution (0.1 mM) used in fabricating the immunosurface showed a detection sensitivity of 3 ppt - the highest reported sensitivity for clenbuterol. For regeneration the immunosurface, 0.1 M NaOH was used and the same sensor surface could be reused for performing >100 rapid immunoreaction.

  9. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on integrated optical waveguide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálek, Jakub; Čtyroký, Jiří; Homola, Jiří; Brynda, Eduard; Skalský, Miroslav; Nekvindová, P.; Špirková, J.; Škvor, J.; Schröfel, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 76, 1/3 (2001), s. 8-12 ISSN 0925-4005. [International Meeting on Chemical Sensors IMCS /8./. Basel, 02.07.2000-05.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/M057; GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors * integrated optics * biosensors * optical waveguides Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  10. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.P.; Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Lodding, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP

  11. Production and testing of an s-band resonator with a Nb3Sn surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiniger, M.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the preparation of a niobium s-band resonator with Nb3Sn surface using a special vapor phase deposition method. High-frequency superconductivity tests were performed on this resonator. Measurements of transition temperature, penetration depth, energy gap, and temperature dependence of surface conductivity of Nb3Sn, and resonator behaviour at high electrical field strengths are reported. (GSCH)

  12. Resonant soft x-ray scattering from stepped surfaces of SrTiO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlappa, J.; Chang, C.F.; Hu, Z.; Schierle, E.; Ott, H.; Weschke, E.; Kaindl, G.; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Tjeng, L.H.; Schüssler-Langeheine, C.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the resonant diffraction signal from stepped surfaces of SrTiO3 at the Ti 2p ¿ 3d (L2,3) resonance in comparison with x-ray absorption (XAS) and specular reflectivity data. The steps on the surface form an artificial superstructure suitable as a model system for resonant soft x-ray

  13. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  14. Compact Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Fieldwork Environmental Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Margrethe; Drake, Madison; Stipe, Kristian; Serban, Monica; Turner, Ivana; Thomas, Aaron; Macaluso, David

    2017-04-01

    The ability to accurately and reliably detect biomolecular targets is important in innumerable applications, including the identification of food-borne parasites, viral pathogens in human tissue, and environmental pollutants. While detection methods do exist, they are typically slow, expensive, and restricted to laboratory use. The method of surface plasmon resonance based biosensing offers a unique opportunity to characterize molecular targets while avoiding these constraints. By incorporating a plasmon-supporting gold film within a prism/laser optical system, it is possible to reliably detect and quantify the presence of specific biomolecules of interest in real time. This detection is accomplished by observing shifts in plasmon formation energies corresponding to optical absorption due to changes in index of refraction near the gold-prism interface caused by the binding of target molecules. A compact, inexpensive, battery-powered surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on this method is being developed at the University of Montana to detect waterborne pollutants in field-based environmental research.

  15. Systematic screening of viral entry inhibitors using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2017-11-01

    Viral binding and entry into host cells for various viruses have been studied extensively, yielding a detailed understanding of the overall viral entry process. As cell entry is an essential and requisite process by which a virus initiates infection, it is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. The advantages of targeting viral entry are an extracellular target site, relatively easy access for biological interventions, and lower toxicity. Several cell-based strategies and biophysical techniques have been used to screen compounds that block viral entry. These studies led to the discovery of inhibitors against HIV, HCV, influenza, Ebola, and RSV. In recent years, several compounds screened by fragment-based drug discovery have been approved as drugs or are in the final stages of clinical trials. Among fragment screening technologies, surface plasmon resonance has been widely used because it provides accurate information on binding kinetics, allows real-time monitoring of ligand-drug interactions, requires very small sample amounts to perform analyses, and requires no modifications to or labeling of ligands. This review focuses on surface plasmon resonance-based schemes for screening viral entry inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Nano Sensing and Energy Conversion Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltai (Isaac Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic technique has been attracting much attention in applications of nano-bio-chemical sensing and energy conversion of solar energy harvesting and enhanced energy transfer. One approach for nano-bio-chemical sensing is surface plasmon resonance (SPR imaging, which can detect the material properties, such as density, ion concentration, temperature, and effective refractive index in high sensitivity, label-free, and real-time under ambient conditions. Recent study shows that SPR can successfully detect the concentration variation of nanofluids during evaporation-induced self-assembly process. Spoof surface plasmon resonance based on multilayer metallo-dielectric hyperbolic metamaterials demonstrate SPR dispersion control, which can be combined with SPR imaging, to characterize high refractive index materials because of its exotic optical properties. Furthermore, nano-biophotonics could enable innovative energy conversion such as the increase of absorption and emission efficiency and the perfect absorption. Localized SPR using metal nanoparticles show highly enhanced absorption in solar energy harvesting. Three-dimensional hyperbolic metamaterial cavity nanostructure shows enhanced spontaneous emission. Recently ultrathin film perfect absorber is demonstrated with the film thickness is as low as ~1/50th of the operating wavelength using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ phenomena at the wavelength close to SPR. It is expected to provide a breakthrough in sensing and energy conversion applications using the exotic optical properties based on the nanophotonic technique.

  17. Electron beam measurements on the Daresbury SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laundy, D.; Cummings, S.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments which use hard x-ray synchrotron radiation have been carried out to allow us to monitor the electron beam on the Daresbury SRS. The beam spatial and angular vertical position and size was determined over a period of time when the SRS was operating normally. From these measurements, the position and angular stability of the electron beam during the measurement period was assessed and correlation of the beam emittance to the electron current was determined

  18. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Bilgen [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Uzun, Lokman [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Beşirli, Necati [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases.

  19. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range. Keywords: surface acoustic wave, surface plasmon resonance, collagen, fibrinogen, density, thickness

  20. Surface plasmon resonance of Ag organosols: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodnik Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate and compare the changes in surface plasmon resonance (SPR of silver (Ag hydrosol and organosols obtained by experimental and theoretical approaches. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs of 5 ± 1.5 nm in diameter were prepared in water by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride. Nanoparticles were subsequently transferred into different organic solvents (chloroform, hexane, toluene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene using oleylamine as a transfer agent. These solvents were chosen because of the differences in their refractive indices. Using UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, we confirmed that there were no shape and size changes of the nanoparticles upon the transfer to the organic phase. The absorption spectra of the obtained Ag organosols showed only changes in the position of SPR band depending on dielectric property of the used solvent. To analyze these changes, absorption spectra were modelled using Mie theory for small spherical particles. The experimental and theoretical resonance values were compared with those predicted by Drude model and its limitations in the analysis of absorption behavior of Ag NPs in organic solvents were briefly discussed.

  1. Synthetic Strategies for Semiconductor Nanocrystals Expressing Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niezgoda, J Scott; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-03-03

    The field of semiconductor plasmonics has grown rapidly since its outset, only roughly six years ago, and now includes many crystalline substances ranging from GeTe to wide-bandgap transition-metal oxides. One byproduct of this proliferation is the sea of differing synthetic methods to realize localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) based on the studied material. Strategies vary widely from material to material, but all have the common goal of introducing extremely high carrier densities to the semiconductor system. This doping results in tunable, size-quantized, and on/off-switchable LSPR modes, which are a complete departure from traditional metal-nanoparticle-based plasmon resonances. This Minireview will provide an overview of the current state of nanocrystal and quantum-dot plasmonics and the physical basis thereof, however its main purpose is to summarize the methods for realizing LSPRs in the various syntheses and systems that have been reported to date. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Electrochemical surface plasmon resonance: basic formalism and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopeng; Huang, Xinping; Shan, Xiaonan; Foley, Kyle J; Tao, Nongjian

    2010-02-01

    A quantitative formalism of electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) was developed for studying electrochemical reactions. The EC-SPR signal from the reactions was found to be a convolution function of electrochemical current, and therefore, EC-SPR is a powerful tool that can provide information similar to the conventional current-based electrochemical techniques. As an example, potential-sweep EC-SPR was analyzed in details and was found to provide a new way to measure convolution voltammetry without the need of numerical integration. In addition to the benefits provided by the conventional convolution voltammetry, the EC-SPR has several unique advantages, including (1) spatial resolution that is particularly attractive for studying heterogeneous reactions, (2) optical properties of the reactions species that may assist identification of reaction mechanisms, and (3) high surface sensitivity for studying surface binding of the reaction species. Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out for a model system, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride. The simultaneously measured electrochemical current and SPR response confirmed the relationship between the two quantities, and the numerical simulations were in excellent agreement with the measurements.

  3. Shape effects on localized surface plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandu, Titus

    2012-01-01

    The effect of smooth shape changes of metallic nanoparticles on localized surface plasmon resonances is assessed with a boundary integral equation method. The boundary integral equation method allows compact expressions of nanoparticle polarizability which is expressed as an eigenmode sum of terms that depends on the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the integral operator associated to the boundary integral equation method. Shape variations change not only the eigenvalues but also their coupling weights to the electromagnetic field. Thus, rather small changes in the shape may induce large variations of the coupling weights. It has been found that shape changes that bring volume variations >12 % induce structural changes in the extinction spectrum of metallic nanoparticles. Also, the largest variations in eigenvalues and their coupling weights are encountered by shape changes along the smallest cross-sections of nanoparticles. These results are useful as guiding rules in the process of designing plasmonic nanostrucrures.

  4. Ultra high phase sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Chang; Chou, Chien

    2009-02-01

    This study demonstrates a novel phase-sensitive surface plasman resonance biosensor (PS-SPRB) which is able to convert the phase modulation into amplitude modulation analytically via a differential amplifier. PS-SPRB is able to measure biomolecule interactions at ultra-low concentration relying on the properties of phase sensitive detection at shot-noise detection in a real-time. The common-phase noise-rejection mode is provided in PS-SPRB to be able to immune the background phase noise efficiently. The experimental results confirm the detection sensitivity of 0.00001 wt % concentration of sucrose solution and 10 fg/ml mouse IgG interaction with anti IgG in real time.

  5. Calibration of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager for Biochemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ktari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Surface Plasmon Resonance imager (SPRi based on immobilized T4-phage for bacteria detection. First, we present the sensitivity of the SPR imager towards refractive index variation for biosensor application. The SPR imager can be calibrated versus different percentage of triethylene glycol mixture in ultrapure water. The system can be used as a refractometer with sensitivity below 5×10−5 in the range of 1.33300–1.34360. Second, bacteriophage (T4-phage can be physisorbed on gold microarray spots for bacteria detection. The kinetic physisorption of different concentrations of T4-phages can be observed in real time. Finally, two types of bacteria such as E. coli (gram negative and Lactobacillus (gram positive were used for positive and negative tests. The results show a selectivity of T4-phage toward E. coli with a detection limit below 104 CFU/mL and with good reproducibility.

  6. Design and evaluation of a 1.1-GHz surface coil resonator for electron paramagnetic resonance-based tooth dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hirotaka; Hirata, Hiroshi; Petryakov, Sergey; Lesniewski, Piotr; Williams, Benjamin B; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an optimized design of a surface coil resonator for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based tooth dosimetry. Using the optimized resonator, dose estimates with the standard error of the mean of approximately 0.5 Gy were achieved with irradiated human teeth. The product of the quality factor and the filling factor of the resonator was computed as an index of relative signal intensity in EPR tooth dosimetry by the use of 3-D electromagnetic wave simulator and radio frequency circuit design environment (ANSYS HFSS and Designer). To verify the simulated results of the signal intensity in our numerical model of the resonator and a tooth sample, we experimentally measured the radiation-induced signals from an irradiated tooth with an optimally designed resonator. In addition to the optimization of the resonator design, we demonstrated the improvement of the stability of EPR spectra by decontamination of the surface coil resonator using an HCl solution, confirming that contamination of small magnetic particles on the silver wire of the surface coil had degraded the stability of the EPR spectral baseline.

  7. The comparison of SRs' variation affected by solar events observed in America and in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Williams, E.

    2017-12-01

    Schumann Resonances(SRs) are the electromagnetic resonance wave propagating in the earth-ionosphere cavity. Its characteristic of propagation are modified by the variation of ionosphere. So SRs can be the tools of monitoring the ionosphere which is often perturbed by solar events, x-ray emission and some other space-weather events (Roldugin et.al., 2004, De et al., 2010; Satori et.al., 2015). In present work, the amplitude and intrinsic frequencies of SRs observed at RID station in America and YSH station in China are compared. The variation of SRs during the solar flare on Feb. 15, 2011 are analyzed. Two-Dimensional Telegraph Equation(TDTE) method is used to simulate the perturbation of ionosphere by solar proton events. From the simulation and observation, the asymmetric construction of ionoshphere which is perturbed by the solar event will affect the amplitudes and frequencies of SRs. Due to the interfere influence of forward and backward propagation of electromagnetic field, the SR amplitude on different station will present different variation. The distance among the lightning source, observer and perturbed area will produce the different variation of amplitude and frequency for different station' SR.

  8. Reference compensation for localized surface-plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehru, Neha

    Noble metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) have been extensively investigated for label free detection of various biological and chemical interactions. When compared to other optical sensing techniques, LSPR sensors offer label-free detection of biomolecular interactions in localized sensing volume solutions. However, these sensors also suffer from a major disadvantage---LSPR sensors remain highly susceptible to interference because they respond to both solution refractive index change and non-specific binding as well as specific binding of the target analyte. These interactions can severely compromise the measurement of the target analyte in a complex unknown media and hence limit the applicability and impact of the sensor. In spite of the extensive amount of work done in this field, there has been a clear absence of efforts to make LSPR sensors immune to interfering effects. The work presented in this document investigates, both experimentally and numerically, dual- and tri-mode LSPR sensors that utilize the multiple surface plasmon modes of gold nanostructures to distinguish target analyte from interfering bulk and non-specific binding effects. Finally, a series of biosensing experiments are performed to examine various regeneration assays for LSPR sensors built on indium tin oxide coated glass substrate.

  9. Subwavelength topological structures resulting from surface two-plasmon resonance by femtosecond laser exposure solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai-Ying; Liu, Shi-Bing; Liu, H Y; Wang, Yang; Chen, Tao; Dong, Xiang-Ming

    2016-05-30

    We present that surface two-plasmon resonance (STPR) in electron plasma sheet produced by a femtosecond laser irradiating a solid surface is the self-formation mechanism of periodic subwavelength ripple structures. Peaks of overdense electrons, formed by resonant two-plasmon wave mode, pull bound ions out of the metal surface. Thus, the wave pattern of STPR is "carved" on the surface by Coulomb ablation (removal) due to periodic distributed strong electrostatic field produced by charge separation. To confirm the STPR model, we have performed analogical carving experiments by two femtosecond laser beams with perpendicular polarizations and time delay. The results explicitly show that two wave patterns of STPR generated by each beam are independently created in the pulse exposure area of a target surface, which is like the traditional "layer-carving" technique by comparison with the structured topological features. The time-scale of ablation dynamics and the electron temperature in ultrafast interaction are also verified by a time-resolved spectroscopy experiment and numerical simulation, respectively. The present model can self-consistently explain the formation of subwavelength ripple structures even with spatial periods shorter than half of the laser wavelength, shedding light on the understanding of ultrafast laser-solid interaction.

  10. Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rear, M.G.; Steele, J.L.; Kitchen, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    The environmental surveillance activities at and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) [formerly the Savannah River Plant (SRP)] comprise one of the most comprehensive and extensive environmental monitoring programs in the United States. This overview contains monitoring data from routine and nonroutine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs in progress, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities, and a listing of environmental permits (Appendix A) issued by regulatory agencies. This overview provides information about the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. The SRS occupies a large area of approximately 300 square miles along the Savannah River, principally in Aiken and Barnwell counties of South Carolina. SRS's primary function is the production of tritium, plutonium, and other special nuclear materials for national defense, for other governmental uses, and for some civilian purposes. From August 1950 to March 31, 1989, SRS was operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by E. I. du Pont de Nemours ampersand Co. On April 1, 1989 the Westinghouse Savannah River Company assumed responsibility as the prime contractor for the Savannah River Site

  11. Carboxyl-rich plasma polymer surfaces in surface plasmon resonance immunosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhneva, Ekaterina; Obrusník, Adam; Farka, Zdeněk; Skládal, Petr; Vandenbossche, Marianne; Hegemann, Dirk; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2018-01-01

    Stable carboxyl-rich plasma polymers (PPs) were deposited onto the gold surface of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips under conditions that were chosen based on lumped kinetic model results. Carboxyl-rich films are of high interest for bio-applications thanks to their high reactivity, allowing the formation of covalent linkages between biomolecules and a surface. Accordingly, the monoclonal antibody, specific to human serum albumin (HSA), was immobilized and the performance of SPR immunosensors was evaluated by the immunoassay flow test. The developed sensors performed high level of stability and provided selective and high response to the HSA antigen solutions. The achieved results confirmed that the presented methodologies for the grafting of biomolecules on the gold surfaces have great potential for biosensing applications.

  12. Gas detection by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nooke, Alida

    2012-11-01

    This thesis investigated gas sensing by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry. Surface plasmons were excited in a 40 - 50 nm gold layer by a He-Ne-laser using the Kretschmann configuration, which was arranged on a self-made copper measuring cell. A fixed angle of incidence and the ellipsometric parameter {Delta} as the measured value were used to monitor changes in the gas phase. Different types of gases were investigated: flammable (hydrocarbons and hydrogen), oxidising (oxygen and ozone), toxic (carbon monoxide) and inert (helium and nitrogen). The gas types can be distinguished by their refractive indices, whereas the sensor responds instantly relative to the reference gas with an increase or a decrease in {Delta}. Diluting the analyte gas with a reference gas (nitrogen or air) allowed the detection limits to be determined, these lay in the low % range. The sensor stability was also enhanced as well as the sensitivity by modifying the gold layers with a 3-10 nm additional layer. These additional layers consisted of the inorganic materials TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2} and Fe: SnO{sub 2} which were deposited by different coating processes. Surface investigations were made of every utilised layer: scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope measurements for surface topology and spectroscopic ellipsometry mapping to determine the optical constants and the layer thicknesses. All applied materials protected the gold layer from contaminations and thus prolonged the life span of the sensor. Furthermore, the detection limits were reduced significantly, to the low ppm range. The material Fe: SnO{sub 2} demonstrates a special behaviour in reaction with the toxic gas carbon monoxide: Due to the iron doping, the response to carbon monoxide is extraordinary and concentrations below 1 ppm were detected. In order to approach a future application in industry, the sensor system was adapted to a stainless steel tube. With this measuring

  13. The SRS analytical laboratories strategic plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiland, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    There is an acute shortage of Savannah River Site (SRS) analytical laboratory capacity to support key Department of Energy (DOE) environmental restoration and waste management (EM) programs while making the transition from traditional defense program (DP) missions as a result of the cessation of the Cold War. This motivated Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to develop an open-quotes Analytical Laboratories Strategic Planclose quotes (ALSP) in order to provide appropriate input to SRS operating plans and justification for proposed analytical laboratory projects. The methodology used to develop this plan is applicable to all types of strategic planning

  14. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  15. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone's LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone's camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  16. Size-dependent surface plasmon resonance in silver silica nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Senoy; Nair, Saritha K; Jamal, E Muhammad Abdul; Anantharaman, M R; Al-Harthi, S H; Varma, Manoj Raama

    2008-01-01

    Silver silica nanocomposites were obtained by the sol-gel technique using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) as precursors. The silver nitrate concentration was varied for obtaining composites with different nanoparticle sizes. The structural and microstructural properties were determined by x-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies were done for determining the chemical states of silver in the silica matrix. For the lowest AgNO 3 concentration, monodispersed and spherical Ag crystallites, with an average diameter of 5 nm, were obtained. Grain growth and an increase in size distribution was observed for higher concentrations. The occurrence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands and their evolution in the size range 5-10 nm is studied. For decreasing nanoparticle size, a redshift and broadening of the plasmon-related absorption peak was observed. The observed redshift and broadening of the SPR band was explained using modified Mie scattering theory

  17. Compact Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for Underwater Chemical Sensing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Minagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the development of compact surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors for mobile robot olfaction. Underwater robots benefit from olfactory sensing capabilities in various tasks including the search for unexploded ordnance and undersea wreckage. Although the SPR-based chemical sensor is a promising sensing platform, the cumbersome optical setup has been limiting its use on mobile robots. The proposed sensor employs a periodic metal structure formed on a self-assembled layer of polystyrene particles of 200 nm in diameter. With the grating of this size, SPR can be excited even with a simple LED light source. The change in the absorbance is simply measured using a photodiode. Demonstration of the proposed SPR sensor is provided by mounting the sensors on an underwater crayfish robot that autonomously searches for a chemical source. The fabricated sensor shows linear response to ascorbic acid for a concentration range from 20 to 80 mM. Responses of the bare and thiol-coated gold nanostructure to different chemical substances are presented to show the change in the selectivity of the sensor by the coating. Discussions are made on the importance of sample collection for the sensor to attain sensitive chemical detection on a mobile robot.

  18. Clenbuterol Assay by Spectral Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichuan; Yao, Manwen; Fang, Xiangyi; Yang, Yucong; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    To prevent illegal use of clenbuterol and for quality control in the food industry, more efficient and reliable methods for clenbuterol detection are needed. In this study, clenbuterol was detected using a spectral imaging surface plasmon resonance sensor system via two inhibition methods: (1) the target site compensation method, in which anti-clenbuterol antibody was immobilized on the sensor chip as a bioprobe and (2) the solution competition method in which a clenbuterol-BSA conjugate was immobilized on the sensor chip as the bioprobe. The detectable clenbuterol concentration ranged between 6.25 and 100 μg/mL for both methods. The clenbuterol limit of detection for the target site compensation method and solution competition method are estimated to be 6.7 and 4.5 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the detection of clenbuterol molecules and were found to have high specificity and high-throughput and were label free and operationally convenient.

  19. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  20. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas

  1. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km2 within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense.From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991.Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium 137, Strontium 90, and Uranium 235), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post- Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes

  2. Mixing in SRS Closure Business Unit Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POIRIER, MICHAELR.

    2004-01-01

    The following equipment is commonly used to mix fluids: mechanical agitators, jets (pumps), shrouded axial impeller mixers (Flygt mixers), spargers, pulsed jet mixers, boiling, static mixers, falling films, liquid sprays, and thermal convection. This discussion will focus on mechanical agitators, jets, shrouded axial impeller mixers, spargers, and pulsed jet mixers, as these devices are most likely to be employed in Savannah River Site (SRS) Closure Business applications. In addressing mixing problems in the SRS Tank Farm, one must distinguish between different mixing objectives. These objectives include sludge mixing (e.g., Extended Sludge Processing), sludge retrieval (e.g., sludge transfers between tanks), heel retrieval (e.g., Tanks 18F and 19F), chemical reactions (e.g., oxalic acid neutralization) and salt dissolution. For example, one should not apply sludge mixing guidelines to heel removal applications. Mixing effectiveness is a function of both the mixing device (e.g., slurry pump, agitator, air sparger) and the properties of the material to be mixed (e.g., yield stress, viscosity, density, and particle size). The objective of this document is to provide background mixing knowledge for the SRS Closure Business Unit personnel and to provide general recommendations for mixing in SRS applications

  3. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and {sup 137}Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  4. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and [sup 137]Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  5. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L.

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and 137 Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor

  6. Grafting hyaluronic acid onto gold surface to achieve low protein fouling in surface plasmon resonance biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2014-08-13

    Antifouling surfaces capable of reducing nonspecific protein adsorption from natural complex media are highly desirable in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. A new protein-resistant surface made through the chemical grafting of easily available hyaluronic acid (HA) onto gold (Au) substrate demonstrates excellent antifouling performance against protein adsorption. AFM images showed the uniform HA layer with a thickness of ∼10.5 nm on the Au surface. The water contact angles of Au surfaces decreased from 103° to 12° with the covalent attachment of a carboxylated HA matrix, indicating its high hydrophilicity mainly resulted from carboxyl and amide groups in the HA chains. Using SPR spectroscopy to investigate nonspecific adsorption from single protein solutions (bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme) and complex media (soybean milk, cow milk, orange juice) to an HA matrix, it was found that ultralow or low protein adsorptions of 0.6-16.1 ng/cm(2) (e.g., soybean milk: 0.6 ng/cm(2)) were achieved on HA-Au surfaces. Moreover, anti-BSA was chosen as a model recognition molecule to characterize the immobilization capacity and the antifouling performance of anti-BSA/HA surfaces. The results showed that anti-BSA/HA sensor surfaces have a high anti-BSA loading of 780 ng/cm(2), together with achieving the ultralow (<3 ng/cm(2) for lysozyme and soybean milk) or low (<17 ng/cm(2) for cow milk and 10% blood serum) protein adsorptions. Additionally, the sensor chips also exhibited a high sensitivity to BSA over a wide range of concentrations from 15 to 700 nM. Our results demonstrate a promising antifouling surface using extremely hydrophilic HA as matrix to resist nonspecific adsorption from complex media in SPR biosensors.

  7. Hybrid Surface Plasmon Polariton Modes of Subwavelength Nanowire Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin; Duggen, Lars; Willatzen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    -localized gap plasmon mode are studied depending on the vacuum wavelength. In order to directly compare resonators, where metal and semiconductor nanowires are employed, we consider the two resonators, both including silver slab and magnesium fluoride gap region, as is shown in figure. The two compared......We perform Comsol simulations of two types of hybrid plasmonic resonator configurations, similar to those proposed for nanowire plasmonic laser in [1] and [2]. In both references the nanowire - based plasmonic resonators are studied, which overall sizes are larger than the wavelength in vacuum....... However, it is advantageous for the nanolaser to have subwavelength sizes at least in two dimensions. Therefore, we study the two configurations and the hybrid mode behavior in the case, where resonator sizes are smaller than the half of the wavelength in vacuum. First, we assume finite dimensions...

  8. Metal-in-metal localized surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G B; Earp, A A

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous strong resonances in silver and gold nanoporous thin films which conduct are found to arise from isolated metal nano-islands separated from the surrounding percolating metal network by a thin loop of insulator. This observed resonant optical response is modelled. The observed peak position is in agreement with the observed average dimensions of the silver core and insulator shell. As the insulating ring thickness shrinks, the resonance moves to longer wavelengths and strengthens. This structure is the Babinet's principle counterpart of dielectric core-metal shell nanoparticles embedded in dielectric. Like for the latter, tuning of resonant absorption is possible, but here the matrix reflects rather than transmits, and tuning to longer wavelengths is more practical. A new class of metal mirror occurring as a single thin layer is identified using the same resonances in dense metal mirrors. Narrow band deep localized dips in reflectance result.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for the Detection of Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azlina Masdor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is an internationally important foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter jejuni. The bacterium is prevalent in chicken meat and it is estimated that as much as 90% of chicken meat on the market may be contaminated with the bacterium. The current gold standard for the detection of C. jejuni is the culturing method, which takes at least 48 h to confirm the presence of the bacterium. Hence, the aim of this work was to investigate the development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR sensor platform for C. jejuni detection. Bacterial strains were cultivated in-house and used in the development of the sensor. SPR sensor chips were first functionalized with polyclonal antibodies raised against C. jejuni using covalent attachment. The gold chips were then applied for the direct detection of C. jejuni. The assay conditions were then optimized and the sensor used for C. jejuni detection, achieving a detection limit of 8 × 106 CFU·mL−1. The sensitivity of the assay was further enhanced to 4 × 104 CFU·mL−1 through the deployment of a sandwich assay format using the same polyclonal antibody. The LOD obtained in the sandwich assay was higher than that achieved using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA (106–107 CFU·mL−1. This indicate that the SPR-based sandwich sensor method has an excellent potential to replace ELISA tests for C. jejuni detection. Specificity studies performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, demonstrated the high specific of the sensor for C. jejuni.

  10. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonances of an Axially Magnetized Plasma Column in the Presence of Collisional Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'kin, V. A.; Ivoninsky, A. V.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonances arising in the course of scattering of an H-polarized plane electromagnetic wave by an axially magnetized plasma column are analyzed. Main attention is paid to the behavior of these resonances in the presence of collisional loss in the magnetoplasma filling the scatterer. The frequencies, Q factors, and amplitude coefficients of the electromagnetic field of multipole surface plasmon resonances of different orders are found, and conditions under which the collisional loss in the plasma completely suppresses a given resonance are determined.

  12. Infrared Surface-Plasmon-Resonance -- a novel biophysical tool for studying living cell

    OpenAIRE

    Golosovsky, M.; Lirtsman, V.; Yashunsky, V.; Davidov, D.; Aroeti, B.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the Surface-Plasmon-Resonance (SPR) technique based on Fourier -Transform - InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry. We explore the potential of the infrared surface plasmon resonance technique for biological studies in aqueous solutions and compare it to the conventional surface plasmon technique operating in the visible range. We demonstrate that the sensitivity of the SPR technique in the infrared range is not lower and in fact is even higher. We show several examples of applying FTIR-SPR ...

  13. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  14. Repackaging SRS Black Box TRU Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swale, D. J.; Stone, K.A.; Milner, T. N.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, large items of TRU Waste, which were too large to be packaged in drums for disposal have been packaged in various sizes of custom made plywood boxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS), for many years. These boxes were subsequently packaged into large steel ''Black Boxes'' for storage at SRS, pending availability of Characterization and Certification capability, to facilitate disposal of larger items of TRU Waste. There are approximately 107 Black Boxes in inventory at SRS, each measuring some 18' x 12' x 7', and weighing up to 45,000 lbs. These Black Boxes have been stored since the early 1980s. The project to repackage this waste into Standard Large Boxes (SLBs), Standard Waste Boxes (SWB) and Ten Drum Overpacks (TDOP), for subsequent characterization and WIPP disposal, commenced in FY04. To date, 10 Black Boxes have been repackaged, resulting in 40 SLB-2's, and 37 B25 overpack boxes, these B25's will be overpacked in SLB-2's prior to shipping to WIPP. This paper will describe experience to date from this project

  15. Injection and laser acceleration of ions based on the resonant surface photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G.

    1993-01-01

    The collective effects have been investigated of the injection and acceleration of the ion beams due to the resonant surface photoionization. The considered scheme of the laser accelerator allows to obtain positive ions with relativistic velocities. 11 refs., 2 figs

  16. Interfacing capillary electrophoresis and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for the determination of dye compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arraez Roman, D.; Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Segura Carretero, A.; Gooijer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The at-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) was optimized for the separation and subsequent spectroscopic identification of charged analytes (dye compounds). Raman spectra were recorded following deposition of the electropherogram

  17. Image potential resonances of the aluminum (100) surface; Bildpotentialresonanzen der Aluminium-(100)-Oberflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Matthias

    2011-07-08

    Image-potential resonances on the (100) surface of pure Aluminum are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted both energy- and time-resolved using the method of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The main attention of the theoretical examination and extensive numerical calculations is devoted to the interaction between surface and bulk states. Image-potential resonances on Al(100) are a system in which a complete series of discrete Rydberg states strongly couples to a continuum of states. As a simple metal it also provides a good opportunity to test theoretical models of the structure of the potential at metal surfaces. This work represents the first high-resolution investigation of image-potential resonances with such strong resonance character. For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that isolated image-potential resonances exist on an Aluminum surface. On the (100) surface of Aluminum the second through fifth image-potential resonance are resolved and both, their energies and lifetimes are measured. The binding energies of the image-potential resonances form a Rydberg series of states {epsilon}{sub n}=-(0,85 eV)/((n+a){sup 2}). Within the accuracy of the measurement it is not necessary to introduce a quantum defect a (a=0.022{+-}0.035). Using angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy the effective mass of electrons in the second image-potential resonance is measured to 1.01{+-}0.11 electron masses. The lifetimes of the resonances increase as {tau}{sub n} = (1.0{+-}0.2)fs.n{sup 3} starting from n=2. Calculations using the density matrix formalism show that the experimentally observed lifetimes can be explained well by electrons decaying into the bulk. The effect of resonance trapping leads to extended lifetimes in the process. Contrary to common theoretical models of image-potential states at metal surfaces the first image-potential resonance cannot be observed in two-photon photoemission on Al(100

  18. Measurements of the anomalous RF surface resistance of niobium using a dielectric resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, D.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Jacques, E.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The surface resistance of high and low residual resistance ratio (RRR) niobium plates at 4.2 K and 1.8 K has been measured as a function of many processing and testing parameters. A dielectric resonator was used instead of a resonant cavity. This resonator offered the ability to make many, sensitive measurements with an efficient use of time and helium. It was found that the surface resistance, R s , of RRR = 190 niobium increased noticeably from the theoretical value if the cooling rate was slower than ∼ 10 K/min. (author)

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin on nanostructured Ag surfaces: The role of excitation wavelength, plasmon resonance and molecular resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šubr, Martin; Kuzminova, Anna; Kylián, Ondřej; Procházka, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Optimization of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensors for (bio)analytical applications has received much attention in recent years. For optimum sensitivity, both the nanostructure fabrication process and the choice of the excitation wavelength used with respect to the specific analyte studied are of crucial importance. In this contribution, detailed SERS intensity profiles were measured using gradient nanostructures with the localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) condition varying across the sample length and using riboflavin as the model biomolecule. Three different excitation wavelengths (633 nm, 515 nm and 488 nm) corresponding to non-resonance, pre-resonance and resonance excitation with respect to the studied molecule, respectively, were tested. Results were interpreted in terms of a superposition of the enhancement provided by the electromagnetic mechanism and intrinsic properties of the SERS probe molecule. The first effect was dictated mainly by the degree of spectral overlap between the LSPR band, the excitation wavelength along with the scattering cross-section of the nanostructures, while the latter was influenced by the position of the molecular resonance with respect to the excitation wavelength. Our experimental findings contribute to a better understanding of the SERS enhancement mechanism.

  20. Bound and resonant surface states at the (110) surfaces of AlSb, AlAs, and AlP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beres, R.P.; Allen, R.E.; Buisson, J.P.; Bowen, M.A.; Blackwell, G.F.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Dow, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The dispersion curves E(k-bar) have been calculated for bound and resonant (110) surface states of AlSb, AlAs, and AlP. AlSb is predicted to have no surface states within the bulk fundamental band gap, but AlAs and AlP are predicted to have surface state band minima which are very near the conduction band edge, and could lie either within the gap or immediately above the edge

  1. Report on SRS activities to March, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, I.H.

    1981-10-01

    In this first Annual Report on synchrotron radiation research and related activities since the completion of the storage ring (the SRS) at Daresbury Laboratory a summary is given of progress on the storage ring itself, on beamlines, experimental stations, data acquisition and processing facilities and on the build-up of ancillary laboratories and equipment. In appendices a bibliography of synchrotron radiation research publications from March 1977 to March 1981 and a cumulative list of research grants and agreements approved by the SRFC from March 1977 to March 1981 are given. (U.K.)

  2. The effect of surface plasmon resonance on optical response in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By increasing the shell radius and therefore increasing the metal content the SPR at the outer surface shifts to higher energy and the weaker peak (at inner surface) shifts to lower energy. Also, depending on the metal shell materials SPR occurs in different energy regions and therefore can be tuned the SP frequency at ...

  3. Improved localized surface plasmon resonance index sensitivity based on chemically-synthesized gold nanoparticles on indium tin oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Li, Xiaolong; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Biao; Tian, Yubo

    2018-02-01

    The results of this reported work indicated that gold nanoparticle arrays self-assembled on indium tin oxide (ITO) glasses can obtain broader localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength range and higher sensitivity than the bare quartz. The results of surface electric field calculated using finite difference time domain showed that the electric field of nanoparticles on ITO glasses is enhanced and the repulsive forces within each particle is weakened. According to the dipolar interaction mechanism, a weakened repulsive forces within each particle lead to a lower resonance frequency and a strong redshift of the LSPR spectra.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance imaging based multiplex biosensor: Integration of biomolecular screening, detection and kinetics estimation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiplex biosensing method to simultaneously screen targets of interest in a multiple target analyte sample and to extract the binding affinities of all interactant pairs from a single sensor surface using a commercial surface plasmon resonance imaging system. For demonstration, we

  5. Label-free screening of foodborne Salmonella using surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 15 pathogens cause approximately 95% of the foodborne infections, it is desirable to develop rapid and simultaneous screening methods for these major pathogens. In this study, we developed an immunoassay for Salmonella based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). The sensor surface modif...

  6. A surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for detecting a dioxin precursor using a gold binding polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, N; Tokuda, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor was developed for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenol, a known dioxin precursor, using an indirect competitive immunoassay. The SPR sensor was fabricated by immobilizing a gold-thin layer on the surface of an SPR sensor chip with an anti-(2...

  7. Surface plasmon resonance is an analytically sensitive method for antigen profiling of extracellular vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, Elmar L.; Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Sturk, Auguste; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.; Coumans, Frank A.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification, enumeration, and characterization of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are hampered by the small size of EVs, a low refractive index, and low numbers of antigens on their surface. METHODS: We investigated the potential of a 48- multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging

  8. Surface Plasmon Resonance is an Analytically Sensitive Method for Antigen Profiling of Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, Elmar L.; Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richard B. M.; Sturk, Auguste; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Coumans, Frank A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Identification, enumeration, and characterization of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are hampered by the small size of EVs, a low refractive index, and low numbers of antigens on their surface. We investigated the potential of a 48-multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system to perform EV

  9. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  10. TU-FG-201-07: Development of SRS Conical Collimator Collision Prediction Software for Radiation Treatment Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutti, V; Morrow, A; Kim, S; Patel, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments using conical collimators can potentially result in gantry collision with treatment table due to limited collision-clear spaces. An in-house software was developed to help the SRS treatment planner mitigate potential SRS conical collimator (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) collisions with the treatment table. This software was designed to remove treatment re-planning secondary to unexpected collisions. Methods: A BrainLAB SRS ICT Frameless Extension used for SRS treatments in our clinic was mathematically modelled using surface points registered to the 3D co-ordinate space of the couch extension. The surface points are transformed based on the treatment isocenter point and potential collisions are determined in 3D space for couch and gantry angle combinations. The distance between the SRS conical collimators and LINAC isocenter is known. The collision detection model was programmed in MATLAB (Mathwork, Natick, MA) to display graphical plots of the calculations, and the plotted data is used to avoid the gantry and couch angle combinations that would likely result in a collision. We have utilized the cone collision tool for 23 SRS cone treatment plans (8 retrospective and 15 prospective for 10 patients). Results: Twenty one plans strongly agreed with the software tool prediction for collision. However, in two plans, a collision was observed with a 0.5 cm margin when the software predicted no collision. Therefore, additional margins were added to the clearance criteria in the program to achieve a lower risk of actual collisions. Conclusion: Our in-house developed collision check software successfully avoided SRS cone re-planning by 91.3% due to a reduction in cone collisions with the treatment table. Future developments to our software will include a CT image data set based collision prediction model as well as a beam angle optimization tool to avoid normal critical tissues as well as previously treated lesions.

  11. 7Q10 flows for SRS streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    The Environmental Transport Group of the Environmental Technology Section was requested to predict the seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) for the SRS streams based on historical stream flow records. Most of the historical flow records for the SRS streams include reactor coolant water discharged from the reactors and process water released from the process facilities. The most straight forward way to estimate the stream daily natural flow is to subtract the measured upstream reactor and/or facility daily effluents from the measured downstream daily flow. Unfortunately, this method does not always work, as indicated by the fact that sometimes the measured downstream volumetric flow rates are lower than the reactor effluent volumetric flow rates. For those cases that cannot be analyzed with the simple subtracting method, an alternative method was used to estimate the stream natural flows by statistically separating reactor coolant and process water flow data. The correlation between the calculated 7Q10 flows and the watershed areas for Four Mile Branch and Pen Branch agrees with that calculated by the USGS for Upper Three Runs and Lower Three Runs Creeks. The agreement between these two independent calculations lends confidence to the 7Q10 flow calculations presented in this report

  12. Cholera toxin binding affinity and specificity for gangliosides determined by surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuziemko, G.M.; Stroh, M.; Stevens, R.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-21

    The present study determines the affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside series GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1A, GD1B, GT1B, asialo GM1, globotriosyl ceramide, and lactosyl ceramide using real time biospecific interaction analysis (surface plasmon resonance, SPR). SPR shows that cholera toxin preferably binds to gangliosides in the following sequence: GM1 > GM2 > GD1A > GM3 > GT1B > GD1B > asialo-GM1. The measured binding affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside sequence ranges from 4.61 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M for GM1 to 1.88 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M for asialo GM1. The picomolar values obtained by surface plasmon resonance are similar to K{sub d} values determined with whole-cell binding assays. Both whole-cell assays ans SPR measurements on synthetic membranes are higher than free solution measurements by several orders of magnitude. This difference may be caused by the effects of avidity and charged lipid head-groups, which may play a major role in the binding between cholera toxin, the receptor, and the membrane surface. The primary difference between free solution binding studies and surface plasmon resonance studies is that the latter technique is performed on surfaces resembling the cell membrane. Surface plasmon resonance has the further advantage of measuring apparent kinetic association and dissociation rates in real time, providing direct information about binding events at the membrane surface. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Comparison of Srs-24 And Srs-22 Scores in Thirty Eight Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients Who Had Undergone Surgical Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CYW Chan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity that affects patients’ self image and confidence. Surgery is offered when the curvature is greater than 50 degrees based on the likelihood of curvature progression. Outcome measures for scoliosis correction can be described in terms of radiological improvement or improvement of health related quality of life scores. The Scoliosis Research Society 22 (SRS-22 and Scoliosis Research Society 24 (SRS-24 questionnaires are widely accepted and used to characterize clinical results. Therefore, this prospective study of 38 patients aims to investigate how the SRS-24 and SRS-22 questionnaires compare to each other in terms of scoring when the same group of patients is evaluated. The SRS-22 questionnaire tends to give an inflated value in the overall score, pain and self image domain compared to the SRS-24 questionnaire.

  14. Resonator structures on AlN ceramics surface treated by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Pawel E.; Antonczak, Arkadiusz J.; Stepak, Bogusz; Gorski, Przemyslaw A.; Walczakowski, Michal; Palka, Norbert; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper a method for producing resonant structures using laser micromachining is presented. In the spot of laser beam impact on AlN ceramics surface a conductive aluminum layer is formed. Compilation of process parameters allows for the fabrication of structures with resistance at Rs ~ 0.01Ω/Rs. It has been also found out that the maximum value of resistance for which spiral resonator structures manifest their unique properties is at the level of Rs = 1.43 Ω. Furthermore, the occurrence of mutual capacity which value is dependent on the arrangement of individual SR structures with respect to each other was observed and examined. Based on satisfactory results for SR structures, it has been attempted to produce a resonant structures dedicated to the THz range based on the process of direct metallization of AlN ceramics surface. As a result, the Split Ring Resonator structure whose properties were verified by using the THz -TDS method was manufactured. In case of the field E perpendicular to SRR structure and one resonance area for 0.50 THz with field E parallel to the structure, two characteristic resonant dips for 0.22 THz and 0.46 THz were obtained. The studies confirmed that the method of direct metallization of AlN ceramics allows to produce resonant structures in the THz range.

  15. Localized surface plasmon polariton resonance in holographically structured Al-doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, David; Lowell, David; Mao, Michelle; Hassan, Safaa; Philipose, Usha [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Li, Li; Jiang, Yan; Cui, Jingbiao [Department of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152 (United States); Ding, Jun; Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Lin, Yuankun [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we studied the localized surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance in hole arrays in transparent conducting aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO). CMOS-compatible fabrication process was demonstrated for the AZO devices. The localized SPP resonance was observed and confirmed by electromagnetic simulations. Using a standing wave model, the observed SPP was dominated by the standing-wave resonance along (1,1) direction in square lattices. This research lays the groundwork for a fabrication technique that can contribute to the core technology of future integrated photonics through its extension into tunable conductive materials.

  16. Localized surface plate modes via flexural Mie resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, M.

    2017-05-11

    Surface-plasmon polaritons are naturally generated upon excitation of metals with high-frequency electromagnetic waves. However, the concept of spoof plasmons has made it possible to generate plasmoniclike effects in microwave electrodynamics, magnetics, and even acoustics. Similarly, in this paper, the concept of localized surface plate modes (SPMs) is introduced. It is demonstrated that SPMs can be generated on a two-dimensional (clamped or stress-free) cylindrical surface with subwavelength corrugations, which resides on a thin elastic plate, under excitation by an incident flexural plane wave. Numerical characterization of this corrugated rigid structure shows that it is elastically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with dispersive but uniformly negative flexural rigidity. This, indeed, suggests that plasmoniclike elastic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including earthquake sensing and elastic imaging and cloaking.

  17. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA -directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  18. Surface functionalization for self-referencing surface plasmon resonance /SPR/ biosensors by multi-step self assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boozer, C.; Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Lee, Ch.-Y.; Homola, Jiří; Yee, S. S.; Jiang, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 90, 1/3 (2003), s. 22-30 ISSN 0925-4005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2003

  19. Angular scanning and variable wavelength surface plasmon resonance allowing free sensor surface selection for optimum material- and bio-sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakayan, Dina; Tuppurainen, Jussipekka; Albers, Martin; van Lint, Matthijs J.; van Iperen, Dick J.; Weda, Jelmer J.A.; Kuncova-Kallio, Johana; Somsen, Govert W.; Kool, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    A variable-wavelength Kretschmann configuration surface plasmon resonance (SPR) apparatus with angle scanning is presented. The setup provides the possibility of selecting the optimum wavelength with respect to the properties of the metal layer of the sensorchip, sample matrix, and biomolecular

  20. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for analysis of influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hemagglutinin (HA) compounds are surface glycoproteins of a virus that can initiate an immune response from a host organism. Hemagglutinin and the related neuraminidase (NA) compounds are the basis for virus strain classification and have become part of the accepted HN taxonomy. These compounds ...

  1. Tuning Acoustic Wave Properties by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    Vibrations generated by high aspects ratio electrodes are studied by the finite element method. It is found that the modes are combined of a surface wave and vibration in the electrodes. For increasing aspect ratio most of the mechanical energy is confined to the electrodes which act as mechanical...

  2. RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2009-04-15

    In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in

  3. ITO induced tunability of surface plasmon resonance of silver thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ruijin; Wang, Xianhai; Ji, Jialin; Tao, Chunxian [Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System, Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Lab of Modern Optical System, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, No. 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); Zhang, Daohua [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhang, Dawei, E-mail: dwzhang@usst.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System, Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Lab of Modern Optical System, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, No. 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • The localized surface plasmon resonance of silver thin film was generated by ITO buffer layer. • The tunability of surface plasmon resonance wavelength was realized by varying silver thin film thickness. • Raman scattering intensity varies with silver layer thickness. • FDTD calculation results of electronic field distribution are consistent with those of experiments. - Abstract: A series of silver films with various thicknesses were deposited on ITO covered silica substrates by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The tunability of the surface plasmon resonance wavelength was realized by varying the thickness of silver thin film. By adjusting the silver layer thickness from 5 to 40 nm, the resonance wavelength shows a blueshift, which is due to a change in the electromagnetic field coupling strength from the localized surface plasmons excited between the silver thin film and ITO layer. In contrast, when the ITO layer is absent from the system, no noticeable shift in the resonance wavelength is observed upon varying the silver thin film thickness.

  4. Breaking the black-body limit with resonant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valagiannopoulos Constantinos A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The speed with which electromagnetic energy can be wirelessly transferred from a source to the user is a crucial indicator for the performance of a large number of electronic and photonic devices. We expect that energy transfer can be enhanced using special materials. In this paper, we determine the constituent parameters of a medium which can support theoretically infinite energy concentration close to its boundary; such a material combines properties of Perfectly Matched Layers (PML and Double-Negative (DNG media. It realizes conjugate matching with free space for every possible mode including, most importantly, all evanescent modes; we call this medium Conjugate Matched Layer (CML. Sources located outside such layer deliver power to the conjugate-matched body exceptionally effectively, impressively overcoming the black-body absorption limit which takes into account only propagating waves. We also expand this near-field concept related to the infinitely fast absorption of energy along the air-medium interface to enhance the far-field radiation. This becomes possible with the use of small particles randomly placed along the boundary; the induced currents due to the extremely high-amplitude resonating fields can play the role of emission “vessels”, by sending part of the theoretically unlimited near-field energy far away from the CML structure.

  5. Localized surface plasmon resonance mercury detection system and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jay; Lucas, Donald; Crosby, Jeffrey Scott; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2016-03-22

    A mercury detection system that includes a flow cell having a mercury sensor, a light source and a light detector is provided. The mercury sensor includes a transparent substrate and a submonolayer of mercury absorbing nanoparticles, e.g., gold nanoparticles, on a surface of the substrate. Methods of determining whether mercury is present in a sample using the mercury sensors are also provided. The subject mercury detection systems and methods find use in a variety of different applications, including mercury detecting applications.

  6. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  7. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  8. Novel spectral fiber optic sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Radan; Homola, Jiří; Čtyroký, Jiří; Brynda, Eduard

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 106-111 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/M057; GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : fibre optic sensors * surface plasmons Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  9. Significance of Soft Zone Sediments at the SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aadland, R.K.

    2000-02-03

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on the origin, extent and stability of ''soft zones'' in the carbonate bearing strata at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As part of this study, a comprehensive historical compendium of how soft zones have been addressed during the past 47 years at SRS is reviewed.

  10. Do the SRS-22 self-image and mental health domain scores reflect the degree of asymmetry of the back in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, James; Gardner, Adrian; Berryman, Fiona; Pynsent, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes are becoming increasingly recognised in the management of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Integrated Shape Imaging System 2 (ISIS2) surface topography is a validated tool to assess AIS. Previous studies have failed to demonstrate strong correlations between AIS and patient-reported outcomes highlighting the need for additional objective surface parameters to define the deformities associated with AIS. The aim of this study was to examine whether the Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) outcome questionnaire reflects the degree of measurable external asymmetry of the back in AIS and thus is a measure of patient outcome for external appearance. A total of 102 pre-operative AIS patients were identified retrospectively. Objective parameters were measured using ISIS2 surface topography. The associations between these parameters and the self-image and mental health domains of the SRS-22 questionnaire were investigated using correlation coefficients. All correlations between the parameters of asymmetry and SRS-22 self-image score were of weak strength. Similarly, all correlations between the parameters of asymmetry and SRS-22 mental health score were of weak strength. The SRS-22 mental health and self-image domains correlate poorly with external measures of deformity. This demonstrates that the assessment of mental health and self-image by the SRS-22 has little to do with external torso shape. Whilst the SRS-22 assesses the patient as a whole, it provides little information about objective measures of deformity over which a surgeon has control.

  11. Fourier Transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FTSPR) with Gyromagnetic Plasmonic Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insub; Yoo, Haneul; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Sanghyun; Lee, Kyungeun; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Sungho

    2018-02-12

    An unprecedented active and dynamic sensing platform based on a LSPR configuration that is modulated by using an external magnetic field is reported. Electrochemically synthesized Au/Fe/Au nanorods exhibited plasmonically active behavior through plasmonic coupling, and the middle ferromagnetic Fe block responded to a magnetic impetus, allowing the nanorods to be modulated. The shear force variation induced by the specific binding events between antigens and antibodies on the nanorod surface is used to enhance the sensitivity of detection of antigens in the plasmonics-based sensor application. As a proof-of-concept, influenza A virus (HA1) was used as a target protein. The limit of detection was enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to that of traditional LSPR sensing. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have fabricated aerogels containing gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles for gas catalysis applications. By applying the concept of an average or effective dielectric constant to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to porous or heterogeneous media. Specifically, we apply the predominant effective medium theories for the determination of the average fractional composition of each component in this inhomogeneous layer. Hence, the surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction is determined. The technique is satisfactory for statistically random metal particle distributions but needs further modification for aggregated or surfactant modified systems. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  13. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...... of the book: how connotations of past meanings may resonate through time, in new contexts, assuming new meanings without surrendering the old....

  14. Evidence on a link between the intensity of Schumann resonance and global surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sekiguchi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A correlation is investigated between the intensity of the global electromagnetic oscillations (Schumann resonance with the planetary surface temperature. The electromagnetic signal was monitored at Moshiri (Japan, and temperature data were taken from surface meteorological observations. The series covers the period from November 1998 to May 2002. The Schumann resonance intensity is found to vary coherently with the global ground temperature in the latitude interval from 45° S to 45° N: the relevant cross-correlation coefficient reaches the value of 0.9. It slightly increases when the high-latitude temperature is incorporated. Correspondence among the data decreases when we reduce the latitude interval, which indicates the important role of the middle-latitude lightning in the Schumann resonance oscillations. We apply the principal component (or singular spectral analysis to the electromagnetic and temperature records to extract annual, semiannual, and interannual variations. The principal component analysis (PCA clarifies the links between electromagnetic records and meteorological data.

  15. Scattering properties of vein induced localized surface plasmon resonances on a gold disk

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    It is demonstrated via simulations that a gold nano-disk with a non-concentric cavity supports localized surface plasmon resonances over a frequency band that includes the visible and the near-infrared parts of the spectrum. The charge distribution on the disk indicates that the two distinct peaks in the scattering cross section are due to the (hybridized) higher-order plasmon modes; plasmon hybridization that involves the dipole modes of the disk and the cavity enforces the "coupling" of the plane-wave excitation to the originally-dark higher-order modes. It is further demonstrated that the resonance frequencies can be tuned by varying the radius of the embedded non-concentric cavity. The near-field enhancement observed at these two tunable resonance frequencies suggests that the proposed structure can be used as a substrate in surface enhanced spectroscopy applications. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Synthesis methods of gold nanoparticles for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsuri Nurul Diyanah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have been known as an excellent characteristic for Local Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR sensors due to their sensitive spectral response to the local environment of the nanoparticle surface and ease of monitoring the light signal due to their strong scattering or absorption. Prior the technologies, GNPs based LSPR has been commercialized and have become a central tool for characterizing and quantifying in various field. In this review, we presented a brief introduction on the history of surface plasmon, the theory behind the surface plasmon resonance (SPR and the principles of LSPR. We also reported on the synthetization as well of the properties of the GNPs and the applications in current LSPR sensors.

  17. Spectrally resolved surface plasmon resonance dispersion using half-ball optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmel, Raphael; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a variant of a Kretschmann-type surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is introduced. k-space imaging is combined with half-ball glass optics to facilitate the measurement of SPRs across the visible spectral range. In contrast to current state-of-the-art techniques, which are widely utilized in commercially available systems, the presented method allows single-shot-acquisition of the full angular reflection without any moving parts, as well as mapping of the surface plasmon dispersion by scanning across the entire visible wavelength range. Measurements on various thin metallic films demonstrate the sensitivity of the system towards minute changes of the metal surface and its close vicinity. The fast and precise measurement of surface plasmon resonances paves the way for improved detection in applications such as immunoassays or gas-sensors, especially for real-time in situ measurements.

  18. Self-calibrated dynamical optical biochip system using surface plasmon resonance imaging: application to genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottin, Jérôme; Moreau, Julien; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Bellemain, Alain; Lecerf, Laure; Goossens, Michel; Canva, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The present paper summarizes some of our work in the field of genetic diagnosis using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging. The optical setup and its capability are presented, as well as the gold surface functionalization used. Results obtained with oligonucleotides targets, specific to Cystic Fibrosis disease, in high and low concentration are shown. The self-calibration method we have developed to reduce data dispersion in genetic diagnosis applications is described.

  19. Multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging platform for label-free detection of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonellae are among the leading causes of foodborne outbreaks in the United States, and more rapid and efficient detection methods are needed. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an emerging optical technique, which allows for rapid and label-free screening of multiple targets simultaneous...

  20. Detection of mycotoxins using imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made in the development of biosensors that can be used to detect mycotoxins. One technology that has been extensively tested is surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In 2003 a multi-toxin method was reported that detected aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisin B1 ...

  1. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for label-free detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    More rapid and efficient detection methods for foodborne pathogenic bacteria and toxins are needed to address the long assay time and limitations in multiplex capacity. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an emerging optical technique, which allows for rapid and label-free screening of multi...

  2. Detection of egg yolk antibodies reflecting Salmonella enteritidis infections using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, M.E.; Bouma, A.; Eerden, van E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Knapen, van F.; Stegeman, J.A.; Bergwerff, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor assay was developed on the basis of a lipopolysaccharide antigen of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis (S. enterica serovar enteritidis) to detect egg yolk antibodies against S. enterica serovar enteritidis. This biosensor assay was compared to two

  3. Applicability of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the direct discrimination of ballpoint pen inks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifar, R.M.; Verheul, J.M.; Ariese, F.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Gooijer, C.

    2001-01-01

    In situ surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) with excitation at 685 nm is suitable for the direct discrimination of blue and black ballpoint pen inks on paper. For black inks, shorter excitation wavelengths can also be used. For blue inks, SERRS at 514.5 and 457.9 nm does not

  4. Detection of benzimidazole carbamates and amino metabolites in liver by surface plasmon resonance-biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor screening assays were developed and validated to detect 11 benzimidazole carbamate (BZT) and four amino-benzimidazole veterinary drug residues in liver tissue. The assays used polyclonal antibodies, raised in sheep, to detect BZTs and amino-benzimidazole...

  5. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers in diluted blood plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piliarik, Marek; Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1656-1661 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Protein array * Cancer marker Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.361, year: 2010

  6. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for detection of bisphenol A in drinking water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hegnerová, Kateřina; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2010), s. 177-179 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance biosensor * bisphenol A * drinking water Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2010

  7. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of VEGFR-1-a protein marker of myelodysplastic syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pimková, K.; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Suttnar, J.; Čermák, J.; Homola, Jiří; Dyr, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 402, č. 1 (2012), s. 381-387 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * myelodysplastic syndromes * vascular endothelial growth factor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.659, year: 2012

  8. Collective acceleration of ions on the basis of resonance surface photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ion beam shaping and collective acceleration on the basis of resonance surface ionization are discussed. The principle diagram of the device for collective acceleration of positive ions is given. The method suggested for positive ion acceleration provides the efficiency increase, the design simplification, the size decrease and the increase in the frequency of the collective laser ion accelerator pulses

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Rapid Label-Free Detection of Microribonucleic Acid at Subfemtomole Level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Zhang, S.-Ch.; Dudley, A.M.; Galas, D.; Wang, K.; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 24 (2010), s. 10110-10115 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * microRNA * cancer diagnostics * biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2010

  10. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy as an identification tool in column liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifar, R.M.; Altelaar, M.A.F.; Dijkstra, R.J.; Ariese, F.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Gooijer, C.

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of ion-pair reversed-phase column liquid chromatography and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) for separation and identification of anionic dyes has been investigated, with emphasis on the at-line coupling via a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate. SERR spectra

  11. Detection of bisphenol A using a novel surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hegnerová, Kateřina; Piliarik, Marek; Šteinbachová, M.; Flegelová, Z.; Černohorská, H.; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 5 (2010), s. 1963-1966 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance biosensor * bisphenol A * endocrine disruptor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  12. Real/time monitoring of biomolecular interactions in blood plasma using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Piliarik, Marek; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 5 (2010), s. 1955-1961 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * molecular interaction analysis * microfluidics * optical biosensor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  13. Reflection-based fibre-optic refractive index sensor using surface plasmon resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlubina, P.; Kadulová, M.; Ciprian, D.; Sobota, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, August 19 (2014), 14033:1-5 ISSN 1990-2573 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * fibre -optic sensor * spectral interrogation technique * aqueous solutions of ethanol * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  14. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G. J.; Barentsz, J. O.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI.

  15. Detection of apoptosis in cancer cell lines using Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanović, I.; van Hal, Y.; van der Velden, T.J.G.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2016-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by therapeutic agents is an important event to detect the potential effectiveness of therapies. Here we explore the potential of Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) to assess apoptosis in cancer cells exposed to therapeutic agents by measuring the

  16. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X; Zhang, Y.; Pan, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensi...

  17. Rapid Determination of Phytophthora infestans sporangia Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2007-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the cause of late blight disease in potato and is an economically important pathogen worldwide. Early disease detection is important to implement disease control measures. In this study a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for detection of P. infestans sporangia...

  18. Theoretical analysis of a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance sensor utilizing a Bragg grating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špačková, Barbora; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 25 (2009), s. 23254-23264 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Fiber optic * Bragg grating * Biosensor * Coupled mode theory Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.278, year: 2009

  19. Novel concept of multi-channel fiber optic surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špačková, Barbora; Piliarik, Marek; Kvasnička, Pavel; Rajarajan, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 1 (2009), s. 199-203 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : . Surface plasmon resonance * Fiber optic * Bragg grating * Biosensor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.083, year: 2009

  20. Coupled resonances allow studying the aging of adhesive contacts between a QCM surface and single, micrometer-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Astrid; Langhoff, Arne; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2015-12-04

    Interparticle contacts and contacts between particles and surfaces are known to change over time. The contact area, the contact stiffness, and the contact strength usually increase as the contact ages. Contact aging is mostly driven by capillary forces, but also by plastic deformation. Making use of acoustic resonators, we have studied the stiffness of contacts between the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and individual, micrometer-sized particles adsorbed to the resonator surface. Studying single particles avoids ensemble-averaging. Central to the analysis is the coupled resonance, occurring when a surface-attached particle together with the link forms a resonator of its own. If the frequency of this second resonator comes close to one of the crystal's overtones, plots of shifts in resonance bandwidth versus overtone order display a resonance curve. This secondary resonance is caused by the coupling between the particle's resonance and the main resonance. One can read the frequency of the coupled resonance from this plot. Similarly, resonance curves are observed in plots of frequency and bandwidth versus time, if the contact stiffness varies smoothly with time. Because the coupled resonance is a characteristic feature, it is easily identified even in cases where frequency shifts of some other origin are superimposed onto the data. For the cases studied here, the links stiffened while they dried. Interestingly, the efficiency of coupling between the particle resonance and the main resonance decreased at the same time. This can be explained with an increase in the link's bending stiffness. The analysis highlights that a QCM experiment amounts to vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached particles. Among the application examples is the adsorption and drying of a lycopodium spore. Clearly, the technique is also applicable to problems of bioadhesion.

  1. Large-area electromagnetic enhancement by a resonant excitation of surface waves on a metallic surface with periodic subwavelength patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Haitao; Zhong, Ying

    2013-10-07

    We theoretically investigate the electromagnetic enhancement on a metallic surface patterned with periodic subwavelength structures. Fully-vectorial calculations show a large-area electromagnetic enhancement (LAEE) on the surface, which strongly contrasts with the previously reported "hot spots" that occur in specific tiny regions and which relieves the rigorous requirement of the nano-scale location of sample molecules. The LAEE allows for designing more practicable substrates for many enhanced-spectra applications. By building up microscopic models, the LAEE is shown due to a resonant excitation of surface waves that include both the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and a quasi-cylindrical wave (QCW). The surface waves propagate on the substrate over a long distance and thus greatly enlarge the area of electromagnetic enhancement compared to the nano-sized hot spots caused by localized modes. Gain medium is introduced to further strengthen the large-area surface-wave resonance, with which an enhancement factor (EF) of electric-field intensity up to a few thousands is achieved.

  2. The Coupling Effects of Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Magnetic Dipole Resonances in Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Tang, Chaojun; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhendong; Zhu, Mingwei; Sui, Yongxing; Tang, Huang

    2017-11-01

    We numerically investigate the coupling effects of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and magnetic dipole (MD) resonances in metamaterials, which are composed of an Ag nanodisk array and a SiO2 spacer on an Ag substrate. The periodicity of the Ag nanodisk array leads to the excitation of SPPs at the surface of the Ag substrate. The near-field plasmon interactions between individual Ag nanodisks and the Ag substrate form MD resonances. When the excitation wavelengths of SPPs are tuned to approach the position of MD resonances by changing the array period of Ag nanodisks, SPPs and MD resonances are coupled together into two hybridized modes, whose positions can be well predicted by a coupling model of two oscillators. In the strong coupling regime of SPPs and MD resonances, the hybridized modes exhibit an obvious anti-crossing, resulting into an interesting phenomenon of Rabi splitting. Moreover, the magnetic fields under the Ag nanodisks are greatly enhanced, which may find some potential applications, such as magnetic nonlinearity.

  3. The Coupling Effects of Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Magnetic Dipole Resonances in Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Tang, Chaojun; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhendong; Zhu, Mingwei; Sui, Yongxing; Tang, Huang

    2017-11-09

    We numerically investigate the coupling effects of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and magnetic dipole (MD) resonances in metamaterials, which are composed of an Ag nanodisk array and a SiO 2 spacer on an Ag substrate. The periodicity of the Ag nanodisk array leads to the excitation of SPPs at the surface of the Ag substrate. The near-field plasmon interactions between individual Ag nanodisks and the Ag substrate form MD resonances. When the excitation wavelengths of SPPs are tuned to approach the position of MD resonances by changing the array period of Ag nanodisks, SPPs and MD resonances are coupled together into two hybridized modes, whose positions can be well predicted by a coupling model of two oscillators. In the strong coupling regime of SPPs and MD resonances, the hybridized modes exhibit an obvious anti-crossing, resulting into an interesting phenomenon of Rabi splitting. Moreover, the magnetic fields under the Ag nanodisks are greatly enhanced, which may find some potential applications, such as magnetic nonlinearity.

  4. A RECOMMENDED PASQUILL-GIFFORD STABILITY CLASSIFICATION METHOD FOR SAFETY BASIS ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION MODELING AT SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Several of the most common methods for estimating Pasquill-Gifford (PG) stability (turbulence) class were evaluated for use in modeling the radiological consequences of SRS accidental releases using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Ver. 2 (MACCS2). Evaluation criteria included: (1) the ability of the method to represent diffusion characteristics above a predominantly forested landscape at SRS, (2) suitability of the method to provide data consistent with the formulation of the MACCS2 model, and (3) the availability of onsite meteorological data to support implementation of the method The evaluation resulted in a recommendation that PG stability classification for regulatory applications at SRS should be based on measurements of the standard deviation of the vertical component of wind direction fluctuations, {sigma}{sub e}, collected from the 61-m level of the SRS meteorological towers, and processed in full accordance with EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA, 2000). This approach provides a direct measurement that is fundamental to diffusion and captures explicitly the turbulence generated by both mechanical and buoyant forces over the characteristic surface (forested) of SRS. Furthermore, due to the potentially significant enhancement of horizontal fluctuations in wind direction from the occurrence of meander at night, the use of {sigma}{sub e} will ensure a reasonably conservative estimate of PG stability class for use in dispersion models that base diffusion calculations on a single value of PG stability class. Furthermore, meteorological data bases used as input for MACCS2 calculations should contain hourly data for five consecutive annual periods from the most recent 10 years.

  5. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  6. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs

  7. Nanoantennas for surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy: Effects of interaction and higher order resonant excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aizpurua

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity in surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy (SEIRS strongly depends on where the resonant excitation is spectrally located compared to the molecular vibration that is to be enhanced. In this contribution, we study the effect of coupling in the electromagnetic properties of 2D gold nanorod arrays in the IR. We also study the SEIRS activity of higher order resonant excitations in long nanoantennas to identify polaritonic signals of a supporting SiO2 layer with nanometer thickness (3 nm on a silicon substrate.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance fiber optic biosensor-based graphene and photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kai; Guo, Jia; Dang, Peng; Wang, Meiyu; Wang, Fucheng; Zhang, Yungang; Wang, Meiting

    2018-02-01

    A new sensor — transverse electric (TE) polarized excite surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber optic biosensor is proposed. The graphene is the plasma layer. The transfer matrix method and the finite difference time domain method are applied to conduct the numerical simulation of the four layers (fiber core/photonic crystals/graphene/sample) of fiber optic biosensor. The results show that the relationship between refractive index and resonant wavelength is linear and the sensitivity of the fiber optic biosensor reaches 1942 nm/RIU.

  9. Electrochemical surface plasmon resonance sensor based on two-electrode configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing; Dong, Wei; Wen, Yizhang; Pang, Kai; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Yazhuo; Zhan, Shuyue

    2016-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about electrochemistry reactions, a two-electrode electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) sensor has been proposed. We describe the theory of potential modulation for this novel sensor and determine the factors that can change the SPR resonance angle. The reference electrode in three-electrode configuration was eliminated, and comparing with several other electrode materials, activated carbon (AC) is employed as the suitable counter electrode for its potential stability. Just like three-electrode configuration, the simpler AC two-electrode system can also obtain detailed information about the electrochemical reactions. (paper)

  10. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  11. Laser-generated surface acoustic waves in a ring-shaped waveguide resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maznev, A A

    2009-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) waveguide resonator is formed by a ring-shaped strip of copper 10 microm wide and approximately 130 microm in diameter embedded into a 0.8 microm thick layer of silica on a silicon wafer. SAWs are excited at one side of the copper ring by a short laser pulse focused into a spatially periodic pattern and detected via diffraction of the probe laser beam overlapped with the excitation spot. SAW wavepackets with central frequency 460 MHz travel around the ring and are detected each time they make a full circle and pass trough the probe spot. Potential applications of ring resonators for SAWs are discussed.

  12. Reduced Near-Resonant Vibrational Coupling at the Surfaces of Liquid Water and Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Wilbert J; Versluis, Jan; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J

    2018-02-26

    We study the resonant interaction of the OH stretch vibrations of water molecules at the surfaces of liquid water and ice using heterodyne-detected sum-frequency generation (HD-SFG) spectroscopy. By studying different isotopic mixtures of H 2 O and D 2 O, we vary the strength of the interaction, and we monitor the resulting effect on the HD-SFG spectrum of the OH stretch vibrations. We observe that the near-resonant coupling effects are weaker at the surface than in the bulk, both for water and ice, indicating that for both phases of water the OH vibrations are less strongly delocalized at the surface than in the bulk.

  13. Nanoarray-based biomolecular detection using individual Au nanoparticles with minimized localized surface plasmon resonance variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Longhua; Ferhan, Abdul Rahim; Lee, Kijoon; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2011-04-01

    Here, we present a mean to expand the use of individual metallic nanoparticles to two-dimensional plasmonic nanoarrays. An optical detection platform to track down localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) signals of individual nanoparticles on substrates was built for the application of plasmonic nanoarrays. A pseudoimage of nanoparticles on a substrate was reconstructed from their scattering spectra obtained by scanning a user-defined area. The spectral and spatial resolutions of the system were also discussed in detail. Most importantly, we present a method to normalize the localized surface plasmon resonance from geometrically different nanoparticles. After normalization, plasmonic responses from different particles become highly consistent, creating well-fitted dose-response curves of both surrounding refractive index changes and receptor-analyte binding to the surface of individual nanoparticles. Finally, the proof-of-concept system for plasmonic nanoarray detection is demonstrated by the measurement of the aptamer-thrombin binding event.

  14. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, J R; Kim, G; Kothapalli, A; Morgan, M T; Ess, D

    2007-01-01

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 10 5 cfu/ml

  15. Light transmission through nanostructured metallic films: coupling between surface waves and localized resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Roberts, A

    2011-01-31

    We present an experimental and computational investigation of the optical properties of thin metallic films periodically perforated with nanometric apertures and show that high transmission through such a structure is attributable to the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonances of the aperture. The periodicity-related optical phenomena, including Wood's anomaly and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation, interfere with LSPs and generate Fano resonances with asymmetric spectral profiles. The transmission maximum of the Fano profile is related to the constructive interference between the LSP field and diffracted light propagating along the surface; the transmission minimum of the Fano profile is caused by the destructive interference between LSPs and SPPs. The study confirms the negative role of SPP in transmission through the structure.

  16. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  17. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Pan, Shanshan; Shum, Ping; Yan, Min; Leviatan, Yehuda; Li, Changming

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensitivity as high as 5500 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can be achieved in the proposed structure. Compared with the entirely coated structure, the selectively coated sensor design demonstrates narrower resonance spectral width. Moreover, the greater resonance depth can improve the sensing performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The improvements in spectral width and SNR can both contribute to a better detection limit for this refractive index sensor

  19. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maceutical, paper, food, dyes, petrochemi- cals, pigments, etc., to identify molecules, to monitor reaction products and so on. One of the most spectacular contributions of NMR has been in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a method that has today revolutionized diagnosis and treatment of diseases in ...

  20. The Role of Anion Adsorption in the Effect of Electrode Potential on Surface Plasmon Resonance Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinavichyute, Veronika K; Nizamov, Shavkat; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2017-06-20

    Surface plasmon resonance, being widely used in bioanalytics and biotechnology, is influenced by the electrical potential of the resonant gold layer. To evaluate the mechanism of this effect, we have studied it in solutions of various inorganic electrolytes. The magnitude of the effect decreases according to the series: KBr>KCl>KF>NaClO 4 . The data were treated by using different models of the interface. A quantitative description was obtained for the model, which takes into account the local dielectric function of gold being affected by the free electron charge, diffuse ionic layer near the gold/water interface, and specific adsorption of halides to the gold surface with partial charge transfer. Taking into account that most biological experiments are performed in chloride-containing solutions, detailed analysis of the model at these conditions was performed. The results indicate that the chloride adsorption is the main mechanism for the influence of potential on the surface plasmon resonance. The dependencies of surface concentration and residual charge of chloride on the applied potential were determined. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Magnetic resonance dacryocystography: comparison between conventional surface coils and microscopic coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Junior, Luiz de; Wolosker, Angela Maria Borri; Borri, Maria Lucia; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo; Hartmann, Luiz Guilherme de Carvalho; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized in the evaluation of the lacrimal apparatus with some advantages over conventional dacryocystography. The present study was aimed at acquiring high resolution images utilizing microscopic coils for evaluating typical structures of the lacrimal apparatus as compared with the findings observed with conventional surface coils. Materials and methods: Five asymptomatic volunteers with no history of epiphora were submitted to high-field magnetic resonance imaging with microscopic and conventional surface coils, and STIR sequence after instillation of saline solution. The definition of normal anatomic structures of lacrimal apparatuses was compared utilizing conventional and microscopic surface coils. Based on a consensual scoring system, the mean values for each structure were calculated by two observers. Results: In 90% of cases, higher scores were attributed to images acquired with the microscopic coil. On average, a 1.17 point increase was observed in the scoring of anatomic structures imaged with the microscopic coil. Additionally, a subjective improvement was observed in the signal-to-noise ratio with the microscopic coil. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance dacryocystography with microscopic coils is the appropriate method for evaluating the lacrimal apparatus, providing images with better quality as compared with those acquired with conventional surface coils. (author)

  2. Optical sensing characteristics of nanostructures supporting multiple localized surface plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehru, Neha; Hastings, J. Todd

    2013-02-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) have been extensively investigated for label free detection of various biological and chemical interactions. When compared to traditional propagating surface plasmon based sensors, LSPR sensors offer extensive wavelength tunability, greater electric field enhancement and sensing in reduced volumes. However, these sensors also suffer from a major disadvantage - LSPR sensors remain highly susceptible to interference because they respond to both solution refractive index changes and non-specific binding as well as specific binding of the target analyte. These interactions can compromise the measurement of the target analyte in a complex unknown media and hence limit the applicability and impact of the sensor. Despite the extensive amount of work done in this field, there has been an absence of optical techniques that make these sensors immune to interfering effects. Recently, our group experimentally demonstrated a multi-mode LSPR sensor that exploits three resonances of a U-shaped gold nanostructure to differentiate the target interaction from bulk and surface interfering effects. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive description of the electric field profiles of the three resonances of the U-shaped nanostructure. We will also evaluate the sensitivities of the nanostructure to the various bulk and surface interactions using numerical simulations.

  3. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeho Jang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air, the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer.

  4. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) study of DNA hybridization at single nanoparticle transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Jahr, N.; Jatschka, J.; Csaki, A.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of DNA–DNA interaction on the localized surface plasmon resonance of single 80 nm gold nanoparticles is studied. Therefore, both the attachment of the capture DNA strands at the particle surface and the sequence-specific DNA binding (hybridization) of analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA is subject of investigations. The influence of substrate attachment chemistry, the packing density of DNA as controlled by an assisting layer of smaller molecules, and the distance as increased by a linker on the LSPR efficiency is investigated. The resulting changes in signal can be related to a higher hybridization efficiency of the analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA. The subsequent attachment of additional DNA strands to this system is studied, which allows for a multiple step detection of binding and an elucidation of the resulting resonance shifts. The detection limit was determined for the utilized DNA system by incubation with various concentration of analyte DNA. Although the method allows for a marker-free detection, we show that additional markers such as 20 nm gold particle labels increase the signal and thereby the sensitivity significantly. The study of resonance shift for various DNA lengths revealed that the resonance shift per base is stronger for shorter DNA molecules (20 bases) as compared to longer ones (46 bases).

  5. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  6. Diffuse Surface Scattering in the Plasmonic Resonances of Ultralow Electron Density Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, R Carmina; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Apell, S Peter

    2015-05-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) have recently been identified in extremely diluted electron systems obtained by doping semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we investigate the role that different surface effects, namely, electronic spill-out and diffuse surface scattering, play in the optical properties of these ultralow electron density nanosystems. Diffuse scattering originates from imperfections or roughness at a microscopic scale on the surface. Using an electromagnetic theory that describes this mechanism in conjunction with a dielectric function including the quantum size effect, we find that the LSPRs show an oscillatory behavior in both position and width for large particles and a strong blue shift in energy and an increased width for smaller radii, consistent with recent experimental results for photodoped ZnO nanocrystals. We thus show that the commonly ignored process of diffuse surface scattering is a more important mechanism affecting the plasmonic properties of ultralow electron density nanoparticles than the spill-out effect.

  7. Self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering using plasmon waveguide resonance for surface and bulk sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiu-mei; Gao, Ran; Lu, Dan-feng; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2018-01-01

    Surface plasmon-coupled emission has been widely used in fluorescence imaging, biochemical sensing, and enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering for simultaneous detection of surface and bulk effects by using plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR) based surface plasmon-coupled emission has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Raman scattering was captured on the prism side in Kretschmann-surface plasmon-coupled emission. The distinct penetration depths (δ) of the evanescent field for the transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes result in different detected distances of the Raman signal. The experimental results demonstrate that the self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering of the TE and TM modes based on the PWR can detect and distinguish the surface and bulk effects simultaneously, which appears to have potential applications in researches of chemistry, medicine, and biology.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective effect against murine cerebral neosporosis of recombinant NcSRS2 in different iscom formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinitkiatisakul, Sunan; Friedman, Mikaela; Wikman, Maria; Mattsson, Jens G; Lövgren-Bengtsson, Karin; Ståhl, Stefan; Lundén, Anna

    2007-05-04

    Recombinant NcSRS2, a major immunodominant surface antigen of the intracellular protozoan parasite Neospora caninum, was used as a model antigen to compare the immunogenicity of iscoms prepared according to three different methods. Two NcSRS2 fusion proteins were used, one that was biotinylated upon expression in Escherichia coli and linked to Ni2+-loaded iscom matrix (iscom without any protein) via a hexahistidyl (His6)-tagged streptavidin fusion protein, and another that contained both a His6-tag and streptavidin (His6-SA-SRS2') and was coupled to either Ni2+-loaded or biotinylated matrix. While all three iscom preparations induced N. caninum specific antibodies at similar levels, His6-SA-SRS2' coupled to biotinylated matrix generated the strongest cellular responses measured as in vitro proliferation and production of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 after antigen stimulation of spleen cells. However, the relationship between the levels of these cytokines as well as between IgG1 and IgG2a titres in serum induced by the three iscom preparations were similar, indicating that the balance between Th1 and Th2 responses did not differ. After challenge infection, mice immunised with His6-SA-SRS2' coupled to biotinylated matrix had significantly lower amounts of parasite DNA in their brains compared to the other immunised groups. Possible reasons for the performance of the different iscom formulations are discussed.

  9. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Using Silica Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to have robust spectroscopic sensors for sensitive detection and chemical analysis of organic and molecular compounds. The solution is to use silica sphere optical resonators to provide surface-enhanced spectroscopic signal. Whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators made from silica microspheres were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) without coupling to a plasmonic mechanism. Large Raman signal enhancement is observed by exclusively using 5.08-micron silica spheres with 785-nm laser excitation. The advantage of this non-plasmonic approach is that the active substrate is chemically inert silica, thermally stable, and relatively simple to fabricate. The Raman signal enhancement is broadly applicable to a wide range of molecular functional groups including aliphatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, and esters. Applications include trace organic analysis, particularly for in situ planetary instruments that require robust sensors with consistent response.

  11. Detection of Volatile Organic Compound Gas Using Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of Gold Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Nengsih; Akrajas Ali Umar; Muhamad Mat Salleh; Muhammad Yahaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the detection of several organic vapors using the unique characteristic of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles on quartz substrate were prepared using seed mediated growth method. In a typical process, gold nanoparticles with average size ca. 36 nm were obtained to densely grown on the substrate. Detection of gas was based on the change in the LSPR of the gold nanoparticles film upon the exposure to the gas sample. It was found that gold nanoparticles were sensitive to the presence of volatile organic compound (VOC) gas from the change in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) intensity. The mechanism for the detection of VOCs gas will be discussed. (author)

  12. Surface plasmon resonance sensors based on uniform-waist tapered fibers in a reflective configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Óscar; Díaz-Herrera, Natalia; Navarrete, María-Cruz; González-Cano, Agustín

    2006-10-01

    We present a configuration for surface plasmon resonance sensors based on uniform-waist tapered optical fibers and reflective elements. Once the fiber is tapered fulfilling the adiabatic criterion, a multilayer including a metallic medium is asymmetrically deposited on the uniform waist of the fiber. This feature provides the resonant excitation of multiple surface plasma waves. In addition, a mirror is produced at the fiber tip by a chemical Tollens reaction. In this way, the sensor operates in a reflective mode, more convenient for dip probes. When these sensors are spectrally interrogated, a high sensitivity of 10-4 refractive index units per nanometer is attained. These devices can be advantageously used for any kind of chemical sensing and biosensing.

  13. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year

  14. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 in clinical samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bocková, Markéta; Chadtová Song, Xue; Gedeonová, Erika; Levová, K.; Kalousová, M.; Zima, T.; Homola, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 408, č. 26 (2016), s. 7265-7269 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1101 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Nanoparticles * Blood sample * Surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  15. Detection of low-molecular-weight domoic acid using surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Taylor, A. D.; Homola, Jiří; Hock, B.; Jiang, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 193-201 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] Grant - others:US FDA (US) FD-U-002250; National Science Foundation(US) CTS-0092699 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  16. Using Metal-Multilayer-Dielectric Structure to Increase Sensitivity of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchenko, Svitlana G.; Lymarenko, Ruslan A.; Taranenko, Victor B.

    2017-04-01

    We propose using a specially designed metal-multilayer-dielectric structure deposited on glass substrate to enhance the evanescent field and improve the sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance sensor. The proposed structure supports both hybrid plasmonic transverse magnetic modes and conventional waveguide transverse electric modes. We show numerically the significant enhancement of the evanescent field and improvement of the sensitivity for the waveguide transverse electric mode.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance: advances of label-free approaches in the analysis of biological samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedel, Tomáš; Majek, P.; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Brynda, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 24 (2014), s. 3325-3336 ISSN 1757-6180 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance sensors * polymer brushes * human serum samples Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.003, year: 2014

  18. Photoluminescence excitation of lithium fluoride films by surface plasmon resonance in Kretschmann configuration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulíř, Jiří; Zikmund, Tomáš; Novotný, Michal; Lančok, Ján; Fekete, Ladislav; Juha, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 4 (2016), s. 1-7, č. článku 412. ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : local surface plasmon resonance * luminescence * XUV laser * LiF Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2016

  19. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for direct detection of antibody against Epstein-Barr virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaisocherová, Hana; Mrkvová, Kateřina; Piliarik, Marek; Jinoch, P.; Šteinbachová, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2007), s. 1020-1026 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/03/0633; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0249 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) QLK4-CT-2002-02323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.061, year: 2007

  20. Spectral surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of staphylococal enterotoxin B /SEB/ in milk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Dostálek, Jakub; Chen, S.; Rasooly, A.; Jiang, S.; Yee, S. S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 75, 1/2 (2002), s. 61-69 ISSN 0168-1605 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.719, year: 2002

  1. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors.

  2. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors for highly sensitive detection in real samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, B.; Carrascosa, L. G.; Regatos, D.; Otte, M. A.; Fariña, D.; Lechuga, L. M.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we summarize the main results obtained with the portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device developed in our group (commercialised by SENSIA, SL, Spain), highlighting its applicability for the real-time detection of extremely low concentrations of toxic pesticides in environmental water samples. In addition, we show applications in clinical diagnosis as, on the one hand, the real-time and label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations at the gene BRCA-1, related to the predisposition in women to develop an inherited breast cancer and, on the other hand, the analysis of protein biomarkers in biological samples (urine, serum) for early detection of diseases. Despite the large number of applications already proven, the SPR technology has two main drawbacks: (i) not enough sensitivity for some specific applications (where pM-fM or single-molecule detection are needed) (ii) low multiplexing capabilities. In order solve such drawbacks, we work in several alternative configurations as the Magneto-optical Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor (MOSPR) based on a combination of magnetooptical and ferromagnetic materials, to improve the SPR sensitivity, or the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) based on nanostructures (nanoparticles, nanoholes,...), for higher multiplexing capabilities.

  3. Multi-dimensional Inversion Modeling of Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR Data for Groundwater Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warsa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is an important economic source of water supply for drinking water and irrigation water for agriculture. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR sounding is a relatively new geophysical method that can be used to determine the presence of culturally and economically important substances, such as subsurface water or hydrocarbon distribution. SNMR sounding allows the determination of water content and pore size distribution directly from the surface. The SNMR method is performed by stimulating an alternating current pulse through an antenna at the surface in order to confirm the existence of water in the subsurface. This paper reports the development of a 3-D forward modeling code for SNMR amplitudes and decay times, after which an improved 2-D and 3-D inversion algorithm is investigated, consisting of schemes for regularizing model parameterization. After briefly reviewing inversion schemes generally used in geophysics, the special properties of SNMR or magnetic resonance sounding (MRS inversion are evaluated. We present an extension of MRS to magnetic resonance tomography (MRT, i.e. an extension for 2-D and 3-D investigation, and the appropriate inversions.

  4. Study of surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles coated with dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-Yu; Huang, Chan-yan; Dai, Ning; Zhu, Da-ming

    2011-08-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit different thickness layers of Al2O3 on Au nanoparticles fabricated by thermal annealing of Au thin films. The effects of the Au-coated Al2O3 layer thickness variation to local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in gold (Au) nanoparticles was investigated using transmission surface plasmon resonance (T-SPR) spectroscopy. Thermal annealing of ultrathin films of Au sputtered on transparent substrates can get a dispersed metal particles system which exhibit transmission spectra showing an extinction band attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The particles prepared by thermal annealing are much more like elliptical rather than sphere. The dielectric medium layer Al2O3 was deposited on these Au particles with the thickness from few nanometers to tens of nanometers by ALD. We found that All the LSPR peak positions of particles on different substrates red shifted as the thickness of deposition layer increase, but the LSPR red-shift effect of particles on alumina substrate was much more remarkable than particles on glass substrate. The results in this paper show that it is a very continent method to manipulate LSPR position which is a profound useful effect in solar cell application by controlling the deposition layer thickness on particles prepared by thermal annealing on suitable substrate.

  5. Gold Nanoplates for a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Boric Acid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlia Morsin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR properties of metallic nanostructures, such as gold, are very sensitive to the dielectric environment of the material, which can simply be adjusted by changing its shape and size through modification of the synthesizing process. Thus, these unique properties are very promising, particularly for the detection of various types of chemicals, for example boric acid which is a non-permitted preservative employed in food preparations. For the sensing material, gold (Au nanoplates with a variety of shapes, i.e., triangular, hexagonal, truncated pentagon and flat rod, were prepared using a seed-mediated growth method. The yield of Au nanoplates was estimated to be ca. 63% over all areas of the sensing material. The nanoplates produced two absorption bands, i.e., the transverse surface plasmon resonance (t-SPR and the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (l-SPR at 545 nm and 710 nm, respectively. In the sensing study, these two bands were used to examine the response of gold nanoplates to the presence of boric acid in an aqueous environment. In a typical process, when the sample is immersed into an aqueous solution containing boric acid, these two bands may change their intensity and peak centers as a result of the interaction between the boric acid and the gold nanoplates. The changes in the intensities and peak positions of t-SPR and l-SPR linearly correlated with the change in the boric acid concentration in the solution.

  6. Free Surface Waves And Interacting Bouncing Droplets: A Parametric Resonance Case Study

    KAUST Repository

    Borja, Francisco J.

    2013-07-01

    Parametric resonance is a particular type of resonance in which a parameter in a system changes with time. A particularly interesting case is when the parameter changes in a periodic way, which can lead to very intricate behavior. This di↵ers from periodic forcing in that solutions are not necessarily periodic. A system in which parametric resonance is realized is when a fluid bath is shaken periodically, which leads to an e↵ective time dependent gravitational force. This system will be used to study the onset of surface waves in a bath with non-uniform topography. A linear model for the surface waves is derived from the Euler equations in the limit of shallow waves, which includes the geometry of the bottom and surface tension. Experiments are performed to compare with the proposed model and good qualitative agreement is found. Another experiment which relies on a shaking fluid bath is that of bouncing fluid droplets. In the case of two droplets the shaking allows for a larger bouncing droplet to attract a smaller moving droplet in a way that creates a bound system. This bound system is studied and shows some analogous properties to quantum systems, so a quantum mechanical model for a two dimensional atom is studied, as well as a proposed model for the droplet-wave system in terms of equations of fluid mechanics.

  7. Hollow Au/Ag nanostars displaying broad plasmonic resonance and high surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Torreggiani, Armida; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Vicente; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars. The size, shape, and composition of Ag as well as their optical properties were studied by extinction spectroscopy, hyperspectral dark field microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these HNS was investigated by using thioflavin T, a biomarker of the β-amyloid fibril formation, responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Lucigenin, a molecule displaying different SERS activities on Au and Ag, was also used to explore the presence of these metals on the NP surface. Thus, a relationship between the morphology, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of these new NPs was made.Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars

  8. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Pitarke, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  9. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  10. Overview of the Characteristics of Micro- and Nano-Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungho Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of bio-chemical sensing devices has been greatly improved by the development of surface plasmon resonance (SPR based sensors. Advancements in micro- and nano-fabrication technologies have led to a variety of structures in SPR sensing systems being proposed. In this review, SPR sensors (from typical Kretschmann prism configurations to fiber sensor schemes with micro- or nano-structures for local light field enhancement, extraordinary optical transmission, interference of surface plasmon waves, plasmonic cavities, etc. are discussed. We summarize and compare their performances and present guidelines for the design of SPR sensors.

  11. Comparison of Srs-24 And Srs-22 Scores in Thirty Eight Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients Who Had Undergone Surgical Correction

    OpenAIRE

    CYW Chan; LB Saw; MK Kwan

    2009-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity that affects patients’ self image and confidence. Surgery is offered when the curvature is greater than 50 degrees based on the likelihood of curvature progression. Outcome measures for scoliosis correction can be described in terms of radiological improvement or improvement of health related quality of life scores. The Scoliosis Research Society 22 (SRS-22) and Scoliosis Research Society 24 (SRS-24) questionnaires are widely accepted and ...

  12. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Resonance studies of H atoms adsorbed on frozen H2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampton, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are reported of the ground state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms stored in a 5 cm. diameter bottle coated with frozen molecular hydrogen. Dephasing of the hyperfine resonance while the atoms are adsorbed produces frequency shifts which vary by a factor of two over the temperature range 3.7 K to 4.6 K and radiative decay rates which vary by a factor of five over this range. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the frequency shifts and decay rates are consistent with a non-uniform distribution of surface adsorption energies with mean about 38(8) K, in agreement with theoretical estimates for a smooth surface. Extrapolation of the 30 nanosec. mean adsorption times at 4.2 K predicts very long adsorption times for H on H 2 below 1 K. Studies of level population recovery rates provide evidence for surface electron spin exchange collisions between adsorbed atoms with collision duration long compared to the hyperfine period, suggesting that the atoms are partially mobile on the surface. The lowest rates observed for level population recovery set a lower limit of about 500 atom-surface collisions at 4.2 K without recombination

  14. Towards an electronic dog nose: surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for security and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-09-05

    This review describes an "electronic dog nose" based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor and an antigen-antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol), dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described.

  15. Towards an Electronic Dog Nose: Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Security and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Onodera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes an “electronic dog nose” based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor and an antigen–antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol, dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described.

  16. Highly Sensitive Local Surface Plasmon Resonance in Anisotropic Au Nanoparticles Deposited on Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Saigusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the facile and high-throughput fabrication method of anisotropic Au nanoparticles with a highly sensitive local surface plasmon resonance (LPR using cylindrical nanofibers as substrates. The substrates consisting of nanofibers were prepared by the electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The Au nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of electrospun nanofibers by vacuum evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a curved Au island structure on the surface of cylindrical nanofibers. Polarized UV-visible extinction spectroscopy showed anisotropy in their LPR arising from the high surface curvature of the nanofiber. The LPR of the Au nanoparticles on the thinnest nanofiber with a diameter of ~100 nm showed maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity over 500 nm/RI unit (RIU. The close correlation between the fiber diameter dependence of the RI sensitivity and polarization dependence of the LPR suggests that anisotropic Au nanoparticles improve RI sensitivity.

  17. Resonator Sensitivity Optimization in Magnetic Resonance and the Development of a Magic Angle Spinning Probe for the NMR Study of Rare Spin Nuclei on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Francis David

    The sensitivity of an arbitrary resonator for the detection of a magnetic resonance signal is derived from basic energy considerations, and is shown to be dependent on V(,s)/t(,90)P(' 1/2). The radiation damping time constant is shown to be inversely dependent on the rf filling factor. Several resonators are analyzed in detail. The optimum solenoid is shown to have a length of about 1.5 times the diameter. The multilayer solenoid and the capacitively shortened slotted line resonator are shown to have advantages for samples with high dielectric losses. The capacitively shortened slotted line resonator is shown to substantially reduce acoustic ringing problems. Efficient methods are discussed for double and triple tuning these resonators. A slotted cylindrical resonator is described which gives higher sensitivity and faster response time than conventional cavities for very small samples at X-band ESR frequencies. Double tuned circuits using lumped elements are shown to be generally more efficient than those using transmission lines in generating rf fields. The optimum inductance ratio of the two coils in a ('13)C, ('1)H CP experiment is about 3. The high speed cylindrical sample spinner is analyzed in terms of compressible fluid dynamics, resonant modes, and structural analysis to arrive at optimum air bearing and spinner design recommendations. The optimum radial clearance is shown to depend on the 1/3 power of the rotor diameter. The required air bearing hole diameter has a square root dependence on the rotor diameter. Air pockets are shown to increase the resonant frequencies. Relevant data for a number of high strength insulators including hard ceramics are tabulated, and limiting speeds are calculated. CP MAS experiments on a 5% monolayer of n-butylamine absorbed on (gamma)-alumina reveal six lines. By comparison with the liquid phase spectrum it was determined that at least two types of chemically different surface species were present and that surface

  18. Surface-enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance biosensing of avian influenza DNA hybridization using subwavelength metallic nanoarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Ae; Jang, Sung Min; Kim, Sung June [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyung Min [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyujung; Kim, Donghyun [Program of Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Kyungjae; Oh, Youngjin [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Guk [College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Shuler, Michael L, E-mail: kmbyun@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    We demonstrated enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing based on subwavelength gold nanoarrays built on a thin gold film. Arrays of nanogratings (1D) and nanoholes (2D) with a period of 200 nm were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the detection of avian influenza DNA hybridization. Experimental results showed that both nanoarrays provided significant sensitivity improvement and, especially, 1D nanogratings exhibited higher SPR signal amplification compared with 2D nanohole arrays. The sensitivity enhancement is associated with changes in surface-limited reaction area and strong interactions between bound molecules and localized plasmon fields. Our approach is expected to improve both the sensitivity and sensing resolution and can be applicable to label-free detection of DNA without amplification by polymerase chain reaction.

  19. Aluminum Film-Over-Nanosphere Substrates for Deep-UV Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhavya; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Ross, Michael B; Zrimsek, Alyssa B; Bykov, Sergei V; Punihaole, David; Asher, Sanford A; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-12-14

    We report here the first fabrication of aluminum film-over nanosphere (AlFON) substrates for UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (UVSERRS) at the deepest UV wavelength used to date (λ ex = 229 nm). We characterize the AlFONs fabricated with two different support microsphere sizes using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, SERRS of adenine, tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II), and trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene, SERS of 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (as a nonresonant molecule), and dielectric function analysis. We find that AlFONs fabricated with the 210 nm microspheres generate an enhancement factor of approximately 10 4-5 , which combined with resonance enhancement of the adsorbates provides enhancement factors greater than 10 6 . These experimental results are supported by theoretical analysis of the dielectric function. Hence our results demonstrate the advantages of using AlFON substrates for deep UVSERRS enhancement and contribute to broadening the SERS application range with tunable and affordable substrates.

  20. Gold split-ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2013-10-24

    We used gold split ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The arrays of SRRs were fabricated by electron-beam lithography in combination with plasma etching. In the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, SERS enhancement factors of the order of 105 was achieved. This SERS enhancement increased as the size of the split gap decrease as a consequence of the matching between the resonance wavelength of the SRRs and the excitation wavelength of SERS. As the size of the split gap decreased, the localized surface plasmon resonance shifted to near the excitation wavelength and, thus, resulted in the increase in the electric field on the nanostructures. We used finite integration method (FIT) to simulate numerically the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs. The results of the simulation agreed well with our experimental observations. We anticipate this work will provide an approach to manipulate the SERS enhancement by modulating the size of split gap with SRRs without affecting the area and structural arrangement. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  2. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S. M.; Antia, H. M.

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the ``surface term.'' The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3D flows, can be reduced to an effective ``quiet-Sun'' wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  3. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection

  4. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemically Tuning the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances of Gold Nanostructure Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2009-04-30

    We report on chemical etching of ordered Au nanostructure arrays to continuously tune their localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR). Real-time extinction spectra were recorded from both Au nanodisks and nanospheres immobilized on glass substrates when immersed in Au etchant. The time-dependent LSPR frequencies, intensities, and bandwidths were studied theoretically with discrete dipole approximations and the Mie solution, and they were correlated with the evolution of the etched Au nanostructures\\' morphology (as examined by atomic force microscopy). Since this chemical etching method can conveniently and accurately tune LSPR, it offers precise control of plasmonic properties and can be useful in applications such as surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy and molecular resonance spectroscopy. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  6. Plasmonic metalens based on coupled resonators for focusing of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Quan

    2016-11-29

    As an essential functionality, flexible focusing of surface plasmons (SPs) is of particular interest in nonlinear optics and highly integrated plasmonic circuitry. Here, we developed a versatile plasmonic metalens, a metasurface comprised of coupled subwavelength resonators, whose optical responses exhibit a remarkable feature of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We demonstrate numerically and experimentally how a proper spatial design of the unit elements steers SPs to arbitrary foci based on the holographic principles. More specifically, we show how to control the interaction between the constituent EIT resonators to efficiently manipulate the focusing intensity of SPs. We also demonstrated that the proposed metalens is capable of achieving frequency division multiplexing. The power and simplicity of the proposed design would offer promising opportunities for practical plasmonic devices.

  7. Dynamics of a quantum emitter resonantly coupled to both external field and localized surface plasmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkararyan, Khachatur V.; Yezekyan, Torgom S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate excitation dynamics in the system of a quantum dipole emitter (QDE) coupled to a located nearby metal nanoparticle (MNP), which exhibits a dipolar localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance at the frequency of the QDE radiative transition, in the presence of a strong external resonant electromagnetic field. Considering the QDE-field interactions in the regime of strong QDE-field coupling, we show that the feedback provided by the MNP on the QDE (due to the LSP excitation with the field generated by the dipole moment of the QDE transition) influences significantly the coherent process of Rabi oscillations, resulting in the occurrence of additional satellite frequencies in the radiation spectrum scattered by the QDE-MNP configuration. The relative ratio of high harmonics depends strongly on the QDE-MNP separation, an important characteristic feature that can be used for observing this effect and can be exploited, for example, for controlling distances at the nanoscale.

  8. Three dimensional display of the brain surface from magnetic resonance images using a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Jin

    1991-01-01

    A new system for three dimensional display of brain surface from magnetic resonance images has been developed using a personal computer. The system consists of the personal computer with a co-processor for mathematical operation and frame memory for full color graphic display. MRI data were transferred to the computer with the floppy disks. Using the paint algorithm, extraction of brain tissue was performed semi-automatically with a manual operation. Brain surface data were displayed on a CRT by a voxel method from an arbitral direction. The result of clinical application of the system showed that the 3-dimentional display of brain surface was useful in comprehending abnormalities including atrophy and cystic lesions. In this paper, we introduce the new system and discuss clinical applicabilities. (author)

  9. Long-range surface plasmons for high-resolution surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nenninger, G. G.; Tobiška, Petr; Homola, Jiří; Yee, S. S.

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 145-151 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Grant - others:Department of Defense(US) DAAD13-99-C-0032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : sensors * surface plasmons * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  10. Numerical investigation into a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on optical fiber microring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunliu; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Dongning; Ding, Zhewen

    2017-06-01

    A reflective surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on optical fiber microring is proposed. In such a sensor, plasmons on the outer surface of the metallized channels containing analyte can be excited by a fundamental mode of a thin-core fiber (TCF). The refractive index (RI) sensing can be achieved as the surface plasmons are sensitive to changes in the refrective index of the analyte. Numerical simulation results show that the resonance spectrum shifts toward the shorter wavelength gradually when the analyte refractive index increases from 1.0 to 1.33, whereas it shifts toward the longer wavelength gradually when the analyte refractive index increases from 1.33 to 1.43, and there is a turning point at the refractive index value of 1.33. The highest sensitivity achieved is up to 2.30×103 nm/RIU near the refractive index value of 1.0. Such a compact sensor has potential in gaseous substance monitoring.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz M Abdi

    Full Text Available A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+ and Hg(2+ ions. The Pb(2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+ compared to Hg(2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  12. User guide to the SRS data logging facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyson, B.E.

    1979-02-01

    The state of the SRS is recorded every two minutes, thus providing a detailed History of its parameters. Recording of History is done via the SRS Computer Network. This consists of a Master Computer, an Interdata 7/32, and three Minicomputers, Interdata 7/16s. Each of the Minicomputers controls one of the accelerators, Linac, Booster and Storage Ring. The Master Computer is connected to the Central Computer, an IBM 370/165, for jobs where greater computing power and storage are required. The Master Computer has a total of 20 Megabytes of fixed and movable disc space but only about 5 Megabytes are available for History storage. The Minicomputers have no storage facilities. The user guide is set out as follows: History filing system, History storage on the Master Computer, transfer of the History to the Central Computer, transferring History to tapes, job integrity, the SRS tape catalogue system. (author)

  13. Sensing with prism-based near-infrared surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanohole array platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Laurel L; Boyne, Devon; Booksh, Karl S

    2014-04-01

    Nanohole arrays exhibit unique surface plasmon resonance (SPR) characteristics according to hole periodicity, diameter, and excitation wavelength (λ(SPR)). This contribution investigates the SPR characteristics and surface sensitivity of various nanohole arrays with the aim of tuning the parameters for optimal sensing capability. Both the Bragg surface plasmons (SPs) arising from diffraction by the periodic holes and the traditional propagating SPs are characterized with emphasis on sensing capability of the propagating SPs. Several trends in bulk sensitivity and penetration depth were established, and the surface sensitivity was calculated from bulk sensitivity and penetration depth of the SPs for different analyte thicknesses. Increased accuracy and precision in penetration depth values were achieved by incorporating adsorbate effects on substrate permittivity. The optimal nanohole array conditions for highest surface sensitivity were determined (820 nm periodicity, 0.27 diameter/periodicity, and λ(SPR) = 1550 nm), which demonstrated an increase in surface sensitivity for the 10 nm analyte over continuous gold films at their optimal λ(SPR) (1300 nm) and conventional visible λ(SPR) (700 nm).

  14. Van der Waals enhancement of optical atom potentials via resonant coupling to surface polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-08-17

    Contemporary experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) with gas-phase neutral atoms rely increasingly on laser cooling and optical, magneto-optical or magnetostatic trapping methods to provide atomic localization with sub-micron uncertainty. Difficult to achieve in free space, this goal is further frustrated by atom-surface interactions if the desired atomic placement approaches within several hundred nanometers of a solid surface, as can be the case in setups incorporating monolithic dielectric optical resonators such as microspheres, microtoroids, microdisks or photonic crystal defect cavities. Typically in such scenarios, the smallest atom-surface separation at which the van der Waals interaction can be neglected is taken to be the optimal localization point for associated trapping schemes, but this sort of conservative strategy generally compromises the achievable cavity QED coupling strength. Here we suggest a new approach to the design of optical dipole traps for atom confinement near surfaces that exploits strong surface interactions, rather than avoiding them, and present the results of a numerical study based on (39)K atoms and indium tin oxide (ITO). Our theoretical framework points to the possibility of utilizing nanopatterning methods to engineer novel modifications of atom-surface interactions. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  15. Detecting unfrozen sediments below thermokarst lakes with surface nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, Andrew D.; Grosse, Guido; Walbrecker, Jan O.; Müller-Petke, Mike; Keating, Kristina; Liu, Lin; Jones, Benjamin M.; Knight, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    A talik is a layer or body of unfrozen ground that occurs in permafrost due to an anomaly in thermal, hydrological, or hydrochemical conditions. Information about talik geometry is important for understanding regional surface water and groundwater interactions as well as sublacustrine methane production in thermokarst lakes. Due to the direct measurement of unfrozen water content, surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a promising geophysical method for noninvasively estimating talik dimensions. We made surface NMR measurements on thermokarst lakes and terrestrial permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska, and confirmed our results using limited direct measurements. At an 8 m deep lake, we observed thaw bulb at least 22 m below the surface; at a 1.4 m deep lake, we detected a talik extending between 5 and 6 m below the surface. Our study demonstrates the value that surface NMR may have in the cryosphere for studies of thermokarst lake hydrology and their related role in the carbon cycle.

  16. Plasmon resonance tuning in metal nanostars for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Krahne, Roman

    2014-06-01

    We report the fabrication of Au nanostar arrays by means of electron beam lithography, in which the plasmon resonance energy can be tuned via the nanostar size from the visible into the near-infrared region. The spectral response of the nanostar arrays was investigated by optical extinction (transmittance) experiments, and their surface enhanced Raman scattering performance has been tested at two different excitation wavelengths, 633 nm and 830 nm, using chemisorbed Cresyl violet molecules as analyte. The experimental results are supported by numerical simulations of the spatial and spectral electric field enhancement.

  17. Plasmon resonance tuning in metal nanostars for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Krahne, Roman

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication of Au nanostar arrays by means of electron beam lithography, in which the plasmon resonance energy can be tuned via the nanostar size from the visible into the near-infrared region. The spectral response of the nanostar arrays was investigated by optical extinction (transmittance) experiments, and their surface enhanced Raman scattering performance has been tested at two different excitation wavelengths, 633 nm and 830 nm, using chemisorbed Cresyl violet molecules as analyte. The experimental results are supported by numerical simulations of the spatial and spectral electric field enhancement. (papers)

  18. Detection of Fungal Spores Using a Generic Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a biosensor-based method for detection of fungal spores using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a mouse monoclonal antibody (Pst mAb8) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of urediniospores from the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.......sp. tritici (Pst). In the subtractive inhibition assay, urediniospores and Pst mAb8 were mixed, urediniospore-bound Pst mAb8 removed by centrifugation and the remaining Pst mAb8 quantified using the SPR sensor. Assay conditions were optimised and a detection limit of 3.1 x 105 urediniospores/ml was achieved...

  19. Surface plasmon resonance study on HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaisocherová, Hana; Snášel, Jan; Špringer, Tomáš; Šípová, Hana; Rosenberg, Ivan; Štěpánek, J.; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 4 (2009), s. 1165-1172 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0628; GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA ČR GP203/05/P557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV -1 intergrase * surface plasmon resonance * label-free monitoring * ds- DNA Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.480, year: 2009

  20. In situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P C; Munro, C H; Smith, W E

    1996-06-01

    An in situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) procedure is described for the analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to a single strand of a cotton fibre. This procedure can be completed in 5 h, whereas an alternative enzyme digestion method takes approximately 21 h. These two fibre preparation methods give similar spectra from picogram quantities of dye present on a 2-5 mm length of fibre. The in situ nature of the analysis and the small sample size make this method particularly suitable for forensic applications.

  1. A surface plasmon resonance-based immunosensors for sensitive detection of heroin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongcheng; Wang Lianchao; Ge Yu; Yu Chengduan; Fang Tingjian; Chen Wenge

    2000-01-01

    A simple technique for sensitive detection of heroine based on surface-plasmon resonance has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. The experiment was realized by using an anti-MO monoclonal antibody and a morphine (MO)-bovine serum albumin (MO-BSA) conjugate (antigen). The reason for using MO-BSA in the detection of heroine was also discussed. MO-BSA was immobilized on a gold thin film of SPR sensor chip by physical adsorption. The configuration of the device is allowed to be further miniaturized, which is required for the construction of a portable SPR device in the application of in-situ analysis

  2. Investigating oligonucleotide hybridization at subnanomolar level by surface plasmon resonance biosensor method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaisocherová, Hana; Zítová, Alice; Lachmanová, Markéta; Štepánek, J.; Králíková, Šárka; Liboska, Radek; Rejman, Dominik; Rosenberg, Ivan; Homola, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2006), s. 394-398 ISSN 0006-3525. [European Conference on the Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules - ECSBM 2005 /11./. Aschaffenburg, 03.09.2005-08.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0249; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0633; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0628 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * biosensors * optical sensors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.480, year: 2006

  3. Resonance Energy Transfer in Hybrid Devices in the Presence of a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature, nonradiative resonant energy transfer from InGaN/GaN quantum wells to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals separated by aluminum oxide layers of different thicknesses. Nonradiative energy transfer from the quantum wells to the nanocrystals at separation distances of up...... to approximately 10 nm was observed. By comparing the carrier dynamics of the quantum wells and the nanocrystals, we found that nonradiative recombination via surface states, generated during dry etching of the wafer, counteracts the nonradiative energy-transfer process to the nanocrystals and therefore decreases...

  4. Modelling of the surface plasmon resonance waveguide sensor with Bragg grating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čtyroký, Jiří; Abdelmalek, F.; Ecke, W.; Usbeck, K.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 31, 9/10 (1999), s. 927-941 ISSN 0306-8919. [Optical waveguide theory and numerical modelling. Hagen, 18.09.1998-19.09.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/96/1561 Grant - others:EU COST(XE) OC 240.10; EU COST(XE) OC 268.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : Bragg gratings * optical waveguide theory * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors * optical waveguides Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.876, year: 1999

  5. Improving Acousto-Optical Interaction by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    The finite element method is employed to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes and their interaction with an optical wave in a waveguide. With a periodic model it is first shown that these electrodes act as a mechanical resonator, which introduces several confined...... modes with slow phase velocities because of mechanical energy storage. The periodic model is extended to a finite model by using perfectly matched layers at the boundaries and the periodic and the finite model are in fine agreement. The finite model is then employed to study the acousto...

  6. Localized surface plasmon resonances in spatially dispersive nano-objects: phenomenological treatise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Pavel; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2013-05-28

    Nonlocal optical response of materials, important at the nanometric scale, influences numerous optical phenomena, such as electromagnetic field confinement and spectral characteristics of plasmonic resonances. Here, we present a general phenomenological approach to account for nonlocal material polarizabilities in nanoscale metal particles. The problem of nonlocal plasmonic resonances is formulated by an integro-differential equation in a space domain and solved by adopting its weak form, implemented in the finite element method, thus, dispensing with the requirements on additional boundary conditions. As an example, nonlocal smearing effects in plasmonic nanorods of various cross sections and nanotubes have been considered. Clear signature of nonlocality manifests itself in the interference fringes in the potential profile and a significant frequency shift of the localized surface plasmon resonances. These effects are especially important for nanoparticles with geometrical features comparable to the de Broglie wavelengths of electrons participating in the light-matter interactions. The proposed method provides a universal tool for phenomenological account of nonlocalities of any kind with the only requirement of linearity in system's response.

  7. High-precision micro-displacement optical-fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongda; Liu, Lu; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yaxun

    2017-05-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel optical-fiber micro-displacement sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by fabricating a Kretschmann configuration on graded-index multimode fiber (GIMMF). We employ a single-mode fiber to change the radial position of the incident beam as the displacement. In the GIMMF, the angle between the light beam and fiber axis, which is closely related to the resonance angle, is changed by the displacement; thus, the resonance wavelength of the fiber SPR shifts. This micro-displacement fiber sensor has a wide detection range of 0-25 μm, a high sensitivity with maximum up to 10.32 nm/μm, and a nanometer resolution with minimum to 2 nm, which transcends almost all of other optical-fiber micro-displacement sensors. In addition, we also research that increasing the fiber polishing angle or medium refractive index can improve the sensitivity. This micro-displacement sensor will have a great significance in many industrial applications and provide a neoteric, rapid, and accurate optical measurement method in micro-displacement.

  8. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Hao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2 deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  9. Near-Infrared Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances Arising from Free Carriers in Doped Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K.; Luther, Joey; Ewers, Trevor; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-10-12

    Quantum confinement of electronic wavefunctions in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) yields discrete atom-like and tunable electronic levels, thereby allowing the engineering of excitation and emission spectra. Metal nanoparticles, on the other hand, display strong resonant interactions with light from localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) oscillations of free carriers, resulting in enhanced and geometrically tunable absorption and scattering resonances. The complementary attributes of these nanostructures lends strong interest toward integration into hybrid nanostructures to explore enhanced properties or the emergence of unique attributes arising from their interaction. However, the physicochemical interface between the two components can be limiting for energy transfer and synergistic coupling within such a hybrid nanostructure. Therefore, it is advantageous to realize both attributes, i.e., LSPRs and quantum confinement within the same nanostructure. Here, we describe well-defined LSPRs arising from p-type carriers in vacancy-doped semiconductor quantum dots. This opens up possibilities for light harvesting, non-linear optics, optical sensing and manipulation of solid-state processes in single nanocrystals.

  10. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output

  11. Mid-Infrared Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of Indium Tin Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Sun

    In this thesis we investigate the phenomenon of surface plasmons on patterned surfaces of conducting thin films. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the electrons of a thin film made of a conducting metal oxide (CMO) can results in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR). However, patterned surfaces give rise to two optical phenomena known as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) or capacitive plasmon resonance (CPR). LSPR is the optical phenomenon of the interaction of light with nano-scale objects. CPR is from a perpendicularly interaction to the surface between surface plasmon and incident light in a very thin film, i.e. with a thickness less than the skin depth of the conducting material. Surface plasmons (SP) are collective electronic oscillations of electrons which are induced by electromagnetic wave at the interface between and conductor and a dielectric. SP couple with incident light to form a surface oscillation known as asurface plasmon polariton (SPP), which can propagate along the surface of the conductor-insulator interface. Then, SPPs can be excited by either electrons or photons and the excitation is measured or observed as a SPR. Specially, on a nanoscale patterned surface or in a nanoparticle sample, the excitations of SPPs are detectable as LSPR. The shapes, sizes, or properties of the conducting materials can be controlled to give rise to a variety of LSPR signatures. Therefore, the lithographic techniques, which are able to make patterns or shapes on the micro- to nano-scale, have been also received attention in photonic applications. Many researchers, until now, have focused on noble metals such as gold and silver as plasmonic materials. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) are well known for their plasmonic absorption in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Despite the fact that this is a well-developed field of investigation there are many fundamental aspects that cannot be studied with the noble metals: First, it is not possible to make a

  12. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tran, Hong Nhung; Fort, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  13. Scaling of the Surface Plasmon Resonance in Gold and Silver Dimers Probed by EELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Beleggia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of surface plasmon coupling on the distance between two nanoparticles (dimer) is the basis of nanometrology tools such as plasmon rulers. Application of these nanometric rulers requires an accurate description of the scaling of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength...... with distance. Here, we have applied electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging to investigate the relationship between the SPR wavelength of gold and silver nanosphere dimers (radius R) and interparticle distance (d) in the range 0.1R .... Instead, within the range 0.1R gold and silver dimers. Despite this common power dependence, consistently larger SPR wavelength shifts are registered for silver for a given change in d, implying...

  14. Surface plasmon resonance sensors a materials guide to design and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Leiva Casemiro; Thirstrup, Carsten; Neff, Helmut Franz

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the important physical phenomenon of Surface Plasmon Resonance or Surface Plasmon Polaritons in thin metal films, a phenomenon which is exploited in the design of a large variety of physico-chemical optical sensors. In this treatment, crucial materials aspects for design and optimization of SPR sensors are investigated and outlined in detail. The text covers the selection of nanometer thin metal films, ranging from free-electron to the platinum type conductors, along with their combination with a large variety of dielectric substrate materials, and associated individual layer and opto-geometric arrangements. Furthermore, as-yet hardly explored SPR features of selected metal–metal and metal–dielectric super lattices are included in this report. An in-depth multilayer Fresnel evaluation provides the mathematical tool for this optical analysis, which otherwise relies solely on experimentally determined electro-optical materials parameters.

  15. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Tiwari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = ∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  16. Superiority of localized surface plasmon resonance technique in characterization of ultra-thin metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer; Tiwari, P.; Bhartiya, S.; Mukherjee, C.; Rai, S. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    The comparison and correlation of morphological, optical and crystallographic properties of ultra-thin Au films obtained using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray reflectivity (XRR), UV-visible transmission, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) are presented. The Au thin films of different thickness are grown on the glass substrate using the sputtering technique. The particle size, number density and the covered area fraction of Au thin film are obtained from FESEM images. The XRR technique is used to determine the film thickness and surface roughness. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) response of Au thin films is obtained using UV-Vis transmission spectroscopy. The LSPR peak position and its strength are correlated with film morphology and thickness. Finally, it is shown that LSPR based spectroscopy techniques can provide much better information about morphology and thickness of the Au films up to a resolution of ~1 nm.

  17. Bimetallic structure fabricated by laser interference lithography for tuning surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C H; Hong, M H; Cheung, H W; Zhang, F; Huang, Z Q; Tan, L S; Hor, T S A

    2008-07-07

    Tuning of surface plasmon resonance by gold and silver bimetallic thin film and bimetallic dot array is investigated. Laser interference lithography is applied to fabricate the nanostructures. A bimetallic dot structure is obtained by a lift-off procedure after gold and silver thin film deposition by an electron beam evaporator. Surface plasmon behaviors of these films and nanostructures are studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy. It is observed that for gold thin film on quartz substrate, the optical spectral peak is blue shifted when a silver thin film is coated over it. Compared to the plasmon band in single metal gold dot array, the bimetallic nanodot array shows a similar blue shift in its spectral peak. These shifts are both attributed to the interaction between gold and silver atoms. Electromagnetic interaction between gold and silver nanostructures is discussed using a simplified spring model.

  18. Evaluation of surface nuclear magnetic resonance-estimated subsurface water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Petke, M; Dlugosch, R; Yaramanci, U

    2011-01-01

    The technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has found widespread use in geophysical applications for determining rock properties (e.g. porosity and permeability) and state variables (e.g. water content) or to distinguish between oil and water. NMR measurements are most commonly made in the laboratory and in boreholes. The technique of surface NMR (or magnetic resonance sounding (MRS)) also takes advantage of the NMR phenomenon, but by measuring subsurface rock properties from the surface using large coils of some tens of meters and reaching depths as much as 150 m. We give here a brief review of the current state of the art of forward modeling and inversion techniques. In laboratory NMR a calibration is used to convert measured signal amplitudes into water content. Surface NMR-measured amplitudes cannot be converted by a simple calibration. The water content is derived by comparing a measured amplitude with an amplitude calculated for a given subsurface water content model as input for a forward modeling that must account for all relevant physics. A convenient option to check whether the measured signals are reliable or the forward modeling accounts for all effects is to make measurements in a well-defined environment. Therefore, measurements on top of a frozen lake were made with the latest-generation surface NMR instruments. We found the measured amplitudes to be in agreement with the calculated amplitudes for a model of 100 % water content. Assuming then both the forward modeling and the measurement to be correct, the uncertainty of the model is calculated with only a few per cent based on the measurement uncertainty.

  19. Intersubband surface plasmon polaritons in all-semiconductor planar plasmonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZałuŻny, M.

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically discuss properties of intersubband surface plasmon polaritons (ISPPs) supported by the system consisting of a multiple quantum well (MQW) slab embedded into planar resonator with highly doped semiconducting claddings playing the role of cavity mirrors. Symmetric structures, where the MQW slab occupies the whole space between the claddings and asymmetric structures, where the MQW occupy only half of the space between mirrors, are considered. We focus mainly on the nearly degenerate structures where intersubband frequency is close to frequency of the surface plasmon of the mirrors. The ISPP characteristics are calculated numerically using a semiclassical approach based on the transfer matrix formalism and the effective-medium approximation. The claddings are described by the lossless Drude model. The possibility of engineering the dispersion of the ISPP branches is demonstrated. In particular, for certain parameters of the asymmetric structures we observe the formation of the multimode ISPP branches with two zero group velocity points. We show that the properties of the ISPP branches are reasonably well interpreted employing quasiparticle picture provided that the concept of the mode overlap factor is generalized, taking into account the dispersive character of the mirrors. In addition to this, we demonstrate that the lossless dispersion characteristics of the ISPP branches obtained in the paper are consistent with the angle-resolved reflection-absorption spectra of the GaAlAs-based realistic plasmonic resonators.

  20. Terahertz modulation based on surface plasmon resonance by self-gated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhenhai; Yang, Dongxiao; Wang, Wei

    2018-05-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the extraordinary optical transmission through a terahertz metamaterial composed of metallic ring aperture arrays. The physical mechanism of different transmission peaks is elucidated to be magnetic polaritons or propagation surface plasmons with the help of surface current and electromagnetic field distributions at respective resonance frequencies. Then, we propose a high performance terahertz modulator based on the unique PSP resonance and combined with the metallic ring aperture arrays and a self-gated parallel-plate graphene capacitor. Because, to date, few researches have exhibited gate-controlled graphene modulation in terahertz region with low insertion losses, high modulation depth and low control voltage at room temperature. Here, we propose a 96% amplitude modulation with 0.7 dB insertion losses and ∼5.5 V gate voltage. Besides, we further study the absorption spectra of the modulator. When the transmission of modulator is very low, a 91% absorption can be achieved for avoiding damaging the source devices.

  1. A surface plasmon resonance biosensor for direct detection of the rabies virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip was constructed for detection of rabies virus. For the construction of the biosensor chip, N protein specific antibody and N protein specific antibody combined with G protein specific antibody of rabies virus were linked on two different flow cells on one CM5 chip, respectively. The chip was tested for the detection of rabies virus antigens using the crude extract of rabies virus from infected BHK cell strain culture. Tenfold serial dilutions of SRV9 strain virus-infected cell cultures were tested by the biosensor chip to establish the detection limit. The limit detection was approximately 70 pg/ml of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein. The biosensor chip developed in this study was employed for the detection of rabies virus in five suspect infectious specimens of brain tissue from guinea pigs; the results were compared by fluorescent antibody test. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip could be a useful automatic tool for prompt detection of rabies virus infection.

  2. A high-performance lab-on-a-chip liquid sensor employing surface acoustic wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustanovich, K.; Yantchev, V.; Kirejev, V.; Jeffries, G. D. M.; Lobovkina, T.; Jesorka, A.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate herein a new concept for lab-on-a-chip in-liquid sensing, through integration of surface acoustic wave resonance (SAR) in a one-port configuration with a soft polymer microfluidic delivery system. In this concept, the reflective gratings of a one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator are employed as mass loading-sensing elements, while the SAW transducer is protected from the measurement environment. We describe the design, fabrication, implementation, and characterization using liquid medium. The sensor operates at a frequency of 185 MHz and has demonstrated a comparable sensitivity to other SAW in-liquid sensors, while offering quality factor (Q) value in water of about 250, low impedance and fairly low susceptibility to viscous damping. For proof of principle, sensing performance was evaluated by means of binding 40 nm neutravidin-coated SiO2 nanoparticles to a biotin-labeled lipid bilayer deposited over the reflectors. Frequency shifts were determined for every step of the affinity assay. Demonstration of this integrated technology highlights the potential of SAR technology for in-liquid sensing.

  3. [INVITED] Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic chemical and biosensors utilizing bulk and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Banshi D.; Kant, Ravi

    2018-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has established itself as an immensely acclaimed and influential optical sensing tool with quintessential applications in life sciences, environmental monitoring, clinical diagnostics, pharmaceutical developments and ensuring food safety. The implementation of sensing principle of surface plasmon resonance employing an optical fiber as a substrate has concomitantly resulted in the evolution of fiber optic surface plasmon resonance as an exceptionally lucrative scaffold for chemical and biosensing applications. This perspective article outlines the contemporary studies on fiber optic sensors founded on the sensing architecture of propagating as well as localized surface plasmon resonance. An in-depth review of the prevalent analytical and surface chemical tactics involved in configuring the sensing layer over an optical fiber for the detection of various chemical and biological entities is presented. The involvement of nanomaterials as a strategic approach to enhance the sensor sensitivity is furnished concurrently providing an insight into the diverse geometrical blueprints for designing fiber optic sensing probes. Representative examples from the literature are discussed to appreciate the latest advancements in this potentially valuable research avenue. The article concludes by identifying some of the key challenges and exploring the opportunities for expanding the scope and impact of surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensors.

  4. Feasibility study of the usefulness of SRS thermoplastic mask for head and neck cancer in tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong Jin; Kim, Chul Jong; Kwon, Dong Yeol; Kim, Jong Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sam Sung Seoul hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    When head and neck cancer radiation therapy, thermoplastic mask is applied for patients with fixed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate usefulness of thermoplastic mask for SRS in tomotherapy by conparison with the conventional mask. Typical mask(conventional mask, C-mask) and mask for SRS are used to fix body phantom(rando phantom) on the same iso centerline, then simulation is performed. Tomotherapy plan for orbit and salivary glands is made by treatment planning system(TPS). A thick portion and a thin portion located near the treatment target relative to the mask S-mask are defined as region of interest for surface dose dosimetry. Surface dose variation depending on the type of mask was analyzed by measuring the TPS and EBT film. Surface dose variation due to the type of mask from the TPS is showed in orbit and salivary glands 0.65-2.53 Gy, 0.85-1.84 Gy, respectively. In case of EBT film, -0.2-3.46 Gy, 1.04-3.02 Gy. When applied to the S-mask, in TPS and Gafchromic EBT3 film, substrantially 4.26%, 5.82% showed maximum changing trend, respectively. To apply S-mask for tomotherapy, surface dose is changed, but the amount is insignificant and be useful when treatment target is close critical organs because decrease inter and intra fractional variation.

  5. Estimation of cerebral surface area using vertical sectioning and magnetic resonance imaging: a stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Cankaya, Mehmet Niyazi; Işçi, Oznur; Baş, Orhan; Camurdanoğlu, Mehmet; Turgut, Mehmet

    2010-01-15

    Stereological techniques using isotropic uniform random and vertical uniform random sections have been used for surface area estimation. However, there are a few studies in which the surface area of the brain is estimated using the vertical section technique in a stereological approach. The objective of the current study was to apply the vertical section technique using cycloid test probes for estimation of cerebral surface area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, cerebral surface areas were estimated in a total of 13 young subjects (6 males, 7 females) who were free of any neurological symptoms and signs. The means (+/-S.D.) of the surface areas were 1619.92+/-140. 97 cm (2), 1625.69+/-147. 58 cm(2) and 1674.69+/-160. 60 cm(2) for 36, 18 and 12 vertical sections, respectively. The mean coefficient of error obtained by applying cycloid test lines that use a 2. 8-cm ratio of area associated with each cycloid was estimated at 0.05). In addition, the three models correlated well with each other. From these results, it is concluded that the vertical section technique is an unbiased, efficient and reliable method and is ideally suited to in vivo examination of MRI data for estimating the surface area of the brain. Hence, we suggest that estimation of surface area using MRI and stereology may be clinically relevant for assessing cortical atrophy as well as for investigating the structure and function of cerebral hemispheres. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A case of Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS): multiple pituitary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ham 1969; Albertsson-Wikland 1989; Chatelain 1993; Az- cona et al. 1998). The incidence of GHD, hypopituitarism in SRS is still controversial. GH insufficiency in low-birth weight syn- dromes has an incidence of 13–67% (Albertsson-Wikland. 1989; Rochiccioli et al. 1989; Stanhope et al. 1989; Bo- guszewski et al. 1995).

  7. VME applications to the Daresbury SRS control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martlew, B.G.; McCarthy, M.; Rawlinson, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The control system for the Daresbury SRS has recently been extended with a VME based alarm system which is operational. A further development is a steering system to provide servo control of the electron beam orbit position in the storage ring. (author)

  8. Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS): Software requirements specification (SRS). Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasscock, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) database, an Impact Level 3Q system. SACS stores information on tank temperatures, surface levels, and interstitial liquid levels. This information is retrieved by the customer through a PC-based interface and is then available to a number of other software tools. The software requirements specification (SRS) describes the system requirements for the SACS Project, and follows the Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Software Practices (WHC-CM-3-10) and Quality Assurance (WHC-CM-4-2, QR 19.0) policies

  9. A high-throughput surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Daqian; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Enyao; Yu, Xinglong; Luo, Zhaofeng; Ou, Huichao

    2012-01-01

    A new high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging is reported. The two SPR interferograms of the sensing surface are imaged on two CCD cameras. The phase difference between the two interferograms is 180°. The refractive index related factor (RIRF) of the sensing surface is calculated from the two simultaneously acquired interferograms. The simulation results indicate that the RIRF exhibits a linear relationship with the refractive index of the sensing surface and is unaffected by the noise, drift and intensity distribution of the light source. The affinity and kinetic information can be extracted in real time from continuously acquired RIRF distributions. The results of refractometry experiments show that the dynamic detection range of SPR differential interferometric imaging system can be over 0.015 refractive index unit (RIU). High refractive index resolution is down to 0.45 RU (1 RU = 1 × 10 −6 RIU). Imaging and protein microarray experiments demonstrate the ability of high-throughput detection. The aptamer experiments demonstrate that the SPR sensor based on differential interferometric imaging has a great capability to be implemented for high-throughput aptamer kinetic evaluation. These results suggest that this biosensor has the potential to be utilized in proteomics and drug discovery after further improvement. (paper)

  10. Spin-wave resonance frequency in ferromagnetic thin film with interlayer exchange coupling and surface anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuhui; Rong, Jianhong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Lei

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of spin-wave resonance(SWR) frequency on the surface anisotropy, the interlayer exchange coupling, the ferromagnetic layer thickness, the mode number and the external magnetic field in a ferromagnetic superlattice film by means of the linear spin-wave approximation and Green's function technique. The SWR frequency of the ferromagnetic thin film is shifted to higher values corresponding to those of above factors, respectively. It is found that the linear behavior of SWR frequency curves of all modes in the system is observed as the external magnetic field is increasing, however, SWR frequency curves are nonlinear with the lower and the higher modes for different surface anisotropy and interlayer exchange coupling in the system. In addition, the SWR frequency of the lowest (highest) mode is shifted to higher (lower) values when the film thickness is thinner. The interlayer exchange coupling is more important for the energetically higher modes than for the energetically lower modes. The surface anisotropy has a little effect on the SWR frequency of the highest mode, when the surface anisotropy field is further increased.

  11. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  12. Diagnostics of microwave assisted electron cyclotron resonance plasma source for surface modification of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Supriya E.; Das, Partha Sarathi; Bansode, Avinash; Dhamale, Gayatri; Ghorui, S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Mathe, Vikas L.

    2018-01-01

    Looking at the increasing scope of plasma processing of materials surface, here we present the development and diagnostics of a microwave assisted Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma system suitable for surface modification of polymers. Prior to the surface-treatment, a detailed diagnostic mapping of the plasma parameters throughout the reactor chamber was carried out by using single and double Langmuir probe measurements in Ar plasma. Conventional analysis of I-V curves as well as the elucidation form of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) has become the source of calibration of plasma parameters in the reaction chamber. The high energy tail in the EEDF of electron temperature is seen to extend beyond 60 eV, at much larger distances from the ECR zone. This proves the suitability of the rector for plasma processing, since the electron energy is much beyond the threshold energy of bond breaking in most of the polymers. Nylon 6 is used as a representative candidate for surface processing in the presence of Ar, H2 + N2, and O2 plasma, treated at different locations inside the plasma chamber. In a typical case, the work of adhesion is seen to almost get doubled when treated with oxygen plasma. Morphology of the plasma treated surface and its hydrophilicity are discussed in view of the variation in electron density and electron temperature at these locations. Nano-protrusions arising from plasma treatment are set to be responsible for the hydrophobicity. Chemical sputtering and physical sputtering are seen to influence the surface morphology on account of sufficient electron energies and increased plasma potential.

  13. An Exposed-Core Grapefruit Fibers Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianchao Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of air hole coating and analyte filling in microstructured optical fiber-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors, we designed an exposed-core grapefruit fiber (EC-GFs-based SPR sensor. The exposed section of the EC-GF is coated with a SPR, supporting thin silver film, which can sense the analyte in the external environment. The asymmetrically coated fiber can support two separate resonance peaks (x- and y-polarized peaks with orthogonal polarizations and x-polarized peak, providing a much higher peak loss than y-polarized, also the x-polarized peak has higher wavelength and amplitude sensitivities. A large analyte refractive index (RI range from 1.33 to 1.42 is calculated to investigate the sensing performance of the sensor, and an extremely high wavelength sensitivity of 13,500 nm/refractive index unit (RIU is obtained. The silver layer thickness, which may affect the sensing performance, is also discussed. This work can provide a reference for developing a high sensitivity, real-time, fast-response, and distributed SPR RI sensor.

  14. Optically abrupt localized surface plasmon resonances in si nanowires by mitigation of carrier density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Li-Wei; Boyuk, Dmitriy S; Filler, Michael A

    2015-02-24

    Spatial control of carrier density is critical for engineering and exploring the interactions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in nanoscale semiconductors. Here, we couple in situ infrared spectral response measurements and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations to show the impact of axially graded carrier density profiles on the optical properties of mid-infrared LSPRs supported by Si nanowires synthesized by the vapor-liquid-solid technique. The region immediately adjacent to each intentionally encoded resonator (i.e., doped segment) can exhibit residual carrier densities as high as 10(20) cm(-3), which strongly modifies both near- and far-field behavior. Lowering substrate temperature during the spacer segment growth reduces this residual carrier density and results in a spectral response that is indistinguishable from nanowires with ideal, atomically abrupt carrier density profiles. Our experiments have important implications for the control of near-field plasmonic phenomena in semiconductor nanowires, and demonstrate methods for determining and controlling axial dopant profile in these systems.

  15. Rational Design of Peptide-Functionalized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for Specific Detection of TNT Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a rationally-designed 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT binding peptide derived from an amino acid sequence of the complementarity-determining region (CDR of an anti-TNT monoclonal antibody was used for TNT detection based on a maleimide-functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor. By antigen-docking simulation and screening, the TNT binding candidate peptides were obtained as TNTHCDR1 derived from the heavy chain of CDR1, TNTHCDR2 derived from CDR2, and TNTHCDR3 from CDR3 of an anti-TNT antibody. The binding events between candidate peptides and TNT were evaluated using the SPR sensor by direct determination based on the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES surface. The TNT binding peptide was directly immobilized on the maleimide-functionalized sensor chip surface from N-γ-maleimidobutyryl-oxysuccinimide ester (GMBS. The results demonstrated that peptide TNTHCDR3 was identified and selected as a TNT binding peptide among the other two candidate peptides. Five kinds of TNT analogues were also investigated to testify the selectivity of TNT binding peptide TNTHCDR3. Furthermore, the results indicated that the APTES-GMBS-based SPR sensor chip procedure featured a great potential application for the direct detection of TNT.

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigations of Bioselective Element Based on the Recombinant Protein A for Immunoglobulin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmachuk, A.; Gorbatiuk, O.; Rachkov, A.; Dons'koi, B.; Khristosenko, R.; Ushenin, I.; Peshkova, V.; Soldatkin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on the recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with an additional cysteine residue (SPA-Cys) used as a biorecognition component showed a good selectivity and sensitivity for the immunoglobulin detection. The developed biosensor with SPA-Cys-based bioselective element can also be used as a first step of immunosensor creation. The successful immobilization of SPA-Cys on the nanolayer gold sensor surface of the SPR spectrometer was performed. The efficiency of blocking nonspecific sorption sites on the sensor surface with milk proteins, gelatin, BSA, and HSA was studied, and a rather high efficiency of using gelatin was confirmed. The SPR biosensor selectively interacted with IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. The linear dependence of the sensor response on the IgG concentration in the range from 2 to 10 μg/ml was shown. Using the calibration curve, the IgG concentration was measured in the model samples. The determined concentrations are in good agreement ( r 2 = 0.97) with the given concentration of IgG.

  17. Fourier Transform Surface Plasmon Resonance of Nanodisks Embedded in Magnetic Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insub; Ih, Seongkeun; Yoo, Haneul; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Sungho

    2018-03-14

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of magnetic plasmonic gyro-nanodisks (GNDs) for Fourier transform surface plasmon resonance based biodetection. Plasmonically active and magnetically responsive gyro-nanodisks were synthesized using electrochemical methods with anodized aluminum templates. Due to the unique properties of GNDs (magnetic responsiveness and surface plasmon bands), periodic extinction signals were generated under an external rotating magnetic field, which is, in turn, converted into frequency domains using Fourier transformation. After the binding of a target on GNDs, an increase in the shear force causes a shift in the frequency domain, which allows us to investigate biodetection for HA1 (the influenza virus). Most importantly, by modulating the number and the location of plasmonic nanodisks (a method for controlling the hydrodynamic forces by rationally designing the nanomaterial architecture), we achieved enhanced biodetection sensitivity. We expect that our results will contribute to improved sensing module performance, as well as a better understanding of dynamic nanoparticle systems, by harnessing the perturbed periodic fluctuation of surface plasmon bands under the modulated magnetic field.

  18. Application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2016-02-01

    In this study, surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) was developed for the detection of Candida albicans which is a causal agent of oral infection. The detection was based on the sandwich assay. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on the mixed self assemble monolayers (SAMs). The ratio of mixed SAMs between 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 3-mercaptopropanol was varied to find the optimal ratio for use as a sensor surface. The results showed that the suitable surface for C. albicans detection was SAM of carboxylic (mixed SAMs 1:0), even though mixed SAMs 1:40 had a high detection signal in comparison to mixed SAMs 1:0, but the non-specific signal was higher. The detection limit was 107 cells/ml for direct detection, and was increased to 106 cells/ml with sandwich antibody. The use of polyclonal C. albicans antibody as capture and sandwich antibody showed good selectivity against the relevant oral bacteria including Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutan, Staphylococcus aureus, β-streptococci, and Lactobacillus casei. SPR platform in this study could detect C. albicans from the mixed microbial suspension without requirement of skillful technician. This SPR imaging biosensor could be applied for Candida identification after cultivation.

  19. A Novel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors with Special Boronic Acid Derivative to Detect Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We proposed and demonstrated a novel tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR label-free biosensor via a special boronic acid derivative to detect glycoprotein with high sensitivity and selectivity. TFBG, as an effective sensing element for optical sensing in near-infrared wavelengths, possess the unique capability of easily exciting the SPR effect on fiber surface which coated with a nano-scale metal layer. SPR properties can be accurately detected by measuring the variation of transmitted spectra at optical communication wavelengths. In our experiment, a 10° TFBG coated with a 50 nm gold film was manufactured to stimulate SPR on a sensor surface. To detect glycoprotein selectively, the sensor was immobilized using designed phenylboronic acid as the recognition molecule, which can covalently bond with 1,2- or 1,3-diols to form five- or six-membered cyclic complexes for attaching diol-containing biomolecules and proteins. The phenylboronic acid was synthetized with long alkyl groups offering more flexible space, which was able to improve the capability of binding glycoprotein. The proposed TFBG-SPR sensors exhibit good selectivity and repeatability with a protein concentration sensitivity up to 2.867 dB/ (mg/mL and a limit of detection (LOD of 15.56 nM.

  20. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  1. Surface-Tunable Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer via Geometry-Controlled ZnO Nanorod Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Park, Geun Chul; Lee, Seung Muk; Lee, Jung Heon; Lim, Butaek; Hwang, Soo Min; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Hansoo; Joo, Jinho; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-01

    The use of ZnO nanorods (NRs) as an effective coordinator and biosensing platform to create bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is reported. Herein, a hydrothermal approach is applied to obtain morphologically controlled ZnO NRs, which are directly bound to luciferase (Luc) and carboxy-modified quantum dot (QD) acting as a donor-acceptor pair for BRET. BRET efficiency varies significantly with the geometry of ZnO NRs, which modulates the coordination between hexahistidine-tagged Luc (Luc-His6 ) and QD, owing to the combined effect of the total surface area consisting of (001) and (100) planes and their surface polarities. Unlike typical QD-BRET reactions with metal ions (e.g., zinc ions), a geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can facilitate the design of surface-initiated BRET sensors without being supplemented by copious metal ions: the geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can therefore pave the way for nanostructure-based biosensors with enhanced analytical performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Probing protein: DNA interactions using a uniform monolayer of DNA and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S.; Campbell, Charles T.; Stormo, Gary D.; Silbaq, Fauzi S.; Aebersold, Rudolf H.

    2000-04-01

    A method is described for immobilizing double-stranded DNAs to a planar gold surface with high density and uniform spacing. This is accomplished by adsorbing biotinylated DNAs onto a nearly close-packed monolayer of the protein streptavidin. This streptavidin monolayer, which offers approximately 5 X 1012 biotin sites per cm2, is prepared first by adsorbing it onto a mixed self-assembled monolayer on gold which contains biotin-terminated and oligo-terminated alkylthiolates in a 3/7 ratio. This DNA- functionalized surface resists non-specific protein adsorption and is useful for probing the kinetics and equilibrium binding of proteins to DNA with surface plasmon resonance. This is demonstrated with the Mnt protein, which is found to bind in 3.8:1 ratio to its immobilized DNA operator sequence. This is consistent with its behavior in homogeneous solution, where it binds as a tetramer to its DNA. A sequence with a single base-pair mutation shows nearly as much Mnt binding, but a completely random DNA sequence shows only 5 percent of this binding. This proves that DNA-binding proteins bind sequence-specifically to double-stranded DNAs which are immobilized to gold with this streptavidin linker layer.

  3. Multielement surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for monitoring of blood circulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevych, Sergey A.; Kostyukevych, Kateryna V.; Khristosenko, Roman V.; Lysiuk, Viktor O.; Koptyukh, Anastasiya A.; Moscalenko, Nadiya L.

    2017-12-01

    The problems related to the development of a multielement immunosensor device with the prism type of excitation of a surface plasmon resonance in the Kretschmann configuration and with the scanning of the incidence angle of monochromatic light aimed at the reliable determination of the levels of three molecular markers of the system of hemostasis (fibrinogen, soluble fibrin, and D-dimer) are considered. We have analyzed the influence of a technology for the production of a gold coating, modification of its surface, and noise effects on the enhancement of sensitivity and stability of the operation of devices. A means of oriented immobilization of monoclonal antibodies on the surface of gold using a multilayer film of copper aminopentacyanoferrate is developed. For the model proteins of studied markers, the calibrating curves (maximum sensitivity of 0.5 μg/ml) are obtained, and the level of fibrinogen in blood plasma of donors is determined. A four-channel modification of the device with an application of a reference channel for comparing the elimination of the noise of temperature fluctuations has been constructed. This device allows one to execute the express-diagnostics of prethrombotic states and the monitoring of the therapy of diseases of the blood circulation system.

  4. Kinetic analysis of IgG antibodies to beta-amyloid oligomers with surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisostomo, Amanda C; Dang, Loan; Digambaranath, Jyothi L; Klaver, Andrea C; Loeffler, David A; Payne, Jeremiah J; Smith, Lynnae M; Yokom, Adam L; Finke, John M

    2015-07-15

    Surface plasmon resonance was used to investigate the kinetics, affinity, and specificity of binding between anti-Aβ (beta-amyloid) IgG antibodies and oligomeric Aβ. Two factors were needed to accurately characterize the IgG binding kinetics. First, a bivalent model was necessary to properly fit the kinetic association and dissociation sensograms. Second, a high concentration of IgG was necessary to overcome a significant mass transport limitation that existed regardless of oligomer density on the sensor surface. Using high IgG concentrations and bivalent fits, consistent kinetic parameters were found at varying sensor surface ligand densities. A comparison of binding specificity, affinity, and kinetic flux between monoclonal and natural human anti-Aβ IgG antibodies revealed the following findings. First, monoclonal antibodies 6E10 and 4G8 single-site binding affinity is similar between Aβ oligomers and monomers. Second, natural human anti-Aβ IgG binding readily binds Aβ oligomers but does not bind monomers. Third, natural human anti-Aβ IgG binds Aβ oligomers with a higher affinity and kinetic flux than 6E10 and 4G8. Both the current analytical methodology and antibody binding profiles are important for advances in antibody drug development and kinetic biomarker applications for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A saliva molecular imprinted localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for wine astringency estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, J Rafaela L; Teixeira, Natércia; De Freitas, Victor; Sales, M Goreti F; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2017-10-15

    Wine astringency was evaluated based on the interaction of two complex matrices (red wine and saliva) by combining localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) at gold nanodisks as an alternative to sensorial analysis. The main objective of the work was to simulate wine astringency inside the mouth by mimicking this biological system. The LSPR/MIP sensor provided a linear response for astringency expressed in pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) units in concentrations ranging from 1 to 140μmol/L. The sensor was also applied to wine samples correlating well with sensorial analysis obtained by a trained panel. The correlation of astringency and wine composition was also evaluated showing that anthocyanins may have an important role, not only for pigmentation but also in astringency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gold nanorods for surface Plasmon resonance detection of mercury (II) in flow injection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Khang; Heider, Emily C; Brooks, Scott C; Barbosa, Fernando; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-10-01

    This article investigates the flow injection analysis of mercury (II) ions in tap water samples via surface Plasmon resonance detection. Quantitative analysis of mercury (II) is based on the chemical interaction of metallic mercury with gold nanorods immobilized on a glass substrate. A new flow cell design is presented with the ability to accommodate the detecting substrate in the sample compartment of commercial spectrometers. Two alternatives are here considered for mercury (II) detection, namely stop-flow and continuous flow injection analysis modes. The best limit of detection (2.4 ng mL(-1)) was obtained with the continuous flow injection analysis approach. The accurate determination of mercury (II) ions in samples of unknown composition is demonstrated with a fortified tap water sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance fluorescence biosensor for detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Chiaki; Iizuka, Ryota; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    To detect biological substances such as bacteria speedily and accurately, a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fluorescence biosensor is being developed. Using Escherichia coli as a target organism, an appropriate voltage frequency to collect E. coli cells on indium tin oxide quadrupole electrodes by dielectrophoresis is analyzed. Then, E. coli is stained with 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). To clearly detect fluorescence signals from DAPI-stained E. coli cells, the sensor is optimized so that we can excite SPR on Al electrodes by illuminating 405 nm photons. As a result, the number of fluorescence signals is increased on the electrodes by the application of a low-frequency voltage. This indicates that E. coli cells with a lower permittivity than the surrounding water are collected by negative dielectrophoresis onto the electrodes where the electric field strength is lowest.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance based biosensor: A new platform for rapid diagnosis of livestock diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravas Ranjan Sahoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR based biosensors are the most advanced and developed optical label-free biosensor technique used for powerful detection with vast applications in environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security as well in livestock sector. The livestock sector which contributes the largest economy of India, harbors many bacterial, viral, and fungal diseases impacting a great loss to the production and productive potential which is a major concern in both small and large ruminants. Hence, an accurate, sensitive, and rapid diagnosis is required for prevention of these above-mentioned diseases. SPR based biosensor assay may fulfill the above characteristics which lead to a greater platform for rapid diagnosis of different livestock diseases. Hence, this review may give a detail idea about the principle, recent development of SPR based biosensor techniques and its application in livestock sector.

  9. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period

  10. Surface plasmon resonance based optical fiber riboflavin sensor by using molecularly imprinted gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2013-05-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical fiber riboflavin/vitamin B2 sensor using combination of colloidal crystal templating and molecularly imprinted gel. The sensor works on spectral interrogation method. The operating range of the sensor lies from 0 μg/ml to 320 μg/ml, the suitable amount of intakes of riboflavin recommended for different age group. The SPR spectra show blue shift with increasing concentration of riboflavin, which is due to the interaction of riboflavin molecule over specific binding sites caused by molecular imprinting. The present sensor has many advantageous features such as fast response, small probe size, low cost and can be used for remote/online monitoring.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Polymer Photonic Crystal Fibers with Metal Nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Quan Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large-mode-area polymer photonic crystal fiber made of polymethyl methacrylate with the cladding having only one layer of air holes near the edge of the fiber is designed and proposed to be used in surface plasmon resonance sensors. In such sensor, a nanoscale metal film and analyte can be deposited on the outer side of the fiber instead of coating or filling in the holes of the conventional PCF, which make the real time detection with high sensitivity easily to realize. Moreover, it is relatively stable to changes of the amount and the diameter of air holes, which is very beneficial for sensor fabrication and sensing applications. Numerical simulation results show that under the conditions of the similar spectral and intensity sensitivity of 8.3 × 10−5–9.4 × 10−5 RIU, the confinement loss can be increased dramatically.

  12. Sensitivity enhancement of a surface plasmon resonance sensor using porous metamaterial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherifi, Abdellatif; Bouhafs, Benamar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device with two porous left handed metamaterial (LHM) layers separated by an insulator gap, is investigated. The effect of the insulator gap thickness and its refractive index (RI) on the angular response of the device is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the SPR sensor is enhanced compared to the standard SPR sensors. Here, the multilayer structure is probed with 738 nm-wavelength, and electromagnetic properties of active porous LHM layers are described from the effective medium theory (EMT). Furthermore, in the increase of the porosity from 0 to 0.6, the designed nanocavity exhibits a fundamental SPR mode long-range (LR) type and it can be of interest in high-performance SPR sensing.

  13. Nanoplasmonic Biosensor Using Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy for Biochemical Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diming; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Yanli; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) associated with metal nanostructures has developed into a highly useful sensor technique. Optical LSPR spectroscopy of nanostructures often shows sharp absorption and scattering peaks, which can be used to probe several bio-molecular interactions. Here, we report nanoplasmonic biosensors using LSPR on nanocup arrays (nanoCA) to recognize bio-molecular binding for biochemical detection. These sensors can be modified to quantify binding of small molecules to proteins for odorant and explosive detections. Electrochemical LSPR biosensors can also be designed by coupling electrochemistry and LSPR spectroscopy measurements. Multiple sensing information can be obtained and electrochemical LSPR property can be investigated for biosensors. In some applications, the electrochemical LSPR biosensor can be used to quantify immunoreactions and enzymatic activity. The biosensors exhibit better performance than those of conventional optical LSPR measurements. With multi-transducers, the nanoplasmonic biosensor can provide a promising approach for bio-detection in environmental monitoring, healthcare diagnostics, and food quality control.

  14. Surface plasmon resonance based sensing of different chemical and biological samples using admittance loci method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Kaushik; Ghosh, Sharmila; Ray, Mina

    2013-06-01

    The admittance loci method plays an important role in the design of multilayer thin film structures. In this paper, admittance loci method has been explored theoretically for sensing of various chemical and biological samples based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon. A dielectric multilayer structure consisting of a Boro silicate glass (BSG) substrate, calcium fluoride (CaF2) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) along with different dielectric layers has been investigated. Moreover, admittance loci as well as SPR curves of metal-dielectric multilayer structure consisting of the BSG substrate, gold metal film and various dielectric samples has been simulated in MATLAB environment. To validate the proposed simulation results, calibration curves have also been provided.

  15. Enabling surface nuclear magnetic resonance at high-noise environments using a pre-polarization pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Yang, Yujing; Teng, Fei; Müller-Petke, Mike

    2018-02-01

    The technique of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) has been widely used for hydrological investigations in recent years. Unfortunately, the detected SNMR signals are limited to tens of nanovolts and are thus susceptible to environmental noise. While pre-polarization pulses to enhance the detected signal amplitudes are common in laboratory applications, SNMR field testing has only utilized excitation pulses until now. In conducting measurements in China, we demonstrate that adding a pre-polarization field to the SNMR pulse sequence is feasible and allows for the reliable detection of SNMR signals in noisy scenarios that otherwise prohibit signal detection. We introduce a forward modelling for pre-polarization using SNMR and present a three-layer model obtained from inverse modelling that satisfies the observed data from the field experiment. We expect this development to open up new applications for SNMR technology, especially in high-noise level places, such as active mines.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  17. Deep UV nano-microstructuring of substrates for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawan, A; Vo-Dinh, T; Duval, A; Nakkach, M; Barbillon, G; Moreau, J; Canva, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe wafer-scale fabrication and characterization of plasmonic chips-containing different sizes and spacings of metallic micro- and nanoline structures-using deep UV lithography. Using a high dose (25 mJ cm -2 ) and a proper lift-off process, feature sizes as small as 25 nm are obtained. Moreover, we study the dependence of surface plasmon resonance on the angle of incidence and wavelength for different micro- and nanoline size and spacing values, yielding localized to quasi-propagative plasmonic behaviors. Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) techniques are employed to numerically confirm these experimental observations. Finally, the refractive index of media around the SPRI sensor chips is varied, showing the angulo-spectral regions of higher sensitivity for each type of structure.

  18. Localized surface plasmon resonances in gold nano-patches on a gallium nitride substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Antonio, Palma; Vincenzo Inchingolo, Alessio; Perna, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vito; Stomeo, Tiziana; De Vittorio, Massimo; Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo; D’Orazio, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and characterization of gold nano-patches, deposited on gallium nitride substrate, acting as optical nanoantennas able to efficiently localize the electric field at the metal–dielectric interface. We analyse the performance of the proposed device, evaluating the transmission and the electric field localization by means of a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We detail the fabrication protocol and show the morphological characterization. We also investigate the near-field optical transmission by means of scanning near-field optical microscope measurements, which reveal the excitation of a localized surface plasmon resonance at a wavelength of 633 nm, as expected by the FDTD calculations. Such results highlight how the final device can pave the way for the realization of a single optical platform where the active material and the metal nanostructures are integrated together on the same chip. (paper)

  19. Fiber Bragg grating assisted surface plasmon resonance sensor with graphene oxide sensing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasu, P. T.; Noor, A. S. M.; Shabaneh, A. A.; Yaacob, M. H.; Lim, H. N.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    A single mode fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used to generate Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The uniform gratings of the FBG are used to scatter light from the fiber optic core into the cladding thus enabling the interaction between the light and a thin gold film in order to generate SPR. Applying this technique, the cladding around the FBG is left intact, making this sensor very robust and easy to handle. A thin film of graphene oxide (GO) is deposited over a 45 nm gold film to enhance the sensitivity of the SPR sensor. The gold coated sensor demonstrated high sensitivity of approximately 200 nm/RIU when tested with different concentrations of ethanol in an aqueous medium. A 2.5 times improvement in sensitivity is observed with the GO enhancement compared to the gold coated sensor.

  20. Excitation of multipolar surface plasmon resonance in plasmonic nanoparticles by complex accelerating beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Jiafang; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Yue-Gang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, through a vector-spherical harmonics approach, we investigate the optical spectra of plasmonic Au nanoparticles excited by two special accelerating beams: a non-paraxial Airy beam and a Bessel beam. We systematically analyze the impacts of the beam profile, phase, and helical wave front of the electromagnetic fields on the optical spectrum and the excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We find that the high-order phase in the Airy beam would result in strong plasmonic oscillations in the optical spectra, while the cone angle and orbital angular momentum carried by the Bessel beam could be employed to engineer the plasmon modes excited in Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the optical spectrum excited by a combined Airy–Bessel–Gauss beam is discussed. The study could help to deeply explore new ways to manipulate SPR in metal nanoparticles via the wave front engineering of optical beams for enhancing light–matter interaction and optical sensing performance. (paper)

  1. The detection of small organic molecules based on novel functionalized surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rui; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop rapid, inexpensive, and easily applied in vivo phenotyping strategies for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in biological fluids. Therefore, the accurate detection of low concentration of theophylline, which can be used as a probe for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes (e.g. CYP1A2) activity, could benefit drug-metabolizing studies. In this study, a portable, specific, and sensitive functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using polyacrylamide molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the highly specific selector is developed for the detection of low concentration theophylline in the presence of other confounding components, such as, caffeine which has a very similar chemical structure.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection using surface plasmon resonance modulated by telecommunication wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2013-12-27

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be -0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment.

  3. Fast centroid algorithm for determining the surface plasmon resonance angle using the fixed-boundary method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Shuyue; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yuling

    2011-01-01

    To simplify the algorithm for determining the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle for special applications and development trends, a fast method for determining an SPR angle, called the fixed-boundary centroid algorithm, has been proposed. Two experiments were conducted to compare three centroid algorithms from the aspects of the operation time, sensitivity to shot noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and measurement range. Although the measurement range of this method was narrower, the other performance indices were all better than the other two centroid methods. This method has outstanding performance, high speed, good conformity, low error and a high SNR and resolution. It thus has the potential to be widely adopted

  4. SRS BEDROCK PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS (PSHA) DESIGN BASIS JUSTIFICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This represents an assessment of the available Savannah River Site (SRS) hard-rock probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs), including PSHAs recently completed, for incorporation in the SRS seismic hazard update. The prior assessment of the SRS seismic design basis (WSRC, 1997) incorporated the results from two PSHAs that were published in 1988 and 1993. Because of the vintage of these studies, an assessment is necessary to establish the value of these PSHAs considering more recently collected data affecting seismic hazards and the availability of more recent PSHAs. This task is consistent with the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 420.1B and DOE guidance document DOE G 420.1-2. Following DOE guidance, the National Map Hazard was reviewed and incorporated in this assessment. In addition to the National Map hazard, alternative ground motion attenuation models (GMAMs) are used with the National Map source model to produce alternate hazard assessments for the SRS. These hazard assessments are the basis for the updated hard-rock hazard recommendation made in this report. The development and comparison of hazard based on the National Map models and PSHAs completed using alternate GMAMs provides increased confidence in this hazard recommendation. The alternate GMAMs are the EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and a regional specific model (Silva et al., 2004). Weights of 0.6, 0.3 and 0.1 are recommended for EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and Silva et al. (2004) respectively. This weighting gives cluster weights of .39, .29, .15, .17 for the 1-corner, 2-corner, hybrid, and Greens-function models, respectively. This assessment is judged to be conservative as compared to WSRC (1997) and incorporates the range of prevailing expert opinion pertinent to the development of seismic hazard at the SRS. The corresponding SRS hard-rock uniform hazard spectra are greater than the design spectra developed in WSRC (1997) that were based on the LLNL (1993) and EPRI (1988) PSHAs. The

  5. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  6. Application of Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance for ABO Blood Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanida Tangkawsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a long-range surface plasmon resonance (LR-SPR biosensor for the detection of whole cell by captured antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs as a model. The LR-SPR sensor chip consists of high-refractive index glass, a Cytop film layer, and a thin gold (Au film, which makes the evanescent field intensity and the penetration depth longer than conventional SPR. Therefore, the LR-SPR biosensor has improved capability for detecting large analytes, such as RBCs. The antibodies specific to blood group A and group B (Anti-A and Anti-B are covalently immobilized on a grafting self-assembled monolayer (SAM/Au surface on the biosensor. For blood typing, RBC samples can be detected by the LR-SPR biosensor through a change in the refractive index. We determined that the results of blood typing using the LR-SPR biosensor are consistent with the results obtained from the agglutination test. We obtained the lowest detection limits of 1.58 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-A and 3.83 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-B, indicating that the LR-SPR chip has a higher sensitivity than conventional SPR biosensors (3.3 × 108 cells/ml. The surface of the biosensor can be efficiently regenerated using 20 mM NaOH. In summary, as the LR-SPR technique is sensitive and has a simple experimental setup, it can easily be applied for ABO blood group typing.

  7. Production of refolded Toxoplasma gondii recombinant SAG1-related sequence 3 (SRS3) and its use for serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Abolfazl; Saadatnia, Geita; Golkar, Majid; Babaie, Jalal; Noordin, Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    SAG1-related sequence 3 (SRS3) is one of the major Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite surface antigens and has been shown to be potentially useful for the detection of toxoplasmosis. This protein is highly conformational due to the presence of six disulfide bonds. To achieve solubility and antigenicity, SRS3 depends on proper disulfide bond formation. The aim of this study was to over-express the SRS3 protein with correct folding for use in serodiagnosis of the disease. To achieve this, a truncated SRS3 fusion protein (rtSRS3) was produced, containing six histidyl residues at both terminals and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The refolding process was performed through three methods, namely dialysis in the presence of chemical additives along with reduced/oxidized glutathione and drop-wise dilution methods with reduced/oxidized glutathione or reduced DTT/oxidized glutathione. Ellman's assay and ELISA showed that the protein folding obtained by the dialysis method was the most favorable, probably due to the correct folding. Subsequently, serum samples from individuals with chronic infection (n = 76), probable acute infection (n = 14), and healthy controls (n = 81) were used to determine the usefulness of the refolded rtSRS3 for Toxoplasma serodiagnosis. The results of the developed IgG-ELISA showed a diagnostic specificity of 91% and a sensitivity of 82.89% and 100% for chronic and acute serum samples, respectively. In conclusion, correctly folded rtSRS3 has the potential to be used as a soluble antigen for the detection of human toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hybrid Microwave Treatment of SRS TRU and Mixed Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-11-18

    A new process, using hybrid microwave energy, has been developed as part of the Strategic Research and Development program and successfully applied to treatment of a wide variety of non-radioactive materials, representative of SRS transuranic (TRU) and mixed wastes. Over 35 simulated (non-radioactive) TRU and mixed waste materials were processed individually, as well as in mixed batches, using hybrid microwave energy, a new technology now being patented by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC).

  9. Hybrid Microwave Treatment of SRS TRU and Mixed Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    A new process, using hybrid microwave energy, has been developed as part of the Strategic Research and Development program and successfully applied to treatment of a wide variety of non-radioactive materials, representative of SRS transuranic (TRU) and mixed wastes. Over 35 simulated (non-radioactive) TRU and mixed waste materials were processed individually, as well as in mixed batches, using hybrid microwave energy, a new technology now being patented by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)

  10. Plastic antibody based surface plasmon resonance nanosensors for selective atrazine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-01

    This study reports a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based affinity sensor system with the use of molecular imprinted nanoparticles (plastic antibodies) to enhance the pesticide detection. Molecular imprinting based affinity sensor is prepared by the attachment of atrazine (chosen as model pesticide) imprinted nanoparticles onto the gold surface of SPR chip. Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of aspartic acid. The imprinted nanoparticles were characterized via FTIR and zeta-sizer measurements. SPR sensors are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) and contact angle measurements. The imprinted nanoparticles showed more sensitivity to atrazine than the non-imprinted ones. Different concentrations of atrazine solutions are applied to SPR system to determine the adsorption kinetics. Langmuir adsorption model is found as the most suitable model for this affinity nanosensor system. In order to show the selectivity of the atrazine-imprinted nanoparticles, competitive adsorption of atrazine, simazine and amitrole is investigated. The results showed that the imprinted nanosensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for atrazine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical properties of WO{sub 3} thin films using surface plasmon resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Anjali; Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com, E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Tomar, Monika [Department of Physics, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Indigenously assembled surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique has been exploited to study the thickness dependent dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films. WO{sub 3} thin films (80 nm to 200 nm) have been deposited onto gold (Au) coated glass prism by sputtering technique. The structural, optical properties and surface morphology of the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD analysis shows that all the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films are exhibiting preferred (020) orientation and Raman data indicates that the films possess single phase monoclinic structure. SEM images reveal the variation in grain size with increase in thickness. The SPR reflectance curves of the WO{sub 3}/Au/prism structure were utilized to estimate the dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films at optical frequency (λ = 633 nm). As the thickness of WO{sub 3} thin film increases from 80 nm to 200 nm, the dielectric constant is seen to be decreasing from 5.76 to 3.42, while the dielectric loss reduces from 0.098 to 0.01. The estimated value of refractive index of WO{sub 3} film is in agreement to that obtained from UV-visible spectroscopy studies. The strong dispersion in refractive index is observed with wavelength of incident laser light.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Bending Loss-Based U-Shaped Plastic Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadny da S. Arcas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a large and diverse bacteria group that inhabits the intestinal tract of many mammals. Most E. coli strains are harmless, however some of them are pathogenic, meaning they can make one sick if ingested. By being in the feces of animals and humans, its presence in water and food is used as indicator of fecal contamination. The main method for this microorganism detection is the bacterial culture medium that is time-consuming and requires a laboratory with specialized personnel. Other sophisticated methods are still not fast enough because they require sending samples to a laboratory and with a high cost of analysis. In this paper, a gold-coated U-shaped plastic optical fiber (POF biosensor for E. coli bacteria detection is presented. The biosensor works by intensity modulation principle excited by monochromatic light where the power absorption is imposed by predominant effect of either bending loss or surface plasmon resonance (SPR, depending on the gold thickness. Bacterial selectivity is obtained by antibody immobilization on the fiber surface. The biosensor showed a detection limit of 1.5 × 103 colony-forming units (CFU/mL, demonstrating that the technology can be a portable, fast response and low-cost alternative to conventional methodologies for quality analysis of water and food.

  13. Interaction of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Specific Proteins of the Corona Studied by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio E. Di Ianni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pharmaceutical and medical nanosystems are among the most intensively investigated fields in nanotechnology. A relevant point to be considered in the design and development of nanovehicles intended for medical use is the formation of the “protein corona” around the nanoparticle, that is, a complex biomolecular layer formed when the nanovehicle is exposed to biological fluids. The chemical nature of the protein corona determines the biological identity of the nanoparticle and influences, among others, the recognition of the nanocarrier by the mononuclear phagocytic system and, thus, its clearance from the blood. Recent works suggest that Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, extensively employed for the analysis of biomolecular interactions, can shed light on the formation of the protein corona and its interaction with the surroundings. The synthesis and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN coated with polymers of different chemical nature (e.g., polyvinyl alcohol, chitosans are reported. The proof-of-concept for the use of SPR technique in characterizing protein-nanoparticle interactions of surface-immobilized proteins (immunoglobulin G and bovine serum albumin, both involved in the formation of the corona subjected to flowing SLN is demonstrated for non-chitosan-coated nanoparticles. All assayed nanosystems show more preference for IgG than for BSA, such preference being more pronounced in the case of polyvinyl-alcohol-coated SLN.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical carcinoma using an endorectal surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocker, Kerstin A.; Alt, Céline D.; Gebauer, Gerhard; Sohn, Christof; Hallscheidt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this trial is to investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal surface coil for precise local staging of patients with histologically proven cervical cancer by comparing the radiological, clinical, and histological results. Materials and methods: Women with cervical cancer were recruited for this trial between February 2007, and September 2010. All the patients were clinically staged according to the FIGO classification and underwent radiological staging by MRI that employed an endorectal surface coil. The staging results after surgery were compared to histopathology in all the operable patients. Results: A total of 74 consecutive patients were included in the trial. Forty-four (59.5%) patients underwent primary surgery, whereas 30 (40.5%) patients were inoperable according to FIGO and underwent primary radiochemotherapy. The mean age of the patients was 50.6 years. In 11 out of the 44 patients concordant staging results were obtained by all three staging modalities. Thirty-two of the 44 patients were concordantly staged by FIGO and histopathological examination, while only 16 were concordantly staged by eMRI and histopathological examination. eMRI overstaged tumors in 14 cases and understaged them in 7 cases. Conclusions: eMRI is applicable in patients with cervical cancer, yet of no benefit than staging with FIGO or standard pelvic MRI. The most precise preoperative staging procedure still appears to be the clinical examination

  15. Thickness-dependent surface plasmon resonance of ITO nanoparticles for ITO/In-Sn bilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenzuo; Hong, Ruijin; Jing, Ming; Shao, Wen; Tao, Chunxian; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-01-01

    Tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in doped semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs), which represents an important characteristic in LSPR sensor applications, still remains a challenge. Here, indium tin oxide/indium tin alloy (ITO/In-Sn) bilayer films were deposited by electron beam evaporation and the properties, such as the LSPR and surface morphology, were investigated by UV–VIS–NIR double beam spectrophotometer and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. By simply engineering the thickness of ITO/In-Sn NPs without any microstructure fabrications, the LSPR wavelength of ITO NPs can be tuned by a large amount from 858 to 1758 nm. AFM images show that the strong LSPR of ITO NPs is closely related to the enhanced coupling between ITO and In-Sn NPs. Blue shifts of ITO LSPR from 1256 to 1104 nm are also observed in the as-annealed samples due to the higher free carrier concentration. Meanwhile, we also demonstrated that the ITO LSPR in ITO/In-Sn NPs structures has good sensitivity to the surrounding media and stability after 30 d exposure in air, enabling its application prospects in many biosensing devices.

  16. Simple Nanoimprinted Polymer Nanostructures for Uncooled Thermal Detection by Direct Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Brandon; Vallini, Felipe; Fang, Cheng-Yi; Alasaad, Amr; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2017-03-08

    We experimentally demonstrate the uncooled detection of long wavelength infrared (IR) radiation by thermal surface plasmon sensing using an all optical readout format. Thermal infrared radiation absorbed by an IR-sensitive material with high thermo-optic coefficient coated on a metal grating creates a refractive index change detectable by the shift of the supported surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measured optically in the visible spectrum. The interface localization of SPR modes and optical readout allow for submicrometer thin film transducers and eliminate complex readout integrated circuits, respectively, reducing form factor, leveraging robust visible detectors, and enabling low-cost imaging cameras. We experimentally present the radiative heat induced thermo-optic action detectable by SPR shift through imaging of a thermal source onto a bulk metal grating substrate with IR-absorptive silicon nitride coating. Toward focal plane array integration, a route to facile fabrication of pixelated metal grating structures by nanoimprint lithography is developed, where a stable polymer, parylene-C, serves as an IR-absorptive layer with a high thermo-optic coefficient. Experimental detection of IR radiation from real thermal sources imaged at infinity is demonstrated by our nanoimprinted polymer-SPR pixels with an estimated noise equivalent temperature difference of 21.9 K.

  17. Monitoring the electrochemical responses of neurotransmitters through localized surface plasmon resonance using nanohole array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nantao; Lu, Yanli; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiajia; Jiang, Jing; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-07-15

    In this study, a novel spectroelectrochemical method was proposed for neurotransmitters detection. The central sensing device was a hybrid structure of nanohole array and gold nanoparticles, which demonstrated good conductivity and high localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity. By utilizing such specially-designed nanoplasmonic sensor as working electrode, both electrical and spectral responses on the surface of the sensor could be simultaneously detected during the electrochemical process. Cyclic voltammetry was implemented to activate the oxidation and recovery of dopamine and serotonin, while transmission spectrum measurement was carried out to synchronously record to LSPR responses of the nanoplasmonic sensor. Coupling with electrochemistry, LSPR results indicated good integrity and linearity, along with promising accuracy in qualitative and quantitative detection even for mixed solution and in brain tissue homogenates. Also, the detection results of other negatively-charged neurotransmitters like acetylcholine demonstrated the selectivity of our detection method for transmitters with positive charge. When compared with traditional electrochemical signals, LSPR signals provided better signal-to-noise ratio and lower detection limits, along with immunity against interference factors like ascorbic acid. Taking the advantages of such robustness, the coupled detection method was proved to be a promising platform for point-of-care testing for neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sharma, Savita [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110075 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the optical properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films after irradiation using SPR. • Otto configuration has been used to excite the surface plasmons using gold metal thin film. • BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique. • Examined the refractive index dispersion of pristine and irradiated BFO thin film. - Abstract: Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup −2}. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  19. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  20. Single domain antibodies as a powerful tool for high quality surface plasmon resonance studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Antonio Della Pia

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies are recombinantly expressed functional antibodies devoid of light chains. These binding elements are derived from heavy chain antibodies found in camelids and offer several distinctive properties for applications in biotechnology such as small size, stability, solubility, and expression in high yields. In this study we demonstrated the potential of using single domain antibodies as capturing molecules in biosensing applications. Single domain antibodies raised against green fluorescent protein were anchored onto biosensor surfaces by using several immobilization strategies based on Ni2+:nitrilotriacetic acid-polyhistidine tag, antibody-antigen, biotin-streptavidin interactions and amine-coupling chemistry. The interaction with the specific target of the single domain antibodies was characterized by surface plasmon resonance. The immobilized single domain antibodies show high affinities for their antigens with KD = 3-6 nM and outperform other antibody partners as capturing molecules facilitating also the data analysis. Furthermore they offer high resistance and stability to a wide range of denaturing agents. These unique biophysical properties and the production of novel single domain antibodies against affinity tags make them particularly attractive for use in biosensing and diagnostic assays.

  1. Plastic antibody based surface plasmon resonance nanosensors for selective atrazine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based affinity sensor system with the use of molecular imprinted nanoparticles (plastic antibodies) to enhance the pesticide detection. Molecular imprinting based affinity sensor is prepared by the attachment of atrazine (chosen as model pesticide) imprinted nanoparticles onto the gold surface of SPR chip. Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of aspartic acid. The imprinted nanoparticles were characterized via FTIR and zeta-sizer measurements. SPR sensors are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) and contact angle measurements. The imprinted nanoparticles showed more sensitivity to atrazine than the non-imprinted ones. Different concentrations of atrazine solutions are applied to SPR system to determine the adsorption kinetics. Langmuir adsorption model is found as the most suitable model for this affinity nanosensor system. In order to show the selectivity of the atrazine-imprinted nanoparticles, competitive adsorption of atrazine, simazine and amitrole is investigated. The results showed that the imprinted nanosensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for atrazine. - Highlights: • SPR based affinity sensor system was developed via molecular imprinting. • Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of an amino acid. • Combination of SPR and MIP offers highly selective sensor with long shelf-life. • Plastic antibody based biomimetic sensors offer relatively cheaper production. • Plastic antibody based biomimetic sensors offer high physical, chemical stability.

  2. Fabrication Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor chip of gold nanoparticles and detection lipase–osmolytes interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hoornam, S. [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Science, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vesaghi, M.A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, B.; Azizi, A. [Department of Biophysics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mobasheri, H. [Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, PO Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Research Institute (BRC), University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We synthesized localized surface plasmon resonance sensor of gold nanoparticles by RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • LSPR sensor was characterized by TEM, XPS, AFM. • LSPR sensor was utilized to detect interaction between sorbitol and trehalose, with Pesudomonace Cepacia Lipase (PCL). • Unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. • Refractive index of PCL was obtained by Mie theory modeling. - Abstract: Co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD from acetylene gas and Au target were used to prepare sensor chip of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Deposition conditions were optimized to reach a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Au NPs with particle size less than 10 nm. The RF power was set at 180 W and the initial gas pressure was set at 0.035 mbar. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data were used to investigate particles size and surface morphology of LSPR sensor chip. The Au and C content of the LSPR sensor chip of Au NPs was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin film was used as intermediate material to immobilize Au NPs on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. The interaction between two types of osmolytes, i.e. sorbitol and trehalose, with Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL) were detected by the prepared LSPR biosensor chip. The detection mechanism is based on LSPR spectroscopy in which the wavelength of absorption peak is sensitive to the refractive index of the environment of the Au NPs. This mechanism eliminates the use of a probe or immobilization of PCL on the Au NPs of LSPR sensor chip. The interaction between PCL and osmolytes can change refractive index of the mixture or solution. We found that unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. This interaction increases refractive index of the PCL and sorbitol mixture. Refractive index of PCL in the presence of different concentration of sorbitol was

  3. Semi-quantitative analysis of indigo by surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) using silver colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadi, I. T.; Chowdhry, B. Z.; Snowden, M. J.; Withnall, R.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we report for the first time semi-quantitative analysis of indigo using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and surface enhance resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS). Indigo, a dye widely used today in the textile industry, has been used, historically, both as a dye and as a pigment; the latter in both paintings and in printed material. The molecule is uncharged and largely insoluble in most solvents. The application of SERS/SERRS to the semi-quantitative analysis of indigo has been examined using aggregated citrate-reduced silver colloids with appropriate modifications to experimental protocols to both obtain and maximise SERRS signal intensities. Good linear correlations are observed for the dependence of the intensities of the SERRS band at 1151 cm -1 using laser exciting wavelengths of 514.5 nm ( R=0.9985) and 632.8 nm ( R=0.9963) on the indigo concentration over the range 10 -7-10 -5 and 10 -8-10 -5 mol dm -3, respectively. Band intensities were normalised against an internal standard (silver sol band at 243 cm -1). Resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of aqueous solutions of indigo could not be collected because of its low solubility and the presence of strong fluorescence. It was, however, possible to obtain RS and RRS spectra of the solid at each laser excitation wavelength. The limits of detection (L.O.D.) of indigo by SERS and SERRS using 514.5 and 632.8 nm were 9 ppm at both exciting wavelengths. Signal enhancement by SERS and SERRS was highly pH dependent due to the formation of singly protonated and possibly doubly protonated forms of the molecule at acidic pH. The SERS and SERRS data provide evidence to suggest that an excess of monolayer coverage of the dye at the surface of silver colloids is observed at concentrations greater than 7.85×10 -6 mol dm -3 for each exciting wavelength. The data reported herein also strongly suggest the presence of multiple species of the indigo molecule.

  4. Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.

    1997-06-16

    This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

  5. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  6. Role of multipolar plasmon resonances during surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on Au micro-patches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowd, Annette; Geisler, Mathias; Zhu, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of a Raman signal by multipolar plasmon resonances – as opposed to the more common practice of using dipolar resonances – is investigated. A wide range of gold stars, triangles, circles and squares with multipolar resonances in the visible region were designed and then produced...... by electron beam lithography. We used 633 nm excitation and Rhodamine 6G as a probe molecule to confirm that, although the dipolar resonances of these shapes lie well into the infrared, SERS in the visible can still be obtained by coupling to their ‘dark mode’ multipolar resonances. However, the magnitude...

  7. A label-free and portable multichannel surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for on site analysis of antibiotics in milk samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernández, F.; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Piliarik, Marek; Sanchez-Baeza, F.; Homola, Jiří; Marko, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1231-1238 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * antibiotics * milk Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.361, year: 2010

  8. Coupling of column liquid chromatography and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy via a thin-layer chromatographic plate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulter, S.K.; Gooijer, C.; Velthorst, N.H.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Somsen, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy was used to characterize compounds separated by column liquid chromatography (LC). Three percent of the effluent from a conventional-size LC column were immobilized on a moving thinlayer chromatography (TLC) plate using a spray-jet

  9. Analytical value of detecting an individual molecular binding event: The case of the surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Vrba, David; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2012), s. 30-33 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Binding events * Biosensing * Surface plasmon resonance biosensor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.695, year: 2012

  10. Multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor assay for the detection of Fusarium toxins in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain Fusarium species (F. graminearum and F. verticilloides in particular) infest grains and can produce a wide range of fungal (myco)-toxins, causing huge economic losses worldwide. A reproducible and sensitive imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) assay was developed and validated for three ...

  11. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    . By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10(-5) λ0(3). The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface...

  12. Binding Interactions Between alpha-glucans from Lactobacillus reuteri and Milk Proteins Characterised by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemer, Silja K.; Svensson, Birte; Babol, Linnea N.; Cockburn, Darrell; Grijpstra, Pieter; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Folkenberg, Ditte M.; Garrigues, Christel; Ipsen, Richard H.

    Interactions between milk proteins and alpha-glucans at pH 4.0-5.5 were investigated by use of surface plasmon resonance. The alpha-glucans were synthesised with glucansucrase enzymes from Lactobacillus reuteri strains ATCC-55730, 180, ML1 and 121. Variations in the molecular characteristics of the

  13. Binding Interactions Between α-glucans from Lactobacillus reuteri and Milk Proteins Characterised by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Silja Kej; Svensson, Birte; Babol, Linnéa N.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between milk proteins and α-glucans at pH 4.0–5.5 were investigated by use of surface plasmon resonance. The α-glucans were synthesised with glucansucrase enzymes from Lactobacillus reuteri strains ATCC-55730, 180, ML1 and 121. Variations in the molecular characteristics of the α...

  14. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on engineered proteins for direct detection of interferon-gamma in diluted blood plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Ševců, Veronika; Kuchař, Milan; Ahmad, Jawid Nazir; Mikulecký, Pavel; Osičková, Adriana; Malý, Petr; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 174, č. 11 (2012), s. 306-311 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : Interferon gamma * Surface plasmon resonance * Biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.535, year: 2012

  15. Gold nanoparticle-enhanced multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) detection of Fusarium mycotoxins in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid, sensitive and multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor assay was developed and validated for three Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA) and T-2 toxin. The iSPR assay was based on a competitive inhibition format with secondary antibodies (Ab2) conjug...

  16. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  17. Electrokinetic label-free screening chip: a marriage of multiplexing and high throughput analysis using surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Carlen, Edwin; Bomer, Johan G.; Wijnperle, Daniël; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2010-01-01

    We present an electrokinetic label-free biomolecular screening chip (Glass/PDMS) to screen up to 10 samples simultaneously using surface plasmon resonance imaging (iSPR). This approach reduces the duration of an experiment when compared to conventional experimental methods. This new device offers a

  18. Surface plasmon resonance sensor with dispersionless microfluidics for direct detection of nucleic acids at the low femtomole level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Piliarik, Marek; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 1 (2010), s. 588-591 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : microfluidics * surface plasmon resonance * DNA detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2010

  19. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  20. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  1. Performance Modeling Applied to the Treatment and Disposal of a Mixed Waste at the SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, J.B.; Jantzen, C.M.; Cook, J.R.; Whited, A.R.; Field, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    Performance modeling for Low Level Mixed Waste disposal was conducted using the measured leach rates from a number of vitrified waste formulations. The objective of the study was to determine if the improved durability of a vitrified mixed waste would allow trench disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Leaching data were compiled from twenty-nine diverse reference glasses, encompassing a wide range of exposed glass surface area to leachant volume ratios (SA/V), and various leachant solutions; all of which had been leached at 90 degrees Celsius, using the MCC-1 or PCT procedures (ASTM Procedures C1220-92 and C1285-94, respectively). The normalized leach rates were scaled to the ambient disposal temperature of 25 degrees Celsius, and compared to the allowable leach rate of uranium - which would meet the performance assessment requirements. The results indicated that a glass of above average durability (vs. the reference glasses) would meet the uranium leaching concentration for direct SRS trench disposal

  2. Effect of Basic Residue on the Kinetics of Peptide Fragmentation Examined Using Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-11-30

    In this work, resonant ejection coupled with surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer is used to examine fragmentation kinetics of two singly protonated hexapeptides, RYGGFL and KYGGFL, containing the basic arginine residue and less basic lysine residue at the N-terminus. The kinetics of individual reaction channels at different collision energies are probed by applying a short ejection pulse (1 ms) in resonance with the cyclotron frequency of a selected fragment ion and varying the delay time between ion-surface collision and resonant ejection while keeping total reaction delay time constant. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental data provides accurate threshold energies and activation entropies of individual reaction channels. Substitution of arginine with less basic lysine has a pronounced effect on the observed fragmentation kinetics of several pathways, including the b2 ion formation, but has little or no effect on formation of the b5+H2O fragment ion. The combination of resonant ejection SID, time- and collision energy-resolved SID, and RRKM modeling of both types of experimental data provides a detailed mechanistic understanding of the primary dissociation pathways of complex gaseous ions.

  3. Analysis of Mycotoxins in Beer Using a Portable Nanostructured Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sweccha; Annida, Rumaisha M; Zuilhof, Han; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-11-02

    A competitive inhibition immunoassay is described for the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer using a portable nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, also referred to as imaging nanoplasmonics. The toxins were directly and covalently immobilized on a 3-dimensional carboxymethylated dextran (CMD) layer on a nanostructured iSPR chip. The assay is based on competition between the immobilized mycotoxins and free mycotoxins in the solution for binding to specific antibodies. The chip surface was regenerated after each cycle, and the combination of CMD and direct immobilization of toxins allowed the chips to be used for more than 450 cycles. The limits of detection (LODs) in beer were 17 ng/mL for DON and 7 ng/mL for OTA (or 0.09 ng/mL after 75 times enrichment). These LODs allowed detection of even less than 10% depletion of the tolerable daily intake of DON and OTA by beer. Significant cross-reactivity of anti-DON was observed toward DON-3-glucoside and 3-acetyl-DON, while no cross-reactivity was seen for 15-acetyl-DON. A preliminary in-house validation with 20 different batches of beer showed that both toxins can be detected at the considered theoretical safe level for beer. The assay can be used for in-field or at-line detection of DON in beer and also in barley without preconcentration, while OTA in beer requires an additional enrichment step, thus making the latter in its present form less suitable for field applications.

  4. Considerations on Circuit Design and Data Acquisition of a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keke; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Shun; Li, Jianwei; Hu, Xinran; Liang, Hao; Cao, Baiqiong; Sun, Xiaohui; Ma, Liuzheng; Zhu, Juanhua; Jiang, Min; Hu, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a circuit for an inexpensive portable biosensing system based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. This portable biosensing system designed for field use is characterized by a special structure which consists of a microfluidic cell incorporating a right angle prism functionalized with a biomolecular identification membrane, a laser line generator and a data acquisition circuit board. The data structure, data memory capacity and a line charge-coupled device (CCD) array with a driving circuit for collecting the photoelectric signals are intensively focused on and the high performance analog-to-digital (A/D) converter is comprehensively evaluated. The interface circuit and the photoelectric signal amplifier circuit are first studied to obtain the weak signals from the line CCD array in this experiment. Quantitative measurements for validating the sensitivity of the biosensing system were implemented using ethanol solutions of various concentrations indicated by volume fractions of 5%, 8%, 15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%, respectively, without a biomembrane immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor. The experiments demonstrated that it is possible to detect a change in the refractive index of an ethanol solution with a sensitivity of 4.99838 × 105 ΔRU/RI in terms of the changes in delta response unit with refractive index using this SPR biosensing system, whereby the theoretical limit of detection of 3.3537 × 10−5 refractive index unit (RIU) and a high linearity at the correlation coefficient of 0.98065. The results obtained from a series of tests confirmed the practicality of this cost-effective portable SPR biosensing system. PMID:26295398

  5. Rh blood phenotyping (D, E, e, C, c) microarrays using multichannel surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipatpanukul, Chinnawut; Takeya, Sasaki; Baba, Akira; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Sutapun, Boonsong; Kitpoka, Pimpun; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2018-04-15

    The application of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi) for the detection of transmembrane antigen of the Rhesus (Rh) blood group system is demonstrated. Clinically significant Rh blood group system antigens, including D, C, E, c, and e, can be simultaneously identified via solid phase immobilization assay, which offers significant time savings and assay simplification. Red blood cells (RBCs) flowed through the micro-channel, where a suitable condition for Rh blood group detection was an RBC dilution of 1:10 with a stop-flow condition. Stop flow showed an improvement in specific binding compared to continuous flow. Rh antigens required a longer incubation time to react with the immobilized antibody than A and B antigens due to the difference in antigen type and their location on the RBC. The interaction between the immobilized antibodies and their specific antigenic counterpart on the RBC showed a significant difference in RBC removal behavior using shear flow, measured from the decay of the SPR signal. The strength of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and RBC antigen was determined from the minimum wall shear stress required to start the decay process in the SPR signal. For a given range of immobilized antibody surface densities, the Rh antigen possesses a stronger interaction than A, B, and AB antigens. Identification of 82 samples of ABO and Rh blood groups using SPRi showed good agreement with the standard micro-column agglutination technique. A wider coverage of antigenic recognition for RBC when using the solid phase immobilization assay was demonstrated for the RBC with the antigenic site located on the transmembrane protein of the clinically significant Rh antigen. Given the level of accuracy and precision, the technique showed potential for the detection of the Rh minor blood group system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Considerations on Circuit Design and Data Acquisition of a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Chang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a circuit for an inexpensive portable biosensing system based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. This portable biosensing system designed for field use is characterized by a special structure which consists of a microfluidic cell incorporating a right angle prism functionalized with a biomolecular identification membrane, a laser line generator and a data acquisition circuit board. The data structure, data memory capacity and a line charge-coupled device (CCD array with a driving circuit for collecting the photoelectric signals are intensively focused on and the high performance analog-to-digital (A/D converter is comprehensively evaluated. The interface circuit and the photoelectric signal amplifier circuit are first studied to obtain the weak signals from the line CCD array in this experiment. Quantitative measurements for validating the sensitivity of the biosensing system were implemented using ethanol solutions of various concentrations indicated by volume fractions of 5%, 8%, 15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%, respectively, without a biomembrane immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor. The experiments demonstrated that it is possible to detect a change in the refractive index of an ethanol solution with a sensitivity of 4.99838 × 105 ΔRU/RI in terms of the changes in delta response unit with refractive index using this SPR biosensing system, whereby the theoretical limit of detection of 3.3537 × 10−5 refractive index unit (RIU and a high linearity at the correlation coefficient of 0.98065. The results obtained from a series of tests confirmed the practicality of this cost-effective portable SPR biosensing system.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance investigation of optical detection in plasma-modified phospholipid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Cho, Chanyoun; Choi, Kyoungho; Jeon, Honggoo [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    We herein report on a study of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in thin gold (Au) films coated with thin layers of phospholipid material, which had been exposed to an atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma containing both pure Ar and Ar mixed with O{sub 2} (Ar/O{sub 2}, 0.8%). The phospholipid material that we used for the SPR experiments was lecithin, and the AP plasma system was applied in air by means of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator. A thin (∼60 nm) film of Au and a thin (∼15 nm) layer of lecithin were deposited and attached to the face of a prism, and surface plasmon modes were excited along the interfaces of the prism-Au-lecithin-air system by means of prism coupling using a He-Ne Laser (632.8 nm). The experimental SPR reflectance curves of the Au-lecithin-air modes were found to be shifted towards those of the Au-air mode with increasing applications of AP RF plasma treatment. From the shifts in the SPR curves, we found that the estimated thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a pure Ar plasma showed a linear decrease with etching rate of about 3 nm per treatment while the thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a mixed Ar/O{sub 2} plasma showed a tendency to saturate following a large initial decrease (ca. 14 nm). All these results demonstrate that the use of SPR sensing could facilitate the detection of extremely small variations in plasma-treated films of biomaterials.

  8. A surface plasmon resonance interferometer based on spatial phase modulation for protein array detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinglong; Ding, Xiang; Liu, Fangfang; Wei, Xing; Wang, Dingxin

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of kinds of proteins exist in a single cell. Proteomics research aims to characterize these proteins and simultaneously analyse modifications and interactions on a large scale. Here we present a label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging interferometer based on spatial phase modulation, which can be useful in this field. It consists of a light source, a SPR sensing unit, a special phase modulator, a photoelectric conversion unit and a computer. Collimated light is projected into a prism and reflected at the gold-glass interface. The p- and s-polarized components of the reflected light pass through a one-dimensional beam expander and a Wollaston prism, and form an interference pattern on a CCD. Interference images are acquired and transferred to the computer for data processing. Protein interaction on the gold surface leads to a local refractive index change and results in interference fringe phase shift. By calculating the phase shift, interaction information can be obtained. It is demonstrated that this technique can detect different concentrations of NaCl solutions, and the phase change generated by a 0.9% NaCl solution is about 10°. In protein-protein interaction experiments, a model system of rabbit IgG and goat-anti-rabbit IgG is tested. The maximum phase change is up to 12°. The phase resolution of the system is 0.2°, equivalent to the refractive index resolution of 3 × 10-5 RIU, and this value can be improved to 2 × 10-6 RIU just by increasing the gold thickness of the sensing chip. It is concluded that the sensitivity of the interferometer is enough to achieve larger capacity than that detected by the present protein micro-array products. These results suggest that the SPR interferometer based on spatial phase modulation provides a potential facility to meet the requirements in proteomics research.

  9. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  10. Micro-capillary-based self-referencing surface plasmon resonance fiber-optic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Yun; Li, Lixia; Liu, Zigeng; Peng, Wei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a novel self-referencing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber-optic sensor which provides a Fabry-Perot (FP) interference referencing signal for temperature compensating. The sensor is fabricated by splicing a capillary partly coated with gold film between multimode fibers. The multimode fibers act as the lead-in and lead-out fibers while the capillary is used as sensing element. Because the FP interference and SPR effects can occur in the capillary simultaneously, the spectrum of the sensor exhibits SPR absorption and FP interference fringes. Due to the FP interference fringe sensitive to temperature while insensitive to refractive index (RI), it can be used as referencing signal and the SPR absorption was used as measuring signal. Experimental results show that this approach we presented can compensate temperature effect and develop this sensor as a practicable high-sensitivity sensing device. Moreover, as a self-referencing fiber-optic SPR sensor, this simple and low-cost element can be used for highly sensitive biosensing for further investigations.

  11. A surface plasmon resonance probe without optical fibers as a portable sensing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Takuo; Wada, Syunsuke; Karube, Isao

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor integrating a small sensor probe, a laser emission diode, a photo detector, and a polarizer was developed as a portable sensing device. The sensor probe was made with a glass cylinder, 50 mm long and 1.5 mm in diameter, that was connected directly to a beam splitter without optical fibers. The SPR spectrum obtained with this probe system showed a 10% reflectivity minimum at 690 nm. Shifts of the SPR spectrum induced by refractive index (RI) changes in the sample were measured by detecting the reflection light intensity at 670 nm. When the sensitivity was compared using a BIAcore TM SPR instrument, the lowest sensor response of 1 mV observed with the SPR probe system coincided with 1.4 x 10 -6 of the RI changes. The RI resolution of the SPR probe was estimated with experimentally evaluated noise on the signal, and, consequently, it was concluded that the RI resolution was 1.2 x 10 -5 . Moreover, immunoreaction was demonstrated with adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody as an analyte. As a result, 50 ng mL -1 of the lower detection limit was estimated

  12. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Feng

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available.

  13. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  14. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  15. Performance enhancement of graphene-coated surface plasmon resonance biosensor using tungsten disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anower, M. Shamim; Rahman, M. Saifur; Rikta, Khaleda Akter

    2018-01-01

    An improved performance of graphene-coated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor using tungsten disulfide (WS2) for sensing deoxyribonucleicacid (DNA) hybridization is investigated. This biosensor structure consisted of prism (SF10 glass), gold (Au), WS2, graphene, and sensing medium. Highly enhanced overall performances are achieved using a thin layer of WS2 between metal and graphene layer and are provided in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy (DA), and quality factor (QF). Concurrent improvement of all performance parameters is depicted by adding a WS2 layer instead of another graphene layer with the existing graphene layer. This overcomes the limitation of graphene-only sensors where addition of a graphene layer increases the sensitivity but decreases the DA and QF. Analysis of Au thickness effect and limit of detection are also investigated. Numerical study demonstrates that the deviation of SPR angle for mismatched DNA strands is relatively insignificant while that for complementary DNA strands is noticeably reckonable. Thus, the proposed biosensor offers a window for detecting DNA hybridization.

  16. Square array photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Yang, Xu; Zhao, Bingyue; Hou, Jingyun; Shum, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a novel refractive index (RI) sensor comprising a square photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed to realize the detection of the annular analyte. Instead of hexagon structure, four large air-holes in a square array are introduced to enhance the sensitivity by allowing two polarization directions of the core mode to be more sensitive. The gold is used as the only plasmonic material. The design purpose is to reduce the difficulty in gold deposition and enhance the RI sensitivity. The guiding properties and the effects of the parameters on the performance of the sensor are numerically investigated by the Finite Element Method (FEM). By optimizing the structure, the sensor can exhibit remarkable sensitivity up to 7250 nm/RIU and resolution of 1.0638 × 10‑5 RIU with only one plasmonic material, which is very competitive compared with the other reported externally coated and single-layer coated PCF-based SPR (PCF-SPR) sensors, to our best knowledge.

  17. Compact Surface Plasmon Resonance System with Au/Si Schottky Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Kuroda, Yuta; Noda, Kentaro; Binh-Khiem, Nguyen; Kan, Tetsuo; Shimoyama, Isao

    2018-01-30

    Ethanol concentration was quantified by the use of a compact surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system, which electrically detects hot electrons via a Schottky barrier. Although it is well known that SPR can be used as bio/chemical sensors, implementation is not necessarily practical, due to the size and cost impediments associated with a system with variable wavelength or angle of incidence. However, scanning capability is not a prerequisite if the objective is to use SPR in a sensor. It is possible to build a small, inexpensive SPR sensor if the optics have no moving parts and a Schottky barrier is used for electrical current detection in place of a photodetector. This article reports on the design and performance of such a novel SPR sensor, and its application for quantifying ethanol concentration. As the concentration of ethanol is increased, the change in the angle dependence of the SPR current is observed. This change can be understood as a superposition of contributions of SPR coupled with the +3rd- and -3rd-order diffraction. Moreover, real-time monitoring of ethanol concentration was demonstrated using the proposed SPR system.

  18. Anti-saturation system for surface nuclear magnetic resonance in efficient groundwater detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Yujing; Sun, Yong; Lin, Tingting

    2017-06-01

    Compared to other geophysical techniques, the surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) method could provide unique insights into the hydrologic properties of groundwater in the subsurface. However, the SNMR signal is in the order of nanovolts (10-9 V), and the complex environmental noise, i.e., the spike and the harmony noise (10-4 V), can reach up to 105 times the signal amplitude. Saturation of the amplifier is therefore a serious problem in current SNMR systems. In this study, we propose an anti-saturation method based on an instantaneous floating-point amplifier. The gain of a programmable amplifier is controlled by the value of the input signal. A regulating speed of 50 kS/s is thus achieved to satisfy the self-adaptive adjustment of the real-time SNMR system, which replaces the original man-made setting gain. A large dynamic range of 192.65 dB with a 24-bit high speed analog-digital converter module is then implemented. Compared to traditional SNMR instruments, whose magnification factor is fixed during the experiment, our system can effectively inhibit the distortion of the SNMR signal in both laboratory and field settings. Furthermore, an improved SNR, which is realized by the real-time SNMR system, enables the accurate inversion of the aquifer. Our study broadens the applicability of SNMR systems to use in and around developed areas.

  19. Analysis of the performance of interferometry, surface plasmon resonance and luminescence as biosensors and chemosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ince, R.; Narayanaswamy, R.

    2006-01-01

    Sensitivity, dynamic range and resolution have been calculated and compared from a range of analytes sensed in the literature using the techniques of interferometry, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and luminescence. A detailed explanation of the physical and chemical/biological properties required of optical sensors is included along with the principle of operation of the sensors. Theoretical sensitivities of interferometry and SPR are also detailed along with parameters affecting these sensitivities. In the literature discussed in this review paper, the technique of luminescence, which relies intrinsically on 'labelling', offers the best resolutions for sensing of biomolecules (protein and DNA). Interference techniques offer the best resolutions for low molecular weight chemical liquids/vapours. Techniques which are 'label-free' are often desirable and it is demonstrated here that by combining the techniques of SPR with interferometry, it is possible to sense proteins with a resolution similar to that of luminescence. The future of chemo- and bio-sensing is discussed in terms of potential for multi-channel analysis, their continuous miniaturisation and their impending nanotechnology revolution

  20. A Highly Sensitive Gold-Coated Photonic Crystal Fiber Biosensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rabiul Hasan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a two-layer circular lattice photonic crystal fiber (PCF biosensor based on the principle of surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The finite element method (FEM with circular perfectly matched layer (PML boundary condition is applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. A thin gold layer is deposited outside the PCF structure, which acts as the plasmonic material for this design. The sensing layer (analyte is implemented in the outermost layer, which permits easy and more practical fabrication process compared to analyte is put inside the air holes. It is demonstrated that, at gold layer thickness of 40 nm, the proposed sensor shows maximum sensitivity of 2200 nm/RIU using the wavelength interrogation method in the sensing range between 1.33–1.36. Besides, using an amplitude interrogation method, a maximum sensitivity of 266 RIU−1 and a maximum sensor resolution of 3.75 × 10−5 RIU are obtained. We also discuss how phase matching points are varied with different fiber parameters. Owing to high sensitivity and simple design, the proposed sensor may find important applications in biochemical and biological analyte detection.

  1. A Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Method for Detection and Determination of Cannabinoids Using Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, M.; Sodouri, T.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, a simple colorimetric method based on the formation of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was developed for the determination of cannabinoids including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). These compounds in a basic solution at 80°C reduce [Ag(NH3)2]+ to form Ag NPs. The produced NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The brown-yellow color of the solution that results from the localized surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs can be observed by the bare eye. The calibration graph obtained by plotting the absorbance at 410 nm versus the concentration of each analyte was linear in the range of 0.1-5.0 μg/ml for all tested cannabinoids. The limits of detection were 0.065, 0.077, and 0.052 μg/ml for Δ9-THC, CBN and CBD, respectively. The developed method was applied to the determination of total cannabinoids in hashish.

  2. Investigating cyclic nucleotide and cyclic dinucleotide binding to HCN channels by surface plasmon resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Hayoz

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels control cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. HCN channels contain cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD in their C-terminal region linked to the pore-forming transmembrane segment with a C-linker. The C-linker couples the conformational changes caused by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides to the HCN pore opening. Recently, cyclic dinucleotides were shown to antagonize the effect of cyclic nucleotides in HCN4 but not in HCN2 channels. Based on the structural analysis and mutational studies it has been proposed that cyclic dinucleotides affect HCN4 channels by binding to the C-linker pocket (CLP. Here, we first show that surface plasmon resonance (SPR can be used to accurately measure cyclic nucleotide binding affinity to the C-linker/CNBD of HCN2 and HCN4 channels. We then used SPR to investigate cyclic dinucleotide binding in HCN channels. To our surprise, we detected no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to the isolated monomeric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels with SPR. The binding of cyclic dinucleotides was further examined with isothermal calorimetry (ITC, which indicated no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to both monomeric and tetrameric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels. Taken together, our results suggest that interaction of the C-linker/CNBD with other parts of the channel is necessary for cyclic-dinucleotide binding in HCN4 channels.

  3. Reversible Control in Surface Plasmon Resonance Wavelength of Gold Nanoparticles by Using Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Yushi; Fudouzi, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Nogami, Masayuki, E-mail: hayatomo@nitech.ac.jp [Field of Advenced Energy Conversion, Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    In this paper, we demonstrate reversible control in surface plasomon resonance (SPR) wavelength of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by changing their interparticle distance, which is dependent on the length of alkyl chain of alkanethiol adsorbed on GNPs and the swelling effect of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) used as a host material. A SPR wavelength was first positioned at a given wavelength dependent on the length of alkanethiol when GNPs were immobilized in PDMS. It was found that SPR wavelength red-shifted when the length of the carbon chain was shortened. On the other hand, when silicone oil was transfused to PDMS, SPR wavelength was blue-shifted by the swelling effect (volume expansion) of PDMS. And once silicone oil was volatilized, the particles returned to the original position and SPR did as well. Additionally, the coefficient of expansion of PDMS could be changed by changing the kind of silicon oils. From these results, it could be concluded that the SPR control due to their interparticle distance of GNPs was reversible and the varying degree of swelling of PDMS led to good controllability of SPR in a wide range of wavelength.

  4. Tetrodotoxin Detection by a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor in Pufferfish Matrices and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX poisoning is most commonly associated with consumption of pufferfish. TTX is a low molecular weight (~319 Da neurotoxin that selectively blocks voltage-sensitive Na+-gated ion channels. The standard method accepted worldwide for monitoring TTX toxicity in food matrices is the mouse bioassay. Ethical concerns from live animal testing, low sample throughput, and analytical inaccuracies have led to the need for an alternative method. We have previously established that surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors can quantify TTX in aqueous buffer samples by an antibody-based inhibition assay. In this paper, we report the extension of the assay for the detection of TTX in both clinical- and food-relevant matrices. The assay was optimized for application to three relevant complex matrices: pufferfish liver extract, pufferfish muscle extract, and human urine. Matrix effects are discussed and calibration curves are presented. Naturally contaminated pufferfish liver and muscle extracts were analyzed by the SPR method, and the data is compared to liquid-chromatography electrospray-ionization multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MRM/MS data. Ten samples, including three from a poisoning incident, two control monkfish samples, and five toxic pufferfish samples, were analyzed using this method, and the data is compared to LC/ESI/MRM/MS analysis of the samples.

  5. Correlating the structure and localized surface plasmon resonance of single silver right bipyramids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie; Zhang, Jian; Langille, Mark R; Mirkin, Chad A; Marks, Laurence D; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2012-11-09

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs), collective electron oscillations in metal nanoparticles, are being heavily scrutinized for applications in prototype devices and circuits, as well as for chemical and biological sensing. Both the plasmon frequency and linewidth of a LSPR are critical factors for application optimization, for which their dependence on structural factors has been qualitatively unraveled over the past decade. However, quantitative knowledge based on systematic single particle studies has only recently become available for a few particle shapes. We show here that to understand the effect of structure (both size and shape) on plasmonic properties, one must take multiple parameters into account. We have successfully done so for a large data set on silver right bipyramids. By correlating plasmon energy and linewidth with edge length and corner rounding for individual bipyramids, we have found that the corner rounding has a significant effect on the plasmon energy for particles of the same size, and thus corner rounding must be taken into account to accurately describe the dependence of a LSPR on nanoparticle size. A detailed explanation of the phenomena responsible for the observed effects and their relationship to each other is presented.

  6. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Singh, Fouran; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol-gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au9+ ions at a fluence of 1 × 1012 ions cm-2. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  7. Fabrication of Gold Nanodot Array for the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is a promising method for detecting antigen-antibody binding in label-free biosensors. In this study, the fabrication of a LSPR substrate with a gold nanodot array through the lift-off process of an alumina mask is reported. The substrate showed an extinction peak in its extinction spectrum, and the peak position was dependent on the height of the gold nanodot array, and the change of extinction peak with the height could be predicted by the numerical simulation. In addition, the peak position was observed to be red-shifted with the increasing RIU value of the medium surrounding the gold nanodot array. In particular, the peak position in the 10 nm thick gold nanodot array was approximately 710 nm in air, and the sensitivity, defined as the ratio of the shift of peak position to the RIU of the medium, was 323.6 nm/RIU. The fabrication procedure could be applied to fabricate the LSPR substrates with a large area.

  8. Functional analysis of synthetic DELLA domain peptides and bioactive gibberellin assay using surface plasmon resonance technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuoya; Xing, Zenan; Zhou, Min; Chen, Yi; Li, Chenzhong; Wang, Ruozhong; Xu, Wenzhong; Ma, Mi

    2015-11-01

    DELLA proteins and phytohormone gibberellin act together to control convergence point of plant development. A gibberellin-bound nuclear receptor that interacts with the N-terminal domain of DELLA proteins is required for gibberellin induced degradation of DELLA proteins. N-terminal DELLA domain includes two conserved motifs: DELLA and VHYNP. However, their respective functions remain unclear. Meanwhile, the identification and detection of several bioactive gibberellins from the more than 100 gibberellin metabolites are overwhelmingly difficult for their similar structures. Using in vitro biochemical approach, our work demonstrates for the first time that the synthetic GAI N-terminal DELLA domain peptides have similar bioactive function as the expressed protein to interact with AtGID1a receptor. Furthermore, our results reveal that DELLA motif is vitally important region and DELLA segment is essentially required region to recognize AtGID1a receptor. Finally, based on bioactive GA-dependent of the interaction between AtGID1a and DELLA protein, we generated a new method that could identify and detect bioactive GAs accurately and rapidly with surface plasmon resonance assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement in sensitivity of graphene-based zinc oxide assisted bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Kushwaha, Angad S.; Srivastava, Monika; Mishra, H.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    In the present communication, a highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with Kretschmann configuration having alternate layers, prism/zinc oxide/silver/gold/graphene/biomolecules (ss-DNA) is presented. The optimization of the proposed configuration has been accomplished by keeping the constant thickness of zinc oxide (32 nm), silver (32 nm), graphene (0.34 nm) layer and biomolecules (100 nm) for different values of gold layer thickness (1, 3 and 5 nm). The sensitivity of the proposed SPR biosensor has been demonstrated for a number of design parameters such as gold layer thickness, number of graphene layer, refractive index of biomolecules and the thickness of biomolecules layer. SPR biosensor with optimized geometry has greater sensitivity (66 deg/RIU) than the conventional (52 deg/RIU) as well as other graphene-based (53.2 deg/RIU) SPR biosensor. The effect of zinc oxide layer thickness on the sensitivity of SPR biosensor has also been analysed. From the analysis, it is found that the sensitivity increases significantly by increasing the thickness of zinc oxide layer. It means zinc oxide intermediate layer plays an important role to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The sensitivity of SPR biosensor also increases by increasing the number of graphene layer (upto nine layer).

  10. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Phenomenon of the Oxidizing and Reducing Polypyrrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlaila Rajabiah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR phenomenon of the oxidizing and reducing polypyrrole (PPy have been observed using a modified Au/PPy Kretschmann configuration. The observation was carried out through simulation Winspall 3.02 software and compared with some experimental data refractive index (n, absorbance index (, and thickness (τ reported in other literatures with spectroscopy ellipsometry. This simulation assumed that the SPR system use BK-7 halfcylinder prism (n= 1,515 and the laser beam was generated by HeNe (λ= 632,8 nm. The result showed that the optimum layer thickness of polypyrrole with neutral electrolyte solution in the reduction state is of about 20 nm. The polypyrrole with an acid solution in the oxidation state showed that the reflectivity curve is sharper and the width of the curve is smaller than the neutral electrolyte solution in the reduction state with the SPR angle of about 46,810 and the reflectivity value of about 0,217. Polypyrrole in a state of oxidation and reduction, related to the absorption, film thickness, and dielectric constant of materials, affected to the SPR angle shift and dip curve

  11. Applicability of a novel immunoassay based on surface plasmon resonance for the diagnosis of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, João G G; Souto, Dênio E P; Machado-Assis, Girley F; de Lana, Marta; Luz, Rita C S; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Damos, Flávio S; Martins, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    We defined the methodological criteria for the interpretation of the results provided by a novel immunoassay based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect antibodies anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in human sera (SPRCruzi). Then, we evaluated its applicability as a diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. To define the cut-off point and serum dilution factor, 57 samples were analyzed at SPRCruzi and the obtained values of SPR angle displacement (ΔθSPR) were submitted to statistical analysis. Adopting the indicated criteria, its performance was evaluated into a wide panel of samples, being 99 Chagas disease patients, 30 non-infected subjects and 42 with other parasitic/infectious diseases. In parallel, these samples were also analyzed by ELISA. Our data demonstrated that 1:320 dilution and cut-off point at ∆θSPR=17.2 m° provided the best results. Global performance analysis demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity (100%), specificity (97.2%), positive predictive value (98%), negative predictive value (100%) and global accuracy (99.6%). ELISA and SPRCruzi showed almost perfect agreement, mainly between chagasic and non-infected individuals. However, the new immunoassay was better in discriminate Chagas disease from other diseases. This work demonstrated the applicability of SPRCruzi as a feasible, real time, label free, sensible and specific methodology for the diagnosis of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of biomolecules in complex media using surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Michael R.; Masson, Jean-Francois; Barhnart, Margaret; Beaudoin, Stephen; Booksh, Karl S.

    2005-11-01

    Detection of multiple biologically relevant molecules was accomplished at sub-ng/mL levels in highly fouling media using fiber- optic based surface plasmon resonance sensors. Myocardial infarction markers, myoglobin and cTnI, were quantified in full serum with limits of detection below 1 ng/mL. Biologically relevant levels are between 15-30 ng/mL and 1-5 ng/mL for myoglobin and cTnI respectively. Cytokines involved in chronic wound healing, Interleukin 1, Interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor α, were detected at around 1 ng/mL in cell culture media. Preliminary results in monitoring these cytokines in cell cultures expressing the cytokines were obtained. The protein diagnostic of spinal muscular atrophy, survival motor neuron protein, was quantified from cell lysate. To obtain such results in complex media, the sensor's stability to non-specific protein adsorption had to be optimized. A layer of the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid is attached to the sensor. This layer optimizes the antibody attachment to the sensor while minimizing the non-specific signal from serum proteins.

  13. Enhancing Optically Pumped Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Amplified Spontaneous Emission via Compound Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite has attracted intensive attention from researchers as the gain medium in lasing devices. However, achieving electrically driven lasing remains a significant challenge. Modifying the devices’ structure to enhance the optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE is the key issue. In this work, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs are first doped into PEDOT: PSS buffer layer in a slab waveguide device structure: Quartz/PEDOT: PSS (with or w/o Au NPs/CH3NH3PbBr3. As a result, the facile device shows a significantly enhanced ASE intensity and a narrowed full width at half maximum. Based on experiments and theoretical simulation data, the improvement is mainly a result of the compound surface plasmon resonance, including simultaneous near- and far-field effects, both of which could increase the density of excitons excited state and accelerate the radiative decay process. This method is highly significant for the design and development and fabrication of high-performance organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite lasing diodes.

  14. Development of Phase Detection Schemes Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a novel optical sensing technique with a unique ability to monitor molecular binding in real-time for biological and chemical sensor applications. Interferometry is an excellent tool for accurate measurement of SPR changes, the measurement and comparison is made for the sensitivity, dynamic range and resolution of the different analytes using interferometry techniques. SPR interferometry can also employ phase detection in addition to the amplitude of the reflected light wave, and the phase changes more rapidly compared with other approaches, i.e., intensity, angle and wavelength. Therefore, the SPR phase interferometer offers the advantages of spatial phase resolution and high sensitivity. This work discusses the advancements in interferometric SPR methods to measure the phase shifts due to refractive index changes. The main application areas of SPR sensors are demonstrated, i.e., the Fabry-Perot interferometer, Michelson interferometer and Mach-Zehnder interferometer, with different configurations. The three interferometers are discussed in detail, and solutions are suggested to enhance the performance parameters that will aid in future biological and chemical sensors.

  15. Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging: detection speed, sensitivity, and portability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Youjun; Hu, Rui; Wang, Lei; Gu, Dayong; He, Jianan; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Ho, Ho-Pui; Li, Xuejin; Qu, Junle; Gao, Bruce Zhi; Shao, Yonghong

    2017-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is a powerful tool for studying the kinetics of biomolecular interactions because they offer unique real-time and label-free measurement capabilities with high detection sensitivity. In the past two decades, SPR technology has been successfully commercialized and its performance has continuously been improved with lots of engineering efforts. In this review, we describe the recent advances in SPR technologies. The developments of SPR technologies focusing on detection speed, sensitivity, and portability are discussed in details. The incorporation of imaging techniques into SPR sensing is emphasized. In addition, our SPR imaging biosensors based on the scanning of wavelength by a solid-state tunable wavelength filter are highlighted. Finally, significant advances of the vast developments in nanotechnology-associated SPR sensing for sensitivity enhancements are also reviewed. It is hoped that this review will provide some insights for researchers who are interested in SPR sensing, and help them develop SPR sensors with better sensitivity and higher throughput.

  16. Quantitative analysis of molecular partition towards lipid membranes using surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Tiago N.; Freire, João M.; Cunha-Santos, Catarina; Heras, Montserrat; Gonçalves, João; Moscona, Anne; Porotto, Matteo; Salomé Veiga, Ana; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the interplay between molecules and lipid membranes is fundamental when studying cellular and biotechnological phenomena. Partition between aqueous media and lipid membranes is key to the mechanism of action of many biomolecules and drugs. Quantifying membrane partition, through adequate and robust parameters, is thus essential. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for studying 1:1 stoichiometric interactions but has limited application to lipid membrane partition data. We have developed and applied a novel mathematical model for SPR data treatment that enables determination of kinetic and equilibrium partition constants. The method uses two complementary fitting models for association and dissociation sensorgram data. The SPR partition data obtained for the antibody fragment F63, the HIV fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, and the endogenous drug kyotorphin towards POPC membranes were compared against data from independent techniques. The comprehensive kinetic and partition models were applied to the membrane interaction data of HRC4, a measles virus entry inhibitor peptide, revealing its increased affinity for, and retention in, cholesterol-rich membranes. Overall, our work extends the application of SPR beyond the realm of 1:1 stoichiometric ligand-receptor binding into a new and immense field of applications: the interaction of solutes such as biomolecules and drugs with lipids.

  17. Transferability of antibody pairs from ELISA to fiber optic surface plasmon resonance for infliximab detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stappen, Thomas; Lu, Jiadi; Bloemen, Maarten; Geukens, Nick; Spasic, Dragana; Delport, Filip; Verbiest, Thierry; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Gils, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is a pleiotropic cytokine up-regulated in inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. The introduction of anti-TNF drugs such as infliximab has revolutionized the treatment of these diseases. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of infliximab has been introduced in clinical decision making to increase cost-efficiency. Nowadays, TDM is performed using radio-immunoassays, homogeneous mobility shift assays or ELISA. Unfortunately, these assays do not allow for in situ treatment optimization, because of the required sample transportation to centralized laboratories and the subsequent assay execution time. In this perspective, we evaluated the potential of fiber optic-surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR). To achieve this goal, a panel of 55 monoclonal anti-infliximab antibodies (MA-IFX) was developed and characterized in-house, leading to the identification of nine different clusters. Based on this high diversity, 22 antibody pairs were selected and tested for their reactivity towards IFX, using one MA-IFX as capture and one MA-IFX for detection, in a sandwich type ELISA and FO-SPR. This study showed that the reactivity towards IFX of each antibody pair in ELISA is highly similar to its reactivity on FO-SPR, indicating that antibody pairs are easily transferable between both platforms. Given the fact that FO-SPR shows the potential for miniaturization and fast assay time, it can be considered a highly promising platform for on-site infliximab monitoring.

  18. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dino, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Rodulfo, Emmanuel Tapas; Nishi, Mayuko

    2006-01-01

    Manifestations of the Kondo effect on an atomic length scale on and around a magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic surface differ depending on the spectroscopic mode of operation of the scanning tunneling microscope. Two prominent signatures of the Kondo effect that can be observed at surfaces are the development of a sharp resonance (Yosida-Kondo resonance) at the Fermi level, which broadens with increasing temperature, and the splitting of this sharp resonance upon application of an external magnetic field. Until recently, observing the temperature and magnetic field dependence has been a challenge, because the experimental conditions strongly depend on the system's critical temperature, the so-called Kondo temperature T K . In order to clearly observe the temperature dependence, one needs to choose a system with a large T K . One can thus perform the experiments at temperatures T K . However, because the applied external magnetic field necessary to observe the magnetic field dependence scales with T K , one needs to choose a system with a very small T K . This in turn means that one should perform the experiments at very low temperatures, e.g., in the mK range. Here we discuss the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom on a metal surface, in relation to recent experimental developments

  19. Oxygen 18 concentration profile measurements near the surface by 18O(p,α)15N resonance reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsel, G.; David, D.

    1975-01-01

    The method of spectrum reduction in nuclear reaction microanalysis does not allow to obtain depth resolutions better than the order of 2000A. Resolutions of the order of 200A may be obtained by using the narrow resonance technique, when applied to thin films. The latter technique was extended to thick targets, with deep concentration profiles presenting a sharp gradient near the surface. This method is presented and illustrated by the study of 18 O profiles in oxygen diffusion measurements in growing ZrO 2 , using the 629keV resonance of the reaction 18 O(p,α) 15 N [fr

  20. Spectral surface plasmon resonance imaging for the detection of clenbuterol via three-dimensional immobilization of bioprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Manwen; Wu, Yichuan; Fang, Xiangyi; Yang, Yucong; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-04-15

    A method of immobilizing clenbuterol (CLEN) on the sensor chip for spectral surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was experimentally investigated. The bioprobes on the sensor chip were prepared by immobilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and conjugating CLEN molecules to BSA, which provides more active points and free orientations for specific binding. The calibration curve showed that the wavelength resonance shift decreased as the concentration of CLEN analyte increased, consistent with the inhibition principle. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 6.32 μg/ml. This method proved to be highly specific, high throughput, label free, and operationally convenient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SRS environmental air surveillance program 1954-2015: General trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-02

    The radiological monitoring program at SRS was established under the DuPont Company in June 1951 and was used as a measurement of the effectiveness of plant controls and as an authoritative record of environmental conditions surrounding the plant. It also served as a method of demonstrating compliance with applicable federal regulations and guidance. This document serves as a general summary of changes made specifically to the environmental air monitoring program since its inception, and a discussion of the general trends seen in the air monitoring program at SRS from 1954 to 2015. Initially, the environmental air surveillance program focused not only on releases from SRS but also on fallout from various weapons testing performed through the end of 1978. Flypaper was used to measure the amount of fallout in the atmosphere during this period, and was present at each of the 10 monitoring stations. By 1959, all site stacks were included in the air monitoring program to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity onsite, and the number of air surveillance samplers rose to 18. This trend of an increased number of sampling locations continued to a peak of 35 sampling locations before shifting to a downward trend in the mid-1990s. In 1962, 4 outer-range samplers were placed in Savannah and Macon, GA, and in Greenville and Columbia, SC. Until 1976, air samplers were simply placed around the perimeter of the various operation locations (after 1959, this included stacks to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity), with the intent of creating as representative a distribution as possible of the air surrounding operations.

  2. Evidence of surface loss as ubiquitous limiting damping mechanism in SiN micro- and nanomechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Luis Guillermo; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN) micro- and nanomechanical resonators have attracted a lot of attention in various research fields due to their exceptionally high quality factors (Qs). Despite their popularity, the origin of the limiting loss mechanisms in these structures has remained controversial....... In this Letter we propose an analytical model combining acoustic radiation loss with intrinsic loss. The model accurately predicts the resulting mode-dependent Qs of low-stress silicon-rich and high-stress stoichiometric SiN membranes. The large acoustic mismatch of the low-stress membrane to the substrate seems......, and cantilevers) SiN resonators extracted from literature, suggesting surface loss as ubiquitous damping mechanism in thin SiN resonators with Qsurf=βh and β=6×1010±4×1010  m−1. Based on the intrinsic loss the maximal achievable Qs and Qf products for SiN membranes and strings are outlined....

  3. Theoretical studies of inelastic molecule-surface and resonant electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowrey, R.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, two problems in the inelastic scattering of molecules from nonvibrating surfaces are discussed. First, the close coupling (CC) method is used to study the orientational dependence of the transition probabilities for vibrationally and rotationally inelastic scattering of H 2 and N 2 from flat surfaces. The dependence of vibrational transition probabilities on the orientation of the molecule is strong but decreases as the energy increases. Second, a new approximation to the CC method for treating scattering of molecules from corrugated surfaces is discussed. The proposed local normal model of j/sub z/ conservation assumes that the component of the rotational angular momentum of the incident molecule which is parallel to the normal to the surface at the impact point is conserved during a collision. In part II, the use of the complex basis function method to study two shape resonances in electron scattering is discussed. The complex self-consistent-field (CSCF) method was used to obtain the position and width of the 2 D shape resonance in electron-calcium scattering. Comparison with experimental results shows that the lifetime is influenced by correlation effects. The CSCF and complex configuration interaction (CCI) methods were used to obtain the complex potential energy function for nuclear motion for the 2 Σ/sub u/ + resonance state of H 2 -

  4. Enterprise SRS: leveraging ongoing operations to advance nuclear fuel cycles research and development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.M.; Marra, J.E.; Wilmarth, W.R.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is re-purposing its vast array of assets (including H Canyon - a nuclear chemical separation plant) to solve issues regarding advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies, nuclear materials processing, packaging, storage and disposition. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into SRS facilities but also in other facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research has been established in SRS

  5. Comparison Between the Trajectories of Electric Field Resonances and those of Rational Surfaces in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    2000-01-01

    Both the radial electric field resonance case and the corresponding to rational magnetic surfaces, show a number of similar behaviours: a) Strong sensitivity of the passing particle loss fraction, and mainly of their los times, to lower order rational values of the ratio between the poloidal and toroidal rotation angular velocities. b) In both cases there exist similar simple analytical models that allow qualitative predictions for the phase space regions where resonant effects can be expected. c) Strong similitude of trajectories, as well in the Poincare diagrams as in the angular maps. Near the resonant regions a extreme minimization of the radial excursion appears, and both diagrams present a minimum filling. At both sides of these regions there are wide excursions, directed alternatively towards the inner and the outer parts of the plasma. Far from these resonant zones the diagrams filling comes back to be continuous. d) All these behaviours are more marked, and the topology change more sudden, the lower is the periodicity order of the resonance, and are extremely clear for the 1/3 and 1/2 cases. This wealth of similar behaviour suggests a single origin for all these phenomena, linked with the trajectory topology, that will be the subject of a specific study. (Author) 13 refs

  6. Analysis Results for Sub-Samples of SRS Tanks 30, 32, and 39 to Support Evaluations of the I-129 Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-11

    In order to appropriately model and predict the chemical integrity and performance of cementitious materials used for waste immobilization at the Savannah River Site (SRS), it is critical to understand the I-129 solubility and distribution within the tank farm. Iodine in radioactive waste and in environmental media is typically highly mobile and long lived. Iodine is ubiquitous in SRS tank waste and waste forms. The iodine is assumed to be soluble and present at low levels in Performance Assessments (PAs) for SRS Tank Farms, and is one of the dose drivers in the PAs for both the SRS Salt Disposal Facility (SDF) and the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF). Analysis of tank waste samples is critical to understanding the Tank Farm iodine inventory and reducing disposal uncertainty. Higher than expected iodine levels have recently been observed in residual solids isolated from some SRS tanks prior to closure, indicating uncertainty regarding the chemical species involved. If the iodine inventory uncertainty is larger than anticipated, future work may be necessary to reduce the uncertainty. This memorandum satisfies a portion of the work scope identified in Task Plan SRNL-RP-2016-00651. A separate memorandum issued previously, reported historical unpublished I-129 data, a significant portion of which was below detectable analytical limits. This memorandum includes iodine and general chemical analysis results for six archived SRNL samples which were previously reported to have I-129 concentrations below detectable limits. Lower sample dilution factors were used for the current analyses in order to obtain concentrations above detection. The samples analyzed included surface and depth samples from SRS tanks 30, 32, and 39.

  7. SU-E-T-72: Commissioning of a Standardized SRS Cone Set: Determination of the Bolus Gap Factors in a Passively Scattered Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R; Gordon, I; Ghebremedhin, A; Wroe, A; Schulte, R; Bush, D; Slater, J; Patyal, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the proton output factors for an SRS cone set using standardized apertures and varied range compensators (bolus blanks); specifically, to determine the best method for modeling the bolus gap factor (BGF) and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations. Methods: A Standard Imaging A-16 chamber was placed in a Plastic Water phantom to measure the change in dose/MU with different treatment combinations for a proton SRS cone, using standardized apertures and range compensators. Measurements were made with all apertures in the SRS cone set, with four different range compensator thicknesses and five different air gaps between the end of the SRS cone and the surface of the phantom. The chamber was located at iso-center and maintained at a constant depth at the center of modulation for all measurements. Each aperture was placed in the cone to measure the change in MU needed to maintain constant dose at the chamber, as the air gap was increased with different thicknesses of bolus. Results: The dose/MU varied significantly with decreasing aperture size, increasing bolus thickness, or increasing air gap. The measured data was fitted with the lowest order polynomials that accurately described the data, to create a model for determining the change in output for any potential combination of devices used to treat a patient. For a given standardized aperture, the BGF could be described by its constituent factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Conclusion: The methods used to model the dose at the calibration point could be used to accurately predict the change in output for SRS proton beams due to the BGF, eliminating the need for patient specific calibrations. This method for modeling SRS treatments could also be applied to model other treatments using passively scattered proton beams

  8. Pump spectral linewidth influence on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-termination behavior of SRS in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guang S.; Kuzmin, Andrey; Prasad, Paras N. [The Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The threshold, temporal behavior, and conversion efficiency of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SBS) in three liquids (benzene, hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide) and two crystals (calcite and barium nitrate) have been investigated under three largely different spectral linewidth conditions. Pumped with 532-nm and nanosecond duration laser pulses of ≤ 0.01 cm{sup -1} linewidth, only SBS can be generated in all tested liquids with a high nonlinear reflectivity. However when the pump spectral linewidth is ∝0.07 cm{sup -1} or ∝0.8 cm{sup -1}, both SBS and SRS can be observed in benzene while only SRS can be generated in dimethyl sulfoxide; in all these cases SRS is the dominant contribution to the stimulated scattering but the efficiency values are drastically decreased due to the self-termination behavior of SRS in liquids, which arises from the thermal self-defocusing of both pump beam and SRS beam owing to Stokes-shift related opto-heating effect. In contrast, for SRS process in the two crystals, the thermal self-defocusing influence is negligible benefitting from their much greater thermal conductivity, and a higher conversion efficiency of SRS generation can be retained under all three pump conditions. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Rapid label-free identification of mixed bacterial infections by surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Weiling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection has been a challenge in clinical practice due to the phenotypic changes in complex environments. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor is widely used to detect DNA-DNA interaction and offers a sensitive and label-free approach in DNA research. Methods In this study, we developed a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA amplification technique and modified the traditional SPR detection system for rapid and simultaneous detection of mixed infections of four pathogenic microorganisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens. Results We constructed the circulation detection well to increase the sensitivity and the tandem probe arrays to reduce the non-specific hybridization. The use of 16S rDNA universal primers ensured the amplification of four target nucleic acid sequences simultaneously, and further electrophoresis and sequencing confirmed the high efficiency of this amplification method. No significant signals were detected during the single-base mismatch or non-specific probe hybridization (P 2 values of >0.99. The lowest detection limits were 0.03 nM for P. aeruginosa, 0.02 nM for S. aureus, 0.01 nM for C. tetani and 0.02 nM for C. perfringens. The SPR biosensor had the same detection rate as the traditional culture method (P Conclusions Our method can rapidly and accurately identify the mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, providing a reliable alternative to bacterial culture for rapid bacteria detection.

  10. Cancer cell uptake behavior of Au nanoring and its localized surface plasmon resonance induced cell inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Che-Kuan; Tu, Yi-Chou; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chu, Chih-Ken; Chen, Shih-Yang; Chi, Ting-Ta; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2015-02-01

    Au nanorings (NRIs), which have the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength around 1058 nm, either with or without linked antibodies, are applied to SAS oral cancer cells for cell inactivation through the LSPR-induced photothermal effect when they are illuminated by a laser of 1065 nm in wavelength. Different incubation times of cells with Au NRIs are considered for observing the variations of cell uptake efficiency of Au NRI and the threshold laser intensity for cell inactivation. In each case of incubation time, the cell sample is washed for evaluating the total Au NRI number per cell adsorbed and internalized by the cells based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement. Also, the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane are etched with KI/I2 solution to evaluate the internalized Au NRI number per cell. The threshold laser intensities for cell inactivation before washout, after washout, and after KI/I2 etching are calibrated from the circular area sizes of inactivated cells around the illuminated laser spot center with various laser power levels. By using Au NRIs with antibodies, the internalized Au NRI number per cell increases monotonically with incubation time up to 24 h. However, the number of Au NRI remaining on cell membrane reaches a maximum at 12 h in incubation time. The cell uptake behavior of an Au NRI without antibodies is similar to that with antibodies except that the uptake NRI number is significantly smaller and the incubation time for the maximum NRI number remaining on cell membrane is delayed to 20 h. By comparing the threshold laser intensities before and after KI/I2 etching, it is found that the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane cause more effective cancer cell inactivation, when compared with the internalized Au NRIs.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance image sensor module of spin-coated silver film with polymer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Prism modules of 20 nm-, 40 nm-, and 60 nm-thick spin-coated silver films both without and with an upper 100 nm-thick spin-coated polymer layer were fabricated for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image sensor applications. The prism modules were applied to an SPR image sensor system. The coefficients of determination (R2s) for the 20 nm-, 40 nm- and 60 nm-thick silver films without the polymer layer were 0.9231, 0.9901, and 0.9889, respectively, and with the polymer layer 0.9228, 0.9951, and 0.9880, respectively when standard ethanol solutions with 0.1% intervals in the range of 20.0% to 20.5% were applied. The upper polymer layer has no effect on the R2. The prism modules of the 40-nm-thick spin-coated silver films had the highest R2 value of approximately 0.99. The durability of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the 100 nm-thick polymer layer is much better than that without the upper low-loss polymer layer. The developed SPR image sensor module of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the upper 100 nm-thick low-loss polymer film is expected to be a very cost-effective and robust solution because the films are formed at low temperatures in a short period of time without requiring a vacuum system and are very durable.

  12. Cancer cell uptake behavior of Au nanoring and its localized surface plasmon resonance induced cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Che-Kuan; Tu, Yi-Chou; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chu, Chih-Ken; Chen, Shih-Yang; Chi, Ting-Ta; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Au nanorings (NRIs), which have the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength around 1058 nm, either with or without linked antibodies, are applied to SAS oral cancer cells for cell inactivation through the LSPR-induced photothermal effect when they are illuminated by a laser of 1065 nm in wavelength. Different incubation times of cells with Au NRIs are considered for observing the variations of cell uptake efficiency of Au NRI and the threshold laser intensity for cell inactivation. In each case of incubation time, the cell sample is washed for evaluating the total Au NRI number per cell adsorbed and internalized by the cells based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement. Also, the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane are etched with KI/I 2 solution to evaluate the internalized Au NRI number per cell. The threshold laser intensities for cell inactivation before washout, after washout, and after KI/I 2 etching are calibrated from the circular area sizes of inactivated cells around the illuminated laser spot center with various laser power levels. By using Au NRIs with antibodies, the internalized Au NRI number per cell increases monotonically with incubation time up to 24 h. However, the number of Au NRI remaining on cell membrane reaches a maximum at 12 h in incubation time. The cell uptake behavior of an Au NRI without antibodies is similar to that with antibodies except that the uptake NRI number is significantly smaller and the incubation time for the maximum NRI number remaining on cell membrane is delayed to 20 h. By comparing the threshold laser intensities before and after KI/I 2 etching, it is found that the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane cause more effective cancer cell inactivation, when compared with the internalized Au NRIs. (paper)

  13. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor method for palytoxin detection based on Na+,K+-ATPase affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Amparo; Pazos, María-José; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Tobio, Araceli; Alfonso, Carmen; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2013-12-27

    Palytoxin (PLTX), produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (Kobs). From the representation of Kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is K(D) = 6.38 × 10-7 ± 6.67 × 10-8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Method for Palytoxin Detection Based on Na+,K+-ATPase Affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX, produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (kobs. From the representation of kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (KD for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is KD = 6.38 × 10−7 ± 6.67 × 10−8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods.

  15. Integrated Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Measurements in a Borosilicate Glass Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique is a well-known optical method that can be used to measure the refractive index of organic nano-layers adsorbed on a thin metal film. Although there are many configurations for measuring biomolecular interactions, SPR-based techniques play a central role in many current biosensing experiments, since they are the most suited for sensitive and quantitative kinetic measurements. Here we give some results from the analysis and numerical elaboration of SPR data from integrated optics experiments in a particular borosilicate glass, chosen for its composition offering the rather low refractive index of 1.4701 at 633 nm wavelength. These data regard the flow over the sensing region (metal window of different solutions with refractive indexes in the range of interest (1.3÷1.5 for the detection of contaminants in aqueous solutions. After a discussion of the principles of SPR, of the metal window design optimization by means of optical interaction numerical modeling, and of waveguide fabrication techniques, we give a description of system setup and experimental results. Optimum gold film window thickness and width in this guided-wave configuration has been for the first time derived and implemented on an integrated optic prototype device. Its characterization is given by means of the real time waveguide output intensity measurements, which correspond to the interaction between the sensing gold thin film window and the flowing analyte. The SPR curve was subsequently inferred. Finally, a modified version of the device is reported, with channel waveguides arranged in a Y-junction optical circuit, so that laser source stability requirements are lowered by a factor of 85 dB, making possible the use of low cost sources in practical applications.

  16. Portable surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for the detection of fluoroquinolone antibiotic residues in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Fátima; Pinacho, Daniel G; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M Pilar

    2011-05-11

    An inexpensive and portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor, SPReeta Evaluation Kit SPR3, has been used to develop a biosensor for the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) and to demonstrate its performance analyzing FQ residues in milk samples. The SPReeta three-channel gold chips were activated with a mixed self-assembled monolayer (m-SAM) and functionalized with a FQ haptenized protein. Binding of the antibody produced a concentration-dependent increase of the SPR signal as a result of the change in the refraction index. Similarly, the presence of the FQ produced a dose-dependent decrease of the response, which allowed a good limit of detection (LOD) to be obtained (1.0 ± 0.4 μg L(-1) for enrofloxacin in buffer). The response was reproducible in all three channels, on different injections and days, and also between chips. Milk samples could be analyzed after a simple sample treatment involving fat removal by centrifugation and dilution with water. Under these conditions calibration curves were obtained showing that FQ residues can be analyzed in milk samples with an IC(50) value of 26.4 ± 7.2 μg L(-1) and a LOD of 2.0 ± 0.2 μg L(-1) (for enrofloxacin), far below the European Union regulations for this antibiotic family in this matrix. Finally, the paper also demonstrates that the biosensor is able to selectively detect the presence of FQs in milk samples, even in the presence of other antibiotics. Enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and norfloxacin residues were detected in blind samples supplied by Nestlé Co.

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Method for Palytoxin Detection Based on Na+,K+-ATPase Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Amparo; Pazos, María-José; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Tobio, Araceli; Alfonso, Carmen; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX), produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (kobs). From the representation of kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is KD = 6.38 × 10−7 ± 6.67 × 10−8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods. PMID:24379088

  18. Detection of clenbuterol hydrochloride residuals in pork liver using a customized surface plasmon resonance bioanalyzer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Hu

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunoassay with an immobilization of self-assembled molecular identification membrane for the detection of residual Clenbuterol Hydrochloride (CLB in pork liver was systematically investigated and experimentally validated for its high performance. SPR immunoassay with a regular competitive inhibition assay cannot be directly verified to detect CLB residuals. In this study, the binding of Au film with mercaptopropionic acid was investigated using the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. After that, the immunoglobulin IgG of swine (SwIgG-CLB was bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. The modified comprehensive analysis of how the membrane structure works was introduced together with the customized SPR bioanalyzer. In order to evaluate the performance of this biomembrane structure, the concentrations of CLB-contained solutions of 0 ng · mL(-1, 10 ng · mL(-1, 20 ng · mL(-1, 33.3 ng · mL(-1, and 40 ng · mL(-1 were prepared by adding CLB reagents into the solutions of CLB antibody (Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Antibody, CLB-Ab, successively and then the response unit (RU was measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the fitting curve was established with the R-Square value of 0.9929. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 88.48% to 103.21% was experimented and the limit of detection of CLB in 1.26 ng · mL(-1 was obtained efficiently. It was concluded that the detection method associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to the determination of residual CLB in pork liver quantitatively by using the customized SPR bioanalyzer.

  19. Detection of clenbuterol hydrochloride residuals in pork liver using a customized surface plasmon resonance bioanalyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiandong; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Shun; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Jianwei; Hu, Xinran; Liang, Hao; Zhu, Juanhua; Sun, Xiaohui; Ma, Liuzheng; Jiang, Min

    2015-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay with an immobilization of self-assembled molecular identification membrane for the detection of residual Clenbuterol Hydrochloride (CLB) in pork liver was systematically investigated and experimentally validated for its high performance. SPR immunoassay with a regular competitive inhibition assay cannot be directly verified to detect CLB residuals. In this study, the binding of Au film with mercaptopropionic acid was investigated using the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. After that, the immunoglobulin IgG of swine (SwIgG-CLB) was bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. The modified comprehensive analysis of how the membrane structure works was introduced together with the customized SPR bioanalyzer. In order to evaluate the performance of this biomembrane structure, the concentrations of CLB-contained solutions of 0 ng · mL(-1), 10 ng · mL(-1), 20 ng · mL(-1), 33.3 ng · mL(-1), and 40 ng · mL(-1) were prepared by adding CLB reagents into the solutions of CLB antibody (Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Antibody, CLB-Ab), successively and then the response unit (RU) was measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the fitting curve was established with the R-Square value of 0.9929. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 88.48% to 103.21% was experimented and the limit of detection of CLB in 1.26 ng · mL(-1) was obtained efficiently. It was concluded that the detection method associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to the determination of residual CLB in pork liver quantitatively by using the customized SPR bioanalyzer.

  20. Srs2: the "Odd-Job Man" in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Victoria; Krejci, Lumir

    2010-03-02

    Homologous recombination plays a key role in the maintenance of genome integrity, especially during DNA replication and the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Just a single un-repaired break can lead to aneuploidy, genetic aberrations or cell death. DSBs are caused by a vast number of both endogenous and exogenous agents including genotoxic chemicals or ionizing radiation, as well as through replication of a damaged template DNA or the replication fork collapse. It is essential for cell survival to recognise and process DSBs as well as other toxic intermediates and launch most appropriate repair mechanism. Many helicases have been implicated to play role in these processes, however their detail roles, specificities and co-operativity in the complex protein-protein interaction networks remain unclear. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about Saccharomyces cerevisiae helicase Srs2 and its effect on multiple DNA metabolic processes that generally affect genome stability. It would appear that Srs2 functions as an "Odd-Job Man" in these processes to make sure that the jobs proceed when and where they are needed. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening dynamic evaluation of SRS cooling water line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; Shteyngart, S.; Breidenbach, G.

    1991-01-01

    The production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been shut down due to perceived safety concerns. A major concern is the seismic integrity of the plant. A comprehensive program is underway to assess the seismic capacity of the existing systems and components and to upgrade them to acceptable levels. The evaluation of the piping systems at the SRS is a major element of this program. Many of the piping systems at the production reactors were designed without performing dynamic analyses. Instead their design complied with good design practice for dead weight supported systems with proper accommodation of thermal expansion effects. In order to gain some insight as to the seismic capacity of piping installed in this fashion, dynamic analyses were performed for some lines. Since the piping was not seismically supported, the evaluations involved various approximations and the results are only used as a screening test of seismic adequacy. In this paper, the screening evaluations performed for the raw water inlet line are described. This line was selected for evaluation since it was considered typical of the smaller diameter piping systems at the plant. It is a dead weight supported system made up of a run of small diameter piping which extends for great distances over many dead weight supports and through wall penetrations. The results of several evaluations for the system using different approximations to represent the support system are described. 2 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Influence of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles on optical and electrical properties of textured silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardana, Sanjay K.; Chava, Venkata S. N.; Thouti, Eshwar; Chander, Nikhil; Komarala, Vamsi K., E-mail: vamsi@ces.iitd.ac.in [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Sanjai [Central Electronics Limited, Sahibabad 201010, Uttar Pradesh (India); Reddy, S. R. [BHEL-Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Plant, BHEL House, Siri Fort, New Delhi 110049 (India)

    2014-02-17

    Here, we report average reflectance reduction of ∼8% in wavelength range of 300–1100 nm after coupling surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) of silver nanoparticles (NPs) to textured silicon (T-Si) surface. The enhancement of photocurrent from T-Si solar cell in off-resonant SPR region observed due to better radiative efficiency of NPs leading to outflow of scattered far-field into silicon maximized power generating electrons. Improvement in series resistance, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage (insensitive NPs size and morphology) are also observed with NPs along with photocurrent enhancement (sensitive to NPs sizes), which resulted cell efficiency enhancement from 4.49% to 6.42% for large area of 12.24 cm{sup 2}.

  3. Study of surface plasmon resonance of core-shell nanogeometry under the influence of perovskite dielectric environment: Electrostatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Nilesh Kumar; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We have systematically study the nano-plasmonic coupling to the perovskite (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) dielectric media in terms of surface plasmon resonance. The surface plasmon resonances are exhibited by the metal nanoparticles which is the electromagnetic excitation conduction electron when it is irradiated by incident light photon. Tunable behaviour of SPRs can be utilized to enhance the absorption of photon inside the surrounding environment in the wavelength range 300 to 800 nm. We have been selected two different types of nanogeometry such as coated and non-coated metal nanoparticles (radii ranges from 10 to 15 nm) to understand the plasmonic interaction to the dielectric media. Finally, we have observed that the coated nanogeometry is more preferable as compared to non-coated system to analyse the tunability of SPR peaks.

  4. Hydrostratigraphy of the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aadland, R.K.; Harris, M.K.; Lewis, C.M.; Gaughan, T.F.; Westbrook, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed analysis and synthesis of geophysical, core, and hydrologic data from 230 wells were used to delineate the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer characteristics of the General Separations Area at SRS. The study area is hydrologically bounded on the north and northwest by Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and on the south by Fourmile Branch (FB). The Cretaceous-Tertiary sedimentary sequence underlying the study area is divided into two Aquifer Systems; in ascending order, Aquifer Systems I and 11. The study concentrated on Aquifer System U, which includes all the Tertiary sediments above the Black Mingo Group (Paleocene) to the water table. This report includes a series of lithostratigraphic cross-sections, piezometric gradient profiles, head ratio contour maps, aquifer isopach maps, and potentiometric surface maps which illustrate the aquifer characteristics of the study area

  5. Hydrostratigraphy of the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aadland, R.K.; Harris, M.K.; Lewis, C.M.; Gaughan, T.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Westbrook, T.M. [Dames and Moore, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Detailed analysis and synthesis of geophysical, core, and hydrologic data from 230 wells were used to delineate the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer characteristics of the General Separations Area at SRS. The study area is hydrologically bounded on the north and northwest by Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and on the south by Fourmile Branch (FB). The Cretaceous-Tertiary sedimentary sequence underlying the study area is divided into two Aquifer Systems; in ascending order, Aquifer Systems I and 11. The study concentrated on Aquifer System U, which includes all the Tertiary sediments above the Black Mingo Group (Paleocene) to the water table. This report includes a series of lithostratigraphic cross-sections, piezometric gradient profiles, head ratio contour maps, aquifer isopach maps, and potentiometric surface maps which illustrate the aquifer characteristics of the study area.

  6. Quantification of aquifer properties with surface nuclear magnetic resonance in the Platte River valley, central Nebraska, using a novel inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Steele, Gregory V.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Woodward, Duane D.

    2012-01-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance, a noninvasive geophysical method, measures a signal directly related to the amount of water in the subsurface. This allows for low-cost quantitative estimates of hydraulic parameters. In practice, however, additional factors influence the signal, complicating interpretation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Platte Natural Resources District, evaluated whether hydraulic parameters derived from surface nuclear magnetic resonance data could provide valuable input into groundwater models used for evaluating water-management practices. Two calibration sites in Dawson County, Nebraska, were chosen based on previous detailed hydrogeologic and geophysical investigations. At both sites, surface nuclear magnetic resonance data were collected, and derived parameters were compared with results from four constant-discharge aquifer tests previously conducted at those same sites. Additionally, borehole electromagnetic-induction flowmeter data were analyzed as a less-expensive surrogate for traditional aquifer tests. Building on recent work, a novel surface nuclear magnetic resonance modeling and inversion method was developed that incorporates electrical conductivity and effects due to magnetic-field inhomogeneities, both of which can have a substantial impact on the data. After comparing surface nuclear magnetic resonance inversions at the two calibration sites, the nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived parameters were compared with previously performed aquifer tests in the Central Platte Natural Resources District. This comparison served as a blind test for the developed method. The nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived aquifer parameters were in agreement with results of aquifer tests where the environmental noise allowed data collection and the aquifer test zones overlapped with the surface nuclear magnetic resonance testing. In some cases, the previously performed aquifer tests were not designed fully to characterize

  7. Analytical Value of Detecting an Individual Molecular Binding Event:The Case of the Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2012), s. 30-34 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * single-molecule detection * kinetics * microfluidics Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.695, year: 2012

  8. Acquisition of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager, Digital Microscope, and Peristaltic Pumps for Defense-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    small power sources to operate them. We have been developing microfluidic formate, methanol , and hydrogen fuel cells (FCs). The use of these... fuels entails one of the most promising mobile technologies by which such power can be provided. FCs can be considered chemical reactors designed to...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this proposal is to purchase the GWC Technologies , Inc. Horizontal Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi

  9. Comparison of E-coli O157 : H7 preparation methods used for detection with surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, A. D.; Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Homola, Jiří; Jiang, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 202-208 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] Grant - others:US FDA(US) FD-U-002250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  10. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: Modeling and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Zullo, R.; Gaglio, G.; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), 015205 ISSN 0957-0233 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical resonators * optical sensors * cavity ring-down spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  11. Fabrication of surface plasmon resonance sensor surface with control of the nonspecific adsorption and affinity for the detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene using an antifouling copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eYatabe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor using a hydrophilic polymer for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. The hydrophilic polymer was made from mono-2-(methacryloyloxyethylsuccinate (MES and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP. The detection of TNT was carried out by displacement assay with the SPR measurement. In displacement assay, the affinity between anti-TNT antibody and the sensor surface, affects to the sensitivity. In the SPR measurement, nonspecific adsorption should be controlled because SPR sensor cannot discriminate between specific and nonspecific adsorption. Therefore, the affinity and nonspecific adsorption were controlled by changing the ratio of HEMA to MES. A detection limit of 0.4 ng/ml (ppb for TNT was achieved using a sensor surface with the lowest affinity without nonspecific adsorption.

  12. Realizing high-performance metamaterial absorber based on the localized surface plasmon resonance in the terahertz regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunfeng, Lin; Xiaoqi, Hu; Lin, Hu

    2018-04-01

    A composite structure design metamaterial absorber is designed and simulated. The proposed composite structure consists of a double-hole sub-structure and a double-metallic particle sub-structure. The damping constant of bulk gold layer is optimized to eliminate the adverse effects of the grain boundary and the surface scattering of thin films on the absorption property. Two absorption peaks (A1 = 58%, A2 = 23%) are achieved based on the localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes resonance. Moreover, the plasmonic hybridization phenomenon between LSP modes is found, which leads to the absorption enhancement between two absorption peaks. The proposed metamaterial absorber holds the property of wide-angle incidence.

  13. Au nanoparticle-modified DNA sensor based on simultaneous electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and localized surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin R; Hau, Ben Y H; Endo, Tatsuro; Kerman, Kagan

    2014-03-15

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were performed on the same Au nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass surfaces. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to electrodeposit AuNPs on ITO surface directly. The surface plasmon band characterization of AuNPs was initially studied by controlling the electrodeposition conditions. It was found that the size of AuNP clusters was significantly affected by the applied potential and KCl concentration in solution. The dual-detection platform was applied to detect DNA hybridization related to a specific point mutation in apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE), which was related to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The preliminary results facilitate the development of a versatile biosensor that can be easily miniaturized and integrated into a high-throughput diagnostic device. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Surface Plasmon Resonance, Resonant Waveguide Grating Biosensing and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA in the Evaluation of a Dengue Virus Immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Buechler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Two label-free biosensor platforms, Resonance Waveguide Grating (RWG and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, were used to rank a large panel of anti-dengue virus NS1 antibodies. Dengue non-structural 1 (NS1 protein is an established serological marker for the early detection of dengue infection. A variety of commercial dengue NS1 antigen capture immunoassays are available in both ELISA and lateral flow format. However, there is a significant scope to improve both the sensitivity and the specificity of those tests. The interactions of antibody (Ab-antigen (Ag were profiled, with weak interactions (KD = 1–0.1 μM able to be detected under static equilibrium conditions by RWG, but not observed to under more rigorous flow conditions using SPR. There were significant differences in the absolute affinities determined by the two technologies, and there was a poor correlation between antibodies best ranked by RWG and the lower limit of detection (LLOD found by ELISA. Hence, whilst high-throughput RWG can be useful as preliminary screening for higher affinity antibodies, care should be exercised in the assignation of quantitative values for affinity between different assay formats.

  15. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Keyamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ, and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability.

  16. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Mike; Herbert, James E.; Scheele, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m 3 to 4921 m 3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and product lubricated canned

  17. Development of a Rotary Microfilter for SRS HLW Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL, POIRIER

    2004-01-01

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site high level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross flow filter, produces 0.02 gpm/ft2 of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory personnel identified the rotary microfilter as a technology that could significantly increase filter flux, with throughput improvements of as much as 10X for that specific operation. With funding from the Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technologies, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. This work includes pilot-scale and actual waste testing to evaluate system reliability, the impact of radiation on system components, the filter flux for a variety of waste streams, and relative performance for alternative filter media

  18. Clemson final report: High temperature formulations for SRS soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-03-11

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate the application of a DC arc melter to in-situ vitrification of SRS soils. The melter that was available at the DOE/Industrial Vitrification Laboratory at Clemson University was equipped with opposing solid electrodes. To simulate field conditions, two hollow electrode configurations were evaluated which allowed fluxes to be injected into the melter while the soils were being vitrified. the first 4 runs utilized pre-blended flux (two runs) and attempted flux injection (two runs). These runs were terminated prematurely due to offgas sampling problems and melt freezing. The remaining four runs utilized a different electrode geometry, and the runs were not interrupted to change out the offgas sampling apparatus. These runs were conducted successfully.

  19. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Mike [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Herbert, James E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scheele, Patrick W. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  20. Questionário SRS-30 para adolescentes portadores de escoliose idiopática Cuestionario SRS-30 para adolescentes portadores de escoliosis idiopática SRS-30 Questionnaire for adolescents with idiophatic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Carriço de Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a medição da qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde é uma prática comum na avaliação de doenças da coluna vertebral. O questionário SRS-30 (versão procedente do instrumento Scoliosis Research Society-22 é um instrumento válido para a avaliação clínica de pacientes portadores de escoliose idiopática nos Estados Unidos. Entretanto, sua adaptação em outros idiomas é necessária para uso multinacional. OBJETIVO: analisar os domínios e itens do questionário SRS-30 para adolescentes. Discutir a aplicação do questionário da Scoliosis Research Society (SRS em diversas versões. DESENHO DE ESTUDO: revisão narrativa da literatura sobre um questionário para mensurar a qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde e suas versões em diferentes idiomas. MÉTODOS: Foi conduzida uma revisão narrativa da literatura em relação à tradução e validação dos questionários SRS-22, SRS-24 e SRS-30. RESULTADOS: oito publicações descrevendo a tradução e validação do questionário SRS nos idiomas espanhol, japonês, turco, chinês, italiano e alemão foram identificadas na literatura. Nenhum artigo sobre o questionário SRS-30 na versão brasileira foi localizado na literatura. O conteúdo dos itens de cada domínio se refere tanto a dados concretos e fáceis de precisar como também às experiências subjetivas das pessoas e às reações emocionais diante de determinados fatos. A maioria dos instrumentos que avaliam qualidade de vida foi desenvolvida no idioma inglês e existe a necessidade da adaptação destes questionários para o uso em países cuja língua oficial não seja o inglês. CONCLUSÕES: questionários que avaliam qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde devem sofrer adaptações culturais para manter a validade interna do instrumento. Para isso, urge outro desenho de estudo para a validação do questionário SRS-30 em português brasileiro para que se determine sua validade em comparação aos question

  1. New Approach for Studying Slow Fragmentation Kinetics in FT-ICR: Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new approach for studying the kinetics of large ion fragmentation in the gas phase by coupling surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with resonant ejection of selected fragment ions using a relatively short (5 ms) ejection pulse. The approach is demonstrated for singly protonated angiotensin III ions excited by collisions with a self-assembled monolayer of alkylthiol on gold (HSAM). The overall decomposition rate and rate constants of individual reaction channels are controlled by varying the kinetic energy of the precursor ion in a range of 65–95 eV. The kinetics of peptide fragmentation are probed by varying the delay time between resonant ejection and fragment ion detection at a constant total reaction time. RRKM modeling indicates that the shape of the kinetics plots is strongly affected by the shape and position of the energy deposition function (EDF) describing the internal energy distribution of the ion following ion-surface collision. Modeling of the kinetics data provides detailed information on the shape of the EDF and energy and entropy effects of individual reaction channels.

  2. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States). Div. of Biogeochemistry; Miller, W.P. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Soil Science

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. A Comprehensive Analysis of the SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification and Confounding Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallager, Dennis Winge; Hansen, Lars Valentin; Dragsted, Casper Rokkjær

    2016-01-01

    hoc analyses were performed for each SRS-Schwab modifier. Age, history of spine surgery, and aetiology of spinal deformity were considered potential confounders and their influence on the association between SRS-Schwab modifiers and aggregated Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores was evaluated...

  4. Exploration of the growth process of ultrathin silica shells on the surface of gold nanorods by the localized surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chong; Li, Yujie; Ling, Yunyang; Lai, Yangwei; Wu, Chuanliu; Zhao, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin silica coating (UTSC) has emerged as an effective way to improve the compatibility and stability of nanoparticles without attenuating their intrinsic optical properties. Exploration strategies to probe the growth process of ultrathin silica shells on the surface of nanoparticles would represent a valuable innovation that would benefit the development of ultrathin silica coated nanoparticles and their relevant applications. In this work, we report a unique, very effective and straightforward strategy for probing the growth of ultrathin silica shells on the surface of gold nanorods (Au NRs), which exploits the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) as a reporting signal. The thickness of the ultrathin silica shells on the surface of Au NRs can be quantitatively measured and predicted in the range of 0.5–3.5 nm. It is demonstrated that the LSPR shift accurately reflects the real-time change in the thickness of the ultrathin silica shells on Au NRs during the growth process. By using the developed strategy, we further analyze the growth of UTSC on the surface of Au NRs via feeding of Na 2 SiO 3 in a stepwise manner. The responsiveness analysis of LSPR also provides important insight into the shielding effect of UTSC on the surface of Au NRs that is not accessible with conventional strategies. This LSPR-based strategy permits exploration of the surface-mediated sol–gel reactions of silica from a new point of view. (paper)

  5. Synthesis of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes containing varying shaped cores and their localized surface plasmon resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianxiao; Zhou, Fei; Li, Zhiyuan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2012-06-19

    We have synthesized Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes containing Au cores with varying shapes and sizes through modified seed-mediated methods. Bromide ions are found to be crucial in the epitaxial growth of Ag atoms onto Au cores and in the formation of the shell's cubic shape. The Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes exhibit very abundant and distinct localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties, which are core-shape and size-dependent. With the help of theoretical calculation, the physical origin and the resonance mode profile of each LSPR peak are identified and studied. The core-shell nanocrystals with varying shaped cores offer a new rich category for LSPR control through the plasmonic coupling effect between core and shell materials.

  6. Blocking ELISA using recombinant NcSRS2 protein for diagnosing bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Francine A; Monte, Leonardo G; Collares, Thais F; De Matos, Bruno M; Pacheco, Diene B; Borsuk, Sibele; Andreotti, Renato; Hartleben, Cláudia P

    2015-03-01

    Neospora caninum is the etiologic agent of neosporosis, which leads to economic impacts on cattle industry. The reference method for serodiagnosis of neosporosis is the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). However, IFAT is laborious, expensive, and is not practicable in high throughput screening. In order to facilitate the serological diagnosis of neosporosis, we developed a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (b-ELISA) based on NcSRS2 recombinant protein (rNcSRS2) and polyclonal antibodies against rNcSRS2 (b-ELISA/rNcSRS2). Compared to IFAT, b-ELISA/rNcSRS2 showed 93.7 % accuracy (98.7 % sensitivity and 88.7 % specificity), suggesting its potential as diagnostic assay to detect N. caninum antibodies in cattle sera.

  7. Optical monitoring of thin film electro-polymerization on surface of ITO-coated lossy-mode resonance sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaszek, Michał; Dominik, Magdalena; Burnat, Dariusz; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Stranak, Viteszlav; Sezemsky, Petr; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2017-04-01

    This work presents an optical fiber sensors based on lossy-mode resonance (LMR) phenomenon supported by indium tin oxide (ITO) thin overlay for investigation of electro-polymerization effect on ITO's surface. The ITO overlays were deposited on core of polymer-clad silica (PCS) fibers using reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) method. Since ITO is electrically conductive and electrochemically active it can be used as a working electrode in 3-electrode cyclic voltammetry setup. For fixed potential applied to the electrode current flow decrease with time what corresponds to polymer layer formation on the ITO surface. Since LMR phenomenon depends on optical properties in proximity of the ITO surface, polymer layer formation can be monitored optically in real time. The electrodeposition process has been performed with Isatin which is a strong endogenous neurochemical regulator in humans as it is a metabolic derivative of adrenaline. It was found that optical detection of Isatin is possible in the proposed configuration.

  8. Affinity enhancement bivalent morpholino for pretargeting: initial evidence by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang; Liu, Guozheng; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc; Dou, Shuping; Mary, Rusckoswki; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2005-01-01

    Pretargeting with bivalent effectors capable of bridging antitumor antibodies has been reported to provide superior results by affinity enhancement. Morpholinos (MORFs) and other DNA analogues used for pretargeting are ideally suited as bivalent effectors since they are easily synthesized and the distance between binding regions, likely to be a determinant of binding, may be adjusted simply by lengthening the chain. The goal of this investigation was to synthesize a bivalent MORF and to determine by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) whether the bivalent MORF exhibited bimolecular binding and whether the MORFs showed improved in vitro hybridization affinity in its bivalent form compared to its monovalent form. An 18 mer amino-derivitized MORF was made bivalent by dimerizing with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) with N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) followed by purification by ion exchange chromatography. The in vitro hybridization affinity of bivalent compared to monovalent MORF was then measured by SPR. For these measurements, the complementary biotinylated cDNA was immobilized at coating densities that provided an average spacing of 20-100 angstroms and used to investigate the influence of this spacing on binding of the bivalent MORF with its binding regions separated by 25 A. The yield of bivalent MORF was as high as 45%, and the structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. When the sensograms obtained by SPR were analyzed using different binding models, the evidence was consistent with bimolecular binding of the bivalent MORF. The dissociation rate constant of the bivalent compared to monovalent MORF was more than 10-fold lower at 2.14 compared to 0.27 x 10(-5) (1/s) (p < 0.05), and since the association rate constants were similar at 8.53 and 5.64 x 10(5) (1/M.s) (p = 0.08), the equilibrium constant for hybridization to the immobilized cDNA of the bivalent compared to the monovalent MORF was almost 20-fold higher at 3

  9. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Lung Cancer Biomarker Using Nanoporous Biosensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Coupled with Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a nanobiosensor to evaluate a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The nanobiosensor is based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO chip and functions on the principles of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR and interferometry. The pore-depth of the fabricated nanoporous AAO chip was 1 µm and was obtained using a two-step electrochemical anodization process. The sensor chip is sensitive to the refractive index (RI changes of the surrounding medium and also provides simple and label-free detection when specific antibodies are immobilized on the gold-deposited surface of the AAO chip. In order to confirm the effectiveness of the sensor, the antibodies were immobilized on the surface of the AAO chip, and the lung cancer-specific biomarker was applied atop of the immobilized-antibody layer using the self-assembled monolayer method. The nanoporous AAO chip was used as a sensor system to detect serum amyloid A1, which is a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The specific reaction of the antigen-antibody contributes to the change in the RI. This in turn causes a shift in the resonance spectrum in the refractive interference pattern. The limit of detection (LOD was found to be 100 ag/mL and the biosensor had high sensitivity over a wide concentration range.

  10. Optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for rapid detection of avian influenza virus subtype H6: Initial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xihong; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Lee, Fu-Jung; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Wu, Mu-Shiang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-07-01

    A side-polished fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was fabricated to expose the core surface and then deposited with a 40 nm thin gold film for the near surface sensing of effective refractive index changes with surface concentration or thickness of captured avian influenza virus subtype H6. The detection surface of the SPR optical fiber sensor was prepared through the plasma modification method for binding a self-assembled monolayer of isopropanol chemically on the gold surface of the optical fiber. Subsequently, N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide was activated to enable EB2-B3 monoclonal antibodies to capture A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 (H6N1) through a flow injection system. The detection limit of the fabricated optical fiber sensor for A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 was 5.14 × 10(5) EID50/0.1 mL, and the response time was 10 min on average. Moreover, the fiber optic sensor has the advantages of a compact size and low cost, thus rendering it suitable for online and remote sensing. The results indicated that the optical fiber sensor can be used for epidemiological surveillance and diagnosing of avian influenza subtype H6 rapidly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-parametric surface plasmon resonance platform for studying liposome-serum interactions and protein corona formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Otto K; Rojalin, Tatu; Salmaso, Stefano; Barattin, Michela; Jarva, Hanna; Meri, Seppo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Viitala, Tapani; Urtti, Arto

    2017-04-01

    When nanocarriers are administered into the blood circulation, a complex biomolecular layer known as the "protein corona" associates with their surface. Although the drivers of corona formation are not known, it is widely accepted that this layer mediates biological interactions of the nanocarrier with its surroundings. Label-free optical methods can be used to study protein corona formation without interfering with its dynamics. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept for a multi-parametric surface plasmon resonance (MP-SPR) technique in monitoring the formation of a protein corona on surface-immobilized liposomes subjected to flowing 100 % human serum. We observed the formation of formulation-dependent "hard" and "soft" coronas with distinct refractive indices, layer thicknesses, and surface mass densities. MP-SPR was also employed to determine the affinity (K D ) of a complement system molecule (C3b) with cationic liposomes with and without polyethylene glycol. Tendency to create a thick corona correlated with a higher affinity of opsonin C3b for the surface. The label-free platform provides a fast and robust preclinical tool for tuning nanocarrier surface architecture and composition to control protein corona formation.

  12. Utilization of surface Plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles for determination of critical micelle concentration of cationic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jamil K.; El-Nahhal, Issa M.; Najri, Bassam A.; Hammad, Talaat M.

    2016-11-01

    We have utilized surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band sensitivity to surfactant concentration to investigate the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of CTAB, HY and CPB. The process is based upon an in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by diethylene triamine (DETA) at 25 °C. In the presence of cationic surfactants, Ag+ ions can be reduced to AgNPs in a few minutes, accompanied by changes in intensity and wavelength of the SPR band. The spectral shifts of SPR band and the change of color have been used to determine CMC values of cationic surfactants.

  13. The interaction between endopolygalacturonase from Fusarium moniliforme and PGIP from Phaseolus Vulgaris studied by surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, B; Cervone, F; Roepstorff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A combination of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and matrix-assisted laser-desorptionionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to study the interaction between endopolygalacturonase (PG) from Fusarium moniliforme and a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) from...... Phaseolus vulgaris. PG hydrolyses the homogalacturonan of the plant cell wall and is considered an important pathogenicity factor of many fungi. PGIP is a specific inhibitor of fungal PGs and is thought to be involved in plant defence against phytopathogenic fungi. SPR was used either to study the effect...

  14. Detection of biochemical reactions by a surface plasmon resonance senor based on polarization interferometry and angle modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaoxu; Chong, Xinyuan; Ma, Suihua; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bio-sensing system has been developed. The system is based on polarization interferometry and angel modulation. In this paper, we apply it in the biological detection. We use the DNA fragment of Escherichia coli (Bacterial 16S rDNA universal primer) as bioprobe and . The process that analyte attach with the bioprobe, and coli DNA as analyte, get a resolution about 2.7× 10-6RI and 0.18nM/L in coli DNA detection.

  15. Investigating the Feedback Path in a Jet-Surface Resonant Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    A resonant interaction between an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet and flat-plates, placed parallel to the jet, is addressed in this study. For certain relative locations of the plates, the resonance takes place with accompanying audible tones. Even when the tone is not audible the sound pressure level spectra is often marked by conspicuous peaks. The frequencies of the spectral peaks, as functions of the streamwise length of the plate and its relative location to the jet as well as the jet Mach number, are explored in an effort of understand the flow mechanism. It is demonstrated that the tones are not due to a simple feedback between the plates trailing edge and the nozzle exit; the leading edge also comes into play in determining the frequency. An acoustic feedback path, involving diffraction from the leading edge, appears to explain the frequencies of some of the spectral peaks.

  16. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  17. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm 3 , 3515 mm 3 , and 4517 mm 3 , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm 2 in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm 2 in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency

  18. Chemical analysis of surfaces by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy associated to ionic pulverization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, P.

    1995-01-01

    This work shows that if resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was first applied in isotopic separation, it's also an analyzing method adapted to the study of semi-conductor materials and thin foils. We have improved this technic: a neodymium laser coupled with a dye laser, a new argon ions gun, a gallium ions gun and a new collection optic for the secondary ions quadrupole spectrometer to allow quantitative and selective measurements. (S.G.). 84 refs

  19. Novel approach to material evaluation of thin surface layers by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Michal; Růžek, Michal; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Bodnárová, Lucie; Zídek, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-5 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena /15./. Leuven, 19.07.2009-23.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) * thin films * DLC Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/214/1/012045/

  20. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light–matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light–matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation. PMID:26584781

  1. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light-matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ~60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light-matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation.

  2. Alternate Approach To Hazard Categorization For Saltstone Facility At SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category

  3. Improving the measurement of health-related quality of life in adolescent with idiopathic scoliosis: the SRS-7, a Rasch-developed short form of the SRS-22 questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronni, Antonio; Zaina, Fabio; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire was developed to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. Rasch analysis (RA) is a statistical procedure which turns questionnaire ordinal scores into interval measures. Measures from Rasch-compatible questionnaires can be used, similar to body temperature or blood pressure, to quantify disease severity progression and treatment efficacy. Purpose of the current work is to present Rasch analysis (RA) of the SRS-22 questionnaire and to develop an SRS-22 Rasch-approved short form. 300 SRS-22 were randomly collected from 2447 consecutive IS adolescents at their first evaluation (229 females; 13.9 ± 1.9 years; 26.9 ± 14.7 Cobb°) in a scoliosis outpatient clinic. RA showed both disordered thresholds and overall misfit of the SRS-22. Sixteen items were re-scored and two misfitting items (6 and 14) removed to obtain a Rasch-compatible questionnaire. Participants HRQL measured too high with the rearranged questionnaire, indicating a severe SRS-22 ceiling effect. RA also highlighted SRS-22 multidimensionality, with pain/function not merging with self-image/mental health items. Item 3 showed differential item functioning (DIF) for both curve and hump amplitude. A 7-item questionnaire (SRS-7) was prepared by selecting single items from the original SRS-22. SRS-7 showed fit to the model, unidimensionality and no DIF. Compared with the SRS-22, the short form scale shows better targeting of the participants' population. RA shows that SRS-22 has poor clinimetric properties; moreover, when used with AIS at first evaluation, SRS-22 is affected by a severe ceiling effect. SRS-7, an SRS-22 7-item short form questionnaire, provides an HRQL interval measure better tailored to these participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Largely enhanced near band edge emission of ultrathin zinc oxide nanowire/gold nanoparticles composites by surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Chenying; Han, Feng; Yang, Shuming; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-03-01

    Ultrathin zinc oxide nanowires with diameter less than 50 nm were synthesized by polyethyleneimine assisted solution method. Zinc oxide nanowire near band edge emission was enhanced obviously by gold nanoparticles coating, and a max 26 times enhancement was realized. The defects caused visible light emission was also quenched to noise level when gold was deposited more than 10 s. The large near band edge emission enhancement was caused by surface plasmon resonance mediated luminescent energy transfer, which absorbed the visible light energy and transferred to the near band edge emission. The large surface to volume ratio enhanced the coupling strength between gold nanoparticles and ultrathin zinc oxide nanowires. This research provide a method to improve the luminescent efficiency of zinc oxide nanowires.

  5. A Generic Method for Fungal Spore Detection: The use of a monoclonal antibody and surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    This study describes a biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a monoclonal antibody (mab) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) a biotrophic fungus...... causing wheat yellow rust. We have developed mabs towards intact whole spores and used a subtractive inhibition format for detection of spores in solution. The antibody was incubated with different spore concentrations and the remaining free antibody was quantified using a BIAcore® 3000 sensor. Decreasing...... binding of mab to the sensor surface was observed as the Pst urediniospore concentration was increased. The detection range for the assay was 1.7 x 106 – 5.3 x 104 spores/ml. This study describes the first use of SPR for detection of fungal spores and the generic principle has the potential to be used...

  6. A Generic Method for Fungal Spore Detection: The use of a monoclonal antibody and surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    This study describes a biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a monoclonal antibody (mab) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) a biotrophic fungus...... causing wheat yellow rust. We have developed mabs towards intact whole spores and used a subtractive inhibition format for detection of spores in solution. The antibody was incubated with different spore concentrations and the remaining free antibody was quantified using a BIAcore® 3000 sensor....... Decreasing binding of mab to the sensor surface was observed as the Pst urediniospore concentration was increased. The detection range for the assay was 1.7 x 106 – 5.3 x 104 spores/ml. This study describes the first use of SPR for detection of fungal spores and the generic principle has the potential...

  7. A Generic Method for Fungal Spore Detection: The use of a monoclonal antibody and surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Hearty, Stephen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a biosensing principle for detection of fungal spores using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The approach involves the use of a monoclonal antibody (mab) and a SPR sensor for label-free detection of the model organism Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) a biotrophic fungus...... causing wheat yellow rust. We have developed mabs towards intact whole spores and used a subtractive inhibition format for detection of spores in solution. The antibody was incubated with different spore concentrations and the remaining free antibody was quantified using a BIAcore® 3000 sensor. Decreasing...... binding of mab to the sensor surface was observed as the Pst urediniospore concentration was increased. The detection range for the assay was 1.7 x 106 – 5.3 x 104 spores/ml. This study describes the first use of SPR for detection of fungal spores and the generic principle has the potential to be used...

  8. Interactions of doxorubicin with self-assembled monolayer-modified electrodes: electrochemical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and gravimetric studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieciecka, Dorota; Krysinski, Pawel

    2011-02-01

    We present the results on the partitioning of doxorubicin (DOX), a potent anticancer drug, through the model membrane system, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes. The monolayers were formed from alkanethiols of comparable length with different ω-terminal groups facing the aqueous electrolyte: the hydrophobic -CH(3) groups for the case of dodecanethiol SAMs or hydrophilic -OH groups of mercaptoundecanol SAMs. The electrochemical experiments combined with the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and gravimetric studies show that doxorubicin is likely adsorbed onto the surface of hydrophilic monolayer, while for the case of the hydrophobic one the drug mostly penetrates the monolayer moiety. The adsorption of the drug hinders further penetration of doxorubicin into the monolayer moiety.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging biosensor for cystatin determination based on the application of bromelain, ficin and chymopapain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sankiewicz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI sensor based on bromelain or chymopapain or ficin has been developed for specific cystatin determination. Cystatin was captured from a solution by immobilized bromelain or chymopapain or ficin due to the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex on the biosensor surface. The influence of bromelain, chymopapain or ficin concentration, as well as the pH of the interaction on the SPRI signal, was investigated and optimized. Sensor dynamic response range is between 0–0.6 μg/ml and the detection limit is equal to 0.1 μg/ml. In order to demonstrate the sensor potential, cystatin was determined in blood plasma, urine and saliva, showing good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  10. High sensitive detection of copper II ions using D-penicillamine-coated gold nanorods based on localized surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoochan; Jo, Seongjae; Park, Joohyung; Park, Jinsung; Yang, Jaemoon

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a nanoplasmonic biosensor based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect that enables a sensitive and selective recognition of copper II ions. First, we fabricated the nanoplasmonics as LSPR substrates using gold nanorods (GNR) and the nano-adsorption method. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoplasmonics was evaluated using various solvents with different refractive indexes. Subsequently, D-penicillamine (DPA)—a chelating agent of copper II ions—was conjugated to the surface of the GNR. The limit of detection (LOD) for the DPA-conjugated nanoplasmonics was 100 pM. Furthermore, selectivity tests were conducted using various divalent cations, and sensitivity tests were conducted on the nanoplasmonics under blood-like environments. Finally, the developed nanoplasmonic biosensor based on GNR shows great potential for the effective recognition of copper II ions, even in human blood conditions.

  11. Incorporation of surface plasmon resonance with novel valinomycin doped chitosan-graphene oxide thin film for sensing potassium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, Afiq Azri; Fen, Yap Wing; Yusof, Nor Azah; Al-Rekabi, Sura Hmoud; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir; Omar, Nur Alia Sheh

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the combination of novel valinomycin doped chitosan-graphene oxide (C-GO-V) thin film and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system for potassium ion (K+) detection has been developed. The novel C-GO-V thin film was deposited on the gold surface using spin coating technique. The system was used to monitor SPR signal for K+ in solution with and without C-GO-V thin film. The K+ can be detected by measuring the SPR signal when C-GO-V thin film is exposed to K+ in solution. The sensor produces a linear response for K+ ion up to 100 ppm with sensitivity and detection limit of 0.00948° ppm- 1 and 0.001 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that the C-GO-V film is high potential as a sensor element for K+ that has been proved by the SPR measurement.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Biosensors for Exploring the Influence of Alkaloids on Aggregation of Amyloid-β Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the presented study was the development of a simple analytical tool for exploring the influence of naturally occurring compounds on the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ40 in order to find potential anti-neurodegenerative drugs. The gold discs used for surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements were modified with thioaliphatic acid. The surface functionalized with carboxylic groups was used for covalent attaching of Aβ40 probe by creation of amide bonds in the presence of EDC/NHS. The modified SPR gold discs were used for exploring the Aβ40 aggregation process in the presence of selected alkaloids: arecoline hydrobromide, pseudopelletierine hydrochloride, trigonelline hydrochloride and α-lobeline hydrochloride. The obtained results were discussed with other parameters which govern the phenomenon studied such as lipophilicity/ hydrophilicy and Aβ40-alkaloid association constants.

  13. Benchtop chemistry for the rapid prototyping of label-free biosensors: Transmission localized surface plasmon resonance platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ssu; Chen, Xin; Yang, Tinglu; Castellana, Edward T.; Chen, Jixin; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, a simple label-free biosensor fabrication method is demonstrated based on transmission localized surface plasmon resonance (T-LSPR). The platform, which consists of a silver nanoparticle array, can be prepared in just a few minutes using benchtop chemistry. The array was made by a templating technique in conjunction with the photoreduction of Ag ions from solution. This metal surface was functionalized with biotin-linked thiol ligands for binding streptavidin molecules from solution. For an array of 19 nm diameter silver nanoparticles, a redshift in the T-LSPR spectrum of 24 nm was observed upon protein-ligand binding at saturation. The binding constant was found to be 2 × 1012 M–1. Platforms were also fabricated with silver nanoparticles of 34, 55, and 72 nm diameters. The maximum LSPR wavelength shift was nanoparticle size dependent and the maximum sensitivity was obtained with the smaller nanoparticles. PMID:20408728

  14. Local structures of mesoporous bioactive glasses and their surface alterations in vitro: inferences from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawidjaja, Philips N.; Mathew, Renny; Lo, Andy Y. H.; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; García, Ana; Arcos, Daniel; Mattias Edén, María Vallet-Regí

    2012-01-01

    We review the benefits of using 29Si and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for probing the local structures of both bulk and surface portions of mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) of the CaO–SiO2−(P2O5) system. These mesoporous materials exhibit an ordered pore arrangement, and are promising candidates for improved bone and tooth implants. We discuss experimental MAS NMR results from three MBGs displaying different Ca, Si and P contents: the 29Si NMR spectra were recorded either directly by employing radio-frequency pulses to 29Si, or by magnetization transfers from neighbouring protons using cross polarization, thereby providing quantitative information about the silicate speciation present in the pore wall and at the MBG surface, respectively. The surface modifications were monitored for the three MBGs during their immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for intervals between 30 min and one week. The results were formulated as a reaction sequence describing the interconversions between the distinct silicate species. We generally observed a depletion of Ca2+ ions at the MBG surface, and a minor condensation of the silicate-surface network over one week of SBF soaking. PMID:22349247

  15. Application of PSA to storage of Pu at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Pu is stored in a wide variety of physical forms and containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) techniques are used to determine the risk associated with each of these storage modes and assist in identification of the controls necessary to minimize the risk. One storage method involves solids in exposed drum storage where the drums are vulnerable to external events, natural phenomena, and release of material due to weathering of the containers. Another storage method may involve liquids being processed inside the canyon facilities where the greatest risks are not from external events but from process upsets. PSA techniques have been particularly useful in the evaluation of criticality situations concerning Pu processing and storage. The applications include ''normal'' operating situations, problems following a seismic event, and the identification of potential problems during the decontamination and decommissioning of a facility. In this paper I would like to discuss two specific examples of the use of PSA techniques. The first involves the analysis of potential accidents in a Pu receipt and storage facility. The second example involves processing solutions that have the potential for experiencing an uncontrolled ''red oil'' reaction

  16. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shaohua [The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an 223003 (China); School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei [The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an 223003 (China)

    2016-04-15

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Strong excitation of surface and bulk spin waves in yttrium iron garnet placed in a split ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Z. J.; Soh, W. T.; Ong, C. K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in a bilayer consisting of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum (Pt) loaded on a metamaterial split ring resonator (SRR). The system is excited by a microstrip feed line which generates both surface and bulk spin waves in the YIG. The spin waves subsequently undergo spin pumping from the YIG film to an adjacent Pt layer, and is converted into a charge current via the ISHE. It is found that the presence of the SRR causes a significant enhancement of the mangetic field near the resonance frequency of the SRR, resulting in a significant increase in the ISHE signal. Furthermore, the type of spin wave generated in the system can be controlled by changing the external applied magnetic field angle (θH ). When the external applied magnetic field is near parallel to the microstrip line (θH = 0 ), magnetostatic surface spin waves are predominantly excited. On the other hand, when the external applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the microstrip line (θH = π/2 ), backward volume magnetostatic spin waves are predominantly excited. Hence, it can be seen that the SRR structure is a promising method of achieving spin-charge conversion, which has many advantages over a coaxial probe.

  18. In situ targeting TEM8 via immune response and polypeptide recognition by wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Jie; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in real-time and in situ monitoring of living cell activities in life science and medicine. This paper reports a whole cell sensing protocol over the interface of Au film coupled in a wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance (WMSPR) biosensor. With dual parabolic mirrors integrated in the sensor, the compact and miniaturized instrument shows satisfactory refractive index sensitivity (2220 nm/RIU) and a high resolution of resonance wavelength shift of 0.3 nm to liquid samples. The affinity interactions between the biomarker of human tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and antibody (Ab) or specific polypeptide (PEP) were firstly introduced to WMSPR biosensor analysis. Both the interaction events of Ab-cell and PEP-cell over the Au film interface can be recognized by the sensor and the balance time of interactions is about 20 min. The concentration range of Ab for quantitative monitoring of the TEM8 expression on human colon carcinoma SW620 cells was investigated. The present low-cost and time-saving method provides a time resolution of binding specificity between Ab/PEP and TEM8 for real-time analysis of antigen on living tumor cell surface. PMID:26822761

  19. Label free checkerboard assay to determine overlapping epitopes of Ebola virus VP-40 antibodies using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George P; Liu, Jinny L; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Immunoassay formats, in which antibodies provide sensitivity and specificity, are often utilized to provide rapid and simple diagnostic tests. Surface plasmon resonance is frequently used to evaluate the suitability of antibodies by determining binding kinetics to agents or surrogate antigens. We used SPR to evaluate a number of commercial monoclonal antibodies as well as single domain antibodies produced in-house. All the antibodies targeted the Ebola virus viral protein 40 (VP40). We determined the ability of each antibody to bind to immobilized VP40, and ensured they did not bind Ebola glycoprotein or the nucleoprotein. A subset of the monoclonal antibodies was immobilized to characterize antigen capture in solution. It can be advantageous to utilize antibodies that recognize distinct epitopes when choosing reagents for detection and diagnostic assays. We determined the uniqueness of the epitope recognized by the anti-VP40 antibodies using a checkerboard format that exploits the 6×6 array of interactions monitored by the Bio-Rad ProteOn XPR36 SPR instrument. The results demonstrate the utility of surface plasmon resonance to characterize monoclonal and recombinant antibodies. Additionally, the analysis presented here enabled the identification of pairs of anti-VP40 antibodies which could potentially be utilized in sandwich type immunoassays for the detection of Ebola virus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Semi-quantitative analysis of indigo carmine, using silver colloids, by surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadi, I. T.; Chowdhry, B. Z.; Snowden, M. J.; Withnall, R.

    2003-08-01

    The application of surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) to the semi-quantitative analysis of the dye, indigo carmine, has been examined using citrate-reduced silver colloids. Good linear correlations are observed for the dye band at 1580 cm -1 in the concentration range 10 -7-10 -5 and 10 -9-10 -5 mol dm -3, using laser exciting wavelengths of 514.5 [( R=0.9983)] and 632.8 nm [( R=0.9978)], respectively. At concentrations of dye above 10 -6 M the concentration dependence of the SERRS signals is non-linear due to the coverage of the surface of the colloidal particles by the dye being in excess of a full monolayer. At concentrations above 10 -6 M resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) can be employed for the quantitative analysis of the dye. An internal standard was used and a good linear correlation ( R=0.997) was observed for the dependence of dye signal intensities at 1580 cm -1 in the concentration range 10 -5-10 -4 M using a laser exciting wavelength of 514.5 nm. The limits of detection of indigo carmine by SERRS (514.5 nm), SERRS (632.8 nm) and solution RRS (514.5 nm) are found to be 0.9, 1 and 38 ppm, respectively.

  1. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. I - Connection formulae at the resonant surfaces. II - Absorption of sound waves by sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1991-01-01

    The present method of addressing the resonance problems that emerge in such MHD phenomena as the resonant absorption of waves at the Alfven resonance point avoids solving the fourth-order differential equation of dissipative MHD by recourse to connection formulae across the dissipation layer. In the second part of this investigation, the absorption of solar 5-min oscillations by sunspots is interpreted as the resonant absorption of sounds by a magnetic cylinder. The absorption coefficient is interpreted (1) analytically, under certain simplifying assumptions, and numerically, under more general conditions. The observed absorption coefficient magnitude is explained over suitable parameter ranges.

  2. Investigation of Carboxymethyl Cellulose Adsorption onto Regenerated Cellulose Surfaces via Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zelin; Gatenholm, Paul; Esker, Alan

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of anionic polyeletrolytes, sodium salts of carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC), with different degrees of substitution (DS = 0.9 and 1.2) from aqueous electrolyte solutions onto regenerated cellulose surface was studied via quartz microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The influence of both calcium chloride (CaCl2) and sodium chloride (NaCl) was examined. Both QCM-D and SPR results indicate that CMC adsorption onto regenerated cellulose surfaces increases with increasing electrolyte concentration and CaCl2 (divalent cation) showed a significant effect on CMC adsorption compared to NaCl (monovalent cation) at the same ionic strength. Voigt-based viscoelastic modeling of the QCM-D data and analysis of the SPR data are consistent with the existence of a swollen CMC layer on the cellulose surface with a viscosity of ˜1.3×10-3 kg m-1 s-1 and an elastic shear modulus of ˜10^5 kg m-1 s-2.

  3. Development of surface plasmon resonance imaging for detection of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac) using specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Wangkam, Thidarat; Huangkamhang, Nongluck; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Himananto, Orawan; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2011-01-15

    An immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) using a specific monoclonal antibody 11E5 (MAb 11E5) was developed for the detection of the seed-borne bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), which causes fruit blotch in watermelons and cantaloupes, and compared to the conventional ELISA technique. The 1:40 mixed self-assembled monolayer (mixed SAM) surface was used for the immobilized MAb 11E5 on sensor surface for the detection of Aac. Both whole cells and broken cells of Aac were tested by using direct and sandwich detection assay. The limit of detection (LOD) of Aac using the SPR imaging technique and a direct detection assay was 10(6)cfu/ml and a subsequent amplification of the SPR signal using a polyclonal antibody (PAb) lowered the LOD to 5×10(5) cfu/ml. The LOD for the ELISA technique was 5×10(4) cfu/ml for the detection of Aac, which was slightly better than that for the SPR technique. However, the sensor surface based on SPR imaging offered a major advantage in terms of surface regeneration, allowing at least five cycles with a shorter time assay, multi-channel analysis with an application on multiplex detection, and an ease of the surface usage for the detection of Aac in the naturally infected plant. The surface was tested against the naturally infected sample and showed good selectivity toward the Aac bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Semi-continuous, real-time monitoring of protein biomarker using a recyclable surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyung; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Paek, Sung-Ho; Cho, Hyun-Mo; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2017-02-15

    Although label-free immunosensors based on, for example, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) provide advantages of real-time monitoring of the analyte concentration, its application to routine clinical analysis in a semi-continuous manner is problematic because of the high cost of the sensor chip. The sensor chip is in most cases regenerated by employing an acidic pH. However, this causes gradual deterioration of the activity of the capture antibody immobilized on the sensor surface. To use sensor chips repeatedly, we investigated a novel surface modification method that enables regeneration of the sensor surface under mild conditions. We introduced a monoclonal antibody (anti-CBP Ab) that detects the conformational change in calcium binding protein (CBP) upon Ca 2+ binding (>1mM). To construct a regenerable SPR-based immunosensor, anti-CBP Ab was first immobilized on the sensor surface, and CBP conjugated to the capture antibody (specific for creatine kinase-MB isoform (CK-MB); CBP-CAb) then bound in the presence of Ca 2+ . A serum sample was mixed with the detection antibody to CK-MB, which generated an SPR signal proportional to the analyte concentration. After each analysis, the sensor surface was regenerated using medium (pH 7) without Ca 2+ , and then adding fresh CBP-CAb in the presence of Ca 2+ for the subsequent analysis. Analysis of multiple samples using the same sensor was reproducible at a rate >98.7%. The dose-response curve was linear for 1.75-500.75ng/mL CK-MB, with an acceptable coefficient of variation of 96%), and exhibited analytical stability for 1 month. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a renewal of a sensor surface with fresh antibody after each analysis, providing high consistency in the assay during a long-term use (e.g., a month at least). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth temperature dependent surface plasmon resonances of densely packed gold nanoparticles’ films and their role in surface enhanced Raman scattering of Rhodamine6G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Shweta; Rao, B. Tirumala; Bhartiya, S.; Sathe, V.; Kukreja, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Growth temperature produces and tunes the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold films. • Optimum thickness and growth temperature combination results narrow SPR band. • Alumina capping red-shifted the SPR band and showed marginal re-sputtering of films. • Densely packed gold nanoparticles of varying sizes can be realized by pulsed laser deposition. • High SERS intensity of dye from gold films of large SPR strength at excitation wavelength. - Abstract: Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) characteristics of gold nanoparticles films grown at different substrate temperatures and mass thicknesses with and without alumina capping were studied. At different film mass thicknesses, the LSPR response was observed mainly in the films grown at high substrate temperatures. About 300 °C substrate temperature was found to be optimum for producing narrow and strong LSPR band in both uncapped and alumina capped gold nanoparticles films. The LSPR wavelength could be tuned in the range of 600–750 nm by changing either number of ablation pulses or decreasing target to substrate distance (TSD) and alumina layer capping. Though the alumina capping re-sputtered the gold films still these films exhibited stronger LSPR response compared to the uncapped films. Atomic force microscopic analysis revealed formation of densely packed nanoparticles films exhibiting strong LSPR response which is consistent with the package density of the nanoparticles predicted by the theoretical calculations. The average size of nanoparticles increased with substrate temperature, number of ablation pulses and decreasing the TSD. For the same mass thickness of gold films grown at different substrate temperatures the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of Rhodamine6G dye was found to be significantly different which had direct correlation with the LSPR strength of the films at the excitation wavelength

  6. A comparative study on optical and magnetic resonance properties of near-surface NV centers in nano and bulk diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico Brandao

    2014-01-01

    Using shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for applications in magnetometry requires the generation of stable defects in the NV charge state in sufficiently high density and high quality spin properties. Recent studies reported about NV defects close to the surface created by ion implantation or during chemical vapor deposition growth technique and in nanodiamonds point to a scenario where defects are stabilized in the neutral charge state and that the minority of negatively charged state defects have poor spin properties, i.e.g shorter coherence times compared to NV defects deeply localized in bulk diamond. This undesirable behavior appears to result from the interaction with rapidly fluctuating electric fields created by moving charges at the surface and with interface effects associated with the termination of the diamond surface. Here we report studies of photoluminescence and magnetic resonance properties of shallow NV ensembles created by low energy nitrogen ion implantation in electronic grade diamond substrate and nanodiamonds with low nitrogen concentration. We verified the shallow NV center spin properties through pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) protocols and found longitudinal time constant (T1) of a few milliseconds and transversal relaxation time constant (T2) of a few microseconds for shallow defects implanted in bulk diamond. For nanodiamonds, the T2 coherence time is similar to the case in bulk sample but on the other hand the T1 coherence time is ten times shorter than in bulk. Additionally was found the T2* is around one microsecond for shallow NV defects in bulk samples meanwhile in nanodiamonds it is around twenty nanoseconds. It worth to mention that all the measurements were performed in NV ensembles which show just two ODMR resonance lines with applied magnetic field as if they were magnetically equivalent. In that sense we are trying to apply chirped pulses and Ramsey pulse sequence to check this assumption

  7. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    confined to the electrode as compared to the total mechanical energy is calculated and is found to be increasing for increasing aspect ratio and to tend to a definite limit for the two families of surface waves. This observation is in support of the interpretation that high aspect ratio electrodes act......It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...

  8. Study of Immobilization Procedure on Silver Nanolayers and Detection of Estrone with Diverged Beam Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abdulhalim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An immobilization protocol was developed to attach receptors on smooth silver thin films. Dense and packed 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA was used to avoid uncontrolled sulfidization and harmful oxidation of silver nanolayers. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS were added to make the silver surfaces reactive. A comparative study was carried out with different immersion times of silver samples in 11-MUA solutions with different concentrations to find the optimum conditions for immobilization. The signals, during each step of the protocol, were analyzed with a refractometer based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR effect and luminescence techniques. Molecular interactions at the surfaces between the probe and target at the surface nanolayer shift the SPR signal, thus indicating the presence of the substance. To demonstrate specific biosensing, rabbit anti-estrone polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody was immobilized through a linker on 47 nm silver layer deposited on SF11 glass. At the final stage, the representative endocrine disruptor—estrone—was attached and detected in deionized water with a diverging beam SPR imaging sensor.

  9. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Selective Analyte Channels and Graphene-Silver Deposited Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed A. Rifat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs. Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber’s properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM. The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU−1 with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10−5 RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46–1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor’s footprint.

  10. Proton magnetic spectroscopy agreed better with magnetic resonance image to lateralization of epileptogenic zone than with surface electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andre Amorim Leite

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the agreement rate of proton magnetic spectroscopy with magnetic resonance image (MRI and surface electroence-phalography (EEG in extratemporal neocortical epilepsies. Methods A cross-sectional study, type series of cases included 33 patients, age range 13–59 years old, of both gender, presenting structural alteration identified by MRI (75.8% or by neurophysiologic techniques (72.7%. The variables were alterations of N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine, choline/creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate/cho-line+creatine coefficient of asymmetry. Results Agreement rates of lateralization by coefficient of asymmetry of NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, Co/Cr, and NAA/Cho+Cr with MRI, independent of alteration of surface EEG, were equal to 93.3, 57.9, 15.4, and 93.3%, respectively, modifying to 100, 33.3, 0, and 100%, in 16 patients, with lateralization agreement of MRI and surface EEG. Conclusion Proton magnetic spectroscopy agreed better with MRI to lateralization of epileptogenic zone than with surface EEG.

  11. Photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance sensor with selective analyte channels and graphene-silver deposited core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Ahmmed A; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Chow, Desmond M; Shee, Yu Gang; Ahmed, Rajib; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2015-05-19

    We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs). Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber's properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU-1) with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10(-5) RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI) sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46-1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor's footprint.

  12. Dual-Wavelength Surface Plasmon Resonance for Determining the Size and Concentration of Sub-Populations of Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Deborah L M; Shelke, Ganesh V; Emilsson, Gustav; Claudio, Virginia; Block, Stephan; Lässer, Cecilia; Dahlin, Andreas; Lötvall, Jan O; Bally, Marta; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-10-04

    Accurate concentration determination of subpopulations of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, is of importance both in the context of understanding their fundamental biological role and of potentially using them as disease biomarkers. In principle, this can be achieved by measuring the rate of diffusion-limited mass uptake to a sensor surface modified with a receptor designed to only bind the subpopulation of interest. However, a significant error is introduced if the targeted EV subpopulation has a size, and thus hydrodynamic diffusion coefficient, that differs from the mean size and diffusion coefficient of the whole EV population and/or if the EVs become deformed upon binding to the surface. We here demonstrate a new approach to determine the mean size (or effective film thickness) of bound nanoparticles, in general, and EV subpopulation carrying a marker of interest, in particular. The method is based on operating surface plasmon resonance simultaneously at two wavelengths with different sensing depths and using the ratio of the corresponding responses to extract the particle size on the surface. By estimating in this way the degree of deformation of adsorbed EVs, we markedly improved their bulk concentration determination and showed that EVs carrying the exosomal marker CD63 correspond to not more than around 10% of the EV sample.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance investigation procedure as a structure sensitive method for SnO{sub 2} nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinevich, V.S., E-mail: grinevich@onu.edu.ua [Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., 65082 Odessa (Ukraine); Filevska, L.M., E-mail: lfilevska@gmail.com [Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., 65082 Odessa (Ukraine); Matyash, I.E.; Maximenko, L.S.; Mischuk, O.N.; Rudenko, S.P. [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 45 Nauky Prospect, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Serdega, B.K., E-mail: bserdega@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 45 Nauky Prospect, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Smyntyna, V.A. [Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University, 2 Dvoryanska St., 65082 Odessa (Ukraine); Ulug, B., E-mail: bulentulug@gmail.com [Akdeniz University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-11-01

    General principles of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon are applied to studying the structure and physical properties of thin conducting tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) films. The SPR effects are detected and investigated by the methods of polarization modulation of the incident electromagnetic radiation. Angular and spectral dependencies of the reflection coefficients R{sub s}{sup 2} and R{sub p}{sup 2} for the s- and p-polarized radiation, together with their polarization difference {rho} = R{sub s}{sup 2} - R{sub p}{sup 2} are measured in the wavelength range of 400-1600 nm. Experimentally obtained {rho}({theta}, {lambda}) characteristics reflect the peculiar optical properties associated with the film structure and morphology. Surface plasmon-polaritons and local plasmons excited by s- and p-polarized radiation were observed. The results confirm that the SPR technique is a sensitive and informative method for the analysis of the SnO{sub 2} film structure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polarimetric technique for surface plasmon resonance was applied to SnO{sub 2} films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Principle optical parameter of the film {rho}({theta}, {lambda}) was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {rho}({theta}, {lambda}) = R{sub s}{sup 2} - R{sub p}{sup 2} - reflection coefficient difference Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was established that {rho}({theta}, {lambda}) is associated with SnO{sub 2} films' structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {rho}({theta}, {lambda}) amplitude is reported to be dependent on precursor concentration.

  14. Initial clinical results of linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Alexander, Eben; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Richardson, Gary E.; McL Black, Peter; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas with regard to tumor control and toxicity of the treatment, thus evaluate the feasibility of these technique for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. Subjects and Methods: 48 patients with either inoperable, recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma who underwent either SRS or SRT at the Brigham and Women's Hospital between 9/89 and 9/95 were analyzed. Of these, 18 received treatment with SRS, and 30 received SRT. SRS was contraindicated for the patients in whom the minimal distance of the target and optic chiasm or optic nerve was less than 5 mm. Patient characteristics were similar in the two groups, with the exception of tumor volume and previous irradiation. Median tumor volumes were 1.8 cm 3 and 7.7 cm 3 for SRS and SRT, respectively. Three of the SRS and none of the SRT patients had a history of previous external radiation therapy. Both SRS and SRT were performed by the use of dedicated stereotactic 6-MV linear accelerator with a treatment plan designed using a dedicated software. Doses were prescribed to the isodose distribution that covered the identified target. Dose and normalization used for SRS varied from 1000 cGy at 85 % isodose line to 1800 cGy at 80 % isodose line. For SRT patients, total dose of 4500 cGy was normalized at 90 or 95 % isodose line and this was delivered in 25 fractions of 180 cGy daily dose. Results: Local control: There was 1 case of local failure in each of SRS and SRT series (median follow up 42.5 months and 22 month, respectively). CNS adverse effects: There were 3 SRS cases in whom a ring enhancement in the temporal lobe was observed in follow-up MRI. (median follow up 32 months). Of these, one resolved spontaneously, whereas the other 2 lesion persisted and considered to be radiation necrosis. None of them required surgical intervention to date. These were observed in the

  15. Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped SrS Phosphor: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ayush; Mishra, Shubhra; Kshatri, D. S.; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped SrS phosphor has attracted a lot of attention on a wide range of photo-, cathodo-, thermo-, and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with different RE elements (e.g., Ce, Pr, Eu, Yb), the luminescence from SrS can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the strontium sulfide host. The main applications include flat panel displays and SrS-based powder electroluminescence (EL) for back lights. Sulfide materials known for providing Eu2+ based red emission band and preferred as a color conversion material in white light emitting diodes are discussed. Especially, the applications of RE doped SrS are described in light of their utility as conversion and storage phosphors. The effect of energy level splitting, EL efficiency, post-annealing, milling time, and impurity on luminescence properties for SrS are also discussed.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for radiotherapy planning of brain cancer patients using immobilization and surface coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanvey, S.; Glegg, M.; Foster, J.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the compatibility of a head and neck immobilization device with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immobilization device is used to position a patient in the same way as when receiving a computed tomography (CT) scan for radiotherapy planning and radiation treatment. The advantage of using immobilization in MR is improved accuracy in CT/MR image registration enabling greater confidence in the delineation of structures. The main practical difficulty in using an immobilization device in MRI is that physical constraints make their use incompatible with head imaging coils. Within this paper we describe a method for MR imaging of the brain which allows the use of head and neck immobilization devices. By a series of image quality tests we obtained the same or better image quality as a multi-channel head coil.

  17. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  18. Autonomous Sampling Platform Development: Radiological Contamination Mapping at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya, Nicholas; Whiteside, Tad

    2016-01-01

    From 1961 to 1964, radioactive elements were released from the Savannah River Site into local bodies of water via cooling water charges from the reactors on site. In 1983, the extent of the radioactive contamination was first studied, and elements such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 238 Pu, 241 Am, 244 Cm, and tritium were found to have seeped from local bodies of water into sediment and the surrounding flora and fauna. The current method of tracking and monitoring radioactive contamination at the SRS is to gather samples and conduct measurements in a laboratory. A cheaper, and safer, method to conduct such measurements would be to automate the process by using an autonomous boat that can travel to locations, conduct measurements, and return home all without human intervention. To introduce this idea, the construction of an autonomous boat prototype was completed to demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of such an idea. The prototype travels to a set of waypoints, stops at each waypoint, and returns when all waypoints have been reached. It does this by employing a simple battery-powered boat with an Arduino controller that steers the boat using a steering algorithm incorporated into a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) function. A total of three tests were conducted at two different bodies of water; and after working out some hardware problems, the boat drone was able to successfully steer and reach all programmed waypoints. With the prototype complete, the next steps to realizing the final product of the boat drone will include adopting a processing unit with higher-bit architecture, using a bigger boat with a more powerful trolling motor, and incorporating a solar panel for continuous power and round-the-clock performance.

  19. Autonomous Sampling Platform Development: Radiological Contamination Mapping at SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya, Nicholas [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Whiteside, Tad [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-01

    From 1961 to 1964, radioactive elements were released from the Savannah River Site into local bodies of water via cooling water charges from the reactors on site. In 1983, the extent of the radioactive contamination was first studied, and elements such as 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, and tritium were found to have seeped from local bodies of water into sediment and the surrounding flora and fauna. The current method of tracking and monitoring radioactive contamination at the SRS is to gather samples and conduct measurements in a laboratory. A cheaper, and safer, method to conduct such measurements would be to automate the process by using an autonomous boat that can travel to locations, conduct measurements, and return home all without human intervention. To introduce this idea, the construction of an autonomous boat prototype was completed to demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of such an idea. The prototype travels to a set of waypoints, stops at each waypoint, and returns when all waypoints have been reached. It does this by employing a simple battery-powered boat with an Arduino controller that steers the boat using a steering algorithm incorporated into a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) function. A total of three tests were conducted at two different bodies of water; and after working out some hardware problems, the boat drone was able to successfully steer and reach all programmed waypoints. With the prototype complete, the next steps to realizing the final product of the boat drone will include adopting a processing unit with higher-bit architecture, using a bigger boat with a more powerful trolling motor, and incorporating a solar panel for continuous power and round-the-clock performance.

  20. Ground motion following selection of SRS design basis earthquake and associated deterministic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of a deterministic assessment of earthquake ground motions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The purpose of this study is to assist the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Laboratory in reevaluating the design basis earthquake (DBE) ground motion at SRS during approaches defined in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 100. This work is in support of the Seismic Engineering Section's Seismic Qualification Program for reactor restart

  1. Surface chemical approach to single-step measurement of antibody in human serum using localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor on microtiter plate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Junta; Ojima, Tetsunori; Iida, Mie; Yurugi, Kimiko; Imamura, Takeshi; Ashihara, Eishi; Kimura, Shinya; Maekawa, Taira

    2014-07-01

    In clinical settings, serum antibody levels serve as markers of pathology. For example, antibodies related to autoimmune diseases are among the conventional targets in laboratory tests. Simple clinical tests can improve the efficacy of laboratory practice. This study describes a single-step, wash-free technique for optically detecting antibodies in human serum through the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold nanoparticles. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the amount of antibiotin dissolved in human serum was measured with a LSPR-based biosensor in a wash-free manner using a conventional 96-well microtiter plate and a plate reader. For an efficient surface modification of biosensors, zwitterionic copolymer was used as a scaffold on the gold nanoparticle surface to immobilize antigen and blocking reagent. Single-step, wash-free measurement of antibiotin in human serum was successfully achieved. In addition, nonspecific responses from serum contents were significantly reduced because both the copolymer and hydrophilic antigen reagent that we employed were composed of poly(ethylene oxide) spacer. Comparative experiments of the antigen-antibody reaction in serum to that in buffered solution revealed that serum is a favorable environment for the biological reaction. In conclusion, our gold-nanoparticle-based LSPR method may provide a rapid and simple way to measure the amount of antibody in serum quantitatively in clinical practice.

  2. TU-A-BRB-00: PANEL DISCUSSION: SBRT/SRS Case Studies - Brain and Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are commonly treated by a multidisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. However the treatment objectives, constraints, and technical considerations involved can be quite different between the two techniques. In this interactive session an expert panel of speakers will present clinical brain SRS and spine SBRT cases in order to demonstrate real-world considerations for ensuring safe and accurate treatment delivery and to highlight the significant differences in approach for each treatment site. The session will include discussion of topic such as clinical indications, immobilization, target definition, normal tissue tolerance limits, and beam arrangements. Learning Objectives: Understand the differences in indications and dose/fractionation strategies for intracranial SRS and spine SBRT. Describe the different treatment modalities which can be used to deliver intracranial SRS and spine SBRT. Cite the major differences in treatment setup and delivery principles between intracranial and spine treatments. Identify key critical structures and clinical dosimetric tolerance levels for spine SBRT and intracranial SRS. Understand areas of ongoing work to standardize intracranial SRS and spine SBRT procedures. Schlesinger: Research support: Elekta Instruments, AB; D. Schlesinger, Elekta Instruments, AB - research support; B. Winey, No relevant external funding for this subject.

  3. A surface plasmon resonance sensing method for determining captopril based on in situ formation of silver nanoparticles using ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegarzadeh, Saadat; Hashemi, Fatemeh

    2014-03-01

    A new method has been proposed to sensitive detection of captopril based on surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The stable and well-dispersed AgNPs with strong plasmon resonance signal were synthesized in situ using a simple and rapid procedure by applying ascorbic acid as reducer and sodium dodecyl sulfate as stabilizer, at room temperature. It was found that, the decreasing of AgNPs plasmon absorbance is proportional to the concentration of captopril which allows the spectrophotometric sensing of this compound. The presented method is capable of determining captopril over a range of 0.20-2.75 μmol L-1 with a limit of detection 0.07 μmol L-1. The relative standard deviation for eight replicate measurements of 1.00 and 2.50 μmol L-1 of captopril was 2.37% and 1.02%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of captopril in pharmaceutical formulations with satisfactory results, which were in agreement with those of the official method.

  4. A surface plasmon resonance sensing method for determining captopril based on in situ formation of silver nanoparticles using ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegarzadeh, Saadat; Hashemi, Fatemeh

    2014-03-25

    A new method has been proposed to sensitive detection of captopril based on surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The stable and well-dispersed AgNPs with strong plasmon resonance signal were synthesized in situ using a simple and rapid procedure by applying ascorbic acid as reducer and sodium dodecyl sulfate as stabilizer, at room temperature. It was found that, the decreasing of AgNPs plasmon absorbance is proportional to the concentration of captopril which allows the spectrophotometric sensing of this compound. The presented method is capable of determining captopril over a range of 0.20-2.75 μmol L(-1) with a limit of detection 0.07 μmol L(-1). The relative standard deviation for eight replicate measurements of 1.00 and 2.50 μmol L(-1) of captopril was 2.37% and 1.02%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of captopril in pharmaceutical formulations with satisfactory results, which were in agreement with those of the official method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Elastic Characterization of Transparent and Opaque Films, Multilayers and Acoustic Resonators by Surface Brillouin Scattering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Carlotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a renewed interest in the development of experimental methods to achieve the elastic characterization of thin films, multilayers and acoustic resonators operating in the GHz range of frequencies. The potentialities of surface Brillouin light scattering (surf-BLS for this aim are reviewed in this paper, addressing the various situations that may occur for the different types of structures. In particular, the experimental methodology and the amount of information that can be obtained depending on the transparency or opacity of the film material, as well as on the ratio between the film thickness and the light wavelength, are discussed. A generalization to the case of multilayered samples is also provided, together with an outlook on the capability of the recently developed micro-focused scanning version of the surf-BLS technique, which opens new opportunities for the imaging of the spatial profile of the acoustic field in acoustic resonators and in artificially patterned metamaterials, such as phononic crystals.

  6. Indium tin oxide refractometer in the visible and near infrared via lossy mode and surface plasmon resonances with Kretschmann configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, V.; Beruete, M.; Sánchez, P.; Del Villar, I.

    2016-01-01

    An indium tin oxide (ITO) refractometer based on the generation of lossy mode resonances (LMRs) and surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) is presented. Both LMRs and SPRs are excited, in a single setup, under grazing angle incidence with Kretschmann configuration in an ITO thin-film deposited on a glass slide. The sensing capabilities of the device are demonstrated using several solutions of glycerin and water with refractive indices ranging from 1.33 to 1.47. LMRs are excited in the visible range, from 617 nm to 682 nm under TE polarization and from 533 nm to 637 nm under TM polarization, with a maximum sensitivity of 700 nm/RIU and 1200 nm/RIU, respectively. For the SPRs, a sensing range between 1375 nm and 2494 nm with a maximum sensitivity of 8300 nm/RIU is measured under TM polarization. Experimental results are supported with numerical simulations based on a modification of the plane-wave method for a one-dimensional multilayer waveguide

  7. Enhanced absorption in Au nanoparticles/a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells exploiting Au surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Sacchetti, Alberto; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Au nanoparticles (NPs)/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions have been deposited combining plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour deposition (PECVD) with Au sputtering. We demonstrate that a density of {proportional_to}1.3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} of Au nanoparticles with an approximately 20 nm diameter deposited onto (n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions enhance performance exploiting the improved absorption of light by the surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs. In particular, Au NPs/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si show an enhancement of 20% in the short-circuit current, J{sub SC}, 25% in the power output, P{sub max} and 3% in the fill factor, FF, compared to heterojunctions without Au NPs. Structures have been characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and current-voltage (I-V) measurements to correlate the plasmon resonance-induced enhanced absorption of light with photovoltaic performance. (author)

  8. Cu-Fe-S Nanocrystals Exhibiting Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in the Visible to NIR Spectral Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Tomaszewski, Waldemar; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2016-07-05

    Cu-Fe-S nanocrystals exhibiting a strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect were synthesized for the first time. The elaborated reproducible preparation procedure involved copper(II) oleate, iron(III) stearate, and sulfur powder dissolved in oleylamine (OLA) as precursors. The wavelength of the plasmonic resonance maximum could be tuned by changing the Cu/Fe ratio in the resulting nanocrystals, being the most energetic for the 1:1 ratio (486 nm) and undergoing a bathochromic shift to ca. 1200 nm with an increase to 6:1. LSPR could also be observed in nanocrystals prepared from the same metal precursors and sulfur powder dissolved in 1-octadecene (ODE), provided that the sulfur precursor was taken in excess. Detailed analysis of the reaction mixture by chromatographic techniques, supplemented by mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy enabled the identification of the true chemical nature of the sulfur precursor in S/OLA, namely, (C18H35NH3(+))(C18H35NH-S8(-)), a reactive product of the reduction of elemental sulfur by the amine groups of OLA. In the case of the S/ODE precursor, the true precursors are much less reactive primary or secondary thioethers and dialkyl polysulfides.

  9. Enhanced THz resonance based on the coupling between Fabry–Perot oscillation and dipolar-like resonance in a metamaterial surface cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yaxin; Xu, Gaiqi; Qiao, Shen; Zhou, Yucong; Wu, Zhenhua; Yang, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    We presented an enhanced resonance with ultra-wide band in the terahertz (THz) regime in a THz metamaterial system composed of a pair of circular rings arrays which act as two opposite mirrors. The two opposite mirrors, both of which will induce a dipolar-like resonance under the incident wave, together with the gap between them will constitute a Fabry–Perot cavity which contributes to a Fabry–Perot oscillation in the system. These two kinds of resonant modes, the dipolar-like resonance and Fabry–Perot oscillation, can be coupled with each other in an optimized structure, which leads to an enhanced electromagnetic resonance. From the experimental results, it can be found that such coupling leads to a nearly zero transmission zone with 0.12 THz bandwidth which is much better than individual conventional metamaterial system. This coupling mechanism could provide a new way for the realization of strong resonance, which shows great potential for THz pass-band or stop-band filters, THz resonators, THz absorbers, frequency selective devices and so on. (paper)

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarkson, R B; Odintsov, B M; Ceroke, P J

    1998-01-01

    ; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the nuclear spin population...

  11. Fabrication of surface micromachined ain piezoelectric microstructures and its potential apllication to rf resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saravanan, S.; Saravanan, S.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2005-01-01

    We report on a novel microfabrication method to fabricate aluminum nitride (AlN) piezoelectric microstructures down to 2 microns size by a surface micromachining process. Highly c-axis oriented AlN thin films are deposited between thin Cr electrodes on polysilicon structural layers by rf reactive

  12. Surface micromachined fabrication of piezoelectric ain unimorph suspension devices for rf resonator applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saravanan, S.; Saravanan, S.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    We report a surface micromachining process for aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films to fabricate piezoelectric unimorph suspension devices for actuator applications. Polysilicon is used as a structural layer. Highly c-axis oriented AlN thin films 1 /spl mu/m thick are deposited by rf reactive

  13. Tailoring Surface Impurity Content to Maximize Q-factors of Superconducting Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities is degraded whenever magnetic flux is trapped in the cavity walls during the cooldown. In this contribution we study how the trapped flux sensitivity, defined as the trapped flux surface resistance normalized for the amount of flux trapped, depends on the mean free path. A variety of 1.3 GHz cavities with different surface treatments (EP, 120 C bake and different N-doping) were studied in order to cover the largest range of mean free path nowadays achievable, from few to thousands of nanometers. A bell shaped trend appears for the range of mean free path studied. Over doped cavities falls at the maximum of this curve defining the largest values of sensitivity. In addition, we have also studied the trend of the BCS surface resistance contribution as a function of mean free path, revealing that N-doped cavities follow close to the theoretical minimum of the BCS surface resistance as a function of the mean free path. Adding these results together we unveil that optimal N-doping treatment allows to maximize Q-factor at 2 K and 16 MV/m until the magnetic field fully trapped during the cavity cooldown stays below 10 mG.

  14. Plasmonic Photonic-Crystal Slabs: Visualization of the Bloch Surface Wave Resonance for an Ultrasensitive, Robust and Reusable Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Baryshev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC with termination by a metal film—a plasmonic photonic-crystal slab—has been theoretically analyzed for its optical response at a variation of the dielectric permittivity of an analyte and at a condition simulating the molecular binding event. Visualization of the Bloch surface wave resonance (SWR was done with the aid of plasmon absorption in a dielectric/metal/dielectric sandwich terminating a PhC. An SWR peak in spectra of such a plasmonic photonic crystal (PPhC slab comprising a noble or base metal layer was shown to be sensitive to a negligible variation of refractive index of a medium adjoining to the slab. As a consequence, the considered PPhC-based optical sensors exhibited an enhanced sensitivity and a good robustness in comparison with the conventional surface-plasmon and Bloch surface wave sensors. The PPhC biosensors can be of practical importance because the metal layer is protected by a capping dielectric layer from contact with analytes and, consequently, from deterioration.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on golden nanoparticles and cold vapour generation technique for the detection of mercury in aqueous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Chirinos, José; Gutiérrez, Héctor; La Cruz, Marie

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a surface plasmon resonance sensor for determination of Hg based on golden nanoparticles was developed. The sensor follows the change of the signal from solutions in contact with atomic mercury previously generated by the reaction with sodium borohydride. Mie theory predicts that Hg film, as low as 5 nm, induced a significant reduction of the surface plasmon resonance signal of 40 nm golden nanoparticles. This property was used for quantification purposes in the sensor. The device provide limits of detection of 172 ng/L that can compared with the 91 ng/L obtained with atomic fluorescence, a common technique used for Hg quantification in drinking water. This result was relevant, considering that it was not necessary to functionalize the nanoparticles or use nanoparticles deposited in a substrate. Also, thanks that Hg is released from the matrix, the surface plasmon resonance signal was not affected by concomitant elements in the sample.

  16. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN/Silicon (Si surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively.

  17. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid in drugs and foods using surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Zarei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive procedure was proposed for spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid. It was found that the reduction of Ag+ to silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs by ascorbic acid in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a stabilizing agent produce very intense surface plasmon resonance peak of Ag-NPs. The plasmon absorbance of the Ag-NPs at λ = 440 nm allows the quantitative spectrophotometric detection of the ascorbic acid. The calibration curve was linear with concentration of ascorbic acid in the range of 0.5–60 μM. The detection limit was obtained as 0.08 μM. The influence of potential interfering substances on the determination of ascorbic acid was studied. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in some powdered drink mixtures, commercial orange juice, natural orange juice, vitamin C injection, effervescent tablet, and multivitamin tablet.

  18. Prediction of the Strain Response of Poly-AlN/(100)Si Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator and Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; You, Zheng

    2016-04-27

    The strain sensitivity of the Aluminum Nitride (AlN)/Silicon (Si) surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) is predicted based on a modeling method introduced in this work, and further compared with experimental results. The strain influence on both the period of the inter-digital transducer (IDT) and the sound velocity is taken into consideration when modeling the strain response. From the modeling results, AlN and Si have opposite responses to strain; hence, for the AlN/Si-based SAWR, both a positive and a negative strain coefficient factor can be achieved by changing the thickness of the AlN layer, which is confirmed by strain response testing based on a silicon cantilever structure with two AlN configurations (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness, respectively).

  19. A novel graphene coated surface plasmon resonance biosensor with tungsten disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Saifur; Hasan, Md. Rabiul; Rikta, Khaleda Akter; Anower, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a rigorous configuration of graphene coated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization. The present configuration is consisted of prism (SF10 glass), Gold (Au), WS2- graphene and sensing medium. We perform the performance parameters of the proposed sensor in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy and quality factor. Here we report a dramatic enhancement of the overall performance. Addition of graphene layers increase the sensitivity but decrease the other performance parameters. To increase the all performance parameters we add WS2 between metal and graphene layer. Furthermore in this paper, the thickness effect of Gold (Au) is also analyzed. Numerical analysis shows that the variation of SPR angle for mismatched DNA strands is quiet negligible whereas that for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Therefore, the proposed biosensor opens a new window towards detection for biomolecular interactions.

  20. Large-area gold nanohole arrays fabricated by one-step method for surface plasmon resonance biochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huijie; Niu, Lihong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, Shujie; Yang, Jingjing; Guo, Siyi; Lawson, Tom; Shi, Bingyang; Song, Chunpeng

    2018-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensors based on metallic nanohole arrays have been widely reported to detect binding interactions in biological specimens. A simple and effective method for constructing nanoscale arrays is essential for the development of SPR nanosensors. In this work, we report a one-step method to fabricate nanohole arrays by thermal nanoimprinting in the matrix of IPS (Intermediate Polymer Stamp). No additional etching process or supporting substrate is required. The preparation process is simple, time-saving and compatible for roll-to-roll process, potentially allowing mass production. Moreover, the nanohole arrays were integrated into detection platform as SPR sensors to investigate different types of biological binding interactions. The results demonstrate that our one-step method can be used to efficiently fabricate large-area and uniform nanohole arrays for biochemical sensing.