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Sample records for surface protons reach

  1. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10 13 protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10 13 ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10 13 ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10 13 ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found

  2. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin film was investigated. • The thin film structure differed greatly from the partially protonated one. • Proton transport occurs on the surface, not inside of the thin film. • This result contributes to biological transport systems such as bacteriorhodopsin. - Abstract: Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120–670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system

  3. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  4. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo, E-mail: yongskim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2}. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples’ surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson–Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  5. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  6. Energy loss in grazing proton-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaristi, J.I.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy loss of fast protons, with energy E > 100 keV, specularly reflected on a solid surface with glancing angle of incidence of the order of a mrad is analysed on theoretical grounds. Two different contributions can be distinguished: i) energy losses originating from the interaction with the valence band, accounted for through an induced force, and ii) the excitation of electron bound states of the target atoms. The results are compared with available experimental data. (orig.)

  7. Effect of seat surface inclination on postural control during reaching in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna; van der Heide, Jolanda C.; Fock, Johanna M.; Stremmelaar, Elisabeth; van Eykern, Leo A.; Otten, Bert

    Background and Purpose Because it is debatable whether seat surface inclination improves motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), the effect of seat surface tilting on postural control and quality of reaching was studied. Subjects The subjects were 58 children with CP aged 2 to 11 years

  8. Automated River Reach Definition Strategies: Applications for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Renato Prata de Moraes; Wei, Rui; Durand, Michael; Minear, J. Toby; Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Williams, Brent A.; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Picamilh, Christophe; Lion, Christine; Pavelsky, Tamlin; Garambois, Pierre-André

    2017-10-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission will measure water surface heights and widths for rivers wider than 100 m. At its native resolution, SWOT height errors are expected to be on the order of meters, which prevent the calculation of water surface slopes and the use of slope-dependent discharge equations. To mitigate height and width errors, the high-resolution measurements will be grouped into reaches (˜5 to 15 km), where slope and discharge are estimated. We describe three automated river segmentation strategies for defining optimum reaches for discharge estimation: (1) arbitrary lengths, (2) identification of hydraulic controls, and (3) sinuosity. We test our methodologies on 9 and 14 simulated SWOT overpasses over the Sacramento and the Po Rivers, respectively, which we compare against hydraulic models of each river. Our results show that generally, height, width, and slope errors decrease with increasing reach length. However, the hydraulic controls and the sinuosity methods led to better slopes and often height errors that were either smaller or comparable to those of arbitrary reaches of compatible sizes. Estimated discharge errors caused by the propagation of height, width, and slope errors through the discharge equation were often smaller for sinuosity (on average 8.5% for the Sacramento and 6.9% for the Po) and hydraulic control (Sacramento: 7.3% and Po: 5.9%) reaches than for arbitrary reaches of comparable lengths (Sacramento: 8.6% and Po: 7.8%). This analysis suggests that reach definition methods that preserve the hydraulic properties of the river network may lead to better discharge estimates.

  9. Proton migration along the membrane surface in the absence of charged or titratable groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as energy transduction. For example, proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is considered to be the dominant mechanism of proton exchange between membrane sites of high and low proton concentrations. For the investigation of this mechanism, kinetic experiments on proton diffusion are evaluated to determine the ability of lipid membranes to retain protons on their surfaces. Experiments on different lipid bilayer membranes (DPhPC, DPhPE and GMO) are performed under the influence of two types of mobile buffer molecules (Capso, NH4CL). During these experiments the surface diffusion of photolytically released protons is visualized in terms of fluorescence changes of a lipid bound pH-sensitive dye (DHPE +fluorescein). The protons under investigation are released by flash photolysis of a hydrophobic caged compound (DMCM, caged diethyl phosphate). The experimental data confirm the existence of an energy barrier, which prevents the protons from escaping into the bulk. So far this effect was attributed to the proton binding to titrateable groups (e.g. ethanolamine) or electrostatic forces created by charged moieties (e.g. phosphate groups) on the membrane/water interface. However, upon removal of the titrateable groups and charged moieties from the membrane surface, a significant energy barrier remained as indicated by the experiments with glycerol monooleate (GMO) bilayers. To estimate the size of the barrier a semi-analytical model is presented that describes the two and three dimensional proton diffusion and the related physical and chemical processes. Common models describe surface proton diffusion as a series of subsequent hopping processes between membrane-anchored buffer molecules. Our experiments provide evidence for an alternative model. We released membrane-bound caged protons by UV flashes and monitored their arrival at distant sites s by fluorescence

  10. Effect of interface on surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Akihiro; Kuroda, Seiichi; Mohamed, Hamdy F M; Tavernier, Bruno

    2013-07-21

    To understand the relationship between surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films, perfluorinated ionomer Nafion® thin films were prepared on different substrates such as glassy carbon (GC), hydrophilic-GC (H-GC), and platinum (Pt) as models for the ionomer film within a catalyst layer. Atomic force microscopy coupled with an electrochemical (e-AFM) technique revealed that proton conduction decreased with film thickness; an abrupt decrease in proton conductance was observed when the film thickness was less than ca. 10 nm on GC substrates in addition to a significant change in surface morphology. Furthermore, thin films prepared on H-GC substrates with UV-ozone treatment exhibited higher proton conduction than those on untreated GC substrates. However, Pt substrates exhibited proton conduction comparable to that of GCs for films thicker than 20 nm; a decrease in proton conduction was observed at ∼5 nm thick film but was still much higher than for carbon substrates. These results indicate that the number of active proton-conductive pathways and/or the connectivity of the proton path network changed with film thickness. The surface morphology of thinner films was significantly affected by the film/substrate interface and was fundamentally different from that of the bulk thick membrane.

  11. A proton microbeam deflection system to scan target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, D.

    1978-12-01

    A system to deflect the proton beam within the Karlsruhe microbeam setup is described. The deflection is achieved whithin a transverse electrical field generated between parallel electrodes. Their tension is controlled by a pattern generator, thus enabling areal and line scans with a variable number of scan points at variable scan speed. The application is demonstrated at two different examples. (orig.) [de

  12. Impact of aerosol on surface reaching solar irradiance over Mohal in the northwestern Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Raj Paul; Kuniyal, Jagdish Chandra; Dhyani, Pitamber Prasad; Joshi, Ranjan; Sharma, Nand Lal

    2014-02-01

    The present study, for the first time during 2007, is focused to examine the impact of aerosols on surface reaching solar irradiance over Mohal (31.9°N, 77.12°E, 1154 m amsl) in the northwestern part of the Indian Himalaya. The study also aims to estimate shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) and its effect on regional climate. The multi-wavelength solar radiometer (MWR) is used to measure aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a wider spectrum, i.e. ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared. The AOD is obtained by analyzing the data from MWR following the Langley technique. The radiative transfer model is used along with Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds model to estimate the SWARF. Aerosol shows a great efficiency to reduce substantial fraction of energy from the surface reaching direct solar beam, i.e. 154 W m-2 μm-1 per unit AOD at 0.5 μm. The SWARF at the surface, top of the atmosphere and the atmosphere is estimated to be -18.5±1.7, +0.6±3.7 and +19.1±3.1 W m-2, respectively. The large SWARF at the surface stood during the summer (April-July), while small during the monsoon (August-September). Moderate SWARF is obtained in the autumn (October-November) and winter (December-March). The study estimates a notable extinction in incoming solar radiation relatively with lower atmospheric heating from 0.41 to 0.73 K day-1. The potential effect of aerosol is found relatively higher on high aerosol loading days. On these days, the lower atmospheric heating increases by a factor 1.8 (during dust events) and 1.7 (during biomass burning). This study concludes that aerosols produce significant reduction in incoming solar radiation with substantial increase in lower atmospheric heating, leading to a remarkable effect on the atmospheric stability. In addition, as a subject of future interest, the present study has also important implications on the atmospheric circulation and regional climate.

  13. The study of PDMS surface treatment and it's applications by using proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, J. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, K. H.; Park, J. Y. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    PDMS(Polydimethylsiloxane) is mainly used as a material to do lab on a chip for biochemical analysis. PDMS has many applicability at the Bio-Technology(BT) field, because it is flexible, biocompatible and has good oxygen permeability. In this study, we have investigated to physical and chemical changes of PDMS surface by proton beam radiation conditions. The used kind of ion were Ar and N, beam energy was 30keV, 60keV, 80keV, total fluence was 1E10 to 1E16 [ions/cm{sup 2}]. PDMS membrane was produced as 150 {mu}m thick on the 3' silicon wafer. We inquired into physical and chemical changes up to beam radiation conditions through the investigate the change of surface roughness by AFM(Atomic Force Microscope), the change of surface morphology by SEM(Scanning Electron Microscope) and the change of chemical composition by FT-IR(Fourier Transform Infrared Raman spectroscopy) and XPS(X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). From these basic data to we set up the proton beam radiation conditions to secure metal layer and PDMS adhesion. This enables to produce the electrode at the PDMS material lab on a chip. From now on, we'll investigate the cell patterning possibility after carry out of cell culture with mouse fibroblast at PDMS surface what is surface modification by using of proton beam radiation and apply this to produce lab on a chip. Physical property: Surface roughness of PDMS membrane was observed using AFM, after exposure of proton beam on it. The roughness increased as the power level of proton beam increase. This phenomena was caused by the kinetic energy of particle. Chemical property: Long term observation was conducted on the contact angles of the samples made by the proton beam exposure or oxygen plasma treatment; the hydrophilicity was found to be stronger in the samples made by the proton beam exposure. We found the reason of this was the destruction of polymer chains by proton beam. Feasibility of Through-hole: Considering that comparatively high

  14. The study of PDMS surface treatment and it's applications by using proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, J. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, K. H.; Park, J. Y.

    2007-04-01

    PDMS(Polydimethylsiloxane) is mainly used as a material to do lab on a chip for biochemical analysis. PDMS has many applicability at the Bio-Technology(BT) field, because it is flexible, biocompatible and has good oxygen permeability. In this study, we have investigated to physical and chemical changes of PDMS surface by proton beam radiation conditions. The used kind of ion were Ar and N, beam energy was 30keV, 60keV, 80keV, total fluence was 1E10 to 1E16 [ions/cm 2 ]. PDMS membrane was produced as 150 μm thick on the 3' silicon wafer. We inquired into physical and chemical changes up to beam radiation conditions through the investigate the change of surface roughness by AFM(Atomic Force Microscope), the change of surface morphology by SEM(Scanning Electron Microscope) and the change of chemical composition by FT-IR(Fourier Transform Infrared Raman spectroscopy) and XPS(X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). From these basic data to we set up the proton beam radiation conditions to secure metal layer and PDMS adhesion. This enables to produce the electrode at the PDMS material lab on a chip. From now on, we'll investigate the cell patterning possibility after carry out of cell culture with mouse fibroblast at PDMS surface what is surface modification by using of proton beam radiation and apply this to produce lab on a chip. Physical property: Surface roughness of PDMS membrane was observed using AFM, after exposure of proton beam on it. The roughness increased as the power level of proton beam increase. This phenomena was caused by the kinetic energy of particle. Chemical property: Long term observation was conducted on the contact angles of the samples made by the proton beam exposure or oxygen plasma treatment; the hydrophilicity was found to be stronger in the samples made by the proton beam exposure. We found the reason of this was the destruction of polymer chains by proton beam. Feasibility of Through-hole: Considering that comparatively high level energy beam

  15. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  16. SU-E-T-577: Obliquity Factor and Surface Dose in Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, I; Andersen, A; Coutinho, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The advantage of lower skin dose in proton beam may be diminished creating radiation related sequalae usually seen with photon and electron beams. This study evaluates the surface dose as a complex function of beam parameters but more importantly the effect of beam angle. Methods: Surface dose in proton beam depends on the beam energy, source to surface distance, the air gap between snout and surface, field size, material thickness in front of surface, atomic number of the medium, beam angle and type of nozzle (ie double scattering, (DS), uniform scanning (US) or pencil beam scanning (PBS). Obliquity factor (OF) is defined as ratio of surface dose in 0° to beam angle Θ. Measurements were made in water phantom at various beam angles using very small microdiamond that has shown favorable beam characteristics for high, medium and low proton energy. Depth dose measurements were performed in the central axis of the beam in each respective gantry angle. Results: It is observed that surface dose is energy dependent but more predominantly on the SOBP. It is found that as SSD increases, surface dose decreases. In general, SSD, and air gap has limited impact in clinical proton range. High energy has higher surface dose and so the beam angle. The OF rises with beam angle. Compared to OF of 1.0 at 0° beam angle, the value is 1.5, 1.6, 1,7 for small, medium and large range respectively for 60 degree angle. Conclusion: It is advised that just like range and SOBP, surface dose should be clearly understood and a method to reduce the surface dose should be employed. Obliquity factor is a critical parameter that should be accounted in proton beam therapy and a perpendicular beam should be used to reduce surface dose

  17. The surface electromyographic evaluation of the Functional Reach in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranesi, E; Fioretti, S; Ghetti, G G; Rabini, R A; Burattini, L; Mercante, O; Di Nardo, F

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a comprehensive assessment of myoelectric activity of the main muscles involved in the Functional Reach (FR) test, in 24 elderly subjects. A specific protocol for the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal acquisition during FR-test was developed. Results show that anterior muscles activate following a caudo-cranial order. Tibialis Anterior (TA) is the first to be activated (-18.0±16.3% of the FR-period), together with Rectus Femoris (-10.4±17.9%). Then, Rectus Abdominis (19.7±24.7%) and Sternocleidomastoideus (19.9±15.6%) activate after the FR-start. Hamstrings, Soleus, and L4-level Erectores Spinae (posterior muscles) activate after the FR-start in this order (11.4±16.8%, 17.7±16.6%, and 35.2±29.0%, respectively) and remain active until the movement end. The analysis of the kinematic strategies adopted by subjects revealed an association between TA-activation patterns and two kinematic strategies (hip/mixed strategy), quantified by an increase (pelderly subjects, providing an early contribution in building a reference frame for balance assessment in clinical context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating surface protonic transport on cerium oxide via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Ryo; Stub, Sindre Østby; Norby, Truls; Sekine, Yasushi

    2018-02-01

    Surface protonic transport on cerium oxide (CeO2) was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CeO2 pellets showing low relative density: approximately 60%, was prepared for the purpose. The structure and morphology of the prepared CeO2 pellets were confirmed from XRD and SEM measurements. Results show that the pellets had a pure cubic phase, with open pores on which water can be adsorbed. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were taken to evaluate the surface protonic transport on CeO2 as a function of temperature and as a function of partial pressure of water (PH2O) at 400 °C. Investigations of the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed that only the conductivities of surface grain bulk (σintra) and surface grain boundary (σinter) increased with decreasing temperatures under wet conditions (PH2O = 0.026 atm). The PH2O dependence of surface conductivities (σintra and σinter) revealed that σintra increases strongly with PH2O at 400 °C. These findings provide evidence that water adsorbates play an important role in surface protonic transport on CeO2 at low temperatures. Surface protonic transport at low temperatures can contribute to the expansion of applications for electrical and catalytic processes.

  19. Intensity distributions of reflected surface channeling protons scattered on surfaces of electron-bombarded alkali halide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukazawa, Y.; Kihara, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Susuki, Y.

    2013-11-01

    We have examined the surface-channeling of 550 keV protons on electron-bombarded KBr(0 0 1) surfaces at grazing incidence. On the surface, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) resulting from the irradiation of 5 keV electrons changes the surface morphology. In order to investigate the change of the surface morphology, the luminous intensity distributions observed on a fluorescent screen (scattering patterns) of the reflected protons under the surface-channeling conditions are measured. Normalized specular intensity of the protons oscillates, and the results of computer simulations show that the period of the intensity oscillation agrees with the period of layer-by-layer desorption. The measured period of the oscillation is comparable to the simulated one, i.e., the period of the desorption, however, the measured amplitude of the oscillation is weak. This shows that the layer-by-layer desorption of the experimental surface is observed but is not as remarkable as that of the perfect surface introduced in the simulation.

  20. Intensity distributions of reflected surface channeling protons scattered on surfaces of electron-bombarded alkali halide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Y., E-mail: yukofu@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp; Kihara, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Susuki, Y.

    2013-11-15

    We have examined the surface-channeling of 550 keV protons on electron-bombarded KBr(0 0 1) surfaces at grazing incidence. On the surface, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) resulting from the irradiation of 5 keV electrons changes the surface morphology. In order to investigate the change of the surface morphology, the luminous intensity distributions observed on a fluorescent screen (scattering patterns) of the reflected protons under the surface-channeling conditions are measured. Normalized specular intensity of the protons oscillates, and the results of computer simulations show that the period of the intensity oscillation agrees with the period of layer-by-layer desorption. The measured period of the oscillation is comparable to the simulated one, i.e., the period of the desorption, however, the measured amplitude of the oscillation is weak. This shows that the layer-by-layer desorption of the experimental surface is observed but is not as remarkable as that of the perfect surface introduced in the simulation.

  1. Simulation of near-surface proton-stimulated diffusion of boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, O. V.; Kozlovski, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    A quantitative model for near-surface redistribution of doping impurity in silicon in the course of proton-stimulated diffusion is developed for the first time. According to the model, the near-surface peak of the impurity concentration is caused by migration of neutral impurity-self-interstitial pairs to the surface with subsequent decomposition of these pairs and accumulation of the impurity at the silicon surface within a thin layer (referred to as δ-doped layer). The depletion and enhancement regions that are found deeper than the near-surface concentration peak are caused by expulsion of ionized impurity by an electric field from the near-surface region of the field penetration. The field appears due to the charge formed in the natural-oxide film at the silicon surface as a result of irradiation with protons. The diffusion-kinetic equations for the impurity, self-interstitials, vacancies, and impurity-self-interstitial pairs were solved numerically simultaneously with the Poisson equation. It is shown that the results of calculations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data on the proton-stimulated diffusion of boron impurity in the near-surface region of silicon

  2. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, I. S.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, Y. J.; Park, H. S. [Seoul National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  3. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, I. S.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, Y. J.; Park, H. S.

    2007-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  4. Protofit: A program for determining surface protonation constants from titration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Benjamin F.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2006-11-01

    Determining the surface protonation behavior of natural adsorbents is essential to understand how they interact with their environments. ProtoFit is a tool for analysis of acid-base titration data and optimization of surface protonation models. The program offers a number of useful features including: (1) enables visualization of adsorbent buffering behavior; (2) uses an optimization approach independent of starting titration conditions or initial surface charge; (3) does not require an initial surface charge to be defined or to be treated as an optimizable parameter; (4) includes an error analysis intrinsically as part of the computational methods; and (5) generates simulated titration curves for comparison with observation. ProtoFit will typically be run through ProtoFit-GUI, a graphical user interface providing user-friendly control of model optimization, simulation, and data visualization. ProtoFit calculates an adsorbent proton buffering value as a function of pH from raw titration data (including pH and volume of acid or base added). The data is reduced to a form where the protons required to change the pH of the solution are subtracted out, leaving protons exchanged between solution and surface per unit mass of adsorbent as a function of pH. The buffering intensity function Qads* is calculated as the instantaneous slope of this reduced titration curve. Parameters for a surface complexation model are obtained by minimizing the sum of squares between the modeled (i.e. simulated) buffering intensity curve and the experimental data. The variance in the slope estimate, intrinsically produced as part of the Qads* calculation, can be used to weight the sum of squares calculation between the measured buffering intensity and a simulated curve. Effects of analytical error on data visualization and model optimization are discussed. Examples are provided of using ProtoFit for data visualization, model optimization, and model evaluation.

  5. Modification of Teflon surface by proton microbeam and nitrogen ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura (Ogawa), Akane; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Kobayashi, Tomohiro

    2013-11-01

    Teflon surfaces were modified using a combination of 3 MeV proton microbeam scanning and subsequent 250 keV N2+ ion beam irradiation. When a Teflon surface is irradiated using only an N2+ ion beam, micro-protrusions are densely formed in the irradiated area. It has been previously confirmed that these protrusions aid the attachment of biological cells, which then spread on the surface. Therefore, modification of the Teflon surface patterning is necessary in order to enhance its functionality as cell culture substrata. In this study, flat areas and depressed structures were created among the dense micro-protrusions by bubbles that were generated inside the sample using proton beam scanning. This modification will contribute to the fabrication of cell culture dishes with the advantages of micro-protrusions.

  6. Correlating humidity-dependent ionically conductive surface area with transport phenomena in proton-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-10-13

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using direct-current voltammetry and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion membrane was examined.

  7. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  8. New insights into proton surface mobility processes in PEMFC catalysts using isotopic exchange methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, Paloma

    2009-09-01

    The surface chemistry and the adsorption/desorption/exchange behavior of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst are analyzed as a case study for the development of tailor-made support materials of enhanced performance and stability. By using H2, D2, and CO as probe molecules, the relevance of some surface functional groups of the catalyst support on several diffusion processes taking place during the adsorption is shown. Sulfonic groups associated with the vulcanized carbon black surface have been detected by means of spectroscopic techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and by analysis of the desorbed products during temperature-programmed desorption tests by mass spectrometry. Such hydrophilic species have been observed to favor proton surface mobility and exchange with Pt-adsorbed deuterium even in the presence of adsorbed CO. This behavior is relevant both for the proper characterization of these kinds of catalysts using adsorption probes and for the design of new surface-modified carbon supports, enabling alternative proton-transfer pathways throughout the catalytic layers toward the membrane.

  9. Proton surface charge determination in Spodosol horizons with organically bound aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllberg, Ulf; Borggaard, Ole K.

    1998-05-01

    Net proton surface charge densities were determined in O, E, Bh, and Bs horizons of a sandy till, Spodosol from Denmark, by means of acid-base titration combined with ion adsorption in 0.005 M Ca(NO 3) 2 and independent permanent charge determination. The release of organic anions exceeded the adsorption of NO 3-, resulting in a desorption of anions in all horizons. Data were found to obey the law of balance between surface charges and adsorbed ions only when charges pertaining to Al and organic anions released during the titration experiments were accounted for, in addition to charges pertaining the potential determining ions (PDI) H + and OH - and the index ions Ca 2+ and NO 3-. It was furthermore shown that the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) in soils highly depends on the concentration of organically bound Al. Approaches previously used in soils, in which adsorbed Al n+ has been ignored (i.e., considered equivalent to nH + as a PDI), resulted in a PZNPC of 4.1 in the Bs horizon. If instead organically bound Al was accounted for as a counter-ion similar to 3/2Ca 2+, a PZNPC of 2.9 was obtained for the same Bs horizon. Based on PZNPC values estimated by the latter approach, combined with a weak-acid analog, it was shown that organic proton surface charges buffered pH with a similar intensity in the O, E, Bh, and Bs horizons of this study. Because the acidity of Al adsorbed to conjugate bases of soil organic acids is substantially weaker than the acidity of the corresponding protonated form of the organic acids, the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) will increase if the concentration of organically adsorbed Al increases at the expense of adsorbed H. This means that PZNPC values determined for soils with unknown concentrations of organically adsorbed Al are highly operational and not very meaningful as references.

  10. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00335524; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichhorn, T.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.

    2015-04-23

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. To upgrade the tracker to required performance level, extensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching with measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's charge collec...

  11. Nanoparticle technology for treatment of Parkinson's disease: the role of surface phenomena in reaching the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Cortés, Hernán; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-07-01

    The absence of a definitive treatment for Parkinson's disease has driven the emerging investigation in the search for novel therapeutic alternatives. At present, the formulation of different drugs on nanoparticles has represented several advantages over conventional treatments. This type of multifunctional carrier, owing to its size and composition, has different interactions in biological systems that can lead to a decrease in ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, this review focuses on the latest advances in obtaining nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease and provides an overview of technical aspects in the design of brain drug delivery of nanoparticles and an analysis of surface phenomena, a key aspect in the development of functional nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Analysis of ocular surface alterations following proton beam radiation in eyes with conjunctival malignant melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westekemper, H; Anastassiou, G; Sauerwein, W; Chauvel, P; Bornfeld, N; Steuhl, K-P; Meller, D

    2006-07-01

    In cases of large, diffuse or multilocular growth pattern of conjunctival melanoma, proton beam irradiation can serve as an alternative therapy to exenteration. In extended tumours, ocular surface problems can result after therapy. In this study we examined ocular surface integrity of ten patients who underwent proton beam radiation between 1996 and 2002. The patients were examined during their follow-up. Eight of the ten cases who underwent proton radiotherapy were recurrent tumours, which were previously treated with other adjuvant therapies. We performed a standard ophthalmological examination and detailed tear film diagnostics. The follow-up was 17-87 months (mean: 40.9+/-20.1). In six cases more than 50% of the upper and lower eyelids were included in the radiation field. All of these cases showed moderate to severe sicca symptoms. The impression cytology revealed squamous metaplasia of conjunctival cells in nine of ten cases. Squamous metaplasia of conjunctival epithelia indicates a radiogenic, persisting disturbance of differentiation of the conjunctival epithelial cells. The tear film instability correlates with the loss of mucin-secreting goblet cells and meibomian gland dysfunction.

  13. Changes in biologically-active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M

    2007-03-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working. Concentrations of major ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere are now decreasing, and the decline in total column amounts seen in the 1980s and 1990s at mid-latitudes has not continued. In polar regions, there is much greater natural variability. Each spring, large ozone holes continue to occur in Antarctica and less severe regions of depleted ozone continue to occur in the Arctic. There is evidence that some of these changes are driven by changes in atmospheric circulation rather than being solely attributable to reductions in ozone-depleting substances, which may indicate a linkage to climate change. Global ozone is still lower than in the 1970s and a return to that state is not expected for several decades. As changes in ozone impinge directly on UV radiation, elevated UV radiation due to reduced ozone is expected to continue over that period. Long-term changes in UV-B due to ozone depletion are difficult to verify through direct measurement, but there is strong evidence that UV-B irradiance increased over the period of ozone depletion. At unpolluted sites in the southern hemisphere, there is some evidence that UV-B irradiance has diminished since the late 1990s. The availability and temporal extent of UV data have improved, and we are now able to evaluate the changes in recent times compared with those estimated since the late 1920s, when ozone measurements first became available. The increases in UV-B irradiance over the latter part of the 20th century have been larger than the natural variability. There is increased evidence that aerosols have a larger effect on surface UV-B radiation than previously thought. At some sites in the Northern Hemisphere, UV-B irradiance may continue to increase because of continuing reductions in aerosol extinctions since the 1990s. Interactions between ozone depletion and climate change are complex and can be mediated through changes in chemistry, radiation, and atmospheric circulation

  14. Surface Textural Analysis of Quartz Grains from Modern Point Bar Deposits in Lower Reaches of the Yellow River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Liu, Cong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yu; Nie, Qi; Wen, Yiming

    2018-01-01

    The surfaces of quartz grains contain characteristic textures formed during the process of transport, due to their stable physical and chemical properties. The surface textures include the information about source area, transporting force, sedimentary environment and evolution history of sediment. Surface textures of quartz grains from modern point bar deposits in the lower reaches of the Yellow River are observed and studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that there are 22 kinds of surface textures. The overall surface morphology of quartz grains shows short transporting time and distance and weak abrasive action of the river water. The combined surface textures caused by mechanical action indicate that quartz grains are transporting in a high-energy hydrodynamic condition and suffer a strong mechanical impact and abrasion. The common solution pits prove that the chemical property of transportation medium is very active and quartz grains receive an obvious chemical action. The combination of these surface textures can be an identification mark of fluvial environment, and that is: quartz grains are main subangular outline, whose roundness is higher with the farther motion distance; Surface fluctuation degree of quartz grains is relatively high, and gives priority to high and medium relief; V-shaped percussion marks are very abundant caused by mechanical action; The conchoidal of different sizes and steps are common-developed with paragenesis relationship; Solution pits are common-developed as well. The study makes up for the blank of surface textures analysis of quartz grains from modern fluvial deposits in China. It provides new ideas and evidence for studies of the sedimentary process and environmental significance, although the deep meanings of these micro textures remain to be further researched.

  15. The Role of Structure and Stratigraphy on Surface-Water Interactions in a Gaining Reach of the EL Rito Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Maddox, N. S.; Degon, A.; Tysor, E.; Swanson, J.; Howard, J.; Frisbee, M. D.; Wilson, J. L.; Newman, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between groundwater and surface water is critical to the future sustainability of communities in semi-arid watersheds. Streamflow is the primary source of water for acequias and irrigation in many semi-arid watersheds and sustained perennial streamflow is thought to depend on greater fractions of deep groundwater following the snowmelt pulse. The persistent perception is that deep groundwater is not a significant component of streamflow generation despite recent observations in the Saguache Creek and Rio Hondo watersheds refuting this perception. Recent research indicates that groundwater/surface water interactions are very complex in the El Rito watershed, a mountainous, sedimentary watershed in northern New Mexico. The El Rito watershed can be broken into four distinct hydrogeological zones: 1) perennial streamflow in the headwaters maintained by springs and groundwater discharge, 2) losing conditions downstream of the headwaters, 3) a small, persistent 500 m gaining stretch in the mid-reach, and 4) losing conditions from the mid-reaches to the outlet. In this poster, we investigate the processes controlling zone 3. We hypothesize that extensional faulting associated with the Rio Grande Rift combined with the westerly dip of stratigraphic units are responsible for the creation of the small gaining reach. We test this hypothesis using high-resolution stream gauging, radon measurements in streams and springs, electrical resistivity surveys, geologic mapping, and temperature logging of streamflow. Our data show that the upwelling occurs near a small east-west trending fault contact characterized by a sharp contrast in water table depth (higher water tables downstream of the fault), persistent and spatially confined temperature anomalies in streamflow associated with the discharge of groundwater. These data provide support for the hypothesis and indicate that structural geologic and stratigraphic features may have profound effects on

  16. Nitrate Deposition to Surface Snow at Summit, Greenland, Following the 9 November 2000 Solar Proton Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duderstadt, Katharine A.; Dibb, Jack E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Spence, Harlan E.; Jackman, Charles Herbert; Randall, Cora E.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Mills, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers whether spurious peaks in nitrate ions in snow sampled at Summit, Greenland from August 2000 to August 2002 are related to solar proton events. After identifying tropospheric sources of nitrate on the basis of correlations with sulfate, ammonium, sodium, and calcium, we use the three-dimensional global Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to examine unaccounted for nitrate spikes. Model calculations confirm that solar proton events significantly impact HOx, NOx, and O3 levels in the mesosphere and stratosphere during the weeks and months following the major 9 November 2000 solar proton event. However, SPE-enhanced NOy calculated within the atmospheric column is too small to account for the observed nitrate ion peaks in surface snow. Instead, our WACCM results suggest that nitrate spikes not readily accounted for by measurement correlations are likely of anthropogenic origin. These results, consistent with other recent studies, imply that nitrate spikes in ice cores are not suitable proxies for individual SPEs and motivate the need to identify alternative proxies.

  17. Quantifying Hyporheic Exchanges in a Large Scale River Reach Using Coupled 3-D Surface and Subsurface Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Glenn Edward; Bao, J; Huang, M; Hou, Z; Perkins, W; Harding, S; Titzler, S; Ren, H; Thorne, P; Suffield, S; Murray, C; Zachara, J

    2017-03-01

    Hyporheic exchange is a critical mechanism shaping hydrological and biogeochemical processes along a river corridor. Recent studies on quantifying the hyporheic exchange were mostly limited to local scales due to field inaccessibility, computational demand, and complexity of geomorphology and subsurface geology. Surface flow conditions and subsurface physical properties are well known factors on modulating the hyporheic exchange, but quantitative understanding of their impacts on the strength and direction of hyporheic exchanges at reach scales is absent. In this study, a high resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that couples surface and subsurface flow and transport is employed to simulate hyporheic exchanges in a 7-km long reach along the main-stem of the Columbia River. Assuming that the hyporheic exchange does not affect surface water flow conditions due to its negligible magnitude compared to the volume and velocity of river water, we developed a one-way coupled surface and subsurface water flow model using the commercial CFD software STAR-CCM+. The model integrates the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation solver with a realizable κ-ε two-layer turbulence model, a two-layer all y+ wall treatment, and the volume of fluid (VOF) method, and is used to simulate hyporheic exchanges by tracking the free water-air interface as well as flow in the river and the subsurface porous media. The model is validated against measurements from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) in the stream water and hyporheic fluxes derived from a set of temperature profilers installed across the riverbed. The validated model is then employed to systematically investigate how hyporheic exchanges are influenced by surface water fluid dynamics strongly regulated by upstream dam operations, as well as subsurface structures (e.g. thickness of riverbed and subsurface formation layers) and hydrogeological properties (e.g. permeability). The results

  18. Aluminum Nitride Hydrolysis Enabled by Hydroxyl-Mediated Surface Proton Hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Christopher J; Muhich, Christopher L; Weimer, Alan W; Musgrave, Charles B

    2016-07-20

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is used extensively in the semiconductor industry as a high-thermal-conductivity insulator, but its manufacture is encumbered by a tendency to degrade in the presence of water. The propensity for AlN to hydrolyze has led to its consideration as a redox material for solar thermochemical ammonia (NH3) synthesis applications where AlN would be intentionally hydrolyzed to produce NH3 and aluminum oxide (Al2O3), which could be subsequently reduced in nitrogen (N2) to reform AlN and reinitiate the NH3 synthesis cycle. No quantitative, atomistic mechanism by which AlN, and more generally, metal nitrides react with water to become oxidized and generate NH3 yet exists. In this work, we used density-functional theory (DFT) to examine the reaction mechanisms of the initial stages of AlN hydrolysis, which include: water adsorption, hydroxyl-mediated proton diffusion to form NH3, and NH3 desorption. We found activation barriers (Ea) for hydrolysis of 330 and 359 kJ/mol for the cases of minimal adsorbed water and additional adsorbed water, respectively, corroborating the high observed temperatures for the onset of steam AlN hydrolysis. We predict AlN hydrolysis to be kinetically limited by the dissociation of strong Al-N bonds required to accumulate protons on surface N atoms to form NH3. The hydrolysis mechanism we elucidate is enabled by the diffusion of protons across the AlN surface by a hydroxyl-mediated Grotthuss mechanism. A comparison between intrinsic (Ea = 331 kJ/mol) and mediated proton diffusion (Ea = 89 kJ/mol) shows that hydroxyl-mediated proton diffusion is the predominant mechanism in AlN hydrolysis. The large activation barrier for NH3 generation from AlN (Ea = 330 or 359 kJ/mol, depending on water coverage) suggests that in the design of materials for solar thermochemical ammonia synthesis, emphasis should be placed on metal nitrides with less covalent metal-nitrogen bonds and, thus, more-facile NH3 liberation.

  19. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  20. Energy loss of MeV protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaristi, J.I.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Echenique, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    A parameter-free model is presented to study the energy loss of fast protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces. The contributions to the energy loss from excitation of valence-band electrons and ionization of localized target-atom electronic states are calculated separately. The former is calculated from the induced surface wake potential using linear response theory and the specular-reflection model, while the latter is calculated in the first Born approximation. The results obtained are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, the experimental qualitative trend of the energy loss as a function of the angle of incidence is obtained when the valence-band electron model is replaced by localized target atom electron states, though with a worse quantitative agreement. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Formation and properties of proton-exchanged and annealed $LiNbO_{3}$ waveguides for surface acoustic wave

    CERN Document Server

    Chien Chuan Cheng; Ying Chung Chen

    2001-01-01

    The proton-exchanged (PE) and annealed PE (APE) z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ waveguides were fabricated using H/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The positive strain, c-axis lattice constant change ( Delta c/c), was calculated to be about +0.43%, which was almost independent of the exchanged conditions. The penetration depth of H measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) exhibited a step-like profile, which was assumed to be equal to the waveguide depth (d). The surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties of PE and APE z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ samples were investigated. The phase velocity (V/sub p/) and electromechanical coupling coefficient (K/sup 2/) of PE samples were significantly decreased by the increase of kd, where k was the wavenumber (2 pi / lambda ). The insertion loss (IL) of PE samples was increased by the increase of kd and became nearly constant at kd >0.064. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of PE samples allowed an apparent increase with kd, reaching a maximum at kd=0.292, then slightly decreased at h...

  2. The Halloween shock of 2003 as it reached Voyager 2 at ˜73 AU - Two separate acceleration zones and two different spectra for energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, W. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Decker, R. B.

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the recent observation that two separate periods of enhanced intensities of solar wind ions at ˜2 times the normal solar wind energy were observed at times of the shock arrival and at the magnetic field maximum at Voyager 2 at 73 AU, arising from the 2003 Halloween event at the Earth, we have re-examined the higher energy proton data from 0.06 to 20 MeV from the LECP and CRS instruments on V2 for this event. We find that there are two separate regions of particle acceleration in this outward propagating merged interaction region. The one near the shock has a much harder proton spectrum extending up to ˜20 MeV, but with a relative paucity of particles below ˜1.0 MeV. The other, near the time of maximum magnetic field fluctuations, is dominated by protons at energies ˜1 MeV or less with a sharp cutoff above 2 MeV. The two regions are separated spatially and the half width of the respective radial intensity distributions at each energy can be used to estimate a local diffusion coefficient. The composite spectrum from these two regions is a power law with a spectral index ˜-1.4 below 1 MeV steepening to -3.2 above ˜2 MeV. This observation has important implications astrophysically, beyond what is seen locally, because most astrophysical observations of accelerated spectra cannot resolve the two components and therefore miss the clues that help identify the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  3. Reach Address Database (RAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores the reach address of each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams,...

  4. Investigating temporal and spatial patterns of groundwater-surface water interaction on a river reach by applying transient thermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Debele Tolche, Abebe; Ghysels, Gert; Schneidewind, Uwe; Nossent, Jiri; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke; Batelaan, Okke

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of groundwater-surface water interaction is an important challenge for hydrologists and ecologists. Within the last decade, many new analytical and numerical estimation methods have been developed, including heat tracer techniques. In a number of publications, their sources of errors were investigated, and future directions for the research in groundwater-surface water exchange were discussed. To improve our respective knowledge of the Belgian lowland Aa River we reinvestigate temperature data which was gathered in the river bed and used for the quantification of the 1D vertical groundwater-surface water exchange. By assuming a thermal steady state of the river bed temperature distribution, Anibas et al. (2011) were unable to use the full potential of the entire large data set. The analysis tool STRIVE is modified to use the river water temperature time series as the upper model boundary. This transient thermal set up overcomes many of the limitations of the steady state assumption and allows for the analysis of vertical 1D exchange fluxes in space and time. Results of about 380 transient simulations covering a period of more than 1.5 years show high absolute changes in exchange fluxes in the upstream part of the river. However, in the downstream part, the relative changes in fluxes are larger. The 26 spatially distributed thermal profiles along the river reach are interpolated using kriging based on variograms calculated from the temperature dataset. Results indicate gaining conditions for most locations and most of the time. Few places in the downstream part show losing conditions in late winter and early spring. While in autumn and winter the mean exchange fluxes can be -90 mmd-1, in spring to early summer fluxes are only -42 mmd-1. The river bed near the banks shows elevated fluxes compared to the center of the river. Probably driven by regional groundwater flow, the river bed near the left and right bank shows fluxes respectively a factor 3

  5. The dependence of maize (Zea mays hybrids yielding potential on the water amounts reaching the soil surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresović Branka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to observe the response of maize hybrids under rainfed and irrigation conditions of the soil in order to establish the dependence of yielding potential on the water amounts reaching the soil surface during the growing season. The four-replicate trail was set up according to the randomised complete-block design on chernozem. Pre-watering soil moisture was approximately 70% of field water capacity, and soil moisture was established thermogravimetrically. During the five-year studies, the following differences in yields could be as follows: 12.68 t ha-1 (ZP 341; 12.76 t ha-1 (ZP 434; 13.17 t ha-1 (ZP 578; 14.03 t ha-1 (ZP 684 and 13.75 t ha-1 (ZP 704 under conditions of 440 mm, 440 mm, 424 mm, 457 mm and 466 mm of water, respectively. The hybrid ZP 341, i.e. ZP 578 expressed the highest, i.e. the lowest tolerance in dry relative seasons, respectively. The reduction of the water amount for every 10 mm decreased the yield by 119.4 kg ha-1 (ZP 341, 156.7 kg ha-1 (ZP 434, 172.3 kg ha-1 (ZP 578, 148.9 kg ha-1 (ZP 684 and 151.1 kg ha-1 (ZP 704. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31037

  6. The odd-proton effects on the potential energy surfaces of odd mass Tl, Au, Ir and Re isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    De Wieclawik, W; Larsson, S E; Leander, G; Vieu, C; Dionisio, J S

    1976-01-01

    The total potential energy surfaces of thallium, gold, iridium and rhenium odd mass isotopes are calculated microscopically as functions of the quadrupole deformation, epsilon /sub 2/, when the odd protons occupy definite orbitals. The nuclear shapes and the static equilibrium deformations of these nuclei are deduced from the results of these calculations for the proton orbitals nearest to the Fermi level. The influence of the hexadecapole deformation, epsilon /sub 4/, on these results is investigated too. Finally, a few experimental data available for these odd mass nuclei are correlated to the corresponding theoretical results. (16 refs).

  7. Catalytic Surface Promotion of Composite Cathodes in Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solis, Cecilia; Navarrete, Laura; Bozza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Composite cathodes based on an electronic conductor and a protonic conductor show advantages for protonic ceramic fuel cells. In this work, the performance of a La5.5WO11.25-δ/ La0.8Sr0.2MnO3+δ (LWO/LSM) composite cathode in a fuel cell based on an LWO protonic conducting electrolyte is shown and...

  8. Surface corrosion analysis of machine elements using thin layer activation technique with the proton beam from national medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1996-01-01

    The surface of metallic objects becomes activated when irradiated with a narrow energetic charged particle (eg. proton) beam. The depth of the activated region and the yield of the induced radioactivity depend on the charged particle energy and beam intensity respectively. The surface radioactivity of the irradiated object is depleted when the activated surface undergo wear or corrosion processes. Therefore, the quantitative assay of the remaining surface radioactivity could be used as a very effective method for monitoring wear or corrosion processes. This poster highlights some interesting results of the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) study currently undertaken at the Health Physics laboratory of the National Medical Cyclotron

  9. Exploring the entrance of proton pathways in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans: surface charge, buffer capacity and redox-dependent polarity changes at the internal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, Kristina; Michel, Hartmut; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal oxidase of cellular respiration, reduces molecular oxygen to water. The mechanism of proton pumping as well as the coupling of proton and electron transfer is still not understood in this redox-linked proton pump. Eleven residues at the aqueous-exposed surfaces of CcO from Paracoccus denitrificans have been exchanged to cysteines in a two-subunit base variant to yield single reactive cysteine variants. These variants are designed to provide unique labeling sites for probes to be used in spectroscopic experiments investigating the mechanism of proton pumping in CcO. To this end we have shown that all cysteine variants are enzymatically active. Cysteine positions at the negative (N-) side of the membrane are located close to the entrance of the D- and K-proton transfer pathways that connect the N-side with the catalytic oxygen reduction site. Labeling of the pH-indicator dye fluorescein to these sites allowed us to determine the surface potential at the cytoplasmic CcO surface, which corresponds to a surface charge density of -0.5 elementary charge/1000Å(2). In addition, acid-base titrations revealed values of CcO buffer capacity. Polarity measurements of the label environment at the N-side provided (i) site-specific values indicative of a hydrophilic and a more hydrophobic environment dependent on the label position, and (ii) information on a global change to a more apolar environment upon reduction of the enzyme. Thus, the redox state of the copper and heme centers inside the hydrophobic interior of CcO affect the properties at the cytoplasmic surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface modification of a proton exchange membrane and hydrogen storage in a metal hydride for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lisa

    Interest in fuel cell technology is rising as a result of the need for more affordable and available fuel sources. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells involve the catalysis of a fuel to release protons and electrons. It requires the use of a polymer electrolyte membrane to transfer protons through the cell, while the electrons pass through an external circuit, producing electricity. The surface modification of the polymer, NafionRTM, commonly researched as a proton exchange membrane, may improve efficiency of a fuel cell. Surface modification can change the chemistry of the surface of a polymer while maintaining bulk properties. Plasma modification techniques such as microwave discharge of an argon and oxygen gas mixture as well as vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis may cause favorable chemical and physical changes on the surface of Nafion for improved fuel cell function. A possible increase in hydrophilicity as a result of microwave discharge experiments may increase proton conductivity. Grafting of acrylic acid from the surface of modified Nafion may decrease the permeation of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell, a process which can decrease efficiency. Modification of the surface of Nafion samples were carried out using: 1) An indirect Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals with the surface, 2) A direct Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals and VUV radiation with the surface and, 3) VUV photolysis investigating exclusively the interaction of VUV radiation with the surface and any possible oxidation upon exposure to air. Acrylic acid was grafted from the VUV photolysed Nafion samples. All treated surfaces were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the grafted Nafion samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements were used to analyze experiments 2 and 3. Using hydrogen as fuel is a

  11. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Predota, M.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO 2 ) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 (angstrom) of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 ± 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH znpc values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH znpc value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 ± 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic strength. Additionally, the H

  12. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Predota, M. [University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 {angstrom} of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 {+-} 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH{sub znpc} values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH{sub znpc} value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 {+-} 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic

  13. Surface Water Geochemistry, Sediment, and Field Parameters During Snowmelt and Monsoons in the New Mexico Reach of the Animas and San Juan Rivers, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J.; Brown, J. E.; Mast, A.

    2017-12-01

    Following the release of three million gallons of metals laden surface water from the Gold King Mine in August 2015, surface-water samples were collected in the New Mexico reach of the Animas and San Juan Rivers during 2016 snowmelt and in the Animas River during three 2016 monsoonal storms. These samples were evaluated for dissolved (soils and bedrock, the streambed sediments, and suspended sediments will improve understanding of the geochemical processes in the Animas and San Juan Rivers.

  14. X-Ray Fluorescence to Estimate the Maximum Temperature Reached at Soil Surface during Experimental Slash-and-Burn Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melquiades, Fábio L; Thomaz, Edivaldo L

    2016-05-01

    An important aspect for the evaluation of fire effects in slash-and-burn agricultural system, as well as in wildfire, is the soil burn severity. The objective of this study is to estimate the maximum temperature reached in real soil burn events using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) as an analytical tool, combined with partial least square (PLS) regression. Muffle-heated soil samples were used for PLS regression model calibration and two real slash-and-burn soils were tested as external samples in the model. It was possible to associate EDXRF spectra alterations to the maximum temperature reached in the heat affected soils with about 17% relative standard deviation. The results are promising since the analysis is fast, nondestructive, and conducted after the burn event, although local calibration for each type of burned soil is necessary. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Potential for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Applications for Identifying Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange in a Meandering River Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, H.; Malenda, H. F.; Briggs, M. A.; Singha, K.; González-Pinzón, R.; Gooseff, M. N.; Tyler, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    The exchange of groundwater and surface water (GW-SW), including dissolved constituents and energy, represents a critical yet challenging characterization problem for hydrogeologists and stream ecologists. Here we describe the use of a suite of high spatial resolution remote sensing techniques, collected using a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS), to provide novel and complementary data to analyze GW-SW exchange. sUAS provided centimeter-scale resolution topography and water surface elevations, which are often drivers of exchange along the river corridor. Additionally, sUAS-based vegetation imagery, vegetation-top elevation, and normalized difference vegetation index mapping indicated GW-SW exchange patterns that are difficult to characterize from the land surface and may not be resolved from coarser satellite-based imagery. We combined these data with estimates of sediment hydraulic conductivity to provide a direct estimate of GW "shortcutting" through meander necks, which was corroborated by temperature data at the riverbed interface.

  16. Proton magnetic spectroscopy agreed better with magnetic resonance image to lateralization of epileptogenic zone than with surface electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andre Amorim Leite

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the agreement rate of proton magnetic spectroscopy with magnetic resonance image (MRI and surface electroence-phalography (EEG in extratemporal neocortical epilepsies. Methods A cross-sectional study, type series of cases included 33 patients, age range 13–59 years old, of both gender, presenting structural alteration identified by MRI (75.8% or by neurophysiologic techniques (72.7%. The variables were alterations of N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine, choline/creatine, and N-acetyl-aspartate/cho-line+creatine coefficient of asymmetry. Results Agreement rates of lateralization by coefficient of asymmetry of NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, Co/Cr, and NAA/Cho+Cr with MRI, independent of alteration of surface EEG, were equal to 93.3, 57.9, 15.4, and 93.3%, respectively, modifying to 100, 33.3, 0, and 100%, in 16 patients, with lateralization agreement of MRI and surface EEG. Conclusion Proton magnetic spectroscopy agreed better with MRI to lateralization of epileptogenic zone than with surface EEG.

  17. Surface fluorination of poly(fluorenyl ether ketone) ionomers as proton exchange membranes for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, H.; Xiao, M.; Wang, S.J.; Shen, P.K.; Meng, Y.Z. [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-06-15

    A series of sulphonated poly(fluorenyl ether ketone) ionomers were successfully fluorinated by the means of direct surface fluorination. Polymer ionomer samples in two different states (membrane and powder) were treated with F{sub 2} gas which is diluted in N{sub 2} in a special reactor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the F/C ratios of the fluorinated materials. The results revealed that the fluorination only occurred on the membrane surface and the fluorination degree increased with increasing F{sub 2} concentration in N{sub 2}. The membrane subjected to fluorination shows an obviously enhanced oxidative stability. The endurance in a Fenton's reagent of FSPFEK-P-28 is longer than 180 min which is two times longer than that of un-fluorinated SPFEK. The PEM properties and single fuel cell performances were investigated by comparison of un- and fluorinated polymer ionomers. The fluorinated membranes demonstrated an enhanced hydrophobic surface property, increased proton conductivities and better single fuel cell performances. Surface fluorination provides a convenient and useful approach to prepare highly proton conductive membrane with long life-time PEM fuel cell applications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Properties of proton-conducting nafion-type membranes with nanometer-thick polyaniline surface layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, I.; Kompan, M.; Malyshkin, V.; Rosanov, V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 6 (2009), s. 697-706 ISSN 1023-1935 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 847 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : proton-conducting membranes * Nafion * polyaniline Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.347, year: 2009

  19. Reach-scale variation surface water quality in a reticular canal system in the lower Yangtze River Delta region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, James Andrew; Chan, Faith Ka Shun; Zhu, Fangfang; Wang, Vickie; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of surface water pollution within a reticular canal system typical of those found in the lower Yangtze River Delta (YRD). For this purpose, surface water quality data was collected from a drainage canal that bisected the southeast district of Ningbo Municipality (Zhejiang) from 2013 to 2015. The sampling transect was designed to represent the change in land-use from the agriculture dominated rural hinterland, to the predominantly urban city-centre. To calculate the representative land-use fraction of each sampling location, the contributing area was defined using an uni-directional 1 km vector line-buffer around the 'upstream' section of canal. The spatial and temporal variation of EC, DO, NH 3 and turbidity indicated a measureable difference between the urban and rural sections of the channel. Water quality indicators were most sensitive to urban and parkland land-use types. The study yielded an increased spatial resolution to knowledge of water-quality variability in the urban environment compared to previous studies within the YRD region. The results were used to make recommendations for the development of an effective long-term strategy for the improvement in surface water quality in this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems applications for identifying groundwater-surface water exchange in a meandering river reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, H.; Malenda, H.; Briggs, Martin A.; Singha, K.; González-Pinzón, R.; Gooseff, M.; Tyler, S.W.; ,

    2017-01-01

    The exchange of groundwater and surface water (GW-SW), including dissolved constituents and energy, represents a critical yet challenging characterization problem for hydrogeologists and stream ecologists. Here, we describe the use of a suite of high spatial-resolution remote-sensing techniques, collected using a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS), to provide novel and complementary data to analyze GW-SW exchange. sUAS provided centimeter-scale resolution topography and water surface elevations, which are often drivers of exchange along the river corridor. Additionally, sUAS-based vegetation imagery, vegetation-top elevation, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) mapping indicated GW-SW exchange patterns that are difficult to characterize from the land surface and may not be resolved from coarser satellite-based imagery. We combined these data with estimates of sediment hydraulic conductivity to provide a direct estimate of GW “shortcutting” through meander necks, which was corroborated by temperature data at the riverbed interface.

  1. Delineation of spatial-temporal patterns of groundwater/surface-water interaction along a river reach (Aa River, Belgium) with transient thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Tolche, Abebe Debele; Ghysels, Gert; Nossent, Jiri; Schneidewind, Uwe; Huysmans, Marijke; Batelaan, Okke

    2017-12-01

    Among the advances made in analytical and numerical analysis methods to quantify groundwater/surface-water interaction, one methodology that stands out is the use of heat as an environmental tracer. A large data set of river and riverbed temperature profiles from the Aa River in Belgium has been used to examine the spatial-temporal variations of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Exchange fluxes were calculated with the numerical heat-transport code STRIVE. The code was applied in transient mode to overcome previous limitations of steady-state analysis, and allowed for the calculation of model quality. In autumn and winter the mean exchange fluxes reached -90 mm d-1, while in spring and early summer fluxes were -42 mm d-1. Predominantly gaining conditions occurred along the river reach; however, in a few areas the direction of flow changed in time. The river banks showed elevated fluxes up to a factor of 3 compared to the center of the river. Higher fluxes were detected in the upstream section of the reach. Due to the influence of exchange fluxes along the river banks, larger temporal variations were found in the downstream section. The exchange fluxes at the river banks seemed more driven by variable local exchange flows, while the center of the river was dominated by deep and steady regional groundwater flows. These spatial and temporal differences in groundwater/surface-water exchange show the importance of long-term investigations on the driving forces of hyporheic processes across different scales.

  2. A Framework for Dynamic Modeling of Surface-Structure Patches on Bed Load Transport in Coarse Grained Reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K. B.

    2010-12-01

    Mountain streams are the first link in the fluvial system and often have complex bed morphologies which make it difficult to develop simple quantitative expressions for sediment mass flux and stream flow resistance. Such expressions are important for landscape evolution modeling as well as stream management and restoration practices and efforts. Part of the difficulty lies in the fact that stream beds can have large variations in particle size and structural organization - both of which lead to variations in bed strength that can change as a function of time. This study presents a mathematical framework to account for the dynamic impact of surface-structure patches on bed strength and bed load transport under simplified conditions. The framework is based on conservation principles for tracking the exchange of mass between structured and unstructured surface patches in the bed during structure formation and breakup. Two main transport equations are solved for the mobile and stationary phases, and the exchange between the two is modeled using particle collision theory and a simple breakup model (figure 1). The experiments of Strom et al. (2004) are used to parameterize the model initial conditions, and calculated and experimentally observed transport rates are compared as a function of time. Conceptual sketch of the modeling framework for: (A) a gravel bed, and (B) an idealized bed of uniform spherical particles. Mass conservation equations are written for each phase (structured and unstructured) and then solved with time under varying conditions.

  3. Plasma-induced Styrene Grafting onto the Surface of Polytetrafluoroethylene Powder for Proton Exchange Membrane Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yan; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Suzhen; Ni, Guohua; Chen, Longwei; Yang, Guangjie; Nagatsu, M.; Meng, Yuedong

    2011-10-01

    Low-temperature plasma treatment was adopted to graft styrene onto polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powder, which is widely used in the fabrication of proton exchange membrane (PEM). The grafted PTFE powder was sulfonated in chlorosulfonic acid and fabricated into a membrane, which was used as inexpensive PEM material for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis were used to characterize the structure of the sulfonated PTFE powder. The results showed that all the PTFE powders were successfully grafted by nitrogen plasma and then sulfonated under such experimental conditions. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image indicated that the fabricated membrane exhibits flat morphology and homogenous structure. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of this kind of PEM was also investigated.

  4. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  5. Investigation of the effects of high-energy proton-beam irradiation on metal-oxide surfaces by using methane adsorption isotherms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Euikwoun; Lee, Junggil; Kim, Jaeyong; Kim, Kyeryung

    2012-01-01

    The creation of possible local defects on metal-oxide surfaces due to irradiation with a high-energy proton beam was investigated by using a series of gas adsorption isotherms for methane (CH 4 ) on a MgO powder surface. After a MgO powder surface having only a (100) surface had been irradiated with a 35-MeV proton beam, the second atomic layer of methane had completely disappeared while two distinct atomic layers were found in a layer-by-layer fashion on the surfaces of unirradiated samples. This subtle modification of the surface is evidenced by a change of the contrasts in the morphologies measured a using a transmission electron microscopy. Combined results obtained from an electron microscopy and methane adsorption isotherms strongly suggest that the high-energy proton-beam irradiation induced a local surface modification by imparting kinetic energy to the sample. The calculation of the 2-dimensional compressibility values, which are responsible for the formation of the atomic layers, confirmed the surface modification after irradiating surface-clean MgO powders with a proton beam.

  6. Effects of land use types on surface water quality across an anthropogenic disturbance gradient in the upper reach of the Hun River, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruizhao; Xu, Tianle; Yu, Lizhong; Zhu, Jiaojun; Li, Xiaoyu

    2013-05-01

    Surface water quality is vulnerable to pollution due to human activities. The upper reach of the Hun River is an important water source that supplies 52 % of the storage capacity of the Dahuofang Reservoir, the largest reservoir for drinking water in Northeast China, which is suffering from various human-induced changes in land use, including deforestation, reclamation/farming, urbanization and mine exploitation. To investigate the impacts of land use types on surface water quality across an anthropogenic disturbance gradient at a local scale, 11 physicochemical parameters (pH, dissolved oxygen [DO], turbidity, oxygen redox potential, conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand [BOD5], chemical oxygen demand [COD], total nitrogen [TN], total phosphorus [TP], NO(3)(-)N, and NH(4)(+)-N) of water from 12 sampling sites along the upper reach of the Hun River were monitored monthly during 2009-2010. The sampling sites were classified into four groups (natural, near-natural, more disturbed, and seriously disturbed). The water quality exhibited distinct spatial and temporal characteristics; conductivity, TN, and NO(3)(-)-N were identified as key parameters indicating the water quality variance. The forest and farmland cover types played significant roles in determining the surface water quality during the low-flow, high-flow, and mean-flow periods based on the results of a stepwise linear regression. These results may provide incentive for the local government to consider sustainable land use practices for water conservation.

  7. Potential sputtering of protons from hydrogen- and H sub 2 O-terminated Si(1 0 0) surfaces with slow highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2003-01-01

    A potential sputtering mechanism of hydrogen has been studied for impacts of slow highly charged Xe sup q sup + ions (<5 keV, q=4-12) on well-defined H-terminated and water-saturated Si(1 0 0) surfaces. It was found that the sputtering yields of protons were proportional to q supgamma (gamma approx 5) for both the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H and Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surfaces, although the absolute yield for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface was 10 times larger than that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface, i.e. the sputtering efficiency per one H-Si bond for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface is five times larger that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. The proton sputtering efficiency from a H-O-Si bond was extracted from measurements of the water-saturated surface, which was approx 8 times larger than the H-Si bond of the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. An effective distance of the proton from its substrate was proposed to be the key parameter to govern the yield, which also influences the energy distributions of sputtered protons. These findings are con...

  8. Interaction of proton microbeam with the inner surface of a polytetrafluoroethylene macrocapillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajta, I.; Nagy, G.U.L.; Bereczky, R.J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam through a single, cylindrically shaped, micrometre-sized polytetrafluoroethylene capillary was studied. The capillary axis was tilted with respect to the axis of the incident ion beam. The tilting, the aspect ratio of the capillary and the small beam divergence disabled the geometrical transmission of the beam through the target. The time dependence of the intensity, the charge-state and the deflection of the transmitted beam were investigated. We found that pure guided transmission of a MeV/amu energy ion beam is possible through an insulator capillary.

  9. Surface composition of magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorokhta, Mykhailo, E-mail: vorohtam@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Khalakhan, Ivan; Václavů, Michal [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Kovács, Gábor; Kozlov, Sergey M. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kúš, Peter; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Natalia; Lavková, Jaroslava [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Potin, Valerie [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanostructured Pt-Co thin catalyst films were grown on carbon by magnetron sputtering. • The surface composition of the nanostructured Pt-Co films was investigated by surface analysis techniques. • We carried out modeling of Pt-Co nanoalloys by computational methods. • Both experiment and modeling based on density functional theory showed that the surface of Pt-Co nanoparticles is almost exclusively composed of Pt atoms. - Abstract: Recently we have tested a magnetron sputtered Pt-Co catalyst in a hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cell and showed its high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Here we present further investigation of the magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst by both experimental and theoretical methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments confirmed the nanostructured character of the catalyst. The surface composition of as-deposited and annealed at 773 K Pt-Co films was investigated by surface analysis techniques, such as synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling based on density functional theory showed that the surface of 6 nm large 1:1 Pt-Co nanoparticles is almost exclusively composed of Pt atoms (>90%) at typical operation conditions and the Co content does not exceed 20% at 773 K, in agreement with the experimental characterization of such films annealed in vacuum. According to experiment, the density of valence states of surface atoms in Pt-Co nanostructures is shifted by 0.3 eV to higher energies, which can be associated with their higher activity in the oxygen reduction reaction. The changes in electronic structure caused by alloying are also reflected in the measured Pt 4f, Co 3p and Co 2p photoelectron peak binding energies.

  10. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  11. Improving the corrosion resistance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell carbon supports by pentafluorophenyl surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzandeh, Farisa; Li, Xiaoan; Banham, Dustin W.; Feng, Fangxia; Joseph Kakanat, Abraham; Ye, Siyu; Birss, Viola

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of surface functionalization on the electrochemical corrosion resistance of a high surface area, mesoporous colloid imprinted carbon powder (CIC), as well as microporous Vulcan carbon (VC, serving as the benchmark), was demonstrated, primarily for PEM fuel cell applications. CIC-22, which is highly hydrophilic and was synthesized with 22 nm silica colloid templates, and as-received, mildly hydrophobic, VC powders, were functionalized with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl (-PhF5) surface groups using a straightforward diazonium reduction reaction. These carbons were then subjected to corrosion testing, involving a potential cycling-step sequence in room temperature 0.5 M H2SO4. Using cyclic voltammetry and charge/time analysis, the double layer and pseudo-capacitive gravimetric charges of the carbons, prior to and after the application of these potential steps, were tracked in order to obtain information about surface area changes and the extent of carbon oxidation, respectively. It is shown that the corrosion resistance was improved by ca. 50-80% by surface functionalization, likely due to a combination of surface passivation (loss of carbon active sites) and increased surface hydrophobicity.

  12. Electroendocytosis is driven by the binding of electrochemically produced protons to the cell's surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadav Ben-Dov

    Full Text Available Electroendocytosis involves the exposure of cells to pulsed low electric field and is emerging as a complementary method to electroporation for the incorporation of macromolecules into cells. The present study explores the underlying mechanism of electroendocytosis and its dependence on electrochemical byproducts formed at the electrode interface. Cell suspensions were exposed to pulsed low electric field in a partitioned device where cells are spatially restricted relative to the electrodes. The cellular uptake of dextran-FITC was analyzed by flow cytometery and visualized by confocal microscopy. We first show that uptake occurs only in cells adjacent to the anode. The enhanced uptake near the anode is found to depend on electric current density rather than on electric field strength, in the range of 5 to 65 V/cm. Electrochemically produced oxidative species that impose intracellular oxidative stress, do not play any role in the stimulated uptake. An inverse dependence is found between electrically induced uptake and the solution's buffer capacity. Electroendocytosis can be mimicked by chemically acidifying the extracellular solution which promotes the enhanced uptake of dextran polymers and the uptake of plasmid DNA. Electrochemical production of protons at the anode interface is responsible for inducing uptake of macromolecules into cells exposed to a pulsed low electric field. Expanding the understanding of the mechanism involved in electric fields induced drug-delivery into cells, is expected to contribute to clinical therapy applications in the future.

  13. Comparison of land–atmosphere interaction at different surface types in the mid- to lower reaches of the Yangtze River valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mid- to lower reaches of the Yangtze River valley are located within the typical East Asian monsoon zone. Rapid urbanization, industrialization, and development of agriculture have led to fast and complicated land use and land cover change in this region. To investigate land–atmosphere interaction in this region where human activities and monsoon climate have considerable interaction with each other, micrometeorological elements over four sites with different surface types around Nanjing, including urban surface at Dangxiao (hereafter DX-urban, suburban surface at Xianling (XL-suburb, and grassland and farmland at Lishui County (LS-grass and LS-crop, are analyzed and their differences are revealed. The impacts of surface parameters of different surface types on the radiation budget and land surface–atmosphere heat, water, and mass exchanges are investigated and compared. The results indicate the following. (1 The largest differences in daily average surface air temperature (Ta, surface skin temperature (Ts, and relative humidity (RH, which are found during the dry periods between DX-urban and LS-crop, can be up to 3.21 °C, 7.26 °C, and 22.79 %, respectively. The diurnal ranges of the above three elements are the smallest at DX-urban and the largest at LS-grass, XL-suburb, and LS-crop. (2 Differences in radiative fluxes are mainly reflected in upward shortwave radiation (USR that is related to surface albedo and upward longwave radiation (ULR that is related to Ts. When comparing four sites, it can be found that both the smallest USR and the largest ULR occur at the DX-urban site. The diurnal variation in ULR is same as that of Ts at all four sites. (3 The differences in daily average sensible heat (H and latent heat (LE between DX-urban and LS-crop are larger than 45 and 95 Wm−2, respectively. The proportion of latent heat flux in the net radiation (LE/Rn keeps increasing with the change in season from the spring to summer

  14. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Desorption of Protonated Dialanine from a Perfluorinated Self-Assembled Monolayer Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohale, Swapnil C; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2018-04-05

    Classical chemical dynamics simulation results are presented for the thermal desorption kinetics and energetics of protonated dialanine ions (ala 2 -H + ) physisorbed on/in a perfluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface. Previously developed analytic potentials were used for the F-SAM and the ala 2 -H + /F-SAM intermolecular interaction, and the AMBER valence force field was used for ala 2 -H + . The activation energy, E a = 13.2 kcal/mol, determined from the simulations is consistent with previous simulations of the ala 2 -H + /F-SAM binding energy. The A-factor, 7.8 × 10 11 s -1 , is about an order of magnitude lower than those representative of small molecule desorption from metal and semiconductor surfaces. This finding is consistent with the decreased entropies of ala 2 -H + and the F-SAM upon desorption. Using the Arrhenius parameters for ala 2 -H + desorption from the F-SAM, the lifetime of ala 2 -H + adsorbed on the F-SAM at 300 K is 5 × 10 -3 s. Larger peptide ions are expected to have longer adsorption lifetimes.

  15. Conical intersections of free energy surfaces in solution: Effect of electron correlation on a protonated Schiff base in methanol solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Toshifumi; Nakano, Katsuhiro; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-01-01

    The minimum energy conical intersection (MECI) optimization method with taking account of the dynamic electron correlation effect [T. Mori and S. Kato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 476, 97 (2009)] is extended to locate the MECI of nonequilibrium free energy surfaces in solution. A multistate electronic perturbation theory is introduced into the nonequilibrium free energy formula, which is defined as a function of solute and solvation coordinates. The analytical free energy gradient and interstate coupling vectors are derived, and are applied to locate MECIs in solution. The present method is applied to study the cis-trans photoisomerization reaction of a protonated Schiff base molecule (PSB3) in methanol (MeOH) solution. It is found that the effect of dynamic electron correlation largely lowers the energy of S 1 state. We also show that the solvation effect strongly stabilizes the MECI obtained by twisting the terminal C=N bond to become accessible in MeOH solution, whereas the conical intersection is found to be unstable in gas phase. The present study indicates that both electron correlation and solvation effects are important in the photoisomerization reaction of PSB3. The effect of counterion is also examined, and seems to be rather small in solution. The structures of free energy surfaces around MECIs are also discussed.

  16. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase with an Asp(289)-->Val mutation fails to reach the cell surface and undergoes proteasome-mediated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yoko; Komaru, Keiichi; Ito, Masahiro; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Shoji; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2003-07-01

    A missense mutation in the gene of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, which replaces aspartic acid at position 289 with valine [TNSALP (D289V)], was reported in a lethal hypophosphatasia patient [Taillandier, A. et al. (1999) Hum. Mut. 13, 171-172]. To define the molecular defects of TNSALP (D289V), this mutant protein in transiently transfected COS-1 cells was analyzed biochemically and morphologically. TNSALP (D289V) exhibited no alkaline phosphatase activity and mainly formed a disulfide-linked high molecular mass aggregate. Cell-surface biotinylation, digestion with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and an immunofluorescence study showed that the mutant protein failed to appear on the cell surface and was accumulated intracellularly. In agreement with this, pulse/chase experiments demonstrated that TNSALP (D289V) remained endo-beta-N-acetyl- glucosaminidase H-sensitive throughout the chase and was eventually degraded, indicating that the mutant protein is unable to reach the medial-Golgi. Proteasome inhibitors strongly blocked the degradation of TNSALP (D289V), and furthermore the mutant protein was found to be ubiquitinated. Besides, another naturally occurring TNSALP with a Glu(218)-->Gly mutation was also found to be polyubiquitinated and degraded in the proteasome. Since the acidic amino acids at positions 218 and 289 of TNSALP are thought to be directly involved in the Ca(2+) coordination, these results suggest the critical importance of calcium binding in post-translational folding and assembly of the TNSALP molecule.

  17. Secondary radiation yield from a surface of heavy targets, irradiated by protons of average energies (E sub p approx 1 GeV)

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnyj, G I; Yanovich, A A

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the nuclear reaction rates of threshold rhodium, indium, phosphorus, sulfur, aluminium, carbon, niobium and bismuth activated detectors are presented. The detectors were set up on the cylindrical surface of full absorption targets: tungsten, uranium and chloride with the molar ratios of the 70 % NaCl and 30 % PbCl sub 2 salts. The targets were irradiated by protons with the energies from 0.8 to 1.21 GeV. Growth of the reaction rate with increasing reaction of primary protons and raising atomic number of the targets, presence of the target profile, where the maximum reaction rate is observed, are noted

  18. Model, First-Principle Calculation of Ammonia Dissociation on Si(100 Surface. Importance of Proton Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Z. Zgierski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The dissociation of an ammonia molecule on a cluster of Si atoms simulating the 100 silicon crystal structure with two Si dimers has been investigated by means of the DFT and an approximate instanton methods. The model corresponds to the low coverage limit of the surface. Absolute rate constants of two different dissociation paths are evaluated together with deuterium isotope effects. It is demonstrated that, even at room temperatures, the process is dominated by tunneling and that dissociation to a silicon atom of the adjacent dimer, rather than a silicon within the same dimer, is the prevailing mechanism. This leads to creation of a metastable structure which will slowly decay through a two-step hydrogen atom migration towards the absolute minimum on the potential energy surface corresponding to the NH2 group and the hydrogen atom residing in the same dimer.

  19. Surface oxidation on thin films affects ionization cross section induced by proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertol, Ana Paula Lamberti; Vasconcellos, M.A.Z.; Hinrichs, Ruth; Limandri, Silvina; Trincavelli, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full text: In microanalysis techniques such as Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), the transformation from intensity to concentration is made by standard less software that needs exact values of fundamental parameters such as the ionization cross section, transition probabilities of the different electronic levels, and fluorescent yield. The three parameters together measure the photon generating probability of an electronic transition and can be determined experimentally under the name of production cross section. These measurements are performed on thin films, with thickness around 10 nm, but most studies do not take into account any spontaneous surface oxidation. In this work, in the attempt to obtain cross section values of Al, Si and Ti, in metallic and oxide films, the influence of surface oxidation on the metallic films was established. Simulations considering the oxidation with the software SIMNRA on the Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectra obtained from the films provided mass thickness values used to calculate the cross section data that were compared with theoretical values (PWBA and ECPSSR), and with experimental values and empirical adjustments from other studies. The inclusion of the natural oxidation affects the values of cross section, and may be one of the causes of discrepancies between the experimental values published in literature. (author)

  20. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 deg. continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 deg. split arc proton therapy (two 90 degree sign arcs) using CT profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  1. Type-II entry of solar wind protons into the lunar wake: Effects of magnetic connection to the night-side surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Fujimoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kawamura, Mariko; Matsushima, Masaki; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hashimoto, Kozo; Omura, Yoshiharu; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Ono, Takayuki; Yokota, Shoichiro

    2014-05-01

    Our recent observations around the Moon revealed that so-called type-II (T2) entry of the solar wind protons into the near-Moon wake occurs when the IMF is dominated by the non-radial components (i.e. BY and/or BZ). Under this condition a part of the solar wind protons scattered/reflected at the lunar dayside surface subsequently enters the central region of the near-Moon wake after a large-scale cycloid motion, which accelerates electrons along the filed line into the wake. The situation handled in the previous studies is that the relevant magnetic field line is detached from the lunar surface, leaving a possibility of the T2 entry under magnetic connection left open. Here we report that the protons can access the central wake region that is magnetically connected to the lunar nightside surface, which we categorize into the T2 entry with magnetic connection to the lunar surface (T2MC). Furthermore we show that the energy of the electron beams induced by the proton entry into the wake depends on the magnetic connectivity. Strong electron acceleration (up to several hundred eV to 1 keV) along the magnetic field associated with the T2 entry is prominent when the field line has its both ends in the solar wind, that is, when the magnetic field is detached from the lunar surface (i.e. the previously-reported T2 entry that we rename to T2MD). On the other hand, no significant electron acceleration is found in the T2MC cases, although an enhancement of the electron flux associated with the T2 proton entry is evident. We also report that the T2 entry process takes place even under radial (BX-dominated) IMF condition. Our results indicate that, while the T2 entry of solar wind protons into the wake itself does not require a special IMF condition but is a rather general phenomenon, the characteristic energy of associated electrons does show a strong dependence on the magnetic connectivity to the lunar surface.

  2. Virucidal Activity of Fogged Chlorine Dioxide- and Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Disinfectants against Human Norovirus and Its Surrogate, Feline Calicivirus, on Hard-to-Reach Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Montazeri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human norovirus (NoV is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the United States. Norovirus is shed in high numbers in the feces and vomitous of infected individuals. Contact surfaces contaminated with bodily fluids harboring infectious virus particles serve as vehicles for pathogen transmission. Environmental stability of NoV and its resistance to many conventional disinfectants necessitate effective inactivation strategies to control the spread of virus. We investigated the efficacy of two commercial disinfectants, hydrogen peroxide (7.5% and a chlorine dioxide (0.2%-surfactant-based product using a fogging delivery system against human NoV GI.6 and GII.4 Sydney strains as well as the cultivable surrogate, feline calicivirus (FCV dried on stainless steel coupons. Log10 reductions in human NoV and FCV were calculated utilizing RNase RT-qPCR and infectivity (plaque assay, respectively. An improved antiviral activity of hydrogen peroxide as a function of disinfectant formulation concentration in the atmosphere was observed against both GII.4 and FCV. At 12.4 ml/m3, hydrogen peroxide achieved a respective 2.5 ± 0.1 and 2.7 ± 0.3 log10 reduction in GI.6 and GII.4 NoV genome copies, and a 4.3 ± 0.1 log10 reduction in infectious FCV within 5 min. At the same disinfectant formulation concentration, chlorine dioxide-surfactant-based product resulted in a respective 1.7 ± 0.2, 0.6 ± 0.0, and 2.4 ± 0.2 log10 reduction in GI.6, GII.4, and FCV within 10 min; however, increasing the disinfectant formulation concentration to 15.9 ml/m3 negatively impacted its efficacy. Fogging uniformly delivered the disinfectants throughout the room, and effectively decontaminated viruses on hard-to-reach surfaces. Hydrogen peroxide delivered by fog showed promising virucidal activity against FCV by meeting the United States EPA 4-log10 reduction criteria for an anti-noroviral disinfectant; however, fogged chlorine dioxide-surfactant-based product did not achieve

  3. Analysis of the chemical transformations induced at the surface of polyacrylonitrile and polymethacrylonitrile films by 5 keV proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniau, G.; Viel, P.; Valin, F.; Lecayon, G.; Pirlot, C.; Bertholet, J.C.; Demortier, G.; Delhalle, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the chemical transformations induced by 5 keV protons (10 6 ion cm -2 ) at the surface of 0.4 μm polyacrylonitrile and polymethacrylonitrile films are analysed by XPS and IRRAS. Spectroscopic changes in both the polymers are globally similar, the most significant feature being a lower relative concentration of nitrogen with respect to carbon closer to the surface. Quantitatively, this change is more marked in the case of polyacrylonitrile which suggests a direct relation with the hydrogen in α to the nitrile function

  4. Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol)/sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) blend membranes for fuel cell applications - Surface energy characteristics and proton conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakasabai, P.; Vijay, P.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Varughese, Susy [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2011-02-01

    Ionic polymers, their blends and composites are considered potential candidates for application as electrolytes in fuel cells. While developing new materials for membranes, it is important to understand the interactions of these electrolytic materials with electrodes/catalysts and with reactants/products. Some of these interactions can be understood by estimating the surface energy and wettability of the membrane materials. In this work, polyvinyl alcohol with varying degrees of sulfonation and its blend with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) are prepared and studied for their wettability characteristics using goniometry. The surface energy and its components are estimated using different approaches and compared. Properties such as the ion-exchange capacity, the proton conductivity and the water sorption/desorption behaviour are also investigated to understand the relationship with wettability and surface energy and its components. Among the different methods, the van Oss acid-base and the modified Berthelot approaches yield comparable estimates for the total surface energy. (author)

  5. Effect of different surface treatments on the stability of stainless steels for use as bipolar plates in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, J.; Schmidt, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Wolfsburg (Germany); Tuebke, J.; Cremers, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The stability of different stainless steels against corrosion under simulated low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operating conditions was studied. These investigations showed a moderate corrosion resistance for a couple of steels under LT-PEMFC conditions. However, for the HT-PEMFC conditions all specimens except one exhibit visible corrosion traces. With regards to their corrosion resistance after different surface treatments results show a minor improvement in corrosion resistance after the electro polishing process for most of the tested stainless steel samples. (orig.)

  6. Proton and aluminum binding properties of organic acids in surface waters of the northeastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraei, Habibollah; Driscoll, Charles T

    2015-03-03

    A variety of mathematical estimators have been used to quantify the degree of protonation of naturally occurring organic acids. These estimators range from monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic analog models to the discrete and continuous (Gaussian) distributions of a single proton binding-dissociation. Natural water samples from two long-term monitoring programs in the northeastern U.S. were used to quantify proton- and aluminum-binding properties of naturally occurring organic matter. Water chemistry observations were clustered into 0.05 pH intervals (over 3.75-7.35 pH range) and fit to a triprotic analog model. The model optimization indicates that about 5% of dissolved organic carbon participates in ion binding, and organic acids are composed of both strong and weak acids (i.e., pKa1 = 2.54, pKa2 = 6.19, and pKa3 = 7.52 for Adirondack samples). Binding between organic acids and aluminum can substantially influence the acid behavior of dissolved organic matter and the availability of the toxic form of aluminum (i.e., inorganic monomeric aluminum).

  7. Formation of self-organized domain structures with charged domain walls in lithium niobate with surface layer modified by proton exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Dolbilov, M. A.; Zelenovskiy, P. S.; Lobov, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the self-organized dendrite domain structures appeared as a result of polarization reversal in the uniform field in lithium niobate single crystals with the artificial surface layer created by proton exchange. We have revealed the self-organized sub-micron scale dendrite domain patterns consisting of domain stripes oriented along the X crystallographic directions separated by arrays of dashed residual domains at the surface by scanning probe microscopy. Raman confocal microscopy allowed visualizing the quasi-regular dendrite domain structures with similar geometry in the vicinity of both polar surfaces. The depth of the structure was about 20 μm for Z+ polar surface and 70 μm for Z- one. According to the proposed mechanism, the dendrite structure formation at the surface was related to the ineffective screening of the residual depolarization field. The computer simulation of the structure formation based on the cellular automata model with probabilistic switching rule proved the eligibility of the proposed scheme, the simulated dendrite domain patterns at various depths being similar to the experimental ones.

  8. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  9. Impact of Urbanization and Land-Use Change on Surface Climate in Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River, 1988–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Land-use/land cover change (LUCC is one of the fundamental causes of global environmental change. In recent years, understanding the regional climate impact of LUCC has become a hot-discussed topic worldwide. Some studies have explored LUCC impact on regional climate in specific cities, provinces, or farming areas. However, the quick-urbanized areas, which are highly influenced by human activities, have the most severe land-use changes in developing countries, and their climatic impact cannot be ignored. This study aims to identify the impact of land-use change coupled with urbanization on regional temperature and precipitation in the metropolitan areas of middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China by means of spatial analysis and numeric methods. Based on the exploration of land-use change and climate change during 1988–2008, the impact of land-use transition from non-built-up area to built-up area on temperature and precipitation was analyzed. The results indicated that the land-use conversion has affected the regional temperature with an increasing effect in the study area, while the influence on precipitation was not so significant. The results can provide useful information for spatial planning policies in consideration of regional climate change.

  10. SU-F-T-189: Dosimetric Comparison of Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Techniques for Liver Tumors Close to the Skin Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Fujii, Y; Fujii, T [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Katoh, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Shimizu, S; Shirato, H [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spot-scanning technique has been utilized to achieve conformal dose distribution to large and complicated tumors. This technique generally does not require patient-specific devices such as aperture and compensator. The commercially available spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) systems, however, cannot deliver proton beams to the region shallower than 4 g/cm2. Therefore some range compensation device is required to treat superficial tumors with SSPT. This study shows dosimetric comparison of the following treatment techniques: (i) with a tabletop bolus, (ii) with a nozzle-mounted applicator, and (iii) without any devices and using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique. Methods: The applicator composed of a combination of a mini-ridge filter and a range shifter has been manufactured by Hitachi, Ltd., and the tabletop bolus was made by .decimal, Inc. Both devices have been clinically implemented in our facility. Three patients with liver tumors close to the skin surface were examined in this study. Each treatment plan was optimized so that the prescription dose of 76 Gy(RBE) or 66 Gy(RBE) would be delivered to 99% of the clinical target volume in 20 fractions. Three beams were used for tabletop bolus plan and IMPT plan, whereas two beams were used in the applicator plan because the gantry angle available was limited due to potential collision to patient and couch. The normal liver, colon, and skin were considered as organs at risk (OARs). Results: The target heterogeneity index (HI = D{sub 5}/D{sub 95}) was 1.03 on average in each planning technique. The mean dose to the normal liver was considerably less than 20 Gy(RBE) in all cases. The dose to the skin could be reduced by 20 Gy(RBE) on average in the IMPT plan compared to the applicator plan. Conclusion: It has been confirmed that all treatment techniques met the dosimetric criteria for the OARs and could be implemented clinically.

  11. SU-F-T-189: Dosimetric Comparison of Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy Techniques for Liver Tumors Close to the Skin Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Fujii, Y; Fujii, T; Katoh, N; Shimizu, S; Shirato, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Spot-scanning technique has been utilized to achieve conformal dose distribution to large and complicated tumors. This technique generally does not require patient-specific devices such as aperture and compensator. The commercially available spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) systems, however, cannot deliver proton beams to the region shallower than 4 g/cm2. Therefore some range compensation device is required to treat superficial tumors with SSPT. This study shows dosimetric comparison of the following treatment techniques: (i) with a tabletop bolus, (ii) with a nozzle-mounted applicator, and (iii) without any devices and using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique. Methods: The applicator composed of a combination of a mini-ridge filter and a range shifter has been manufactured by Hitachi, Ltd., and the tabletop bolus was made by .decimal, Inc. Both devices have been clinically implemented in our facility. Three patients with liver tumors close to the skin surface were examined in this study. Each treatment plan was optimized so that the prescription dose of 76 Gy(RBE) or 66 Gy(RBE) would be delivered to 99% of the clinical target volume in 20 fractions. Three beams were used for tabletop bolus plan and IMPT plan, whereas two beams were used in the applicator plan because the gantry angle available was limited due to potential collision to patient and couch. The normal liver, colon, and skin were considered as organs at risk (OARs). Results: The target heterogeneity index (HI = D 5 /D 95 ) was 1.03 on average in each planning technique. The mean dose to the normal liver was considerably less than 20 Gy(RBE) in all cases. The dose to the skin could be reduced by 20 Gy(RBE) on average in the IMPT plan compared to the applicator plan. Conclusion: It has been confirmed that all treatment techniques met the dosimetric criteria for the OARs and could be implemented clinically.

  12. Protonated nitrosamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Øgaard Madsen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The protonated nitrosamide, NH3NO+, has been generated by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Although a direct search for this species in ammonia flames has proved negative, fast proton transfer to major flame constituents is supported experimentally as well as by MO calculations....

  13. Local Control Theory in Trajectory Surface Hopping Dynamics Applied to the Excited-State Proton Transfer of 4-Hydroxyacridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F E; Penfold, Thomas J; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-07-20

    The application of local control theory combined with nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics to study the photoinduced intramolecular proton transfer reaction in 4-hydroxyacridine was investigated. All calculations were performed within the framework of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. The computed pulses revealed important information about the underlying excited-state nuclear dynamics highlighting the involvement of collective vibrational modes that would normally be neglected in a study performed on model systems constrained to a subset of the full configuration space. This study emphasizes the strengths of local control theory for the design of pulses that can trigger chemical reactions associated with the population of a given molecular excited state. In addition, analysis of the generated pulses can help to shed new light on the photophysics and photochemistry of complex molecular systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Proton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  15. SGA Reach Breaks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The stream geomorphic assessment (SGA) is a physical assessment competed by geomorphologists to determine the condition and sensitivity of a stream. The SGA Reach...

  16. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  17. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  18. [Bluetongue disease reaches Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M; Griot, C; Chaignat, V; Perler, L; Thür, B

    2008-02-01

    Since 2006 bluetongue disease is rapidly spreading across Europe and reached Switzerland in October 2007. In the present article a short overview about the disease and the virus is given, and the first three clinical bluetongue disease cases in cattle, and the respective laboratory findings are presented.

  19. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  20. Reaching for the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  1. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  2. Formation of vanadium-containing nanostructures on the surface of protonated forms of layered perovskite-like titanates K2La2Ti3O10 and NaLaTiO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silyukov, Oleg I.; Kulish, Liliia D.; Trofimova, Dariya V.; Burovikhina, Alena A.; Chislov, Mikhail V.; Rodionov, Ivan A.; Zhukov, Yuri M.; Zvereva, Irina A.

    2018-03-01

    Reactions of layered perovskite-like oxides K2La2Ti3O10, NaLaTiO4 and corresponding protonated oxides H2La2Ti3O10, HLaTiO4 with vanadyl sulfate aqueous solution have been studied. It was revealed that the exchange reaction of interlayer alkali cations in K2La2Ti3O10 and NaLaTiO4 by with vanadyl cations, which was reported in the literature previously, does not proceed. The formation of the corresponding protonated forms and vanadium-containing particles is found to occur instead. In the case of protonated forms H2La2Ti3O10, HLaTiO4 vanadium-containing nanostructures are formed on the surface.

  3. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machesky, M.L.; Předota, Milan; Wesolowski, D.J.; Vlček, Lukáš; Cummings, P. T.; Rosenqvist, J.; Ridley, M.K.; Kubicki, J.D.; Bandura, A.V.; Kumar, N.; Sofo, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 21 (2008), s. 12331-12339 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0094; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:M.K.R.(US) EAR/0124001; M.L.M(US) DE/AC05/00OR22725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : solid-liquid interface * surface * simulation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.097, year: 2008

  4. Reaching the unreached.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaratne, A T

    1989-01-01

    Embodied in the child survival revolution are ideological, methodological, and organizational innovations aimed at radical change in the condition of the world's children as rapidly as possible. In countries such as Sri Lanka, child survival and health for all by the year 2000 often seem to be impossible goals, given the tumultuous socioeconomic and political conditions. In Sri Lanka, the quality of life has been eroded, not enhanced, by the importation of Western technology and managerial capitalism and the destruction of indigenous processes. The chaos and violence that have been brought into the country have made it difficult to reach the poor children, women, and refugees in rural areas with primary health care interventions. Sri Lanka's unreachable--the decision making elites--have blocked access to the unreached--the urban and rural poor. If governments are to reach the unreached, they must remove the obstacles to a people-centered, community development process. It is the people themselves, and the institutions of their creation, that can reach the children amidst them in greatest need. To achieve this task, local communities must be provided with basic human rights, the power to make decisions that affect their lives, necessary resources, and appropriate technologies. Nongovernmental organizations can play a crucial role as bridges between the unreached and the unreachable by promoting community empowerment, aiding in the formation of networks of community organizations, and establishing linkages with government programs. If the ruling elites in developing countries can be persuaded to accommodate the needs and aspirations of those who, to date, have been excluded from the development process, the child survival revolution can be a nonviolent one.

  5. High current polarized proton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Polarized proton sources are now being used more frequently on linacs. In pulsed operation up to 10 mA of /rvec H//sup +/ and 0.4 mA of /rvec H//sup /minus// have been produced. The present status of these sources, and developments to reach even higher intensities, are reviewed. 39 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  7. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  8. Porous Proton- and Chloride-Ion Conducting Layers Based on Ethanolamine Derivatives of PVC on the Surfaces of Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, B. N.; Yavich, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Materials are produced with porous layers based on ethanolamine derivatives of PVC or compounds of active carbon with hydroxyethylcyclam derivatives of PVC with aqua complexes of chloride hydrogen cross-linked with the surface of cellulose or asbestos fabric. Their capacity for sorption with respect to hexane and benzene in the saturated vapor and liquid phases is determined. The dependences of current on voltage in a circuit are determined for bridges composed of these materials in air, and in the vapor and liquid phases of benzene and hexane between 3 M HCl solutions and 3 M HCl solutions containing 3 M CaCl2. It is established that only H+ ions migrate along the bridges between the HCl solutions, and H+ and Cl- ions were the only species that moved along the bridges between the HCl solutions containing CaCl2. The voltages at which the movement of ions starts are determined, and constants characterizing the conductivity of the layers are found. It is shown that these parameters depend on the structure of a layer, the nature of the fabric, and the medium surrounding a bridge.

  9. GAP-REACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Raggio, Greer A.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Duan, Naihua; Marcus, Sue; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Humensky, Jennifer; Becker, Anne E.; Alarcón, Renato D.; Oquendo, María A.; Hansen, Helena; Like, Robert C.; Weiss, Mitchell; Desai, Prakash N.; Jacobsen, Frederick M.; Foulks, Edward F.; Primm, Annelle; Lu, Francis; Kopelowicz, Alex; Hinton, Ladson; Hinton, Devon E.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of health and health care disparities highlights the importance of including information about race, ethnicity, and culture (REC) in health research. Reporting of REC factors in research publications, however, is notoriously imprecise and unsystematic. This article describes the development of a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness and the applicability of REC factor reporting in psychiatric research publications. The 16-itemGAP-REACH© checklist was developed through a rigorous process of expert consensus, empirical content analysis in a sample of publications (N = 1205), and interrater reliability (IRR) assessment (N = 30). The items assess each section in the conventional structure of a health research article. Data from the assessment may be considered on an item-by-item basis or as a total score ranging from 0% to 100%. The final checklist has excellent IRR (κ = 0.91). The GAP-REACH may be used by multiple research stakeholders to assess the scope of REC reporting in a research article. PMID:24080673

  10. Reaching Beyond The Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mariah; Rosenthal, L.; Gaughan, A.; Hopkins, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strawbridge Observatory at Haverford College is home to a undergraduate-led public observing program. Our program holds ~once monthly public events throughout the academic year that take advantage of eyepiece observing on our 16-inch and 12-inch telescopes as well as of the classroom, library, and projection system. These resources allow us to organize a variety of astronomy related activities that are engaging for individuals of all ages: accessible student talks, current film screenings and even arts and crafts for the families who attend with young children. These events aim to spark curiosity in others about scientific discovery and about the remarkable nature of the world in which we live. In addition to exciting local families about astronomy, this program has excited Haverford students from a range of disciplines about both science and education. Being entirely student led means that we are able to take the initiative in planning, coordinating and running all events, fostering an atmosphere of collaboration, experimentation and commitment amongst our volunteers. Additionally, this program is one of the few at Haverford that regularly reaches beyond the campus walls to promote and build relationships with the outside community. In light of this, our program presents a distinctive and enlightening opportunity for student volunteers: we get to use our scientific backgrounds to educate a general audience, while also learning from them about how to communicate and inspire in others the excitement we feel about the subject of astronomy. The work on this project has been supported by NSF AST-1151462.

  11. UX-15 Reaches LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The creation of the world's largest sandstone cavern, not a small feat! At the bottom, cave-in preventing steel mesh can be seen clinging to the top of the tunnel. The digging of UX-15, the cavern that will house ATLAS, reached the upper ceiling of LEP on October 10th. The breakthrough which took place nearly 100 metres underground occurred precisely on schedule and exactly as planned. But much caution was taken beforehand to make the LEP breakthrough clean and safe. To prevent the possibility of cave-ins in the side tunnels that will eventually be attached to the completed UX-15 cavern, reinforcing steel mesh was fixed into the walls with bolts. Obviously no people were allowed in the LEP tunnels below UX-15 as the breakthrough occurred. The area was completely evacuated and fences were put into place to keep all personnel out. However, while personnel were being kept out of the tunnels below, this has been anything but the case for the work taking place up above. With the creation of the world's largest...

  12. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  13. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%–30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%–42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26828525

  14. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 10 19 W/cm 2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ∼ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum ( E pmax ) and the mean (( E p )) proton energy on |Δ x | is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m E pmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = −100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness E p changed only within ∼ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  15. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  16. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°

  17. Proton solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikova, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of proton solar flares have been carried out in 1950-1958 using the extrablackout coronograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory. The experiments permit to determine two characteristic features of flares: the directed motion of plasma injection flux from the solar depths and the appearance of a shock wave moving from the place of the injection along the solar surface. The appearance of the shock wave is accompanied by some phenomena occuring both in the sunspot zone and out of it. The consistent flash of proton flares in the other groups of spots, the disappearance of fibres and the appearance of eruptive prominences is accomplished in the sunspot zone. Beyond the sunspot zone the flares occur above spots, the fibres disintegrate partially or completely and the eruptive prominences appear in the regions close to the pole

  18. γ-decay of {}_{8}^{16}{{\\rm{O}}}_{8}\\,{and}\\,{}_{7}^{16}{{\\rm{N}}}_{9} in proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations with optimized surface δ interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2016-09-01

    γ-ray transitions from excited states of {}16{{N}} and {}16{{O}} isomers that appear in the γ spectrum of the {}616{{{C}}}10\\to {}716{{{N}}}9\\to {}816{{{O}}}8 beta decay chain are investigated. The theoretical approach used in this research starts with a mean-field potential consisting of a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential including spin-orbit and Coulomb terms (for protons) in order to obtain single-particle energies and wave functions for nucleons in a nucleus. A schematic residual surface delta interaction is then employed on the top of the mean field and is treated within the proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pnTDA) and the proton-neutron random phase approximation. The goal is to use an optimized surface delta interaction interaction, as a residual interaction, to improve the results. We have used artificial intelligence algorithms to establish a good agreement between theoretical and experimental energy spectra. The final results of the ‘optimized’ calculations are reasonable via this approach.

  19. Protons in hydrated protein powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Careri, G.; Bruni, F.; Consolini, G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has shown that hydrated lysozyme powders exhibit a dielectric behaviour, due to proton conductivity, explainable within the frame of percolation theory. Long range proton displacement appears only above the critical hydration for percolation, when the 2-dimensional motion takes place on fluctuating clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules adsorbed on the protein surface. The emergence of biological function, enzyme catalysis, was found to coincide with the critical hydration for percolation. More recently, we have evaluated the protonic conductivity of hydrated lysozyme powders, from room down to liquid N 2 temperature. In the high temperature limit a classical isotopic effect can be detected, and the conductivity follows the familiar Arrhenius law for thermally activated hopping. In the low temperature region the conductivity shows a temperature dependence in agreement with prediction by the theory of dissipative quantum tunneling. Below room temperature the static dielectric constant, and the dielectric relaxation time for charge transport showed an increase likely to be identified with the formation of a polaronic-solitonic species as predicted by the theory of proton transport in water chains, a species which displays a larger effective mass and a larger dipole moment that the usual hydrated protonic defects. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first section we present a tutorial report of some previous experimental results on proton displacement in slightly hydrated biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological function coincides with the onset of percolative pathways in the water molecules network adsorbed on the surface of biomolecules. In the second section, we report on preliminary data on the dielectric relaxation of hydrated lysozyme below room temperature, to suggest

  20. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  1. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  2. Comparison of the proton-transfer paths in hydrogen bonds from theoretical potential-energy surfaces and the concept of conservation of bond order III. O-H-O hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerz, Irena; Olovsson, Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The quantum-mechanically derived reaction coordinates (QMRC) for the proton transfer in O-H-O hydrogen bonds have been derived from ab initio calculations of potential-energy surfaces. A comparison is made between the QMRC and the corresponding bond-order reaction coordinates (BORC) derived by applying the Pauling bond order concept together with the principle of conservation of bond order. In agreement with earlier results for N-H-N(+) hydrogen bonds there is virtually perfect agreement between the QMRC and BORC curves for intermolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds. For intramolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds, the donor and acceptor parts of the molecule impose strong constraints on the O···O distance and the QMRC does not follow the BORC relation in the whole range. The neutron-determined proton positions are located close to the theoretically calculated potential-energy minima, and where the QMRC and the BORC curves coincide with each other. The results confirm the universal character of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: BORC is identical with QMRC and the proton can be moved from donor to acceptor keeping its valency equal to 1. The shape of PES for intramolecular hydrogen bonds is more complex as it is sensitive to the geometry of the molecule as well as of the hydrogen bridge. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2010

  3. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  4. Proton radiography for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, L.; Batani, D. [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Baton, S.; Perez, F.; Koenig, M. [LULI Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-UPMC, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Nicolai, Ph.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J. [CELIA, University de Bordeaux (France)

    2011-11-15

    Generation of high-intensity and well collimated multi-energetic proton beams from laser-matter interaction extend the possibility for using protons as a diagnostic to image imploding targets in inertial confinement fusion experiments in the framework of the experimental road map of the Hiper project (the European High Power laser Energy Research facility Project). Due to the very large mass densities reached during implosion processes, protons traveling through the target undergo a very large number of collisions which deviate the protons from their original trajectories reducing the proton radiography resolution below our expectations. Here we present a simple analytical model to study the performance of proton radiography as a function of the main experimental parameters, such as the proton beam energies and targets areal density. This approach leads to define two different criteria for proton radiography resolution (called the 'strong' and the 'weak' conditions) describing different experimental conditions. Finally, numerical simulations using both hydrodynamic and Monte Carlo codes are presented to validate the analytical predictions.

  5. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppel, Cynthia [Hampton Univ. Proton Therapy Inst., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  6. LHC Report: reaching high intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Jan Uythoven

    2015-01-01

    After both beams having been ramped to their full energy of 6.5 TeV, the last two weeks saw the beam commissioning process advancing on many fronts. An important milestone was achieved when operators succeeded in circulating a nominal-intensity bunch. During the operation, some sudden beam losses resulted in beam dumps at top energy, a problem that needed to be understood and resolved.   In 2015 the LHC will be circulating around 2800 bunches in each beam and each bunch will contain just over 1 x 1011 protons. Until a few days ago commissioning was taking place with single bunches of 5 x 109 protons. The first nominal bunch with an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons was injected on Tuesday, 21 April. In order to circulate such a high-intensity bunch safely, the whole protection system must be working correctly: collimators, which protect the aperture, are set at preliminary values known as coarse settings; all kicker magnets for injecting and extracting the beams are commissioned with beam an...

  7. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  8. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-06-01

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project

  9. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  10. Constraining the proton structure at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Tricoli, Alessandro; Viehhauser, Georg

    Particle physics is at a pivotal moment: the origin of mass and new physics scenarios beyond the Standard Model or particle physics could be unveiled in the coming year. In 2007 the most powerful particl e accelerator, the Large Hadron Coolider (LHC), will start colliding proton beams reaching the ihghest energy and luminosity ever in collider particle physics. The ATLAS detector is one of two general pu rpose detectors placed along the collider ring to fully exploit the LHC potential. The theoretical uncertainties on most of the LHC physics progream are dominated by the proton structure uncertaintiy. This thesis demonstrates that $W^{\\pm}$ boson productionis an ideal process to constr ain the proton strcuture uncertainty. The rapidity distributions of electrons and positrons originating respectively from the $W^-$ and $W^+$ decays have been analysed. The results show that the current uncertainty on the gluon content of the proton can be reduced by a very significant amount if the total systematic uncertaint...

  11. The structure of the proton phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeffel, L.

    1996-01-01

    Deep inelastic scattering of an electron on a proton is a very interesting process to probe with high precision the structure of the proton. With HERA, precise tests of the theory of strong interactions (perturbative QCD) can be done. Recent results from HERA experiments on the proton structure function F 2 have reached a high level of precision. A strong rise of F 2 is observed when x ( the fraction of impulsion carried by the struck parton of the proton after its interaction with a highly virtual photon) becomes very small. In this regime two main theoretical predictions allow to describe the evolution of F 2 with respect to x or Q 2 (the photon mass), the DGLAP and the BFKL evolution equations. This contribution presents the main aspects of these predictions and then comment experimental ideas which can be used to discriminate between the alternatives. (N.T.)

  12. Prehension with trunk assisted reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saling, M; Stelmach, G E; Mescheriakov, S; Berger, M

    1996-10-01

    For prehensile tasks, where objects are located beyond the normal reaching space, the trunk is bent forward to assist in the transport of the wrist to the object. Such task behaviors raise complex motor control issues such as how is the trunk movement incorporated into the motor plan. In this experiment, seated subjects were asked to reach and grasp a small and a large object placed on a table located beyond their maximal reach. Forward trunk bending was required to extend the reach distance. For such reaching movements, the wrist velocity consisted of a bell shape profile similar to those seen when the arm is the sole transport agent. In most trials, the trunk was the first to initiate movement, although there was no strict pattern of initiation order. The transport data showed that trunk and arm movement components were decoupled at the end of the reach. While the object was being grasped and lifted, the trunk continued moving for approximately 180 ms after the grasp. Wrist deceleration time expressed in absolute and relative values was sensitive to object size. The time from maximum peak aperture to the end of wrist movement also was significantly longer for grasping the small compared to the large object. No such relationships were observed for the trunk. Temporal coupling was only observed between the grip and wrist transport component. Time to maximum aperture was significantly correlated with time to peak wrist deceleration and only rarely with time to trunk deceleration peak. When the trunk participates in the transport of the wrist to an object, these findings suggest that only the wrist component is directly related to the achievement of the grasp. While the trunk assisted the arm to reach the object, the kinematic parameter recorded did not reveal any evidence of direct coupling. The presented data suggests that the planning takes place at the level of the hand and that endpoint is the primary variable controlled.

  13. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  14. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  15. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. The Reach of the Arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan; W.P. Knulst

    2000-01-01

    Original title: Het bereik van de kunsten. The reach of the arts (Het bereik van de kunsten) is the fourth study in a series which periodically analyses the status of cultural participation, reading and use of other media. The series, Support for culture (Het culturele draagvlak) is sponsored

  17. Laser-driven proton sources and their applications: femtosecond intense laser plasma driven simultaneous proton and x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M; Daido, H; Yogo, A; Sagisaka, A; Ogura, K; Orimo, S; Mori, M; Ma, J; Pirozhkov, A S; Kiriyama, H; Kanazawa, S; Kondo, S; Yamamoto, Y; Shimoura, T; Tanoue, M; Nakai, Y; Akutsu, A; Nagashima, A; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Z [Advanced Photon Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto (Japan)], E-mail: nishiuchi.mamiko@jaea.go.jp (and others)

    2008-05-01

    We have performed simultaneous proton and X-ray imaging with an ultra-short and high-intensity Ti: Sap laser system. More than 10{sup 10} protons, whose maximum energy reaches 2.5 MeV, were delivered within a {approx}ps bunch. At the same time, keV X-ray is generated at almost the same place where protons are emitted. We have performed the simultaneous imaging of the copper mesh by using proton and x-ray beams, in practical use of the characteristics of the laser produced plasma that it can provide those beams simultaneously without any serious problems on synchronization.

  18. Measurements of π{sup ±} differential yields from the surface of the T2K replica target for incoming 31 GeV/c protons with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Ajaz, M.; Blondel, A.; Bravar, A.; Debieux, S.; Haesler, A.; Korzenev, A.; Ravonel, M. [University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Aduszkiewicz, A.; Dominik, W.; Kuich, M.; Matulewicz, T.; Posiadala-Zezula, M. [University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Ali, Y. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Andronov, E.; Feofilov, G.A.; Igolkin, S.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Seryakov, A.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vinogradov, L. [St. Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Susa, T. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Antoniou, N.; Christakoglou, P.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.; Kapoyannis, A.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Vassiliou, M. [University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Baatar, B.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Krasnoperov, A.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Malakhov, A.I.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G.L.; Tereshchenko, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bay, F.; Di Luise, S.; Rubbia, A.; Sgalaberna, D. [ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Bluemer, J.; Dembinski, H.; Engel, R.; Herve, A.E.; Mathes, H.J.; Roth, M.; Szuba, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Veberic, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Tsenov, R. [University of Sofia, Faculty of Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Brandin, A.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Taranenko, A. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Brzychczyk, J.; Larsen, D.; Planeta, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Staszel, P.; Wyszynski, O. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Busygina, O.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Kurepin, A.; Sadovsky, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cirkovic, M.; Manic, D.; Puzovic, J. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Czopowicz, T.; Dynowski, K.; Grebieszkow, K.; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Sarnecki, R.; Slodkowski, M.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D. [Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Deveaux, M.; Koziel, M.; Renfordt, R.; Stroebele, H. [University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Dumarchez, J.; Robert, A. [LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (France); Ereditato, A.; Hierholzer, M.; Nirkko, M.; Pistillo, C.; Redij, A. [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fodor, Z. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Garibov, A. [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Gazdzicki, M. [University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce (Poland); Grzeszczuk, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kowalski, S.; Pulawski, S.; Schmidt, K.; Wilczek, A. [University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Hasegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shibata, M.; Tada, M.; Friend, M. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Johnson, S.R.; Marino, A.D.; Rumberger, B.T.; Zimmerman, E.D. [University of Colorado, Boulder (United States); Kowalik, K.; Rondio, E.; Stepaniak, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Laszlo, A.; Marton, K.; Vesztergombi, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Lewicki, M.; Naskret, M.; Turko, L. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Marcinek, A. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (PL); Messerly, B.; Nagai, Y.; Paolone, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US); Mills, G.B.; Yarritu, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (US); Morozov, S.; Petukhov, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (RU); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (RU); Mrowczynski, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Seyboth, P.; Stefanek, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A. [Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce (PL); Pavin, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (HR); LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (FR); Popov, B.A. [LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (FR); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (RU); Rauch, W. [Fachhochschule Frankfurt, Frankfurt (DE); Roehrich, D. [University of Bergen, Bergen (NO); Rustamov, A. [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (AZ); University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (DE); Zambelli, L. [LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (FR); Institute for Particle and Nuclear Studies, Tsukuba (JP); Galymov, V. [IPNL, University of Lyon, Villeurbanne (FR); Hartz, M. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (JP); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (CA); Hiraki, T.; Ichikawa, A.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Kyoto (JP); Tzanov, M. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baton Rouge, LA (US); Yu, M. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Toronto, ON (CA); Collaboration: NA61/SHINE Collaboration

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of particle emission from a replica of the T2K 90 cm-long carbon target were performed in the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN SPS, using data collected during a high-statistics run in 2009. An efficient use of the long-target measurements for neutrino flux predictions in T2K requires dedicated reconstruction and analysis techniques. Fully-corrected differential yields of π{sup ±}-mesons from the surface of the T2K replica target for incoming 31 GeV/c protons are presented. A possible strategy to implement these results into the T2K neutrino beam predictions is discussed and the propagation of the uncertainties of these results to the final neutrino flux is performed. (orig.)

  19. Measurements of charged pion differential yields from the surface of the T2K replica target for incoming 31 GeV/c protons with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N.; Ajaz, M.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blümer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Cirkovic, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G.A.; Fodor, Z.; Garibov, A.; Gazdzicki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hervé, A.E.; Hierholzer, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Johnson, S.R.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Mackowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A.I.; Manic, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A.D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G.L.; Messerly, B.; Mills, G.B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczynski, S.; Nagai, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskret, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B.A.; Posiadała-Zezula, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzovic, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rumberger, B.T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sarnecki, R.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberic, D.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszynski, O.; Yarritu, K.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Friend, M.; Galymov, V.; Hartz, M.; Hiraki, T.; Ichikawa, A.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Tzanov, M.; Yu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of particle emission from a replica of the T2K 90 cm-long carbon target were performed in the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN SPS, using data collected during a high-statistics run in 2009. An efficient use of the long-target measurements for neutrino flux predictions in T2K requires dedicated reconstruction and analysis techniques. Fully-corrected differential yields of charged pions from the surface of the T2K replica target for incoming 31 GeV/c protons are presented. A possible strategy to implement these results into the T2K neutrino beam predictions is discussed and the propagation of the uncertainties of these results to the final neutrino flux is performed

  20. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  1. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. L. Gresik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  3. A review on the effect of proton exchange membranes in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFC liberate electrons while the electron donors are consumed. In the anaerobic anode compartment, substrates such as carbohydrates are utilized and as a result bioelectricity is produced in the MFC. MFCs may be utilized as electricity generators in small devices such as biosensors. MFCs still face practical barriers such as low generated power and current density. Recently, a great deal of attention has been given to MFCs due to their ability to operate at mild conditions and using different biodegradable substrates as fuel. The MFC consists of anode and cathode compartments. Active microorganisms are actively catabolized to carbon sources, therefore generating bioelectricity. The produced electron is transmitted to the anode surface but the generated protons must pass through the proton exchange membrane (PEM in order to reach the cathode compartment. PEM as a key factor affecting electricity generation in MFCs has been investigated here and its importance fully discussed.

  4. Neutron yields from massive lead and uranium targets irradiated with relativistic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamani, M.; Fragopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Manolopoulou, M.; Kulakov, B.A.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Sosnin, N.A.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Debeauvais, M.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-lived isotopes can be transmuted into stable or short-lived elements either by neutron captures or neutron induced fission. The need of a large excess of neutrons has led to the use of accelerator driven sources (ADS). A series of experiments were carried out at the Synchrophasotron/Nuclotron of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Dubna, using protons of 1.0 GeV. Solid Lead and Uranium targets surrounded by paraffin moderator were irradiated. On the outer surface of the moderator a number of Solid State Track Detectors were placed to monitor neutron spatial distribution. The results showed that the maximum neutron production was reached within the range of one to two proton mean free paths in the target. Then decreasing neutron production follows the proton beam attenuation along the target. Moreover, the results showed both targets neutron production evolution along the target, to be the same. However, neutron flux per incident proton is depended on the target mass, which was found to be higher for the heavier target

  5. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  6. Proton Conductivity of Proton Exchange Membrane Synergistically Promoted by Different Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhuang; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-07-12

    In this study, two functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), UiO-66-SO 3 H and UiO-66-NH 2 , were synthesized. Then, different composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared by single doping and codoping of these two MOFs, respectively. It was found that codoping of these two MOFs with suitable sizes was more conducive to the proton conductivity enhancement of the composite PEM. A synergistic effect between these two MOFs led to the the formation of more consecutive hydration channels in the composite PEM. It further greatly promoted the proton conductivity of the composite PEM. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM reached up to 0.256 S/cm under 90 °C, 95% RH, which was ∼1.17 times higher than that of the recast Nafion (0.118 S/cm). Besides, the methanol permeability of the codoped PEM was prominently decreased owing to the methanol trapping effect of the pores of these two MOFs. Meanwhile, the high water and thermal stabilities of these two MOFs were beneficial to the high proton conductivity stability of the codoped PEM under high humidity and high temperature. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM was almost unchanged throughout 3000 min of testing under 90 °C, 95% RH. This work provides a valuable reference for designing different functionalized MOFs to synergistically promote the proton conductivities of PEMs.

  7. Nanoscale compositional changes and modification of the surface reactivity of Pt3Co/C nanoparticles during proton-exchange membrane fuel cell operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubau, L.; Maillard, F.; Chatenet, M.; Andre, J.; Rossinot, E.

    2010-01-01

    This study bridges the structure/composition of Pt-Co/C nanoparticles with their surface reactivity and their electrocatalytic activity. We show that Pt 3 Co/C nanoparticles are not stable during PEMFC operation (H 2 /air; j = 0.6 A cm -2 , T = 70 o C) but suffer compositional changes at the nanoscale. In the first hours of operation, the dissolution of Co atoms at their surface yields to the formation of a Pt-enriched shell covering a Pt-Co alloy core ('Pt-skeleton') and increases the affinity of the surface to oxygenated and hydrogenated species. This structure does not ensure stability in PEMFC conditions but is rather a first step towards the formation of 'Pt-shell/Pt-Co alloy core' structures with depleted Co content. In these operating conditions, the Pt-Co/C specific activity for the ORR varies linearly with the fraction of Co alloyed to Pt present in the core and is severely depreciated (ca. -50%) after 1124 h of operation. This is attributed to: (i) the decrease of both the strain and the ligand effect of Co atoms contained in the core (ii) the changes in the surface structure of the electrocatalyst (formation of a multilayer-thick Pt shell) and (iii) the relaxation of the Pt surface atoms.

  8. Dynamics and adsorption of gas molecules using proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Lee, M. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    MgO powders and Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were irradiated by proton beams with high energy (10-35 MeV) for various exposure times, and Ar gas adsorption experiments were carried. A careful investigation measured by TEM studies revealed significant differences in morphological evolution before and after irradiating the proton beams. After irradiating the proton beams, adsorption properties of Ar measured below 80K on MgO powders having only (100) surface exposure exhibited an additional isotherm steps suggesting the creation of the local surface defects presumably due to the bombardments of the protons. Interestingly, CNTs that were radiated by proton beams with energy 35 MeV at the Bragg peak position contain much less Fe, Ni catalysts compare to the ones that were not irradiated by the proton beams. This experiment was re-performed at the same condition to confirm the reproducibility of the result, and the same outcomes were produced.

  9. REACH and nanomaterials: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrelli, Maria; Di Prospero Fanghella, Paola; Polci, Maria Letizia; Castelli, Stefano; Pettirossi, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    New challenges for regulators are emerging about a specific assessment and appropriate management of the potential risks of nanomaterials. In the framework of European legislation on chemicals, Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 REACH aims to ensure the safety of human health and the environment through the collection of information on the physico-chemical characteristics of the substances and on their profile (eco) toxicological and the identification of appropriate risk management linked to 'exposure to these substances without impeding scientific progress and the competitiveness of industry. In order to cover the current shortage of information on the safety of nanomaterials and tackle the acknowledged legal vacuum, are being a rich activities, carried out both by regulators both by stake holders, and discussions on the proposals for adapting the European regulatory framework for chemicals . The European Commission is geared to strengthen the REACH Regulation by means of updates of its annexes. The importance of responding to the regulatory requirements has highlighted the need for cooperation between European organizations, scientists and industries to promote and ensure the safe use of nanomaterials. [it

  10. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  11. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  12. Proton irradiation of vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, P.J.

    1976-04-01

    Radiation blisters were produced on vanadium, niobium, and molybdenum after bombardment with 150-keV protons. The proton fluxes ranged from approximately 3 x 10 15 to 3 x 10 16 H + /s cm 2 while the proton fluence ranged from 8 x 10 17 to 7 x 10 19 H + /cm 2 . Increases in the proton fluence produced an increase in blister size and a decrease in the blister density. The formation of blisters at temperatures below the hydride dissociation temperature was demonstrated for vanadium. 26 figures, 31 tables

  13. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  14. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

  15. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

  16. Stroke rehabilitation reaches a threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol E Han

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor training with the upper limb affected by stroke partially reverses the loss of cortical representation after lesion and has been proposed to increase spontaneous arm use. Moreover, repeated attempts to use the affected hand in daily activities create a form of practice that can potentially lead to further improvement in motor performance. We thus hypothesized that if motor retraining after stroke increases spontaneous arm use sufficiently, then the patient will enter a virtuous circle in which spontaneous arm use and motor performance reinforce each other. In contrast, if the dose of therapy is not sufficient to bring spontaneous use above threshold, then performance will not increase and the patient will further develop compensatory strategies with the less affected hand. To refine this hypothesis, we developed a computational model of bilateral hand use in arm reaching to study the interactions between adaptive decision making and motor relearning after motor cortex lesion. The model contains a left and a right motor cortex, each controlling the opposite arm, and a single action choice module. The action choice module learns, via reinforcement learning, the value of using each arm for reaching in specific directions. Each motor cortex uses a neural population code to specify the initial direction along which the contralateral hand moves towards a target. The motor cortex learns to minimize directional errors and to maximize neuronal activity for each movement. The derived learning rule accounts for the reversal of the loss of cortical representation after rehabilitation and the increase of this loss after stroke with insufficient rehabilitation. Further, our model exhibits nonlinear and bistable behavior: if natural recovery, motor training, or both, brings performance above a certain threshold, then training can be stopped, as the repeated spontaneous arm use provides a form of motor learning that further bootstraps performance and

  17. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  18. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  19. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  20. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  1. Proton beams in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroshkov, V. S.; Minakova, E. I.

    1998-11-01

    A branch of radiology, proton therapy employs fast protons as a tool for the treatment of various, mainly oncological, diseases. The features of tissue ionization by protons (Bragg peak) facilitate a further step towards solving the principal challenge in radiology: to deliver a sufficiently high and homogeneous dose to virtually any tumour, while sparing healthy neighbouring tissues, organs and structures. The state of the art of proton therapy is described, as well as the main technical, physics and clinical results gained since the 1950s at high-energy physics centres worldwide. The future of proton therapy is connected with the construction of hospital-based facilities with dedicated medical accelerators and modern technical instrumentation.

  2. Medical Applications: Proton Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2009-05-01

    Proton therapy is a highly advanced and precise form of radiation treatment for cancer. Due to the characteristic Bragg peak associated with ion energy deposition, proton therapy provides the radiation oncologist with an improved method of treatment localization within a patient, as compared with conventional radiation therapy using X-rays or electrons. Controlling disease and minimizing side effects are the twin aims of radiation treatment. Proton beams enhance the opportunity for both by facilitating maximal dose to tumor and minimal dose to surrounding tissue. In the United States, five proton radiotherapy centers currently treat cancer patients, with more in the construction phase. New facilities and enabling technologies abound. An overview of the treatment modality generally, as well as of the capabilities and research planned for the field and for the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in particular, will be presented.

  3. Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip,K.

    2009-08-30

    The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.

  4. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  5. Electron cloud instability in high intensity proton rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ohmi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available An e^{-}p instability has been observed in some proton rings. The instability, which causes beam loss, limits the performance of the ring. The instability may be serious for 3 and 50 GeV proton storage rings in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC. We study the e^{-}p instability in several high intensity proton storage rings operated in the world. This work informs J-PARC of the necessity to cure the instability, for example, by applying a TiN coating on the chamber surface.

  6. In Situ Calibration for Proton Particle Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Collin; Padalino, Stephen; Polsin, Danae; Russ, Megan; Krieger, Michael; Bienstock, Mollie; Ellison, Drew; Simone, Angela; Yuly, Mark; Mann, Keith; Reynolds, Tyler; Sangster, Craig

    2012-10-01

    Neutrons produced via the 3H(2H,n)4He reaction at the Ohio University Accelerator Lab were used to activate a graphite sample via the ^12C(n,2n)^11C reaction in an attempt to measure the (n,2n) reaction cross section. Before striking the graphite, the neutrons struck a thin polyethylene foil and elastically scattered protons in to a surface barrier detector telescope. The recoiling protons were used to determine the energy and number of neutrons which struck the ^12C activation sample. To verify that the particle telescope's predicted response function for 15 to 27 MeV protons was correct a calibration of the detector telescope was performed in air on the SUNY Geneseo tandem Pelletron accelerator. High energy protons were created via the ^2H(^3He, p)^4He reaction by bombarding a deuterated polyethylene target with 4.5 MeV ^3He ions. The high-energy protons then pass through a Kapton window from vacuum into air where they were detected by the particle telescope. The dependence of the detector response on various proton energies was then investigated for various detector geometries. This data was extremely useful when performing the graphite activation experiment at the Ohio University accelerator lab. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  8. THEORY OF PROTON EMITTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. TALOU

    2000-08-01

    Modern theoretical methods used to interpret recent experimental data on ground-state proton emission near the proton drip line are reviewed. Most of them are stationary and are aimed to compute proton decay widths {Gamma}{sub p} only. Comparison is made between these approaches before being compared to experimental data. Our time-dependent approach based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for initial quasi-stationary single-proton states is then introduced. It is shown that much deeper insights into the physics of this clean multidimensional quantum tunneling effect can be accessed, and that in addition to {Gamma}{sub p}, other physical quantities could be tested experimentally, offering new stringent tests on nuclear physics models away from the valley of {beta}-stability. Finally, the necessity of using the TDSE approach in more complex, dynamical, problems is demonstrated.

  9. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  10. Lorentz contracted proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, D. Bedoya; Kelkar, N.G.; Nowakowski, M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1E No. 18A-10, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

    2015-09-30

    The proton charge and magnetization density distributions can be related to the well known Sachs electromagnetic form factors G{sub E,M}(/emph {q}{sup 2}) through Fourier transforms, only in the Breit frame. The Breit frame however moves with relativistic velocities in the Lab and a Lorentz boost must be applied before extracting the static properties of the proton from the corresponding densities. Apart from this, the Fourier transform relating the densities and form factors is inherently a non-relativistic expression. We show that the relativistic corrections to it can be obtained by extending the standard Breit equation to higher orders in its 1/c{sup 2} expansion. We find that the inclusion of the above corrections reduces the size of the proton as determined from electron proton scattering data by about 4%.

  11. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  12. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  13. LEP Dismantling Reaches Half-Way Stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP's last superconducting module leaves its home port... Just seven months into the operation, LEP dismantling is forging ahead. Two of the eight arcs which form the tunnel have already been emptied and the last of the accelerator's radiofrequency (RF) cavities has just been raised to the surface. The 160 people working on LEP dismantling have reason to feel pleased with their progress. All of the accelerator's 72 superconducting RF modules have already been brought to the surface, with the last one being extracted on 2nd May. This represents an important step in the dismantling process, as head of the project, John Poole, explains. 'This was the most delicate part of the project, because the modules are very big and they could only come out at one place', he says. The shaft at point 1.8 through which the RF cavity modules pass is 18 metres in diameter, while each module is 11.5 metres long. Some modules had to travel more than 10 kilometres to reach the shaft. ... is lifted up the PM 1.8 shaft, after a m...

  14. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  15. The physics of proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes a...

  16. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  17. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    , charge-bearing species at interfaces and porous host materials on proton transport properties. As a common thread, articles in this special issue contribute to understanding the functionality provided by complex materials, beyond hydrogen bond fluctuations in water. The first group of articles (Smirnov et al, Henry et al, Medvedev and Stuchebrukhov) elucidates various aspects of the impact of local structural fluctuations, hydrogen bonding and long-range electrostatic forces on proton transfer across and at the surface of mitochondrial membranes. The second group of articles (Ilhan and Spohr, Allahyarov et al and Idupulapati et al) employ molecular dynamics simulations to rationalize vital dependencies of proton transport mechanisms in aqueous-based polymer electrolyte membranes on the nanoporous, phase-separated ionomer morphology, and on the level of hydration. The articles by Gebel et al, Boillat et al, and Aleksandrova et al employ small angle neutron scattering, neutron radiography, and electrochemical atomic force microscopy, respectively, to obtain detailed insights into the kinetics of water sorption, water distribution, water transport properties, as well as spatial maps of proton conductivity in fuel cell membranes. The contribution of Paschos et al provides a comprehensive review of phosphate-based solid state protonic conductors for intermediate temperature fuel cells. The topic of proton conductive materials for high-temperature, water-free operation of fuel cells is continued in the article of Verbraeken et al which addresses synthesis and characterization of a proton conducting perovskite. The guest editor wishes to acknowledge and thank all contributing authors for their commitment to this special issue. Moreover, I would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for coordinating submission and refereeing processes. Finally, for the readers, I hope that this special issue will be a valuable and stimulating source of insights into the versatile and

  18. Stream Habitat Reach Summary - NCWAP [ds158

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Stream Habitat - NCWAP - Reach Summary [ds158] shapefile contains in-stream habitat survey data summarized to the stream reach level. It is a derivative of the...

  19. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori.

    1993-01-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  20. Compaction of PDMS due to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Huszank, R.; Rajta, I.; Kokavecz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. This work is about the detailed investigation of the changes of the surface topography, the degree of compaction/shrinkage and its relation to the irradiation fluence and the structure spacing in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patterned with 2 MeV proton microbeam. Sylgard 184 kit (Dow-Corning) was used to create the PDMS samples. The density of the PDMS samples was determined with pycnometer. The penetration depth for 2 MeV protons is ∼85 μm, the PDMS layer was ∼95 μm thick, so the incident protons stop in the PDMS, they do not reach the substrate. The irradiations have been performed at the nuclear microprobe facility at ATOMKI. The irradiated periodic structures consisted of parallel lines with different widths and spacing. To achieve different degrees of compaction, each structure was irradiated with five different fluences. The surface topography, the phase modification of the surface, and the connection between them were revealed using an atomic force microscope (AFM PSIA XE 100). The shrinkage data were obtained from the topography images. The structures with different line widths and spacing show different degrees of compaction as a function of irradiation fluence. By plotting them in the same graph (Fig. 1) it is clearly seen that the degree of compaction depends on both the irradiation fluence and the distance of the structures. The fluence dependence of the compaction can be explained with the chemical changes of PDMS. When an energetic ion penetrates through the material it scissions the polymer chain, whereupon among other things volatile products form. In the case of PDMS, these are mainly hydrogen, methane and ethane gases that can be released from PDMS. The irradiated volume shrinks due to significant structural change during which silicate derivatives (SiO x ) are formed. The phase change and the corresponding surface topography was compared and studied at all applied irradiation fluences. It was concluded

  1. Proton Conductive Channel Optimization in Methanol Resistive Hybrid Hyperbranched Polyamide Proton Exchange Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a previously developed polyamide proton conductive macromolecule, the nano-scale structure of the self-assembled proton conductive channels (PCCs is adjusted via enlarging the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules. Hyperbranched polyamide macromolecules with different size are synthesized from different monomers to tune the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules, and a series of hybrid membranes are prepared from these two micromoles to optimize the PCC structure in the proton exchange membrane. The optimized membrane exhibits methanol permeability low to 2.2 × 10−7 cm2/s, while the proton conductivity of the hybrid membrane can reach 0.25 S/cm at 80 °C, which was much higher than the value of the Nafion 117 membrane (0.192 S/cm. By considering the mechanical, dimensional, and the thermal properties, the hybrid hyperbranched polyamide proton exchange membrane (PEM exhibits promising application potential in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC.

  2. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  3. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  4. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The physics of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  6. The physics of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  7. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  8. New membrane structures with proton conducting properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Casper Frydendal

    Perfluorosulfonic acid membranes (e.g. Nafion®) are the most widely applied electrolytes in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) because of their good chemical stability, mechanical properties and high proton conductivity, when well hydrated. The upper limit of operating temperature...... for these membranes is restricted by the loss of conductivity and dimensional stability as the temperature reaches the boiling point of water and the glass transition temperature of the polymer. At low relative humidity the membranes dehydrate, resulting in loss of conductivity and reduced dimensions. High...... [1, 2, 3]. Improved fuel cell performance from incorporation of hygroscopic oxides or solid proton conductors (e.g. zirconium phosphates) has been reported. The poster exhibits upcoming work in the field of composite electrolyte membranes at the University of Southern Denmark, combining radiation...

  9. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references

  10. Do protons decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    The experimental status of proton decay is reviewed after the Leipzig International conference, July 1984. A brief comparative description of the currently active experiments is given. From the overall samples of contained events it can be concluded that the experiments are working well and broadly agree with each other. The candidates for proton decay from each experiment are examined. Although several experiments report candidates at a higher rate than expected from background calculations, the validity of these calculations is still open to doubt. (author)

  11. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Wiltsche, Helmar; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented.

  12. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D; Kuntke, Philipp; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C; Wiltsche, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented. (paper)

  13. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  14. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  15. Proton Drivers for neutrino beams and other high intensity applications

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R; Koseki, T; Thomason, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN, Fermilab, J-PARC and RAL tentatively plan to have proton accelerators delivering multi-MW of beam power in view of enhancing their physics reach especially in the domain of neutrinos. These plans are described, together with their benefits for other applications.

  16. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  17. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  18. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  19. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10 4 Bq cm -3 at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10 6 Bq cm -3 after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to 179 Ta with

  20. Why the Real Part of the Proton-Proton Forward Scattering Amplitude Should be Measured at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrely, C.; Martin, Andre; Soffer, Jacques; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2006-01-01

    For the energy of 14 TeV, to be reached at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we have had for some time accurate predictions for both the real and imaginary parts of the forward proton-proton elastic scattering amplitude. LHC is now scheduled to start operating in two years, and it is timely to discuss some of the important consequences of the measurements of both the total cross-section and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part. We stress the importance of measuring the real part of the proton-proton forward scattering amplitude at LHC, because a deviation from existing theoretical predictions could be a strong sign for new physics.

  1. Protons in collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, M.

    1983-01-01

    The article is concerned with the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), sited at CERN, which produces the world's highest energy collisions between protons, but is due to be dismantled soon. The ISR has contributed to major advances in physics, during the past 13 years, particularly in quantum chromodynamics. (U.K.)

  2. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  3. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legge, G.J.F.; McKenzie, C.D.; Mazzolini, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  4. Proton dosimetry intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatnitsky, S.; Siebers, J.; Miller, D.; Moyers, M.; Schaefer, M.; Jones, D.; Vynckier, S.; Hayakawa, Y.; Delacroix, S.; Isacsson, U.; Medin, J.; Kacperek, A.; Lomax, A.; Coray, A.; Kluge, H.; Heese, J.; Verhey, L.; Daftari, I.; Gall, K.; Lam, G.; Beck, T.; Hartmann, G.

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose: Methods for determining absorbed dose in clinical proton beams are based on dosimetry protocols provided by the AAPM and the ECHED. Both groups recommend the use of air-filled ionization chambers calibrated in terms of exposure or air kerma in a 60 Co beam when a calorimeter or Faraday cup dosimeter is not available. The set of input data used in the AAPM and the ECHED protocols, especially proton stopping powers and w-value is different. In order to verify inter-institutional uniformity of proton beam calibration, the AAPM and the ECHED recommend periodic dosimetry intercomparisons. In this paper we report the results of an international proton dosimetry intercomparison which was held at Loma Linda University Medical Center. The goal of the intercomparison was two-fold: first, to estimate the consistency of absorbed dose delivered to patients among the participating facilities, and second, to evaluate the differences in absorbed dose determination due to differences in 60 Co-based ionization chamber calibration protocols. Materials and methods: Thirteen institutions participated in an international proton dosimetry intercomparison. The measurements were performed in a 15-cm square field at a depth of 10 cm in both an unmodulated beam (nominal accelerator energy of 250 MeV) and a 6-cm modulated beam (nominal accelerator energy of 155 MeV), and also in a circular field of diameter 2.6 cm at a depth of 1.14 cm in a beam with 2.4 cm modulation (nominal accelerator energy of 100 MeV). Results: The results of the intercomparison have shown that using ionization chambers with 60 Co calibration factors traceable to standard laboratories, and institution-specific conversion factors and dose protocols, the absorbed dose specified to the patient would fall within 3% of the mean value. A single measurement using an ionization chamber with a proton chamber factor determined with a Faraday cup calibration differed from the mean by 8%. Conclusion: The

  5. Lifetime effects of single-event proton exposures in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    The US School of Aerospace Medicine studies of the lifetime effects of proton irradiation in rhesus monkeys have been conducted. Life-span shortening has been associated with proton energies of 55 MeV and above, as well as with doses greater than 360 rads. Female rhesus monkeys have a higher mortality than males as a result of high incidence of endometriosis in the irradiated animals. A dose ordering effect is apparent. Mortality rates began to accelerate at eight years after doses of 360 to 400 rads; at two years, after 500 to 650 rads; and less than one year, after 800 rads. Malignant tumors accounted for 18% of the deaths in the proton-exposed animals. Endometriosis was the cause of 25% of the deaths in this group. Energy-specific effects were observed. Eight malignant brain tumors occurred in animals exposed to 55-MeV protons and in no other group. Cataract incidence was highest in animals exposed to 32 and 55 MeV. These observations suggest a positive relationship with the Bragg peak energy distribution in the area of the brain and crystalline lens. Glucose tolerance was lowest in the animals exposed to totally penetrating radiation, where the fraction of the surface dose reaching the pancreas was highest. Age-matched control animals have yet to pass their median survival time, and the colony continues to be a valuable source of data on the relationship of total-body radiation to age-related diseases in captive monkeys. 16 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A.; Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G.; Barragan V, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  7. Visualizing proton antenna in a high-resolution green fluorescent protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu, Ai; Palm, Gottfried J; Schierbeek, Abraham J; Agmon, Noam

    2010-08-18

    "Proton-collecting antenna" are conjectured to consist of several carboxylates within hydrogen-bond (HB) networks on the surface of proteins, which funnel protons to the orifice of an internal proton wire leading to the protein's active site. Yet such constructions were never directly visualized. Here we report an X-ray structure of green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the highest resolution to date (0.9 A). It allows the identification of some pivotal hydrogen atoms pertinent to uncertainties concerning the protonation state of the chromophore. Applying a computer algorithm for mapping proton wires in proteins reveals the previously observed "active site wire" connecting Glu222 with the surface carboxylate Glu5. In addition, it is now possible to identify what appears to be a proton-collecting apparatus of GFP. It consists of a negative surface patch containing carboxylates, threonines, and water molecules, connected by a HB network to Glu5. Furthermore, we detect exit points via Asn146 and His148 to a hydrophobic surface region. The more extensive HB network of the present structure, as compared with earlier GFP structures, is not accidental. A systematic investigation of over 100 mutants shows a clear correlation between the observed water content of GFP X-ray structures and their resolution. With increasing water content, the proton wires become progressively larger. These findings corroborate the scenario in which the photodissociated proton from wild-type GFP can leak outside, whereafter another proton is recruited via the proton-collecting apparatus reported herein.

  8. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues. [Proton induced x-ray emission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, S B; Jones, K W; Kraner, H W; Shroy, R E; Hanson, A L

    1980-06-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port was used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage.

  9. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  10. REACH: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibieta, Luke

    2016-01-01

    REACH is a targeted reading support programme designed to improve reading accuracy and comprehension in pupils with reading difficulties in Years 7 and 8. It is based on research by the Centre for Reading and Language at York and is delivered by specially trained teaching assistants (TAs). This evaluation tested two REACH interventions, one based…

  11. Dosimetry of proton therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.

    1996-01-01

    Review of basic dosimetry of proton therapy treatment are presented with a goal to further development of the center for proton therapy planed in the frame of accelerator installation TESLA, which construction has been going on in the Vinca Institute. The basic of existing international recommendation for proton dosimetry, related both to dosimeter choice and calibration, as well as to absorbed dose determination methods, are presented. Recommendation statement and supposition in the future proton therapy practice belongs to the basic elements of developed conceptual program for proton therapy usage

  12. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-01-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods

  13. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanuma, A. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  14. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  15. Anhydrous proton conducting composite membranes containing Nafion and triazole modified POSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, M.; Wang, Y.G.; Zhang, F.F.; Huang, C.; Xu, X.; Zhang, R.; Fan, D.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Development of membrane electrolytes having reasonable proton conductivity and mechanical strength under anhydrous conditions is of great importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells operated at elevated temperature. With the introduction of triazole modified polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (Tz-POSS) into Nafion membrane, the formed composite electrolytes exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to pristine Nafion membrane due to the well distribution of Tz-POSS inside the membrane. The anhydrous proton conductivity of the formed composite membranes increases initially with the increase in temperature, reaching about 0.02 Scm −1 at 140 °C. With further increase in temperature to about 150 °C, the composite membrane reaches its glass transition point above which the proton conductivity decreases dramatically. The performance of assembled single cell from composite membrane is slightly dependent on humidification conditions at 95 °C, reaching 0.45 V at 600 mAcm −2 using hydrogen and oxygen as reaction gases

  16. The database for reaching experiments and models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Walker

    Full Text Available Reaching is one of the central experimental paradigms in the field of motor control, and many computational models of reaching have been published. While most of these models try to explain subject data (such as movement kinematics, reaching performance, forces, etc. from only a single experiment, distinct experiments often share experimental conditions and record similar kinematics. This suggests that reaching models could be applied to (and falsified by multiple experiments. However, using multiple datasets is difficult because experimental data formats vary widely. Standardizing data formats promises to enable scientists to test model predictions against many experiments and to compare experimental results across labs. Here we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a database of reaching called the Database for Reaching Experiments And Models (DREAM. DREAM collects both experimental datasets and models and facilitates their comparison by standardizing formats. The DREAM project promises to be useful for experimentalists who want to understand how their data relates to models, for modelers who want to test their theories, and for educators who want to help students better understand reaching experiments, models, and data analysis.

  17. Enhanced production of multi-strange hadrons in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovska, J.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; di Ruzza, B.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Coral, D. M. Goméz; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Vargas, H. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; García, G. Martínez; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; de Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; da Luz, H. Natal; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; de Oliveira, R. A. Negrao; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Oleniacz, J.; da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; da Costa, H. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lezama, E. Perez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Doce, O. Vázquez; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Vickovic, L.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Tello, A. Villatoro; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-06-01

    At sufficiently high temperature and energy density, nuclear matter undergoes a transition to a phase in which quarks and gluons are not confined: the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Such an exotic state of strongly interacting quantum chromodynamics matter is produced in the laboratory in heavy nuclei high-energy collisions, where an enhanced production of strange hadrons is observed. Strangeness enhancement, originally proposed as a signature of QGP formation in nuclear collisions, is more pronounced for multi-strange baryons. Several effects typical of heavy-ion phenomenology have been observed in high-multiplicity proton-proton (pp) collisions, but the enhanced production of multi-strange particles has not been reported so far. Here we present the first observation of strangeness enhancement in high-multiplicity proton-proton collisions. We find that the integrated yields of strange and multi-strange particles, relative to pions, increases significantly with the event charged-particle multiplicity. The measurements are in remarkable agreement with the p-Pb collision results, indicating that the phenomenon is related to the final system created in the collision. In high-multiplicity events strangeness production reaches values similar to those observed in Pb-Pb collisions, where a QGP is formed.

  18. The proton radius puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognini, A; Haensch, T W; Amaro, F D; Cardoso, J M R; Fernandes, L M P; Lopes, J A M; Biraben, F; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Le Bigot, E-O; Covita, D S; Dax, A; Dhawan, S; Graf, T; Giesen, A; Kao, C-Y; Liu, Y-W; Knowles, P; Ludhova, L; Kottmann, F

    2011-01-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ - p) we have measured the 2S F= 1 1/2 - 2P F= 2 3/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of r p = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm, and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  19. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, A.; Amaro, F. D.; Biraben, F.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A.; Dhawan, S.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Giesen, A.; Graf, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kao, C.-Y.; Knowles, P.; Kottmann, F.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Liu, Y.-W.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Ludhova, L.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nebel, T.; Nez, F.; Rabinowitz, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schaller, L. A.; Schuhmann, K.; Schwob, C.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Pohl, R.

    2011-09-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ- p) we have measured the 2SF = 11/2 - 2PF = 23/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz [1]. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rp = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm [8], and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm [9]. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  20. Measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    khalek, Samah Abdel

    It is now nearly fifty years since total proton-proton (pp) cross sections have been found to grow with energy after it was believed for long time that they would become asymptotically constant . The uncertainties of the cosmic ray data, at high energy, do not allow to determine the exact growth with energy of the total cross section .The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva has already delivered collisions with an energy never reached in a particle accelerator. The energy in the center of mass was 7 TeV (2010 - 2011) or 8 TeV (2012) and will ultimately reached 14 TeV in the near future. Thus, this will provide a good environment for a new precise measurement of the total pp cross section at this energy.The ATLAS detector installed in one of the four LHC interaction points is used to collect the result of the pp collisions. Its sub-detector ALFA located 240 m from the interaction point, is used to track protons resulting from elastic collisions.Therefore, within special beam optics conditions, ALFA i...

  1. The Amsterdam proton microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop a microbeam setup such that small beam spot sizes can be produced routinely, and to investigate the capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE analysis. The development and performance of the Amsterdam proton microbeam setup are described. The capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE are shown with an investigation into the presence of trace elements in human hair. (Auth.)

  2. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  3. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  4. Hydraulic characterization of the middle reach of the Congo River

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, F.; Trigg, M. A.; Schumann, G. J.-P.; Bates, P. D.

    2013-08-01

    The middle reach of the Congo remains one of the most difficult places to access, with ongoing conflicts and a lack of infrastructure. This has resulted in the Congo being perhaps the least understood large river hydraulically, particularly compared to the Amazon, Nile, or Mississippi. Globally the Congo River is important; it is the largest river in Africa and the basin contains some of the largest areas of tropical forests and wetlands in the world, which are important to both the global carbon and methane cycles. This study produced the first detailed hydraulic characterization of the middle reach, utilizing mostly remotely sensed data sets. Using Landsat imagery, a 30 m resolution water-mask was created for the middle reach, from which effective river widths and the number of channels and islands were determined. Water surface slopes were determined using ICESat observations for three different periods during the annual flood pulse, and while the overall slope calculated was similar to previous estimates, greater spatial variability was identified. We find that the water surface slope varies markedly in space but relatively little in time and that this appears to contrast with the Amazon where previous studies indicate that time and spatial variations are of equal magnitude. Five key hydraulic constraints were also identified, which play an important role in the overall dynamics of the Congo. Finally, backwater lengths were approximated for four of these constraints, with the results showing that at high water, over a third of the middle reach is affected by backwater effects.

  5. Does workplace health promotion reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: One reason for health disparities between shift and day workers may be that workplace health promotion does not reach shift workers to the same extent as it reaches day workers. This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and the availability of and participatio...... could not confirm that shift workers in general report a lower availability of and participation in workplace health promotion.......OBJECTIVES: One reason for health disparities between shift and day workers may be that workplace health promotion does not reach shift workers to the same extent as it reaches day workers. This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and the availability of and participation...... in workplace health promotion. METHODS: We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from a large representative sample of all employed people in Denmark. We obtained information on the availability of and participation in six types of workplace health promotion. We also obtained information on working hours, ie...

  6. Proton radioactivity studies at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Seweryniak, D; Davinson, T; Heinz, A; Mahmud, H; Mukherjee, G; Munro, P; Ressler, J J; Robinson, A; Shergur, J; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A; Woods, P J

    2003-01-01

    Several searches for new proton emitters were performed recently at ATLAS using the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer equipped with a Double-Sided Si Strip Detector. Proton emitting states were observed in odd-odd spherical nuclei /sup 164/Ir and /sup 170/Au. /sup 164/Ir is the fourth Ir proton emitter. A proton line was associated with the highly deformed odd-odd nucleus /sup 130/Eu. The proton emitter /sup 135/Tb was also observed. It is the first proton emitting Tb isotope. The estimated cross section for producing /sup 135/Tb is about 2 nb. The properties of the proton emitters deduced from this work helped to understand the role of core vibrations and neutrons in proton decay. In view of the present results the full delineation of the proton drip-line between Z=50 and Z=83 is feasible. In order to cope with small cross sections and short half lives expected for even more exotic proton emitters several modifications of the FMA implantation station were implemented. Measurements were also performed at the tar...

  7. Increase of stratospheric aerosols after a solar proton event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Oleg I.; Vashenyuk, Eduard V.; Kasatkina, Elena E. E.; Baidalov, S.; Henriksen, Kjell

    1993-11-01

    The lidar measurements at Verhnetulomski Observatory ((phi) equals 68.6 degree(s)N, (lambda) equals 31.8 degree(s)E) in the Murmansk region detected the considerable increase of stratospheric aerosol concentration after a solar proton event of GLE (ground level event) type at 16.02.1984. This increase at 17 km altitude reached 40% at 20.02.1984. Some details of trigger influence of high energetic incident solar protons on stratospheric ozone layer, including aerosol formations, are discussed.

  8. Payair – Reaching for critical mass

    OpenAIRE

    Kock, Gustav; Rådelius, Max

    2014-01-01

    The mobile payments industry has in recent years experienced large growth and rapid changes. Several different actors are trying to capture the market, to get enough users of their system to reach critical mass. This study investigates how a small Swedish mobile payments company have utilized its business network in their strive to reach critical mass, both in their domestic market and internationally.  The study intends to describe how the company has developed its network and which stages o...

  9. Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Drewes, Line

    The conference report Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace constitutes the primary outcome of the conference It is based on excerpts from the conference presenters and workshop discussions. Furthermore, the report contains policy recommendations and key findings, with the ambition of develo......The conference report Guiding Warfare to Reach Sustainable Peace constitutes the primary outcome of the conference It is based on excerpts from the conference presenters and workshop discussions. Furthermore, the report contains policy recommendations and key findings, with the ambition...

  10. Proton Radiography Imager:Generates Synthetic Proton Radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-12

    ProRad is a computer program that is used to generate synthetic images of proton (or other charged particles) radiographs. The proton radiographs arc images that arc obtained by sending energetic protons (or electrons or positrons, for example) through 11 plasma where electric and/or magnetic fields alter the particles trajectory, Dnd the variations me imaged on RC film, image plate, or equivalent

  11. Proton elastic scattering from stable and unstable nuclei - Extraction of nuclear densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.

    2017-11-01

    Progress in proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies to determine nuclear density distributions is reviewed. After challenges of about 15 years to explain proton elastic scattering and associated polarization phenomena at intermediate energies, we have reached to some conclusions regarding proton elastic scattering as a means of obtaining nuclear densities. During this same period, physics of unstable nuclei has become of interest, and the density distributions of protons and neutrons play more important roles in unstable nuclei, since the differences in proton and neutron numbers and densities are expected to be significant. As such, proton elastic scattering experiments at intermediate energies using the inverse kinematic method have started to determine density distributions of unstable nuclei. In the region of unstable nuclei, we are confronted with a new problem when attempting to find proton and neutron densities separately from elastic proton scattering data, since electron scattering data for unstable nuclei are not presently available. We introduce a new means of determining proton and neutron densities separately by double-energy proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies.

  12. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  13. Influence of micromachined targets on laser accelerated proton beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Malay; Permogorov, Alexander; Pahl, Hannes; Persson, Anders; Wahlström, Claes-Göran

    2018-03-01

    High intensity laser-driven proton acceleration from micromachined targets is studied experimentally in the target-normal-sheath-acceleration regime. Conical pits are created on the front surface of flat aluminium foils of initial thickness 12.5 and 3 μm using series of low energy pulses (0.5–2.5 μJ). Proton acceleration from such micromachined targets is compared with flat foils of equivalent thickness at a laser intensity of 7 × 1019 W cm‑2. The maximum proton energy obtained from targets machined from 12.5 μm thick foils is found to be slightly lower than that of flat foils of equivalent remaining thickness, and the angular divergence of the proton beam is observed to increase as the depth of the pit approaches the foil thickness. Targets machined from 3 μm thick foils, on the other hand, show evidence of increasing the maximum proton energy when the depths of the structures are small. Furthermore, shallow pits on 3 μm thick foils are found to be efficient in reducing the proton beam divergence by a factor of up to three compared to that obtained from flat foils, while maintaining the maximum proton energy.

  14. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  15. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  16. Physics controversies in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Schwarz, Marco; Dong, Lei

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of proton beams are appealing for cancer therapy. The rapid increase in operational and planned proton therapy facilities may suggest that this technology is a "plug-and-play" valuable addition to the arsenal of the radiation oncologist and medical physicist. In reality, the technology is still evolving, so planning and delivery of proton therapy in patients face many practical challenges. This review article discusses the current status of proton therapy treatment planning and delivery techniques, indicates current limitations in dealing with range uncertainties, and proposes possible developments for proton therapy and supplementary technology to try to realize the actual potential of proton therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F S{sub N}2 and proton-abstraction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabó, István; Telekes, Hajnalka; Czakó, Gábor, E-mail: czako@chem.elte.hu [Laboratory of Molecular Structure and Dynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös University, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary)

    2015-06-28

    We develop a full-dimensional global analytical potential energy surface (PES) for the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F reaction by fitting about 50 000 energy points obtained by an explicitly correlated composite method based on the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation-F12 and coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples-F12a methods and the cc-pVnZ-F12 [n = D, T] basis sets. The PES accurately describes the (a) back-side attack Walden inversion mechanism involving the pre- and post-reaction (b) ion-dipole and (c) hydrogen-bonded complexes, the configuration-retaining (d) front-side attack and (e) double-inversion substitution pathways, as well as (f) the proton-abstraction channel. The benchmark quality relative energies of all the important stationary points are computed using the focal-point analysis (FPA) approach considering electron correlation up to coupled-cluster singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples method, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, core-valence correlation, and scalar relativistic effects. The FPA classical(adiabatic) barrier heights of (a), (d), and (e) are −0.45(−0.61), 46.07(45.16), and 29.18(26.07) kcal mol{sup −1}, respectively, the dissociation energies of (b) and (c) are 13.81(13.56) and 13.73(13.52) kcal mol{sup −1}, respectively, and the endothermicity of (f) is 42.54(38.11) kcal mol{sup −1}. Quasiclassical trajectory computations of cross sections, scattering (θ) and initial attack (α) angle distributions, as well as translational and internal energy distributions are performed for the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F(v = 0) reaction using the new PES. Apart from low collision energies (E{sub coll}), the S{sub N}2 excitation function is nearly constant, the abstraction cross sections rapidly increase with E{sub coll} from a threshold of ∼40 kcal mol{sup −1}, and retention trajectories via double inversion are found above E{sub coll} = ∼ 30 kcal mol{sup −1}, and at E{sub coll} =

  18. Energy distribution of proton microbeam transmitted through two flat plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.U.L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R.J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam passing between two parallel flat plates was investigated. Three different materials were used in our experiments. As insulators we used Polytetrafluoroethylene and borosilicate glass plates and glass with gold layer on the surface as conductor. The surface of the plates was parallel to the beam axis and one of the plates was moved towards the beam. The energy distribution and the deflection of the transmitted beam were measured as the function of the sample distance relative to the beam. We found systematic differences between the behaviour of the metallic and insulator samples. The proton microbeam suffered significant deflection towards the sample surface due to the image acceleration when using conductor material. In case of the glass and Polytetrafluoroethylene plates the beam was deflected into the opposite direction, and the incident protons did not suffer significant energy loss, which is the consequence of the guiding effect.

  19. Importance of hydrophobic traps for proton diffusion in lyotropic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of protons in self-assembled systems is potentially important for the design of efficient proton exchange membranes. In this work, we study proton dynamics in a low-water content, lamellar phase of a sodium-carboxylate gemini surfactant/water system using computer simulations. The hopping of protons via the Grotthuss mechanism is explicitly allowed through the multi-state empirical valence bond method. We find that the hydronium ion is trapped on the hydrophobic side of the surfactant-water interface, and proton diffusion then proceeds by hopping between surface sites. The importance of hydrophobic traps is surprising because one would expect the hydronium ions to be trapped at the charged headgroups. The physics illustrated in this system should be relevant to the proton dynamics in other amphiphilic membrane systems, whenever there exist exposed hydrophobic surface regions.

  20. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  1. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Proton conductors; proton transport properties; solid electrolytes; ionic conductors; proton conduction in zirconium (IV) phosphonates; proton transport properties in Zr(IV) amino phosphonates.

  2. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector. The questions concerned usual working hours, quality of leadership, and self-reported implementation of workplace activities aimed at stress reduction, reorganization of the working hours, and participation in improvements of working procedures or qualifications. Compared with day workers, shift workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership to some extent explained the lack of reach of interventions especially among fixed evening workers. In the light of the evidence of shift workers' stressful working conditions, we suggest that future studies focus on the generalizability of results of the present study and on how to reach this group and meet their needs when designing and implementing workplace interventions.

  3. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers

  4. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  5. REACH. Analytical characterisation of petroleum UVCB substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graaff, R.; Forbes, S.; Gennart, J.P.; Gimeno Cortes, M.J.; Hovius, H.; King, D.; Kleise, H.; Martinez Martin, C.; Montanari, L.; Pinzuti, M.; Pollack, H.; Ruggieri, P.; Thomas, M.; Walton, A.; Dmytrasz, B.

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of this report is to summarise the findings of the scientific and technical work undertaken by CONCAWE to assess the feasibility and potential benefit of characterising petroleum UVCB substances (Substances of Unknown or Variable Composition, Complex reaction products or Biological Materials) beyond the recommendations issued by CONCAWE for the substance identification of petroleum substances under REACH. REACH is the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use (EC 1907/2006). It deals with the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical substances. The report is based on Member Company experience of the chemical analysis of petroleum UVCB substances, including analysis in support of REACH registrations undertaken in 2010. This report is structured into four main sections, namely: Section 1 which provides an introduction to the subject of petroleum UVCB substance identification including the purpose of the report, regulatory requirements, the nature of petroleum UVCB substances, and CONCAWE's guidance to Member Companies and other potential registrants. Section 2 provides a description of the capabilities of each of the analytical techniques described in the REACH Regulation. This section also includes details on the type of analytical information obtained by each technique and an evaluation of what each technique can provide for the characterisation of petroleum UVCB substances. Section 3 provides a series of case studies for six petroleum substance categories (low boiling point naphthas, kerosene, heavy fuel oils, other lubricant base oils, residual aromatic extracts and bitumens) to illustrate the value of the information derived from each analytical procedure, and provide an explanation for why some techniques are not scientifically necessary. Section 4 provides a summary of the conclusions reached from the technical investigations undertaken by CONCAWE Member Companies, and summarising the

  6. Effects of relativity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of negative-energy states in proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a fully relativistic framework using the T matrix of Fleischer and Tjon. The contribution from negative-energy states in the single-scattering diagrams is shown to be large, indicating that relativistic effects

  7. Proton-proton virtual bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, GH; Scholten, O; Tjon, J

    1999-01-01

    Lepton-pair production (virtual bremsstrahlung) in proton-proton scattering is investigated using a relativistic covariant model. The effects of negative-energy slates and two-body currents are studied. These are shown to have large effects in some particular structure functions, even at the

  8. Electromagnetic off-shell effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, S.A.; Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.

    1998-01-01

    We study the influence of the off-shell structure of the nucleon electromagnetic vertex on proton-proton bermsstrahlung observables. Realistic choices for the off-shell behavior are found to have considerable influences on observables such as cross sections and analyzing powers. The rescattering

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper...

  10. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Have We Reached the End of History?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    restaurants and clothing stores opened in the past year in Moscow, the Beethoven piped into Japanese department stores and the rock music enjoyed alike in...cv) N 00 N N I HAVE WvE REACHED THE END OF HISTORY ? Francis Fukuyama February 1989 P-7 532 -AtIlo I’ VI~ I HAVE WE REACHED THE END OF HISTORY ...fundamental has happened in world history . The past year has seen a flood of articles commemorating the end of the Cold War, and the fact that ’peace

  12. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    which arises from the determination of the relative luminosity. A precision ALLL measurement requires measuring the final state yield from the portions of the proton beams that collide like and unlike sign helicity protons separately. It also requires understanding the ratio of the collision rates of these two portions of the beam exquisitely well. This is a long standing problem and, until recently, had threatened to severely restrict the ability of PHENIX to utilize the large data sets that have been acquired in the last two years to improve the constraints on DeltaG. We will conclude this thesis with a comprehensive overview of the relative luminosity systematic uncertainty and present a new framework within which this uncertainty can be determined. The measurement of the gluon contribution to the proton spin at the PHENIX experiment is a multi- faceted problem which requires a multi-faceted solution. This thesis describes several aspects of the solution as the single- and di-hadron measurements from MPC data are likely to provide the best constraints to Delta G at low-x for the next decade. Eventually, an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be designed and commissioned that will further extend the kinematic reach of the polarized DIS experiments that motivated the spin program at RHIC. In the meantime, the goal of PHENIX in general, and the MPC in particular, is to glean as much information about the gluon polarization as possible before the EIC era arrives. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation; Modificacion de cobre policristalino por irradiacion con protones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Hipodromo Condesa, 06100 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G. [UNAM Centro de Instrumentos, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Barragan V, A. [UNAM Instituto de Fisica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  14. Transverse spin effects in proton-proton scattering and $Q \\bar Q$ production

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss transverse spin effects caused by the spin-flip part of the Pomeron coupling with the proton. The predicted spin asymmetries in proton-proton scattering and QQ production in proton-proton and lepton-proton reactions are not small and can be studied in future polarized experiments.

  15. Proton beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auslender, V.L.; Lazarev, V.N.; Panfilov, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    A proton pulse source with penning discharge and a cathode needle in the discharge chamber is described. The source is simple in design and has a great service life. An electromagnet induces a magnetic field of the order of 700 Oe along the axis of the discharge chamber. In this field the discharge is ignited between the left and right cathodes when a positive voltage is applied to the anode. A hole in the recess of the right cathode serves to provide the injection of plasma into the accelerating gap. The cathodes and the anode unit are set into a sleeve welded to magnet poles. Through a magnetic circuit this unit is placed on a high-voltage ceramic insulator. For extraction and initial shaping of an ion beam with a divergence angle of 3 0 use is made of extraction electrodes which form the Pierce optics. Further shaping of the ion beam is realized by an electrostatic lens. Tungsten grids in the holes of grounded electrodes increase the focusing effect of the lens. At the input of the first accelerating gap of an accelerator the described source provides an ion peak current of 140 mA at 65% content of protons and a normalized emittance of no more than 4x10 -5 cmxrad

  16. The FAIR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe - constructed at GSI in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research. FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated accelerator system, which delivers beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations - APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA - in parallel. Modern H-type cavities offer highest shunt impedances of resonant structures of heavy ion linacs at low beam energies < 20 MeV/u and enable the acceleration of intense proton and ion beams. One example is the interdigital H-type structure. The crossed-bar H-cavities extend these properties to high energies even beyond 100 MeV/u. Compared to conventional Alvarez cavities, these crossed-bar (CH) cavities feature much higher shunt impedance at low energies. The design of the proton linac is based on those cavities

  17. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  18. Enforcing order : Territorial reach and maritime piracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daxecker, U.; Prins, B.C.

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies of piracy focus attention on the institutional determinants of maritime piracy, but neglect variation in governments’ reach over territory. We argue that the effect of state capacity on piracy is a function of states’ ability to extend authority over the country’s entire territory.

  19. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  20. REACH. Electricity Units, Post-Secondary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gene; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this postsecondary student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals, electric motors, electrical components, and controls and installation.…

  1. Reliability of the Advanced REACH Tool (ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, J.; Fransman, W.; McDonnell, P.E.; Entink, R.K.; Tielemans, E.; Kromhout, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) by (i) studying interassessor agreement of the resulting exposure estimates generated by the ART mechanistic model, (ii) studying interassessor agreement per model parameters of the ART mechanistic

  2. Reactive transport of aqueous protons in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    McNeece, Colin J.

    2016-10-09

    The sorption of protons determines the surface charge of natural media and is therefore a first-order control on contaminant transport. Significant effort has been extended to develop chemical models that quantify the sorption of protons at the mineral surface. To compare these models’ effect on predicted proton transport, we present analytic solutions for column experiments through silica sand. Reaction front morphology is controlled by the functional relationship between the total sorbed and total aqueous proton concentrations. An inflection point in this function near neutral pH leads to a reversal in the classic front formation mechanism under basic conditions, such that proton desorption leads to a self-sharpening front, while adsorption leads to a spreading front. A composite reaction front comprising both a spreading and self-sharpening segment can occur when the injected and initial concentrations straddle the inflection point. This behavior is unique in single component reactive transport and arises due to the auto-ionization of water rather than electrostatic interactions at the mineral surface. We derive a regime diagram illustrating conditions under which different fronts occur, highlighting areas where model predictions diverge. Chemical models are then compared and validated against a systematic set of column experiments.

  3. Modeling study of seated reach envelopes based on spherical harmonics with consideration of the difficulty ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaozhi; Ren, Jindong; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Qun; Liu, Honghao

    2017-04-01

    Reach envelopes are very useful for the design and layout of controls. In building reach envelopes, one of the key problems is to represent the reach limits accurately and conveniently. Spherical harmonics are proved to be accurate and convenient method for fitting of the reach capability envelopes. However, extensive study are required on what components of spherical harmonics are needed in fitting the envelope surfaces. For applications in the vehicle industry, an inevitable issue is to construct reach limit surfaces with consideration of the seating positions of the drivers, and it is desirable to use population envelopes rather than individual envelopes. However, it is relatively inconvenient to acquire reach envelopes via a test considering the seating positions of the drivers. In addition, the acquired envelopes are usually unsuitable for use with other vehicle models because they are dependent on the current cab packaging parameters. Therefore, it is of great significance to construct reach envelopes for real vehicle conditions based on individual capability data considering seating positions. Moreover, traditional reach envelopes provide little information regarding the assessment of reach difficulty. The application of reach envelopes will improve design quality by providing difficulty-rating information about reach operations. In this paper, using the laboratory data of seated reach with consideration of the subjective difficulty ratings, the method of modeling reach envelopes is studied based on spherical harmonics. The surface fitting using spherical harmonics is conducted for circumstances both with and without seat adjustments. For use with adjustable seat, the seating position model is introduced to re-locate the test data. The surface fitting is conducted for both population and individual reach envelopes, as well as for boundary envelopes. Comparison of the envelopes of adjustable seat and the SAE J287 control reach envelope shows that the latter

  4. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  5. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  6. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Proton-antiproton workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Coming just two months after Fermilab announced definitive discovery of the sixth ('top') quark, the 10th proton-antiproton workshop, held at Fermilab from 9-13 May, provided a useful overview of this important physics sector. With the sixth quark in place, the conference opened with an eye to the exotic, beginning with searches at the Tevatron for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Experimenters from CDF and DO showed the latest lower bounds on masses for leptoquarks, new heavy gauge bosons, gluinos, squarks and other aspiring particles. Limits were raised, and new areas explored, but nothing new seemed to be stirring. Theorists, like expectant parents, showed their latest predictions for where particles would appear and how they would behave, but at the end, the Standard Model was still standing defiantly on its own two feet. The focus then turned to fifth ('bottom', b) and fourth ('charm') quark production, where, ironically, theory and experiment showed some disagreement. Both CDF and DO presented results for b quark production which agreed with each other but remained higher than theoretical predictions (perturbative quantum chromodynamics, QCD, using nextto- leading-order). On the charm front, the prompt production of psi-prime particles was shown to be anomalously high, many times higher than theoretical predictions. Latest results for the lifetimes of B particles (containing the bquark), quarkonia production and neutral B mixing were also presented. Closing the session, Jonathan Rosner of Chicago gave a theoretical overview of B physics at the Tevatron, and presented prospects for measuring the violation of CP (matter-antimatter) symmetry in the b sector. For the top quark, neither CDF's nor DO's results had much changed since their 2 March discovery announcement (April, page 1). Interesting discussions centred on the differences between the two experiments' methods of measuring the top mass. Clearly the

  8. Proton femtoscopy at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbroszczyk, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle femtoscopy provides a powerful tool to study the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. Applied to identical and nonidentical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and antiprotons for Au + Au collisions at √ s NN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. On the other hand, as STAR experiment participates in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program, we present theoretical predictions of p - p , p-bar - p-bar and p - p-bar femtoscopic measurements, based on UrQMD simulation for √ s NN = 5-39 GeV

  9. Proton synchrotron accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1977-01-01

    This is the text of a series of lectures given as part of the CERN Academic Training Programme and primarily intended for young engineers and technicians in preparation for the running-in of the 400 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Following the definition of basic quantities, the problems of betatron motion and the effect of momentum spread and orbital errors on the transverse motion of the beam are reviewed. Consideration is then given to multipole fields, chromaticity and non-linear resonances. After dealing with basic relations governing longitudinal beam dynamics, the space-charge, resistive-wall and other collective effects are treated, with reference to precautions in the SPS to prevent their occurrence. (Auth.)

  10. SNS proton power upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M.; DeGraff, B.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S.-H.

    2017-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is preparing for the Proton Power Upgrade (PPU) project to increase the output energy of the accelerator from 1.0 GeV to 1.3 GeV. As part of this project with the combination of increasing the output energy and beam current, the beam power capability will be doubled from 1.4MW to 2.8MW. In this project, seven new high beta cryomodules housing 28 superconducting niobium cavities will be added to the LINAC tunnel. Lessons learned from over ten years of operation will be incorporated into the new cryomodule and cavity design. The design and the fabrication of these cryomodules and how these will be integrated into the existing accelerator will be detailed in this paper.

  11. Superpower proton linear accelerators for neutron generators and electronuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, N.V.; Kozodaev, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The report is a review of projects on the superpower proton linear accelerators (SPLA) for neutron generators (NG) and electronuclear facilities, proposed in the recent years. The beam average output capacity in these projects reaches 100 MW. The basic parameters of certain operating NGs, as well as some projected NGs will the SPLA drivers are presented. The problems on application of superconducting resonators in the SPLA as well as the issues of the SPLA reliability and costs are discussed [ru

  12. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene

    2016-01-01

    . The questions concerned usual working hours, quality of leadership, and self-reported implementation of workplace activities aimed at stress reduction, reorganization of the working hours, and participation in improvements of working procedures or qualifications. RESULTS: Compared with day workers, shift...... the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. METHODS: We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector...... workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership...

  13. Improving exposure scenario definitions within REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jihyun; Pizzol, Massimo; Thomsen, Marianne

    In recent years, the paradigm of chemical management system has changed from being toxicity oriented and media based to being risk oriented and receptor based. This trend is evident not only regarding environmental quality standards, but also for industrial chemical regulations. Political...... instruments to support a precautionary chemicals management system and to protect receptor’s health have also been increasing. Since 2007, the European Union adopted REACH (the Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals): REACH makes industry responsible for assessing...... and managing the risks posed by industrial chemicals and providing appropriate safety information to their users (EC, 2007). However, to ensure a high level of protection of human health and the environment, there is a need to consider ‘aggregate exposure’ including background exposures from environment which...

  14. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons

  15. Performance reach in the LHC for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the 2011 experience and Machine Development study results, the performance reach of the LHC with 25 and 50 ns beams will be addressed for operation at 3.5 and 4 TeV. The possible scrubbing scenarios and potential intensity limitations resulting from vacuum, heating will be taken into account wherever possible. The paper mainly covers the performance of the two high luminosity regions in IR1 and IR5. (author)

  16. Olefins and chemical regulation in Europe: REACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penman, Mike; Banton, Marcy; Erler, Steffen; Moore, Nigel; Semmler, Klaus

    2015-11-05

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) is the European Union's chemical regulation for the management of risk to human health and the environment (European Chemicals Agency, 2006). This regulation entered into force in June 2007 and required manufacturers and importers to register substances produced in annual quantities of 1000 tonnes or more by December 2010, with further deadlines for lower tonnages in 2013 and 2018. Depending on the type of registration, required information included the substance's identification, the hazards of the substance, the potential exposure arising from the manufacture or import, the identified uses of the substance, and the operational conditions and risk management measures applied or recommended to downstream users. Among the content developed to support this information were Derived No-Effect Levels or Derived Minimal Effect Levels (DNELs/DMELs) for human health hazard assessment, Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for environmental hazard assessment, and exposure scenarios for exposure and risk assessment. Once registered, substances may undergo evaluation by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) or Member State authorities and be subject to requests for additional information or testing as well as additional risk reduction measures. To manage the REACH registration and related activities for the European olefins and aromatics industry, the Lower Olefins and Aromatics REACH Consortium was formed in 2008 with administrative and technical support provided by Penman Consulting. A total of 135 substances are managed by this group including 26 individual chemical registrations (e.g. benzene, 1,3-butadiene) and 13 categories consisting of 5-26 substances. This presentation will describe the content of selected registrations prepared for 2010 in addition to the significant post-2010 activities. Beyond REACH, content of the registrations may also be relevant to other European activities, for

  17. K-shell ionisation cross sections for W, Au and U by low velocity protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Faria, N.V. de; Freire Junior, F.L.; Montenegro, E.C.; Pinho, A.G. de; Silveira, E.F. da.

    1984-01-01

    Proton-induced K-shell ionisation cross section for W, Au and U by low velocity protons were obtained from thick target measurements. For the first time the lowest incident energy reached a value less than 10 times the binding energy of the K-shell electron (less than 9 times in the case of Au). Possible errors are thoroughly examined and a comparison with other available experimental results and theoretical values is presented and discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Distance Reached in the Anteromedial Reach Test as a Function of Learning and Leg Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Nicholas P.; Rushton, Alison B.; Wright, Chris C.; Batt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The Anteromedial Reach Test (ART) is a new outcome measure for assessing dynamic knee stability in anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients. The effect of learning and leg length on distance reached in the ART was examined. Thirty-two healthy volunteers performed 15 trials of the ART on each leg. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.44-0.50)…

  19. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  20. Biological and dosimetric characterisation of spatially fractionated proton minibeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Juergen; Stewart, Robert D.; Smith, Daniel; Eagle, James; Lee, Eunsin; Cao, Ning; Ford, Eric; Hashemian, Reza; Schuemann, Jan; Saini, Jatinder; Marsh, Steve; Emery, Robert; Dorman, Eric; Schwartz, Jeff; Sandison, George

    2017-12-01

    The biological effectiveness of proton beams varies with depth, spot size and lateral distance from the beam central axis. The aim of this work is to incorporate proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) considerations into comparisons of broad beam and highly modulated proton minibeams. A Monte Carlo model of a small animal proton beamline is presented. Dose and variable RBE is calculated on a per-voxel basis for a range of energies (30–109 MeV). For an open beam, the RBE values at the beam entrance ranged from 1.02–1.04, at the Bragg peak (BP) from 1.3 to 1.6, and at the distal end of the BP from 1.4 to 2.0. For a 50 MeV proton beam, a minibeam collimator designed to produce uniform dose at the depth of the BP peak, had minimal impact on the open beam RBE values at depth. RBE changes were observed near the surface when the collimator was placed flush with the irradiated object, due to a higher neutron contribution derived from proton interactions with the collimator. For proton minibeams, the relative mean RBE weighted entrance dose (RWD) was ~25% lower than the physical mean dose. A strong dependency of the EUD with fraction size was observed. For 20 Gy fractions, the EUD varied widely depending on the radiosensitivity of the cells. For radiosensitive cells, the difference was up to ~50% in mean dose and ~40% in mean RWD and the EUD trended towards the valley dose rather than the mean dose. For comparative studies of uniform dose with spatially fractionated proton minibeams, EUD derived from a per-voxel RWD distribution is recommended for biological assessments of reproductive cell survival and related endpoints.

  1. Proton transfer and water exchange in the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam

    2014-03-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is the only naturally occurring protein in which excited-state proton-transfer has been identified. Upon excitation, a proton is ejected from its chromophore, travelling through the ``privileged water molecule'' (PWM) and Ser205 to Glu222, on a 10 ps timescale or faster. However, time-resolved fluorescence from the chromophore exhibits a t-α power-law decay extending into the ns regime. With increasing temperature, α switches from 1/2 (below 230 K) to 3/2 (above it). This has been interpreted as pseudo one-dimensional proton hopping along an internal ``proton wire,'' with an activated process that opens a ``doorway'' for proton escape to solution at the higher temperatures. To identify such putative pathways, we have developed a computer code mapping all ``proton wires'' within a protein structure. Applying it to a X-ray GFP structure of 0.9 Angstrom resolution, a proton wire indeed continues from Glu222 along the axis of the GFP ``barrel,'' connecting to a negatively charged surface patch (a ``proton collecting antenna''?). This might explain the t- 1 / 2 behavior. However, a direct escape pathway opening from the chromophore to solution is not readily identified in the X-ray structure. Here we report molecular dynamics results showing that the PWM escapes to solution on the 100 ps timescale. This occurs by fluctuations of the beta-sheet, creating an opening through which water molecules can leave and enter the protein. The exact pathway of the PWM on its way in and out has been identified, as well as the water-exchange kinetics that follows a stretched-exponential time behavior. This research was supported by the ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION grant No. 766/12.

  2. Reaching Constructive Compromise: Steps, Tactics, and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Arben Salihu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The history of war and conflicts is as old as human history itself. Along with it always existed attempts to find ways and means to reconcile conflicting parties and reach peace. In today’s world, more than ever, where war and conflicts are everyday occurrence is imperative to find faster and reliable ways how to resolve conflicts. Reaching a constructive compromise is extremely difficult (very often even the implementation phase creates additional hitches as the parties involved pretend or believe that all of their demands for peace deal are rational and thus should be fulfilled. While one party may have expertise in negotiation process itself, the other may be unwittingly unprepared, and believing that honesty and fairness will result in impartial peace deal. This is, unfortunately, not always so. The aim of this paper, besides targeting these types of naïve perceptions, is to inspire others to be fully prepared prior entering negotiation process. The negotiation strategy, along with steps and tactics is the fundament of this research. History of negotiations teaches us that often the strong and more prepared side tends to win more than the weak and unprepared one in a negotiation process. Yet studying and exploring the approach to reach a constructive compromise is essential and conducive even if you happen to find yourself as the weaker party vis-à-vis a stronger opposing rival. The purpose of this study is to analyse the implications of negotiating strategies in the course of reaching the eventual constructive compromise. Throughout, this paper has endeavoured to answer numerous but distinct issues related to the topic and offer a balanced analysis on the arguments explored. The study also delves into some international conflicts (resolved and unresolved examining them in light of potential constructive compromise. Finally the study ends up by concluding that constructive compromise strategy that focuses, above all, on creativity

  3. Track etch parameters and annealing kinetics assessment of protons of low energy in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.K.; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We calibrate CR-39 detector with very low energy protons. ► We establish linear relationship between track diameter and time/energy up to 200 keV. ► We determine activation energy of annealing using different models. ► We justify concept of single annealing activation energy in CR-39. - Abstract: In this paper threshold of the registration sensitivity of very low energy proton in CR-39 is investigated. Irradiation of CR-39 (poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate) was carried out with very low energy mono energetic protons of 20–60 keV from a mini proton accelerator. Nearly 10 4 /cm 2 fluence of protons was used. The variation of track diameter with etching time as well as proton energy response curve was carefully calibrated. The bulk and track etch rates were measured by using proton track diameters. Bulk etch rate was also measured by the thickness of removed surface layer. The thermal annealing of proton track at temperatures ranging from 100 to 200 °C in CR-39 was studied by several models. Activation energy of annealed CR-39 detectors was calculated by slope of track etch rate and temperature plot. The data of proton tracks of 200, 250 and 300 keV from 400 kV Van-de-Graaff accelerator was also used and compared with the track diameters of different energies of proton.

  4. Coal Oxide as a Thermally Robust Carbon-Based Proton Conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Kazuto; Ogata, Chikako; Koinuma, Michio; Taniguchi, Takaaki; Hayami, Shinya; Kuroiwa, Keita; Matsumoto, Yasumichi

    2015-10-21

    Inexpensive solid proton conducting materials with high proton conductivity and thermal stability are necessary for practical solid state electrochemical devices. Here we report that coal oxide (CO) is a promising carbon-based proton conductor with remarkable thermal robustness. The CO produced by simple liquid-phase oxidation of coal demonstrates excellent dispersibility in water owing to the surface carboxyl groups. The proton conductivity of CO, 3.9 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 90% relative humidity, is as high as that of graphene oxide (GO). Remarkably, CO exhibits much higher thermal stability than GO, with CO retaining the excellent proton conductivity as well as the capacitance performance even after thermal annealing at 200 °C. Our study demonstrates that the chemical modification of the abundant coal provides proton conductors that can be used in practical applications for a wide range of energy devices.

  5. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  6. Proton-proton elastic scattering measurements at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    To construct the reliable phase shift analysis (PSA) that can successfully describe the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction it is necessary to measure variety of experimental observables for both proton-proton (pp) and neutron-proton (np) elastic scattering. The polarized beams and targets at COSY-ANKE facility allow a substantial contribution to the existing database. The experiment was carried out in April 2013 at ANKE using a transversely polarized proton beam incident on an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target. Six beam energies of T{sub p}=0.8,1.6,1.8,2.0,2.2,2.4 GeV were used. The aim of this talk is to present the preliminary results for the analyzing power (A{sub y}) for the pp elastic scattering in the so-far unexplored 5 <θ{sub cm}<30 angular range. Our measurements are also compared to the world data and current partial wave solutions.

  7. Study of the proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies through eikonal models; Estudo do espalhamento elastico proton-proton a altas energias atraves de modelos eiconais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Alvaro Favinha

    1995-12-31

    The proton-proton elastic scattering in the center of mass energy region 23 to 63 GeV is investigated through a multiple diffraction model. As an introduction to the subject, a detailed review of the fundamental basis of the Multiple Diffraction Formalism and a survey of the multiple diffraction models (geometrical) currently used are presented. The goal of this investigation is to reformulate one of these models, which makes use of an elementary (parton-parton) amplitude purely imaginary and is not able to predict the {rho}-parameter (the ratio of the forward real and imaginary parts of the hadronic amplitude). Introducing a real part for the elementary amplitude proportional to the imaginary part, improvements in the formalism are obtained. It is shown that this new approach is able to reproduce all experimental data on differential and integrated cross sections (total, elastic and inelastic), but not the {rho}-parameter as function of the energy. Then, starting from fitting of this parameter an overall reproduction of the physical observables is obtained, with the exception of the dip region (diffractive minimum in the differential cross section) overall description are also not firmly reached in all these models. Finally, alternatives to improve the results in a future research are suggested and discussed. (author) 69 refs., 69 figs., 20 tabs.

  8. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  9. Catalytic surface promotion of highly active La0.85Sr0.15Cr0.8Ni0.2O3-δ anodes for La5.6WO11.4-δ based proton conducting fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solis, C.; Balaguer, M.; Bozza, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    to the widely used NiO. Under typical anode reducing conditions, Ni is segregated from the LSCN lattice on the grain surface as metallic Ni nanoparticles, which are proved to be compatible with LWO in reducing conditions. These Ni nanoparticles become the catalytic active sites for the H-2 oxidation reaction......, the R-p, values achieved for LSCN infiltrated with Ni, e.g. 0.47 Omega cm(2) at 700 degrees C, suggest the practical application of this kind of anodes in proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (PC-SOFC). (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......La0.85Sr0.15CrO3-delta (LSC), La0.85Sr0.15Cr0.8Ni0.2O3-delta (LSCN) and LSCN infiltrated with Ni nanoparticles were tested as anodes for symmetrical cells based on La5.6WO11.4-delta (LWO) protonic electrolyte. These chromite-based electrode materials are compatible with LWO material, in contrast...

  10. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microbeam irradiation effects on poly-tert-butyl-acrylate (PtBA) polymer using 2.0 MeV proton microbeam are reported. Preliminary results on pattern formation on PtBA are carried out as a function of fluence. After writing the pattern, a thin layer of Ge is deposited. Distribution of Ge in pristine and ion beam patterned surface ...

  11. Proton-neutron modes in non-axial nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA) Theoretical Div., Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ginocchio, J.N. (Theoretical Div., Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1991-09-05

    A normal-mode analysis is carried out for aligned rigid-triaxial, gamma-unstable and oblique proton-neutron shapes. Intrinsic hamiltonians, energy surfaces and estimates for bandhead energies and selected transition rates are provided. Possible experimental signatures are briefly discussed. (orig.).

  12. Proton-neutron modes in non-axial nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.; Ginocchio, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    A normal-mode analysis is carried out for aligned rigid-triaxial, gamma-unstable and oblique proton-neutron shapes. Intrinsic hamiltonians, energy surfaces and estimates for bandhead energies and selected transition rates are provided. Possible experimental signatures are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  13. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002

  14. Feldenkrais sensory imagery and forward reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P A; Rogers, D K

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sensory imagery on subsequent movement, a unilateral Fleldenkrais lesson of imaging a soft bristle brush passing over one half of the body and in which no movement occurred, was given to 12 naive subjects. Forward flexion for each side of the body was measured at a sit-and-reach box. For 8 and 10 subjects who reported the perception of a side as being longer and lighter following the sensory imagery, there was also a significant increase in the forward flexion range on that side.

  15. City Reach Code Technical Support Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Yan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Bing [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frankel, Mark [New Buildings Inst., Portland, OR (United States); Lyles, Mark [New Buildings Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-10-31

    This report describes and analyzes a set of energy efficiency measures that will save 20% energy over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013. The measures will be used to formulate a Reach Code for cities aiming to go beyond national model energy codes. A coalition of U.S. cities together with other stakeholders wanted to facilitate the development of voluntary guidelines and standards that can be implemented in stages at the city level to improve building energy efficiency. The coalition's efforts are being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy via Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and in collaboration with the New Buildings Institute.

  16. The development of MEMS device packaging technology using proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyeon, J. W.; Kong, Y. J.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, H. S.; No, S. J.

    2006-05-01

    Wafer-bonding techniques are key issues for the commercialization of MEMS(MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices. The anodic bonding method and the wafer direct-bonding method are well-known major techniques for wafer bonding. Due to the anodic bonding method includes high voltage processes above 1.5 kV, the MEMS devices can be damaged during the bonding process or malfunctioned while long-term operation. On the other hand, since the wafer direct-bonding method includes a high temperature processes above 1000 .deg. C, temperature-sensitive materials and integrated circuits will be damaged or degraded during the bonding processes. Therefore, high-temperature bonding processes are not applicable for fabricating or packaging devices where temperature-sensitive materials exist. During the past few years, much effort has been undertaken to find a reliable bonding process that can be conducted at a low temperature. Unfortunately, these new bonding processes depend highly on the bonding material, surface treatment and surface flatness. In this research, a new packaging method using proton beam irradiation is proposed. While the energy loss caused in an irradiated material by X-rays or electron beams decreases with the surface distance, the energy loss caused by proton beams has a maximum value at the Bragg peak. Thus, the localized energy produced at the Bragg peak of the proton beams can be used to bond pyrex glass on a silicon wafer, so the MEMS damage is expected to be minimized. The localized heating caused by as well as the penetration depth, or the proton beam has been investigated. The energy absorbed in a stack of pyrex glass/silicon wafers due to proton-beam irradiation was numerically calculated for various proton energies by using the SRIM program. The energy loss was shown to be sufficiently localized at the interface between the pyrex glass and the silicon wafer. Proton beam irradiation was performed in the common environment of room temperature and

  17. Determination of the protonation enthalpy of humic acid by calorimetric titration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimuro, Shingo; Kirishima, Akira; Sato, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The thermodynamic quantities of protonation of humic acid were determined by the combination of potentiometric titration and calorimetric titration. It was observed that the protonation enthalpy and Gibbs free energy had been affected by pH of solution. As a result, the thermodynamics of the protonation reaction of humic acid is influenced by the polyelectrolyte effect and the heterogeneity. - Highlights: • We applied calorimetric titration technique to the protonation of humic acid. • The thermodynamic quantities of protonation of humic acid were determined. • The protonation enthalpy of humic acid is affected by the heterogeneity. • Gibbs free energy of the protonation is affected by the polyelectrolyte effect. - Abstract: In this study, the calorimetric titration technique was used to determine the protonation enthalpy of two reference humic acids and polyacrylic acid. First, we obtained the apparent protonation constant of two kinds of humic acid purchased from IHSS (International Humic Substances Society) and polyacrylic acid by potentiometric titration. Second, we obtained the protonation enthalpy of them by calorimetric titration. The protonation enthalpy of humic acid was affected by pH and the ionic strength of bulk solution. From the comparison of ΔH between humic acid and polyacrylic acid, it was concluded that the pH dependence of ΔH is attributed to the heterogeneity of humic acid. And ΔH of phenolic hydroxyl group in humic acid is strongly influenced by the electric double layer of humic acid’s surface. This is considered to be a reason of the ionic strength dependence of ΔH. On the other hand, Gibbs free energy of the protonation of humic acid is affected by the electrostatic attraction with the progress of dissociation of functional groups such as carboxyl group and phenolic hydroxyl group. Consequently, the thermodynamics of the protonation of humic acid is affected by the polyelectrolyte effect and the

  18. Enhancement of proton conductivity of sulfonated polystyrene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    like proton transport, water uptake, sulfonation rate, ion exchange capacity and thermal behaviour. The proton conductivity of the ... Plasma polymerization process; ion exchange capacity; proton conductivity; thermal stability. 1. Introduction ... of low proton conductivity at operating temperature greater than 100. ◦. C due to ...

  19. Self-Consistent Electron-Cloud Simulation for Long Proton Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Danilov, Viatcheslav V; Henderson, Stuart; Holmes, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Macek, Robert J; Sato, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    The results of numerical electron-cloud simulations for long-bunch proton beams in accumulator rings are presented and compared with data from the Proton Storage Ring at LANL. The frequency spectra and growth rate of proton-bunch transverse instabilities are studied as functions of the RF cavity voltage, external magnetic fields, beam pipe surface properties, and other factors. We used the recently developed electron-cloud module in the ORBIT code. The model includes a fully self-consistent coupled treatment of the "proton bunch - electron-cloud" dynamics and the multipacting process with a realistic secondary emission surface model. Realistic lattices and proton bunch distributions are used. The efficiency of electron-cloud instability suppression has also been studied using a new ORBIT model.

  20. Protonation Equilibrium of Linear Homopolyacids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požar J.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short summary of investigations dealing with protonation equilibrium of linear homopolyacids, in particularly those of high charge density. Apart from the review of experimental results which can be found in the literature, a brief description of theoretical models used in processing the dependence of protonation constants on monomer dissociation degree and ionic strength is given (cylindrical model based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, cylindrical Stern model, the models according to Ising, Högfeldt, Mandel and Katchalsky. The applicability of these models regarding the polyion charge density, electrolyte concentration and counterion type is discussed. The results of Monte Carlo simulations of protonation equilibrium are also briefly mentioned. In addition, frequently encountered errors connected with calibration of of glass electrode and the related unreliability of determined protonation constants are pointed out.

  1. Analysis of using protons in secondary beam on BEPC as a particle source in single event effects experiment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chaohui; Li Guozheng; Liu Enke

    1999-01-01

    The energy range and yield of the protons in the secondary beam on BEPC are first analyzed, at the point of using the protons as a particle source in the single event effects (SEE) experiment of semiconductor devices. The energy ranges of the proton produced by high energy electrons bombarding on targets in three methods are calculated and the corresponding cross sections are estimated. The cross section of producing protons can be increased by using heavy nucleus target and the differential yield of protons can reach 1.66 x 10 -3 s -1 ·sr -1 ·eV -1 . The protons can be used in SEE experiment of the semiconductor devices with the high SEE cross sections

  2. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  3. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer.

  4. NASA's Astronomy Education Program: Reaching Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise Anne; Hertz, Paul; Meinke, Bonnie

    2015-08-01

    An overview will be given of the rich programs developed by NASA to inject the science from it's Astrophysics missions into STEM activities targeted to diverse audiences. For example, Astro4Girls was started as a pilot program during IYA2009. This program partners NASA astrophysics education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families, and has been executed across the country. School curricula and NASA websites have been translated in Spanish; Braille books have been developed for the visually impaired; programs have been developed for the hearing impaired. Special effort has been made to reach underrepresented minorities. Audiences include students, teachers, and the general public through formal and informal education settings, social media and other outlets. NASA Astrophysics education providers include teams embedded in its space flight missions; professionals selected though peer reviewed programs; as well as the Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Education forum. Representative examples will be presented to demonstrate the reach of NASA education programs, as well as an evaluation of the effectiveness of these programs.

  5. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  6. Napa River Restoration Project: Rutherford Reach Completion and Oakville to Oak Knoll Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Napa River Restoration Project: Rutherford Reach Completion/Oakville to Oak Knoll, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  7. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  8. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  9. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  10. Temperature distribution on the MEA surface of a PEMFC with serpentine channel flow bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maohai; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chongfang

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution on the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) surface and heat transfer processes inside a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is helpful to improvement of cell reliability, durability and performance. The temperature fields on the surface of MEA fixed inside a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with a serpentine channel flow bed were measured by infrared imaging technology under non-humidification conditions. The temperature distributions over the MEA surface under whole channel region were achieved. The experimental results show that the downstream temperatures are higher than the upstream. The hot region on the MEA surface is easy to locate from the infrared temperature image. The mean temperature on the MEA surface and the cell temperature both increase with the current density. Higher current density makes the non-uniformity of temperature distribution on the MEA surface worse. The loading time significantly affects the temperature distribution. Compared with the electrical performance of the cell, the MEA's temperatures need much more time to reach stable. The results indicate that isothermal assumption is not appropriate for a modeling of PEMFCs, and monitoring the temperature of external surface of the flow field plate or end plate cannot supply accurate reference to control the temperatures on MEA surface.

  11. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-06-05

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2-10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora.

  12. Quantitative proton imaging from multiple physics processes: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, C; Rescigno, R; Rousseau, M; Brasse, D

    2015-07-07

    Proton imaging is developed in order to improve the accuracy of charged particle therapy treatment planning. It makes it possible to directly map the relative stopping powers of the materials using the information on the energy loss of the protons. In order to reach a satisfactory spatial resolution in the reconstructed images, the position and direction of each particle is recorded upstream and downstream from the patient. As a consequence of individual proton detection, information on the transmission rate and scattering of the protons is available. Image reconstruction processes are proposed to make use of this information. A proton tomographic acquisition of an anthropomorphic head phantom was simulated. The transmission rate of the particles was used to reconstruct a map of the macroscopic cross section for nuclear interactions of the materials. A two-step iterative reconstruction process was implemented to reconstruct a map of the inverse scattering length of the materials using the scattering of the protons. Results indicate that, while the reconstruction processes should be optimized, it is possible to extract quantitative information from the transmission rate and scattering of the protons. This suggests that proton imaging could provide additional knowledge on the materials that may be of use to further improve treatment planning.

  13. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  14. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  15. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, S.B.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Shroy, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port has been used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton micorprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Our measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage. (orig.)

  16. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, S.B.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Shroy, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.

    1980-06-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port was used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage

  17. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, S. B.; Jones, K. W.; Kraner, H. W.; Shroy, R. E.; Hanson, A. L.

    1981-03-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port has been used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determination in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Our measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage.

  18. Acoustic mode converters micromachined in silicon by proton beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, U.; Menzel, F.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.; Butz, T.

    2011-01-01

    Proton beam writing is a powerful tool for the production of microstructures for acoustic applications because it allows to create structures inclined to the original sample surface which therefore can act as acoustic mode converters. We report on experiments, finding optimal structure sizes in p-type 12 Ω cm silicon for this purpose. For the creation of the structures the proton beam at the LIPSION laboratory was used. Furthermore, by investigating the micromachined silicon with a phase sensitive acoustic microscope we give evidence that inclined structures such as rods and walls can be used to change the mode of acoustic waves in the crystal.

  19. Secondary-electron-bremsstrahlung imaging for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1 Hirate-cho, Kita-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A feasibility study on an imaging technique of a therapeutic proton-beam trajectory using a gamma camera by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a beam-irradiation experiment. From the simulation and experimental results, it was found that a significant amount of SEB yield exists between the beam-injection surface and the range position along the beam axis and the beam trajectory is clearly imaged by the SEB yield. It is concluded that the SEB imaging is a promising technique for monitoring of therapeutic proton-beam trajectories.

  20. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY

  1. Reach and get capability in a computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Ann M [Albuquerque, NM; Osbourn, Gordon C [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    A reach and get technique includes invoking a reach command from a reach location within a computing environment. A user can then navigate to an object within the computing environment and invoke a get command on the object. In response to invoking the get command, the computing environment is automatically navigated back to the reach location and the object copied into the reach location.

  2. Initiatives. Central African Republic: reaching the youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The population in the Central African Republic is relatively young, with youths accounting for 43% of its total population, many of whom are sexually active. Young people suffer from a variety of problems such as unemployment, juvenile delinquency, as well as early and unwanted pregnancies. To reach out to young people, the ACABEF, in cooperation with the Ministry of Public Health and with financial assistance from the UN Population Fund, launched the ¿Youth Club for Family Planning¿ in December 1994. The major activities in this sensitization campaign for responsible sexuality among the youth included talks and debates, as well as film projections. In addition, condoms are made available through a social marketing program in order to contain the spread of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS.

  3. Which Antidumping Cases Reach the WTO?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari; Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson; Videnord, Josefin

    This article examines the distribution of antidumping (AD) disputes across countries and industries, and examines which AD cases reach the dispute settlement system of the WTO. Our general finding is that neither the country nor the industry distribution of AD cases remains constant across...... the different levels of disputes, as cases proceed from notifications to requests for consultations and third party adjudication at the WTO. The US is the main user of AD measures, as well as the main target for complaints at the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body. However, emerging markets have increasingly started...... an upper middle-income country, challenging a high-income country (most likely the US) that is allegedly giving unfair protection to an industry producing differentiated goods that are not very relationship-specific, using medium-low technologies. The analysis also reveals that when lower middle...

  4. Plasma Deposited Thin Iron Oxide Films as Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz JOZWIAK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using plasma deposited thin films of iron oxides as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC was examined. Results of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis indicated that the plasma deposit consisted mainly of FeOX structures with the X parameter close to 1.5. For as deposited material iron atoms are almost exclusively in the Fe3+ oxidation state without annealing in oxygen containing atmosphere. However, the annealing procedure can be used to remove the remains of carbon deposit from surface. The single cell test (SCT was performed to determine the suitability of the produced material for ORR. Preliminary results showed that power density of 0.23 mW/cm2 could be reached in the tested cell.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14406

  5. Proton transfer reactions and dynamics in protonated water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao-Ngam, Charoensak; Asawakun, Prapasri; Wannarat, Sornthep; Sagarik, Kritsana

    2011-03-14

    Proton transfer reactions and dynamics were theoretically studied using the hydrogen-bond (H-bond) complexes formed from H(3)O(+) and nH(2)O, n = 1-4, as model systems. The investigations began with searching for characteristics of transferring protons in the gas phase and continuum aqueous solution using DFT method at the B3LYP/TZVP level, followed by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations at 350 K. B3LYP/TZVP calculations revealed the threshold asymmetric O-H stretching frequencies (ν(OH)*) for the proton transfers in the Zundel complex (H(5)O) in the gas phase and continuum aqueous solution at 1984 and 1881 cm(-1), respectively. BOMD simulations suggested lower threshold frequencies (ν(OH,MD)* = 1917 and 1736 cm(-1), respectively), with two characteristic ν(OH,MD) being the IR spectral signatures of the transferring protons. The low-frequency band could be associated with the "oscillatory shuttling motion" and the high-frequency band with the "structural diffusion motion". These can be regarded as the spectroscopic evidences of the formations of the shared-proton structure (O···H(+)···O) and the H(3)O(+)-H(2)O contact structure (O-H(+)···O), respectively. Since the quasi-dynamic equilibrium between the Zundel and Eigen complexes was suggested to be the rate-determining step, in order to achieve an "ideal" maximum efficiency of proton transfer, a concerted reaction pathway should be taken. The most effective interconversion between the two proton states, the shared-proton structure and the H(3)O(+)-H(2)O contact structure, can be reflected from comparable intensities of the oscillatory shuttling and structural diffusion bands. The present results iterated the previous conclusions that static proton transfer potentials cannot provide complete description of the structural diffusion process and it is essential to incorporate thermal energy fluctuations and dynamics in the model calculations.

  6. Increasing the proton conductivity of sulfonated polyether ether ketone by incorporating graphene oxide: Morphology effect on proton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jun Xing; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Ahmad, Azizan; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Kasai, Hideaki

    2018-03-01

    We synthesized graphene oxide-sulfonated polyether ether ketone (GO-SPEEK) composite membrane and compare its proton conductivity with that of Nafion® 117 and SPEEK membranes. From experimental measurements, we found that GO-SPEEK has better proton conductivity (σGO-SPEEK = 3.8 × 10-2 S cm-1) when compared to Nafion® 117 (σNafion = 2.4 × 10-2 S cm-1) and SPEEK (σSPEEK = 2.9 × 10-3 S cm-1). From density functional theory (DFT-) based total energy calculations, we found that GO-SPEEK has the shortest proton diffusion distance among the three membranes, yielding the highest tunneling probability. Hence, GO-SPEEK exhibits the highest conductivity. The short proton diffusion distance in GO-SPEEK, as compared to Nafion® 117 and SPEEK, can be attributed to the presence of oxygenated functional groups of GO in the polymer matrix. This also explains why GO-SPEEK requires the lowest hydration level to reach its maximum conductivity. Moreover, we have successfully shown that the proton conductivity σ is related to the tunneling probability T, i.e., σ = σ‧ exp(-1/T). We conclude that the proton diffusion distance and hydration level are the two most significant factors that determine the membrane’s good conductivity. The distance between ionic sites of the membrane should be small to obtain good conductivity. With this short distance, lower hydration level is required. Thus, a membrane with short separation between the ionic sites can have enhanced conductivity, even at low hydration conditions.

  7. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line.

  8. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2006-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line

  9. Modified conductivity of polymer materials with proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shinji; Seki, Miharu; Shima, Kunihiro; Ishihara, Toyoyuki

    2001-01-01

    Ionic conductivity of polymer materials is of increasing interest in many scientific fields. Industrial applications seem to be promising. In the present investigation, we used proton bombardment to modify the characteristic properties of polymers, especially for improvement in conductivity and hardening gel polymers. Particle beam bombardment is known to produce many scissions by particle passages and new bonds by bridge connection. These effects may modify various properties in many ways. We examined the modification of conductivity in solid polymers composed of polyethylene oxide and polyurethane and the surface appearance of gel polymers with bombardment by a proton beam using the accelerator facility of Tsukuba University. The results indicated proton bombardment induced conductivity changes in various ways according to particle range and polymer properties. (author)

  10. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine); Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    1993-03-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author).

  11. Reactions of Proton Halo Nuclei in a Relativistic Optical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Rashdan, M

    2003-01-01

    The reaction cross section, sigma sub R; of the proton halo nuclei sup 1 sup 7 Ne and sup 1 sup 2 N on Si is calculated using an optical potential derived from the solution of the Dirac-Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equation, starting from the one-boson-exchange potential of Bonn. The nuclear densities are generated from self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations using the recent Skyrme interaction SKRA. It is found that the enhancement in the reaction cross section found experimentally for the sup 1 sup 7 Ne + Si system in comparison to sup 1 sup 5 O + Si, where sup 1 sup 5 O has been considered as a core of sup 1 sup 7 Ne, is mainly due to the proton halo structure of sup 1 sup 7 Ne which increases the interaction, in the surface and tail regions. Glauber model calculations did not produce this enhancement in sigma sub R for proton halo nuclei

  12. Analysis of the low-altitude proton flux asymmetry: methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Kruglanski, M

    1999-01-01

    Existing East-West asymmetry models of the trapped proton fluxes at low altitudes depend on the local magnetic dip angle and a density scale height derived from atmospheric models. We propose an alternative approach which maps the directional flux over a drift shell (B sub m , L) in terms of the local pitch and azimuthal angles alpha and beta, where beta is defined in the local mirror plane as the angle between the proton arrival direction and the surface normal to the drift shell. This approach has the advantage that it only depends on drift shell parameters and does not involve an atmosphere model. A semi-empirical model based on the new methodology is able to reproduce the angular distribution of a set of SAMPEX/PET proton flux measurements. Guidelines are proposed for spacecraft missions and data analysis procedures that are intended to be used for the building of new trapped radiation environment models.

  13. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  14. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  15. LHC 2012 proton run extended by seven weeks

    CERN Multimedia

    James Gillies

    2012-01-01

    An important piece of news that almost got lost in the excitement of the Higgs update seminar on 4 July is that the 2012 LHC proton run is to be extended.   On 3 July, a meeting was held between the CERN Management and representatives of the LHC and the experiments to discuss the merits of increasing the data target for this year in the light of the announcement to be made the following day. The conclusion was that an additional seven weeks of running would allow the luminosity goal for the year to be increased from 15 inverse femtobarns to 20, giving the experiments a good supply of data to work on during the LHC’s first long shut-down (LS1), and allowing them to make progress in determining the properties of the new particle whose discovery was announced last week. The current LHC schedule foresees proton running reaching a conclusion on 16 October, with a proton-ion run scheduled for November. In the preliminary new schedule, proton running is planned to continue until 16 December, ...

  16. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references

  17. On intense proton beam generation and transport in hollow cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Honrubia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton generation, transport and interaction with hollow cone targets are investigated by means of two-dimensional PIC simulations. A scaled-down hollow cone with gold walls, a carbon tip and a curved hydrogen foil inside the cone has been considered. Proton acceleration is driven by a 1020 W·cm−2 and 1 ps laser pulse focused on the hydrogen foil. Simulations show an important surface current at the cone walls which generates a magnetic field. This magnetic field is dragged by the quasi-neutral plasma formed by fast protons and co-moving electrons when they propagate towards the cone tip. As a result, a tens of kT Bz field is set up at the cone tip, which is strong enough to deflect the protons and increase the beam divergence substantially. We propose using heavy materials at the cone tip and increasing the laser intensity in order to mitigate magnetic field generation and proton beam divergence.

  18. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  19. Proton sputtering. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finfgeld, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    This research provides sputtering yields as a function of energy for H + and D + on several representative pure metallic elements, in the absence of surface contaminants. The experimental technique and apparatus are described. Data are given for Au, Co, Ta, W, and Mo

  20. Continental reach: The Westcoast Energy story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, P. C.

    2002-07-01

    A historical account is given of the spectacular success that was Westcoast Energy Inc., a Canadian natural gas giant that charted a wilderness pipeline from natural gas fields in Canada's sub-arctic solitude. The beginning of the company is traced to an event in 1934 when near the bank of the Pouce Coupe River, close to the Alberta-British Columbia border, Frank McMahon, a solitary wildcatter and the eventual founder of the company, first sighted the fiery inferno of a runaway wildcat well, drilled by geologists of the Imperial Oil Company during their original search for the Canadian petroleum basin's motherlode. It was on this occasion in 1934 that McMahon first conceived a geological profile that connected the gas-bearing sandstone of Pouce Coupe with the reservoir rock of the biggest natural gas field of Alberta, and a pipeline from this sandstone storehouse across the rugged heart of British Columbia to Vancouver, and south into the United States. It took the better part of a quarter century to realize the dream of that pipeline which, in due course, turned out to be only the first step towards reaching the top rank of Canadian corporations in operational and financial terms, and becoming one of only a handful in terms of a story that became a Canadian corporate legend. By chronicling the lives and contributions of the company's founder and senior officials over the years, the book traces the company's meteoric rise from a gleam in its founder's eye to a cautious regional utility, and to the aggressive Canadian adventurer that went on to burst the boundaries of its Pacific Coast world, until the continental reach of its operations and interests run from Canada's Pacific shoreline to its Atlantic basins and Mexico's Campeche Bay to Alaska's Prudhoe Bay. The company's independent existence came to an end in 2002 when Westcoast Energy, by then a $15 billion operation, was acquired by Duke Energy Limited of North

  1. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  2. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  3. Reaching the Next Generation of Marine Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, J.

    2009-04-01

    The next generation of marine scientists are today at primary school, secondary school or at college. To encourage them in their career, and to introduce those who are as yet undecided to the wonders of marine science, the Irish Marine Institute has devised a series of three overlapping outreach programmes to reach children at all three levels. Beginning at primary school, the "Explorers" programme offers a range of resources to teachers to enable them to teach marine-related examples as part of the science or geography modules of the SESE curriculum. These include teacher training, expert visits to schools, the installation and stocking of aquaria, field trips and downloadable lesson plans. For older pupils, the "Follow the Fleet" programme is a web-based education asset that allows users to track individual merchant ships and research vessels across the world, to interact with senior crew members of ships and to learn about their cargoes, the ports they visit and the sea conditions along the way. Finally, the "Integrated Marine Exploration Programme (IMEP)" takes secondary school pupils and university students to sea aboard the Marine Institute's research vessels to give them a taste of life as a marine scientist or to educate them in the practical day-to-day sampling and data processing tasks that make up a marine scientist's job.

  4. Has Athletic Performance Reached its Peak?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Geoffroy; Sedeaud, Adrien; Marck, Adrien; Antero-Jacquemin, Juliana; Schipman, Julien; Saulière, Guillaume; Marc, Andy; Desgorces, François-Denis; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Limits to athletic performance have long been a topic of myth and debate. However, sport performance appears to have reached a state of stagnation in recent years, suggesting that the physical capabilities of humans and other athletic species, such as greyhounds and thoroughbreds, cannot progress indefinitely. Although the ultimate capabilities may be predictable, the exact path for the absolute maximal performance values remains difficult to assess and relies on technical innovations, sport regulation, and other parameters that depend on current societal and economic conditions. The aim of this literature review was to assess the possible plateau of top physical capabilities in various events and detail the historical backgrounds and sociocultural, anthropometrical, and physiological factors influencing the progress and regression of athletic performance. Time series of performances in Olympic disciplines, such as track and field and swimming events, from 1896 to 2012 reveal a major decrease in performance development. Such a saturation effect is simultaneous in greyhound, thoroughbred, and frog performances. The genetic condition, exhaustion of phenotypic pools, economic context, and the depletion of optimal morphological traits contribute to the observed limitation of physical capabilities. Present conditions prevailing, we approach absolute physical limits and endure a continued period of world record scarcity. Optional scenarios for further improvements will mostly depend on sport technology and modification competition rules.

  5. CAST reaches milestone but keeps on searching

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Courier (september 2011 issue)

    2011-01-01

    After eight years of searching for the emission of a dark matter candidate particle, the axion, from the Sun, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has fulfilled its original physics programme.   Members of the CAST collaboration in July, together with dipole-based helioscope. CAST, the world’s most sensitive axion helioscope, points a recycled prototype LHC dipole magnet at the Sun at dawn and dusk, looking for the conversion of axions to X-rays. It incorporates four state-of-the-art X-ray detectors: three Micromegas detectors and a pn-CCD imaging camera attached to a focusing X-ray telescope that was recovered from the German space programme (see CERN Courier April 2010).  Over the years, CAST has operated with the magnet bores - the location of the axion conversion - in different conditions: first in vacuum, covering axion masses up to 20 meV/c2, and then with a buffer gas (4He and later 3He) at various densities, finally reaching the goal of 1.17 eV/c2 on 22 ...

  6. Important ATLAS Forward Calorimeter Milestone Reached

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, P.

    The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter working group has reached an important milestone in the production of their detectors. The mechanical assembly of the first electromagnetic module (FCal1C) has been completed at the University of Arizona on February 25, 2002, only ten days after the originally scheduled date. The photo shows the University of Arizona FCal group in the clean room, together with the assembled FCal1C module. The module consists of a stack of 18 round copper plates, each about one inch thick. Each plate is about 90 cm in diameter, and has 12260 precision-drilled holes in it, to accommodate the tube/rod electrode assembly. The machining of the plates, which was done at the Science Technology Center (STC) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, required high precision to allow for easy insertion of the electrode copper tube. The plates have been carefully cleaned at the University of Arizona, to remove any machining residue and metal flakes. This process alone took about eleven weeks. Exactly 122...

  7. Parallel explicit and implicit control of reaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mazzoni

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human movement can be guided automatically (implicit control or attentively (explicit control. Explicit control may be engaged when learning a new movement, while implicit control enables simultaneous execution of multiple actions. Explicit and implicit control can often be assigned arbitrarily: we can simultaneously drive a car and tune the radio, seamlessly allocating implicit or explicit control to either action. This flexibility suggests that sensorimotor signals, including those that encode spatially overlapping perception and behavior, can be accurately segregated to explicit and implicit control processes.We tested human subjects' ability to segregate sensorimotor signals to parallel control processes by requiring dual (explicit and implicit control of the same reaching movement and testing for interference between these processes. Healthy control subjects were able to engage dual explicit and implicit motor control without degradation of performance compared to explicit or implicit control alone. We then asked whether segregation of explicit and implicit motor control can be selectively disrupted by studying dual-control performance in subjects with no clinically manifest neurologic deficits in the presymptomatic stage of Huntington's disease (HD. These subjects performed successfully under either explicit or implicit control alone, but were impaired in the dual-control condition.The human nervous system can exert dual control on a single action, and is therefore able to accurately segregate sensorimotor signals to explicit and implicit control. The impairment observed in the presymptomatic stage of HD points to a possible crucial contribution of the striatum to the segregation of sensorimotor signals to multiple control processes.

  8. Media perspective - new opportunities for reaching audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Katy

    2007-08-01

    The world of media is experiencing a period of extreme and rapid change with the rise of internet television and the download generation. Many young people no longer watch standard TV. Instead, they go on-line, talking to friends and downloading pictures, videos, music clips to put on their own websites and watch/ listen to on their laptops and mobile phones. Gone are the days when TV controllers determined what you watched and when you watched it. Now the buzzword is IPTV, Internet Protocol Television, with companies such as JOOST offering hundreds of channels on a wide range of subjects, all of which you can choose to watch when and where you wish, on your high-def widescreen with stereo surround sound at home or on your mobile phone on the train. This media revolution is changing the way organisations get their message out. And it is encouraging companies such as advertising agencies to be creative about new ways of accessing audiences. The good news is that we have fresh opportunities to reach young people through internet-based media and material downloaded through tools such as games machines, as well as through the traditional media. And it is important for Europlanet to make the most of these new and exciting developments.

  9. Parity Non-Conservation in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, V.R.; B.F. Gibson; J.A. Carlson; R. Schiavilla

    2002-01-01

    The parity non-conserving longitudinal asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering is calculated in the lab-energy range 0-350 MeV using contemporary, realistic strong-interaction potentials combined with a weak-interaction potential comprised of rho- and omega-meson exchanges as exemplified by the DDH model. Values for the rho- and omega-meson coupling constants, h rho rho rho and h rho rho omega , are determined from comparison with the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV

  10. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  11. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  12. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  13. Particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Monteno, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be studied with the ALICE detector, not only as a benchmark for the comparison with heavy-ion reactions, but also as a mean to study important aspects of pp physics in the new energy domain probed by the LHC. A report will be given here on the potentialities of ALICE in the study of the global properties of pp events, and especially of their multiplicity. This will be one of the main issues in pp physics where, because of the special features of its design, ALICE will be competitive with the other LHC experiments.

  14. Allosteric interactions and proton conducting pathways in proton pumping aa(3) oxidases: heme a as a key coupling element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Nazzareno; Palese, Luigi Leonardo; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Richter, Oliver-Matthias H; Ludwig, Bernd; Papa, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    In this paper allosteric interactions in protonmotive heme aa(3) terminal oxidases of the respiratory chain are dealt with. The different lines of evidence supporting the key role of H(+)/e(-) coupling (redox Bohr effect) at the low spin heme a in the proton pump of the bovine oxidase are summarized. Results are presented showing that the I-R54M mutation in P. denitrificans aa(3) oxidase, which decreases by more than 200mV the E(m) of heme a, inhibits proton pumping. Mutational amino acid replacement in proton channels, at the negative (N) side of membrane-inserted prokaryotic aa(3) oxidases, as well as Zn(2+) binding at this site in the bovine oxidase, uncouples proton pumping. This effect appears to result from alteration of the structural/functional device, closer to the positive, opposite (P) surface, which separates pumped protons from those consumed in the reduction of O(2) to 2 H(2)O. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  16. Planning of the Extended Reach well Dieksand 2; Planung der Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, U.; Berners, H. [RWE-DEA AG, Hamburg (Germany). Drilling Team Mittelplate und Dieksand; Hadow, A.; Klop, G.; Sickinger, W. [Wintershall AG Erdoelwerke, Barnstdorf (Germany); Sudron, K.

    1998-12-31

    The Mittelplate oil field is located 7 km offshore the town of Friedrichskoog. Reserves are estimated at 30 million tonnes of oil. At a production rate of 2,500 t/d, it will last about 33 years. The transport capacity of the offshore platform is limited, so that attempts were made to enhance production by constructing the extended reach borehole Dieksand 2. Details are presented. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Erdoelfeld Mittelplate liegt am suedlichen Rand des Nationalparks Schleswig Holsteinisches Wattenmeer, ca. 7000 m westlich der Ortschaft Friedrichskoog. Die gewinnbaren Reserven betragen ca. 30 Millionen t Oel. Bei einer Foerderkapazitaet von 2.500 t/Tag betraegt die Foerderdauer ca. 33 Jahre. Aufgrund der begrenzten Transportkapazitaeten von der Insel, laesst sich durch zusaetzliche Bohrungen von der kuenstlichen Insel Mittelplate keine entscheidende Erhoehung der Foerderkapazitaet erzielen. Ab Sommer 1996 wurde erstmals die Moeglichkeit der Lagerstaettenerschliessung von Land untersucht. Ein im Mai 1997 in Hamburg etabliertes Drilling Team wurde mit der Aufgabe betraut, die Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2 zu planen und abzuteufen. Die Planungsphasen fuer die Extended Reach Bohrung Dieksand 2 wurden aufgezeigt. Die fuer den Erfolg einer Extended Reach Bohrung wichtigen Planungsparameter wurden erlaeutert. Es wurden Wege gezeigt, wie bei diesem Projekt technische und geologische Risiken in der Planung mit beruecksichtigt und nach Beginn der Bohrung weiter bearbeitet werden koennen. (orig.)

  17. Teach to Reach: The Effects of Active Versus Passive Reaching Experiences on Action and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertus, Klaus; Needham, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Reaching is an important and early emerging motor skill that allows infants to interact with the physical and social world. However, few studies have considered how reaching experiences shape infants’ own motor development and their perception of actions performed by others. In the current study, two groups of infants received daily parent guided play sessions over a two-week training period. Using “Sticky Mittens”, one group was enabled to independently pick up objects whereas the other group only passively observed their parent’s actions on objects. Following training, infants’ manual and visual exploration of objects, agents, and actions in a live and a televised context were assessed. Our results showed that only infants who experienced independent object apprehension advanced in their reaching behavior, and showed changes in their visual exploration of agents and objects in a live setting. Passive observation was not sufficient to change infants’ behavior. To our surprise, the effects of the training did not seem to generalize to a televised observation context. Together, our results suggest that early motor training can jump-start infants’ transition into reaching and inform their perception of others’ actions. PMID:20828580

  18. Teach to reach: the effects of active vs. passive reaching experiences on action and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertus, Klaus; Needham, Amy

    2010-12-01

    Reaching is an important and early emerging motor skill that allows infants to interact with the physical and social world. However, few studies have considered how reaching experiences shape infants' own motor development and their perception of actions performed by others. In the current study, two groups of infants received daily parent guided play sessions over a 2-weeks training period. Using "Sticky Mittens", one group was enabled to independently pick up objects whereas the other group only passively observed their parent's actions on objects. Following training, infants' manual and visual exploration of objects, agents, and actions in a live and a televised context were assessed. Our results showed that only infants who experienced independent object apprehension advanced in their reaching behavior, and showed changes in their visual exploration of agents and objects in a live setting. Passive observation was not sufficient to change infants' behavior. To our surprise, the effects of the training did not seem to generalize to a televised observation context. Together, our results suggest that early motor training can jump-start infants' transition into reaching and inform their perception of others' actions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The search for proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The conservation of the quantum number called baryon number, like lepton (or family) number, is an empirical fact even though there are very good reasons to expect otherwise. Experimentalists have been searching for baryon number violating decays of the proton and neutron for decades now without success. Theorists have evolved deep understanding of the relationship between the natural forces in the development of various Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) that nearly universally predict baryon number violating proton decay, or related phenomena like n-bar n oscillations. With this in mind, the Proton Decay Working Group reviewed the current experimental and theoretical status of the search for baryon number violation with an eye to the advancement in the next decade

  20. Plans for the Future of Proton Accelerators at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R; High Intensity Frontier Workshop (HIF04)

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, presently in construction at CERN, will be filled through a set of high performance proton accelerators providing the high brightness beam needed to reach the foreseen luminosity. Although this difficult project has top priority and uses most of the CERN resources, it is nevertheless time investigating improvements of the proton accelerator complex for physical cases beyond the LHC expectations. The needs of multiple physics communities have to be taken into account, as well as the necessity of consolidating the installations while keeping high reliability. This paper starts from the analysis and proposals made by the “High Intensity Proton” (HIP) working group [1, 2] to improve the performances of the PS and the SPS complex and better match the users requests in a staged scenario at short and medium term, and complement it, addressing the main possibilities beyond that horizon.

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  2. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  3. Superconducting proton ring for PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, E.

    1979-01-01

    A powerful new facility for colliding beam physics could be provided by adding a proton storage ring in the range of several hundred GeV to the electron-positron storage ring PETRA at DESY. This can be achieved in an economic way utilizing the PETRA tunnel and taking advantage of the higher magnetic fields of superconducting magnets which would be placed above or below the PETRA magnets. A central field of 4 Tesla in the bending magnets corresponds to a proton energy of 225 GeV. (orig.)

  4. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  5. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  6. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  7. Size-restricted proton transfer within toluene-methanol cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-Tung; Shores, Kevin S; Freindorf, Marek; Furlani, Thomas; DeLeon, Robert L; Garvey, James F

    2008-11-20

    To understand the interaction between toluene and methanol, the chemical reactivity of [(C6H5CH3)(CH3OH) n=1-7](+) cluster ions has been investigated via tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and through calculations. Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) experiments show that the dissociated intracluster proton transfer reaction from the toluene cation to methanol clusters, forming protonated methanol clusters, only occurs for n = 2-4. For n = 5-7, CID spectra reveal that these larger clusters have to sequentially lose methanol monomers until they reach n = 4 to initiate the deprotonation of the toluene cation. Metastable decay data indicate that for n = 3 and n = 4 (CH3OH)3H(+) is the preferred fragment ion. The calculational results reveal that both the gross proton affinity of the methanol subcluster and the structure of the cluster itself play an important role in driving this proton transfer reaction. When n = 3, the cooperative effect of the methanols in the subcluster provides the most important contribution to allow the intracluster proton transfer reaction to occur with little or no energy barrier. As n >or= 4, the methanol subcluster is able to form ring structures to stabilize the cluster structures so that direct proton transfer is not a favored process. The preferred reaction product, the (CH3OH)3H(+) cluster ion, indicates that this size-restricted reaction is driven by both the proton affinity and the enhanced stability of the resulting product.

  8. A new anhydrous proton conductor based on polybenzimidazole and tridecyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fengjing; Pu Hongting; Meyer, Wolfgang H.; Guan Yisi; Wan Decheng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the anhydrous proton conducting membranes are based on inorganic or partially inorganic materials, like SrCeO 3 membranes or polybenzimidazole (PBI)/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes. In present work, a new kind of anhydrous proton conducting membrane based on fully organic components of PBI and tridecyl phosphate (TP) was prepared. The interaction between PBI and TP is discussed. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of the composite membranes can be modeled by an Arrhenius relation. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) illustrates that these composite membranes are chemically stable up to 145 deg. C. The weight loss appearing at 145 deg. C is attributed to the selfcondensation of phosphate, which results in the proton conductivity drop of the membranes occurring at the same temperature. The DC conductivity of the composite membranes can reach ∼10 -4 S/cm for PBI/1.8TP at 140 deg. C and increases with increasing TP content. The proton conductivity of PBI/TP and PBI/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes is compared. The former have higher proton conductivity, however, the proton conductivity of the PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes increases with temperature more significantly. Compared with PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes, the migration stability of TP in PBI/TP membranes is improved significantly

  9. Study of the proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies through eikonal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Alvaro Favinha

    1995-01-01

    The proton-proton elastic scattering in the center of mass energy region 23 to 63 GeV is investigated through a multiple diffraction model. As an introduction to the subject, a detailed review of the fundamental basis of the Multiple Diffraction Formalism and a survey of the multiple diffraction models (geometrical) currently used are presented. The goal of this investigation is to reformulate one of these models, which makes use of an elementary (parton-parton) amplitude purely imaginary and is not able to predict the ρ-parameter (the ratio of the forward real and imaginary parts of the hadronic amplitude). Introducing a real part for the elementary amplitude proportional to the imaginary part, improvements in the formalism are obtained. It is shown that this new approach is able to reproduce all experimental data on differential and integrated cross sections (total, elastic and inelastic), but not the ρ-parameter as function of the energy. Then, starting from fitting of this parameter an overall reproduction of the physical observables is obtained, with the exception of the dip region (diffractive minimum in the differential cross section) overall description are also not firmly reached in all these models. Finally, alternatives to improve the results in a future research are suggested and discussed. (author)

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-01-01

    Surgical excision, conventional external radiotherapy, and chemotherapy could prolong survival in patients with small intracranial tumors. However, surgical excision for meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull or re-resection is often difficult. Moreover, treatment is needed for patients with recurrent tumors or postoperative residual tumors. Conventional external radiotherapy is popular and has significantly increased for treating brain tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective alternative treatment technique to microsurgical resection such as benign brain tumor or vestibular Schwannomas. In general, the dose to OAR of 3D conformal plan is lower than that of conformal arc and dynamic conformal arc plans. However, any of OARs was not reached to tolerance dose. Although mean dose of the healthy brain tissue for 3D conformal plan was slightly higher than that of arc plans, the doses of the healthy brain tissue at V10 and V20 were significantly low for dynamic conformal arc plan. The dosimetric differences were the greatest at lower doses. In contrast, 3D conformal plan was better spare at higher doses. In this study, a dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery for brain lesion tumors was using fixed and arc beams. A brass block fitted to the PTV structure was modeled for dynamic conformal collimator. Although all treatment plans offer a very good coverage of the PTV, we found that proton arc plans had significantly better conformity to the PTV than static 3D conformal plan. The V20 dose of normal brain for dynamic conformal arc therapy is dramatically reduced compare to those for other therapy techniques.

  11. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We

  12. Study of the strange baryons and mesons production (Λ and Ks0) in proton-proton collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricaud, H.

    2008-11-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC is dedicated to the investigation of the transition of matter from the hadron gas to the Quark and Gluons Plasma in which partons are deconfined. Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions offer indeed the possibility to create extreme temperature and pressure conditions which are required to reach a deconfined phase. Elementary collisions such as proton-proton are of great importance since they are regarded as the hadronic reference. The aim of this thesis was to prepare the analysis of strange baryon and meson production mechanisms in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies by the detection of Λ and K s 0 particles with ALICE. Strange particles are a major tool to probe the matter created. The behaviour of the Λ/K s 0 ratio at intermediate transverse momentum in high energy proton-proton collisions, that we have studied with several theoretical models, could also sign the presence of collective phenomena. Up to now, these phenomena have been observed only in heavy-ion collisions. (author)

  13. Metabolite concentrations in the developing brain estimated with proton MR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P B; Leth, H; Lou, H C

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate absolute concentrations and relaxation time constants of metabolites that were detectable with proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy in the healthy preterm, term, and infant brain. Five MR spectra were recorded for each infant by using STEAM ...... concentration. The concentration of PCr+Cr increased rapidly and reached adolescent values at approximately 4 months of age....

  14. Aligned electrospun nanofibers as proton conductive channels through thickness of sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue; He, Gaohong; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Shikai; Chen, Bo; Dai, Yan; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-08-01

    A novel approach is proposed to fabricate sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (SPPESK) proton exchange membranes with ordered through-plane electrospinning nanofibers, which provide nano-scale through-plane proton conductive channels along the thickness direction of the membranes, aiming to satisfy the challenging requirement of high through-plane proton conductivity in fuel cell operations. Induced by electrostatic attraction of strong electric field, the negatively charged sulfonic acid groups tend to aggregate towards surface of the electrospun fibers, which is evidenced by TEM and SAXS and further induces aggregation of the sulfonic acid groups in the SPPESK inferfiber voids filler along the surface of the nanofibers. The aligned electrospun nanofibers carries long-range ionic clusters along the thickness direction of the membrane and results in much higher total through-plane conductivity in the thickness aligned electrospun membranes, nearly twice as much as that of the cast SPPESK membrane. With smooth treatment, the thickness aligned electrospun SPPESK membranes exhibit higher single cell power density and tensile strength as compared with Nafion 115 (around 1.2 and 1.5 folds, respectively). Such a design of thickness aligned nano-size proton conductive channels provide feasibility for high performance non-fluorinated PEMs in fuel cell applications.

  15. Backscattering of light ions from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, H.

    1975-07-01

    When a metal target is bombarded with light ions some are implanted and some are reflected from the surface or backscattered from deeper layers. This results in an energy distribution of the backscattered particles which reaches from zero to almost the primary energy. The number of the backscattered particles and their energy, angular, and charge distributions depends largely on the energy and the ion target combination. For high energies (i.e., greater than50 keV for protons) particles are backscattered in a single collision governed by the Rutherford cross section. Protons and He-ions with energies of 100 keV to several MeV are widely used for thin film analysis. For lower energies multiple collisions and the screening of the Coulomb potential have to be taken into account, which makes the theoretical treatment more difficult. This energy region is, however, of special interest in the field of nuclear fusion research. Some recent results for energies below 20 keV are discussed in some detail. (auth)

  16. Determining the mechanism of cusp proton aurora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Zhonglei

    2013-01-01

    Earth's cusp proton aurora occurs near the prenoon and is primarily produced by the precipitation of solar energetic (2-10 keV) protons. Cusp auroral precipitation provides a direct source of energy for the high-latitude dayside upper atmosphere, contributing to chemical composition change and global climate variability. Previous studies have indicated that magnetic reconnection allows solar energetic protons to cross the magnetopause and enter the cusp region, producing cusp auroral precipitation. However, energetic protons are easily trapped in the cusp region due to a minimum magnetic field existing there. Hence, the mechanism of cusp proton aurora has remained a significant challenge for tens of years. Based on the satellite data and calculations of diffusion equation, we demonstrate that EMIC waves can yield the trapped proton scattering that causes cusp proton aurora. This moves forward a step toward identifying the generation mechanism of cusp proton aurora.

  17. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references

  18. Influence of Geant4 parameters on proton dose distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Merouani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The proton therapy presents a great precision during the radiation dose delivery. It is useful when the tumor is located in a sensitive area like brain or eyes. The Monte Carlo (MC simulations are usually used in treatment planning system (TPS to estimate the radiation dose. In this paper we are interested in estimating the proton dose statistical uncertainty generated by the MC simulations. Methods: Geant4 was used in the simulation of the eye’s treatment room for 62 MeV protons therapy, installed in the Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS-INFN facility in Catania. This code is a Monte Carlo based on software dedicated to simulate the passage of particles through the matter. In this work, we are interested in optimizing the Geant4 parameters on energy deposit distribution by proton to achieve the spatial resolution of dose distribution required for cancer therapy. We propose various simulations and compare the corresponding dose distribution inside water to evaluate the statistical uncertainties. Results: The simulated Bragg peak, based on facility model is in agreement with the experimental data, The calculations show that the mean statistical uncertainty is less than 1% for a simulation set with 5 × 104 events, 10-3 mm production threshold and a 10-2 mm step limit. Conclusion: The set of Geant4 cut and step limit values can be chosen in combination with the number of events to reach precision recommended from International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements (ICRU in Monte Carlo codes for proton therapy treatment.

  19. Search for New Particles in Two-Jet Final States in 7 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, S.R.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boddy, C.R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozhko, N.I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Braccini, S.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Bright-Thomas, P.G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N.J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R.M.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E.J.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S.A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R.W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C.D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P.V.M.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J.P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J.W.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D.V.; Defay, P.O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Dennis, C.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diaz Gomez, M.M.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O.B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Dowell, J.D.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; 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Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    A search for new heavy particles manifested as narrow resonances in two-jet final states is presented. The data were produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 315 nb^-1 collected by the ATLAS detector. No resonances were observed. Upper limits were set on the product of cross section and detector acceptance for excited-quark (q*) production as a function of q* mass. These exclude at the 95% CL the q* mass interval 0.40 < mq* < 1.26 TeV, extending the reach of previous experiments.

  20. Search for new particles in two-jet final states in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Rahal, G; Rahimi, A M; Rahm, D; Raine, C; Raith, B; Rajagopalan, S; Rajek, S; Rammensee, M; Rammes, M; Ramstedt, M; Ratoff, P N; Rauscher, F; Rauter, E; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Reichold, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I; Reljic, D; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renkel, P; Rensch, B; Rescia, S; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richards, A; Richards, R A; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieke, S; Rijpstra, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Rios, R R; Riu, I; Rivoltella, G; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Roa Romero, D A; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robinson, M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Roda Dos Santos, D; Rodier, S; Rodriguez, D; Rodriguez Garcia, Y; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rojo, V; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romanov, V M; Romeo, G; Romero Maltrana, D; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosenberg, E I; Rosendahl, P L; Rosselet, L; Rossetti, V; Rossi, L P; Rossi, L; Rotaru, M; Rothberg, J; Rottländer, I; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Ruckert, B; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, G; Rühr, F; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Rumiantsev, V; Rumyantsev, L; Runge, K; Runolfsson, O; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Rust, D R; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruwiedel, C; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Ryadovikov, V; Ryan, P; Rybkin, G; Rzaeva, S; Saavedra, A F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Sala, P; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Saltó Bauza, O; Salvachua Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Samset, B H; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandhu, P; Sandoval, T; Sandstroem, R; Sandvoss, S; Sankey, D P C; Sanny, B; Sansoni, A; Santamarina Rios, C; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarri, F; Sartisohn, G; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, T; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Savard, P; Savine, A Y; Savinov, V; Savva, P; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Says, L P; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scallon, O; Scannicchio, D A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schäfer, U; Schaetzel, S; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schaller, M; Schamberger, R D; Schamov, A G; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schlereth, J L; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, M P; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitz, M; Scholte, R C; Schöning, A; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schreiner, A; Schroeder, C; Schroer, N; Schroers, M; Schroff, D; Schuh, S; Schuler, G; Schultes, J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schumacher, J W; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, P; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schweiger, D; Schwemling, P; Schwienhorst, R; Schwierz, R; Schwindling, J; Scott, W G; Searcy, J; Sedykh, E; Segura, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; 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Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soluk, R; Sondericker, J; Soni, N; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sorbi, M; Sosebee, M; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P; Spencer, E; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiriti, E; Spiwoks, R; Spogli, L; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S N; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stastny, J; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steele, G; Stefanidis, E; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G A; Stiller, W; Stockmanns, T; Stockton, M C; Stodulski, M; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strang, M; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; 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Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Tobias, J; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokunaga, K; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tonazzo, A; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torchiani, I; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Traynor, D; Trefzger, T; Treis, J; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; 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Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wellisch, H P; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Woehrling, E; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wuestenfeld, J; Wulf, E; Wunstorf, R; Wynne, B M; Xaplanteris, L; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, G; Xu, N; Yabsley, B; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaets, V G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zalite, Yo K; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, A V; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zolnierowski, Y; Zsenei, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-10-15

    A search for new heavy particles manifested as resonances in two-jet final states is presented. The data were produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions by the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 315  nb⁻¹ collected by the ATLAS detector. No resonances were observed. Upper limits were set on the product of cross section and signal acceptance for excited-quark (q*) production as a function of q* mass. These exclude at the 95% C.L. the q* mass interval 0.30m(q*)<1.26  TeV, extending the reach of previous experiments.

  1. Determination of diffuse double layer protonation constants for hydrous ferric oxide (HFO): supporting evidence for the Dzombak and Morel compilation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, PJ

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available of the experimental system suggests that titration points below pH 4 should not be used for the determination of protonation constants because of potential HFO dissolution. Surface protonation constant, PZC and binding site estimates agree excellently with currently...

  2. Functional reach and lateral reach tests adapted for aquatic physical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Angélica Ribeiro de Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Functional reach (FR and lateral reach (LR tests are widely used in scientific research and clinical practice. Assessment tools are useful in assessing subjects with greater accuracy and are usually adapted according to the limitations of each condition. Objective: To adapt FR and LR tests for use in an aquatic environment and assess the performance of healthy young adults. Methods: We collected anthropometric data and information on whether the participant exercised regularly or not. The FR and LR tests were adapted for use in an aquatic environment and administered to 47 healthy subjects aged 20-30 years. Each test was repeated three times. Results: Forty-one females and six males were assessed. The mean FR test score for men was 24.06 cm, whereas the mean value for right lateral reach (RLR was 10.94 cm and for left lateral reach (LLR was 9.78 cm. For females, the mean FR score was 17.57 cm, while the mean values for RLR was 8.84cm and for LLR was 7.76 cm. Men performed better in the FR (p < 0.001 and RLR tests than women (p = 0.037. Individuals who exercised regularly showed no differences in performance level when compared with their counterparts. Conclusion: The FR and LR tests were adapted for use in an aquatic environment. Males performed better on the FR and RLR tests, when compared to females. There was no correlation between the FR and LR tests and weight, height, Body Mass Index (BMI, foot length or length of the dominant upper limb.

  3. Playing with Protons CREATIONS Demonstrator

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2017-01-01

    This document describes Playing with Protons, a CMS education initiative that seeks to enhance teachers’ pedagogical practice with creative, hands-on methodologies through which 10-12 year old students can, in turn, get engaged effectively with science, technology and innovation.

  4. Uncertainties in the proton lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rudaz, S.; Gaillard, M.K.

    1980-04-01

    We discuss the masses of the leptoquark bosons m(x) and the proton lifetime in Grand Unified Theories based principally on SU(5). It is emphasized that estimates of m(x) based on the QCD coupling and the fine structure constant are probably more reliable than those using the experimental value of sin 2 theta(w). Uncertainties in the QCD Λ parameter and the correct value of α are discussed. We estimate higher order effects on the evolution of coupling constants in a momentum space renormalization scheme. It is shown that increasing the number of generations of fermions beyond the minimal three increases m(X) by almost a factor of 2 per generation. Additional uncertainties exist for each generation of technifermions that may exist. We discuss and discount the possibility that proton decay could be 'Cabibbo-rotated' away, and a speculation that Lorentz invariance may be violated in proton decay at a detectable level. We estimate that in the absence of any substantial new physics beyond that in the minimal SU(5) model the proton lifetimes is 8 x 10 30+-2 years

  5. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Recent improvements in the intensities and optical qualities of radioactive beams have made possible the study of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on unstable nuclei. The design and performances of an innovative silicon strip detector array devoted to such experiments are described. The quality of the data ...

  6. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam

  7. High intensity circular proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    Circular machines suitable for the acceleration of high intensity proton beams include cyclotrons, FFAG accelerators, and strong-focusing synchrotrons. This paper discusses considerations affecting the design of such machines for high intensity, especially space charge effects and the role of beam brightness in multistage accelerators. Current plans for building a new generation of high intensity 'kaon factories' are reviewed. 47 refs

  8. Reaching the next generation of nuclear engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokic, Denia; Fratoni, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB) American Nuclear Society (ANS) Student Section hosted two outreach events for young students between the ages of seven and twelve. The students were part of a private after-school club called Adventures Through Open Minds Science TM club for kids (A.T.O.M.S. club for kids) heated by Leslie Buchalter. Buchalter is an expert in early education and teaches children fundamental scientific concepts by using 'kid language' and associating usually difficult ideas with something even the very young children can understand. The greatest challenge for us UCB student organizers was to follow this manner of teaching and to construct activities that would always keep the attention of the children. We put together an array of fundamental concept demonstrations based on this philosophy. For example, the concept of half-life was taught by repeatedly tossing M and M's onto a surface and removing the upside down M and M's, and the concept of a nuclear chain reaction was introduced using a mousetrap-and-ping-pong-ball contraption. The main lessons learned were that the children most successfully absorbed ideas by engaging the students activity in the concept demonstrations, by using concepts and vocabulary already familiar to them which encouraged them to answer questions about familiar topics, and by creating a playful game out of every learning opportunity. (author)

  9. Extending mass spectrometry's reach in proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downard, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Mass spectrometry is an essential component of proteome analysis. The accuracy, speed and sensitivity of mass spectrometric analysis is further aided by an ability to analyse proteins and peptides directly from two-dimensional sample arrays. This is accomplished either by gel excision and recovery of proteins or their proteolysis products, or after blotting of gel-separated proteins onto membranes. The protein components are most often analysed in each case by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Beyond automated protein identification, proteomics ultimately demands that protein function and activity be characterised. We have developed new mass spectrometry methodologies that enable protein-protein associations to be analysed by MALDI mass spectrometry. Methods to preserve protein-protein associations on 2D sample surfaces and to affect their ionisation and detection have been developed. This presentation will describe the features of protocol that are required for the successful analysis of protein-protein complexes. Data will be shown to illustrate the application of the technology to the study of important biological and immunological processes. The methods form the basis of powerful new mass spectrometric based assays for screening and affinity studies. Details of our investigations and their implications for high-throughput proteomics applications will be discussed in conjunction with directions of our future research

  10. Relativistic Current Dynamics Investigations By Proton Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, M.; Quinn, K.; Wilson, P. A.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Romagnani, L.; Sarri, G.; Lancia, L.; Fuchs, J.; Pipahl, A.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Carroll, D. C.; Gallegos, P.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Clarke, R. J.; Evans, R. G.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.; Macchi, A.; Lyseikina, T. V.; Nazarov, W.

    2009-07-01

    The proton probing technique has been used to investigate the incidence of a mid-1019 W cm-2 pulse with metallic wire and laminar foam targets. Electric fields ˜1010 Vṡm-1 are measured on the surface of the 125 μm-diameter wire in the wake of the laser interaction as it charges and discharges within a 20 ps temporal window, whilst the employment of a novel experimental technique permits the observation of the propagation of a charging front at ˜c away from the point of interaction. In the foam shots, meanwhile, the behaviour of the hot electrons generated by the interaction pulse is probed inside the target. Evidence of electric inhibition effects and filamentation is found.

  11. Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The brochure deals with the following topics: radiation therapy and its significance, proton therapy - worldwide and at PSI, advantages of the protons, the new proton therapy facility at PSI, therapy at PSI using the spot-scan technique. figs., tabs., refs

  12. Proton Testing: Opportunities, Pitfalls and Puzzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Although proton SEE testing can place constraints on some heavy-ion SEE susceptibilities, it is important to quantify residual risk that protons may not reveal all SEE susceptibilities in a system. We examine the relative strengths and limitations of proton and heavy-ion SEE testing and how these may be affected by technology scaling and high-Z materials in the device.

  13. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'.

  14. Neutrino proton scattering and the isosinglet term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic neutrino proton scattering is sensitive to the SU(3) axial isosinglet term which is in turn dependent on the strangeness content of the proton. The uncertainties in the analysis of a neutrino proton elastic scattering experiment are discussed, and an experiment which is insensitive to many of the difficulties of the previous experiment is described

  15. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  16. Experimental neutron scattering evidence for proton polaron in hydrated metal oxide proton conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Artur; Chen, Qianli

    2017-06-01

    Hydration of oxygen-deficient metal oxides causes filling of oxygen vacancies and formation of hydroxyl groups with interstitial structural protons, rotating around the oxygen in localized motion. Thermal activation from 500 to 800 K triggers delocalization of the protons by jumping to adjacent oxygen ions, constituting proton conductivity. We report quantitative analyses of proton and lattice dynamics by neutron-scattering data, which reveal the interaction of protons with the crystal lattice and proton-phonon coupling. The motion for the proton trapped in the elastic crystal field yields Eigen frequencies and coupling constants, which satisfy Holstein's polaron model for electrons and thus constitutes first experimental evidence for a proton polaron at high temperature. Proton jump rates follow a polaron model for cerium-oxygen and hydroxyl stretching modes, which are thus vehicles for proton conductivity. This confirms that the polaron mechanism is not restricted to electrons, but a universal charge carrier transport process.

  17. New proton conducting membranes for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, P.R.

    2006-07-01

    In order to synthesize proton-conducting materials which retain acids in the membrane during fuel cell operating conditions, the synthesis of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) grafted polybenzimidazole (PVPA grafted PBI) and the fabrication of multilayer membranes are mainly focussed in this dissertation. Synthesis of PVPA grafted PBI membrane can be done according to ''grafting through'' method. In ''grafting through'' method (or macromonomer method), monomer (e.g., vinylphosphonic acid) is radically copolymerized with olefin group attached macromonomer (e.g., allyl grafted PBI and vinylbenzyl grafted PBI). This approach is inherently limited to synthesize graft-copolymer with well-defined architectural and structural parameters. The incorporation of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) into PBI lead to improvements in proton conductivity up to 10-2 S/cm. Regarding multilayer membranes, the proton conducting layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of polymers by various strong acids such as poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylsulfonic acid) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) paired with basic polymers such as poly(4-vinylimidazole) and poly(benzimidazole), which are appropriate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell applications have been described. Proton conductivity increases with increasing smoothness of the film and the maximum measured conductivity was 10-4 S/cm at 25A C. Recently, anhydrous proton-conducting membranes with flexible structural backbones, which show proton-conducting properties comparable to Nafion have been focus of current research. The flexible backbone of polymer chains allow for a high segmental mobility and thus, a sufficiently low glass transition temperature (Tg), which is an essential factor to reach highly conductive systems. Among the polymers with a flexible chain backbone, poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylbenzylphosphonic acid), poly(2-vinylbenzimidazole), poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid), poly(4-vinylimidazole), poly

  18. Efficient energetic proton generation driven by ultrashort ultraintense ti:Sapphire laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I. W.; Kim, C. M.; Jeong, T. M.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Hafz, N.; Pae, K. H.; Ko, D. K.; Lee, J. [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Orimo, S.; Ogura, K.; Ma, J.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Oishi, Y.; Nemoto, K. [Central Research Institute of Electronic Power Industry, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Significant progress on laser driven proton generation has been made in the past few years. Proton acceleration driven by ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse has been a promising technology for realizing a compact accelerator. Laser driven protons have several unique properties, such as shot pulse duration of ∼ps, high peak current in kA range, low transverse emittance below 10{sup -}2{sup m}m mrad, and good laminarity. For practical applications, the proton beam should be optimized to obtain higher energy, narrower energy spread, larger number and conversion efficiency. Maximum proton energy of 58 MeV has been demonstrated using PW class laser pulse, and quasi monoenergetic protons were produced from microstructured target. We have performed series of experiments to generate energetic proton beam by collaborating with JAEA and CRIEPI groups. Energetic protons were produced by the interaction of ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse with thin solid targets. Laser pulse with maximum energy of 1.7 J and minimum pulse duration of 34 FS, giving maximum peak intensity 3x10{sup 1}9{sup W}/cm{sup 2,} was focused using an off axis parabolic mirror at 45 degree incident angle with p polarization. The target used was one of 5μm thick copper of 7.5, 12.5, 25μm thick polyimide foils. Fresh Surface of target was supplied by moving the target with tape target driver for every laser shot, performing repetitive laser shooting without breaking vacuum. In order to investigate optimal generation conditions, we varied the laser pulse width and changed target position with respect to a tight focus position of laser beam. Main proton diagnostic was proton time of flight spectrometer to facilitate real time optimization of the laser and target conditions. Energetic protons with maximum energy of up to 4 MeV are generated by the interaction of laser pulse with a 7.5μm thick Polyimide target. The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the proton kinetic energies is achieved to

  19. Quasi-monoenergetic proton beam produced by cone-top-end target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinqing; Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin; Zhou Weimin; Gu Yuqiu

    2012-01-01

    A scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic proton beam is presented. In this paper, a new cone-top-end target is proposed and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulation. The simulation results show that this target configuration can guide the hot electrons by the self-generated magnetic field along the profile of the cone-top-end target. The peak magnitude of sheath field at the rear surface of solid target can be enhanced, so the proton energy can be improved. The proton beam with energy spread of 9.9% can be obtained. (authors)

  20. Proton-beam window design for a transmutation facility operating with a liquid lead target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, C.; Lypsch, F.; Lizana, P. [Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology, Juelich (Germany)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The proton beam target of an accelerator-driven transmutation facility can be designed as a vertical liquid lead column. To prevent lead vapor from entering the accelerator vacuum, a proton-beam window has to separate the area above the lead surface from the accelerator tube. Two radiation-cooled design alternatives have been investigated which should withstand a proton beam of 1.6 GeV and 25 mA. Temperature calculations based on energy deposition calculations with the Monte Carlo code HETC, stability analysis and spallation-induced damage calculations have been performed showing the applicability of both designs.

  1. Manipulation of laser-accelerated proton beam profiles by nanostructured and microstructured targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giuffrida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured and microstructured thin foils have been fabricated and used experimentally as targets to manipulate the spatial profile of proton bunches accelerated through the interaction with high intensity laser pulses (6×10^{19}  W/cm^{2}. Monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres were placed on the rear surfaces of thin plastic targets to improve the spatial homogeneity of the accelerated proton beams. Moreover, thin targets with grating structures of various configurations on their rear sides were used to modify the proton beam divergence. Experimental results are presented, discussed, and supported by 3D particle-in-cell numerical simulations.

  2. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pair angular correlations for pions, kaons and protons in proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Zaborowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the correlation functions in $\\Delta\\eta\\, \\Delta\\phi$ space for pairs of pions, kaons and protons. The studies were carried out on the set of proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, obtained in ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The analysis was performed for two charge combinations (like-sign pairs and unlike-sign pairs) as well as for three multiplicity ranges. Angular correlations are a rich source of information about the elementary particles behaviour. They result in from the interplay of numerous effects, including resonances’ decays, Coulomb interactions and energy and momentum conservation. In case of identical particles quantum statistics needs to be taken into account. Moreover, particles differ in terms of quark content. Kaons, carrying the strange quark obey the strangeness conservation law. In the production of protons baryon number must be conserved. These features are reflected...

  4. Can proton radiography be used to image imploding target in ICF experiments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, L.; Batani, D.; Vauzour, B.; Nicolai, Ph.; Santos, J. J.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Hulin, S.; Regan, C.; Perez, F.; Baton, S.; Koenig, M.; Lancaster, K.; Galimberti, M.; Heathcote, R.; Tolley, M.; Spindloe, Ch.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; Benedetti, C.; Sgattoni, A.; Richetta, M.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of high intensity and well collimated multi energetic proton beams from laser-matter interaction extend the possibility to use protons as a diagnostic to image imploding target in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. An experiment was done at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Vulcan Laser Petawatt laser) to study fast electron propagation in cylindrically compressed targets, a subject of interest for fast ignition. This was performed in the framework of the experimental road map of HiPER (the European High Power laser Energy Research facility Project). In the experiment, protons accelerated by a ps-laser pulse were used to radiograph a 220 m diameter cylinder (20 m wall, filled with low density foam), imploded with 200 J of green laser light in 4 symmetrically incident beams of pulse length 1 ns. Point projection proton backlighting was used to get the compression history and the stagnation time. Detailed comparison with 2D numerical hydro simulations has been done using a Monte Carlo code adapted to describe multiple scattering and plasma effects and with those from hard X-ray radiography. These analysis shows that due to the very large mass densities reached during implosion processes, protons traveling through the target undergo a very large number of collisions which deviate protons from their original trajectory reducing proton radiography resolution. Here we present a simple analytical model to study the proton radiography diagnostic performance as a function of the main experimental parameters such as proton beam energy and target areal density. This approach leads to define two different criteria for PR resolution (called "strong" and "weak" condition) describing different experimental conditions. Finally numerical simulations using both hydrodynamic and Monte Carlo codes are presented to validate analytical predictions.

  5. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  6. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  7. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Satco, Daria

    2017-01-01

    In view of new possibilities becoming more realistic with FCC design and of recent promising results regarding $(B+L)$-violating processes detection we concentrated our research on generation and analysis of sphaleron transitions. The existence of instanton and sphaleron solutions which are associated with transitions between different vacuum states is well known since 1980s. However first calculations of instanton rate killed any hope to detect them even at very high energies while the calculation of sphaleron transitions rate is a tricky problem which continue being widely discussed. In our research we used HERBVI package to generate baryon- and lepton-number violating processes in proton-proton collisions at typical energies 14, 33, 40 and 100 TeV in order to estimate the upper limit on the sphaleron cross-section. We considered the background processes and determined the zero background regions.

  8. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  9. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-01

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  10. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  11. Golden Jubilee photos: ISR - The first proton-proton interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) on 16 October 1971, the man in charge of their construction, Kjell Johnsen, presented the "key" to the machine to Edoardo Amaldi, President of Council. Seated on the stage with them for this symbolic event were Victor Weisskopf, Marcel Antonioz, Willy Jentschke (seen on the left of the photo) and Werner Heisenberg (on the far right). On 27 January that year, in a world premier, signals produced by proton-proton collisions had been observed at the ISR. The protons, supplied by the PS, were injected into two identical rings, each measuring 300 metres in diameter, and collided head on at the 8 points where the rings intersected. The installation, which remained in operation until 1984, gave physicists access to a wide range of energies for hadron physics, hitherto restricted to the data from cosmic ray studies. The many technological challenges that were met at the ISR, in the fields of vacuum technology and stochastic cooling for instance,...

  12. Correlated wounded hot spots in proton-proton interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Petersen, Hannah; Soto-Ontoso, Alba

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of nontrivial spatial correlations between proton constituents, considered in this work to be gluonic hot spots, on the initial conditions of proton-proton collisions from ISR to Large Hadron Collider energies, i.e., √{s }=52.6 , 7000, and 13 000 GeV. The inclusion of these correlations is motivated by their fundamental role in the description of a recently observed new feature of p p scattering at √{s }=7 TeV, the hollowness effect. Our analysis relies on a Monte Carlo Glauber approach including fluctuations in the hot spot positions and their entropy deposition in the transverse plane. We explore both the energy dependence and the effect of spatial correlations on the number of wounded hot spots, their spatial distribution, and the eccentricities, ɛn, of the initial state geometry of the collision. In minimum bias collisions we find that the inclusion of short-range repulsive correlations between the hot spots reduces the value of the eccentricity (ɛ2) and the triangularity (ɛ3). In turn, upon considering only the events with the highest entropy deposition, i.e., the ultracentral ones, the probability of having larger ɛ2 ,3 increases significantly in the correlated scenario. Finally, the eccentricities show a quite mild energy dependence.

  13. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gautschi

    Full Text Available The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  14. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Schild, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC) exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  15. Segmental trunk control acquisition and reaching in typically developing infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwani, Jaya; Santamaria, Victor; Saavedra, Sandra L; Wood, Stacy; Porter, Francine; Woollacott, Marjorie H

    2013-07-01

    This study explored the influence of an external support at the thoracic and pelvic level of the trunk on the success of reaching, postural stability and reaching kinematics while infants reached for a toy. Seventeen infants (4-6 months) were clustered into two groups according to their trunk control assessed with the Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control. Major differences were seen between groups with pelvic support, whereas with thoracic support, all infants showed similar quality reaching behaviors. With the external pelvic support, infants who had acquired trunk control in the lumbar region were more accurate in their reaching movements (less movement time, improved straightness of reach, less movement units and increased path length per movement unit) and were more stable (decreased trunk and head displacement) during a reach than infants who had only acquired trunk control in the thoracic region. These results support the hypothesis that trunk control influences the quality of reaching behavior.

  16. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  17. Blistering of the selected materials irradiated by intense 200 keV proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrelin, V.T. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bykov, P.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I.A.; Ivanov, A.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jongen, Y. [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Konstantinov, S.G. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, A.M.; Kuklin, K.N.; Mekler, K.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Polosatkin, S.V., E-mail: s.v.polosatkin@inp.nsk. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Postupaev, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Rovenskikh, A.F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sinitskiy, S.L. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zubairov, E.R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrent' eva 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-01

    Formation of blisters on the surfaces of metal targets made of the selected materials was studied. The targets were irradiated by 100-200 keV, 1-2 mA proton beam up to the doses above 10{sup 24} m{sup -2}. Real-time monitoring of the target surface was performed with a set of in situ optical surface diagnostics that allows detection of the moment of blisters appearance. The overview of experimental setup and the results of testing of different materials are presented. The number and the size of blisters gradually increase during the irradiation. Critical fluence of blistering strongly depends on the target temperature, proton energy and surface machining method. The features of blistering under the proton beam irradiation and the effects of hydrogen diffusion and interaction with the target lattice are discussed.

  18. Observation of gaseous nitric acid production at a high-energy proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Y; Nakajima, H

    2005-01-01

    High-energy protons and neutrons produce a variety of radionuclides as well as noxious and oxidative gases, such as ozone and nitric acid, in the air mainly through the nuclear spallation of atmospheric elements. Samples were collected from the surfaces of magnets, walls, and floors in the neutrino beamline tunnel and the target station of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron facility by wiping surfaces with filter paper. Considerably good correlations were found between the amounts of nitrate and tritium and between those of nitrate and /sup 7/Be. This finding gives evidence that at high-energy proton facilities, nitric acid is produced in the radiolysis of air in beam- loss regions. Also, the nitric acid on the surfaces was found to be desorbed and tended to be more uniform throughout the tunnel due to air circulation. The magnitude of diminishing from the surfaces was in the order of tritium>nitrate>/sup 7/Be1).

  19. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makgato, T.N.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Ramos, M.A.; García-Hernández, M.; Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A.; Shrivastava, S.; Erasmus, R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1–2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1–1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μ eff ~(0.1–0.2)μ B . No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. - Highlights: • Proton macro-irradiation of pure diamond creates fluence dependent paramagnetism. • The effective magnetic moment is found to be in the range μ eff ~(0.1–0.2)μ B . • No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed.

  20. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makgato, T.N., E-mail: Thuto.Makgato@students.wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Sideras-Haddad, E. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Center of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Ramos, M.A. [CMAM, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); García-Hernández, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A. [CMAM, Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Shrivastava, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Erasmus, R. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Center of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa)

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1–2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1–1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μ{sub eff}~(0.1–0.2)μ{sub B}. No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. - Highlights: • Proton macro-irradiation of pure diamond creates fluence dependent paramagnetism. • The effective magnetic moment is found to be in the range μ{sub eff}~(0.1–0.2)μ{sub B}. • No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed.

  1. Preliminary design of the new Proton Synchrotron Internal Dump core

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091975; Nuiry, François-Xavier

    The luminosity of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN is planned to be upgraded in the first half of 2020s, requiring also the upgrade of its injector accelerators, including the Proton Synchrotron (PS). The PS Internal Dumps are beam dumps located in the PS accelerator ring. They are safety devices designed to stop the circulating proton beam in order to protect the accelerator from damage due to an uncontrolled beam loss. The PS Internal Dumps need to be upgraded to be able to withstand the future higher intensity and energy proton beams. The dump core is a block of material interacting with the beam. It is located in ultra-high vacuum and moved into the beam path in 150 milliseconds by an electromagnet and spring-based actuation mechanism. The circulating proton beam is shaved by the core surface during thousands of beam revolutions. The preliminary new dump core design weighs 13 kilograms and consists of an isostatically pressed fine-grain graphite and a precipitation hardened copper alloy CuCrZr. The ...

  2. Reaching Hard-to-Reach Individuals: Nonselective Versus Targeted Outbreak Response Vaccination for Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Andrea; Hurtado, Northan; Grais, Rebecca F.; Ferrari, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Current mass vaccination campaigns in measles outbreak response are nonselective with respect to the immune status of individuals. However, the heterogeneity in immunity, due to previous vaccination coverage or infection, may lead to potential bias of such campaigns toward those with previous high access to vaccination and may result in a lower-than-expected effective impact. During the 2010 measles outbreak in Malawi, only 3 of the 8 districts where vaccination occurred achieved a measureable effective campaign impact (i.e., a reduction in measles cases in the targeted age groups greater than that observed in nonvaccinated districts). Simulation models suggest that selective campaigns targeting hard-to-reach individuals are of greater benefit, particularly in highly vaccinated populations, even for low target coverage and with late implementation. However, the choice between targeted and nonselective campaigns should be context specific, achieving a reasonable balance of feasibility, cost, and expected impact. In addition, it is critical to develop operational strategies to identify and target hard-to-reach individuals. PMID:24131555

  3. Using Proton Radiation from the Moon to Probe Regolith Hydrogenation in the Upper 1-10 cm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N.; Wilson, J. K.; Jordan, A.; Looper, M. D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Townsend, L.; Spence, H. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Petro, N. E.; Stubbs, T. J.; Pieters, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Detection of proton radiation from the Moon offers a new observational method for mapping compositional variations over the lunar surface. Recently, it was discovered that the yield of high energy "albedo" proton radiation coming from the lunar regolith due to bombardment by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) depends on latitude: the yield increases toward higher latitudes. This dependence was attributed to a surface layer of hydrogenated regolith near the poles. Here, an improved technique is developed to use the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to detect proton radiation from the lunar horizon and from lunar nadir and to use this to investigate diurnal variation in near-surface hydrogenation. Based on measurements taken in 2015, CRaTER observes an average proton albedo rate with a higher yield of protons from the lunar horizon than from the nadir. Both the average proton radiation albedo rate and the excess of proton radiation from the lunar horizon agree well with simulations. The measurements provide further evidence for the existence of the lunar hydrogenation layer. Lastly, CRaTER finds a yield (defined by the proton albedo divided by the GCR input) that is higher on the morning terminator compared to the evening terminator. Based on the observational statistics, there is a significant likelihood that the AM terminator produces a higher yield in the proton radiation albedo than the PM terminator during the period studied. While this presents some possible evidence of an AM enhancement, the excess could also potentially be explained by variation in GCR heavy species (He and heavier species). While initial results of an improved technique for measuring the proton radiation albedo are promising, the observational dataset utilized by CRaTER must be expanded significantly to reduce uncertainties in the search for temporal evolution and the excess of proton radiation from the lunar horizon as we probe

  4. Reach/frequency for printed media: Personal probabilities or models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    2000-01-01

    The author evaluates two different ways of estimating reach and frequency of plans for printed media. The first assigns reading probabilities to groups of respondents and calculates reach and frequency by simulation. the second estimates parameters to a model for reach/frequency. It is concluded ...

  5. Visual Guidance in Infants' Reaching toward Suddenly Displaced Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmead, Daniel H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Fourteen five- and nine-month-old infants were presented with illuminated toys to reach for in total darkness. In half the trials, a luminescent marker was attached to the reaching hand. The nine-month olds reached just as accurately with or without the hand marker, whereas five-month olds were generally inaccurate and unaffected by the marker.…

  6. Visual Control of Reaching and Grasping in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Michael E.; Ashmead, Daniel H.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated role of visual input during reaching and grasping. Found that both infants and adults completed a reach and grasp to a darkened object but used vision when object remained visible. Infants contacted the object more often when it remained visible, although with longer durations and more movement units. Adults reached faster and more…

  7. Proton decay: Numerical simulations confront grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, R.C.; Maturana, G.; Giles, R.C.; Moriarty, K.J.M.; Samuel, S.

    The Grand Unified Theories of the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions constitute a far reaching attempt to synthesize our knowledge of theoretical particle physics into a consistent and compelling whole. Unfortunately, many quantitative predictions of such unified theories are sensitive to the analytically intractible effects of the strong subnuclear theory (Quantum Chromodynamics or QCD). The consequence is that even ambitious experimental programs exploring weak and super-weak interaction effects often fail to give definitive theoretical tests. This paper describes large-scale calculations on a supercomputer which can help to overcome this gap between theoretical predictions and experimental results. Our focus here is on proton decay, though the methods described are useful for many weak processes. The basic algorithms for the numerical simulation of QCD are well known. We will discuss the advantages and challenges of applying these methods to weak transitions. The algorithms require a very large data base with regular data flow and are natural candidates for vectorization. Also, 32-bit floating point arithmetic is adequate. Thus they are most naturally approached using a supercomputer alone or in combination with a dedicated special purpose processor. (orig.).

  8. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  9. Proton Radiography at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos National Lab uses high energy protons to acquire multiple frame flash radiographic sequences at megahertz speeds: that is, it can make movies of the inside of explosions as they happen. The facility is primarily used to study the damage to and failure of metals subjected to the shock forces of high explosives as well as to study the detonation of the explosives themselves. Applications include improving our understanding of the underlying physical processes that drive the performance of the nuclear weapons in the United States stockpile and developing novel armor technologies in collaboration with the Army Research Lab. The principle and techniques of pRad will be described, and examples of some recent results will be shown.

  10. Alternative initial proton acceptors for the D pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Lakshman; Hosler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    In order to characterize protein structures that control proton uptake, forms of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) containing a carboxyl or a thiol group in line with the initial, internal waters of the D pathway for proton transfer have been assayed in the presence and absence of subunit III. Subunit III provides approximately half of the protein surrounding the entry region of the D pathway. The mutant N139D-D132N contains a carboxyl group 6Å within the D pathway and lacks the normal, surface-exposed proton acceptor, Asp-132. With subunit III, the steady-state activity of this mutant is slow but once subunit III is removed its activity is the same as wild-type CcO lacking subunit III (∼1800 H+ s-1). Thus, a carboxyl group ∼25% within the pathway enhances proton uptake even though the carboxyl has no direct contact with bulk solvent. Protons from solvent apparently move to internal Asp-139 through a short file of waters, normally blocked by subunit III. Cysteine-139 also supports rapid steady-state proton uptake, demonstrating that an anion other than a carboxyl can attract and transfer protons into the D pathway. When both Asp-132 and Asp/Cys-139 are present, the removal of subunit III increases CcO activity to rates greater than that of normal CcO due to simultaneous proton uptake by two initial acceptors. The results show how the environment of the initial proton acceptor for the D pathway in these CcO forms dictates the pH range of CcO activity, with implications for the function of Asp-132, the normal proton acceptor. PMID:21344856

  11. Radiotherapy Proton Interactions in Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    A survey of physics useful to proton radiotherapy, centered on stopping, scattering and hard scatters: 1. Introduction 2. The fundamental formula dose = fluence x mass stopping power. Practical units, comments on effective stopping power. 3. Range: experimental definition, Beth-Bloch CSDA theory, range-energy tables and approximations, range straggling. 4. Multiple Coulomb Scattering: suggested reading, elements of Moliere theory, the Gaussian approximation, scattering power. 5. Hard scatters...

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are novel compounds that strongly inhibit the H+/K+-ATPase in the gastric parietal cells to cause profound suppression of acid secretion. Acid-generating ATPase, also known as vacuolar-type ATPase, is located in the lysozomes of leukocytes and osteoclasts and its activity is also reportedly influenced by treatment with PPIs. This concept is supported by the results of studies using autoradiography in which 3H-Lansoprazole uptake sites were clearly detected in the...

  13. Are starburst galaxies proton calorimeters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    Several starburst galaxies have been observed in the GeV and TeV bands. In these dense environments, gamma-ray emission should be dominated by cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the interstellar medium (pcrpism → π0 → γγ). Indeed, starbursts may act as proton `calorimeters' where a substantial fraction of CR energy input is emitted in gamma-rays. Here, we build a one-zone, `thick-target' model implementing calorimetry and placing a firm upper bound on gamma-ray emission from CR interactions. The model assumes that CRs are accelerated by supernovae (SNe), and all suffer nuclear interactions rather than escape. Our model has only two free parameters: the CR proton acceleration energy per SN ɛcr, and the proton injection spectral index s. We calculate the pionic gamma-ray emission from 10 MeV to 10 TeV, and derive thick-target parameters for six galaxies with Fermi, H.E.S.S., and/or VERITAS data. Our model provides good fits for the M82 and NGC 253, and yields ɛcr and s values suggesting that SN CR acceleration is similar in starbursts and in our Galaxy. We find that these starbursts are indeed nearly if not fully proton calorimeters. For NGC 4945 and NGC 1068, the models are consistent with calorimetry but are less well-constrained due to the lack of TeV data. However, the Circinus galaxy and the ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 exceed our pionic upper-limit; possible explanations are discussed.

  14. Proton lifetime from SU(5) unification in extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alciati, Maria Laura; Feruglio, Ferruccio E-mail: ferruccio.feruglio@pd.infn.it; Lin Yin; Varagnolo, Alvise

    2005-03-01

    We provide detailed estimates of the proton lifetime in the context of simple supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with an extra compact spatial dimension, described by the orbifold S/(Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 2}') and by a large compactification scale Mc. We focus on a class of models where the grand unified symmetry is broken by the compactification mechanism and where baryon violation proceeds mainly through gauge vector boson exchange so that the proton lifetime scales as the fourth power of Mc. We carefully compute Mc from a next-to-leading analysis of gauge coupling unification and we find that Mc can only be predicted up to an overall factor one hundred. The simplest model, where the dominant decay mode is ({pi}{sup 0}e+) and has no flavour suppression, is strongly constrained by existing data, but not totally ruled out. We also analyze models where some of the matter fields are localized in the extra space and proton decay is flavour suppressed. In models associated to anarchy in the neutrino sector the preferred decay channel is (K+{l_brace}{nu}-bar{r_brace}) and the lifetime can be within the reach of the next generation of experiments. (author)

  15. The intense proton accelerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1990-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency of Japan has formulated the OMEGA project, in which incineration of nuclear wastes by use of accelerators is defined as one of the important tasks. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been engaged for several years in basic studies in incineration technology with use of an intense proton linear accelerator. The intense proton accelerator program intends to provide a large scale proton linear accelerator called Engineering Test Accelerator. The principal purpose of the accelerator is to develop nuclear waste incineration technology. The accelerator will also be used for other industrial applications and applied science studies. The present report further outlines the concept of incineration of radio-activities of nuclear wastes, focusing on nuclear reactions and a concept of incineration plant. Features of Engineering Test Accelerator are described focusing on the development of the accelerator, and research and development of incineration technology. Applications of science and technology other than nuclear waste incineration are also discussed. (N.K.)

  16. Magnetic optics for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    High energy protons of 10 to 50 GeV can be used to radiograph dense objects. Because the transmitted beam particles undergo multiple coulomb scattering (MCS) in the object, a magnetic lens system is used to focus the particles exiting each point of the object onto a distant image plane. Without the lens, the MCS would seriously blur the radiographic image. Correlations can be introduced in the illuminating beam to cancel a major part of the chromatic and geometric aberrations in the lens, while providing locations inside the lens where the rays are sorted by MCS angle. This allows the introduction of angle cut apertures to aid material identification. The requirement for a matched multistage lens system with successively smaller angle-cut apertures leads to the use of minus-identity (-I) lenses, in which the angle sorting is in the longitudinal mid plane of the lens, and the exit beam correlations are the same as the input correlations. A single stage -I lens has been successfully tested at Brookhaven with 10-GeV protons and another is being used in dynamic experiments with 0.8-GeV protons at Los Alamos. The resolution achievable at higher energies is briefly surveyed

  17. Spiking and LFP activity in PRR during symbolically instructed reaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Jung; Andersen, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    The spiking activity in the parietal reach region (PRR) represents the spatial goal of an impending reach when the reach is directed toward or away from a visual object. The local field potentials (LFPs) in this region also represent the reach goal when the reach is directed to a visual object. Thus PRR is a candidate area for reading out a patient's intended reach goals for neural prosthetic applications. For natural behaviors, reach goals are not always based on the location of a visual object, e.g., playing the piano following sheet music or moving following verbal directions. So far it has not been directly tested whether and how PRR represents reach goals in such cognitive, nonlocational conditions, and knowing the encoding properties in various task conditions would help in designing a reach goal decoder for prosthetic applications. To address this issue, we examined the macaque PRR under two reach conditions: reach goal determined by the stimulus location (direct) or shape (symbolic). For the same goal, the spiking activity near reach onset was indistinguishable between the two tasks, and thus a reach goal decoder trained with spiking activity in one task performed perfectly in the other. In contrast, the LFP activity at 20-40 Hz showed small but significantly enhanced reach goal tuning in the symbolic task, but its spatial preference remained the same. Consequently, a decoder trained with LFP activity performed worse in the other task than in the same task. These results suggest that LFP decoders in PRR should take into account the task context (e.g., locational vs. nonlocational) to be accurate, while spike decoders can robustly provide reach goal information regardless of the task context in various prosthetic applications.

  18. Measurement of proton and nitrogen polarization in ammonia and a test of equal spin temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bradtke, C; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Dreshpande, A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dutz, H; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gehring, R; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Harmsen, J; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Kok, E; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Martin, A; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Parks, D P; Pereira da Costa, H D; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Plückthun, M; Polec, J; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K

    1998-01-01

    The 1996 data taking of the SMC experiment used polarized protons to measure the spin dependent structure function $g_1$ of the proton. Three liters of solid granular ammonia were irradiated at the Bonn electron linac in order to create the paramagnetic radicals which are needed for polarizing the protons. Proton polarizations of $\\pm(90\\pm2.5)\\,\\%$ were routinely reached. An analysis based on a theoretical line-shape for spin-1 systems with large quadrupolar broadening was developed which allowed the nitrogen polarization in the ammonia to be determined with a 10\\,\\% relative error. The measured quadrupolar coupling constant of $^{14}$N agrees well with earlier extrapolated values. The polarization of the nitrogen nuclei was measured as a function of the proton polarization in order to provide a test of the equal spin temperature (EST) hypothesis. It was found to be closely valid under the dynamic nuclear polarization conditions with which the protons are polarized. Large deviations from EST could be induced...

  19. Dose rate and irradiation time effects on the shape of Au nanomaterials under proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong-Joon; Song, Jae Hee

    2007-01-01

    A synthetic route is presented for the high yield production of Au nanomaterials via a simple proton beam irradiation process. We were able to prepare Au nanomaterials under a proton beam at low concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide at room temperature. It was observed that the size and shape of the prepared gold nanocrystals were easily controlled by the dose rate and irradiation time of the proton beam. When the dose rate of the proton beam was kept constant, a shape transition of Au crystals from particles to nanorods/nanowires and then again to particles was observed as the duration time was increased. When the total dose was kept constant by varying the dose rate and duration time of the proton beam, there was an apparent change in the feature size and shape of the Au nanomaterials produced under proton beam irradiation. Once the dose rate reached a proper value, very similar feature shapes of gold nanocrystals were produced, as long as the total dose was constant

  20. Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Ottochian, Alistar; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2015-07-15

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate proton transport in BaSnO3. Structural optimizations in the stable and saddle point configurations for transfer (hopping) and reorientation allow description of the high-temperature classical and semi-classical regimes, in which diffusion occurs by over-barrier motion. At lower temperature (typically below 300 K), we describe the thermally-assisted quantum regime, in which protonic motion is of quantum nature and occurs in "coincidence" configurations favored by thermal fluctuations of the surrounding atoms. Both the non-adiabatic and the adiabatic limits are examined. In the adiabatic limit, the protonic energy landscape in the coincidence configuration is very flat. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of the proton in the coincidence potential reveal, in the transfer case, that the density of probability of H(+) has its maximum at the saddle point, because the zero-point energy exceeds the coincidence barrier. Arguments are given that support the adiabatic picture for the transfer mechanism. In the case of reorientation, the time scales for the existence of the coincidence and for protonic motion, as estimated from the time-energy uncertainty principle by using a simple one-dimensional model, are of the same order of magnitude, suggesting that the adiabatic limit is not reached. Protonic transfer and reorientation in this oxide are therefore governed by different mechanisms below room temperature.

  1. Two-Photon-Exchange Correction to Parity-Violating Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Carl Carlson

    2005-02-01

    Higher-order QED effects play an important role in precision measurements of nucleon elastic form factors in electron scattering. Here we introduce a two-photon exchange QED correction to the parity-violating polarization asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering. We calculate this correction in the parton model using the formalism of generalized parton distributions, and demonstrate that it can reach several per cent in certain kinematics, becoming comparable in size with existing experimental measurements of strange-quark effects in the proton neutral weak current.

  2. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  3. Construction and test of the PRIOR proton microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Philipp-Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) in the laboratory makes great demands on the diagnostics because these states can usually only be created for a short time and usual diagnostic techniques with visible light or X-rays come to their limit because of the high density. The high energy proton radiography technique that was developed in the 1990s at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is a very promising possibility to overcome those limits so that one can measure the density of HEDM with high spatial and time resolution. For this purpose the proton microscope PRIOR (Proton Radiography for FAIR) was set up at GSI, which not only reproduces the image, but also magnifies it by a factor of 4.2 and thereby penetrates matter with a density up to 20 g/cm 2 . Straightaway a spatial resolution of less than 30 μm and a time resolution on the nanosecond scale was achieved. This work describes details to the principle, design and construction of the proton microscope as well as first measurements and simulations of essential components like magnetic lenses, a collimator and a scintillator screen. For the latter one it was possible to show that plastic scintillators can be used as converter as an alternative to the slower but more radiation resistant crystals, so that it is possible to reach a time resolution of 10 ns. Moreover the characteristics were investigated for the system at the commissioning in April 2014. Also the changes in the magnetic field due to radiation damage were studied. Besides that an overview about future applications is given. First experiments with Warm Dense Matter created by using a Pulsed Power Setup have already been performed. Furthermore the promising concept of combining proton radiography with particle therapy has been investigated in context of the PaNTERA project. An outlook on the possibilities with future experiments at the FAIR accelerator facility is given as well. Because of higher beam intensity an energy one can expect even

  4. Intrinsically proton-conducting poly(1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole)/triflic acid blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Ayse; Celik, Sevim U.; Sen, Unal; Haser, Resul; Bozkurt, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, proton conductivity in a polymer blend comprising proton solvating heterocycles was examined. Poly(1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole), PVTri was produced by free radical polymerization of 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole and then proton-conducting polymer electrolytes were obtained by blending of PVTri with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, triflic acid (TA). To promote the intrinsic proton conductivity the percent blending ratio was changed from 25% to 150% with respect to polymer repeat unit. The protonation of aromatic heterocyclic rings was proved with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Thermogravimetry (TG) analysis showed that the samples are thermally stable up to approximately 300 deg. C. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results illustrated that the samples are homogeneous and their glass transition temperatures are located within 130-160 deg. C. The surface morphology of the materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The proton conductivity of the blends increased with triflic acid concentration and the temperature. In the anhydrous state, the proton conductivity of PVTriTA100 is 2.2 x 10 -4 S/cm at 150 deg. C and that of PVTriTA150 is approximately 0.012 S/cm at 80 deg. C which is similar to that of hydrated Nafion

  5. Rechargeable Metal-Air Proton-Exchange Membrane Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Togo; Oogushi, Akihide; Hibino, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Rechargeable proton-exchange membrane batteries that employ organic chemical hydrides as hydrogen-storage media have the potential to serve as next-generation power sources; however, significant challenges remain regarding the improvement of the reversible hydrogen-storage capacity. Here, we address this challenge through the use of metal-ion redox couples as energy carriers for battery operation. Carbon, with a suitable degree of crystallinity and surface oxygenation, was used as an effective anode material for the metal redox reactions. A Sn 0.9 In 0.1 P 2 O 7 -based electrolyte membrane allowed no crossover of vanadium ions through the membrane. The V 4+ /V 3+ , V 3+ /V 2+ , and Sn 4+ /Sn 2+ redox reactions took place at a more positive potential than that for hydrogen reduction, so that undesired hydrogen production could be avoided. The resulting electrical capacity reached 306 and 258 mAh g -1 for VOSO 4 and SnSO 4 , respectively, and remained at 76 and 91 % of their respective initial values after 50 cycles.

  6. Physiologic and Radiographic Evidence of the Distal Edge of the Proton Beam in Craniospinal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejcarek, Stephanie C.; Grant, P. Ellen; Henson, John W.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Fatty replacement of bone marrow resulting from radiation therapy can be seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. We evaluated the radiographic appearance of the vertebral bodies in children treated with proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to illustrate the distal edge effect of proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 13 adolescents aged 12-18 years who received CSI with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. Ten of these patients had reached maximal or near-maximal growth. Proton beam radiation for these 10 patients was delivered to the thecal sac and exiting nerve roots only, whereas the remaining 3 patients had a target volume that included the thecal sac, exiting nerve roots, and entire vertebral bodies. Median CSI dose was 27 [range, 23.4-36] cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) given in 1.8-CGE fractions. Magnetic resonance images of the spine were obtained after completion of radiotherapy. Results: Magnetic resonance images of patients who received proton radiotherapy to the thecal sac only demonstrate a sharp demarcation of hyperintense T1-weighted signal in the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies, consistent with radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement. Magnetic resonance images of the patients prescribed proton radiotherapy to the entire vertebral column had corresponding hyperintense T1-weighted signal involving the entire vertebral bodies. Conclusion: The sharp delineation of radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement in the vertebral bodies demonstrates the rapid decrease in energy at the edge of the proton beam. This provides evidence for a sharp fall-off in radiation dose and supports the premise that proton radiotherapy spares normal tissues unnecessary irradiation

  7. Calibration and monitoring of the MEG experiment by a proton beam from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Bai, X.; Baldini, A.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Cerri, C.; Corbo, M.; Curalli, N.; Bari, A. de; De Gerone, M.; Doke, T.; Dussoni, S.; Egger, J.

    2011-01-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI searches for the decay μ→eγ at a level of ∼10 -13 on the branching ratio BR(μ→eγ/μ→tot), well beyond the present experimental limit (BR≤1.2x10 -11 ) and is sensitive to the predictions of SUSY-GUT theories. To reach this goal the experiment uses one of the most intense continuous surface muon beams available (∼10 8 μ/s) and relies on advanced technology (LXe calorimetry, a gradient-field superconducting spectrometer as well as flexible and powerful trigger and acquisition systems). In order to maintain the highest possible energy, time and spatial resolutions for such detector, frequent calibration and monitoring, using a Cockcroft-Walton proton accelerator, are required. The proton beam is brought to the centre of MEG by a special bellows insertion system and travels in a direction opposite to the one of the normal μ-beam. Protons interact with a lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) nuclear target and produce one γ (17.6 MeV) from the reaction 7 3 Li(p,γ) 8 4 Be or two coincident γs (11.67 and 4.4 MeV) from the reaction 11 5 B(p,γ 1 ) 12 6 C * . The 17.6 MeV γ is used for calibrating and monitoring the LXe calorimeter (σ E γ /E γ =3.85±0.15% at 17.6 MeV) while the coincident 11.67 and 4.4 MeV γs are used to measure the relative timing of the calorimeter and the spectrometer timing counters (σ Δt =0.450±0.015ns). - Highlights: →Experiments that search for rare phenomena need to be constantly monitor and calibrated. →We show that proton induced nuclear reactions generate γ-rays useful for calibrating and monitoring the MEG experiment. →We describe the design, assembly and test of the calibration and monitoring accelerator for the MEG experiment.

  8. Action plans can interact to hinder or facilitate reach performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Lisa R; Wiediger, Matthew D; Taddese, Ezana F

    2015-11-01

    Executing a reach action can be delayed while retaining another action in working memory (WM) if the two action plans partly overlap rather than do not overlap. This delay (partial repetition cost) occurs when reach responses are under cognitive control. In this study, we investigated whether facilitation (a partial repetition benefit) occurs when reach responses are automatic. We also examined whether the hemisphere controlling the limb or selection of the preferred limb (based on a free-reach task) influences reach performance when the actions partly overlap. Left- and right-handers reached to different stimulus locations to the left and right of body midline with their ipsilateral hand while maintaining an action plan in WM that required the same or the different hand. The results showed a partial repetition benefit for spatially compatible reaches to left and right stimulus locations far from the body midline, but not for those near the body midline. Also, no partial repetition cost was found at any of the stimulus-reach locations. This indicates that automatic reach responses that partly overlap with an action plan maintained in WM are not delayed, but instead can be facilitated (partial repetition benefit). The roles of hemisphere and reach-hand preference in action control and the importance of the degree of feature overlap in obtaining a partial repetition benefit (and cost) are discussed.

  9. Studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors and a measurement of the inelastic proton--proton cross-section at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360674; Ward, Patricia

    This thesis presents studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors for the new ATLAS tracker at the high-luminosity LHC, calibrations of the LHC luminosity scale, and a measurement of the proton--proton inelastic cross-section at 13 TeV~with ATLAS data. The studies of radiation damage are performed by comparing sensor performance before and after irradiation, and include annealing studies. The measured quantities include: leakage current, depletion depth, inter-strip isolation, and charge collection. Surface and bulk damage is studied by comparing the results of sensors irradiated with protons and neutrons. The observed degradation of performance suggests the current sensor design will endure the radiation damage expected over the lifetime of the experiment at the high-luminosity LHC. The luminosity is calibrated for the proton--proton, proton--lead, and lead--lead collisions delivered by the LHC during 2013 and 2015. The absolute luminosity scale is derived with the van der Meer method. The systematic unc...

  10. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  11. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  12. Enthalpies of proton adsorption onto Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2011-03-01

    Understanding bacterial surface reactivity requires many different lines of investigation. Toward this end, we used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure heats of proton adsorption onto a Gram positive thermophile Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C. Proton adsorption under all conditions exhibited exothermic heat production. Below pH 4.5, exothermic heats decreased as temperature increased above 37 °C; above pH 4.5, there was no significant difference in heats evolved at the temperatures investigated. Total proton uptake did not vary significantly with temperature. Site-specific enthalpies and entropies were calculated by applying a 4-site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model to the calorimetric data. Interpretation of site-specific enthalpies and entropies of proton adsorption for site L1, L2, and L4 are consistent with previous interpretations of phosphoryl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl/amine site-identities, respectively, and with previous calorimetric measurements of proton adsorption onto mesophilic species. Enthalpies and entropies for surface site L3 are not consistent with the commonly inferred phosphoryl site-identity and are more consistent with sulfhydryl functional groups. These results reveal intricacies of surface reactivity that are not detectable by other methods.

  13. The cosmic ray proton, helium and CNO fluxes in the 100 TeV energy region from TeV muons and EAS atmospheric Cherenkov light observations of MACRO and EAS-TOP

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M; Ambrosio, M; Antolini, R; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, F; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bergamasco, L; Bernardini, P; Bertaina, M; Bilokon, H; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Castagnoli, C; Castellina, A; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Chiavassa, A; Choudhary, B C; Cini, G; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Di Sciascio, G; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fulgione, W; Fusco, P; Galeotti, P; Ghia, P L; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iacovacci, M; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Mannocchi, G; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Morello, C; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Navarra, G; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Saavedra, O; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Stamerra, A; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Trinchero, G C; Vakili, M; Valchierotti, S; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2004.01.005

    2004-01-01

    The primary cosmic ray (CR) proton, helium and CNO fluxes in the energy range 80-300 TeV are studied at the National Gran Sasso Laboratories by means of EAS-TOP (Campo Imperatore, 2005 m a.s.l.) and MACRO (deep underground, 3100 m w.e., the surface energy threshold for a muon reaching the detector being E/sub mu //sup th/ approximately=1.3 TeV). The measurement is based on: (a) the selection of primaries based on their energy/nucleon (i.e., with energy/nucleon sufficient to produce a muon with energy larger than 1.3 TeV) and the reconstruction of the shower geometry by means of the muons recorded by MACRO in the deep underground laboratories; (b) the detection of the associated atmospheric Cherenkov light (C.l.) signals by means of the C.l. detector of EAS-TOP. The C.l. density at core distance r>100 m is directly related to the total primary energy E/sub 0/. Proton and helium ("p+He") and proton, helium and CNO ("p +He+CNO") primaries are thus selected at E/sub 0/ approximately=80 Te V, and at E/sub 0/ appro...

  14. An introduction to proton conduction in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    1980-09-01

    Proton conducting solids have been studied intensively in recent years due to their potential use as ion conducting separators in efficient fuel cells for electricity generation. This report describes fuel cell - and other possible applications of solid proton conductors. The best performing materials known today are listed. Typical synthetic routes and some models for proton transport in solids are discussed. Hints to future research are given. The litterature collected for this report covers mainly the period 1974-1980. (author)

  15. Laser Compton polarimetry of proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, A.

    1995-01-01

    A need exists for non-destructive polarization measurements of the polarized proton beams in the AGS and, in the future, in RHIC. One way to make such measurements is to scatter photons from the polarized beams. Until now, such measurements were impossible because of the extremely low Compton scattering cross section from protons. Modern lasers now can provide enough photons per laser pulse not only to scatter from proton beams but also, at least in RHIC, to analyze their polarization

  16. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  17. Multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering and soft proton proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1987-06-01

    We demonstrate how the theoretical knowledge about multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering can be incorporated into a multistring model for low p/sub t/ proton proton collisions. 25 refs., 8 figs

  18. A plan to clear energetic protons from the radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The Earth's radiation belts have been a known hazard to satellites since at least 1962, when an American high-altitude nuclear weapons test named Starfish Prime produced an artificial belt that disabled the first commercial communications satellite, TelStar 1. In the years since the Cold War, thousands of satellites have been put into orbit, and surface charging, high-energy protons, high-energy electrons known as "killer electrons," and other hazards of the inner magnetosphere have continued to take their toll. Satellites can be hardened against these radiation hazards, but some researchers have recently floated a more radical idea: If specially designed transmitters are put into space and set to emit tightly tuned waves, known as electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, they could potentially push the highly energetic protons out of the Earth's inner radiation belt, clearing the satellite's path.

  19. Proton beam writing of erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sum, T.C.; Bettiol, A.A.; Liu, K.; Ren, M.Q.; Pun, E.Y.B.; Venugopal Rao, S.; Kan, J.A. van; Watt, F.

    2005-01-01

    Buried channel waveguide amplifiers in Er 3+ -Yb 3+ co-doped phosphate glasses were fabricated by proton beam writing using a focused sub-micron beam of 2.0 MeV protons with a fluence ranging from 0.5-6.0 x 10 15 particles/cm 2 . The waveguides were located at a depth of ∼38 μm beneath the surface. Above a threshold fluence of 3.0 x 10 15 particles/cm 2 , a negative refractive index change occurs, preventing any light confinement in the channel. A peak net gain of ∼1.57 dB/cm was measured for waveguides fabricated with a fluence of ∼0.9 x 10 15 particles/cm 2 . These measurements were performed at 1.534 μm signal wavelength, with 100 mW pump power at 975 nm wavelength

  20. Challenges in reduction of dinitrogen by proton and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Cornelis J M; Koper, Marc T M; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-08-07

    Ammonia is an important nutrient for the growth of plants. In industry, ammonia is produced by the energy expensive Haber-Bosch process where dihydrogen and dinitrogen form ammonia at a very high pressure and temperature. In principle one could also reduce dinitrogen upon addition of protons and electrons similar to the mechanism of ammonia production by nitrogenases. Recently, major breakthroughs have taken place in our understanding of biological fixation of dinitrogen, of molecular model systems that can reduce dinitrogen, and in the electrochemical reduction of dinitrogen at heterogeneous surfaces. Yet for efficient reduction of dinitrogen with protons and electrons major hurdles still have to be overcome. In this tutorial review we give an overview of the different catalytic systems, highlight the recent breakthroughs, pinpoint common grounds and discuss the bottlenecks and challenges in catalytic reduction of dinitrogen.

  1. Structural studies on proton/protonation of the protein molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yukio; Kida, Akiko; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Keiichi; Murakami, Takuto; Umino, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yanagisawa, Yasutake; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Hidaka, Yuji; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Mitsutoshi; Nakanishi, Takeyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports three studies involved in the analysis of protons and protonation at physiologically active sites in protein molecules. (1) 'Elucidation of the higher-order structure formation and activity performing mechanism of yeast proteasome.' With an aim to apply to anti-cancer drugs, this study performed the shape analysis of the total structure of 26S proteasome using small-angle X-ray scattering to clarify the complex form where controlling elements bonded to the both ends of 20S catalyst body, and analyzed the complex structure between the active sites of 20S and inhibitor (drug). (2) 'Basic study on the neutron experiment of biomolecules such as physiologically active substances derived from Natto-bacteria.' This study conducted the purification, crystallization, and X-ray analysis experiment of nattokinase; high-grade purification and solution experiment of vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7); and Z-DNA crystal structure study related to the neutron crystal analysis of DNA as another biomolecule structure study. (3) 'Functional evaluation on digestive enzymes derived from Nephila clavata.' As an Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation model, this study carried out elucidation on the fibrosis and fiber-forming mechanism of the traction fiber of Nephila clavata, and the functional analysis of its degrading enzyme. (A.O.)

  2. Very Forward proton-proton interactions with the LHCf detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    The LHCf experiment has been designed to precisely measure very forward neutral particle spectra produced in proton-proton collisions at LHC up to an energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass system. These measurements are of fundamental importance to calibrate the Monte Carlo models widely used in the high energy cosmic ray (HECR) field, up to an equivalent laboratory energy of the order of 1017 eV. In 2009-2010 the experiment has completed the p-p data taking at sqrt{s} = 0.9 TeV and sqrt{s}=7 TeV and the detectors have later on been removed from the tunnel region, when the LHC luminosity increased above 1030 cm-2s-1. In this paper the most up-to-date results on the inclusive photon spectra and the pi0 spectra measured by LHCf are reported. Comparison of these spectra with the model expectations and the impact on high energy cosmic ray (HECR) Physics are discussed. In addition, perspectives for future analyses as well as the program for the next data taking period, in particular the foreseen data taking in p-P...

  3. The Australian National Proton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A.; Bishop, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Protons have been used in the treatment of cancer since 1954 and over 30,000 patients have been treated around the world. Their precise dose distribution allows the treatment of small tumours in critical locations such as the base of skull and orbit and is an alternative to stereotactic radiotherapy in other sites. With the development of hospital-based systems in the 1990's, common tumours such as prostate, breast and lung cancer can now also be treated using simple techniques. The therapeutic ratio is improved as the dose to the tumour can be increased while sparing normal tissues. The well defined high dose region and low integral dose compared with photon treatments is a particular advantage in children and other situations where long-term survival is expected and when used in combination with chemotherapy. In January 2002, the NSW Health Department initiated a Feasibility Study for an Australian National Proton Facility. This Study will address the complex medical, scientific, engineering, commercial and legal issues required to design and build a proton facility in Australia. The Facility will be mainly designed for patient treatment but will also provide facilities for biological, physical and engineering research. The proposed facility will have a combination of fixed and rotating beams with an energy range of 70-250 MeV. Such a centre will enable the conduct of randomised clinical trials and a comparison with other radiotherapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Cost-utility comparisons with other medical treatments will also be made and further facilities developed if the expected benefit is confirmed. When patients are not being treated, the beam will be available for commercial and research purposes. This presentation will summarize the progress of the Study and discuss the important issues that need to be resolved before the Facility is approved and constructed

  4. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-04-01

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  5. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2014-04-03

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  6. Proton transport in additives to the polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Pia

    2011-03-21

    The enhancement of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes is an important issue for the development of fuel cell technology. The objective is a material providing proton transport at a temperature range of 350 K to 450 K independent from a purely water based mechanism. To enhance the PEM properties of standard polymer materials, a class of additives is studied by means of atomistic simulations consisting of functionalised mesoporous silicon dioxide particles. The functional molecules are imidazole or sulphonic acid, covalently bound to the surface via a carbon chain with a surface density of about 1.0 nm{sup -2} groups. At first, the proton transport mechanism is explored in a system of functional molecules in vacuum. The molecules are constrained by the terminal carbon groups according to the geometric arrangement in the porous silicon dioxide. The proton transport mechanism is characterised by structural properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations and consists of the aggregation of two or more functional groups, a barrier free proton transport between these groups followed by the separation of the groups and formation of new aggregates due to fluctuations in the hydrogen bond network and movement of the carbon chain. For the different proton conducting groups, i.e. methyl imidazole, methyl sulphonic acid and water, the barrier free proton transport and the formation of protonated bimolecular complexes were addressed by potential energy calculations of the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB). For sulphonic acid even at a temperature of 450 K, relatively stable aggregates are formed, while most imidazole groups are isolated and the hydrogen bond fluctuations are high. However, high density of groups and elevated temperatures enhance the proton transport in both systems. Besides the anchorage and the density of the groups, the influence of the chemical environment on the proton transport was studied. Therefore, the

  7. Sigmatropic proton shifts: a quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2017-09-13

    A quantum chemical study of [1,j] sigmatropic proton shifts in polyenyl anions and related conjugated systems has been performed. We found that the Woodward-Hoffmann rules can be applied to understand the stereochemical outcome of these sigmatropic rearrangements, showing that [1,j] sigmatropic proton shift occurs antarafacially when j = 4n + 2, while suprafacial proton shift is symmetry-allowed when j = 4n. The activation barriers for [1,j] proton shifts in polyenyl anions C j H j+3 - are 48.2 (j = 2), 32.8 (j = 4), 21.0 (j = 6), 40.5 (j = 8), and 49.1 (j = 10) kcal mol -1 , respectively. This trend can be explained by the trade-off between stereoelectronic requirement and ring strain in the proton shift transition structure. Among these reactions, only the [1,6] proton shift with the lowest activation barrier can occur intramolecularly under mild reaction conditions. The others are unlikely to take place in a direct manner. Consequently, proton shuttles are generally required to facilitate these sigmatropic proton shifts through a protonation/deprotonation mechanism.

  8. Study on design of proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2000-01-01

    Two important directions in the development of proton linacs are high-current proton linacs (mainly applied in nuclear power field) and compact proton linacs (for proton therapy). There are some common characteristics in them: (1) Employment of the novel accelerating structures, which are combination and evolution of the conventional ones; (2) Accelerating beam with small emittance; (3) Requirement for high reliability. The construction of the former is, however, much more difficult because it still needs low beam lose rate and as high power transformation efficiency as possible. Some important problems in the design of these accelerators are discussed and some schemes designed are presented

  9. Modification of solid surface by intense pulsed light-ion and metal-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Ariyoshi, T.; Hanjo, H.; Tsutsumi, S.; Fujii, Y.; Itami, M.; Okamoto, A.; Ogawa, S.; Hamada, T.; Fukumaru, F.

    1989-03-01

    Metal surfaces of Al, stainless-steel and Ti were bombarded with focused intense pulsed proton and carbon ion beams (energy ˜ 80 keV, current density ≲ 1000 A/cm 2, pulse width ˜ 300 ns). Thin titanium carbide layers were produced by carbon-ion irradiation on the titanium surface. The observed molten surface structures and recrystallized layer (20 μm depth) indicated that the surfaces reached high temperatures as a result of the irradiation. The implantation of intense pulsed metal ion beams (Al +, ˜ 20 A/cm 2) with simultaneous deposition of anode metal vapor on Ti and Fe made a mixed layer of AlTi and AlFe of about 0.5 μm depth. Ti and B multilayered films evaporated on glass substrates were irradiated by intense pulsed proton beams of relatively lower current density (10-200 A/cm 2). Ti films containing B atoms above 10 at.% were obtained. When the current density was about 200 A/cm 2 diffraction peaks of TiB 2 appeared.

  10. Storage ring proton EDM experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    sensitivity of 10^-29 e-cm.  The strength of the method originates from the fact that there are high intensity polarized proton beams available and the fact that the so-called geometric phase systematic error background cancels with clock-wise and counter-clock-wise storage possible in electric rings. The ultimate sensitivity of the method is 10^-30 e-cm. At this level it will either detect a non-zero EDM or it will eliminate electro-weak baryogenesis.

  11. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A [Riverside, CA; Beloussov, Alexandre V [Bernardino, CA; Bakir, Julide [Alta Loma, CA; Armon, Deganit [Redlands, CA; Olsen, Howard B [Colton, CA; Salem, Dana [Riverside, CA

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  12. Proton ejection project for Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronca, G.; Gendreau, G.

    1959-01-01

    The reasons for choosing the ejection system are given. The characteristics required for the ejected beam are followed by a description of the ejection process, in chronological order from the viewpoint of the protons: movement of the particles, taking into account the various elements which make up the system (internal magnet, external magnet, quadrupoles, ejection correction coils, thin and thick cables,...) and specification of these elements. Then follows an estimation of the delay in manufacture and the cost of the project. Finally, the characteristics of the magnets and quadrupoles are listed in an appendix. (author) [fr

  13. SNS Proton Beam Window Disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to support the disposal of the proton beam window assembly of the Spallation Neutron Source beamline to the target station, waste classification analyses are performed. The window has a limited life-time due to radiation-induced material damage. Analyses include calculation of the radionuclide inventory and shielding analyses for the transport package/container to ensure that the container is compliant with the transportation and waste management regulations. In order to automate this procedure and minimize manual work a script in Perl language was written.

  14. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, H. E.S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Röhrich, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2–3% of the

  15. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, H. E. S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Rohrich, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2-3% of the

  16. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning : a Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; Nakaji, Taku; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; Koffeman, E.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images,

  17. Influence of proton scattering angles on the energy radiograph in proton radiotherapy : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, A.K.; Takatsu, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M-J.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment quality of cancer patients with a proton beam critically depends on accurate predictions of proton stopping powers. Uncertainties in proton range that occur from translation of an X-ray CT patient image, of typical 3–4% or more, lead to necessary enlargements of contours around the

  18. Upgrades for the Precision Proton Spectrometer at the LHC: Precision Timing and Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gallinaro, Michele

    2017-01-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) is an approved project to add tracking and timing information at approximately $\\pm$210~m from the interaction point around the CMS detector. It is designed to operate at high luminosity with up to 50 interactions per 25~ns bunch crossing to perform measurements of e.g. the quartic gauge couplings and search for rare exclusive processes. During 2016, CT-PPS took data in normal high-luminosity proton-proton LHC collisions. In the coming years, high radiation doses and large multiple-vertex interactions will represent difficult challenges that resemble those of the high-luminosity LHC program. A coordinated effort of detector upgrades with the goal of reaching the physics goals while mitigating the degradation effects is under way. Upgrades to the tracking and timing detectors are discussed.

  19. Dynamic studies of multiple configurations of CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target core under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2248381

    Antiprotons, like many other exotic particles, are produced by impacting high energy proton beams onto fixed targets. At the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), this is done in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) Facility. The engineering challenges related to the design of an optimal configuration of the AD-Target system derive from the extremely high energy depositions reached in the very thin target core as a consequence of each proton beam impact. A new target design is foreseen for operation after 2021, triggering multiple R&D activities since 2013 for this purpose. The goal of the present Master Thesis is to complement these activities with analytical and numerical calculations, delving into the phenomena associated to the dynamic response of the target core. In this context, two main studies have been carried out. First, the experimental data observed in targets subjected to low intensity proton pulses was cross-checked with analytical and computational methods for modal analysis, applie...

  20. Upgrades for the Precision Proton Spectrometer at the LHC: Fast Timing and Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gallinaro, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) is an approved project to add tracking and timing information at approximately $\\pm$210~m from the interaction point around the CMS detector. It is designed to operate at high luminosity with up to 50 interactions per 25~ns bunch crossing to perform measurements of e.g. the quartic gauge couplings and search for rare exclusive processes. During 2016, CT-PPS took data in normal high-luminosity proton-proton LHC collisions. In the coming years, high radiation doses and large multiple-vertex interactions will represent difficult challenges that resemble those of the high-luminosity LHC program. A coordinated effort of detector upgrades with the goal of reaching the physics goals while mitigating the degradation effects is under way. Upgrades to the tracking and timing detectors are discussed.

  1. Large Logarithms in the Beam Normal Spin Asymmetry of Elastic Electron--Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mykola Merenkov

    2004-06-01

    We study a parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. It is demonstrated that excitation of inelastic hadronic intermediate states by the consecutive exchange of two photons leads to logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. The asymmetry at small electron scattering angles is expressed in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton, and is predicted to reach the magnitude of 20-30 parts per million. At these conditions and fixed 4-momentum transfers, the asymmetry is rising logarithmically with increasing electron beam energy, following the high-energy diffractive behavior of total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  2. Niobium phosphates as an intermediate temperature proton conducting electrolyte for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    2012-01-01

    A new proton conductor based on niobium phosphates was synthesized using niobium pentoxide and phosphoric acid as precursors. The existence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphates was confirmed and found to be preserved after heat treatment at 500 °C or higher, contributing to an anhydrous proton co...... are of high interest as potential proton conducting electrolytes for fuel cells operational in an intermediate temperature range....... conductivity of 1.6 × 10−2 S cm−1 at 250 °C. The conductivity increased with water content in the atmosphere and reached 5.8 × 10−2 S cm−1 under pure water vapour at the same temperature. The conductivity showed good stability in the low water partial pressure range of up to 0.05 atm. The metal phosphates...

  3. Air-born contamination caused in a high-energy proton accelerator room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, K.; Toyoda, A.; Matsumura, H.; Kunifuda, T.

    2013-01-01

    Surface contamination caused during the operation of 12-GeV proton synchrotron, KEK have been studied by gamma-ray spectrometry and imaging plate technique. The surface of accelerator component was wiped with the filter paper. PSL value of imaging plate contacted on the filter paper decreased according to the half-life of 2 weeks. Therefore, it was assumed that 32 P might be produced from Ar by the high-energy protons and neutrons and deposited on the accelerator components. (author)

  4. Development of a high-resolution bathymetry dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Larson, Kyle B.; Lettrick, Joseph W.

    2010-10-08

    A bathymetric and topographic data collection and processing effort involving existing and newly collected data has been performed for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach in central Washington State, extending 60-miles from the tailrace of Priest Rapids Dam (river mile 397) to near the vicinity of the Interstate 182 bridge just upstream of the Yakima River confluence (river mile 337). The contents of this report provide a description of the data collections, data inputs, processing methodology, and final data quality assessment used to develop a comprehensive and continuous merged 1m resolution bathymetric and topographic surface dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach.

  5. Proton pump inhibitors and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarne Nesgaard; Johansen, Per Birger; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months and a di......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months...... and a discussion of these findings and how this has influenced our understanding of this association, the clinical impact and the underlying pathophysiology. RECENT FINDINGS: New studies have further strengthened existing evidence linking use of PPIs to osteoporosis. Short-term use does not appear to pose a lower...... risk than long-term use. There is a continued lack of conclusive studies identifying the pathogenesis. Direct effects on calcium absorption or on osteoblast or osteoclast action cannot at present plausibly explain the mechanism. SUMMARY: The use of PPIs is a risk factor for development of osteoporosis...