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Sample records for surface molecule involved

  1. HIV Aspartic Peptidase Inhibitors Modulate Surface Molecules and Enzyme Activities Involved with Physiopathological Events in Fonsecaea pedrosoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanila F. Palmeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the main etiological agent of chromoblastomycosis, a recalcitrant disease that is extremely difficult to treat. Therefore, new chemotherapeutics to combat this fungal infection are urgently needed. Although aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs currently used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have shown anti-F. pedrosoi activity their exact mechanisms of action have not been elucidated. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of four HIV-PIs on crucial virulence attributes expressed by F. pedrosoi conidial cells, including surface molecules and secreted enzymes, both of which are directly involved in the disease development. In all the experiments, conidia were treated with indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir (100 μM for 24 h, and then fungal cells were used to evaluate the effects of HIV-PIs on different virulence attributes expressed by F. pedrosoi. In comparison to untreated controls, exposure of F. pedrosoi cells to HIV-PIs caused (i reduction on the conidial granularity; (ii irreversible surface ultrastructural alterations, such as shedding of electron dense and amorphous material from the cell wall, undulations/invaginations of the plasma membrane with and withdrawal of this membrane from the cell wall; (iii a decrease in both mannose-rich glycoconjugates and melanin molecules and an increase in glucosylceramides on the conidial surface; (iv inhibition of ergosterol and lanosterol production; (v reduction in the secretion of aspartic peptidase, esterase and phospholipase; (vi significant reduction in the viability of non-pigmented conidia compared to pigmented ones. In summary, HIV-PIs are efficient drugs with an ability to block crucial biological processes of F. pedrosoi and can be seriously considered as potential compounds for the development of new chromoblastomycosis chemotherapeutics.

  2. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  3. Reactions of substituted aromatic molecules on the silicon(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutler, Sarah Kathryn

    Organic molecules possess unique physical and electronic properties that could be incorporated as components in new technologies, such as molecular electronics, biosensors and DNA chip arrays. While the properties of individual molecules often can be measured and predicted, the technological value of organic molecules for these types of applications requires the ability to understand and manipulate how physical and electronic properties are affected by bonding to a surface. Consequently, integration of organic systems with existing silicon-based technology necessitates a thorough investigation of the interfacial chemistry involved in adsorption processes. On a molecular scale, the delocalized electrons of a conjugated system could be used to carry charge from one point to another. Therefore, the interaction of pi-conjugated molecules with the technologically important Si(001) surface is of particular interest. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to investigate the bonding selectivity of several model aromatic molecules. Analysis of the infrared spectra of benzene, toluene and xylene suggest that these simple aromatic molecules covalently bond with the Si(001) surface, resulting in a loss of aromaticity. Studies of aromatic rings with other, more reactive substituent groups containing sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, iodine or carbon atoms, indicate that the majority of these molecules preferentially adsorb to the surface through the substituent group. Careful consideration of the role played by both the electron-rich substituent groups and the silicon dimers in controlling selectivity leads to new insights regarding adsorption mechanisms. This knowledge, in turn, provides a method for selecting and designing molecules that will preferentially chemisorb on the Si(001) surface in a highly predictable manner. Preliminary studies correlating the chemical identity of the

  4. Energy redistribution in diatomic molecules on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asscher, M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    Translational and internal degrees of freedom of a scattered beam of NO molecules from a Pt(111) single crystal surface were measured as a function of scattering angle and crystal temperature in the range 450 to 1250K. None of the three degrees of freedom were found to fully accommodate to the crystal temperature, the translational degree being the most accommodated and the rotational degree of freedom the least. A precursor state model is suggested to account for the incomplete accommodation of translational and vibrational degrees of freedom as a function of crystal temperature and incident beam energy. The vibrational accommodation is further discussed in terms of a competition between desorption and vibrational excitation processes, thus providing valuable information on the interaction between vibrationally excited molecules and surfaces. Energy transfer into rotational degrees of freedom is qualitatively discussed

  5. Bonding and interaction of molecules with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this lecture it is intended to discuss some general features of bonding and interaction of molecules with surfaces. The geometry of surface complexes is sufficiently difficult and the interaction mechanisms are sufficiently subtle. That all possible theoretical models need to be exploited such as: i) Semiempirical - including Huckel molecular orbital theory; ii)first principles including self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock and Local Density approaches; iii)explicitly correlated, including C.I., Generalized Valence Bond, Coupled Cluster Perturbation Theory and Many Body Perturbation Theory. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. New protein involved in the replacement of cell molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed” compartme......In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed...

  7. Structure determination by photoelectron diffraction of small molecules on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, N.A.

    1998-05-01

    The synchrotron radiation based technique of Photoelectron Diffraction (PhD) has been applied to three adsorption systems. Structure determinations, are presented for each system which involve the adsorption of small molecules on the low index {110} plane of single crystal Cu and Ni substrates. For the NH 3 -Cu(110) system PhD was successful in determining a N-Cu bondlength of 2.05 ± 0.03 A as well as values for the anisotropic vibrational amplitudes of the N and an expansion of the 1st to 2nd Cu substrate layer spacing from the bulk value of 0.08 ± 0.08 A. The most significant and surprising structural parameter determined for this system was that the N atom occupies an asymmetric adsorption site. Rather than being situated in the expected high symmetry atop site the N atom was found to be offset parallel to the surface by 0.37 ± 0.12 A in the [001] azimuth. In studying the glycine-Cu(110) system the adsorption structure of an amino-acid has been quantified. The local adsorption geometries of all the atoms involved in the molecule to surface bond have been determined. The glycine molecule is found to be bonded to the surface via both its amino and carboxylate functional groups. The molecule straddles two [11-bar0] rows of the Cu substrate. The two O atoms are found to be in identical sites both approximately atop Cu atoms on the [11-bar0] rows offset parallel to the surface by 0.80 ± 0.05 A in the [001] azimuth, the O-Cu bondlength was found to be 2.03 ± 0.05 A. The N atom was also found to adsorb in an approximately atop geometry but offset parallel to the surface by 0.24 ± 0.10A in the [11-bar0] direction, the N-Cu bondlength was found to be 2.05± 0.05 A. PhD was unsuccessful in determining the positions of the two C atoms that form a bridge between the two functional groups bonded to the surface due to difficulties in separating the two inequivalent contributions to the final intensity modulation function. For the CN-Ni(110) system both PhD and Near Edge

  8. Electrospray deposition of organic molecules on bulk insulator surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Large organic molecules are of important interest for organic-based devices such as hybrid photovoltaics or molecular electronics. Knowing their adsorption geometries and electronic structures allows to design and predict macroscopic device properties. Fundamental investigations in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) are thus mandatory to analyze and engineer processes in this prospects. With increasing size, complexity or chemical reactivity, depositing molecules by thermal evaporation becomes challenging. A recent way to deposit molecules in clean conditions is Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI keeps the possibility to work with large molecules, to introduce them in vacuum, and to deposit them on a large variety of surfaces. Here, ESI has been successfully applied to deposit triply fused porphyrin molecules on an insulating KBr(001) surface in UHV environment. Different deposition coverages have been obtained and characterization of the surface by in-situ atomic force microscopy working in the non-contact mode shows details of the molecular structures adsorbed on the surface. We show that UHV-ESI, can be performed on insulating surfaces in the sub-monolayer regime and to single molecules which opens the possibility to study a variety of complex molecules.

  9. Self-assembly patterning of organic molecules on a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Minghu; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Maksymovych, Petro; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Li, Qing

    2017-04-04

    The embodiments disclosed herein include all-electron control over a chemical attachment and the subsequent self-assembly of an organic molecule into a well-ordered three-dimensional monolayer on a metal surface. The ordering or assembly of the organic molecule may be through electron excitation. Hot-electron and hot-hole excitation enables tethering of the organic molecule to a metal substrate, such as an alkyne group to a gold surface. All-electron reactions may allow a direct control over the size and shape of the self-assembly, defect structures and the reverse process of molecular disassembly from single molecular level to mesoscopic scale.

  10. Imaging prototypical aromatic molecules on insulating surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2018-01-01

    Insulating substrates allow for in-plane contacted molecular electronics devices where the molecule is in contact with the insulator. For the development of such devices it is important to understand the interaction of molecules with insulating surfaces. As substrates, ionic crystals such as KBr, KCl, NaCl and CaF2 are discussed. The surface energies of these substrates are small and as a consequence intrinsic properties of the molecules, such as molecule–molecule interaction, become more important relative to interactions with the substrates. As prototypical molecules, three variants of graphene-related molecules are used, pentacene, C60 and PTCDA. Pentacene is a good candidate for molecular electronics applications due to its high charge carrier mobility. It shows mainly an upright standing growth mode and the morphology of the islands is strongly influenced by dewetting. A new second flat-lying phase of the molecule has been observed. Studying the local work function using the Kelvin method reveals details such as line defects in the center of islands. The local work function differences between the upright-standing and flat-lying phase can only be explained by charge transfer that is unusual on ionic crystalline surfaces. C60 nucleation and growth is explained by loosely bound molecules at kink sites as nucleation sites. The stability of C60 islands as a function of magic numbers is investigated. Peculiar island shapes are obtained from unusual dewetting processes already at work during growth, where molecules ‘climb’ to the second molecular layer. PTCDA is a prototypical semiconducting molecule with strong quadrupole moment. It grows in the form of elongated islands where the top and the facets can be molecularly resolved. In this way the precise molecular arrangement in the islands is revealed.

  11. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  12. DFT study of water adsorption on lignite molecule surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhengyang; Ding, Yi; Yang, Weijie; Han, Wentao

    2017-01-01

    High moisture content is a main characteristic of low-rank coal, such as lignite. Numerous oxygen containing functional groups in lignite make it represent some special properties, and these functional groups affect the adsorption mechanisms of water molecules on lignite surface. This study reports some typical water · · · lignite conformations, along with a detailed analysis of the geometry, electrostatic potential distribution, reduced density gradient of interaction, and interaction energy decomposition. The results show that water molecules tend to aggregate around functional groups, and hydrogen bonds play a dominant role in the interaction. The adsorption energy of water cluster on lignite surface is larger than that of isolated water molecule, a good linear relationship between the interaction distance and adsorption energy of layers has been found. Since water is a polar molecule, the local minima and maxima of electrostatic potential in conformations increase along with more water adsorbing on lignite surface. Reduced density gradient analysis shows that H-bonds, van der Waals interaction, and a little steric make up the interaction between water cluster and lignite molecule. In these studied conformations which mainly are H-bond complexes, electrostatic and exchange repulsion play a dominant role, whereas polarization and dispersion make relatively small contribution to the interaction. Attractive and repulsive interaction both affect the stability of water · · · lignite conformations.

  13. Surface-confined electroactive molecules for multistate charge storage information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Torrent, M; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2013-01-18

    Bi-stable molecular systems with potential for applications in binary memory devices are raising great interest for device miniaturization. Particular appealing are those systems that operate with electrical inputs since they are compatible with existing electronic technologies. The processing of higher memory densities in these devices could be accomplished by increasing the number of memory states in each cell, although this strategy has not been much explored yet. Here we highlight the recent advances devoted to the fabrication of charge-storage molecular surface-confined devices exhibiting multiple states. Mainly, this goal has been realized immobilizing a variety (or a combination) of electroactive molecules on a surface, although alternative approaches employing non-electroactive systems have also been described. Undoubtedly, the use of molecules with chemically tunable properties and nanoscale dimensions are raising great hopes for the devices of the future in which molecules can bring new perspectives such as multistability.

  14. Internal state distributions of molecules scattering and desorbing from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts are made to interpret scattering experiments of NO molecules on Ag(111) where a (rotational) state-specific detector has been used. A model using an anisotropic potential is proposed to explain the observed incoming energy- and angle dependence. The so-called rotational rainbows are explained. It is concluded, that in this way information on intermolecular potentials and the transfer of translational to rotational energy in the dynamics of trapping and sticking of molecules on surfaces can be extracted. (G.Q.)

  15. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  16. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  17. Preservation of organic molecules at Mars' near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, Caroline

    2016-07-01

    One of the biggest concerns for the in situ detection of organics on extraterrestrial environment is the preservation potential of the molecules at the surface and subsurface given the harsh radiation conditions and oxidants they are exposed to. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) search for hydrocarbons is designed to understand taphonomic windows of organic preservation in the Mars' near-surface. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the MSL Curiosity rover discovered chlorohydrocarbon indigenous to a mudstone drilled sample, Cumberland (CB). The discovery of chlorohydrocarbons in the martian surface means that reduced material with covalent bonds has survived despite the severe degrading conditions. However, the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by pyrolysis at CB remain unknown. Organic compounds in this ancient sedimentary rock on Mars could include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and refractory organic material, either formed on Mars from igneous, hydrothermal, atmospheric, or biological processes or, alternatively, delivered directly to Mars via meteorites, comets, or interplanetary dust particles. It has been postulated that organic compounds in near-surface rocks may undergo successive oxidation reactions that eventually form metastable benzenecarboxylates, including phthalic and mellitic acids. These benzenecarboxylates are good candidates as the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected in SAM pyrolysis at CB. Indeed, recently, SAM performed a derivatization experiments on a CB sample, using the residual vapor of N-methyl-N-tertbutylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) leaking into the system. The preliminary interpretations are compatible with the presence of benzocarboxylates, coincidently with long chain carboxylic acids and alcohols. The analysis of this interesting data set to identify these derivatization products, as well as future SAM measurements on Mt Sharp, should shed additional light on the chemical nature and the

  18. Multiple atomic scale solid surface interconnects for atom circuits and molecule logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachim, C; Martrou, D; Gauthier, S; Rezeq, M; Troadec, C; Jie Deng; Chandrasekhar, N

    2010-01-01

    The scientific and technical challenges involved in building the planar electrical connection of an atomic scale circuit to N electrodes (N > 2) are discussed. The practical, laboratory scale approach explored today to assemble a multi-access atomic scale precision interconnection machine is presented. Depending on the surface electronic properties of the targeted substrates, two types of machines are considered: on moderate surface band gap materials, scanning tunneling microscopy can be combined with scanning electron microscopy to provide an efficient navigation system, while on wide surface band gap materials, atomic force microscopy can be used in conjunction with optical microscopy. The size of the planar part of the circuit should be minimized on moderate band gap surfaces to avoid current leakage, while this requirement does not apply to wide band gap surfaces. These constraints impose different methods of connection, which are thoroughly discussed, in particular regarding the recent progress in single atom and molecule manipulations on a surface.

  19. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, P A

    1999-01-01

    directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d sub N sub N responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N sub 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (approx 10 sup - sup 6 to 10 sup - sup 7). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe sub 4 N. Scanning tunnelling microscopy yields atomic scale features that cannot be explained by simple overlayers. It is proposed that the uppermost iron layer reconstructs to generate quasi-octahedral sites between the top two layers, with sub-surface nitrogen in these sites forming a model for the 'surface nitride' structure. The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D sub 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy a...

  20. Mobility of chemisorbed molecules and surface regeneration of active centers during dehydration of isopropanol on aluminium oxide and aluminosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlis, L.A.; Vasserberg, V.Eh.

    1976-01-01

    By a differential isotope method involving 14 C the authors have investigated the surface mobility of chemisorbed molecules of isopropanol during its dehydration in an adsorption layer on aluminium oxide and aluminosilicate. The chemisorbed alcohol molecules possess marked surface mobility which plays a decisive part in the mechanism of surface regeneration of the active catalyst centers in the process of dehydration. The cessation of the reaction long before the adsorbed alcohol is completely used up is explained by the hypothesis that there is local overpopulation of the active sectors by water formed by the reaction; this hinders further surface regeneration and repetition of the elementary events of dehydration

  1. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  2. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-01-01

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  3. Involvement of Leishmania donovani major surface glycoprotein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The major surface glycoprotein gp63 of the kinetoplastid protozoal parasite Leishmania is implicated as a ligand mediating uptake of the parasite into, and survival within, the host macrophage. By expressing gp63 antisense RNA from an episomal vector in L. donovani promastigotes, gp63-deficient transfectants were ...

  4. Fundamental properties of molecules on surfaces. Molecular switching and interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatter, Nino

    2016-12-14

    In this thesis, we investigate individual molecular switches and metal-organic complexes on surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) at low temperatures. One focus addresses the switching ability and mechanism of diarylethene on Ag(111). The other focus lies on resolving and tuning magnetic interactions of individual molecules with superconductors. 4,4'-(4,4'-(perfluorocyclopent-1-ene-1,2-diyl)bis (5-methylthiophene-4,2-diyl)dip yridine (PDTE) is a prototypical photochromic switch. We can induce a structural change of individual PDTE molecules on Ag(111) with the STM tip. This change is accompanied by a reduction of the energy gap between the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the induced switching corresponds to a ring-closing reaction from an open isomer in a flat adsorption configuration to a ring-closed isomer with its methyl groups in a cis configuration. The final product is thermodynamically stabilized by strong dispersion interactions with the surface. A linear dependence of the switching threshold with the tip-sample distance with a minimal threshold of 1.4 V is found, which we assign to a combination of an electric-field induced process and a tunneling-electron contribution. DFT calculations suggest a large activation barrier for a ring-closing reaction from the open flat configuration into the closed cis configuration. The interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors is studied on manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) adsorbed on Pb(111). We find triplets of Shiba states inside the superconducting gap. Different adsorption sites of MnPc provide a large variety of exchange coupling strengths, which lead to a collective energy shift of the Shiba triplets. We can assign the splitting of the Shiba states to be an effect of magnetic anisotropy in the system. A quantum phase transition from a ''Kondo screened'' to a &apos

  5. Coupling of therapeutic molecules onto surface modified coralline hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, R; Ramakrishna, S

    2004-07-01

    Surface modification and coupling of therapeutic molecules, tetracycline, onto coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) and their in vitro evaluations were described in this study. Initially, CHA was graft polymerized with glycidylmethacrylate (GMA) using redox initiators and subsequently coupled to tetracycline through epoxy groups. The CHA grafted with polyGMA (CHA-g-PGMA) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) for proof of grafting. The absorption peaks pertaining to epoxy and ester carbonyl groups were observed for the graft polymer due to PGMA grafting. The XRD results signified that there was no secondary phase in the apatite lattice and crystallinity was also not affected by grafting, which suggested that the PGMA chains were grafted only on the surface of CHA. Drug loading and releasing was evaluated and found that CHA-g-PGMA exhibited higher loading efficiency than CHA. The in vitro release of tetracycline was performed in phosphate buffered saline under physiological condition and the release profiles showed that the tetracycline-containing graft polymer releases the drug for prolonged period as compared to CHA. Based on the experimental results, CHA-g-PGMA appears to be a promising biomaterial for drug delivery.

  6. Molecules with multiple switching units on a Au(111) surface: self-organization and single-molecule manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Johannes; Selvanathan, Sofia; Peters, Maike; Schwarz, Jutta; Hecht, Stefan; Grill, Leonhard

    2012-10-01

    Three different molecules, each containing two azobenzene switching units, were synthesized, successfully deposited onto a Au(111) surface by sublimation and studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperatures. To investigate the influence of electronic coupling between the switching units as well as to the surface, the two azo moieties were connected either via π-conjugated para-phenylene or decoupling meta-phenylene bridges, and the number of tert-butyl groups was varied in the meta-phenylene-linked derivatives. Single molecules were found to be intact after deposition as identified by their characteristic appearance in STM images. Due to their mobility on the Au(111) surface at room temperature, the molecules spontaneously formed self-organized molecular arrangements that reflected their chemical structure. While lateral displacement of the molecules was accomplished by manipulation, trans-cis isomerization processes, typical for azobenzene switches, could not be induced.

  7. Investigating the conformation of polymeric dispersant molecules on nanoparticle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasin, S.; Luckham, P.F.; Iqbal, T

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymers are widely used as stabilizers in industrial dispersions. These polymers adsorb on surfaces by an anchor chain and extend by a hydrophilic chain. Scaling model or de Gennes theory has been used to determine the grafting density of the block copolymers. By implementing this theory to the block copolymers, conformation of the polymer molecules as a function of distance between adjacent anchor chains can be determined. The scaling model was applied to a selection of block copolymers (PE/F 103, PE/F 108, NPE1800, Triton X100, Triton X405, Lugalvan BNO12, Hypermer LP1, Hypermer B246 and OLOA 11000) in this study. The cross sectional area sc, distance s (square root of sc) and the Flory radius (end to end dimension of polymer), Rf, for all the polymers was determined. The cross sectional area per PEO (Poly Ethylene Oxide) chain (nm2) was found to be increasing with the size of stabilizing chain. Triton X100 and Lugalvan BNO12 has the smaller stabilizing chains so occupy smaller cross sectional areas whereas PE/F108 and triton X405 have larger number of PEO units and occupy a larger cross sectional area. This shows that stabilizing chain regulates the adsorption amounts that are lower in case of lower number of EO units. The application of de Gennes theory to experimental results suggested brush configuration of adsorbed polymer molecules in case of PE/F 103, PE/F 108, Triton X100, Triton X405, NPE1800, Lugalvan BNO12, Hypermer B246 and OLOA 11000. Whereas, Hypermer LP1 is more likely found to be adsorbed on graphitic carbon black in loops and trains. (author)

  8. Differential Expression of Osteo-Modulatory Molecules in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in Response to Modified Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed differential gene expression of signaling molecules involved in osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs subjected to different titanium (Ti surface types. PDLSCs were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, and four types of Ti discs (PT, SLA, hydrophilic PT (pmodPT, and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA with no osteoinductive factor and then osteogenic activity, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of runt-related gene 2, osterix, FOSB, FRA1, and protein levels of osteopontin and collagen type IA, were examined. The highest osteogenic activity appeared in PDLSCs cultured on SLA, compared with the TCPS and other Ti surfaces. The role of surface properties in affecting signaling molecules to modulate PDLSC behavior was determined by examining the regulation of Wnt pathways. mRNA expression of the canonical Wnt signaling molecules, Wnt3a and β-catenin, was higher on SLA and modSLA than on smooth surfaces, but gene expression of the calcium-dependent Wnt signaling molecules Wnt5a, calmodulin, and NFATc1 was increased significantly on PT and pmodPT. Moreover, integrin α2/β1, sonic hedgehog, and Notch signaling molecules were affected differently by each surface modification. In conclusion, surface roughness and hydrophilicity can affect differential Wnt pathways and signaling molecules, targeting the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs.

  9. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlanga, Isadora; Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo; Gómez, Victoria Alejandra; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Fuenzalida, Victor; Flores, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  10. Formation of self-assembled monolayer of curcuminoid molecules on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlanga, Isadora [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Etcheverry-Berríos, Álvaro; Mella, Andy; Jullian, Domingo [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beaucheff 851, Santiago (Chile); Gómez, Victoria Alejandra [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria [ICREA (Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08018, Barcelona (Spain); CSIC-ICMAB (Institut de Ciència dels Materials de Barcelona), Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Fuenzalida, Victor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Flores, Marcos, E-mail: mflorescarra@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Thiophene curcuminoid molecules deposited on a gold surface by immersion. • Molecular dynamic studies of the molecular arrangement approaching the surface. • XPS and STM studies showing different arrangement of the molecules on the surface. • Molecular Interaction with surface depends on the sulfur position in thiophene rings. • Temporal evolution of the molecular arrangement on the surface. - Abstract: We investigated the formation of self-assembled monolayers of two thiophene curcuminoid molecules, 2-thphCCM (1) and 3-thphCCM (2), on polycrystalline gold substrates prepared by immersion of the surfaces in a solution of the molecules during 24 h. The functionalized surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Despite the fact that both molecules have the same composition and almost the same structure, these molecules exhibit different behavior on the gold surface, which can be explained by the different positions of the sulfur atoms in the terminal aromatic rings. In the case of molecule 1, the complete formation of a SAM can be observed after 24 h of immersion. In the case of molecule 2, the transition from flat-lying to upright configuration on the surface is still in process after 24 h of immersion. This is attributed to the fact that molecule 2 have the sulfur atoms more exposed than molecule 1.

  11. Involvement of HLA class I molecules in the immune escape of urologic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, R; Gil-Julio, H; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Garrido, F; Castiñeiras, J; Cózar, J M

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the influence of different alterations in human leukocyte antigen class I molecules (HLA I) in renal cell carcinoma, as well as in bladder and prostate cancer. We also study the correlation between HLA I expression and the progression of the disease and the response after immunotherapy protocols. It has been shown, experimentally, that the immune system can recognize and kill neoplastic cells. By analyzing the expression of HLA I molecules on the surface of cancer cells, we were able to study the tumor escape mechanisms against the immune system. Alteration or irreversible damage in HLA I molecules is used by the neoplastic cells to escape the immune system. The function of these molecules is to recognize endogenous peptides and present them to T cells of the immune system. There is a clear relationship between HLA I reversible alterations and success of therapy. Irreversible lesions also imply a lack of response to treatment. The immune system activation can reverse HLA I molecules expression in tumors with reversible lesions, whereas tumors with irreversible ones do not respond to such activation. Determine the type of altered HLA I molecules in tumors is of paramount importance when choosing the type of treatment to keep looking for therapeutic success. Those tumors with reversible lesions can be treated with traditional immunotherapy; however, tumour with irreversible alterations should follow alternative protocols, such as the use of viral vectors carrying the HLA genes to achieve damaged re-expression of the protein. From studies in urologic tumors, we can conclude that the HLA I molecules play a key role in these tumors escape to the immune system. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Spontaneous dissociation of a conjugated molecule on the Si(100) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Rong; Galili, Michael; Quaade, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of alpha-sexithiophene (alpha-6T) on the clean Si(100)-(2x1) surface has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first principles electronic structure calculations. We find that at submonolayer coverage, the alpha-6T molecules are not stable...... coverage, the STM images show the existence of complete alpha-6T molecules. In addition, results of the adsorption behavior of alpha-6T molecules on the H-passivated Si(100)-(2x1) surface are reported. On this surface the molecules are highly mobile at room temperature due to the weak molecule...

  13. Strategies for creating antifouling surfaces using selfassembled poly(ethylene glycol) thiol molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2011-01-01

    process. The PEG SAM backfilled with OEG molecules was tested for resistance towards serum adsorption and bacterial attachment, and was found to better resist fouling compared to PEG SAM that had not been backfilled. The second strategy involved PEG grafting using supercritical carbon dioxide (SFC), which...... biofilms forming on the surfaces of equipment to avoid contamination of their products. In addition to posing a health problem, biofilms also pose technical problems, such as corrosion and reduced water flow in technical water systems. Removal of a biofilm is very tedious and sometimes even impossible...

  14. Theory of coherent molecule to surface electron injection: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    erogeneous electron transfer from a molecule to a semiconductor occurs before full vibrational relaxa- tion of the excited molecule is achieved. 5,6. Accor- dingly, theoretical description of the decay of the initial state has been formulated to include vibra- tional coherence in the transfer process. 4. 2. Analytical model.

  15. Dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules on sulfuric acid-water surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, P; Scharfenort, U; Ataya, K; Zellner, R

    2009-09-28

    A molecular beam technique has been used to study the dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules in collision with sulfuric acid-water surfaces. The experiments were performed by directing a nearly mono-energetic beam of HCl molecules onto a continuously renewed liquid film of 54-76 wt% sulfuric acid at temperatures between 213 K and 243 K. Deuterated sulfuric acid was used to separate sticking but non-reactive collisions from those that involved penetration through the phase boundary followed by dissociation and recombination with D+. The results indicate that the mass accommodation of HCl on sulfuric acid-water surfaces decreases sharply with increasing acidity over the concentration range 54-76 wt%. Using the capillary wave theory of mass accommodation this effect is explained by a change of the surface dynamics. Regarding the temperature dependence it is found that the mass accommodation of HCl increases with increasing temperature and is limited by the bulk phase viscosity and driven by the restoring forces of the surface tension. These findings imply that under atmospheric conditions the uptake of HCl from the gas phase depends crucially on the bulk phase parameters of the sulfuric acid aerosol.

  16. c-Met and Other Cell Surface Molecules: Interaction, Activation and Functional Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Viticchiè

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The c-Met receptor, also known as the HGF receptor, is one of the most studied tyrosine kinase receptors, yet its biological functions and activation mechanisms are still not fully understood. c-Met has been implicated in embryonic development and organogenesis, in tissue remodelling homeostasis and repair and in cancer metastasis. These functions are indicative of the many cellular processes in which the receptor plays a role, including cell motility, scattering, survival and proliferation. In the context of malignancy, sustained activation of c-Met leads to a signalling cascade involving a multitude of kinases that initiate an invasive and metastatic program. Many proteins can affect the activation of c-Met, including a variety of other cell surface and membrane-spanning molecules or receptors. Some cell surface molecules share structural homology with the c-Met extracellular domain and can activate c-Met via clustering through this domain (e.g., plexins, whereas other receptor tyrosine kinases can enhance c-Met activation and signalling through intracellular signalling cascades (e.g., EGFR. In this review, we provide an overview of c-Met interactions and crosstalk with partner molecules and the functional consequences of these interactions on c-Met activation and downstream signalling, c-Met intracellular localization/recycling and c-Met degradation.

  17. Theoretical studies of inelastic molecule-surface and resonant electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowrey, R.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, two problems in the inelastic scattering of molecules from nonvibrating surfaces are discussed. First, the close coupling (CC) method is used to study the orientational dependence of the transition probabilities for vibrationally and rotationally inelastic scattering of H 2 and N 2 from flat surfaces. The dependence of vibrational transition probabilities on the orientation of the molecule is strong but decreases as the energy increases. Second, a new approximation to the CC method for treating scattering of molecules from corrugated surfaces is discussed. The proposed local normal model of j/sub z/ conservation assumes that the component of the rotational angular momentum of the incident molecule which is parallel to the normal to the surface at the impact point is conserved during a collision. In part II, the use of the complex basis function method to study two shape resonances in electron scattering is discussed. The complex self-consistent-field (CSCF) method was used to obtain the position and width of the 2 D shape resonance in electron-calcium scattering. Comparison with experimental results shows that the lifetime is influenced by correlation effects. The CSCF and complex configuration interaction (CCI) methods were used to obtain the complex potential energy function for nuclear motion for the 2 Σ/sub u/ + resonance state of H 2 -

  18. Organic Molecules On the Surfaces of Iapetus and Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2017-01-01

    Absorption bands of both aliphatic and aromatic organic molecules are found in the reflectance spectra of Saturn satellites Iapetus, Phoebe, and Hyperion obtained with the Cassini Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The VIMS data do not fully resolve the individual bands of C-H functional groups specific to particular molecules, but instead show absorption envelopes representing blended clusters of the bands of aromatic (approximately 3.28 microns) and aliphatic (approximately 3.4 microns) hydrocarbons known in spectra of interstellar dust. In Cruikshank et al. (2014), we matched components of the unresolved hydrocarbon band envelopes with clusters of bands of a range of functional groups in specific types of organic compounds (e.g., normal and N-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, olefins, cycloalkanes, and molecules with lone-pair interactions of N and O with CH3+). In the work reported here, we revisit the spectra of Iapetus and Phoebe using VIMS data processed with improved radiometric and wavelength calibration (denoted RC19). The band envelopes of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons are now more clearly defined, corroborating the provisional assignment of specific classes of molecules in Cruikshank et al. 2014, but permitting a more reliable quantitative assessment of the relative contributions of those classes, and a revision to the earlier estimate of the ratio of the abundances of aromatic to aliphatic molecules.

  19. Electrically driven directional motion of a four-wheeled molecule on a metal surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudernac, Tibor; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Parschau, Manfred; Macia, Beatriz; Katsonis, Nathalie; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Propelling single molecules in a controlled manner along an unmodified surface remains extremely challenging because it requires molecules that can use light, chemical or electrical energy to modulate their interaction with the surface in a way that generates motion. Nature's motor proteins(1,2)

  20. Single molecule studies of surface-induced secondary structure in a model peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Douglas S.; Cunningham, Joy A.; Wehri, Sarah C.; Petrik, Amy F.; Okamoto, Kenji

    2004-10-01

    We have proposed using single molecule fluorescence resonant energy transfer (SM-FRET) to investigate the induction of secondary structure in model, surface-active peptides upon binding at an interface. The ability for SM-FRET to distinguish structural heterogeneity will offer a distinct advantage over traditional biophysical methods in these types of studies. Ensemble methods mask heterogeneity and only provide an average measure of secondary structural features. Because secondary structure contributes greatly to the energetics of dehydrating the amide backbone, detailed information of conformational distributions is crucial to the understanding of the thermodynamic cycle involved. Here we present results from our first efforts at using SM-FRET to study an amphipathic α-helix forming peptide immobilized at the solid-liquid interface between an aqueous solution and an octadecylsilane modified glass surface. This system serves as a model for future studies of peptide partitioning to lipid bilayers and other relevant interfaces.

  1. Surface formation routes of interstellar molecules : a laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sergio, Ioppolo

    2010-01-01

    It has been a long standing problem in astrochemistry to explain how molecules can form in a highly dilute environment as the interstellar medium. In recent years it has become clear that solid state reactions on icy grains play an important role in the formation of both simple and rather complex

  2. Incident energy dependence of scattering behavior of water molecules on Si (100) and graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, G.; Kotsubo, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Takagi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between water molecules and solid surfaces has a great impact on water vapor flows in nanostructures. We conduct molecular beam scattering experiments covering the incident energy range corresponding to the thermal energy at room temperature to investigate the scattering behavior of water molecules on silicon and graphite surfaces. The incident energy dependence of the scattering distributions exhibits opposite trends on these surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the difference is caused by the inertia effect of the incident molecules and the surface corrugations.

  3. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  4. Interactions of molecules with surfaces. Progress report, 1 February 1985-31 January 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of beams of Ne and Ar atoms scattered nearly elastically from LiF (100) at 294 K show structure that is obscured by inelastic scattering when the whole range of velocities leaving the crystal is recorded. Increased fluxes of neutral species in beams from an effusive source of alkali halide vapor observed when a beam of electrons is coaxial with the neutral beam are shown to be well accounted for by a model involving electron stimulated desorption of alkali atoms. A simple model is proposed for the compensation observed for changes of the preexponential factor and activation energy in rate coefficients for the desorption of molecules from surfaces undergoing surface phase transitions. The isomerization of perfluoroDewarbenzene to perfluorobenzene can be produced in yields of 10% after single energetic collisions with a surface of polytetrafluoroethylene. The yield of ions produced when a beam of Na atoms strikes a Si(111) surface is increased over the equilibrium value observed for thermal beams by a factor of 10 or more when the kinetic energy of the incoming atoms is increased to 14 eV. The yield is sensitive to the dynamics of electron exchange between the surface and the ion. 12 refs., 1 fig

  5. Molecules on vicinal Au surfaces studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Jensen, H; Berndt, R; Rurali, R; Lorente, N

    2006-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we investigated the adsorption characteristics of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride and fullerenes on Au(788), Au(433), and Au(778). On Au(788) and Au(778), 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride exhibits three coexisting superstructures, which do not reflect the periodicity of the hosting substrate. The adsorption on Au(433) leads to the formation of molecule chains along the step edges after annealing the sample. Fullerene molecules on Au(788) arrange in a mesh of islands, which extends over several hundreds of nanometres with an extraordinarily high periodicity. A combination of fullerene adsorption and annealing leads to facetting of Au(433) and the formation of extraordinarily long fullerene stripes

  6. Single OR molecule and OR atomic circuit logic gates interconnected on a Si(100)H surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ample, F; Joachim, C; Duchemin, I; Hliwa, M

    2011-01-01

    Electron transport calculations were carried out for three terminal OR logic gates constructed either with a single molecule or with a surface dangling bond circuit interconnected on a Si(100)H surface. The corresponding multi-electrode multi-channel scattering matrix (where the central three terminal junction OR gate is the scattering center) was calculated, taking into account the electronic structure of the supporting Si(100)H surface, the metallic interconnection nano-pads, the surface atomic wires and the molecule. Well interconnected, an optimized OR molecule can only run at a maximum of 10 nA output current intensity for a 0.5 V bias voltage. For the same voltage and with no molecule in the circuit, the output current of an OR surface atomic scale circuit can reach 4 μA.

  7. Vibrational excitation in molecule--surface collisions due to temporary negative molecular ion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadzuk, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from gaseous and physisorbed diatomic molecules results in greatly enhanced vibrational overtone excitation if the incident electron has the appropriate energy to form a shape-resonance-induced temporary negative molecular ion. It is proposed here that due to the image potential lowering of the electron affinity level of a diatomic molecule in interaction with a metal surface, somewhere outside the surface an incident molecule would find its affinity level degenerate with or lower than the substrate Fermi level at which point a substrate electron could hop onto the molecule, in analogy with gas phase harpooning processes. A negative molecular ion is thus formed which remains until the molecular ion reflects from the surface and the affinity level rises above the Fermi level, thus permitting reverse electron hopping back into the metal. The lifetime of the molecular ion can be controlled by varying both the kinetic energy of the incident molecule and also the substrate work function. In analogy with the electron scattering events, greatly enhanced vibrational excitation of overtones is expected in the molecules of the scattered beam. Induced fluorescence probing of the vibrational state distribution should then yield fundamental information pertaining to the dynamics of charge transfer reactions and nonadiabatic effects in molecule--surface interactions. A theory of this phenomenon is here presented together with the numerical consequences for a model system designed to simulate N 2 or NO scattering from standard surface science metal surfaces

  8. DFT study on the interaction of TiO2 (001) surface with HCHO molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guofei; Zhao, Cuihua; Guo, Changqing; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Yibing; Li, Yuqiong

    2018-01-01

    The interactions of formaldehyde (HCHO) molecule with TiO2 (001) surface were studied using density functional theory calculations. HCHO molecules are dissociated by the cleavage of Csbnd H bonds after adsorption on TiO2 surface. The strong interactions between HCHO melecules and TiO2 surface are largely attributed to the bonding of hydrogen of HCHO and oxygen of TiO2 surface, which is mainly from the hybridization of the H 1s, O 2p and O 2s. The newly formed Hsbnd O bonds cause the structure changes of TiO2 surface, and lead to the cleavage of Osbnd Ti bond of TiO2 surface. The Csbnd O bond that the dissociated remains of HCHO and newly formed Hsbnd O bond can be oxidized to form carbon dioxide and water in subsequent action by oxygen from the atomosphere. The charges transfer from HCHO to TiO2 surface, and the sum amount of the charges transferred from four HCHO molecules to TiO2 surface is bigger than that from one HCHO molecule to TiO2 surface due to the combined interaction of four HCHO molecules with TiO2 surface.

  9. Selection of conformational states in surface self-assembly for a molecule with eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli; Schultz-Falk, Vickie; Lind Cramer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a molecule with many distinct conformational states, resulting in eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers, is investigated on a Au(111) surface under UHV conditions. The complex molecule is equipped with alkyl and carboxyl moieties to promote controlled self-assembly of lamel...... moieties in mirror-image domains of the lamellae structures, leading to selection of three out of the eight possible enantiomeric pairs....

  10. Nitric oxide modulates the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules involved in angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreau, Aude; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and immune response have in common to be cell recognition mechanisms, which are based on specific adhesion molecules and dependent on nitric oxide (NO(•)). The aim of the present study is to deepen the mechanisms of angiogenesis and inflammation regulation by NO(•) to find out the molecular regulation processes that govern endothelial cell permeability and leukocyte transmigration. Effects of NO(•), either exogenous or produced in hypoxic conditions, were studied on microvascular endothelial cells from skin and lymph node because of their strong involvement in melanoma progression. We found that NO(•) down-regulation of pseudo-vessel formation was linked to a decrease in endothelial cell ability to adhere to each other which can be explain, in part, by the inhibition of PECAM-1/CD31 expression. On the other hand, NO(•) was shown to be able to decrease leukocyte adhesion on an endothelial monolayer, performed either in static or in rolling conditions, and to modulate differentially CD34, ICAM-1/CD54, ICAM-2/CD102 and VCAM-1/CD106 expression. In conclusion, during angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment, NO(•) regulates cell interactions by controlling adhesion molecule expression and subsequently cell adhesion. Moreover, each endothelial cell type presents its own organospecific response to NO(•), reflecting the functions of the tissue they originate from. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface topography of immunoglobulin molecules. I. Accessibility of aromatic chromophores of rabbit IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białkowska, H; Morawiecki, A

    1978-01-01

    Non-ionic detergent, Tween-20, was used in solvent perturbation studies of accessibility of aromatic amino acid residues in rabbit IgG molecules. It has been found that surface aromatic residues are localized in cervices inaccessible to perturbant molecules larger than ca. 10 A in diameter.

  12. Adsorption configuration effects on the surface diffusion of large organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, F.; Legoas, S.B.; Hummelink, F.

    2010-01-01

    results show that it has its physical basis on the interplay of the molecular hydrogens and the Cu(110) atomic spacing, which is a direct consequence of the matching between molecule and surface dimensions. This information could be used to find new molecules capable of displaying lock-and-key behavior...

  13. Dietary curcumin supplementation counteracts reduction in levels of molecules involved in energy homeostasis after brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Zhuang, Y; Ying, Z; Wu, A; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2009-07-21

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is followed by an energy crisis that compromises the capacity of the brain to cope with challenges, and often reduces cognitive ability. New research indicates that events that regulate energy homeostasis crucially impact synaptic function and this can compromise the capacity of the brain to respond to challenges during the acute and chronic phases of TBI. The goal of the present study is to determine the influence of the phenolic yellow curry pigment curcumin on molecular systems involved with the monitoring, balance, and transduction of cellular energy, in the hippocampus of animals exposed to mild fluid percussion injury (FPI). Young adult rats were exposed to a regular diet (RD) without or with 500 ppm curcumin (Cur) for four weeks, before an FPI was performed. The rats were assigned to four groups: RD/Sham, Cur/Sham, RD/FPI, and Cur/FPI. We found that FPI decreased the levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK) and cytochrome c oxidase II (COX-II) in RD/FPI rats as compared to the RD/sham rats. The curcumin diet counteracted the effects of FPI and elevated the levels of AMPK, uMtCK, COX-II in Cur/FPI rats as compared to RD/sham rats. In addition, in the Cur/sham rats, AMPK and uMtCK increased compared to the RD/sham. Results show the potential of curcumin to regulate molecules involved in energy homeostasis following TBI. These studies may foster a new line of therapeutic treatments for TBI patients by endogenous upregulation of molecules important for functional recovery.

  14. Renormalization of Optical Excitations in Molecules near a Metal Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    The lowest electronic excitations of benzene and a set of donor-acceptor molecular complexes are calculated for the gas phase and on the Al(111) surface using the many-body Bethe-Salpeter equation. The energy of the charge-transfer excitations obtained for the gas phase complexes are found...... consequence we find that close to the metal surface the optical gap of benzene can exceed its quasiparticle gap. A classical image charge model for the screened Coulomb interaction can account for all these effects which, on the other hand, are completely missed by standard time-dependent density functional...

  15. Surface plasmon-enhanced optical trapping of quantum-dot-conjugated surface molecules on neurons cultured on a plasmonic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Kohei; Tawa, Keiko; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa; Hosokawa, Chie

    2016-06-01

    Living neurons in a complex neuronal network communicate with each other through synaptic connections. The molecular dynamics of cell surface molecules localized at synaptic terminals is essential for functional connections via synaptic plasticity in the neuronal network. Here, we demonstrate surface-plasmon-resonance-based optical trapping using a plasmonic chip toward realizing effective manipulation of molecules on the surface of neurons. Surface-plasmon-enhanced optical trapping was evaluated by the fluorescence analysis of nanoparticles suspended in water and neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAMs) labeled with quantum dots (Q-dots) on rat hippocampal neurons. The motion of nanoparticles in water and the molecular dynamics of NCAMs on neuronal cells cultured on a plasmonic chip were constrained at the laser focus more effectively than those on a glass substrate because of the surface plasmon resonance effect.

  16. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna Aleksandra; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the method used to improve osseointegration. Nanoscale modification of titanium implants affects surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, biochemical bonding capacity...... with focus on polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans, and how these molecules change surface properties, cell reactions and affect on osseointegartion. The included in vitro studies demonstrated increased cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization of a number of the tested polysaccharide...

  17. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2006-01-14

    We measured polar angle (theta)-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of approximately 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0 degreesdynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  18. In Situ Detection of Organic Molecules on the Martian Surface With the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) on Exomars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Danell, Ryan M.; Arevalo, Ricardo D., Jr.; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars rover will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. The MOMA instrument is centered around a miniaturized linear ion trap (LIT) that facilitates two modes of operation: i) pyrolysisgas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrGC-MS); and, ii) laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) at ambient Mars pressures. The LIT also enables the structural characterization of complex molecules via complementary analytical capabilities, such as multi-frequency waveforms (i.e., SWIFT) and tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS). When combined with the complement of instruments in the rovers Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds.

  19. Interactions between nitrogen molecules and barium atoms on Ru (0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinxin; Mi Yiming; Xu Hongxia; Wang Lili; Ren Li; Tao Xiangming; Tan Mingqiu

    2011-01-01

    We had performed first principles calculations on interactions between nitrogen molecules and barium atoms on Ru (0001) surface using density function theory methods. It was shown that effects of barium atoms weakened the bond strength of nitrogen molecules. The bond length of nitrogen molecule increases from 0.113 nm on Ru (001)-N 2 to 0.120 nm on Ru (001)-N 2 /Ba surface. While stretch vibrational frequency of nitrogen molecule decreased from 2222 cm -1 and charge transfer toward nitrogen molecule increased from 0.3 e to 1.1 e. Charge was mainly translated from 6 s orbitals of barium atoms to 4 d orbitals of substrate, which enhanced the hybridization between 4 d and 2 π orbitals and increased the dipole moment of 5 σ and d π orbitals of nitrogen molecule. The molecular dipole moment of nitrogen molecule was increased by -0.136 e Anstrom. It was suggested that barium had some characters to be an electronic promoter on the process of activating nitrogen molecules on Ru (0001) surface. (authors)

  20. Manipulating individual dichlorotin phthalocyanine molecules on Cu(100) surface at room temperature by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Xiang, Feifei; Wang, Zhongping; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Danfeng; Wang, Li; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Xueao; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule manipulations have been achieved on dichlorotin phthalocyanine(SnCl 2 Pc) molecules adsorbed on Cu (100) at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy observations directly demonstrate that the individual SnCl 2 Pc molecules can be moved along the [100] direction on Cu(100) surface by employing a scanning tunneling microscope tip fixed at the special position of the molecules. The orientation of the molecule can be switched between two angles of ±28° with respect to the [011] surface direction in the same way. Dependences of the probability of molecular motion on the distances between the tip and the molecules reveal that the mechanism for such manipulation of a SnCl 2 Pc molecule is dominated by the repulsive interactions between the tip and the molecules. With the assistance of this manipulation process, a prototype molecular storage array with molecular orientation as information carrier and an artificial hydrogen bonded supramolecular structure have been constructed on the surface. (paper)

  1. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  2. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements. PMID:22523083

  3. The topological molecule: Its finite fluxes, exchange stability and minimal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gerald F.

    2016-03-01

    Molecules have at least one nontrivial topological property in common: their minimal surfaces of finite flux. This is why they are stable aggregates of atoms mutually engaged to varying degrees via Coulombic and exchange interactions in fealty to quantum mechanics on otherwise passive nuclear scaffolds. Isolated atoms do not have minimal surfaces but they do undergo exchange interactions. All surfaces implicitly defined by a molecule’s charge density are shown to have zero mean curvature and are consequently minimal surfaces. This finding extends to any potential of a molecule. The minimal surface is of importance in that it is indicative of a vanishing mean curvature whose measurement serves as a way of gauging the charge density or electrostatic potential’s local reliability, a quality assurance protocol absent in conventional crystallography but available to scanning force microscopy. The smaller the mean curvature of an atom, the more bonded is that atom in a molecule. The basis for this discovery is that implicit surfaces admit finite flux to cross them regardless of atomic affiliation, thus engendering exchange, correlation, and chemical bonding between the atoms in the underlying nuclear framework of a molecule. Finite flux in the charge density is a necessary condition for chemical bonding and the stability of molecules and is what makes the electron localization function (ELF) and the exchange-correlation functional (BLYP) useful.

  4. Preparation and single molecule structure of electroactive polysilane end-grafted on a crystalline silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuaki; Ebata, Keisuke

    2000-12-01

    Electrically active polysilanes of poly(methylphenylsilane) (PMPS) and poly[bis(p-n-butylphenyl)silane] (PBPS), which are, respectively, known as a good hole transporting material and a near-ultraviolet electroluminescent material, are end-grafted directly on a crystalline silicon surface. The single polysilane molecules are clearly distinguished one from the other on the surface by means of atomic force microscopy observations. End-grafted single molecules of PMPS are observed as dots while end-grafted PBPS appear as worms extending for more than 100 nm on the crystalline silicon surface.

  5. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signalling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiatul Akmal Mohd-Radzman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  6. Switching behavior of double-decker single molecule magnets on a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yingshuang; Schwoebel, Joerg; Hoffmann, Germar; Brede, Jens; Wiesendanger, Roland [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Dillulo, Andrew [Ohio University, Athens (United States); Klyatskaya, Svetlana [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ruben, Mario [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-07-01

    Single molecule magnets (SMM) are most promising materials for spin based molecular electronics. Due to their large magnetic anisotropy stabilized by inside chemical bonds, SMM can potentially be used for information storage at the single molecule level. For applications, it is of importance to adsorb the SMM onto surfaces and to study their subsequent conformational, electronic and magnetic properties. We have investigated the adsorption behavior of Tb and Dy based double-decker SMM on an Ir(111) surface with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. It is found that Tb double-decker molecules bind tightly to the Ir(111) surface. By resonantly injecting tunneling electrons into its LUMO or HOMO state, the Tb double-decker molecule can be switched from a four-lobed structure to an eight-lobed structure. After switching, energy positions of the HOMO and LUMO states both shift closer to the Fermi level. Dy double-decker molecules also exhibit the same switching properties on the Ir(111) surface. The switching behavior of the molecules is tentatively attributed to a conformational change of the double-decker molecular frame.

  7. Rate coefficients for reactive elementary processes involving atoms and vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, A.; Ochoa de Aspuru, G.; Riganelli, A.; Garcia, E.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate reactions of atoms with simple molecules with new computation approaches and applying consolidated efficient numerical procedures to the calculation of experimental observables under a wide range of operating conditions were developed. A first family of reactions investigated using the described techniques and computational procedures are those of the nitrogen atom with some diatomic molecules (N 2 and O 2 ) as well as oxygen atom reactions with O 2 and HCl molecules

  8. Quantum dynamics of STM and laser induced desorption of atoms and molecules from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boendgen, G

    2001-01-01

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules at solid surfaces by electronic excitations with electrons (or holes) emitted from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or with laser radiation is both of applied and fundamental interest, e.g. for micro- and nanostructuring of materials, the clarification of elementary (catalytic) reaction mechanisms and for the question of how to treat the quantum dynamics of a laser or STM driven 'system' (the adsorbate) in contact with a dissipative (energy-withdrawing) 'bath' (the substrate). Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) and its variant DIMET (M = multiple) are among the simplest possible 'reactions' of adsorbate-surface systems; usually involving extremely short-lived electronically excited intermediates. In this thesis, the ultra-short dynamics of directly (localised to the adsorbate-substrate complex) and indirectly (i.e., through the substrate) stimulated DIET and DIMET processes was studied for Si(100)-(2x1):H(D) and Pt(111):NO. Isotope effec...

  9. Surface single-molecule dynamics controlled by entropy at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, J. C.; Penedo, M.; Parschau, M.; Schwenk, J.; Marioni, M. A.; Hudson, E. W.; Hug, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    Configuration transitions of individual molecules and atoms on surfaces are traditionally described using an Arrhenius equation with energy barrier and pre-exponential factor (attempt rate) parameters. Characteristic parameters can vary even for identical systems, and pre-exponential factors sometimes differ by orders of magnitude. Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) to measure an individual dibutyl sulfide molecule on Au(111), we show that the differences arise when the relative position of tip apex and molecule changes by a fraction of the molecule size. Altering the tip position on that scale modifies the transition's barrier and attempt rate in a highly correlated fashion, which results in a single-molecular enthalpy-entropy compensation. Conversely, appropriately positioning the STM tip allows selecting the operating point on the compensation line and modifying the transition rates. The results highlight the need to consider entropy in transition rates of single molecules, even at low temperatures.

  10. Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy of coumarin organosilane molecules adsorbed on a fused silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the adsorption of coumarin organosilane molecules onto a fused silica surface. The difference between the absorption spectra of the molecules on the surface and in solution was explained by the interaction of the adsorbed coumarin organosilane molecules with the hydroxyl groups on the fused silica surface. This interaction produces a perturbation of the π electron distribution and the electronic transitions of the coumarin chromophore of the organosilane molecules adsorbed on the surface. From the kinetics adsorption curves, the calculated enthalpy values of 74.8 ± 5.2 kJ mol -1 and free energy of -38.22 ± 0.70 kJ mol -1 at 23 deg. C indicates a chemisorption process. The high sensitivity of ATR spectroscopy allows the detection of a monolayer formed by a 10 nM concentration of coumarin organosilane molecules, which covers more than half of the maximum surface coverage at 60 deg. C.

  11. A theoretical model for the scattering of I2 molecule from a perfluoropolyeter liquid surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Alexandre S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate experimental results of scattering of an I2 beam from liquid perfluorpolyeter ( PFPE surface we developed a model potential for the gas-polymer interaction at the liquid surface and solved the dynamics of the collision process by the classical trajectory method. The energy transferred in the process to the vibrational mode of the I2 molecule and to the liquid surface was investigated as a function of potential parameters.

  12. Adsorption Study of a Water Molecule on Vacancy-Defected Nonpolar CdS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the water–semiconductor interface is of major importance for elucidating the molecular interactions at the photocatalyst’s surface. Here, we studied the effect of vacancy defects on the adsorption of a water molecule on the (101̅0) and (112̅0) CdS surfaces, using spin-polarized density functional theory. We observed that the local spin polarization did not persist for most of the cationic vacancies on the surfaces, unlike in bulk, owing to surface reconstructions caused by displaced S atoms. This result suggests that cationic vacancies on these surfaces may not be the leading cause of the experimentally observed magnetism in CdS nanostructures. The surface vacancies are predominantly nonmagnetic except for one case, where a magnetic cationic vacancy is relatively stable due to constraints posed by the (101̅0) surface geometry. At this particular magnetic defect site, we found a very strong interaction with the H2O molecule leading to a case of chemisorption, where the local spin polarization vanishes concurrently. At the same defect site, adsorption of an O2 molecule was also simulated, and the results were found to be consistent with experimental electron paramagnetic resonance findings for powdered CdS. The anion vacancies on these surfaces were always found to be nonmagnetic and did not affect the water adsorption at these surfaces. PMID:28539988

  13. Characterization of Heme Proteins Involved in Microbial Exoelectric Activity and Small Molecule-Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Vogler, Malvina M.

    2018-01-01

    Heme proteins, also termed cytochromes, are a widespread class of metalloproteins containing an Fe-protoporphyrin IX cofactor. They perform numerous functions in nature such as oxygen-transport by hemoglobin, monooxygenation reactions catalyzed by Cytochrome P-450, and electron transfer reactions during photosynthesis. The differences between proteincofactor binding characteristics and the cofactor environment greatly influence the extensive range of functions. In this dissertation, proteins from the Mtr pathway of Shewanella oneidensis are characterized. These c-type cytochromes contain multiple heme cofactors per protein molecule that covalently attach to the protein amino acid sequence and are involved in electron transfer to extracellular metal oxides during anaerobic conditions. Successful recombinant expression of pathway components MtrC and MtrA is achieved in Escherichia coli. Heme-dependent gel staining and UV/Vis spectroscopy show characteristic c-type cytochrome characteristics. Mass spectrometry confirms that the correct extensive post-translational modifications were performed and the ten heme groups were incorporated per protein of MtrC and MtrA and the correct lipid-anchor was attached to extracellular MtrC. Raman spectroscopy measurements of MtrA provide intriguing structural information and highlight the strong influence of the heme cofactors within the protein structure. Next, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein is analyzed. It was previously identified via a motif search of the plant genome, based on conserved residues in the H4 NOX pocket. Here, the incorporation of a heme b cofactor is confirmed. UV/Vis spectroscopy under anaerobic conditions demonstrates reversible binding of nitric oxide to the heme iron and depicts the previously published characteristic absorption maxima for other H-NOX proteins.

  14. Surface-Attached Molecules Control Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Zhao, Aishan; Wang, Ashley; Brown, Zachary Z.; Muir, Tom W.; Stone, Howard A.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use a process called quorum sensing to communicate and orchestrate collective behaviors including virulence factor secretion and biofilm formation. Quorum sensing relies on production, release, accumulation, and population-wide detection of signal molecules called autoinducers. Here, we develop concepts to coat surfaces with quorum-sensing-manipulation molecules as a method to control collective behaviors. We probe this strategy using Staphylococcus aureus. Pro- and anti-quorum-sensing molecules can be covalently attached to surfaces using click chemistry, where they retain their abilities to influence bacterial behaviors. We investigate key features of the compounds, linkers, and surfaces necessary to appropriately position molecules to interact with cognate receptors, and the ability of modified surfaces to resist long-term storage, repeated infections, host plasma components, and flow-generated stresses. Our studies highlight how this surface approach can be used to make colonization-resistant materials against S. aureus and other pathogens and how the approach can be adapted to promote beneficial behaviors of bacteria on surfaces. PMID:28530651

  15. Interface properties of organic molecules on metal surfaces; Grenzflaecheneigenschaften organischer Molekuele auf Metalloberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacuban, Hatice

    2010-01-28

    In this work, the growth of the archetype molecules CuPc and PTCDA was investigated on Cu(111). PTCDA was also studied on NaCl/Cu(111). The main experiments were carried out with a scanning tunneling microscope. Structural analysis of CuPc on Cu (111) is only possible at low temperatures, since at room temperature the molecules exhibit a high surface mobility. For the investigation of these structures and especially to enable scanning tunneling spectroscopy, a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was developed. Using this home built STM the experiments could be carried out at about 10 K. After the adsorption of CuPc on Cu (111) a substrate-induced symmetry reduction of the molecules can be observed in scanning tunneling microscopy. When the occupied states of the molecules are imaged, a switching between two distinct levels is found. These modifications are determined by the adsorption geometry of the molecules. Based on high resolution STM data, an on-top adsorption geometry of the CuPc-molecules on Cu (111)-substrate can be deducted. At low temperatures, two new superstructures of PTCDA on Cu(111) are observed. The molecules within these superstructures are tilted with respect to the substrate. Intermolecular interactions may be the crucial factor for the realignment of the molecules. If PTCDA molecules are adsorbed on a NaCl/Cu (111) substrate, at room temperature, also two new superstructures on the copper substrate were found. They indicate the formation of a metall-organic-complex. On top of the NaCl layer the molecules exclusively grow at polar NaCl step edges. This is an indication for electrostatic interaction between the PTCDA molecules and the NaCl layer. When the molecule density is further increased, a Vollmer-Weber growth sets in. If both molecules PTCDA and CuPc are present on the sample at the same time, local spectroscopy provides information on the metal-organic interface in direct comparison. The STS-results of CuPc/PTCDA on Cu (111

  16. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface

    OpenAIRE

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akira

    2006-01-01

    We measured polar angle ()-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0°30°. The observed desorption dynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  17. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling mo...

  18. Adsorption of the water molecule on monolayer graphene surface has effect on its optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y F; Wang, J; Lu, Z S; Han, X Y

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of water molecules on the surface of a monolayer graphene can be studied with the Materials Studio software and be applied density function theory from first principles. By studying the interaction of graphene with water molecule, it uses DFT (density function theory) with the PBE-GGA (the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew- Burke-Ernzerhof) and Periodic plane model, on the one hand working out the adsorption energy, and on the other hand getting related optical properties. It is shown that a single water molecule on graphene has very small adsorption energy, mainly owning to the van der Waals interactions. Graphene has high hydrophobic; adsorbed water molecule has little effect on the electronic structure of the graphene. The optical properties of the graphene have changed after the adsorption. (paper)

  19. Static force fields simulations of reduced CeO2 (110) surface: Structure and adsorption of H2O molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Serge; Meunier, Cathy

    2018-02-01

    The CeO2(110) surface properties are largely involved in the catalysis, energy and biological phenomenon. The Static Force Fields simulations are able to describe large atomic systems surface even if no information on the electronic structure can be obtained. We employ those simulations to study the formation of the neutral 2 CeCe‧ VO•• cluster. We focus on seven different cluster configurations and find that the defect formation energy is the lower for the 1N-2N configurations. Two geometries are possible, as it is the case for the ab initio studies, the in plane and the more stable bridging one. We evidence the modifications of the surface energy and the Potential Energy Surface due to the presence of the 2 CeCe‧ VO•• defect. The physical adsorption of a water molecule is calculated and the geometry described for all the cluster configurations. The H2O molecule physisorption stabilizes the Ce(110) surface and the presence of the 2 CeCe‧ VO•• defect increases this effect.

  20. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis.......We present a model suggesting high chemical activity of electronically-excited molecules colliding with an isolator surface. Initial photochemical event is accounted for as the result of molecular evolution on the electronically-excited potential energy surface (PES), where acceleration...

  1. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, Nicholas F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C2H3 and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  2. Insulin and IGF1 modulate turnover of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in a process involving specific extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzo, Hector J; Park, Thomas I H; Dieriks, Birger V; Jansson, Deidre; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A

    2013-09-01

    Cellular interactions mediated by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) are critical in cell migration, differentiation and plasticity. Switching of the NCAM-interaction mode, from adhesion to signalling, is determined by NCAM carrying a particular post-translational modification, polysialic acid (PSA). Regulation of cell-surface PSA-NCAM is traditionally viewed as a direct consequence of polysialyltransferase activity. Taking advantage of the polysialyltransferase Ca²⁺-dependent activity, we demonstrate in TE671 cells that downregulation of PSA-NCAM synthesis constitutes a necessary but not sufficient condition to reduce cell-surface PSA-NCAM; instead, PSA-NCAM turnover required internalization of the molecule into the cytosol. PSA-NCAM internalization was specifically triggered by collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and prevented by insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) and insulin. Our results pose a novel role for IGF1 and insulin in controlling cell migration through modulation of PSA-NCAM turnover at the cell surface. Neural cell adhesion molecules (NCAMs) are critically involved in cell differentiation and migration. Polysialylation (PSA)/desialylation of NCAMs switches their functional interaction mode and, in turn, migration and differentiation. We have found that the desialylation process of PSA-NCAM occurs via endocytosis, induced by collagen-IV and blocked by insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) and insulin, suggesting a novel association between PSA-NCAM, IGF1/insulin and brain/tumour plasticity. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  4. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  5. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  6. Osmium Atoms and Os2 Molecules Move Faster on Selenium-Doped Compared to Sulfur-Doped Boronic Graphenic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Tran, Johanna; Spencer, Simon E F; Johansen, Adam M; Sanchez, Ana M; Dove, Andrew P; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Deeth, Robert J; Beanland, Richard; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-07-28

    We deposited Os atoms on S- and Se-doped boronic graphenic surfaces by electron bombardment of micelles containing 16e complexes [Os(p-cymene)(1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecarborane-1,2-diselenate/dithiolate)] encapsulated in a triblock copolymer. The surfaces were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy of energy filtered TEM (EFTEM). Os atoms moved ca. 26× faster on the B/Se surface compared to the B/S surface (233 ± 34 pm·s(-1) versus 8.9 ± 1.9 pm·s(-1)). Os atoms formed dimers with an average Os-Os distance of 0.284 ± 0.077 nm on the B/Se surface and 0.243 ± 0.059 nm on B/S, close to that in metallic Os. The Os2 molecules moved 0.83× and 0.65× more slowly than single Os atoms on B/S and B/Se surfaces, respectively, and again markedly faster (ca. 20×) on the B/Se surface (151 ± 45 pm·s(-1) versus 7.4 ± 2.8 pm·s(-1)). Os atom motion did not follow Brownian motion and appears to involve anchoring sites, probably S and Se atoms. The ability to control the atomic motion of metal atoms and molecules on surfaces has potential for exploitation in nanodevices of the future.

  7. Effective medium potentials for molecule-surface interactions: H2 on Cu and Ni surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1989-01-01

    outside metal surfaces and the applicability is illustrated for H2 adsorbing on various Cu and Ni surfaces. Although very approximate, the calculated potentials seem to include a number of features observed experimentally: Ni is more active in dissociating H2 than Cu, and open surfaces are more active...... than close-packed ones. Moreover, the method is simple enough that one can contemplate studying variations in dissociation pathways over the surface unit cell. For the Cu surfaces these variations are substantial accounting for at least part of the variation of the sticking coefficient with the kinetic...

  8. Marangoni Convection Assisted Single Molecule Detection with Nanojet Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Wei; Wang, Xinhao; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Liu, Gang Logan; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-25

    Many single-molecule (SM) label-free techniques such as scanning probe microscopies (SPM) and magnetic force spectroscopies (MFS) provide high resolution surface topography information, but lack chemical information. Typical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) systems provide chemical information on the analytes, but lack spatial resolution. In addition, a challenge in SERS sensors is to bring analytes into the so-called "hot spots" (locations where the enhancement of electromagnetic field amplitude is larger than 10 3 ). Previously described methods of fluid transport around hot spots like thermophoresis, thermodiffusion/Soret effect, and electrothermoplasmonic flow are either too weak or detrimental in bringing new molecules to hot spots. Herein, we combined the resonant plasmonic enhancement and photonic nanojet enhancemnet of local electric field on nonplanar SERS structures, to construct a stable, high-resolution, and below diffraction limit platform for single molecule label-free detection. In addition, we utilize Marangoni convection (mass transfer due to surface tension gradient) to bring new analytes into the hotspot. An enhancement factor of ∼3.6 × 10 10 was obtained in the proposed system. Rhodamine-6G (R6G) detection of up to a concentration of 10 -12 M, an improvement of two orders of magnitude, was achieved using the nanojet effect. The proposed system could provide a simple, high throughput SERS system for single molecule analysis at high spatial resolution.

  9. Adsorption and dissociation of oxygen molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Chun-Yao; Wang, Jian-Tao

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of O 2 molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surface have been studied by first-principles calculations. Our results show that all the O 2 molecular species adsorbed on Si(111)-(7×7) surface are unstable and dissociate into atomic species with a small energy barrier about 0.1 eV. The single O 2 molecule adsorption tends to form an ins×2 or a new metastable ins×2* structure on the Si adatom sites and the further coming O 2 molecules adsorb on those structures to produce an ad-ins×3 structure. The ad-ins×3 structure is indeed highly stable and kinetically limited for diving into the subsurface layer to form the ins×3-tri structure by a large barrier of 1.3 eV. Unlike the previous views, we find that all the ad-ins, ins×2, and ad-ins×3 structures show bright images, while the ins×2*, ins×3, and ins×3-tri structures show dark images. The proposed oxidation pathways and simulated scanning tunneling microscope images account well for the experimental results and resolve the long-standing confusion and issue about the adsorption and reaction of O 2 molecules on Si(111) surface

  10. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of human-specific bacterial pathogens involves the adaptor molecule Nck

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are exploited by human-specific pathogens to anchor themselves to or invade host cells. Interestingly, human granulocytes express a specific isoform, CEACAM3, that can direct efficient, opsonin-independent phagocytosis of CEACAM-binding Neisseria, Moraxella and Haemophilus species. As opsonin-independent phagocytosis of CEACAM-binding Neisseria depends on Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) phosphorylation of the CEACAM3 ...

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of dyes: from single molecules to the artists' canvas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustholz, Kristin L; Brosseau, Christa L; Casadio, Francesca; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2009-09-14

    This perspective presents recent surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of dyes, with applications to the fields of single-molecule spectroscopy and art conservation. First we describe the development and outlook of single-molecule SERS (SMSERS). Rather than providing an exhaustive review of the literature, SMSERS experiments that we consider essential for its future development are emphasized. Shifting from single-molecule to ensemble-averaged experiments, we describe recent efforts toward SERS analysis of colorants in precious artworks. Our intention is to illustrate through these examples that the forward development of SERS is dependent upon both fundamental (e.g., SMSERS) and applied (e.g., on-the-specimen SERS of historical art objects) investigations and that the future of SERS is very bright indeed.

  12. Mechanochemistry at Solid Surfaces: Polymerization of Adsorbed Molecules by Mechanical Shear at Tribological Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jejoon; He, Xin; Martini, Ashlie; Kim, Seong H

    2017-01-25

    Polymerization of allyl alcohol adsorbed and sheared at a silicon oxide interface is studied using tribo-tests in vapor phase lubrication conditions and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The load dependences of product formation obtained from experiments and simulations were consistent, indicating that the atomic-scale processes observable in the simulations were relevant to the experiments. Analysis of the experimental results in the context of mechanically assisted thermal reaction theory, combined with the atomistic details available from the simulations, suggested that the association reaction pathway of allyl alcohol molecules induced by mechanical shear is quite different from chemically induced polymerization reactions. Findings suggested that some degree of distortion of the molecule from its equilibrium state is necessary for mechanically induced chemical reactions to occur and such a distortion occurs during mechanical shear when molecules are covalently anchored to one of the sliding surfaces.

  13. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  14. Average local ionization energies computed on the surfaces of some strained molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.S.; Seminario, J.M.; Politzer, P.; Sjoberg, P.

    1990-01-01

    An ab initio self-consistent-field molecular orbital (SCF-MO) procedure has been used to compute the average local ionization energies [bar I(r)] of some strained molecules on three-dimensional surfaces defined by the contour of electronic density equal to 0.002 electrons/bohr 3 . bar I(r) is rigorously defined within the framework of SCF-MO theory and can be interpreted as the average energy needed to ionize an electron at any point in the space of a molecule. Thus, the positions of the smallest (bar IOr) values (bar I S,min ) on the surfaces of molecules are the sites expected to be the most reactive to electrophiles. We find bar I S,min near the C-C bond midpoints of saturated three-membered, but not four-membered hydrocarbon rings. These bar I S,min are interpreted as reflecting the σ-aromatic character of the former. Our (bar IOr) data effectively provide a fingerprint characterizing saturated three-membered rings, which is useful, for example, in analyzing molecules such as [1.1.1]propellane. Our results for the latter are consistent with the interpretation of it having a biradical character, as has been suggested earlier

  15. Adsorption of squaraine molecules to Au(111) and Ag(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Maike; Groß, Boris; Schulz, Matthias; Lützen, Arne; Schiek, Manuela; Nilius, Niklas

    2018-02-01

    The adsorption of anilino squaraines, an important chromophore for the use in organic solar cells, to Ag(001) and Au(111) has been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy. Self-assembly into square building blocks with eight molecules per unit cell is revealed on the Ag surface, while no ordering effects occur on gold. The squaraine-silver interaction is mediated by the carbonyl and hydroxyl oxygens located in the center of the molecule. The intermolecular coupling, on the other hand, is governed by hydrogen bonds formed between the terminal isobutyl groups and oxygen species of adjacent molecules. The latter gets maximized by rotating the molecules by a few degrees against a perfect square alignment. A similar molecular pattern does not form on Au(111) due to symmetry mismatch. Moreover, the high electronegativity of gold reduces the directing effect of oxygen-metal bonds that trigger the ordering process on silver. As a consequence, only frustrated three-fold symmetric units that do not expand into an ordered molecular network are present on the gold surface.

  16. Exogenous cathepsin G upregulates cell surface MHC class I molecules on immune and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Madleen; Turiello, Nadine; Molenda, Nicole; Palesch, David; Meid, Annika; Schroeder, Roman; Basilico, Paola; Benarafa, Charaf; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Zimecki, Michal; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Burster, Timo

    2016-11-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. During an adaptive immune response, MHC molecules are regulated by several mechanisms including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-g). However, it is unclear whether the serine protease cathepsin G (CatG), which is generally secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, might regulate MHC I molecules. We identified CatG, and to a higher extend CatG and lactoferrin (LF), as an exogenous regulator of cell surface MHC I expression of immune cells and glioblastoma stem cells. In addition, levels of MHC I molecules are reduced on dendritic cells from CatG deficient mice compared to their wild type counterparts. Furthermore, cell surface CatG on immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and NK cells triggers MHC I on THP-1 monocytes suggesting a novel mechanism for CatG to facilitate intercellular communication between infiltrating cells and the respective target cell. Subsequently, our findings highlight the pivotal role of CatG as a checkpoint protease which might force target cells to display their intracellular MHC I:antigen repertoire.

  17. Revisiting the Challenges in Fabricating Uniform Coatings with Polyfunctional Molecules on High Surface Energy Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Oyola-Reynoso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modifying the chemistry of a surface has been widely used to influence interfacial properties of a material or nature of interaction between two materials. This article provides an overview on the role of polyfunctional molecules, specifically silanes, in surface modification of polar surfaces (bearing soft nucleophiles. An emphasis on the mechanism of the reaction in the presence of adsorbed water, where the modifying reagents are hydrolysable, is discussed. To highlight the complexity of the reaction, modification of paper with trichlorosilanes is highlighted. Preparation of hydrophobic cellulosic paper, and structure–property relations under different treatment conditions is used to highlight that a monolayer is not always formed during the surface modification. Gel-formation via step-growth polymerization suggests that at the right monomer:adsorbed water ratio, a monolayer will not form but rather self-assembly driven particle formation will occur leading to a textured surface. The review highlights recent work indicating that the focus on monolayer formation, is at the very least, not always the case but gel formation, with concomitant self-assembly, might be the culprit in understanding challenges associated with the use of polyfunctional molecules in surface modification.

  18. The effect of oxygen molecule adsorption on lead iodide perovskite surface by first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xia-Xia; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen molecule has a negative effect on perovskite solar cells, which has been investigated experimentally. However, detailed theoretical research is still rare. This study presents a microscopic view to reveal the interaction mechanism between O2 and perovskite based on the first-principles calculation. The results show that O2 is adsorbed on the (100) surface of MAPbI3 perovskite mainly by Van der Waals force. O2 adsorption makes the MAPbI3 surface generate a small number of positive charges, which leads to the increase of the work function of the MAPbI3 surface. This is in agreement with the experimental measurement. And increased work function of MAPbI3 surface is not beneficial to electron transfer from perovskite to electronic extraction layer (such as TiO2). Comparison of the density of states (DOS) of the clean (100) surface and the adsorbed system shows that an in-gap state belonging to O2 appears, which can explain the phenomenon observed from experiments that electron transfers from the surface of perovskite to O2 to form superoxide. The theoretical power conversion efficiency of the system with and without O2 adsorption is evaluated, and it turns out that the power conversion efficiency of the system with O2 adsorption is slightly lower than that of the system without O2 adsorption. This result indicates that avoiding the introduction of O2 molecules between perovskite and electronic extraction layer is beneficial to the perovskite solar cell.

  19. Human cortical areas involved in perception of surface glossiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Atsushi; Sakano, Yuichi; Ando, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Glossiness is the visual appearance of an object's surface as defined by its surface reflectance properties. Despite its ecological importance, little is known about the neural substrates underlying its perception. In this study, we performed the first human neuroimaging experiments that directly investigated where the processing of glossiness resides in the visual cortex. First, we investigated the cortical regions that were more activated by observing high glossiness compared with low glossiness, where the effects of simple luminance and luminance contrast were dissociated by controlling the illumination conditions (Experiment 1). As cortical regions that may be related to the processing of glossiness, V2, V3, hV4, VO-1, VO-2, collateral sulcus (CoS), LO-1, and V3A/B were identified, which also showed significant correlation with the perceived level of glossiness. This result is consistent with the recent monkey studies that identified selective neural response to glossiness in the ventral visual pathway, except for V3A/B in the dorsal visual pathway, whose involvement in the processing of glossiness could be specific to the human visual system. Second, we investigated the cortical regions that were modulated by selective attention to glossiness (Experiment 2). The visual areas that showed higher activation to attention to glossiness than that to either form or orientation were identified as right hV4, right VO-2, and right V3A/B, which were commonly identified in Experiment 1. The results indicate that these commonly identified visual areas in the human visual cortex may play important roles in glossiness perception. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Rate coefficients for reactive elementary processes involving atoms and vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate reactions of atoms with simple molecules wa are both developing new computational approaches and applying consolidated efficient numerical procedures to the calculation of experimental observables under a wide range of operating conditions. Our work on the design of new theoretical and computational approaches to the accurate three dimensional calculation of reactive properties from first principles is based upon the use of the hyperspherical formalism. On the contrary, our work on the design of efficient parallel codes dealing with quantum reduced dimensionality techniques is based upon the use of Jacobi coordinates. The trajectory code makes use of position vectors with respect to the center of mass of the system. (author)

  1. Collisions of ideal gas molecules with a rough/fractal surface. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczyk, Tomasz

    2007-02-01

    The frequency of collisions of ideal gas molecules (argon) with a rough surface has been studied. The rough/fractal surface was created using random deposition technique. By applying various depositions, the roughness of the surface was controlled and, as a measure of the irregularity, the fractal dimensions of the surfaces were determined. The surfaces were next immersed in argon (under pressures 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(5) Pa) and the numbers of collisions with these surfaces were counted. The calculations were carried out using a simplified molecular dynamics simulation technique (only hard core repulsions were assumed). As a result, it was stated that the frequency of collisions is a linear function of pressure for all fractal dimensions studied (D = 2, ..., 2.5). The frequency per unit pressure is quite complex function of the fractal dimension; however, the changes of that frequency with the fractal dimension are not strong. It was found that the frequency of collisions is controlled by the number of weakly folded sites on the surfaces and there is some mapping between the shape of adsorption energy distribution functions and this number of weakly folded sites. The results for the rough/fractal surfaces were compared with the prediction given by the Langmuir-Hertz equation (valid for smooth surface), generally the departure from the Langmuir-Hertz equation is not higher than 48% for the studied systems (i.e. for the surfaces created using the random deposition technique).

  2. Single NdPc2 molecules on surfaces. Adsorption, interaction, and molecular magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrendorf, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    They have huge potential for application in molecular-spin-transistors, molecular-spinvalves, and molecular quantum computing. SMMs are characterized by high spin ground states with zero-field splitting leading to high relaxation barriers and long relaxation times. A relevant class of molecules are the lanthanide double-decker phthalocyanines (LaPc 2 ) with only one metal atom sandwiched between two organic phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands. For envisaged spintronic applications it is important to understand the interaction between the molecules and the substrate and its influence on the electronic and magnetic properties. The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the adsorbed neodymium double-decker phthalocyanine (NdPc 2 ) by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). The molecules are deposited by sublimation onto different substrates. It is observed that a large fraction of the double-decker molecules decomposes during deposition. The decomposition probability strongly depends on the chosen substrate. Therefore it is concluded that the substrate modifies the electronic structure of the molecule leading to a stabilization or destabilization of the molecular entity. Charge transfer from the surface to the molecule is identified as a potential stabilizing mechanism. The electronic and magnetic properties are investigated in detail for adsorbed NdPc 2 molecules on Cu(100). The results of the experimental study are compared to state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations performed by our colleagues from the Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-1) at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. Interestingly, the lower Pc ring of the molecule hybridizes intensely with the substrate leading to strong chemisorption of the molecule, while the upper Pc ring keeps its molecular type electronic states, which can be energetically shifted by an external electric field. Importantly, it is possible to get direct access to the spin

  3. Single NdPc{sub 2} molecules on surfaces. Adsorption, interaction, and molecular magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrendorf, Sarah

    2013-01-24

    They have huge potential for application in molecular-spin-transistors, molecular-spinvalves, and molecular quantum computing. SMMs are characterized by high spin ground states with zero-field splitting leading to high relaxation barriers and long relaxation times. A relevant class of molecules are the lanthanide double-decker phthalocyanines (LaPc{sub 2}) with only one metal atom sandwiched between two organic phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands. For envisaged spintronic applications it is important to understand the interaction between the molecules and the substrate and its influence on the electronic and magnetic properties. The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the adsorbed neodymium double-decker phthalocyanine (NdPc{sub 2}) by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). The molecules are deposited by sublimation onto different substrates. It is observed that a large fraction of the double-decker molecules decomposes during deposition. The decomposition probability strongly depends on the chosen substrate. Therefore it is concluded that the substrate modifies the electronic structure of the molecule leading to a stabilization or destabilization of the molecular entity. Charge transfer from the surface to the molecule is identified as a potential stabilizing mechanism. The electronic and magnetic properties are investigated in detail for adsorbed NdPc{sub 2} molecules on Cu(100). The results of the experimental study are compared to state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations performed by our colleagues from the Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-1) at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. Interestingly, the lower Pc ring of the molecule hybridizes intensely with the substrate leading to strong chemisorption of the molecule, while the upper Pc ring keeps its molecular type electronic states, which can be energetically shifted by an external electric field. Importantly, it is possible to get direct access to the

  4. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  5. Toward single-molecule detection with sensors based on propagating surface plasmons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnička, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Vala, Milan; Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2012), s. 163-165 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical biosenzor * single molecule * surface plasmon microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.385, year: 2012

  6. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  7. Selectivity by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Interactions Can Be Driven by Protein Surface Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David K.; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity) can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these “distinct” pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25706586

  8. Measuring the force of single protein molecule detachment from surfaces with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S; Missirlis, Yannis F

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the non-specific detachment force of single fibrinogen molecules from glass surfaces. The identification of single unbinding events was based on the characteristics of the parabolic curves, recorded during the stretching of protein molecules. Fibrinogen molecules were covalently bound to Si(3)N(4) AFM tips, previously modified with 3-aminopropyl-dimethyl-ethoxysilane, through a homobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) linker bearing two hydroxysulfosuccinimide esters. The most probable detachment force was found to be 210 pN, when the tip was retracting with a velocity of 1400 nm/s, while the distribution of the detachment distances indicated that the fibrinogen chain can be elongated beyond the length of the physical conformation before detachment. The dependence of the most probable detachment force on the loading rate was examined and the dynamics of fibrinogen binding to the surface were found amenable to the simple expression of the Bell-Evans theory. The theory's expansion, however, by incorporating the concept of the rupture of parallel residue-surface bonds could only describe the detachment of fibrinogen for a small number of such bonds. Finally, the mathematical expression of the Worm-Like Chain model was used to fit the stretching curves before rupture and two interpretations are suggested for the description of the AFM curves with multiple detachment events.

  9. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. © FASEB.

  10. Localization of CD9 Molecule on Bull Spermatozoa: Its Involvement in the Sperm-Egg Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antalíková, J; Jankovičová, J; Simon, M; Cupperová, P; Michalková, K; Horovská, Ľ

    2015-06-01

    Tetraspanin CD9 is one of the egg membrane proteins known to be essential in fertilization process. The presence and localization of CD9 molecule in spermatozoa and its possible function in reproduction are still unclear. In our study, we describe the localization of CD9 on bull spermatozoa. In the immunofluorescence assay, the positive signal has been observed in the high proportion of sperm cells as a fine grains either on the apical part or through the entire anterior region of sperm head. CD9 recognized by monoclonal antibody IVA-50 was detected on freshly ejaculated (83.4 ± 3.7%) and frozen-thawed (84.3 ± 2.3%) sperm. The same reaction pattern was observed on sperm capacitated for 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 4 h (83.6 ± 2.0%; 84.0 ± 1.5%; 85.7 ± 0.8%; 77.5 ± 10.8%). The presence of CD9 exclusively on plasma membrane of the bovine sperm has been detected by Western blot analysis of the protein fractions after the discontinuous sucrose gradient fractionation of the bull sperm. Moreover, probable role of the sperm CD9 molecule in fertilization process of cattle has been suggested as sperm treatment with anti-CD9 antibody significantly reduced (by 25%, p ≤ 0.001) the number of fertilized oocytes compared to control group in fertilization assay in vitro. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Single-molecule conductivity of non-redox and redox molecules at pure and gold-mined Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Ulstrup, Jens

    media supported by comprehensive theoretical frames, have emerged as core approaches in these exciting areas. Single-molecule redox electrochemistry is rooted in two major areas. One is the preparation of well-defined (atomically planar) electrode surfaces modified by molecular monolayers (SAMs). High...... to surface-mined Au-atoms. In addition the SAMs ensure protein/enzyme immobilization gentle enough that the proteins retain electron transfer or enzyme activity in a variety of local environments. The second area is the mapping and control of the immobilized redox molecules and metalloproteins themselves...

  12. Role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition involved molecules in the progression of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtas, Daniela; Maxia, Cristina; Diana, Andrea; Pilloni, Luca; Corda, Claudia; Minerba, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Piras, Franca; Ferreli, Caterina; Perra, Maria Teresa

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been suggested to have a driving role in the acquisition of a metastatic potential by melanoma cells. Important hallmarks of EMT include both E-cadherin downregulation and increased expression of N-cadherin. This switch in distinct classes of adhesion molecules leads melanoma cells to lose contact with adjacent keratinocytes and interact instead with stromal fibroblasts and endothelial cells, thus promoting dermal and vascular melanoma invasion. Consequently, tumor cells migrate to distant host tissues and establish metastases. A key regulator in the induction of EMT in melanoma is the Notch1 signaling pathway that, when activated, is prompt to upregulate N-cadherin expression. By means of this strategy, melanoma cells gain enhanced survival, proliferation and invasion properties, driving the tumor toward a more aggressive phenotype. On the basis of these statements, the present study aimed to investigate the possible association between N-cadherin and Notch1 presence in primary cutaneous melanomas and lymph node metastases. Our results from immunohistochemical analysis confirmed a positive correlation between N-cadherin and Notch1 presence in the same tumor samples. Moreover, this study highlighted that a concomitant high expression of N-cadherin and Notch1, both in primary lesions and in lymph node metastases, predicts an adverse clinical outcome in melanoma patients. Therefore, N-cadherin and Notch1 co-presence can be monitored as a predictive factor in early- and advanced-stage melanomas and open additional therapeutic targets for the restraint of melanoma metastasis.

  13. The specificity of targeted vaccines for APC surface molecules influences the immune response phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig Grødeland

    Full Text Available Different diseases require different immune responses for efficient protection. Thus, prophylactic vaccines should prime the immune system for the particular type of response needed for protection against a given infectious agent. We have here tested fusion DNA vaccines which encode proteins that bivalently target influenza hemagglutinins (HA to different surface molecules on antigen presenting cells (APC. We demonstrate that targeting to MHC class II molecules predominantly induced an antibody/Th2 response, whereas targeting to CCR1/3/5 predominantly induced a CD8(+/Th1 T cell response. With respect to antibodies, the polarizing effect was even more pronounced upon intramuscular (i.m delivery as compared to intradermal (i.d. vaccination. Despite these differences in induced immune responses, both vaccines protected against a viral challenge with influenza H1N1. Substitution of HA with ovalbumin (OVA demonstrated that polarization of immune responses, as a consequence of APC targeting specificity, could be extended to other antigens. Taken together, the results demonstrate that vaccination can be tailor-made to induce a particular phenotype of adaptive immune responses by specifically targeting different surface molecules on APCs.

  14. Delta self-consistent field method to obtain potential energy surfaces of excited molecules on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Olsen, Thomas; Engelund, Mads

    2008-01-01

    is a density-functional method closely resembling standard density-functional theory (DFT), the only difference being that in Delta SCF one or more electrons are placed in higher lying Kohn-Sham orbitals instead of placing all electrons in the lowest possible orbitals as one does when calculating the ground......-photoemission spectroscopy measurements. This comparison shows that the modified Delta SCF method gives results in close agreement with experiment, significantly closer than the comparable methods. For N2 adsorbed on ruthenium (0001) we map out a two-dimensional part of the potential energy surfaces in the ground state...

  15. Nonseparable exchange-correlation functional for molecules, including homogeneous catalysis involving transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haoyu S; Zhang, Wenjing; Verma, Pragya; He, Xiao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-05-14

    The goal of this work is to develop a gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional of Kohn-Sham density functional theory for treating molecular problems with a special emphasis on the prediction of quantities important for homogeneous catalysis and other molecular energetics. Our training and validation of exchange-correlation functionals is organized in terms of databases and subdatabases. The key properties required for homogeneous catalysis are main group bond energies (database MGBE137), transition metal bond energies (database TMBE32), reaction barrier heights (database BH76), and molecular structures (database MS10). We also consider 26 other databases, most of which are subdatabases of a newly extended broad database called Database 2015, which is presented in the present article and in its ESI. Based on the mathematical form of a nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), as first employed in the N12 functional, we design a new functional by using Database 2015 and by adding smoothness constraints to the optimization of the functional. The resulting functional is called the gradient approximation for molecules, or GAM. The GAM functional gives better results for MGBE137, TMBE32, and BH76 than any available generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or than N12. The GAM functional also gives reasonable results for MS10 with an MUE of 0.018 Å. The GAM functional provides good results both within the training sets and outside the training sets. The convergence tests and the smooth curves of exchange-correlation enhancement factor as a function of the reduced density gradient show that the GAM functional is a smooth functional that should not lead to extra expense or instability in optimizations. NGAs, like GGAs, have the advantage over meta-GGAs and hybrid GGAs of respectively smaller grid-size requirements for integrations and lower costs for extended systems. These computational advantages combined with the relatively high accuracy for all

  16. Transport properties of water molecules confined between hydroxyapaptite surfaces: A Molecular dynamics simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Muthuramalingam; Lemaire, Thibault; Di Tommaso, Devis; de Leeuw, Nora; Lewerenz, Marius; Caruel, Matthieu; Naili, Salah

    2017-10-01

    Water diffusion in the vicinity of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals is a key issue to describe biomineralization process. In this study, a configuration of parallel HAP platelets mimicking bone nanopores is proposed to characterize the nanoscopic transport properties of water molecules at HAP-water surface and interfaces using various potential models such as combination of the Core-Shell (CS) model, Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials with SPC or SPC/E water models. When comparing all these potentials models, it appears that the core-shell potential for HAP together with the SPC/E water model more accurately predicts the diffusion properties of water near HAP surface. Moreover, we have been able to put into relief the possibility of observing hydroxyl (OH-) ion dissociation that modifies the water structure near the HAP surface.

  17. Strategies For Immobilization Of Bioactive Organic Molecules On Titanium Implant Surfaces – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotov Ivan V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous approaches have been used to improve the tissue-implant interface of titanium (Ti and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V. They all aim at increasing cell migration and attachment to the metal, preventing unspecific protein adsorption and improving post-implantation healing process. Promising methods for titanium and titanium alloy surface modification are based on the immobilization of biologically active organic molecules. New and interesting biochemical approaches to such surface modification include layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte films, phage display-selected surface binding peptides and self-assembled DNA monolayer systems. The present review summarizes the scientific information about these methods, which are at in vitro or in vivo development stages, and hopes to promote their future application in dental implantology and in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  18. Cell-surface interactions involving immobilized magnetite nanoparticles on flat magnetic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loichen, Juliane; Hartmann, Uwe

    2009-09-01

    A new method to affect cells by cell-surface interaction is introduced. Biocompatible magnetic nanobeads are deposited onto a biocompatible magnetic thin layer. The particles are composed of small magnetite crystals embedded in a matrix which can be functionalized by different molecules, proteins or growth factors. The magnetic interaction between surface and beads prevents endocytosis if the setup is utilized for cell culturing. The force acting between particles and magnetic layer is calculated by a magnetostatic approach. Biocompatibility is ensured by using garnet layers which turned out to be nontoxic and stable under culturing conditions. The garnet thin films exhibit spatially and temporally variable magnetic domain configurations in changing external magnetic fields and depending on their thermal pretreatment. Several patterns and bead deposition methods as well as the cell-surface interactions were analyzed. In some cases the cells show directed growth. Theoretical considerations explaining particular cell behavior on this magnetic material involve calculations of cell growth on elastic substrates and bending of cell membranes.

  19. The Extracellular Vesicles of the Helminth Pathogen, Fasciola hepatica: Biogenesis Pathways and Cargo Molecules Involved in Parasite Pathogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Trelis, Maria; Bernal, Dolores; Dufresne, Philippe J.; Brennan, Gerard P.; O'Neill, Sandra; Tort, Jose; Paterson, Steve; Marcilla, Antonio; Dalton, John P.; Robinson, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by parasites have important roles in establishing and maintaining infection. Analysis of the soluble and vesicular secretions of adult Fasciola hepatica has established a definitive characterization of the total secretome of this zoonotic parasite. Fasciola secretes at least two subpopulations of EVs that differ according to size, cargo molecules and site of release from the parasite. The larger EVs are released from the specialized cells that line the parasite gastrodermus and contain the zymogen of the 37 kDa cathepsin L peptidase that performs a digestive function. The smaller exosome-like vesicle population originate from multivesicular bodies within the tegumental syncytium and carry many previously described immunomodulatory molecules that could be delivered into host cells. By integrating our proteomics data with recently available transcriptomic data sets we have detailed the pathways involved with EV biogenesis in F. hepatica and propose that the small exosome biogenesis occurs via ESCRT-dependent MVB formation in the tegumental syncytium before being shed from the apical plasma membrane. Furthermore, we found that the molecular “machinery” required for EV biogenesis is constitutively expressed across the intramammalian development stages of the parasite. By contrast, the cargo molecules packaged within the EVs are developmentally regulated, most likely to facilitate the parasites migration through host tissue and to counteract host immune attack. PMID:26486420

  20. Doping effects of surface functionalization on graphene with aromatic molecule and organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangfu; Tang, Xin; Meyyappan, M.; Lai, King Wai Chiu

    2017-12-01

    Aromatic molecule functionalization plays a key role in the development of graphene field-effect transistors (G-FETs) for bio-detection. We have investigated the doping effects of surface functionalization and its influence on the carrier mobility of graphene. The aromatic molecule (1-pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester, PBASE), which is widely used as a linker to anchor bio-probes, was employed here to functionalize graphene. Dimethyl formamide (DMF) and methanol (CH3OH) were used as two solvents to dissolve PBASE. Raman spectra showed that both PBASE and these two solvents imposed doping effects on graphene. The PBASE was stably immobilized on the graphene surface, which was confirmed by the new peak at around 1623.5 cm-1 and the disordered D peak at 1350 cm-1. Electrical measurements and Fermi level shift analysis further revealed that PBASE imposes a p-doping effect while DMF and CH3OH impose an n-doping effect. More importantly, CH3OH causes a smaller reduction in the carrier mobility of G-FETs (from 1095.6 cm2/V s to 802.4 cm2/V s) than DMF (from 1640.4 cm2/V s to 5.0 cm2/V s). Therefore, CH3OH can be regarded as a better solvent for the PBASE functionalization. This careful study on the influence of organic solvents on graphene during PBASE functionalization process provides an effective approach to monitor the surface functionalization of graphene.

  1. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Roelofs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs, and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis. In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis. The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota.

  2. The adsorption and dissociation of water molecule on goethite (010) surface: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Long, E-mail: shuweixia@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Xiu, Fangyuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Qiu, Meng [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China); Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The optimized structure of hydrated goethite (010) surface with medium water coverage (water density about 6.7 H{sub 2}O/nm{sup 2}). - Highlights: • Stable adsorption and dissociation structure of H{sub 2}O on goethite (010) surface was investigated by DFT. • Reasonable path for water dissociation was proposed by transitional state analysis. • The mechanism of water adsorption on goethite and binding nature were revealed by PDOS. - Abstract: Using density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we investigate the configuration, stability and electronic properties of fresh cleaved (010) goethite surface (Pnma) and this surface exposed to water monolayer at low, medium and high coverage. Water is predicted to be chemisorbed to the surface, together with the surface reconstruction. The interaction energy of the most stable configuration of both low and medium coverage per water molecule is almost the same (−1.17 eV), while that of high coverage is much lower (less than 1.03 eV). It indicates that highly hydrated surface is less stable. PDOS analysis reveals the adsorption of H{sub 2}O is due to the formation of Fe−O bond, caused by overlapping of Fe's 3d and O's 2p orbitals. Dissociation processes at low and medium water coverage are non-spontaneous; while at high coverage, it can undertake spontaneously both thermodynamically and dynamically. The dissociation paths of all three water coverage are the similar. The proton from one adsorbed water is likely to dissociate to bind to the vicinal surface μ{sub 3}−O as an intermediate product; the proton belonged to μ{sub 3}−O transferred to the neighbor surface μ{sub 2}−O as the dissociative configuration.

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  4. Surface plasmon-coupled emission from shaped PMMA films doped with fluorescence molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D G; Moh, K J; Yuan, X-C

    2010-06-07

    Surface plasmon-coupled emission from shaped PMMA films doped with randomly oriented fluorescence molecules was investigated. Experimental results show that for different shapes, such as triangle or circular structures, the SPCE ring displays different intensity patterns. For a given shape, it was observed that the relative position and polarization of an incident laser spot on the shaped PMMA can be used to adjust the fluorescence intensity distribution of the SPCE ring. The proposed method enables controlling the fluorescence emission in azimuthal direction in addition to the radial angle controlled by common SPCE, which will further enhances the fluorescence collection efficiency and has applications in fluorescence sensing, imaging and so on.

  5. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  6. Single-molecule characterization and engineering of the surfaces of nucleic acid sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Eric Alan

    The advent of personalized medicine will require biosensors capable of reliably detecting small levels of disease biomarkers. In microarrays and sensors for nucleic acids, hybridization events between surface-tethered DNA probes and the nucleic acids of interest (targets) are transduced into a detectable signal. However, target-binding ultimately occurs as a result of molecular motions and interactions between the probe and target at the nanometer scale, and common characterization methods either lack the resolution to characterize the sensors at this scale or provide only limited information about their interactions with their nanoscale chemical environment. In this dissertation I argue that an impediment to the development of more reliable and practical biosensors is the lack of knowledge and control of the nanometer length-scale structure of biosensor surfaces, which has a profound impact on molecular recognition and reactions for detection. After reviewing the fundamental surface chemistry and structural motifs of biosensors in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 I use electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) to characterize in situ a common class of model nucleic acid sensors---thiolated DNA attached to a gold electrode which has been passivated by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer---with single-molecule resolution. This level of detail allows me to observe both the conformations of individual probes and their spatial distribution at the nanoscale, then determine how these are affected by assembly conditions, probe structure, and interactions with co-adsorbates. I also determine how these nanoscale details affect the dynamic response of probes to electric fields, which have been commonly used in sensing schemes, and ultimately the ability of the surface-tethered probes to bind with target nucleic acids. In Chapter 3, I demonstrate and optimize the nanoscale patterning of individual DNA molecules into isolated, chemically well-defined niches on the surface

  7. Analysis of crucial molecules involved in herniated discs and degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Qu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Herniated discs and degenerative disc disease are major health problems worldwide. However, their pathogenesis remains obscure. This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms of these ailments and to identify underlying therapeutic targets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using the GSE23130 microarray datasets downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, differentially co-expressed genes and links were identified using the differentially co-expressed gene and link method with a false discovery rate ,0.25 as a significant threshold. Subsequently, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the differential co-expression of these genes were investigated using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis. In addition, the transcriptional regulatory relationship was also investigated. RESULTS: Through the analysis of the gene expression profiles of different specimens from patients with these diseases, 539 differentially co-expressed genes were identified for these ailments. The ten most significant signaling pathways involving the differentially co-expressed genes were identified by enrichment analysis. Among these pathways, apoptosis and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction pathways have been reported to be related to these diseases. A total of 62 pairs of regulatory relationships between transcription factors and their target genes were identified as critical for the pathogenesis of these diseases. CONCLUSION: The results of our study will help to identify the mechanisms responsible for herniated discs and degenerative disc disease and provides a theoretical basis for further therapeutic study.

  8. Analysis of crucial molecules involved in herniated discs and degenerative disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhigang; Miao, Weiwei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhenyu; Fu, Changfeng; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Herniated discs and degenerative disc disease are major health problems worldwide. However, their pathogenesis remains obscure. This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms of these ailments and to identify underlying therapeutic targets. Using the GSE23130 microarray datasets downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, differentially co-expressed genes and links were identified using the differentially co-expressed gene and link method with a false discovery rate ,0.25 as a significant threshold. Subsequently, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the differential co-expression of these genes were investigated using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis. In addition, the transcriptional regulatory relationship was also investigated. Through the analysis of the gene expression profiles of different specimens from patients with these diseases, 539 differentially co-expressed genes were identified for these ailments. The ten most significant signaling pathways involving the differentially co-expressed genes were identified by enrichment analysis. Among these pathways, apoptosis and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction pathways have been reported to be related to these diseases. A total of 62 pairs of regulatory relationships between transcription factors and their target genes were identified as critical for the pathogenesis of these diseases. The results of our study will help to identify the mechanisms responsible for herniated discs and degenerative disc disease and provides a theoretical basis for further therapeutic study.

  9. Method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Futrell, Jean H [Richland, WA

    2008-04-29

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation (SID) in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis. Results demonstrate formation of a wide distribution of structure-specific fragments having wide sequence coverage useful for sequencing and identifying the complex molecules.

  10. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  11. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  12. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-05

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063cm -1 (2438cm -1 ) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the OH (OD) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124cm -1 (2325cm -1 ) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Do surfaces of positive electrostatic potential on different halogen derivatives in molecules attract? like attracting like!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Arpita; Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Yamashita, Koichi

    2018-03-15

    Coulomb's law states that like charges repel, and unlike charges attract. However, it has recently been theoretically revealed that two similarly charged conducting spheres will almost always attract each other when both are in close proximity. Using multiscale first principles calculations, we illustrate practical examples of several intermolecular complexes that are formed by the consequences of attraction between positive atomic sites of similar or dissimilar electrostatic surface potential on interacting molecules. The results of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and symmetry adapted perturbation theory support the attraction between the positive sites, characterizing the F•••X (X = F, Cl, Br) intermolecular interactions in a series of 20 binary complexes as closed-shell type, although the molecular electrostatic surface potential approach does not (a failure!). Dispersion that has an r -6 dependence, where r is the equilibrium distance of separation, is found to be the sole driving force pushing the two positive sites to attract. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nanometer-scale discernment of field emission from tungsten surface with single carbon monoxide molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Soichiro; Suwa, Yuji; Katagiri, Souichi

    2017-12-01

    Unusual quantized beam fluctuations were found in the emission current from a cold-field emitter (CFE) operating in an extremely high vacuum of 10-10 Pa. To clarify the microscopic mechanism behind these fluctuations, we developed a new calculation method to evaluate the field emission from a heterogeneous surface under a strong electric field of 4 × 109 V/m by using the local potential distribution obtained by a first-principles calculation, instead of by using the work function. As a result of the first-principles calculations of a single molecule adsorbed on a tungsten surface, we found that dissociative adsorption of a carbon monoxide (CO) molecule enhances the emission current by changing the potential barrier in the area surrounding the C and O adatoms when these two atoms are placed at their most stable positions. It is also found that the migration of the O atom from the most stable position reduces the emission current. These types of enhancement and reduction of the emission current quantitatively explain the observed quantized fluctuations of the CFE emission current.

  15. Effects of water molecules on rearrangements of formamide on the kaolinite basal (001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huyen Thi; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2014-08-28

    The effects of kaolinite mineral surfaces on the unimolecular rearrangements of formamide (FM) were investigated using periodic density functional theory in conjunction with pseudopotential plane-wave approach. Surface hydroxyl groups covering the octahedral surface of kaolinite were found to play the role of catalysts in the transformations of FM. They induce a reduction of 31 kcal/mol on the energy barrier for formation of its isomer aminohydroxymethylene (AHM), which is close to the reduction amount calculated for water-catalyzed reactions. This suggests that the kaolinite octahedral surface exerts a catalytic effect similar to that of the water molecule. As the tetrahedral surface does not contain catalytic surface hydroxyl groups, only water-assisted FM transformation was therefore studied on this surface whose energy barrier amounts to ∼17 kcal/mol. The combined effect of both water and kaolinite on FM rearrangements via triple hydrogen transfer reactions does not significantly lower the energy barriers, as compared to those of double hydrogen transfer reactions. The triple hydrogen transfer energy barriers amount to ∼20 and ∼36 kcal/mol, and the double ones are ∼21 and ∼40 kcal/mol for formation of formimic acid and AHM isomers, respectively. However, the energies of the systems in water-catalyzed channels lie below the available energies of the original reactants, and thus these channels are more favored than the water-free ones. With its multiple functions as both a supporting plate-form and a catalyst for FM reactions, kaolinite can thus be regarded as an important natural catalyst for prebiotic synthesis.

  16. Ab initio investigation of the passivation effect of the acrylonitrile molecule on the Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usanmaz, D., E-mail: demetusanmaz@gmail.com [Physics Program, Middle East Technical University, Northern Cyprus Campus, Kalkanlı, Güzelyurt, KKTC, Mersin 10 (Turkey); Srivastava, G.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Different bonding configurations of acrylonitrile molecule on the Si(2 × 1) surface based on reported experimental results have been investigated. • The acrylonitrile molecule has the minimum energy configuration at the on-top adsorption site. • The adsorption of the acrylonitrile molecule passivates the Si(2 × 1) surface both chemically as well as electronically. • The resulting surface structure is passivated both chemically as well as electronically. - Abstract: Based on pseudopotentials and the density functional theory, we have investigated the atomic geometry and electronic structure of the acrylonitrile molecule adsorbed on the Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface. By considering different bonding configurations based on reported experimental results, we have investigated several possible geometries. Our total energy results suggest that the acrylonitrile molecule has the minimum energy configuration at the on-top adsorbtion site. The electronic surface properties of the most stable structure have been discussed. Our results show that the adsorption of this molecule fully passivates the Si(001)(2 × 1) surface.

  17. In Vitro Optimization of Enzymes Involved in Precorrin-2 Synthesis Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huan; Dong, Huina; Cai, Tao; Zheng, Ping; Li, Haixing; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    In order to maximize the production of biologically-derived chemicals, kinetic analyses are first necessary for predicting the role of enzyme components and coordinating enzymes in the same reaction system. Precorrin-2 is a key precursor of cobalamin and siroheme synthesis. In this study, we sought to optimize the concentrations of several molecules involved in precorrin-2 synthesis in vitro: porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS), porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), and S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent urogen III methyltransferase (SUMT). Response surface methodology was applied to develop a kinetic model designed to maximize precorrin-2 productivity. The optimal molar ratios of PBGS, PBGD, UROS, and SUMT were found to be approximately 1:7:7:34, respectively. Maximum precorrin-2 production was achieved at 0.1966 ± 0.0028 μM/min, agreeing with the kinetic model's predicted value of 0.1950 μM/min. The optimal concentrations of the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and substrate 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were also determined to be 200 μM and 5 mM, respectively, in a tandem-enzyme assay. By optimizing the relative concentrations of these enzymes, we were able to minimize the effects of substrate inhibition and feedback inhibition by S-adenosylhomocysteine on SUMT and thereby increase the production of precorrin-2 by approximately five-fold. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of kinetic modeling via response surface methodology for maximizing the production of biologically-derived chemicals.

  18. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  19. Decoration of carbon nano surfaces with hydrogen and hydrogen rich molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zöttl, S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of helium nano droplets as a matrix to investigate different atomic and molecular samples is a well established experimental technique. The unique properties of helium allow for different analytical methods and at the same time provide a stable ambient temperature. Cluster growth inside helium nano droplets can be accomplished by repeatedly doping the droplets with sample particles in a controlled environment. The experimental work represented in this thesis was performed using helium nano droplets to create clusters of fullerenes like C 60 and C 70 . The adsorption properties of these fullerene clusters regarding hydrogen and hydrogen rich molecules have been subject to investigation. The observed results suggest that curved carbon nano surfaces offer higher storage densities than planar graphite surfaces. The use of C 60 as a model carbon nano structure provides a well understood molecule for testing and evaluating computational methods to calculate surface properties of various carbon nano materials. The cost effective storage of hydrogen for mobile applications plays a key role in the development of alternatives to fossil fuels. For that reason, the application of carbon nano materials to store hydrogen by adsorption has attracted much scientific attention lately. The insights gained in the presented thesis contribute to the collective efforts and deliver more refined tools to estimate the adsorption properties of future carbon nano materials. In addition to the aforementioned, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for educational purpose has been designed and constructed in the framework of my PhD thesis. The instrument is successfully used in various lab courses and information on the setup can be found in the Appendix of this work. (author) [de

  20. On-Demand Final State Control of a Surface-Bound Bistable Single Molecule Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Torres, José A; Simpson, Grant J; Adams, Christopher J; Früchtl, Herbert A; Schaub, Renald

    2018-04-12

    Modern electronic devices perform their defined action because of the complete reliability of their individual active components (transistors, switches, diodes, and so forth). For instance, to encode basic computer units (bits) an electrical switch can be used. The reliability of the switch ensures that the desired outcome (the component's final state, 0 or 1) can be selected with certainty. No practical data storage device would otherwise exist. This reliability criterion will necessarily need to hold true for future molecular electronics to have the opportunity to emerge as a viable miniaturization alternative to our current silicon-based technology. Molecular electronics target the use of single-molecules to perform the actions of individual electronic components. On-demand final state control over a bistable unimolecular component has therefore been one of the main challenges in the past decade (1-5) but has yet to be achieved. In this Letter, we demonstrate how control of the final state of a surface-supported bistable single molecule switch can be realized. On the basis of the observations and deductions presented here, we further suggest an alternative strategy to achieve final state control in unimolecular bistable switches.

  1. Effects of an electric field on the adsorption of water molecules on the Cd(0001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yu-Bing; Tao, Min-Long; Sun, Kai; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2018-02-01

    The adsorption of water molecules on the Cd(0001) surface has been systematically investigated in the absence or presence of the electric field using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. It has been determined that the adsorption is enhanced by the electric field. From the geometries and energetics, we find that the water-cadmium interaction become stronger (weaker) under a negative (positive) field in the adsorbed monomer. Otherwise, the formation of the hydrogen bonds makes it difficult for molecules in the water clusters to response the electric field. Most importantly, the stability of the water bilayers depends on the strength of the negative electric field. Instead of the H-up bilayer, the H-down bilayer is more stable when the negative field is sufficiently strong. In this case, the dipole-field interaction is the dominant interaction in the change of stability. These results are helpful in the understanding of the fundamental processes at the water-electrode interfaces.

  2. Structure investigation of organic molecules on Au(111) surfaces; Strukturuntersuchung organischer Molekuele auf Au(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazempoor, Michel

    2009-02-02

    The present work covers two topics namely the coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) and the structure of biphenylalkanthiole SAMs on Au(111) surfaces. The coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) surfaces has been investigated by means of vibrational and photoelectron spectroscopy (HREELS, XPS). Formic acid adsorbs at 90 K molecularly with vibrational modes characteristic for flat lying zig-zag chains in the mono- and multilayer regime, like in solid formic acid. The structure of the flat lying formic acid chains was determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as a (2r3 x r19) unit cell. Annealing results in a complete desorption at 190 K. Sequential adsorption of formic acid and water at 90 K shows no significant chemical interaction. Upon annealing the coadsorbed layer to 140 K a hydrogenbonded cyclic complex of formic acid with one water molecule could be identified using isotopically labelled adsorbates. Upon further annealing this complex decomposes leaving molecularly adsorbed formic acid on the surface at 160 K, accompanied by a proton exchange between formic acid and water. The influence of the alkane spacer chain length on the structure of biphenylalkanethiols on Au(111) surfaces was investigated as well. A systematic study was done on BPn-SAMs deposited from the gas phase. For every chain length a structure was found by LEED. Furthermore the influence of temperature on the structure was investigated in the range from room temperature up to about 400 K. To obviate influences from different preparation methods BP3 and BP4 was deposited from gas phase and from solution. No LEED spots were observed on BP4 SAMs deposited from solution. For BP3 an influence of the preparation could be excluded. For all BPn-SAMs a good agreement between LEED and STM data's was found. Nevertheless different unit cells were determined by LEED and STM consistent structures could be suggested considering the unit cell size given by LEED and the

  3. Coupling of Surface and Volume Dipole Oscillations in C60 Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, M.; Winkler, P.; Murthy, M. V. N.

    We first give a short review of the "local-current approximation" (LCA), derived from a general variation principle, which serves as a semiclassical description of strongly collective excitations in finite fermion systems starting from their quantum-mechanical mean-field ground state. We illustrate it for the example of coupled translational and compressional dipole excitations in metal clusters. We then discuss collective electronic dipole excitations in C60 molecules (Buckminster fullerenes). We show that the coupling of the pure translational mode ("surface plasmon") with compressional volume modes in the semiclasscial LCA yields semi-quantitative agreement with microscopic time-dependent density functional (TDLDA) calculations, while both theories yield qualitative agreement with the recent experimental observation of a "volume plasmon".

  4. Coupling of surface and volume dipole oscillations in C60 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.; Winkler, P.; Murthy, M.V.N.

    2008-01-01

    We first give a short review of the "local-current approximation" (LCA), derived from a general variation principle, which serves as a semiclassical description of strongly collective excitations in finite fermion systems starting from their quantum-mechanical mean-field ground state. We illustrate it for the example of coupled translational and compressional dipole excitations in metal clusters. We then discuss collective electronic dipole excitations in C 60 molecules (Buckminster fullerenes). We show that the coupling of the pure translational mode ("surface plasmon") with compressional volume modes in the semiclasscial LCA yields semi-quantitative agreement with microscopic time-dependent density functional (TDLDA) calculations, while both theories yield qualitative agreement with the recent experimental observation of a "volume plasmon". (author)

  5. Stabilizing small molecules on metal oxide surfaces using atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kenneth; Losego, Mark D; Kalanyan, Berç; Parsons, Gregory N; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-10-09

    Device lifetimes and commercial viability of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs) are dependent on the stability of the surface bound molecular chromophores and catalysts. Maintaining the integrity of the solution-metal oxide interface is especially challenging in DSPECs for water oxidation where it is necessary to perform high numbers of turnovers, under irradiation in an aqueous environment. In this study, we describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 on nanocrystalline TiO2 prefunctionalized with the dye molecule [Ru(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)bpy)](2+) (RuP) as a strategy to stabilize surface bound molecules. The resulting films are over an order of magnitude more photostable than untreated films and the desorption rate constant exponentially decreases with increased thickness of ALD TiO2 overlayers. However, the injection yield for TiO2-RuP with ALD TiO2 also decreases with increasing overlayer thickness. The combination of decreased injection yield and 95% quenched emission suggests that the ALD TiO2 overlayer acts as a competitive electron acceptor from RuP*, effectively nonproductively quenching the excited state. The ALD TiO2 also increases back electron transfer rates, relative to the untreated film, but is independent of overlayer thickness. The results for TiO2-RuP with an ALD TiO2 overlayer are compared with similar films having ALD Al2O3 overlayers.

  6. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces (MPS2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions from the invited speakers at the 2014 edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces held in Metz, France, from 15th to 18th July 2014. This biennial conference alternates with the ICPEAC satellite International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics, and is concerned with experimental and theoretical studies of radiation interactions with matter. These include many-body and electron-electron correlation effects in excitation, and in single and multiple ionization of atoms, molecules, clusters and surfaces with various projectiles: electrons, photons and ions. More than 80 scientists, from 19 different countries around the world, came together to discuss the most recent progress on these topics. The scientific programme included 28 invited talks and a poster session extending over the three days of the meeting. Amongst the 51 posters, 11 have been selected and were advertised through short talks. Besides, Professor Nora Berrah gave a talk in memory of Professor Uwe Becker who sadly passed away shortly after co-chairing the previous edition of this conference. Financial support from the Institut Jean Barriol, Laboratoire SRSMC, Groupement de Recherche THEMS (CNRS), Ville de Metz, Metz Métropole, Conseil Général de la Moselle and Région Lorraine is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the local committee and the staff of the Université de Lorraine for making the conference run smoothly, the International Advisory Board for building up the scientific programme, the sessions chairpersons, those who gave their valuable time in carefully refereeing the articles of this volume and last, but not least, all participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the meeting.

  7. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Huang, Xiaohua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Laboratory Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); An, Yue [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Feng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta [Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Xiao, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); Ma, Keli, E-mail: makeli666@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Li, Yali, E-mail: yalilipaper@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119078 (Singapore)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  8. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression

  9. Supramolecular self-assembly on the B-Si(111)-(√3x√3) R30° surface: From single molecules to multicomponent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoudi, Younes; Jeannoutot, Judicaël; Palmino, Frank; Chérioux, Frédéric; Copie, Guillaume; Krzeminski, Christophe; Cleri, Fabrizio; Grandidier, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the physical and chemical processes in which local interactions lead to ordered structures is of particular relevance to the realization of supramolecular architectures on surfaces. While spectacular patterns have been demonstrated on metal surfaces, there have been fewer studies of the spontaneous organization of supramolecular networks on semiconductor surfaces, where the formation of covalent bonds between organics and adatoms usually hamper the diffusion of molecules and their subsequent interactions with each other. However, the saturation of the dangling bonds at a semiconductor surface is known to make them inert and offers a unique way for the engineering of molecular patterns on these surfaces. This review describes the physicochemical properties of the passivated B-Si(111)-(√3x√3) R30° surface, that enable the self-assembly of molecules into a rich variety of extended and regular structures on silicon. Particular attention is given to computational methods based on multi-scale simulations that allow to rationalize the relative contribution of the dispersion forces involved in the self-assembled networks observed with scanning tunneling microscopy. A summary of state of the art studies, where a fine tuning of the molecular network topology has been achieved, sheds light on new frontiers for exploiting the construction of supramolecular structures on semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita Júnior, D.; Cruvinel, W.M.; Araujo, J.A.P.; Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G.; Andrade, L.E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25 +/high CD127 Ø/low FoxP3 + , and effector T cells were defined as CD25 + CD127 + FoxP3 Ø . The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4 + TREG and CD28 + TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L + TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR + , HLA-DR + , OX40 + , and CD45RO + cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L + cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L + TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease

  11. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  12. Control of magnetism in dilute magnetic semiconductor (Ga,MnAs films by surface decoration of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The responses of magnetic moments to external stimuli such as magnetic-field, heat, light and electric-field have been utilized to manipulate the magnetism in magnetic semiconductors, with many of the novel ideas applied even to ferromagnetic metals. Here, we review a new experimental development on the control of magnetism in (Ga,MnAs thin films by surface decoration of organic molecules: Molecules deposited on the surface of (Ga,MnAs thin films are shown to be capable of significantly modulating their saturation magnetization and Curie temperature. These phenomena are shown to originate from the carrier-mediated ferromagnetism in (Ga,MnAs and the surface molecules acting as acceptors or donors depending on their highest occupied molecular orbitals, resembling the charge transfer mechanism in a pn junction in which the equilibrium state is reached on the alignment of Fermi levels.

  13. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  14. Full-potential self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave method for calculating the electronic structure of molecules and surfaces: O2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, E.; Krakauer, H.; Weinert, M.; Freeman, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The linearized-augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) method for thin films is generalized by removing the remaining shape approximation to the potential inside the atomic spheres. A new technique for solving Poisson's equation for a general charge density and potential is described and implemented in the film LAPW method. In the resulting full-potential LAPW method (FLAPW), all contributions to the potential are completely taken into account in the Hamiltonian matrix elements. The accuracy of the method: already well known for clean metal surfaces: is demonstrated for the case of a nearly free (noninteracting) O 2 molecule which is a severe test case of the method because of its large anisotropic charge distribution. Detailed comparisons show that the accuracy of the FLAPW results for O 2 exceeds that of existing state-of-the-art local-density linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals (LCAO)-type calculations, and that taking the full potential LAPW results as a reference, the LCAO basis can be improved by adding off-site functions. Thus the full-potential LAPW is a unified method which is ideally suited to test not only molecular adsorption on surfaces, but also the components of the same system separately, i.e., the extreme limits of the molecule and the clean surface

  15. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Nims, Robert J; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio ( www.febio.org ). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  16. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  17. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine; Guerra, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1–5 Torr and discharge currents ∼40–120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O 3 * , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O 3 * is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established. (paper)

  18. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  19. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  20. Flow cytometric investigation of immune-response-related surface molecules on human colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Stenholm, A C; Kronborg, O

    1998-01-01

    different colorectal cancers were monitored by multiparameter flow cytometry. Gating on EP4+ cells, the expression of the surface molecules HLA class I, HLA class II, CD80 (B7-1), CD54 (ICAM-I) and CD58 (LFA-3) was evaluated. In 60 of 70 tumours, all tumour cells expressed HLA class I, in 10 tumours 15......Our purpose was to clarify whether human colorectal cancer cells are equipped to present tumour-associated-antigens to the immune system, and whether this ability correlates with lymphoid infiltration, the Dukes' stage and Jass classification. Enzymatically dissociated tumour cells from 70......-96% of the tumour cells expressed HLA class I. In 1 tumour, all tumour cells expressed HLA class II, in 67 tumours some expressed HLA class II, in 2 tumours none expressed HLA class II. Expression of CD58 was heterogeneous, and there was no or only sparse expression of CD80 and CD54. Expression of the HLA class I...

  1. Monocyte and lymphocyte surface molecules in severe sepsis and non-septic critically ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsä, Joel; Syrjälä, Hannu; Huotari, Virva; Savolainen, Eeva-Riitta; Ala-Kokko, Tero

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether expression of monocyte and lymphocyte surface molecules differs between patients with severe sepsis and non-septic patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). The expression of monocyte CD14, CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR, and lymphocyte CD69 were analyzed using quantitative flow cytometry on three consecutive days in 27 patients with severe sepsis and in 15 non-septic patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed and each corresponding area under the curve (AUC) was determined. The results showed that the expression levels of CD40 on monocytes and CD69 on CD4+ T cells and on natural killer (NK) cells were highest in patients with severe sepsis (p sepsis and positive blood culture compared with those with negative blood culture (p sepsis detection were 0.836 for CD40, 0.872 for CD69 on NK cells, and 0.795 for CD69 on CD4+ T cells. These findings suggest that monocyte CD40 and CD69 on NK cells and CD4+ T cells could prove useful for new approaches in the identification of severe sepsis in the ICU. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Possibility of 1-nm level localization of a single molecule with gap-mode surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Han Kyu; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) enhancement mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been well established through 30 years of extensive investigation: molecules adsorbed on resonantly driven silver or gold nanoparticles (NPs) experience strongly enhanced field and thus show enhanced Raman scattering. Even stronger SERS enhancement is possible with a gap structure in which two or more NPs form assemblies with gap sizes of 1 nm or less. We have theoretically shown that the measurement of SERS angular distribution can reveal the position of a single molecule near the gap with 1-nm accuracy, even though the spatial extent of the enhanced field is ~10 nm. Real implementation of such experiment requires extremely well-defined (preferably a single crystal) dimeric junctions. Nevertheless, the experiment will provide spatial as well as frequency domain information on single-molecule dynamics at metallic surfaces

  3. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces: Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengio, Silvina

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) √3x √3R30 0 , H 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( √3√3)R30 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was establishing the limits of precision with which one can determine not only the location of the adsorbed hydroxyl (OH) species, but also the extent to which this adsorption modifes the asymmetric dimers of the clean surface to which it is bonded.On the Si(111)(7x7) surface the problem is particularly complex because there are several different potentially active sites for NH3 adsorption and fragmentation.The application of the PhD method, however, has shown that the majority of the N atoms are on so-called 'rest atom' sites when deposited at RT.This is consistent with the N in the NH2 chemical state.This investigation represents the first quantitative structural study of any molecular adsorbate on the complex Si(111)(7x7) surface.This atomic structures determination shows the PhD is a powerful tool for the atomic structure determination.The molecular systems interacting with the active sites of the substrate fragments producing a short-range order surface.This long-range disorder is produced by the

  4. X-ray diffraction study on the structure of concentrated aqueous solutions involving alanine molecules with different optical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Yasuo; Okuyama, Aya; Amo, Yuko; Usuki, Takeshi; Kohara, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements on aqueous 2.5 mol% DL-, L-, and D-alanine solutions in D 2 O were carried out at 26±2degC in order to obtain information concerning the difference in the hydrogen-bonded structure between aqueous solutions involving amino acid molecules with different optical activities. The difference function, Δi inter (Q), between intermolecular interference term observed for DL- and L-alanine and between DL- and D-alanine solutions both exhibited a first peak at Q=1.6 A -1 , followed by oscillatory features extending to higher-Q region, implying that there is a difference in the intermolecular structure is present between these solutions. The difference distribution function, Δg inter (r), obtained from the Fourier transform of the Δi inter (Q) between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions showed an obvious negative peak at r=2.8 A, which was attributed to the nearest neighbor hydrogen-bonded O...O interaction. The least squares fitting analysis of the observed Δi inter (Q) showed that the intermolecular O...O distance and the difference in the coordination number between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions are 2.76(2) A and -0.18(1), and 2.81(3) A and -0.18(1), respectively. It was concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen-bonded network in aqueous L- and D-alanine solutions is stronger than that in the DL-alanine solution. (author)

  5. Surface Chemistry Dependence of Mechanochemical Reaction of Adsorbed Molecules-An Experimental Study on Tribopolymerization of α-Pinene on Metal, Metal Oxide, and Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Kim, Seong H

    2018-02-20

    Mechanochemical reactions between adsorbate molecules sheared at tribological interfaces can induce association of adsorbed molecules, forming oligomeric and polymeric products often called tribopolymers). This study revealed the role or effect of surface chemistry of the solid substrate in mechanochemical polymerization reactions. As a model reactant, α-pinene was chosen because it was known to readily form tribopolymers at the sliding interface of stainless steel under vapor-phase lubrication conditions. Eight different substrate materials were tested-palladium, nickel, copper, stainless steel, gold, silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). All metal substrates and DLC were initially covered with surface oxide species formed naturally in air or during the oxidative sample cleaning. It was found that the tribopolymerization yield of α-pinene is much higher on the substrates that can chemisorb α-pinene, compared to the ones on which only physisorption occurs. From the load dependence of the tribopolymerization yield, it was found that the surfaces capable of chemisorption give a smaller critical activation volume for the mechanochemical reaction, compared to the ones capable of physisorption only. On the basis of these observations and infrared spectroscopy analyses of the adsorbed molecules and the produced polymers, it was concluded that the mechanochemical reaction mechanisms might be different between chemically reactive and inert surfaces and that the chemical reactivity of the substrate surface greatly influences the tribochemical polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules.

  6. Theoretical study of intermolecular energy transfer involving electronically excited molecules: He(1S) + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    To further understanding of gas phase collision dynamics involving electronically-excited molecules, a fully quantum mechanical study of He + H 2 (B 1 Σ/sub u/ + ) was undertaken. Iterative natural orbital configuration interaction (CI) calculations were performed to obtain the interaction potential between He and H 2 (B 1 Σ/sub u/ + ). The potential energy surface (PES) is highly anisotropic and has a van der Waals well of about 0.03 eV for C/sub 2v/ approach. Avoided PES crossings occur with He + H 2 (E,F 1 Σ/sub g/ + ) and with He + H 2 (X 1 Σ/sub g/ + ) and cause a local maximum and a deep minimum in the He + H 2 (B 1 Σ/sub u/ + ) PES, respectively. The crossing with He + H 2 (X 1 Σ/sub g/ + ) provides a mechanism for fluorescence quenching. The computed CI energies were combined with previous multi-reference double excitation CI calculations and fit with analytic functions for convenience in scattering calculations. Accurate dipole polarizabilities and quadrupole moment of H 2 (B 1 Σ/sub u/ + ) were computed for use in the multipole expansion, which is the analytic form of the long-range PES. 129 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs

  7. Understanding the adsorption behavior of surface active molecules on ZnO nanostructures by experimental and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Satvinder; Singh, Janpreet; Saini, G S S; Mehta, D S; Singh, Gurinder; Tripathi, S K; Kaura, Aman

    2015-11-11

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with different morphologies are prepared in the presence of surface active molecules such as sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), Tween 80 and Triton X-100 by a chemical method. The experimental and first principles methods are employed to understand the microscopic origin of the asymmetric growth mechanism of ZnO in the presence of various surface active molecules. Effect of increase in the amount of surface active molecules and temperature is studied on the growth morphology of ZnO. An innovative method is developed to synthesize ZnO nanowires (NWs) in the presence of SDS. Spherical nanoparticles (NPs) to spherical clusters are obtained in the presence of Triton X-100 and Tween 80. These results are then supported by first principles calculations. The adsorption of the -OH functional group on both polar and nonpolar surfaces of ZnO is modelled by using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated binding energy (BE) is almost equivalent on both the surfaces with no preference on any particular surface. The calculated value of BE shows that the -OH group is physio-adsorbed on both the surfaces. This results in the spherical morphology of nanoparticles prepared in the presence of Tween 80. Bader charge analysis shows that the charge transfer mainly takes place on top two layers of the ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface. The absence of high values of electron localization function (ELF) reflects the lack of covalent bonding between the -OH group and the ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface.

  8. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Dequaire, Tristan; Stalport, Fabien; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The search for organic carbon-containing molecules at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major scientific goal for Mars exploration. Several lines of evidence, including the detection of phyllosilicates, suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining of water. As a consequence, we can assume that in those days, endogenous chemical processes, or even primitive life, may have produced organic matter on Mars. Moreover, exogenous delivery from small bodies or dust particles is likely to have brought fresh organic molecules to the surface of Mars up today. Organic matter is therefore expected to be present at the surface/subsurface of the planet. But the current environmental conditions at the surface - UV radiation, oxidants and energetic particles - generate physico-chemical processes that may affect organic molecules. On the other hand, on Earth, phyllosilicates are known to accumulate and preserve organic matter. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under the current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We have monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea and adenine interacting with the Fe3+-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated Martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We have tested organic-rich samples which may be representative of the evaporation of a warm little pond of liquid water having concentrated organics on Mars. For each molecule, we have observed how the nontronite influences the quantum efficiency of its photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine: their efficiencies of photodecomposition are reduced by a factor

  9. The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is distinct from the N-CAM related group of surface antigens BSP-2 and D2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faissner, A; Kruse, J; Goridis, C

    1984-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and the group of N-CAM related molecules, BSP-2 and D2 antigen, are immunochemically distinct molecular species. The two groups of surface molecules are also functionally distinct entities, since inhibition of Ca2+-independent adhesion among early post-natal m...

  10. Theoretical studies of molecule surface scattering: Rotationally inelastic diffraction and dissociative dynamics of H2 on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Pol, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of H 2 and its isotopes with metal surfaces has been the subject of many investigations. The scattering experiments provide data such as the final rotational state distribution, sticking coefficients, kinetic energy distribution, and diffraction data. In the first study of this thesis the author implemented a model for looking at the rotationally inelastic diffraction probabilities for H 2 , HD, and D 2 , as a function of surface temperature. The surface is treated in a quantum mechanical fashion using a recently developed formalism. The center of mass translational motion is treated semiclassically using Gaussian wave packets, and the rotations are described quantum mechanically. The phonon summed rotation-diffraction probabilities as well as the probability distribution for a scattering molecule exchanging an amount of energy ΔE with the surface were computed. In the second and third study of this thesis the author implemented a mixed quantum-classical model to compute the probability for dissociation and rotational excitation for H 2 , HD, and D 2 scattered from Ni(100) dimensionally in dynamics simulations. Of the six degrees of freedom for the dissociative adsorption of a diatomic molecule on a static surface, the author treats Z,d the center of mass distance above the surface plan, r, the internuclear separation, θ, the polar orientation angle, quantum mechanically. The remaining three degrees of freedom, X and Y, the center of mass position on the surface plane, and oe, the azimuthal orientation angle, are treated classically. Probabilities for dissociation and ro-vibrational excitation are computed as a function of incident translational energy. Two sudden approximations are tested, in which either the center of mass translation parallel to the surface or the azimuthal orientation of the molecule are frozen. Comparisons are made between low and high dimensionality results and with fully classical results

  11. Hydration processes of electrolyte anions and cations on pt(111), Ir(111), Ru(001) and Au(111) surfaces: coadsorption of water molecules with electrolyte ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, M; Nakamura, M

    2002-01-01

    Water adsorption on Pt( 111) and Ru(001) treated with oxygen, hydrogen chloride and sodium atom at 20 K has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and surface X-ray diffraction. Water molecules chemisorb predominantly on the sites of the electronegative additives, forming hydrogen bonds. Three types of hydration water molecules coordinate to an adsorbed Na atom through an oxygen lone pair. In contrast, water molecules adsorb on electrode surfaces in a simple way in solution. In 1 mM CuSO4 + 0.5 M H2SO4 solution on an Au(111) electrode surface, water molecules coadsorb not only with sulfuric acid anions through hydrogen bonding but also with copper, over wide potential ranges. In the first stage of underpotential deposition (UPD), each anion is accommodated by six copper hexagon (honeycomb) atoms on which water molecules dominate. At any UPD stage water molecules interact with both the copper atom and sulfuric acid anions on the Au(111) surface. Water molecules also coadsorb with CO molecules on the surface of 2 x 2-2CO-Ru(001). All of the hydration water molecules chemisorb weakly on the surfaces. There appears to be a correlation between the orientation of hydrogen bonding water molecules and the electrode potential.

  12. Ureaplasma diversum Genome Provides New Insights about the Interaction of the Surface Molecules of This Bacterium with the Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas M Marques

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing and analyses of Ureaplasma diversum ATCC 49782 was undertaken as a step towards understanding U. diversum biology and pathogenicity. The complete genome showed 973,501 bp in a single circular chromosome, with 28.2% of G+C content. A total of 782 coding DNA sequences (CDSs, and 6 rRNA and 32 tRNA genes were predicted and annotated. The metabolic pathways are identical to other human ureaplasmas, including the production of ATP via hydrolysis of the urea. Genes related to pathogenicity, such as urease, phospholipase, hemolysin, and a Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB-Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP system were identified. More interestingly, a large number of genes (n = 40 encoding surface molecules were annotated in the genome (lipoproteins, multiple-banded antigen like protein, membrane nuclease lipoprotein and variable surface antigens lipoprotein. In addition, a gene encoding glycosyltransferase was also found. This enzyme has been associated with the production of capsule in mycoplasmas and ureaplasma. We then sought to detect the presence of a capsule in this organism. A polysaccharide capsule from 11 to 17 nm of U. diversum was observed trough electron microscopy and using specific dyes. This structure contained arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose and glucose. In order to understand the inflammatory response against these surface molecules, we evaluated the response of murine macrophages J774 against viable and non-viable U. diversum. As with viable bacteria, non-viable bacteria were capable of promoting a significant inflammatory response by activation of Toll like receptor 2 (TLR2, indicating that surface molecules are important for the activation of inflammatory response. Furthermore, a cascade of genes related to the inflammasome pathway of macrophages was also up-regulated during infection with viable organisms when compared to non-infected cells. In conclusion, U. diversum has a typical ureaplasma genome and

  13. Ureaplasma diversum Genome Provides New Insights about the Interaction of the Surface Molecules of This Bacterium with the Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Lucas M; Rezende, Izadora S; Barbosa, Maysa S; Guimarães, Ana M S; Martins, Hellen B; Campos, Guilherme B; do Nascimento, Naíla C; Dos Santos, Andrea P; Amorim, Aline T; Santos, Verena M; Farias, Sávio T; Barrence, Fernanda  C; de Souza, Lauro M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Zenteno, Maria E; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Messick, Joanne B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing and analyses of Ureaplasma diversum ATCC 49782 was undertaken as a step towards understanding U. diversum biology and pathogenicity. The complete genome showed 973,501 bp in a single circular chromosome, with 28.2% of G+C content. A total of 782 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), and 6 rRNA and 32 tRNA genes were predicted and annotated. The metabolic pathways are identical to other human ureaplasmas, including the production of ATP via hydrolysis of the urea. Genes related to pathogenicity, such as urease, phospholipase, hemolysin, and a Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB)-Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP) system were identified. More interestingly, a large number of genes (n = 40) encoding surface molecules were annotated in the genome (lipoproteins, multiple-banded antigen like protein, membrane nuclease lipoprotein and variable surface antigens lipoprotein). In addition, a gene encoding glycosyltransferase was also found. This enzyme has been associated with the production of capsule in mycoplasmas and ureaplasma. We then sought to detect the presence of a capsule in this organism. A polysaccharide capsule from 11 to 17 nm of U. diversum was observed trough electron microscopy and using specific dyes. This structure contained arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose and glucose. In order to understand the inflammatory response against these surface molecules, we evaluated the response of murine macrophages J774 against viable and non-viable U. diversum. As with viable bacteria, non-viable bacteria were capable of promoting a significant inflammatory response by activation of Toll like receptor 2 (TLR2), indicating that surface molecules are important for the activation of inflammatory response. Furthermore, a cascade of genes related to the inflammasome pathway of macrophages was also up-regulated during infection with viable organisms when compared to non-infected cells. In conclusion, U. diversum has a typical ureaplasma genome and metabolism, and

  14. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  15. Surface Chemistry Involved in Epitaxy of Graphene on 3C-SiC(111)/Si(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Abe Shunsuke; Handa Hiroyuki; Takahashi Ryota; Imaizumi Kei; Fukidome Hirokazu; Suemitsu Maki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Surface chemistry involved in the epitaxy of graphene by sublimating Si atoms from the surface of epitaxial 3C-SiC(111) thin films on Si(111) has been studied. The change in the surface composition during graphene epitaxy is monitored by in situ temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy using deuterium as a probe (D2-TPD) and complementarily by ex situ Raman and C1s core-level spectroscopies. The surface of the 3C-SiC(111)/Si(111) is Si-terminated before the graphitization, and ...

  16. High-resolution neutron-scattering study of slow dynamics of surface water molecules in zirconium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontov, E

    2005-07-08

    We have performed a quasielastic neutron-scattering experiment on backscattering spectrometer with sub-mueV resolution to investigate the slow dynamics of surface water in zirconium oxide using the sample studied previously with a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer [E. Mamontov, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9087 (2004)]. The backscattering measurements in the temperature range of 240-300 K have revealed a translational dynamics slower by another order of magnitude compared to the translational dynamics of the outer hydration layer observed in the time-of-flight experiment. The relaxation function of this slow motion is described by a stretched exponential with the stretch factors between 0.8 and 0.9, indicating a distribution of the relaxation times. The temperature dependence of the average residence time is non-Arrhenius, suggesting that the translational motion studied in this work is more complex than surface jump diffusion previously observed for the molecules of the outer hydration layer. The observed slow dynamics is ascribed to the molecules of the inner hydration layer that form more hydrogen bonds compared to the molecules of the outer hydration layer. Despite being slower by two orders of magnitude, the translational motion of the molecules of the inner hydration layer may have more in common with bulk water compared to the outer hydration layer, the dynamics of which is slower than that of bulk water by just one order of magnitude.

  17. Formation of Complex Organics by Gas Phase and Intracluster Ion-Molecule Reactions Involving Acetylene and Hydrogen Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shall, S.; Hamed, A.; Soliman, A. R.; Momoh, P. O.

    2011-05-01

    Many complex organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in flames and combustion processes as well as in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae. Here, we present evidence for the formation of complex covalent organics by gas phase and intracluster reactions of the benzene, phenylium, pyridine, pyrimidine, phenylacetylene and benzonitrile cations with acetylene and hydrogen cyanide molecules. These reactions are studied using mass-selected ion mobility, chemical reactivity, collisional dissociation, and ab initio calculations. Measurements of collision cross sections in helium provide structural information on the adducts and allow probing structural changes at different temperatures (isomerization). We observed multiple additions of five acetylene molecules on the pyridine cation at room temperature. This is a remarkable result considering that only two acetylene molecules were added to the phenyl cation and no addition was observed on the benzene cation at room temperature. The experimental results are in full agreement with the ab initio calculations which predict that the first and second acetylenes add to the pyridine ion in barrierless, highly exothermic reactions. Similar reactions have been observed for the pyrimidine radical cation although the extent of the addition reactions is limited to only two acetylene molecules at room temperature. The results provide the first evidence for the incorporation of nitrogen in the formation cyclic hydrocarbons via the gas phase reactions of pyridine and pyrimidine ions with acetylene molecules. In addition, the formation of covalent adducts in the ionized acetylene/HCN system will be reported for the first time. Sequential reactions leading to the formation of pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and higher adducts are observed over a wide range of temperature and pressure. The formation of these covalent adducts may represent a general class of addition reactions that can form complex

  18. First-principles study of the adsorption properties of atoms and molecules on UN2 (001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjuan; Liu, Guangdong; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng; Hu, Wangyu; Deng, Huiqiu

    2017-09-01

    Uranium nitrides are one kind of accident-tolerant fuels and have been paid more attention recently. With the first-principles Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorptions properties of some typical atoms, molecules and radical (including O, H, H2, O2, H2O and OH) adsorbed on the UN2 (001) surface have been studied in the present work. The preferred sites and stable configurations for those adsorbates on the UN2 (001) surface have been obtained. It's found that O or H atom prefers to be adsorbed at the bridge site; O2 adsorption will dissociate into two O atoms and occupy the nearest neighbor bridge sites; the interaction between H2 molecule and the UN2 (001) surface is very weak; OH prefers to occupy the bridge site with its O-H bond vertical to the surface; the surface adsorption of H2O is non-dissociated and adsorption energies are dependent on the initial structures and adsorption modes.

  19. Effects of microwave electric fields on the translational diffusion of dipolar molecules in surface potential: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Sergey V.; Kouzaev, Guennadi A.

    2018-01-01

    Variations of effective diffusion coefficient of polar molecules exposed to microwave electric fields in a surface potential are studied by solving coupled stochastic differential equations of motion with a deterministic component of the surface force. Being an essential tool for the simulation interpretation, a theoretical approach to effective diffusion in surface potential is first developed. The effective diffusion coefficient is represented as the product of the normal diffusion coefficient and potential-dependent correction function, whose temperature dependence is close to the Arrhenius form. The analytically found zero-diffusion condition defines the state of thermal equilibrium at the surface. The diffusion of a water-like dipole molecule in the potential of graphite surface is simulated in the field-free conditions and in the presence of the alternating electric fields of various magnitude intensities and frequencies. Temperature dependence of the correction function exhibits field-induced variations of the effective Lennard-Jones energy parameter. It demonstrates maximum departure from the zero-field value at certain frequencies and intensities, which is associated with variations in the rotational dynamics. A concept of the amplitude-frequency resonance put forward to interpret the simulation results is explained using a heuristic reasoning and is corroborated by semi-quantitative considerations in terms of the Dissado-Hill cluster theory of dielectric relaxation.

  20. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  1. Trafficking of MHC molecules to the cell surface creates dynamic protein patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel; Edidin, Michael; Gheber, Levi A

    2016-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules signal infection or transformation by engaging receptors on T lymphocytes. The spatial organization of MHC-I on the plasma membranes is important for this engagement. We and others have shown that MHC-I molecules, like other membrane proteins, are not uniformly distributed, but occur in patches in the plasma membrane. Here, we describe the temporal details of MHC-I patch formation and combine them with the spatial details, which we have described earlier, to yield a comprehensive quantitative description of patch formation. MHC-I is delivered to the plasma membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles, arriving at a rate of ∼2.5×10(-3) μm(-1) min(-1) (or about two arrivals per minute over the whole cell). The vesicles dock and fuse at non-random, apparently targeted, locations on the membrane and the newly delivered MHC-I molecules form patches that are a few hundred nanometers in diameter. The patches are maintained at steady state by a dynamic equilibrium between the rate of delivery and the rate of hindered diffusion of MHC-I molecules out of the patches (caused by components of the actin cytoskeleton). © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. DNA Origami Directed Au Nanostar Dimers for Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Swati; Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Sen, Tapasi

    2017-12-06

    We demonstrate the synthesis of Au nanostar dimers with tunable interparticle gap and controlled stoichiometry assembled on DNA origami. Au nanostars with uniform and sharp tips were immobilized on rectangular DNA origami dimerized structures to create nanoantennas containing monomeric and dimeric Au nanostars. Single Texas red (TR) dye was specifically attached in the junction of the dimerized origami to act as a Raman reporter molecule. The SERS enhancement factors of single TR dye molecules located in the conjunction region in dimer structures having interparticle gaps of 7 and 13 nm are 2 × 10 10 and 8 × 10 9 , respectively, which are strong enough for single analyte detection. The highly enhanced electromagnetic field generated by the plasmon coupling between sharp tips and cores of two Au nanostars in the wide conjunction region allows the accommodation and specific detection of large biomolecules. Such DNA-directed assembled nanoantennas with controlled interparticle separation distance and stoichiometry, and well-defined geometry, can be used as excellent substrates in single-molecule SERS spectroscopy and will have potential applications as a reproducible platform in single-molecule sensing.

  3. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated martian surface ultraviolet radiation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Jaber, Maguy; Stalport, Fabien; Nowak, Sophie; Georgelin, Thomas; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-03-01

    Most of the phyllosilicates detected at the surface of Mars today are probably remnants of ancient environments that sustained long-term bodies of liquid water at the surface or subsurface and were possibly favorable for the emergence of life. Consequently, phyllosilicates have become the main mineral target in the search for organics on Mars. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea, and adenine in interaction with the Fe(3+)-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K), and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We tested organic-rich samples that were representative of the evaporation of a small, warm pond of liquid water containing a high concentration of organics. For each molecule, we observed how the nontronite influences its quantum efficiency of photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine; their efficiencies of photodecomposition were reduced by a factor of 5 when mixed at a concentration of 2.6 × 10(-2) mol of molecules per gram of nontronite. Moreover, when the amount of nontronite in the sample of glycine was increased by a factor of 2, the gain of photoprotection was multiplied by a factor of 5. This indicates that the photoprotection provided by the nontronite is not a purely mechanical shielding effect but is also due to stabilizing interactions. No new evolution product was firmly identified, but the results obtained with urea suggest a particular reactivity in the presence of nontronite, leading to an increase of its dissociation rate.

  4. A fiber-modified adenoviral vector interacts with immunoevasion molecules of the B7 family at the surface of murine leukemia cells derived from dormant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogée Sophie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor cells can escape the immune system by overexpressing molecules of the B7 family, e.g. B7-H1 (PD-L1 or CD86, which suppresses the anti-tumor T-cell responses through binding to the PD-1 receptor, and similarly for B7.1 (CD80, through binding to CTLA-4. Moreover, direct interactions between B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules are also likely to participate in the immunoevasion mechanism. In this study, we used a mouse model of tumor dormancy, DA1-3b leukemia cells. We previously showed that a minor population of DA1-3b cells persists in equilibrium with the immune system for long periods of time, and that the levels of surface expression of B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules correlates with the dormancy time. We found that leukemia cells DA1-3b/d365 cells, which derived from long-term dormant tumors and overexpressed B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules, were highly permissive to Ad5FB4, a human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vector pseudotyped with chimeric human-bovine fibers. Both B7-H1 and B7.1 were required for Ad5FB4-cell binding and entry, since (i siRNA silencing of one or the other B7 gene transcript resulted in a net decrease in the cell binding and Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365; and (ii plasmid-directed expression of B7.1 and B7-H1 proteins conferred to Ad5FB4-refractory human cells a full permissiveness to this vector. Binding data and flow cytometry analysis suggested that B7.1 and B7-H1 molecules played different roles in Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365, with B7.1 involved in cell attachment of Ad5FB4, and B7-H1 in Ad5FB4 internalization. BRET analysis showed that B7.1 and B7-H1 formed heterodimeric complexes at the cell surface, and that Ad5FB4 penton, the viral capsomere carrying the fiber projection, could negatively interfere with the formation of B7.1/B7-H1 heterodimers, or modify their conformation. As interactors of B7-H1/B7.1 molecules, Ad5FB4 particles and/or their penton capsomeres represent potential therapeutic agents

  5. Adsorption of acetyl halide molecules on the surface of pristine and Al-doped graphene: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi, E-mail: a.shokuhi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kashani, Omid Razaghi [Department of Polymer Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption of acetyl chloride and acetyl fluoride on Al-doped graphene were investigated. • The doped Al induces some changes in the electronic structure of graphene. • Notable orbital hybridizations are achieved upon adsorption. • Al-doped graphene can be used as a superior sensor for Acetyl halides. - Abstract: We have scrutinized the adsorption energy, electronic structure, natural bond analysis (NBO), density of state (DOS) and global indices for adsorption of acetyl chloride (AC) and acetyl fluoride (AF) on the surface of pristine graphene as well as Al-doped graphene. The adsorption energies have been calculated for the most stable configurations of the molecules on the surface of pristine and Al-doped graphene. According to the calculated parameters, there is very weak physical adsorption of AC and AF on pristine graphene while strong adsorption takes place in the case of Al-doped graphene. The charge transfer from adsorbed molecules to Al-doped graphene surface was confirmed by the natural bond orbital as well as the Mulliken population analysis while there is no charge transfer with pristine graphene. Additionally, the density of states results reveal that orbital hybridization takes place between above-mentioned molecules and Al-doped graphene sheet, whereas there is no hybridization between the molecules and the pristine graphene. Our calculated adsorption energies for the most stable position configurations of AC and AF on Al-doped graphene were −68.8 kJ mol{sup −1} (−52.6 kJ mol{sup −1} BSSE corrected energy) and −78.4 kJ mol{sup −1} (−64.3 kJ mol{sup −1} BSSE corrected energy) which are correspond to chemisorptions process respectively. These results point to the appropriateness of Al-doped graphene as a powerful adsorbent for practical applications.

  6. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Shepelenko S; S, Salnikov A; V, Rak S; P, Goncharova E; B, Ryzhikov A, E-mail: shep@vector.nsc.r, E-mail: shep@ngs.r [Federal State Research Institution State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR of the Federal Service for Surveillance in Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being (FSRI SRC VB VECTOR) Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  7. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O, Shepelenko S; S, Salnikov A; V, Rak S; P, Goncharova E; B, Ryzhikov A

    2009-01-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 12} single-molecule magnets on the Au(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Soenke; Burgert, Michael; Fonin, Mikhail; Groth, Ulrich; Ruediger, Ulrich [Universitaet Konstanz (Germany); Michaelis, Christian; Brihuega, Ivan; Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Dedkov, Yury S. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The paramount interest in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) like Mn{sub 12}-acetate and its derivatives was inspired by numerous experimental and theoretical insights indicating the feasibility of addressing quantum effects of magnetism on a molecular scale. Due to its relatively high blocking temperature ({proportional_to}3 K) combined with the ability to identify well-defined spin states, Mn{sub 12} still remains the most favoured SMM possibly allowing the detection of magnetic fingerprints in transport properties of a single molecule. In this work, the electronic properties of Mn{sub 12} molecules chemically grafted on Au(111) surfaces have been studied by means of low temperature as well as room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed signatures from most probably intact Mn{sub 12} molecules while STS measurements in magnetic fields indicate the possibility to identify magnetic fingerprints in scanning tunneling spectra. The results will be discussed with respect to previous attempts to perform transport measurements on Mn{sub 12} SMMs.

  9. Single-Molecule Protein Folding: A Study of the Surface-Mediated Conformational Dynamics of a Model Amphipathic Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joy; English, Douglas

    2004-03-01

    Most surface-active polypeptides, composed of 10-50 amino acids, are devoid of well-defined tertiary structure. The conformation of these proteins is greatly dependent upon their environment and may assume totally different characteristics in an aqueous environment, in a detergent micelle, or in an organic solvent. Most antimicrobial peptides are helix-forming and are activated upon interaction with a membrane-mimicking environment. We are seeking to physically characterize the mechanism of membrane-peptide interaction through studying a simple model peptide, MT-1. MT-1 was designed as a nonhomologous analogue of melittin, the principle component in bee venom. We are using single molecule spectroscopy to examine the induction of secondary structure upon interaction of MT-1 with various membrane-mimicking interfaces. Specifically, we monitor coil-to-helix transition through single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) to determine conformational distributions of folded and unfolded peptides at an interface. Studies with MT-1 will focus upon the biologically relevant issues of orientation, aggregation, and folding at surfaces using both ensemble and single molecule experiments.

  10. 1H NMR methods for the noninvasive study of metabolism and other processes involving small molecules in intact erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    1 H NMR methods are described with which resolved resonances can be obtained for many of the small molecules in intact erythrocytes. In one method, the more intense hemoglobin resonances are suppressed by transfer of saturation throughout the hemoglobin spin system by cross relaxation following a selective saturation pulse. In a second method, the hemoglobin resonances are eliminated with the spin-echo pulse sequence by using a between-pulse delay time long enough for complete elimination of the hemoglobin resonances by spin-spin relaxation. Selected examples of the study of erythrocyte biochemistry by 1 H NMR are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Bayesian optimization for constructing potential energy surfaces of polyatomic molecules with the smallest number of ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernandez, Rodrigo A.; v Krems, Roman

    2017-04-01

    We examine the application of kernel methods of machine learning for constructing potential energy surfaces (PES) of polyatomic molecules. In particular, we illustrate the application of Bayesian optimization with Gaussian processes as an efficient method for sampling the configuration space of polyatomic molecules. Bayesian optimization relies on two key components: a prior over an objective function and a mechanism for sampling the configuration space. We use Gaussian processes to model the objective function and various acquisition functions commonly used in computer science to quantify the accuracy of sampling. The PES is obtained through an iterative process of adding ab initio points at the locations maximizing the acquisition function and re-trainig the Gaussian process with new points added. We sample different PESs with one or many acquisition functions and show how the acquisition functions affect the construction of the PESs.

  12. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations on reactions of molecules with metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nattino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Reactions on metal surfaces are of scientific interest due to the tremendous relevance of heterogeneous catalysis. Single crystal surfaces under controlled physical conditions are generally employed as a model for the real catalysts, with the aim of improving the fundamental understanding of the

  14. Homochirality in space – Selective enrichment of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloie G.

    2014-02-01

    $\\left\\{ {10\\,\\overline {10} } \\right\\}$ and the chiral molécule is lactic acid, HOCH(CH3COOH. In this theoretical work we rely on numerical simulations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT that proved efficient in the super-molecule and periodic approaches to this category of phenomena. In view of the different types of adsorption sites, a statistical treatment was necessary; it shows that (S-lactic acid is preferentially adsorbed with a selectivity of ~0.7 kcal/mol with respect to the (R isomer.

  15. Cell surface adhesion molecules and cytokine profiles in primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ukkonen, Maritta; Wu, Xingchen; Reipert, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the utility of adhesion molecule (AM) and cytokine/chemokine expressions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as markers of disease activity in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). METHODS: The expressions of AMs and the levels of 17 cytokines in patients...... with PPMS (n = 25) were compared with those in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) (n = 18) and controls (n =11) and correlated with the volumes of focal and atrophic changes on MRI. RESULTS: The expressions of very late activation antigen 4 (VLA-4), lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1...

  16. Surface Chemistry Involved in Epitaxy of Graphene on 3C-SiC(111/Si(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Shunsuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface chemistry involved in the epitaxy of graphene by sublimating Si atoms from the surface of epitaxial 3C-SiC(111 thin films on Si(111 has been studied. The change in the surface composition during graphene epitaxy is monitored by in situ temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy using deuterium as a probe (D2-TPD and complementarily by ex situ Raman and C1s core-level spectroscopies. The surface of the 3C-SiC(111/Si(111 is Si-terminated before the graphitization, and it becomes C-terminated via the formation of C-rich (6√3 × 6√3R30° reconstruction as the graphitization proceeds, in a similar manner as the epitaxy of graphene on Si-terminated 6H-SiC(0001 proceeds.

  17. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Krishna; Eisel, David; Lenkl, Clarissa; Goyal, Ashish; Diederichs, Sven; Dickes, Elke; Osen, Wolfram; Eichmüller, Stefan B

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY), were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sg)RNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO) clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N), unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor.

  18. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Das

    Full Text Available In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY, were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sgRNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N, unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor.

  19. Intense Visible Luminescence in CdSe Quantum Dots by Efficiency Surface Passivation with H2O Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeoung Woo Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effect of water (H2O cooling and heat treatment on the luminescence efficiency of core CdSe quantum dots (QDs. The photoluminescence (PL quantum yield of the CdSe QDs was enhanced up to ~85%, and some periodic bright points were observed in wide color ranges during the heat treatment of QDs mixed with H2O. The PL enhancement of QDs could be attributed to the recovery of QDs surface traps by unreacted ligands confined within the hydrophilic H2O molecule containers.

  20. MO LCAO approximation in solid state approach for calculations of electronic structure of a crystal surface and chemisorbed molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapilin, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of calculation of the electronic structure of a solid state surface and chemisorbed molecules is discussed. The method of the Green's function and MO LCAO approximation are used which permits to perform calculations, taking into account the whole crystal but not its fragment only, with the accuracy adopted by quantum chemistry. Results of model calculations are presented: chemisorption of hydrogen-like atom on the (100) face of the one-band crystal model and dispersion curves for the density of states of nickel (100) face. (Auth.)

  1. 3D nanostar dimers with a sub-10-nm gap for single-/few-molecule surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Chirumamilla, Manohar

    2014-01-22

    Plasmonic nanostar-dimers, decoupled from the substrate, have been fabricated by combining electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching techniques. The 3D architecture, the sharp tips of the nanostars and the sub-10 nm gap size promote the formation of giant electric-field in highly localized hot-spots. The single/few molecule detection capability of the 3D nanostar-dimers has been demonstrated by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nanometer scale titanium surface texturing are detected by signaling pathways involving transient FAK and Src activations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian F Zambuzzi

    Full Text Available It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations.Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M, dual acid-etched (DAA, resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA, and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB. Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites.The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption.It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces.

  3. Virus-based surface patterning of biological molecules, probes, and inorganic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Suji; Jeon, Seongho; Kwak, Eun-A; Kim, Jong-Man; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    An essential requirement for continued technological advancement in many areas of biology, physics, chemistry, and materials science is the growing need to generate custom patterned materials. Building from recent achievements in the site-specific modification of virus for covalent surface tethering, we show in this work that stable 2D virus patterns can be generated in custom geometries over large area glass surfaces to yield templates of biological, biochemical, and inorganic materials in high density. As a nanomaterial building block, filamentous viruses have been extensively used in recent years to produce materials with interesting properties, owing to their ease of genetic and chemical modification. By utilizing un-natural amino acids generated at specific locations on the filamentous fd bacteriophage protein coat, surface immobilization is carried out on APTES patterned glass resulting in precise geometries of covalently linked virus material. This technique facilitated the surface display of a high density of virus that were labeled with biomolecules, fluorescent probes, and gold nanoparticles, thereby opening the possibility of integrating virus as functional components for surface engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel attribute of enoxaparin: inhibition of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by a mechanism involving cell adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduteanu, I; Voinea, M; Capraru, M; Dragomir, E; Simionescu, M

    2002-05-01

    Enoxaparin is a low molecular weight heparin, widely accepted as anticoagulant or antithrombotic drug, and is likely to have a role in acute inflammation. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of enoxaparin, we investigated the direct effect of the drug on the activation of endothelial cells. For this purpose we set up an in vitro system in which cultured valvular endothelial cells (VEC) activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha or lipopolysaccharide were exposed to a monocytic cell line; these conditions induced a significant adhesion of monocytes to VEC. Adhesion assays, ELISA, and flow cytometric analysis revealed that pretreatment with enoxaparin, at a relevant plasma concentration (16 microg/ml), acts upon activation of VEC by inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced E-selectin expression and tumor necrosis factor stimulated ICAM-1 expression, thus reducing monocyte adhesion to VEC. These results suggest a novel function of enoxaparin, namely to protect VEC from activation and inhibiting the expression of cell adhesion molecules. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Are polymorphisms of molecules involved in bone healing correlated to aseptic femoral and tibial shaft non-unions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeckey, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank; Glaubitz, Lena-Marie; Jürgens, Simon; Ludwig, Theresa; Andruszkow, Hagen; Hüfner, Tobias; Krettek, Christian; Stuhrmann, Manfred

    2011-11-01

    Fracture healing is a well-organized process between several molecules and mediators. As known from other diseases, genetic polymorphisms may exhibit different expression patterns in these mediators. Concerning fracture healing, this may lead to an extended healing process or non-union. We investigated the incidence of polymorphisms in patients with aseptic non-unions after femoral and tibial shaft fractures as compared to patients with uneventful healing. Exclusion criteria were smoking, diabetes, bilateral fractures, systemic corticoid therapy, and septic non-unions. Analysis of allele frequencies and genotype distribution of various mediators were carried out following PCR. Clinical parameters such as injury severity and in-hospital were analyzed. Fifty patients following non-union (group NU) were enrolled, the control group consisted of 44 patients (group H). A significant association of a PDGF haplotype and non-unions following fracture could be observed. There was a significantly increased in-hospital time and amount of surgical procedures in group NU. Polymorphisms within the PDGF gene seem to be a genetic risk factor for the development of non-unions of the lower extremity following fracture. The early identification of high risk patients could result in an adapted therapeutical strategy and might contribute to a significant decrease of posttraumatic non-unions. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  6. Manipulating Magnetism at Organic/Ferromagnetic Interfaces by Molecule-Induced Surface Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Rui; Shi, Xingqiang; Van Hove, Michel A

    2016-03-30

    Fullerenes have several advantages as potential materials for organic spintronics. Through a theoretical first-principles study, we report that fullerene C60 adsorption can induce a magnetic reconstruction in a Ni(111) surface and expose the merits of the reconstructed C60/Ni(111) spinterface for molecular spintronics applications. Surface reconstruction drastically modifies the magnetic properties at both sides of the C60/Ni interface. Three outstanding properties of the reconstructed structure are revealed, which originate from reconstruction enhanced spin-split π-d coupling between C60 and Ni(111): (1) the C60 spin polarization and conductance around the Fermi level are enhanced simultaneously, which can be important for read-head sensor miniaturization; (2) localized spin-polarized states appear in C60 with a spin-filter functionality; and (3) magnetocrystalline anisotropic energy and exchange coupling in the outermost Ni layer are reduced enormously. Surface reconstruction can be realized simply by controlling the annealing temperature in experiments.

  7. The role of outer surface/inner bulk Brønsted acidic sites in the adsorption of a large basic molecule (simazine) on H-Y zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Filomena; Pansini, Michele; Marocco, Antonello; Bonelli, Barbara; Garrone, Edoardo; Esposito, Serena

    2015-11-21

    The simple means adopted for investigating H-Y zeolite acidity in water is the pH-dependence of the amount of a basic molecule adsorbed under isochoric conditions, a technique capable of yielding, under equilibrium conditions, an estimate of the pKa value of the involved acidic centres: the behaviour with temperature of adsorbed amounts yields instead some information on thermodynamics. Simazine (Sim, 2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine) was chosen as an adsorbate because its transverse dimension (7.5 Å) is close to the opening of the supercage in the faujasite structure of H-Y (7.4 Å). In short term measurements, Sim adsorption at 25 °C occurs only at the outer surface of H-Y particles. Two types of mildly acidic centres are present (with pKaca. 7 and ca. 8, respectively) and no strong one is observed. Previous adsorption of ammonia from the gas phase discriminates between the two. The former survives, and shows features common with the silanols of amorphous silica. The latter is suppressed: because of this and other features distinguishing this site from silanol species (e.g. the formation of dimeric Sim2H(+) species, favoured by coverage and unfavoured by temperatures of adsorption higher than ambient temperature) a candidate is an Al based site. We propose a Lewis centre coordinating a water molecule, exhibiting acidic properties. This acidic water molecule can be replaced by the stronger base ammonia, also depleting inner strong Brønsted sites. A mechanism for the generation of the two sites from surface Brønsted species is proposed. Long term adsorption measurements at 25 °C already show the onset of the interaction with inner strongly acidic Brønsted sites: because of its size, activation is required for Sim to pass the supercage openings and reach inner acidic sites. When adsorption is run at 40-50 °C, uptake is much larger and increases with temperature. Isochoric measurements suggest a pKa value of ca. 3 compatible with its marked acidic

  8. Determination of surface concentrations of individual molecule-layers used in nanoscale biosensors by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Punzet, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    For the development of nanowire sensors for chemical and medical detection purposes, the optimal functionalization of the surface is a mandatory component. Quantitative ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used in situ to investigate the step-by-step layer formation of typical functionalization protocols and to determine the respective molecule surface concentrations. BSA, anti-TNF-α and anti-PSA antibodies were bound via 3-(trimethoxy)butylsilyl aldehyde linkers to silicon-oxide surfaces in order to investigate surface functionalization of nanowires. Maximum determined surface concentrations were 7.17 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for BSA, 1.7 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-TNF-α antibody, 6.1 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-PSA antibody, 3.88 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for TNF-α and 7.0 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for PSA. Furthermore we performed antibody-antigen binding experiments and determined the specific binding ratios. The maximum possible ratio of 2 was obtained at bulk concentrations of the antigen in the μg ml -1 range for TNF-α and PSA. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Electrochemistry of Single Metalloprotein and DNA‐Based Molecules at Au(111) Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Zeng, Dongdong; Karlsen, Kasper Kannegård

    2013-01-01

    have been primary targets, with a view on stabilizing the ds‐ONs and improving voltammetric signals of intercalating electrochemical redox probes. Voltammetric signals of the intercalator anthraquinone monosulfonate (AQMS) at ds‐DNA/Au(111) surfaces diluted by mercaptohexanol are significantly...

  10. Performance of a Microfluidic Device for In Situ ToF-SIMS Analysis of Selected Organic Molecules at Aqueous Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2013-04-03

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a unique surface analysis technique because it can provide molecular recognition for organic and biological molecules. However, analyzing aqueous solution surfaces by ToF-SIMS is difficult, because ToF-SIMS is a high-vacuum technique, while the vapor pressure of water is about 2.3 kPa at room temperature (20 C). We designed and fabricated a self-contained microfluidic device, enabling in situ analysis of aqueous surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and ToF-SIMS, which has been briefly reported.1,2 In this study, we report more performance data, focusing on the performance of this device for in situ analysis of organic molecules at aqueous surfaces using ToF-SIMS. Three representative organic compounds (formic acid, glycerol, and glutamic acid) were tested, and their molecular signals were successfully observed. The device can be self-running in vacuum for 8 hours, and SIMS measurements are feasible at any time in this time range. The stability of this device under primary ion beam bombardment is also impressive. High fluence (6 × 1012 ions cm-2 s-1) measurements can be operated continuously for up to 30 minutes without any significant damage to the aperture. However, extra-high fluence measurements (>1 × 1014 ions cm-2 s-1) may lead to liquid bumping in the aperture, and the aqueous solutions may spread out quickly. Signal reproducibility is reasonably good, and relative standard deviation (RSD) for molecular ion signals can be controlled to be smaller than ±15% for consecutive measurements. Measurements at long time intervals (e.g., 60 min) show RSDs of ±40-50%. In addition, the detection limits of formic acid, glycerol, and glutamic acid are estimated to be 0.04%, 0.008%, and 0.002% (weight ratio), respectively.

  11. MRD-CI potential surfaces using balanced basis sets. IV. The H2 molecule and the H3 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.S.; Kruus, E.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of midbond functions in molecular calculations was tested in two cases where the correct results are known: the H 2 potential curve and the collinear H 3 potential surface. For H 2 , a variety of basis sets both with and without bond functions was compared to the exact nonrelativistic potential curve of Kolos and Wolniewicz [J. Chem. Phys. 43, 2429 (1965)]. It was found that optimally balanced basis sets at two levels of quality were the double zeta single polarization plus sp bond function basis (BF1) and the triple zeta double polarization plus two sets of sp bond function basis (BF2). These gave bond dissociation energies D/sub e/ = 4.7341 and 4.7368 eV, respectively (expt. 4.7477 eV). Four basis sets were tested for basis set superposition errors, which were found to be small relative to basis set incompleteness and therefore did not affect any conclusions regarding basis set balance. Basis sets BF1 and BF2 were used to construct potential surfaces for collinear H 3 , along with the corresponding basis sets DZ*P and TZ*PP which contain no bond functions. Barrier heights of 12.52, 10.37, 10.06, and 9.96 kcal/mol were obtained for basis sets DZ*P, TZ*PP, BF1, and BF2, respectively, compared to an estimated limiting value of 9.60 kcal/mol. Difference maps, force constants, and relative rms deviations show that the bond functions improve the surface shape as well as the barrier height

  12. Liver protein profiles in insulin receptor-knockout mice reveal novel molecules involved in the diabetes pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuani, Barbara; Della-Morte, David; Donadel, Giulia; Caratelli, Sara; Bova, Luca; Pastore, Donatella; De Canio, Michele; D'Aguanno, Simona; Coppola, Andrea; Pacifici, Francesca; Arriga, Roberto; Bellia, Alfonso; Ferrelli, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Federici, Massimo; Neri, Anna; Bernardini, Sergio; Sbraccia, Paolo; Di Daniele, Nicola; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Augusto; Urbani, Andrea; Lauro, Davide

    2015-05-01

    Liver has a principal role in glucose regulation and lipids homeostasis. It is under a complex control by substrates such as hormones, nutrients, and neuronal impulses. Insulin promotes glycogen synthesis, lipogenesis, and lipoprotein synthesis and inhibits gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, and VLDL secretion by modifying the expression and enzymatic activity of specific molecules. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to metabolic liver disease, we analyzed liver protein patterns expressed in a mouse model of diabetes by proteomic approaches. We used insulin receptor-knockout (IR(-/-)) and heterozygous (IR(+/-)) mice as a murine model of liver metabolic dysfunction associated with diabetic ketoacidosis and insulin resistance. We evaluated liver fatty acid levels by microscopic examination and protein expression profiles by orthogonal experimental strategies using protein 2-DE MALDI-TOF/TOF and peptic nLC-MS/MS shotgun profiling. Identified proteins were then loaded into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to find possible molecular networks. Twenty-eight proteins identified by 2-DE analysis and 24 identified by nLC-MS/MS shotgun were differentially expressed among the three genotypes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a central role of high-mobility group box 1/2 and huntigtin never reported before in association with metabolic and related liver disease. A different modulation of these proteins in both blood and hepatic tissue further suggests their role in these processes. These results provide new insight into pathophysiology of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and could be useful in identifying novel biomarkers to predict risk for diabetes and its complications. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Involvement of dying beta cell originated messenger molecules in differentiation of pancreatic mesenchymal stem cells under glucotoxic and glucolipotoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezginci-Oktayoglu, Selda; Onay-Ucar, Evren; Sancar-Bas, Serap; Karatug-Kacar, Ayse; Arda, Emine S N; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2018-05-01

    Beta cell mass regulation represents a critical issue for understanding and treatment of diabetes. The most important process in the development of diabetes is beta cell death, generally induced by glucotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity, and the regeneration mechanism of new beta cells that will replace dead beta cells is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the generation mechanism of new beta cells by considering the compensation phase of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, pancreatic islet derived mesenchymal stem cells (PI-MSCs) were isolated from adult rats and characterized. Then, beta cells isolated from rats were co-cultured with PI-MSCs and they were exposed to glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity and glucolipotoxicity conditions for 72 hr. As the results apoptotic and necrotic cell death were increased in both PI-MSCs and beta cells especially by the exposure of glucotoxic and glucolipotoxic conditions to the co-culture systems. Glucotoxicity induced-differentiated beta cells were functional due to their capability of insulin secretion in response to rising glucose concentrations. Moreover, beta cell proliferation was induced in the glucotoxicity-treated co-culture system whereas suppressed in lipotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity-treated co-culture systems. In addition, 11 novel proteins, that may release from dead beta cells and have the ability to stimulate PI-MSCs in the direction of differentiation, were determined in media of glucotoxicity or glucolipotoxicity-treated co-culture systems. In conclusion, these molecules were considered as important for understanding cellular mechanism of beta cell differentiation and diabetes. Thus, they may be potential targets for diagnosis and cellular or therapeutic treatment of diabetes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  15. Multi-Chlorine-Substituted Self-Assembled Molecules As Anode Interlayers: Tuning Surface Properties and Humidity Stability for Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaofang; Huang, Liqiang; Zhang, Lifu; Ai, Qingyun; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2017-03-15

    Self-assembled small molecules (SASMs) are effective materials to improve the interfacial properties between a metal/metal oxide and the overlying organic layer. In this work, surface modification of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode by a series of Cl-containing SASMs has been exploited to control the surface properties of ITO and device performance for organic photovoltaics. Depending on the position and degrees of chlorination for SASMs, we could precisely manipulate the work function of the ITO electrode, and chemisorption of SASMs on ITO as well. Consequently, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.1% was achieved with tetrachlorobenzoic acid (2,3,4,5-CBA) SASM by a simple solution-processed method based on PTB7-Th-PC 71 BM heterojunction. More intriguingly, we discover that device performance is closely associated with the humidity of ambient conditions. When the humidity increases from 35-55% to 80-95%, device performance with 2,3,4,5-CBA has negligible reduction, in contrast with other SASMs that show a sharp reduction in PCEs. The increased device performance is primarily attributed to a matched work function, stable chemisorption, and beneficial wettability with overlying active layer. These findings suggest an available approach for manufacturing inexpensive, stable, efficient, and environmentally friendly organic photovoltaics by appropriate self-assembled small molecules.

  16. Nuclear trafficking of secreted factors and cell-surface receptors: new pathways to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and involvement in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planque Nathalie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Secreted factors and cell surface receptors can be internalized by endocytosis and translocated to the cytoplasm. Instead of being recycled or proteolysed, they sometimes translocate to the nucleus. Nuclear import generally involves a nuclear localization signal contained either in the secreted factor or its transmembrane receptor, that is recognized by the importins machinery. In the nucleus, these molecules regulate transcription of specific target genes by direct binding to transcription factors or general coregulators. In addition to the transcription regulation, nuclear secreted proteins and receptors seem to be involved in other important processes for cell life and cellular integrity such as DNA replication, DNA repair and RNA metabolism. Nuclear secreted proteins and transmembrane receptors now appear to induce new signaling pathways to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. Their nuclear localization is often transient, appearing only during certain phases of the cell cycle. Nuclear secreted and transmembrane molecules regulate the proliferation and differentiation of a large panel of cell types during embryogenesis and adulthood and are also potentially involved in wound healing. Secreted factors such as CCN proteins, EGF, FGFs and their receptors are often detected in the nucleus of cancer cells. Nuclear localization of these molecules has been correlated with tumor progression and poor prognosis for patient survival. Nuclear growth factors and receptors may be responsible for resistance to radiotherapy.

  17. Design and fabrication of structural color by local surface plasmonic meta-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Ya-Qi; Shao Jin-Hai; Lu Bing-Rui; Zhang Si-Chao; Chen Yi-Fang; Zhang Ya-Feng; Sun Yan; Qu Xin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of nanostructures with Al film deposited on a patterned dielectric material for generating structural color, which is induced by local surface plasmonic resonant (LSPR) absorption in sub-wavelength-indented hole/ring arrays. Unlike other reported results obtained by using focus ion beam (FIB) to create metallic nanostructures, the nano-sized hole/ring arrays in Al film in this work are replicated by high resolution electron beam lithography (EBL) combined with self-aligned metallization. Clear structural color is observed and systematically studied by numerical simulations as well as optical characterizations. The central color is strongly related to the geometric size, which provides us with good opportunities to dye the colorless Al surface by controlling the hole/ring dimensions (both diameter and radius), and to open up broad applications in display, jewelry decoration, green production of packing papers, security code, and counterfeits prevention. (paper)

  18. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  19. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurparkash Singh Chahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the "Passive burnishing technique" for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows. For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used.

  20. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecules involving the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} resonant Rydberg electronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celiberto, R., E-mail: r.celiberto@poliba.it [Department of Water Engineering and Chemistry, Polytechnic of Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, CNR, 70125 Bari (Italy); Janev, R.K., E-mail: r.janev@fz-juelich.de [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, P.O.B 428, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Wadehra, J.M., E-mail: wadehra@wayne.edu [Physics Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tennyson, J., E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v{sub i} = 0-5, 10 of the H{sub 2} molecule. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculated electron-hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison with the process involving the electron-hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecule taking place via the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v{sub i} = 0-14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v{sub i}, when the process proceeds via the X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} shape resonance of H{sub 2}, for the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v{sub i} = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v{sub i} Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v{sub i} levels are also calculated in the 0.5-1000 eV temperature range.

  1. Photoelectron diffraction of C6H8/Si(001) : A model case for photoemission study of organic molecules adsorbed on silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnella, R.; Shimomura, M.; D'Amico, F.; Abukawa, T.; Kono, S.

    2006-06-01

    The core-level photoemission of 1,4-cyclohexadiene molecules on the quasi-single-domain 2×1-Si(001) surface below the saturation condition was studied. Taking advantage of core-level-shift photoelectron diffraction of the C 1s core level, the details of the surface structure were found. The model was essentially constituted by an unbuckled (planar) molecule chemisorbed on the surface, inclined at an angle of about 18° with respect to the surface normal, keeping one double bond unsaturated. An accurate analysis of the line shape parameters of the strongly asymmetric C 1s core level was mandatory for the structural study. Conversely, the success of the structural determination represented a confirmation of the correct deconvolution procedure. Such a feedback loop was decisive in reducing the indeterminacy affecting the analysis of core-level photoemission in the case of complex molecules adsorbed on surfaces.

  2. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.-A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated 45 Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. (author)

  3. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R. (Department of Periodontology, University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.)

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated /sup 45/Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis.

  4. Design and fabrication of structural color by local surface plasmonic meta-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ya-Qi; Shao, Jin-Hai; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Lu, Bing-Rui; Zhang, Si-Chao; Sun, Yan; Qu, Xin-Ping; Chen, Yi-Fang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of nanostructures with Al film deposited on a patterned dielectric material for generating structural color, which is induced by local surface plasmonic resonant (LSPR) absorption in sub-wavelength-indented hole/ring arrays. Unlike other reported results obtained by using focus ion beam (FIB) to create metallic nanostructures, the nano-sized hole/ring arrays in Al film in this work are replicated by high resolution electron beam lithography (EBL) combined with self-aligned metallization. Clear structural color is observed and systematically studied by numerical simulations as well as optical characterizations. The central color is strongly related to the geometric size, which provides us with good opportunities to dye the colorless Al surface by controlling the hole/ring dimensions (both diameter and radius), and to open up broad applications in display, jewelry decoration, green production of packing papers, security code, and counterfeits prevention. Project partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205148).

  5. Surface study of organopalladium molecules on S-terminated GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tomoya; Toujyou, Takashi; Ishikawa, Takuma; Teraoka, Teruki; Ueta, Yukiko; Kihara, Yoshifumi; Moritoki, Hideji; Tono, Tatsuo; Musashi, Mio; Tada, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Shiro; Nishiwaki, Nagatoshi; Fujikawa, Seiji; Takahasi, Masamitu; Bell, Gavin; Shimoda, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Organopalladium species ({Pd}) immobilized on an S-terminated GaAs substrate (S/GaAs) effectively catalyzes C-C bond formation in the Mizoroki-Heck reaction with cycle durability. However, the immobilizing mechanism of {Pd} is unknown. In this study, we deposited Pd(OCOCH 3 ) 2 on S/GaAs in two different methods, namely dry-physical vapor-deposition and wetchemical deposition, and compared the catalytic activities in the Mizoroki-Heck reaction. Also, S-termination and {Pd}-immobilization on GaAs grains were performed by the wet-chemical method to monitor the change in the surface chemical structure during the preparation process with diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). FT-IR measurements implied that the immobilization of catalytic active {Pd} was related to the OH groups on the S-terminated surface. {Pd}-S/GaAs prepared dryphysically showed poor catalytic activity, because {Pd} was not immobilized under absence of OH groups. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Application of an efficient asymptotic analysis method to molecule-surface scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowrey, R. C.; Kroes, G. J.

    1995-07-01

    An improved method for performing asymptotic analysis developed by Balint-Kurti et al. [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 86, 1741 (1990)] was used with the close-coupling wave packet (CCWP) method. S-matrix elements are computed from the time dependence of the wave packet amplitude at a dividing surface in the asymptotic region. The analysis technique can be combined in a natural way with the use of an optical potential to absorb the scattered wave function beyond the dividing surface and with a technique in which the initial wave function is brought in on a separate, one-dimensional grid, thereby allowing the use of a smaller grid. The use of the method in conjunction with the Chebyshev and short-iterative Lanczos propagation techniques is demonstrated for a model problem in which H2 is scattered from LiF(001). Computed S-matrix elements are in good agreement with those obtained using a time-independent close-coupling method.

  7. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity of molecules on orientationally averaged substrates: theory of electromagnetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2006-09-28

    We present a model for electromagnetic enhancements in surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA) spectroscopy. The model extends previous treatments of SEROA to substrates, such as metal nanoparticles in solution, that are orientationally averaged with respect to the laboratory frame. Our theoretical treatment combines analytical expressions for unenhanced Raman optical activity with molecular polarizability tensors that are dressed by the substrate's electromagnetic enhancements. We evaluate enhancements from model substrates to determine preliminary scaling laws and selection rules for SEROA. We find that dipolar substrates enhance Raman optical activity (ROA) scattering less than Raman scattering. Evanescent gradient contributions to orientationally averaged ROA scale to first or higher orders in the gradient of the incident plane-wave field. These evanescent gradient contributions may be large for substrates with quadrupolar responses to the plane-wave field gradient. Some substrates may also show a ROA contribution that depends only on the molecular electric dipole-electric dipole polarizability. These conclusions are illustrated via numerical calculations of surface enhanced Raman and ROA spectra from (R)-(-)-bromochlorofluoromethane on various model substrates.

  8. ENOX2 (or tNOX): a new and old molecule with cancer activity involved in tumor prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, G; Lessiani, G; Spinas, E; Kritas, S K; Caraffa, Al; Saggini, A; Antinolfi, P; Pizzicannella, J; Toniato, E; Conti, P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer includes a number of related diseases due to abnormal cell proliferation that spreads to nearby tissues. Many compounds (physical, chemical and biological) have been used to try to halt this abnormal proliferation, but the therapeutic results are poor, due also to the side effects. It has been reported that ecto-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase di-sulfide-thiol exchanger 2 (ENOX2), also known as tumor-associated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (tNOX), was found to be located on the cancer cell surface, essential for cancer cell growth. Capsaicin and other anti-oxidants are capable of inhibiting tNOX, causing apoptosis of cells, exerting anti-tumor activity. It is interesting that some authors reported that ENOX2 is present in the serum of cancer patients several years before the clinical symptoms of the tumor. However, this result has to be confirmed. In this article we discuss ENOX2 and its inhibition as a hope of improving cancer therapy.

  9. Influence of the crystallographic structure of the electrode surface on the structure of the electrical double layer and adsorption of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochorovski, Z.; Zagorska, I.; Pruzhkovska-Drakhal, R.; Trasatti, S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of systematic investigation of influence of crystal structure of Bi-, Sb- and Cd-electrode surfaces on regularities of double electric layer structure in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions of surface-nonactive electrolyte are given. Influence of electrode surface characteristics on adsorptive behaviour of different organic molecules has been studied. General regularities of of chemical nature influence and surface crystallographic structure on the double layer structure and on organic compounds adsorption have been established. 57 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Exploring surface landscapes with molecules: rotationally induced diffraction of H2on LiF(001) under fast grazing incidence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Somers, M F; Kroes, G J; Díaz, C; Martín, F

    2017-06-28

    Atomic diffraction by surfaces under fast grazing incidence conditions has been used for almost a decade to characterize surface properties with more accuracy than with more traditional atomic diffraction methods. From six-dimensional solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that diffraction of H 2 molecules under fast grazing incidence conditions could be even more informative for the characterization of ionic surfaces, due to the large anisotropic electrostatic interaction between the quadrupole moment of the molecule and the electric field created by the ionic crystal. Using the LiF(001) surface as a benchmark, we show that fast grazing incidence diffraction of H 2 strongly depends on the initial rotational state of the molecule, while rotationally inelastic processes are irrelevant. We demonstrate that, as a result of the anisotropy of the impinging projectile, initial rotational excitation leads to an increase in intensity of high-order diffraction peaks at incidence directions that satisfy precise symmetry constraints, thus providing a more detailed information on the surface characteristics than that obtained from low-order atomic diffraction peaks under fast grazing incidence conditions. As quadrupole-ion surface potentials are expected to accurately represent the interaction between H 2 and any surface with a marked ionic character, our analysis should be of general applicability to any of such surfaces. Finally, we show that a density functional theory description of the molecule-ion surface potential catches the main features observed experimentally.

  11. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Bingqian, E-mail: bxu@engr.uga.edu [Single Molecule Study Laboratory, College of Engineering and Nanoscale Science, and Engineering Center, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30605 (United States); Lou, Zhichao [Single Molecule Study Laboratory, College of Engineering and Nanoscale Science, and Engineering Center, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30605 (United States); College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhang, Haiqian [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2016-03-21

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  12. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-01

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  13. Water adsorption on non polar ZnO surfaces: from single molecules to multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, Stephane; Biedermann, P. Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The interface between water and ZnO plays an important role in many domains of technological relevance. Following the vital role of adsorbed water on substrate properties and the fascinating properties of interfacial water, there is a great interest in characterizing this interface. We use DFT to study the possible aggregation regimes that can form on the ZnO non-polar low-index (1010) and (1120) surfaces. We study the adsorption of water monomers, small water clusters like water dimers, water chains, ladder-like water structures, water thin films and water multilayers. Based on this, trends in binding energy as well as the binding mechanisms are analyzed to understand the driving forces and the nature of the fundamental interactions that stabilize the adsorbed layers.

  14. The detection of small organic molecules based on novel functionalized surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rui; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop rapid, inexpensive, and easily applied in vivo phenotyping strategies for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in biological fluids. Therefore, the accurate detection of low concentration of theophylline, which can be used as a probe for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes (e.g. CYP1A2) activity, could benefit drug-metabolizing studies. In this study, a portable, specific, and sensitive functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using polyacrylamide molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the highly specific selector is developed for the detection of low concentration theophylline in the presence of other confounding components, such as, caffeine which has a very similar chemical structure.

  15. Inhibition of Host Cell Lysosome Spreading by Trypanosoma cruzi Metacyclic Stage-Specific Surface Molecule gp90 Downregulates Parasite Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Paulo Ferreira; Sant'ana, Guilherme Hideki Takahashi; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2017-09-01

    Successful infection by Trypanosoma cruzi , the agent of Chagas' disease, is critically dependent on host cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigote (MT) forms. Two main metacyclic stage-specific surface molecules, gp82 and gp90, play determinant roles in target cell invasion in vitro and in oral T. cruzi infection in mice. The structure and properties of gp82, which is highly conserved among T. cruzi strains, are well known. Information on gp90 is still rather sparse. Here, we attempted to fill that gap. gp90, purified from poorly invasive G strain MT and expressing gp90 at high levels, inhibited HeLa cell lysosome spreading and the gp82-mediated internalization of a highly invasive CL strain MT expressing low levels of a diverse gp90 molecule. A recombinant protein containing the conserved C-terminal domain of gp90 exhibited the same properties as the native G strain gp90: it counteracted the host cell lysosome spreading induced by recombinant gp82 and exhibited an inhibitory effect on HeLa cell invasion by CL strain MT. Assays to identify the gp90 sequence associated with the property of downregulating MT invasion, using synthetic peptides spanning the gp90 C-terminal domain, revealed the sequence GVLYTADKEW. These data, plus the findings that lysosome spreading was induced upon HeLa cell interaction with CL strain MT, but not with G strain MT, and that in mixed infection CL strain MT internalization was inhibited by G strain MT, suggest that the inhibition of target cell lysosome spreading is the mechanism by which the gp90 molecule exerts its downregulatory role. Copyright © 2017 Rodrigues et al.

  16. Combined Effects of Rosuvastatin and Exercise on Gene Expression of Key Molecules Involved in Cholesterol Metabolism in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilienne Tudor Ngo Sock

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three weeks of rosuvastatin (Ros treatment alone and in combination with voluntary training (Tr on expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism (LDLR, PCSK9, LRP-1, SREBP-2, IDOL, ACAT-2 and HMGCR in the liver of eight week-old ovariectomized (Ovx rats. Sprague Dawley rats were Ovx or sham-operated (Sham and kept sedentary for 8 weeks under a standard diet. Thereafter, rats were transferred for three weeks in running wheel cages for Tr or kept sedentary (Sed with or without Ros treatment (5mg/kg/day. Six groups were formed: Sham-Sed treated with saline (Sal or Ros (Sham-Sed-Sal; Sham-Sed-Ros, Ovx-Sed treated with Sal or Ros (Ovx-Sed-Sal; Ovx-Sed-Ros, Ovx trained treated with Sal or Ros (Ovx-Tr-Sal; Ovx-Tr-Ros. Ovx-Sed-Sal rats depicted higher (P < 0.05 body weight, plasma total cholesterol (TC and LDL-C, and liver TC content compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. In contrast, mRNA levels of liver PCSK9, LDLR, LRP-1 as well as plasma PCSK9 concentrations and protein levels of LRP-1 were reduced (P < 0.01 in Ovx-Sed-Sal compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. However, protein levels of LDLR increased (P < 0.05 in Ovx-Sed-Sal compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. Treatment of Ovx rats with Ros increased (P < 0.05 mRNA and protein levels of LRP-1 and PCSK9 but not mRNA levels of LDLR, while its protein abundance was reduced at the level of Sham rats. As a result, plasma LDL-C was not reduced. Exercise alone did not affect the expression of any of these markers in Ovx rats. Overall, Ros treatment corrected Ovx-induced decrease in gene expression of markers of cholesterol metabolism in liver of Ovx rats, but without reducing plasma LDL-C concentrations. Increased plasma PCSK9 levels could be responsible for the reduction of liver LDLR protein abundance and the absence of reduction of plasma LDL-C after Ros treatment.

  17. Theoretical estimation of optical hyperpolarizability appearance in fullerene molecule and carbon nanotubes interacting with ionic crystal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestechkin, M. M.

    2007-05-01

    The first hyperpolarizability (HP) of fullerene and finite length carbon nanotubes (FCN), attached to the neutral surfaces of SiO 2 (1 1 0), CdS(1 1 2 0), and CdTe(1 1 0) crystals, is calculated in the framework of the semi-empirical version of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory (TDHF). The norm of β-vector invariant, induced by the substrate, is of the same order as in some organic molecules with the observed nonlinear optical properties. The orthogonal to the substrate β-component is responsible for generation of the second harmonic by fullerene according to Hoshi and co-authors [H. Hoshi, N. Nakamura, Y. Maruyama, T. Nakagawa, S. Suzuki, H. Shiromaru, Y. Achiba, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30 (1991) L1397]. The calculated value of this component is shown sufficient for the weak generation. It is found that zig-zag FCN, in contrast to armchair FCN, are characterized by the resonant behaviour of HP for second harmonic generation (SHG) at low frequencies due to the existence of quasi-degenerate (hyperbolic) levels in the close vicinity of the Fermi level. This ability is created by the external ionic crystal potential and affected by mutual electron interaction of molecules in the layer.

  18. Machine learning of single molecule free energy surfaces and the impact of chemistry and environment upon structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Rachael A; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2015-03-14

    The conformational states explored by polymers and proteins can be controlled by environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and solvent) and molecular chemistry (e.g., molecular weight and side chain identity). We introduce an approach employing the diffusion map nonlinear machine learning technique to recover single molecule free energy landscapes from molecular simulations, quantify changes to the landscape as a function of external conditions and molecular chemistry, and relate these changes to modifications of molecular structure and dynamics. In an application to an n-eicosane chain, we quantify the thermally accessible chain configurations as a function of temperature and solvent conditions. In an application to a family of polyglutamate-derivative homopeptides, we quantify helical stability as a function of side chain length, resolve the critical side chain length for the helix-coil transition, and expose the molecular mechanisms underpinning side chain-mediated helix stability. By quantifying single molecule responses through perturbations to the underlying free energy surface, our approach provides a quantitative bridge between experimentally controllable variables and microscopic molecular behavior, guiding and informing rational engineering of desirable molecular structure and function.

  19. Comparison between the classical interaction energy and periodic Hartree-Fock binding energies for the interaction between molecules and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Taylor, M.R.; McCarthy, M.I.

    1995-01-01

    The energetics of the H 2 O/MgO(001), HCl/MgO(001), and NH 3 /MgO(001) interface were investigated using the ab initio periodic Hartree-Fock LCAO method and a classical interaction energy model. The QM calculations treated a system that was periodic in two dimensions with the adsorbate approaching a three-layer slab of MgO(001). The authors used an approximation to the classical interaction energy, where the surface is represented by its potential, electric field, and electric field derivatives at the positions of the molecule center of mass, and the molecule is described by its charge, electric dipole, electric quadrupole and polarizability. The potential, electric field and electric field gradient are obtained for the clean three-layer slab using the ab initio periodic Hartree-Fock LCAO method (CRYSTAL) and an optimized split valence basis 8-61G on Mg and 8-51G on O. The charge, electric dipole, and electric quadrupole are calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock theory (GAUSSIAN-92) with a 6-31G* basis set while the SCF polarizability is determined analytically using the same basis set

  20. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  1. Surface diffusion of long chainlike molecules: The role of memory effects and stiffness on effective diffusion barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelt, T.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio

    2000-01-01

    studies with chains of different lengths lead to a conclusion that, for a single diffusing chain, the memory contribution in E-A(T) decreases along with an increasing chain length and is almost negligible in the case of very long chains. Finally, we close this work by discussing our results in light......We study the coverage dependence of surface diffusion for chainlike molecules by the fluctuating-bond model with a Monte Carlo dynamics. The model includes short-ranged excluded volume interactions between different chains as well as an intrachain bond angle potential to describe the chain...... stiffness. Our primary aim is to consider the role played by chain stiffness and the resulting memory effects in tracer diffusion, and in particular their role in the effective tracer diffusion barrier E-A(T) extracted from the well-known Arrhenius form. We show that the memory effects in tracer diffusion...

  2. Surface-supported Ag islands stabilized by a quantum size effect: Their interaction with small molecules relevant to ethylene epoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Dahai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on how QSE-stabilized, surface-supported Ag nanoclusters will interact with ethylene or oxygen. Experiments are performed to determine whether the QSE-mediated Ag islands react differently toward adsorption of ethylene or oxygen, or whether the adsorption of these small molecules will affect the QSE-mediated stability of Ag islands. Studies of the interaction of oxygen with Ag/Si(111)-7×7 were previously reported, but these studies were performed at a low Ag coverage where 3D Ag islands were not formed. So the study of such a system at a higher Ag coverage will be a subject of this work. The interaction of ethylene with Ag/Si(111)-7×7, as well as the interaction of oxygen with Ag/NiAl(110) are also important parts of this study.

  3. Single Molecule and Nanoparticle Imaging in Biophysical, Surface, and Photocatalysis Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ji Won [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A differential interference contrast (DIC) polarization anisotropy is reported that was successfully used for rotational tracking of gold nanorods attached onto a kinesin-driven microtubule. A dual-wavelength detection of single gold nanorods rotating on a live cell membrane is described. Both transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) modes were used for tracking the rotational motions during a fast dynamic process under a DIC microscope. A novel method is presented to determine the full three-dimensional (3D) orientation of single plasmonic gold nanorods rotating on live cell membranes by combining DIC polarization anisotropy with an image pattern recognition technique. Polarization- and wavelength-sensitive DIC microscopy imaging of 2- m long gold nanowires as optical probes in biological studies is reported. A new method is demonstrated to track 3D orientation of single gold nanorods supported on a gold film without angular degeneracy. The idea is to use the interaction (or coupling) of gold nanorods with gold film, yielding characteristic scattering patterns such as a doughnut shape. Imaging of photocatalytic activity, polarity and selectivity on single Au-CdS hybrid nanocatalysts using a high-resolution superlocalization fluorescence imaging technique is described.

  4. Accurate adsorption energies of small molecules on oxide surfaces: CO-MgO(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, A Daniel; Sauer, Joachim

    2013-10-21

    A hybrid MP2:DFT + D optimization method is applied using a 3 × 3 × 2 cluster model (Mg9O9) embedded in a 4 × 4 × 4 slab model. The calculated CO-Mg(2+) distance is 248 pm, and the calculated CO frequency (blue) shift is 20 cm(-1), 6 cm(-1) larger than the experimental value. For the structure obtained, MP2 calculations with basis set extrapolation on a series of cluster models of increasing size are performed. Taking into account the difference in the periodic limit at the DFT + D level, 20.9 ± 0.7 kJ mol(-1) is obtained as the estimate for the full periodic MP2 limit for the energy of CO desorption from the MgO(001) surface. CCSD(T) corrections are evaluated for the Mg9O9 cluster model using an augmented double-zeta basis set. Basis set extension effects are examined for smaller models. For a loading of Θ = 1/8, the estimated CCSD(T) value is 21.0 ± 1.0 kJ mol(-1), which is 0.4 ± 1.0 kJ mol(-1) larger than the (electronic) desorption energy derived in this study from TPD desorption barriers reported in the literature.

  5. Phase properties of elastic waves in systems constituted of adsorbed diatomic molecules on the (001) surface of a simple cubic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P. A.; Runge, K.

    2018-03-01

    A Green's function-based numerical method is developed to calculate the phase of scattered elastic waves in a harmonic model of diatomic molecules adsorbed on the (001) surface of a simple cubic crystal. The phase properties of scattered waves depend on the configuration of the molecules. The configurations of adsorbed molecules on the crystal surface such as parallel chain-like arrays coupled via kinks are used to demonstrate not only linear but also non-linear dependency of the phase on the number of kinks along the chains. Non-linear behavior arises for scattered waves with frequencies in the vicinity of a diatomic molecule resonance. In the non-linear regime, the variation in phase with the number of kinks is formulated mathematically as unitary matrix operations leading to an analogy between phase-based elastic unitary operations and quantum gates. The advantage of elastic based unitary operations is that they are easily realizable physically and measurable.

  6. Involvement of cell surface TG2 in the aggregation of K562 cells triggered by gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriotto, G; Calza, R; Bergamini, C M; Griffin, M; Wang, Z; Beninati, S; Ferretti, V; Marzola, E; Guerrini, R; Pagnoni, A; Cavazzini, A; Casciano, F; Mischiati, C

    2017-03-01

    Gluten-induced aggregation of K562 cells represents an in vitro model reproducing the early steps occurring in the small bowel of celiac patients exposed to gliadin. Despite the clear involvement of TG2 in the activation of the antigen-presenting cells, it is not yet clear in which compartment it occurs. Herein we study the calcium-dependent aggregation of these cells, using either cell-permeable or cell-impermeable TG2 inhibitors. Gluten induces efficient aggregation when calcium is absent in the extracellular environment, while TG2 inhibitors do not restore the full aggregating potential of gluten in the presence of calcium. These findings suggest that TG2 activity is not essential in the cellular aggregation mechanism. We demonstrate that gluten contacts the cells and provokes their aggregation through a mechanism involving the A-gliadin peptide 31-43. This peptide also activates the cell surface associated extracellular TG2 in the absence of calcium. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identify the possible docking sites of this peptide on the open and closed TG2 structures. Peptide docks with the closed TG2 structure near to the GTP/GDP site, by establishing molecular interactions with the same amino acids involved in stabilization of GTP binding. We suggest that it may occur through the displacement of GTP, switching the TG2 structure from the closed to the active open conformation. Furthermore, docking analysis shows peptide binding with the β-sandwich domain of the closed TG2 structure, suggesting that this region could be responsible for the different aggregating effects of gluten shown in the presence or absence of calcium. We deduce from these data a possible mechanism of action by which gluten makes contact with the cell surface, which could have possible implications in the celiac disease onset.

  7. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Probing the interactions of organic molecules, nanomaterials, and microbes with solid surfaces using quartz crystal microbalances: methodology, advantages, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Yi, Peng; Tang, Yuanzhi

    2017-06-21

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) provide a new analytical opportunity and prospect to characterize many environmental processes at solid/liquid interfaces, thanks to their almost real-time measurement of physicochemical changes on their quartz sensor. This work reviews the applications of QCMs in probing the interactions of organic molecules, nanomaterials (NMs) and microbes with solid surfaces. These interfacial interactions are relevant to critical environmental processes such as biofilm formation, fate and transport of NMs, fouling in engineering systems and antifouling practices. The high sensitivity, real-time monitoring, and simultaneous frequency and dissipation measurements make QCM-D a unique technique that helps reveal the interaction mechanisms for the abovementioned processes (e.g., driving forces, affinity, kinetics, and the interplay between surface chemistry and solution chemistry). On the other hand, QCM measurement is nonselective and spatially-dependent. Thus, caution should be taken during data analysis and interpretation, and it is necessary to cross-validate the results using complementary information from other techniques for more quantitative and accurate interpretation. This review summarizes the general methodologies for collecting and analyzing raw QCM data, as well as for evaluating the associated uncertainties. It serves to help researchers gain deeper insights into the fundamentals and applications of QCMs, and provides new perspectives on future research directions.

  9. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal and Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  10. The neuroplastin adhesion molecules are accessory proteins that chaperone the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 to the neuronal cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieangela C Wilson

    Full Text Available The neuroplastins np65 and np55 are two synapse-enriched immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily adhesion molecules that contain 3 and 2 Ig domains respectively. Np65 is implicated in long term, activity dependent synaptic plasticity, including LTP. Np65 regulates the surface expression of GluR1 receptor subunits and the localisation of GABA(A receptor subtypes in hippocampal neurones. The brain is dependent not only on glucose but on monocarboxylates as sources of energy. The. monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs 1-4 are responsible for the rapid proton-linked translocation of monocarboxylates including pyruvate and lactate across the plasma membrane and require association with either embigin or basigin, proteins closely related to neuroplastin, for plasma membrane expression and activity. MCT2 plays a key role in providing lactate as an energy source to neurons.Here we use co-transfection of neuroplastins and monocarboxylate transporters into COS-7 cells to demonstrate that neuroplastins can act as ancillary proteins for MCT2. We also show that Xenopus laevis oocytes contain endogenous neuroplastin and its knockdown with antisense RNA reduces the surface expression of MCT2 and associated lactate transport. Immunocytochemical studies show that MCT2 and the neuroplastins are co-localised in rat cerebellum. Strikingly neuroplastin and MCT2 are enriched in the same parasagittal zebrin II-negative stripes.These data strongly suggest that neuroplastins act as key ancillary proteins for MCT2 cell surface localisation and activity in some neuronal populations, thus playing an important role in facilitating the uptake of lactate for use as a respiratory fuel.

  11. Quantum tunneling in real space: Tautomerization of single porphycene molecules on the (111) surface of Cu, Ag, and Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Takashi; Ladenthin, Janina N.; Litman, Yair; Rossi, Mariana; Grill, Leonhard; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Persson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    Tautomerization in single porphycene molecules is investigated on Cu(111), Ag(111), and Au(111) surfaces by a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is revealed that the trans configuration is the thermodynamically stable form of porphycene on Cu(111) and Ag(111), whereas the cis configuration occurs as a meta-stable form. The trans → cis or cis → trans conversion on Cu(111) can be induced in an unidirectional fashion by injecting tunneling electrons from the STM tip or heating the surface, respectively. We find that the cis ↔ cis tautomerization on Cu(111) occurs spontaneously via tunneling, verified by the negligible temperature dependence of the tautomerization rate below ˜23 K. Van der Waals corrected DFT calculations are used to characterize the adsorption structures of porphycene and to map the potential energy surface of the tautomerization on Cu(111). The calculated barriers are too high to be thermally overcome at cryogenic temperatures used in the experiment and zero-point energy corrections do not change this picture, leaving tunneling as the most likely mechanism. On Ag(111), the reversible trans ↔ cis conversion occurs spontaneously at 5 K and the cis ↔ cis tautomerization rate is much higher than on Cu(111), indicating a significantly smaller tautomerization barrier on Ag(111) due to the weaker interaction between porphycene and the surface compared to Cu(111). Additionally, the STM experiments and DFT calculations reveal that tautomerization on Cu(111) and Ag(111) occurs with migration of porphycene along the surface; thus, the translational motion couples with the tautomerization coordinate. On the other hand, the trans and cis configurations are not discernible in the STM image and no tautomerization is observed for porphycene on Au(111). The weak interaction of porphycene with Au(111) is closest to the gas-phase limit and therefore the absence

  12. First-Principles Calculations of the Adsorption of Nitromethane and 1,1-Diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) Molecules on the Al(111) Surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorescu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    .... Based on these calculations, we have determined that both dissociative and nondissociative adsorption mechanisms are possible, depending on the molecular orientation and the particular surface sites involved...

  13. The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is essential in mechanisms involving the Fyn tyrosine kinase for induction and progression of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-11-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is an Src homology 2 domain-only adaptor involved in multiple immune cell functions. It has also been linked to immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we examined the role and mechanism of action of SAP in autoimmunity using a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that SAP was essential for development of CIA in response to collagen immunization. It was also required for production of collagen-specific antibodies, which play a key role in disease pathogenesis. These effects required SAP expression in T cells, not in B cells. In mice immunized with a high dose of collagen, the activity of SAP was nearly independent of its ability to bind the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and correlated with the capacity of SAP to promote full differentiation of follicular T helper (TFH) cells. However, with a lower dose of collagen, the role of SAP was more dependent on Fyn binding, suggesting that additional mechanisms other than TFH cell differentiation were involved. Further studies suggested that this might be due to a role of the SAP-Fyn interaction in natural killer T cell development through the ability of SAP-Fyn to promote Vav-1 activation. We also found that removal of SAP expression during progression of CIA attenuated disease severity. However, it had no effect on disease when CIA was clinically established. Together, these results indicate that SAP plays an essential role in CIA because of Fyn-independent and Fyn-dependent effects on TFH cells and, possibly, other T cell types.

  14. Enoxaparin reduces H2O2-induced activation of human endothelial cells by a mechanism involving cell adhesion molecules and nuclear transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduteanu, Ileana; Dragomir, Elena; Voinea, Manuela; Capraru, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2007-01-01

    There are data that document the anti-inflammatory effect of enoxaparin (EP) and its possible antioxidant potential. This study was designed to search for the antioxidant mechanism(s) of EP directly on endothelial cells exposed to an oxidant stimulus. For this purpose cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to nontoxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of EP, and the adhesion of monocytes, the expression of cell adhesion molecules and transcription factors possibly involved in the process were tested. Adhesion assays, ELISA and Western blot analysis revealed that EP reduced monocyte adhesion, ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression, decreased the nuclear levels of c-Jun and p65 proteins, and diminished the phosphorylation of c-Jun protein, MAPK p38 and JNK. Together, the data demonstrate the antioxidant effect of EP and the involvement of ICAM-1, P-selectin, MAPK p38, JNK and the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the mechanism of action of this drug. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  16. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  17. Probing the rate-determining region of the potential energy surface for a prototypical ion-molecule reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Liu, Xinguo; Sweeny, Brendan C; Miller, Thomas M; Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-13

    We report a joint experimental-theoretical study of the F -  + HCl → HF + Cl - reaction kinetics. The experimental measurement of the rate coefficient at several temperatures was made using the selected ion flow tube method. Theoretical rate coefficients are calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory method on a newly developed global potential energy surface, obtained by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points with augmentation of long-range electrostatic terms. In addition to good agreement between experiment and theory, analyses suggest that the ion-molecule reaction rate is significantly affected by shorter-range interactions, in addition to the traditionally recognized ion-dipole and ion-induced dipole terms. Furthermore, the statistical nature of the reaction is assessed by comparing the measured and calculated HF product vibrational state distributions to that predicted by the phase space theory.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. Non-adiabatic effects within a single thermally averaged potential energy surface: thermal expansion and reaction rates of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J L; Castro, A; Clemente-Gallardo, J; Echenique, P; Mazo, J J; Polo, V; Rubio, A; Zueco, D

    2012-12-14

    At non-zero temperature and when a system has low-lying excited electronic states, the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down and the low-lying electronic states are involved in any chemical process. In this work, we use a temperature-dependent effective potential for the nuclei which can accommodate the influence of an arbitrary number of electronic states in a simple way, while at the same time producing the correct Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for the electronic part. With the help of this effective potential, we show that thermally activated low-lying electronic states can have a significant effect in molecular properties for which electronic excitations are oftentimes ignored. We study the thermal expansion of the Manganese dimer, Mn(2), where we find that the average bond length experiences a change larger than the present experimental accuracy upon the inclusion of the excited states into the picture. We also show that, when these states are taken into account, reaction-rate constants are modified. In particular, we study the opening of the ozone molecule, O(3), and show that in this case the rate is modified as much as a 20% with respect to the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer prediction.

  19. Adsorption mechanism of H2O molecule on the Li4SiO4 (0 1 0) surface from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xianggang; Yu, You; Ma, Shenggui; Gao, Tao; Xiao, Chengjian; Chen, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation behaviors of molecular H2O on the Li4SiO4 (0 1 0) surface have been systematically studied by first-principles calculations. It is found that the adsorbed H2O molecule mainly interacts with the O and Li atoms of the surface, that is, H atom bonds with O atoms of the surface while O atom bonds with the surface Li atoms due to the hydrogen bond effect. According to the different adsorption energies and vibrational frequencies of H2O, different adsorption types can be classified. These results may explain the origin of multiple desorption peaks in TDS experiments.

  20. Hypercrosslinked large surface area porous polymer monoliths for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography of small molecules featuring zwitterionic functionalities attached to gold nanoparticles held in layered structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Yongqin; Lin, Zhixing; Svec, Frantisek

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to porous polymer monoliths hypercrosslinked to obtain large surface areas and modified with zwitterionic functionalities through the attachment of gold nanoparticles in a layered architecture has been developed. The capillary columns were used for the separation of small molecules in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode. First, a monolith with a very large surface area of 430 m2/g was prepared by hypercrosslinking from a generic poly(4-methylstyrene-co-vinylben...

  1. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  2. Ocular surface and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pelinsari Lana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many reports have indicated an association between thyroid dieases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of the tests used for dry eye diagnosis and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods: Forty-two patients (group 1 with autoimmune thyroid disease and 30 controls (group 2 were selected. Tear film break up time, Schirmer I test, Schirmer II test, ocular staining with 1% rose Bengal and salivary gland cintilography were performed in both groups. Results: Regarding the ocular surface damage observed by Rose Bengal test there was no difference between groups (p=0.77. For tear film break up time the groups did not differ statistically (p=0.46. There was no statistical difference between groups 1 and control in scintigraphy of the salivary gland (p=0.99. A statistical difference between the patients with thyroid disease and the control group was seem only in the Schirmer II test (p=0.0009. Conclusions: No patients fulfilled all criteria for Sjögren’s syndrome. It is possible that it could be underestimated.

  3. Structure determination of disordered organic molecules on surfaces from the Bragg spots of low-energy electron diffraction and total energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, H.C.; Weinert, M.; Saldin, D.K.; Stacchiola, D.; Zheng, T.; Tysoe, W.T.

    2004-01-01

    We show that an analysis of the intensity versus energy variation of Bragg spots due to low-energy electron diffraction from a disordered overlayer of molecules on a crystal surface allows a much more convenient method of determining the local adsorption geometries of such molecules than previously analyzed weak diffuse diffraction patterns. For the case of methanol on Pd(111), we show that the geometry determined by this means from experimental diffraction data is in excellent agreement with the predictions of density functional total energy calculations

  4. Bacteria-induced neo-biosynthesis, stabilization, and surface expression of functional class I molecules in mouse dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rescigno, Maria; Citterio, Stefania; Thèry, Clotilde; Rittig, Michael; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni; Amigorena, Sebastian; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    1998-01-01

    Here, we show that bacteria induce de novo synthesis of both major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in a mouse dendritic cell culture system. The neo-biosynthesis of MHC class I molecules is delayed as compared with that of MHC class II. Furthermore, bacteria stabilize MHC class I molecules by a 3-fold increase of their half-life. This has important consequences for the capacity of dendritic cells to present bacterial antigens in the draining lymph nodes. In addition,...

  5. Insights into the superhydrophobicity of metallic surfaces prepared by electrodeposition involving spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Cao, Ling; Zhao, Wei; Xia, Yue; Huang, Wei; Li, Zelin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Several superhydrophobic metallic surfaces were fabricated by fast electrodeposition. • Both micro/nanostructures and adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons make contributions. • XPS analyses confirm presence of airborne hydrocarbons on these metallic surfaces. • The adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons on the clean metal Au surface was very quick. • UV-O 3 treatment oxidized the hydrocarbons to hydrophilic oxygen-containing organics. - Abstract: Electrochemical fabrication of micro/nanostructured metallic surfaces with superhydrophobicity has recently aroused great attention. However, the origin still remains unclear why smooth hydrophilic metal surfaces become superhydrophobic by making micro/nanostructures without additional surface modifications. In this work, several superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured metal surfaces were prepared by a facile one-step electrodeposition process, including non-noble and noble metals such as copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, gold, and palladium with (e.g. Cu) or without (e.g. Au) surface oxide films. We demonstrated by SEM and XPS that both hierarchical micro/nanostructures and spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons endowed these surfaces with excellent superhydrophobicity. We revealed by XPS that the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons at the Ar + -etched clean Au surface was rather quick, such that organic contamination can hardly be prevented in practical operation of surface wetting investigation. We also confirmed by XPS that ultraviolet-O 3 treatment of the superhydrophobic metal surfaces did not remove the adsorbed hydrocarbons completely, but mainly oxidized them into hydrophilic oxygen-containing organic substances. We hope our findings here shed new light on deeper understanding of superhydrophobicity for micro/nanostructured metal surfaces with and without surface oxide films

  6. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface.

  7. Adsorption of small molecules at the cobalt-doped SrTiO3(001) surface: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotto, Silvia; Natile, Marta Maria; Glisenti, Antonella; Vittadini, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The cobalt-doped SrTiO3 (001) surface and its interaction with small molecules (CO, NO and O2) is investigated by DFT and DFT + U calculations. Structural, electronic, and chemical changes induced by the presence of the cobalt impurity are studied. Similar to what is found for the bulk SrTiO3, cobalt impurities promote the formation of oxygen vacancies and tend to cluster with them. The presence of impurities has a strong influence on adsorption and in particular it gives rise i) to an enhancement of the adsorption energies and ii) to an inversion of the π electron flux from a surfacemolecule to a moleculesurface donation. Furthermore, the examined molecular probes have different affinities with surface defects/impurities: whereas the vacancy site is favored for O2and CO, NO is preferentially adsorbed at the Co impurity site. The obtained results provide the basis for further studies of the catalytic properties of Co-doped SrTiO3.

  8. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  9. Calculation and fitting of potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for the water molecule: Fully ab initio determination of vibrational transition energies and band intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziora, G.S.; Shavitt, I.

    1997-01-01

    Potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for the water molecule have been generated by multireference singles-and-doubles configuration interaction calculations using a large basis set of the averaged-atomic-natural-orbital type and a six-orbital-six-electron complete-active-space reference space. The surfaces are suitable for modeling vibrational transitions up to about 11000cm -1 above the ground state. A truncated singular-value decomposition method has been used to fit the surfaces. This fitting method is numerically stable and is a useful tool for examining the effectiveness of various fitting function forms in reproducing the calculated surface points and in extrapolating beyond these points. The fitted surfaces have been used for variational calculations of the 30 lowest band origins and the corresponding band intensities for transitions from the ground vibrational state. With a few exceptions, the results compare well with other calculations and with experimental data. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  11. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  12. Potential drug – nanosensor conjugates: Raman, infrared absorption, surface – enhanced Raman, and density functional theory investigations of indolic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pięta, Ewa, E-mail: Ewa.Pieta@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Paluszkiewicz, Czesława [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Oćwieja, Magdalena [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-30239 Krakow (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Molecular fragments involved in the adsorption process were determined. • Formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold substrates was observed. • Indole moiety strongly interacts with gold nanosensors. • The synthesized sensors are characterized by high stability and reproducibility. • Chemical mechanism plays a crucial role in the enhancement of the Raman signal. - Abstract: An extremely important aspect of planning cancer treatment is not only the drug efficiency but also a number of challenges associated with the side effects and control of this process. That is why it is worth paying attention to the promising potential of the gold nanoparticles combined with a compound treated as a potential drug. This work presents Raman (RS), infrared absorption (IR) and surface–enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopic investigations of N–acetyl–5–methoxytryptamine (melatonin) and α–methyl–DL–tryptophan, regarding as anti breast cancer agents. The experimental spectroscopic analysis was supported by the quantum-chemical calculations based on the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP 6–311G(d,p) level of theory. The studied compounds were adsorbed onto two colloidal gold nanosensors synthesized by a chemical reduction method using sodium borohydride (SB) and trisodium citrate (TC), respectively. Its morphology characteristics were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been suggested that the NH moiety from the aromatic ring, a well-known proton donor, causes the formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold surface.

  13. The binding of monoclonal antibodies to cell surface molecules. Quantitative analysis of the reactions and cross-reactions of an antibody (MB40.3) with four HLA-B molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, P

    1984-11-10

    The MB40.3 monoclonal antibody binds to four distinct HLA-B molecules; B7, B40, B40*, and B27. With Fab' fragments only the interaction with B7 and B40 was detected and the affinity for both was the same (1-2 X 10(8) M-1) suggesting the epitope is shared by the two molecules. Unlike many antibodies for which low affinity is due to a high-dissociation constant, that of MB40.3 results from a very low-association rate constant, coupled with a low-dissociation constant. In consequence, the affinity and avidity of Fab', F(ab')2, and IgG for B7 and B40 were found to be of a similar magnitude, soluble B7 was a more efficient competitor for antibody than cell surface B7 and in practice antibody bivalency was of little importance. The forward rate constant could be increased by removing Fc from the antibody or by removing sialic acid from the cells by treatment with neuraminidase. The neuraminidase treatment also produced an increase in the number of detectable cell surface HLA-A,B molecules. The affinity of MB40.3 for B40* and B27 was estimated to be less than 4 X 10(6) as no binding with Fab' was detected due to a high-dissociation rate. For these two HLA-B molecules bivalent attachment was critical, and it increased the strength of interaction with cell surface B40* and B27 to a point where the avidities were comparable to those obtained with B7 and B40, with B40* interacting more strongly than B27. The epitopes recognized by MB40.3 on B40* and B27 were thus shown to be structurally different from each other and from those on B7 and B40. The properties of this antibody contrast with those of other anti-HLA-A,B we have studied (Ways, J.P., and Parham, P. (1983) Biochem. J. 216, 423-432).

  14. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R B

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  15. High-risk human papillomavirus E7 expression reduces cell-surface MHC class I molecules and increases susceptibility to natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottley, G; Watherston, O G; Hiew, Y-L

    2007-01-01

    a role for E7 in tumour immune evasion. We show that knockdown of E7 expression in HPV16- and HPV18-transformed cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I at the cell surface and reduced susceptibility of these cells to natural...... killer (NK) cells. Tetracycline-regulated induction of HPV16 E7 resulted in reduced expression of cell surface MHC class I molecules and increased NK cell killing. Our results suggest that, for HPV-associated malignancies, reduced MHC class I expression is the result of an active immune evasion strategy...

  16. An evaluation of quasi-Newton methods for application to FSI problems involving free surface flow and solid body contact

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available -surface flow problem with an advancing wave front and a solid-body contact problem. 2 Partitioned FSI Fluid-structure interactions can be defined as a two-field coupled problem, involving a fluid domain Ωf and a solid domain Ωs sharing a common interface ΓFSI...

  17. Imbalanced immune responses involving inflammatory molecules and immune-related pathways in the lung of acute and subchronic arsenic-exposed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Lu; Zhang, Yang; Li, Wei; Duan, Xiaoxu; Chen, Jinli; Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shan; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2017-11-01

    treatment. Conclusively, our present study demonstrated both acute and subchronic oral administration of arsenic triggers multiple pulmonary immune responses involving inflammatory molecules and T-cell differentiation, which might be closely associated with the imbalanced redox status and activation of immune-related MAPKs, NF-κB and anti-inflammatory NRF2 pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diabetic impairment of C-kit bone marrow stem cells involves the disorders of inflammatory factors, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stem cells from diabetes mellitus patients exhibit functional impairment, but the relative molecular mechanisms responsible for this impairment are poorly understood. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for diabetes-related functional impairment of bone marrow stem cells by extensively screening the expression levels of inflammatory factors, cell cycle regulating molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and adhesion molecules. Bone marrow cells were collected from type 2 diabetic (db/db and healthy control (db/m+ mice, and c-kit+ stem cells were purified (purity>85% for experiments. Compared with the healthy control mice, diabetic mice had significantly fewer c-kit+ stem cells, and these cells had a lower potency of endothelial differentiation; however, the production of the angiogenic growth factor VEGF did not differ between groups. A pathway-focused array showed that the c-kit+ stem cells from diabetic mice had up-regulated expression levels of many inflammatory factors, including Tlr4, Cxcl9, Il9, Tgfb1, Il4, and Tnfsf5, but no obvious change in the expression levels of cell cycle molecules. Interestingly, diabetes-related alterations of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules were varied; Pecam, Mmp10, Lamc1, Itgb7, Mmp9, and Timp4 were up-regulated, but Col11a1, Fn1, Admts2, and Itgav were down-regulated. Some of these changes were also confirmed at the protein level by flow cytometry analysis. In conclusion, c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells from diabetic mice exhibited an extensive enhancement of inflammatory factors and disorders of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules. Further intervention studies are required to determine the precise role of each molecule in the diabetes-related functional impairment of c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells.

  19. Quantum chemical investigation of the interaction between a hydrogen molecule and a solid surface using the partitioning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenne, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The partitioning technique is used to investigate the chemisorption of hydrogen. Including non-zero overlap between atomic orbitals the developed formulation of the problem is valid in any LCAO-approximation. Its extension to the problem of chemisorption of other molecules is briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, C K

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complicati...

  1. Conserved surface residues on the feline calicivirus (FCV) capsid are essential for interaction with its receptor feline junctional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengchun; Ledgerwood, Emily D; Hinchman, Meleana M; Dick, Robert; Parker, John S L

    2018-01-31

    Host cell surface receptors are required for attachment, binding, entry and infection by nonenveloped viruses. Receptor binding can induce conformational changes in the viral capsid and/or the receptor that couple binding with downstream events in the viral life cycle (intracellular signaling, endocytosis and trafficking, and membrane penetration). Virus-receptor interactions also influence viral spread and pathogenicity. The interaction between feline calicivirus (FCV) and its receptor feline Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (fJAM-A) on host cells is required for infection and induces irreversible, inactivating conformational changes in the capsid of some viral strains. Cryo-EM structures of FCV bound to fJAM-A showed several possible virus-receptor interactions. However, the specific residues on the viral capsid required for binding are not known. Capsid residues that may be involved in post-binding events have been implicated by isolation of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants in which changes in the capsid protein sequence change the capacity of such srr mutants to be inactivated upon incubation with soluble fJAM-A. To clarify which residues on the surface of FCV are required for its interaction with fJAM-A, and to potentially identify residues required for post-receptor binding events, we used the existing atomic resolution structures of FCV and the FCV-fJAM-A cryo-EM structures to select 14 capsid residues for mutation and preparation of recombinant viral capsids. Using this approach, we identified residues on the FCV capsid that are required for fJAM-A binding and other residues not required for binding, but required for infection that are likely important for subsequent post-binding events. IMPORTANCE Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of mild upper respiratory disease in cats. Some FCV isolates can cause virulent systemic disease. The genetic determinants of virulence for FCV are unknown. We previously found that virulent FCV isolates have

  2. Surprising phenomena at the surface of solids: complex molecule emission after impact of ions or of energetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Beyec, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The vanishing of large mass molecules, by particle or photon impact is an unexpected behavior of the matter which allows to study the medium answer to the interaction. This phenomenon has several applications and gives rise development of analysis scientific instrumentation for non volatile compounds as the time of flight mass spectrometers. - In this report, the point is made about the induced desorption by rapid heavy ions [fr

  3. Charge-controlled fixation of DNA molecules on silicon surface and electro-physical properties of Au–DNA–Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazlov, N.V., E-mail: nikolay.bazlov@gmail.com [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyvenko, O.F.; Sokolov, P.A.; Kas’yanenko, N.A.; Petrov, Yu V. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Light-induced fixation of DNA molecules on silicon surface was done and electro-physical properties of Schottky diodes with DNA on interfaces were investigated. Thymus DNA molecules were deposited on silicon from a water solution. Fixed molecular structures were observed with helium ionic microscopy and atomic force microscopy and then they were covered with thermal sputtered gold film. Obtained structures Au–DNA–(n-Si) were examined with current–voltage and frequency dependent admittance measurements. In darkness immobilizing of molecules leaded to form DNA ropes with thickness up to 10 nm and distances between them about 1 mkm. Fixation under illumination resulted in forming of single DNA mesh with thickness about 1 nm and cell size about 100 nm. Presence of molecular mesh on interface leaded to increasing of charge density controlled by metal Fermi level and improved diode quality. Presence of molecular ropes resulted in increasing of charge density controlled by semiconductor. From the estimation of interface state density values the origin of the states at the interface between DNA and silicon substrate is suggested to be DNA phosphate groups contacting or being close to the substrate surface.

  4. High sensitivity surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of microRNA and small molecule based on graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Qing; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Zhang, Hua; Nie, Wenyan

    2017-11-01

    A versatile and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on two layers of graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (GO-AuNPs) composites was designed for the detection of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecule adenosine. The bottom layer, which acted as a functionalized substrate on the sensor chip, provided a high specific surface area convenient for the immobilization of capture DNA molecules. The upper layer served as a signal-amplification element. By employing these two layers of GO-AuNPs composites, the dual amplification strategy was achieved so that a measurement of miRNA-141 with a detection limit of 0.1fM was obtained. Moreover, the developed SPR biosensor showed decent selectivity toward miRNA-200 family members. Especially, the SPR biosensor demonstrated its applicability for the detection of miRNA-141 in cancer cell extractions, and the results obtained were consistent with those obtained by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, small molecule adenosine could also be detected using this SPR biosensor in combination with a split aptamer. Considering the superior sensitivity, selectivity and generality, this work promised much potential for the detection of various biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating Molecular Properties Involved in Transport of Small Molecules in Stratum Corneum: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship for Skin Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Peng Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The skin permeability (Kp defines the rate of a chemical penetrating across the stratum corneum. This value is widely used to quantitatively describe the transport of molecules in the outermost layer of epidermal skin and indicate the significance of skin absorption. This study defined a Kp quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR based on 106 chemical substances of Kp measured using human skin and interpreted the molecular interactions underlying transport behavior of small molecules in the stratum corneum. The Kp QSAR developed in this study identified four molecular descriptors that described the molecular cyclicity in the molecule reflecting local geometrical environments, topological distances between pairs of oxygen and chlorine atoms, lipophilicity, and similarity to antineoplastics in molecular properties. This Kp QSAR considered the octanol-water partition coefficient to be a direct influence on transdermal movement of molecules. Moreover, the Kp QSAR identified a sub-domain of molecular properties initially defined to describe the antineoplastic resemblance of a compound as a significant factor in affecting transdermal permeation of solutes. This finding suggests that the influence of molecular size on the chemical’s skin-permeating capability should be interpreted with other relevant physicochemical properties rather than being represented by molecular weight alone.

  6. Evaluating Molecular Properties Involved in Transport of Small Molecules in Stratum Corneum: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship for Skin Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Peng; Chen, Chan-Cheng; Huang, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yen-Ching

    2018-04-15

    The skin permeability ( Kp ) defines the rate of a chemical penetrating across the stratum corneum. This value is widely used to quantitatively describe the transport of molecules in the outermost layer of epidermal skin and indicate the significance of skin absorption. This study defined a Kp quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) based on 106 chemical substances of Kp measured using human skin and interpreted the molecular interactions underlying transport behavior of small molecules in the stratum corneum. The Kp QSAR developed in this study identified four molecular descriptors that described the molecular cyclicity in the molecule reflecting local geometrical environments, topological distances between pairs of oxygen and chlorine atoms, lipophilicity, and similarity to antineoplastics in molecular properties. This Kp QSAR considered the octanol-water partition coefficient to be a direct influence on transdermal movement of molecules. Moreover, the Kp QSAR identified a sub-domain of molecular properties initially defined to describe the antineoplastic resemblance of a compound as a significant factor in affecting transdermal permeation of solutes. This finding suggests that the influence of molecular size on the chemical's skin-permeating capability should be interpreted with other relevant physicochemical properties rather than being represented by molecular weight alone.

  7. Electronic energy transfer from molecules to metal and semiconductor surfaces, and chemisorption-induced changes in optical response of the nickel (111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmore, P.M.

    1982-10-01

    The evolution of molecular excited states near solid surfaces is investigated. The mechanisms through which energy is transferred to the surface are described within a classical image dipole picture of the interaction. More sophisticated models for the dielectric response of the solid surface add important new decay channels for the energy dissipation. The predictions and applicability of three of these refined theories are discussed.

  8. Electronic energy transfer from molecules to metal and semiconductor surfaces, and chemisorption-induced changes in optical response of the nickel (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, P.M.

    1982-10-01

    The evolution of molecular excited states near solid surfaces is investigated. The mechanisms through which energy is transferred to the surface are described within a classical image dipole picture of the interaction. More sophisticated models for the dielectric response of the solid surface add important new decay channels for the energy dissipation. The predictions and applicability of three of these refined theories are discussed

  9. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Significance of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Dispersion in the dc and ac Voltammetry of Surface-Confined Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Morris, Graham P.

    2015-05-05

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Commonly, significant discrepancies are reported in theoretical and experimental comparisons of dc voltammograms derived from a monolayer or close to monolayer coverage of redox-active surface-confined molecules. For example, broader-than-predicted voltammetric wave shapes are attributed to the thermodynamic or kinetic dispersion derived from distributions in reversible potentials (E0) and electrode kinetics (k0), respectively. The recent availability of experimentally estimated distributions of E0 and k0 values derived from the analysis of data for small numbers of surface-confined modified azurin metalloprotein molecules now allows more realistic modeling to be undertaken, assuming the same distributions apply under conditions of high surface coverage relevant to voltammetric experiments. In this work, modeling based on conventional and stochastic kinetic theory is considered, and the computationally far more efficient conventional model is shown to be equivalent to the stochastic one when large numbers of molecules are present. Perhaps unexpectedly, when experimentally determined distributions of E0 and k0 are input into the model, thermodynamic dispersion is found to be unimportant and only kinetic dispersion contributes significantly to the broadening of dc voltammograms. Simulations of ac voltammetric experiments lead to the conclusion that the ac method, particularly when the analysis of kinetically very sensitive higher-order harmonics is undertaken, are far more sensitive to kinetic dispersion than the dc method. ac methods are therefore concluded to provide a potentially superior strategy for addressing the inverse problem of determining the k0 distribution that could give rise to the apparent anomalies in surface-confined voltammetry.

  10. In Situ Mapping of the Molecular Arrangement of Amphiphilic Dye Molecules at the TiO 2 Surface of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2015-05-27

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Amphiphilic sensitizers are central to the function of dye-sensitized solar cells. It is known that the cell\\'s performance depends on the molecular arrangement and the density of the dye on the semiconductor surface, but a molecular-level picture of the cell-electrolyte interface is still lacking. Here, we present subnanometer in situ atomic force microscopy images of the Z907 dye at the surface of TiO2 in a relevant liquid. Our results reveal changes in the conformation and the lateral arrangement of the dye molecules, depending on their average packing density on the surface. Complementary quantitative measurements on the ensemble of the film are obtained by the quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation technique. An atomistic picture of the dye coverage-dependent packing, the effectiveness of the hydrophobic alkyl chains as blocking layer, and the solvent accessibility is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. (Figure Presented).

  11. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  12. Manipulating magnetism and conductance of an adatom-molecule junction on a metal surface: An ab initio study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Kun; Stepanyuk, V.S.; Bruno, P.

    2008-01-01

    The state of the art ab initio calculations reveal the effect of a scanning tunneling microscopy tip on magnetic properties and conductance of a benzene-adatom sandwich on Cu(001). We concentrate on a benzene-Co system interacting with a Cr tip. Our studies give a clear evidence that magnetism...... and conductance in molecule-adatom junctions can be tailored by the STM tip. Varying the tip-substrate distance the magnetic moment of the Co adatom can be switched on/off. The interplay between spin-polarized electron transport through the junction and its magnetic properties is demonstrated. A spin...

  13. Molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and epithelial-stromal interaction in phyllodes tumors: implications for histologic grade and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ji Eun; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of molecules associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and epithelial-stromal interactions (ESI) and to evaluate their roles in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were constructed from 207 PT specimens (157 benign, 34 borderline and 16 malignant). The presence of EMT-related markers including N-cadherin, Twist, TGF-beta, HMGA2, S100A4 and Ezrin as well as ESI-related molecules such as SDF1 and CXCR4 among the TMAs was assessed immunohistochemically. Immunohistochemical results were analyzed in terms of clinicopathologic parameters. For higher grade PTs, expressions of Twist (p grade PTs. Further, high expression of Twist in the stromal component was correlated with poorer prognoses.

  14. From Molecules to Surfaces: Radical-Based Mechanisms of Si-S and Si-Se Bond Formation on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buriak, Jillian M; Sikder, Md Delwar H

    2015-08-05

    The derivatization of silicon surfaces can have profound effects on the underlying electronic properties of the semiconductor. In this work, we investigate the radical surface chemistry of silicon with a range of organochalcogenide reagents (comprising S and Se) on a hydride-terminated silicon surface, to cleanly and efficiently produce surface Si-S and Si-Se bonds, at ambient temperature. Using a diazonium-based radical initiator, which induces formation of surface silicon radicals, a group of organochalcogenides were screened for reactivity at room temperature, including di-n-butyl disulfide, diphenyl disulfide, diphenyl diselenide, di-n-butyl sulfide, diphenyl selenide, diphenyl sulfide, 1-octadecanethiol, t-butyl disulfide, and t-butylthiol, which comprises the disulfide, diselenide, thiol, and thioether functionalities. The surface reactions were monitored by transmission mode Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry. Calculation of Si-Hx consumption, a semiquantitative measure of yield of production of surface-bound Si-E bonds (E = S, Se), was carried out via FTIR spectroscopy. Control experiments, sans the BBD diazonium radical initiator, were all negative for any evident incorporation, as determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The functional groups that did react with surface silicon radicals included the dialkyl/diphenyl disulfides, diphenyl diselenide, and 1-octadecanethiol, but not t-butylthiol, diphenyl sulfide/selenide, and di-n-butyl sulfide. Through a comparison with the rich body of literature regarding molecular radicals, and in particular, silyl radicals, reaction mechanisms were proposed for each. Armed with an understanding of the reaction mechanisms, much of the known chemistry within the extensive body of radical-based reactivity has the potential to be harnessed on silicon and could be extended to a range of technologically relevant semiconductor

  15. Using Force to Probe Single-Molecule Receptor-Cytoskeletal Anchoring Beneath the Surface of a Living Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Evan; Kinoshita, Koji

    2007-01-01

    , K. (2005). Nano-to-micro scale dynamics of P-selectin detachment from leukocyte interfaces: I. Separation of PSGL-1 from the cell cytoskeleton. Biophys. J. 88, 2288-2298]. Retracting cells from receptor-surface attachments at many different speeds revealed that the kinetic rate for receptor......The ligation of cell surface receptors often communicates a signal that initiates a cytoplasmic chemical cascade to implement an important cell function. Less well understood is how physical stress applied to a cell surface adhesive bond propagates throughout the cytostructure to catalyze...... or trigger important steps in these chemical processes. Probing the nanoscale impact of pulling on cell surface bonds, we discovered that receptors frequently detach prematurely from the interior cytostructure prior to failure of the exterior adhesive bond [Evans, E., Heinrich, V., Leung, A., and Kinoshita...

  16. A chemokine self-presentation mechanism involving formation of endothelial surface microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittall, Catherine; Kehoe, Oksana; King, Sophie; Rot, Antal; Patterson, Angela; Middleton, Jim

    2013-02-15

    Endothelial surface microstructures have been described previously under inflammatory conditions; however, they remain ill-characterized. In this study, CXCL8, an inflammatory chemokine, was shown to induce the formation of filopodia-like protrusions on endothelial cells; the same effects were observed with CXCL10 and CCL5. Chemokines stimulated filopodia formation by both microvascular (from bone marrow and skin) and macrovascular (from human umbilical vein) endothelial cells. Use of blocking Abs and degradative enzymes demonstrated that CXCL8-stimulated filopodia formation was mediated by CXCR1 and CXCR2, Duffy Ag/receptor for chemokines, heparan sulfate (HS), and syndecans. HS was present on filopodial protrusions appearing as a meshwork on the cell surface, which colocalized with CXCL8, and this glycosaminoglycan was 2,6-O- and 3-O-sulfated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that CXCL8-stimulated filopodial and microvilli-like protrusions that interacted with leukocytes before transendothelial migration and removal of HS reduced this migration. iTRAQ mass spectrometry showed that changes in the levels of cytoskeletal, signaling, and extracellular matrix proteins were associated with CXCL8-stimulated filopodia/microvilli formation; these included tropomyosin, fascin, and Rab7. This study suggests that chemokines stimulate endothelial filopodia and microvilli formation, leading to their presentation to leukocytes and leukocyte transendothelial migration.

  17. Coaggregation of the T-cell receptor with CD4 and other T-cell surface molecules enhances T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B; Miller, J F

    1987-01-01

    and the TCR to stabilize TCR complexes and so to enhance T-cell activation. A related but less specific accessory role for other T-cell surface molecules is also suggested. We propose that the cellular interaction that leads to physiological T-cell activation not only achieves TCR ligation but also promotes......The CD4 molecule, expressed by T cells restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, is believed to play a role in T-cell activation. We have previously suggested that CD4 interacts with the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR) and with class II MHC and that this dual...... interaction stabilizes the bond between the TCR and antigen in association with MHC. To investigate the contribution of CD4-TCR interaction, we have used the murine monoclonal anti-TCR V beta 8 antibody F23.1 to activate cloned T cells. Weak activation by soluble biotinylated F23.1 was markedly enhanced...

  18. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  19. Characterization of Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers and Surface-Attached Interlocking Molecules Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, T; Willey, T

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of the fundamental structure and substrate binding, as well as the direct measurement of conformational changes, are essential to the development of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and surface-attached interlocking molecules, catenanes and rotaxanes. These monolayers are vital to development of nano-mechanical, molecular electronic, and biological/chemical sensor applications. This dissertation investigates properties of functionalized SAMs in sulfur-gold based adsorbed molecular monolayers using quantitative spectroscopic techniques including near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stability of the gold-thiolate interface is addressed. A simple model SAM consisting of dodecanethiol adsorbed on Au(111) degrades significantly in less than 24 hours under ambient laboratory air. S 2p and O 1s XPS show the gold-bound thiolates oxidize to sulfinates and sulfonates. A reduction of organic material on the surface and a decrease in order are observed as the layer degrades. The effect of the carboxyl vs. carboxylate functionalization on SAM structure is investigated. Carboxyl-terminated layers consisting of long alkyl-chain thiols vs. thioctic acid with short, sterically separated, alkyl groups are compared and contrasted. NEXAFS shows a conformational change, or chemical switchability, with carboxyl groups tilted over and carboxylate endgroups more upright. Surface-attached loops and simple surface-attached rotaxanes are quantitatively characterized, and preparation conditions that lead to desired films are outlined. A dithiol is often insufficient to form a molecular species bound at each end to the substrate, while a structurally related disulfide-containing polymer yields surface-attached loops. Similarly, spectroscopic techniques show the successful production of a simple, surface-attached rotaxane that requires a ''molecular riveting'' step to hold the mechanically attached

  20. The Adsorption Geometry and Electronic Structure of Organic Dye Molecule on TiO2(101 Surface from First Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Mang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using density functional theory (DFT, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs comprised of I-doped anatase TiO2(101 surface sensitized with NKX-2554 dye. The calculation results indicate that the cyanoacrylic acid anchoring group in NKX-2554 has a strong binding to the TiO2(101 surface. The dissociative and bidentate bridging type was found to be the most favorable adsorption configuration. On the other hand, the incorporations of I dopant can reduce the band gap of TiO2 photoanode and improve the of NKX-2554 dye, which can improve the visible-light absorption of anatase TiO2 and can also facilitate the electron injection from the dye molecule to the TiO2 substrate. As a result, the I doping can significantly enhance the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE of DSSCs.

  1. Studies of the mechanisms involved in the laser surface hardening process of aluminum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luciana Ventavele da

    2011-01-01

    The Al-Si alloys are widely used in industry to replace the steel and gray cast iron in high-tech sectors. The commercial importance of these alloys is mainly due to its low weight, excellent wear (abrasion) and corrosion resistance, high resistance at elevated temperatures, low coefficient of thermal expansion and lesser fuel consumption that provide considerable reduction of emission of pollutants. In this work, Al-Si alloy used in the automotive industry to manufacture pistons of internal combustion engines, was undergone to surface treatments using LASER remelting (Nd:YAG, λ = 1.06 μm, pulsed mode). The LASER enables various energy concentrations with accurate transfer to the material without physical contact. The intense energy transfer causes the occurrence of structural changes in the superficial layer of the material. Experiments with single pulses and trails were conducted under various conditions of LASER processing in order to analyze microstructural changes resulting from treatments and their effects on the hardness. For the characterization of hardened layer was utilized the following techniques: optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray mapping, Vickers microhardness and maximum roughness tests. The high cooling rate caused a change in the alloy structure due to the refinement of the primary eutectic silicon particles, resulting in increase of the mechanical properties (hardness) of the Al-Si alloy. (author)

  2. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, part II: Grafting of polyphenols extracted from grape skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenols, as one of the most important family of phytochemicals protective substances from grape fruit, possess various biological activities and health-promoting benefits, for example: inhibition of some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, reduction of plasma oxidative stress and slowing aging. The combination of polyphenols and biomaterials may have good potential to reach good bioavailability and controlled release, as well as to give biological signaling properties to the biomaterial surfaces. In this research, conventional solvent extraction was developed for obtaining polyphenols from dry grape skins. The Folin&Ciocalteu method was used to determine the amount of total polyphenols in the extracts. Surface functionalization of two bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2) was performed by grafting the extracted polyphenols on their surfaces. The effectiveness of the functionalization was tested by UV spectroscopy, which analyzes the amount of polyphenols in the uptake solution (before and after functionalization) and on solid samples, and XPS, which analyzes the presence of phenols on the material surface.

  3. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  4. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  5. Vibrational analysis of pyramidal XY3-type molecules based on high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces: application to NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Thiel, W.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Carvajal, M.; Jensen, P.

    Variational calculations of the vibrational energies of the non-rigid and semirigid XY3 molecules, as ammonia and phosphine respectively, have been carried out [1,2]. In the procedure used is emphasized the umbrella motion due to the corresponding coordinate, for pyramidal non-rigid XY3 molecules, is the responsible of the torsional tunneling between different minima of the Potential Energy Surfaces. For the NH3 analytical potential energy surfaces were constructed from CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio data augmented by the results obtained by extrapolating CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVXZ (X=T,Q,5) results to the complete basis set limit and adding corrections for core-valence correlation and relativistic effects. The vibrational energies were calculated by employing a kinetic energy operator expressed in terms of linearized internal coordinates. The exact internal coordinates were expressed as sixth-order Taylor expansions in the linearized coordinates. In the present work we show the latter improvement in the calculated vibrational energies with respect to the latter report [1]. This work is supported by the European Commission through contract no. HPRN-CT-2000-00022 ``Spectroscopy of Highly Excited Rovibrational States''.

  6. Density functional theory modeling of the adsorption of small analyte and indicator dye 9-(diphenylamino)acridine molecules on the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Rykova, Elena; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2011-01-28

    The adsorption of small analyte molecules (H(2)O, NH(3), C(2)H(5)OH, and (CH(3))(2)CO) and an indicator dye, 9-(diphenylamino)acridine (DPAA), on the surface of amorphous silica particles is studied using electronic structure calculations at the DFT-D level of theory taking into account explicit corrections for van der Waals forces. Cluster models of three different types are used; two of them have been constructed using classical MD methods. The effect of particle size, local environment, and the choice of the exchange-correlation functional and basis set on the adsorption energies is studied, and adsorption energies are extrapolated to nanosized clusters. It is shown that the dye is more strongly bound to amorphous silica particles than the studied analyte molecules and that the energy of DPAA adsorption increases with the particle size, being at least twice as high as the energy of analyte adsorption for nanosized clusters. Electrostatic interactions play an important role in the adsorption of acridine dyes on the surface of silica nanoparticles.

  7. Modeling Nonreactive Molecule-Surface Systems on Experimentally Relevant Time and Length Scales: Dynamics and Conductance of Polyfluorene on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Franco, Ignacio

    2018-03-01

    We propose a computationally efficient strategy to accurately model nonreactive molecule-surface interactions that adapts density functional theory calculations with the Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme for van der Waals interactions into a simple classical force field. The resulting force field requires just two adjustable parameters per atom type that are needed to capture short-range and polarization interactions. The developed strategy allows for classical molecular dynamics simulation of molecules on surfaces with the accuracy of high-level electronic structure methods but for system sizes (10 3 to 10 7 atoms) and timescales (picoseconds to microseconds) that go well beyond what can be achieved with first-principles methods. Parameters for H, sp 2 C, and O on Au(111) are developed and employed to atomistically model experiments that measure the conductance of a single polyfluorene on Au(111) as a continuous function of its length. The simulations qualitatively capture both the gross and fine features of the observed conductance decay during initial junction elongation and lead to a revised atomistic understanding of the experiment.

  8. Are the surface areas of the gills and body involved with changing metabolic scaling with temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge; Lv, Xiao; Zhou, Jing; Shen, Cong; Xia, Danyang; Xie, Hang; Luo, Yiping

    2018-03-20

    The metabolic-level boundaries (MLB) hypothesis proposes that metabolic level mediates the relative influence of surface area (SA) vs volume related metabolic processes on the body-mass scaling of metabolic rate in organisms. The variation in the scaling of SA may affect how metabolic level affects the metabolic scaling exponent. This study aimed to determine the influence of increasing metabolic level at a higher temperature on the metabolic scaling exponent of the crucian carp and determine the link between metabolic scaling exponents and SA parameters of both gills and body. The SA of gills and body and the resting metabolic rate (RMR) of the crucian carp were assessed at 15 o C and 25 o C, and their mass scaling exponents were analyzed. The results showed a significantly higher RMR, with a lower scaling exponent, in the crucian carp at a higher temperature. The gills SA and the total SA of the fish (TSA) are reduced with the increasing temperature. The b RMR tends to be close to that of the TSA at a higher temperature. This suggests that temperature positively affects metabolic level but negatively affects the scaling exponent of RMR ( b RMR ). The findings support the MLB hypothesis. The lower scaling exponent at a higher temperature can be alternatively explained as that the higher viscosity of cold water impedes respiratory ventilation and oxygen uptake and reduces MR more in smaller individuals than in larger individuals at lower temperature, thus resulting in a negative association between temperature and b RMR . © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Dengue Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells, but Not Monocytes, Activate Natural Killer Cells through a Contact-Dependent Mechanism Involving Adhesion Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos; Ye, Weijian; Chen, Qingfeng; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Preiser, Peter; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a protective role against dengue virus (DENV) infection, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Using an optimized humanized mouse model, we show that human NK cells, through the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), are critical in the early defense against DENV infection. Depletion of NK cells or neutralization of IFN-γ leads to increased viremia and more severe thrombocytopenia and liver damage in humanized mice. In vitro studies using autologous human NK cells show that DENV-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs), but not monocytes, activate NK cells in a contact-dependent manner, resulting in upregulation of CD69 and CD25 and secretion of IFN-γ. Blocking adhesion molecules (LFA-1, DNAM-1, CD2, and 2β4) on NK cells abolishes NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, and the control of DENV replication. NK cells activated by infected MDDCs also inhibit DENV infection in monocytes. These findings show the essential role of human NK cells in protection against acute DENV infection in vivo , identify adhesion molecules and dendritic cells required for NK cell activation, and delineate the sequence of events for NK cell activation and protection against DENV infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease with a range of symptoms, from mild fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. The diverse disease manifestation is thought to result from a complex interplay between viral and host factors. Using mice engrafted with a human immune system, we show that human NK cells inhibit virus infection through secretion of the cytokine gamma interferon and reduce disease pathogenesis, including depletion of platelets and liver damage. During a natural infection, DENV initially infects dendritic cells in the skin. We find that NK cells interact with infected dendritic cells through physical contact mediated by adhesion molecules and become activated before they can control

  10. Quantum-kinetic modeling of electron release in low-energy surface collisions of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marbach, Johannes

    2012-09-20

    In this work we present a theoretical description of electron release in the collision of atomic and molecular projectiles with metallic and especially dielectric surfaces. The associated electron yield, the secondary electron emission coefficient, is an important input parameter for numerical simulations of dielectric barrier discharges and other bounded low-temperature gas discharges. The available reference data for emission coefficients is, however, very sparse and often uncertain, especially for molecular projectiles. With the present work we aim to contribute to the filling of these gaps by providing a flexible and easy-to-use model that allows for a convenient calculation of the emission coefficient and related quantities for a wide range of projectile-surface systems and the most dominant reaction channels.

  11. A novel role for small molecule glycomimetics in the protection against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction: Involvement of Akt/eNOS and Nrf2/ARE signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ayman M; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Jones, Alan M; Wilkinson, James A; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan; Alexander, M Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Glycomimetics are a diverse array of saccharide-inspired compounds, designed to mimic the bioactive functions of glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, glycomimetics represent a unique source of novel therapies to target aberrant signaling and protein interactions in a wide range of diseases. We investigated the protective effects of four newly synthesized small molecule glycomimetics against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction, with an emphasis on nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress. Four aromatic sugar mimetics were synthesized by the stepwise transformation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid to derivatives (C1-C4) incorporating sulfate groups to mimic the structure of heparan sulfate. Glycomimetic-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to palmitic acid to model lipid-induced oxidative stress. Palmitate-induced impairment of NO production was restored by the glycomimetics, through activation of Akt/eNOS signaling. Furthermore, C1-C4 significantly inhibited palmitate-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and activity and expression of NADPH oxidase. These effects were attributed to activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway and downstream activation of cellular antioxidant and cytoprotective proteins. In ex vivo vascular reactivity studies, the glycomimetics (C1-C4) also demonstrated a significant improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreased ROS production and NADPH oxidase activity in isolated mouse thoracic aortic rings exposed to palmitate. The small molecule glycomimetics, C1-C4, protect against lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction through up-regulation of Akt/eNOS and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Thus, carbohydrate-derived therapeutics are a new class of glycomimetic drugs targeting endothelial dysfunction, regarded as the first line of defense against vascular complications in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of beta-amino acid transport by diamide does not involve the brush border membrane surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesney, R.W.; Gusowski, N.; Albright, P.

    1985-01-01

    Diamide (dicarboxylic acid bis-(N,N-dimethylamide) has been shown in previous studies to block the uptake of the beta-amino acid taurine at its high affinity transport site in rat renal cortex slices. Diamide may act by increasing the efflux of taurine from the slice. Studies performed in rat slices again indicate enhanced efflux over 8-12 minutes. The time course of reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion from renal cortex is similar, indicating a potential interaction between GSH depletion and inhibition of taurine accumulation. The effect of 9 mM diamide on the Na+ -dependent accumulation of taurine (10 and 250 microM) by brush border membrane vesicles was examined, and the taurine uptake value both initially and at equilibrium was the same in the presence and absence of diamide. Isolation of the brush border surface and subsequent transport studies of taurine are not influenced by diamide. Thus, diamide inhibition of taurine uptake does not involve physiochemical alteration of the membrane surface where active amino acid transport occurs, despite the thiol-oxidizing properties of this agent. Further, these studies suggest that diamide either acts at the basolateral surface, rather than the brush border surface of rat renal cortex or requires the presence of an intact tubule, capable of metabolism, prior to its inhibitory action

  13. ΔM/sub j/ transitions in homonuclear molecule scattering off corrugated surfaces. Square and rectangular lattice symmetry and purely repulsive interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, T.R.; Kouri, D.J.; Gerber, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first formal and computational studies of Δm/sub j/ transitions occurring in homonuclear molecule-corrugated surface collisions. The model potential is a pairwise additive one which correctly incorporates the fact that Δm/sub j/ transitions occur only for corrugated surfaces (provided the quantization axis is chosen to be the average surface normal). The principal results are: (a) Δm/sub j/ transitions are extremely sensitive to lattice symmetry; (b) strong selection rules obtain for specular scattering; (c) the magnitude of Δm/sub j/ -transition probabilities are strongly sensitive to surface corrugation; (d) the Δm/sub j/ transitions depend strongly on diffraction peak; (e) the ratio of molecular length to lattice dimension (r/a) has a strong influence on the magnitude of Δm/sub j/ -transition probabilities [with the probabilities increasing as (r/a) increases]; (f) Δm/sub j/ rainbows are predicted to occur as a function of the (r/a) ratio increases; (g) Δm/sub j/ transitions and the Δm/sub j/ rainbow are expected to accompany Δj-rotational rainbows; (h) such magnetic transition rainbows accompanying Δj rainbows are suggested as an explanation of recent experimental observations of quenching of NO polarization for larger Δj transitions in NO/Ag(111) scattering

  14. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  15. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  16. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  17. Dynamical Orientation of Large Molecules on Oxide Surfaces and its Implications for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-12

    A dual experimental-computational approach utilizing near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) is presented for determining the orientation of a large adsorbate on an oxide substrate. A system of interest in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells is studied: an organic cyanoacrylic acid-based donor-π-acceptor dye (WN1) bound to anatase TiO2. Assessment of nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra is supported by calculations of the electronic structure that indicate energetically discrete transitions associated with the two π systems of the C-N triple bond in the cyanoacrylic acid portion of the dye. Angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra are fitted to determine the orientation of these two orbital systems, and the results indicate an upright orientation of the adsorbed dye, 63 from the TiO2 surface plane. These experimental results are then compared to computational studies of the WN1 dye on an anatase (101) TiO2 slab. The ground state structure obtained from standard DFT optimization is less upright (45 from the surface) than the NEXAFS results. However, DFT-MD simulations, which provide a more realistic depiction of the dye at room temperature, exhibit excellent agreement - within 2 on average - with the angles determined via NEXAFS, demonstrating the importance of accounting for the dynamic nature of adsorbate-substrate interactions and DFT-MD\\'s powerful predictive abilities. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck following ligation of the tumor-associated cell surface molecule A6H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labuda, T; Gerwien, J; Ødum, Niels

    1999-01-01

    and the TCR-CD3 complex takes place and which signaling pathway might be involved. Here we show that ligation of the A6H antigen with mAb induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lck protein tyrosine kinase (PTK). Co-ligation of the A6H antigen with CD3 resulted in augmented Lck phosphorylation and mitogenesis....... In addition, A6H ligation induced an up-regulation of CD3-mediated phosphorylation of the 23 kDa high mol. wt form of TCR zeta and the zeta-associated protein, ZAP-70. Co-precipitation of Lck and ZAP-70 was only seen in T cells activated by combined A6H and anti-CD3 stimulation. In contrast, another Src...... family PTK, Fyn, was not affected by A6H ligation. In conclusion, we now demonstrate, for the first time, that A6H ligation triggers Lck phosphorylation, and that cross-talk between A6H and the TCR-CD3 complex involves Lck, ZAP-70 and the slow migrating isoform of TCR zeta. These results further suggests...

  19. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  20. Evidence of a rearrangement of the surface structure in titanium phthalocyanine sensors induced by the interaction with nitrogen oxides molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generosi, A.; Paci, B.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Perfetti, P.; Paoletti, A.M.; Pennesi, G.; Rossi, G.; Caminiti, R.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film samples of titanium phthalocyanine, a sensor of environmental pollutants, were studied by time resolved energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity (EDXR). This original method demonstrated to be an ideal tool to follow the evolution of the films morphology upon gas exposure, in situ, also allowing an unexpected response of the sensors to be detected. Indeed, while the increase in thickness showed the characteristic feature of a 'breathing-like' expansion, already observed in other metal-Pc, the curve of roughness versus exposure time exhibited a peak. This effect, in some cases evident by observation with the naked eye the EDXR data, was attributed to a surface structure rearrangement process

  1. Renner-Teller effect in linear tetra-atomic molecules. I. Variational method including couplings between all degrees of freedom on six-dimensional potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutier, L.; Léonard, C.; Gatti, F.

    2009-04-01

    For electronically degenerate states of linear tetra-atomic molecules, a new method is developed for the variational treatment of the Renner-Teller and spin-orbit couplings. The approach takes into account all rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, the dominant couplings between the corresponding angular momenta as well as the couplings with the electronic and electron spin angular momenta. The complete rovibrational kinetic energy operator is expressed in Jacobi coordinates, where the rovibrational angular momenta ĴN have been replaced by L̂ez-Ŝ and the spin-orbit coupling has been described by the perturbative term ASO×L̂ezṡŜz. Attention has been paid on the electronic wave functions, which require additional phase for linear tetra-atomic molecules. Our implemented rovibrational basis functions and the integration of the different parts of the total Hamiltonian operator are described. This new variational approach is tested on the electronic ground state X Π2u of HCCH+ for which new six-dimensional potential energy surfaces have been computed using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and the cc-pV5Z basis set. The calculated rovibronic energies and their comparisons with previous theoretical and experimental works are presented in the next paper.

  2. Differentiation of MCF-7 tumor cells from leukocytes and fibroblast cells using epithelial cell adhesion molecule targeted multicore surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Isabel; Matthäus, Christian; Csaki, Andrea; Clement, Joachim H.; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Identification of tumor and normal cells is a promising application of Raman spectroscopy. The throughput of Raman-assisted cell sorting is limited by low sensitivity. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a well-recognized candidate to increase the intensity of Raman signals of cells. First, different strategies are summarized to detect tumor cells using targeted SERS probes. Then, a protocol is described to prepare multicore-SERS-labels (MSLs) by aggregating gold nanoparticles, coating with a reporter molecule and a thin silver shell to further boost enhancement, encapsulating with a stable silica layer, and functionalizing by epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies. Raman, dark field and fluorescence microscopy proved the specific and nonspecific binding of functionalized and nonfunctionalized MSLs to MCF-7 tumor cells, leukocytes from blood, and nontransformed human foreskin fibroblasts. Raman imaging and dark field microscopy indicated no uptake of MSLs, yet binding to the cellular membrane. Viability tests were performed with living tumor cells to demonstrate the low toxicity of MSL-EpCAM. The SERS signatures were detected from cells with exposure times down to 25 ms at 785-nm laser excitation. The prospects of these MSLs in multiplex assays, for enumeration and sorting of circulating tumor cells in microfluidic chips, are discussed.

  3. Surface Adsorption Energetics Studied with "Gold Standard" Wavefunction Based Ab Initio Methods: Small Molecule Binding to TiO2(110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, Adam M; Berger, Daniel; Oberhofer, Harald; Maganas, Dimitrios; Reuter, Karsten; Neese, Frank

    2016-10-03

    Coupled cluster theory with single, double and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) is widely considered to be the 'gold standard' of ab initio quantum chemistry. Using the domain-based pair natural orbital local correlation concept (DLPNO-CCSD(T)), these calculations can be performed on systems with hundreds of atoms at an accuracy of about 99.9% of the canonical CCSD(T) method. This allows for ab initio calculations providing reference adsorption energetics at solid surfaces with an accuracy approaching 1 kcal/mol. This is an invaluable asset, not least for the assessment of density-functional theory (DFT) as the prevalent approach for large-scale production calculations in energy or catalysis applications. Here we use DLPNO-CCSD(T) with embedded cluster models to compute entire adsorbate potential energy surfaces for the binding of a set of prototypical closed-shell molecules (H2O, NH3, CH4, CH3OH, CO2) to the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The DLPNO-CCSD(T) calculations show excellent agreement with available experimental data, even for the 'infamous' challenge of correctly predicting the CO2 adsorption geometry. The numerical efficiency of the approach is within one order of magnitude of hybrid-level DFT calculations, hence blurring the borders between reference and production technique.

  4. TLR accessory molecule RP105 (CD180 is involved in post-interventional vascular remodeling and soluble RP105 modulates neointima formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco C Karper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RP105 (CD180 is TLR4 homologue lacking the intracellular TLR4 signaling domain and acts a TLR accessory molecule and physiological inhibitor of TLR4-signaling. The role of RP105 in vascular remodeling, in particular post-interventional remodeling is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: TLR4 and RP105 are expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC as well as in the media of murine femoral artery segments as detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the response to the TLR4 ligand LPS was stronger in VSMC from RP105(-/- mice resulting in a higher proliferation rate. In RP105(-/- mice femoral artery cuff placement resulted in an increase in neointima formation as compared to WT mice (4982 ± 974 µm(2 vs.1947 ± 278 µm(2,p = 0.0014. Local LPS application augmented neointima formation in both groups, but in RP105(-/- mice this effect was more pronounced (10316±1243 µm(2 vs.4208 ± 555 µm(2,p = 0.0002, suggesting a functional role for RP105. For additional functional studies, the extracellular domain of murine RP105 was expressed with or without its adaptor protein MD1 and purified. SEC-MALSanalysis showed a functional 2∶2 homodimer formation of the RP105-MD1 complex. This protein complex was able to block the TLR4 response in whole blood ex-vivo. In vivo gene transfer of plasmid vectors encoding the extracellular part of RP105 and its adaptor protein MD1 were performed to initiate a stable endogenous soluble protein production. Expression of soluble RP105-MD1 resulted in a significant reduction in neointima formation in hypercholesterolemic mice (2500 ± 573 vs.6581 ± 1894 µm(2,p<0.05, whereas expression of the single factors RP105 or MD1 had no effect. CONCLUSION: RP105 is a potent inhibitor of post-interventional neointima formation.

  5. Lifestyle intervention up-regulates gene and protein levels of molecules involved in insulin signaling in the endometrium of overweight/obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, D; Hulchiy, M; Calaby, A; Nybacka, Å; Byström, B; Hirschberg, A L

    2014-07-01

    Does lifestyle intervention aiming at weight loss influence endometrial insulin signaling in overweight/obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Lifestyle intervention up-regulates, both at the mRNA and protein levels, components of insulin signaling in the endometrium of overweight/obese PCOS women, in relation to an improved menstrual pattern. PCOS is a multifactorial endocrine disorder diagnosed by two of the following three criteria: chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries. Many women with PCOS also have insulin resistance and obesity. The syndrome is furthermore associated with endometrial cancer and possible alterations in endometrial function and receptivity. This study assessed the effects of a combined diet and exercise lifestyle intervention for 3 months. A group of 20 overweight/obese PCOS women with anovulation, hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries were subjected to a combined diet and exercise program for 3 months. Ten body mass index (BMI)-matched regularly menstruating overweight/obese controls, nine normal-weight PCOS women and ten normal-weight controls were also included in the study. In an academic clinical setting, women were examined in mid-follicular phase for endocrine assessment and determination of endometrial levels of mRNA and immunohistochemical staining of insulin signaling molecules (the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) and glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and 4). Women with PCOS exhibited lower levels of IRS1 (P PCOS. Levels of IRS1 (P PCOS following lifestyle intervention improves the glucose homeostasis and thereby restores the functioning of the endometrium in these women. This study was supported financially by the Swedish Research Council (A.L.H., 20324), Karolinska Institutet and the Stockholm County Council. None of the authors has any conflict of interest to declare.

  6. Synthesis, solubilization, and surface functionalization of highly fluorescent quantum dots for cellular targeting through a small molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Justin F.

    To achieve long-term fluorescence imaging with quantum dots (QDs), a CdSe core/shell must first be synthesized. The synthesis of bright CdSe QDs is not trivial and as a consequence, the role of surfactant in nucleation and growth was investigated. It was found that the type of surfactant used, either phosphonic or fatty acid, played a pivotal role in the size of the CdSe core. The study of surfactant on CdSe synthesis, ultimately led to an electrical passivation method that utilized a short-chained phosphonic acid and highly reactive organometallic precursors to achieve high quantum yield (QY) as has been previously described. The synthesis of QDs using organometallic precursors and a phosphonic acid for passivation resulted in 4 out of 9 batches of QDs achieving QYs greater than 50% and 8 out of 9 batches with QYs greater than 35%. The synthesis of CdSe QDs was done in organic solutions rendering the surface of the particle hydrophobic. To perform cell-targeting experiments, QDs must be transferred to water. The transfer of QDs to water was successfully accomplished by using single acyl chain lipids. A systematic study of different lipid combinations and coatings demonstrated that 20-40 mol% single acyl chained lipids were able to transfer QDs to water resulting in monodispersed, stable QDs without adversely affecting the QY. The advantage to water solubilization using single acyl chain lipids is that the QD have a hydrodynamic radius less than 15 nm, QYs that can exceed 50% and additional surface functionalization can be down using the reactive sites incorporated into the lipid bilayer. QDs that are bright and stable in water were studied for the purpose of targeting G protein-coupled Receptors (GPCR). GPCRs are transmembrane receptors that internalize extracellular cues, and thus mediate signal transduction. The cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Receptor 1 of the model organism Dictyostelium disodium was the receptor of interest. The Halo protein, a genetically

  7. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, A.L.; Cubellis, M.V.; Masucci, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    , and therefore the capacity of cells to migrate and invade neighboring tissues. We have isolated a 1.4 kb cDNA clone coding for the entire human uPAR. An oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein was used to screen a cDNA library made from SV40 transformed human......, a size very close to that of the cloned cDNA. Expression of the uPAR cDNA in mouse cells confirms that the clone is complete and expresses a functional uPA binding protein, located on the cell surface and with properties similar to the human uPAR. Caseinolytic plaque assay, immunofluorescence analysis...... fibroblasts [Okayama and Berg (1983) Mol. Cell Biol., 3, 280-289]. The cDNA encodes a protein of 313 amino acids, preceded by a 21 residue signal peptide. A hydrophobicity plot suggests the presence of a membrane spanning domain close to the C-terminus. The cDNA hybridizes to a 1.4 kb mRNA from human cells...

  8. A study on the influence of surface active agent molecules on the AFM scanning and imaging of SWCNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Ke; Yu Haibo; Tian Xiaojun; Dong Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wu Chengdong [Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)], E-mail: xuke08@sia.cn

    2009-09-01

    The paper proposed a preprocessing method for scanning samples based on rinsing technology, and solved the effective fabrication problem of AFM scanning samples based on facilitated dispersing SWCNTs with SDS surface active agents. First, the ultrasonication oscillation method was applied, and the uniform alignment of SWCNTs in SDS was realized. Then, SDS solution of different concentrations was scanned and imaged with AFM, the influence of SDS solution on the imaging quality of SWCNTs was analyzed, and the method to effectively fabricate scanning samples after dispersing SWCNTs was found. The results of the experiments showed that the preprocessing of the SWCNTs solution scanning samples was the decisive factor to influence SWCNTs imaging quality, that the result of rinsing SWCNTs scanning samples for 5s at 0.1ml/s with di-ionized water was the best, and that with the same rinsing rate and angle, the rinsing di-ionized water quantity would influence the alignment degree of SWCNTs on the substrates and SDS macromolecules' residual quantity on SWCNTs scanning samples.

  9. A study on the influence of surface active agent molecules on the AFM scanning and imaging of SWCNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ke; Yu Haibo; Tian Xiaojun; Dong Zaili; Wu Chengdong

    2009-01-01

    The paper proposed a preprocessing method for scanning samples based on rinsing technology, and solved the effective fabrication problem of AFM scanning samples based on facilitated dispersing SWCNTs with SDS surface active agents. First, the ultrasonication oscillation method was applied, and the uniform alignment of SWCNTs in SDS was realized. Then, SDS solution of different concentrations was scanned and imaged with AFM, the influence of SDS solution on the imaging quality of SWCNTs was analyzed, and the method to effectively fabricate scanning samples after dispersing SWCNTs was found. The results of the experiments showed that the preprocessing of the SWCNTs solution scanning samples was the decisive factor to influence SWCNTs imaging quality, that the result of rinsing SWCNTs scanning samples for 5s at 0.1ml/s with di-ionized water was the best, and that with the same rinsing rate and angle, the rinsing di-ionized water quantity would influence the alignment degree of SWCNTs on the substrates and SDS macromolecules' residual quantity on SWCNTs scanning samples.

  10. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  11. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  12. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  13. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India); Upadhyay, Daya S. [Laboratory Animals Services, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Sitapur Road, Lucknow (India); Sultana, Sarwat [Dept. Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Krishna P., E-mail: krishnag522@yahoo.co.in [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India)

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  14. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  15. Ligand-induced association of surface immunoglobulin with the detergent insoluble cytoskeleton may involve an 89K protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Woda, B.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane immunoglobulin of B-lymphocytes is thought to play an important role in antigen recognition and cellular activation. Binding of cross-linking ligands to surface immunoglobulin (SIg) on intact cells converts it to a detergent insoluble state, and this conversion is associated with the transmission of a mitogenic signal. Insolubilized membrane proteins may be solubilized by incubating the detergent insoluble cytoskeletons in buffers which convert F-actin to G-actin [(Buffer 1), 0.34M sucrose, 0.5mM ATP, 0.5mM Dithiothrietol and lmM EDTA]. Immunoprecipitation of SIg from the detergent soluble fraction of 35 S-methionine labeled non ligand treated rat B-cells results in the co-isolation of an 89K protein and a 44K protein, presumably actin. The 89K protein is not associated with the fraction of endogenous detergent insoluble SIg. On treatment of rat B cells with cross-linking ligand (anti-Ig) the 89K protein becomes detergent insoluble along with most of the SIg and co-isolates with SIg on immunoprecipitation of the detergent insoluble, buffer l solubilized fraction. The migration of the SIg-associated 89K protein from the detergent soluble fraction to the detergent insoluble fraction after ligand treatment, suggests that this protein might be involved in linking SIg to the underlying cytoskeleton and could be involved in the transmission of a mitogenic signal

  16. The synthesis of four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver core-shell nanomushroom with inbuilt Raman molecule for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jun

    2017-12-01

    A facial two-step reduction method was proposed to synthesize four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver (Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag) core-shell nanomushrooms (NMs) with inbuilt Raman molecule. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of 4MBA adhered on the surface of Au core gradually increased with the modification of middle Ag shell and then Ag mushroom cap due to the formation of two kinds of ultra-small interior nanogap. Compared with the initial Au nanoparticles, the SERS enhancement ratio of the Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag NMs approached to nearly 40. The novel core-shell NMs also exhibited homogeneous SERS signals for only one sample and reproducible signals for 10 different samples, certified by the low relative standard deviation values of less than 10% and 15% for the character peaks of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, respectively. Such a novel four-layer core-shell nanostructure with reliable SERS performance has great potential application in quantitative SERS-based immunoassay.

  17. FRET structure with non-radiative acceptor provided by dye-linker-glass surface complex and single-molecule photodynamics by TIRFM-polarized imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Mashimo, Kei; Suzuki, Tetsu; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Oda, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    We present our recent study of microscopic single-molecule imaging on the artificial complex of tetramethylrhodamine linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface, i.e. an asymmetric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structure with non-radiative acceptor. In the synthesis of the complex, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers to introduce rather small photodynamic difference among them. This isomeric structure change will provide more or less a distinctive photophysical change in e.g. non-radiative relaxation rate. Our recent observation at room temperatures, so far, shows that such contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the fluorescent spot intensities; broad but distinctive multi-components appear. To identify the isomeric difference as a cause of structures, some configurational assumptions are necessary. One such basic prerequisite is that the transition dipoles of the chromophores should be oriented almost parallel to the glass surface. In order to make clear the modeling, we also provide preliminary experiments on the polarization dependence of the imaging under rotating polarization in epi-illumination

  18. Hypercrosslinked large surface area porous polymer monoliths for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography of small molecules featuring zwitterionic functionalities attached to gold nanoparticles held in layered structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongqin; Lin, Zhixing; Svec, Frantisek

    2012-10-16

    A novel approach to porous polymer monoliths hypercrosslinked to obtain large surface areas and modified with zwitterionic functionalities through the attachment of gold nanoparticles in a layered architecture has been developed. The capillary columns were used for the separation of small molecules in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode. First, a monolith with a very large surface area of 430 m(2)/g was prepared by hypercrosslinking from a generic poly(4-methylstyrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-divinylbenzene) monolith via a Friedel-Crafts reaction catalyzed with iron chloride. Free radical bromination then provided this hypercrosslinked monolith with 5.7 at % Br that further reacted with cystamine under microwave irradiation, resulting in a product containing 3.8 at % sulfur. Clipping the disulfide bonds with tris(2-carboxylethyl) phosphine liberated the desired thiol groups that bind the first layer of gold nanoparticles. These immobilized nanoparticles were an intermediate ligand enabling the attachment of polyethyleneimine as a spacer followed by immobilization of the second layer of gold nanoparticles which were eventually functionalized with zwitterionic cysteine. This layered architecture, prepared using 10 nm nanoparticles, contains 17.2 wt % Au, more than twice than that found in the first layer alone. Chromatographic performance of these hydrophilic monolithic columns was demonstrated with the separation of mixtures of nucleosides and peptides in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) mode. A column efficiency of 51,000 plates/m was achieved for retained analyte cytosine.

  19. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  20. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  1. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy......, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include...

  2. Membrane labeling of coral gastrodermal cells by biotinylation: the proteomic identification of surface proteins involving cnidaria-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular-scale processes underlying the stability of coral-Symbiodinium endosymbioses remain unclear despite decades of investigation. As the coral gastroderm is the only tissue layer characterized by this unique symbiotic association, the membranes of these symbiotic gastrodermal cells (SGCs may play important roles in the initiation and maintenance of the endosymbiosis. In order to elucidate the interactions between the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates and their coral hosts, a thorough characterization of SGC membranes is therefore required. Cell surface proteins of isolated SGCs were biotinylated herein by a cell impermeant agent, biotin-XX sulfosuccinimidyl ester. The in situ distribution of these biotinylated proteins was uncovered by both fluorescence and transmission electron microscopic imaging of proteins bound to Alexa Fluor® 488-conjugated streptavidin. The identity of these proteins was then determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nineteen (19 proteins were identified, and they are known to be involved in the molecular chaperone/stress response, cytoskeletal remodeling, and energy metabolism. These results not only reveal the molecular characters of the host SGC membrane, but also provide critical insight into understanding the possible role of host membranes in this ecologically important endosymbiotic association.

  3. Dynamics of cyanophenyl alkylbenzoate molecules in the bulk and in a surface layer adsorbed onto aerosil. Variation of the lengths of the alkyl chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frunza, Stefan [National Institute of Materials Physics, R-077125 Magurele (Romania); Schoenhals, Andreas [BAM Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Frunza, Ligia, E-mail: lfrunza@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, R-077125 Magurele (Romania); Beica, Traian; Zgura, Irina; Ganea, Paul [National Institute of Materials Physics, R-077125 Magurele (Romania); Stoenescu, Daniel [Telecom-Bretagne, Departement d' Optique, Technopole Brest-Iroise 29238 Cedex (France)

    2010-06-16

    Graphical abstract: The temperature dependence of the molecular mobility in composites shows an Arrhenius-type regime at low temperature and a glassy-type one at higher temperature separated by a crossover phenomenon. - Abstract: The molecular mobility of 4-butyl- and 4-pentyl-4'-cyanophenyl benzoate (CP4B, CP5B) and their composites prepared from aerosil A380 was investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in a large temperature range. Thermogravimetric and infrared investigations were additionally performed. High silica density (larger than 7 g aerosil/1 g of liquid crystal) was selected to observe a thin layer adsorbed on the surface of the silica particles. The data were compared with those of the member of the series with six carbon atoms in the alkyl tail. Bulk CP4B and CP5B show the dielectric behaviour expected for liquid crystals. For the composites one relaxation process is observed at frequencies much lower than those for the corresponding bulk, which was assigned to the dynamics of the molecules in a surface layer. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rates (and of the dielectric strength) shows a crossover behaviour with two distinguished regimes. At higher temperatures the data obey the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law, whereas an Arrhenius law is observed at lower temperature, in a close similarity to the behaviour of a constrained dynamic glass transition. The estimated Vogel and crossover temperature is independent on the tail length, while the activation energy for the low temperature branch increases weakly with increasing the alkyl tail.

  4. Leukocytes-depleting filters preferentially remove activated leukocytes and reduce the expression of surface adhesion molecules during the simulated extracorporeal circulation of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Christos; Sheppard, Stuart; Tang, Augustine; Rengarajan, Arvind; Smith, David; Haw, Marcus; Gibbs, Roz

    2006-01-01

    The effect of leukocyte-depleting filters on the total and activated leukocyte counts and the expression of surface adhesion molecules CD11b, CD18, and CD62L during the in vitro extracorporeal circulation of human blood was studied. A 200 ml blood sample was taken from 10 patients undergoing CABG surgery. The blood was circulated for 60 minutes within an experimental extracorporeal circuit. A leukocyte-depleting filter was attached in five circuits (filtered group). In five other circuits, no filter was used (controls). Total leukocyte counts were determined manually. Activated leukocytes were identified using nitroblue tetrazolium staining. The expression of CD11b, CD18, and CD62L was measured with flow cytometry. At 60 minutes, total leukocyte counts were reduced by 49% from the baseline values in the filtered group and 10% in the control group (p filtered group and increased by 116% in the control group (p filtered group, the expression of CD11b, CD18, and CD612L decreased by 60%, 21%, and 79%, respectively, and in the control group it increased by 24%, 6%, and 28% (p filters preferentially remove activated leukocytes and reduce the expression of CD11b, CD18, and CD62L during the in vitro extracorporeal circulation of human blood.

  5. Plasmid DNA binds to the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS molecules of E. coli cell surface in the CaCl2-mediated transformation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Subrata; Aich, Pulakesh; Jana, Bimal; Basu, Tarakdas

    2008-09-01

    In the standard procedure for artificial transformation of E. coli by plasmid DNA, cellular competence for DNA uptake is developed by suspending the cells in ice-cold CaCl2 (50-100 mM). It is believed that CaCl2 helps DNA adsorption to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules on E. coli cell surface; however, the binding mechanism is mostly obscure. In this report, we present our findings of an in-depth study on in vitro interaction between plasmid DNA and E. coli LPS, using different techniques like absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, electron and atomic force microscopy, and so on. The results suggest that the Ca(II) ions, forming coordination complexes with the phosphates of DNA and LPS, facilitate the binding between them. The binding interaction appears to be cooperative, reversible, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven in nature. Binding of LPS causes a partial transition of DNA from B- to A-form. Finer study with the hydrolyzed products of LPS shows that only the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS is responsible for the interaction with DNA. Moreover, the biological significance of this interaction becomes evident from the observation that E. coli cells, from which the LPS have been leached out considerably, show higher efficiency of transformation, when transformed with plasmid-LPS complex rather than plasmid DNA alone.

  6. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  7. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  8. Surface imaging, laser positioning or volumetric imaging for breast cancer with nodal involvement treated by helical TomoTherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, David; Baczkiewic, Amandine; Doré, Julie; Bequet, Lena; Steux, Emeline; Gadroy, Anne; Bouillon, Jacqueline; Florence, Clement; Muszynski, Laurence; Lacour, Mathilde; Lartigau, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A surface imaging system, Catalyst (C‐Rad), was compared with laser‐based positioning and daily mega voltage computed tomography (MVCT) setup for breast patients with nodal involvement treated by helical TomoTherapy. Catalyst‐based positioning performed better than laser‐based positioning. The respective modalities resulted in a standard deviation (SD), 68% confidence interval (CI) of positioning of left–right, craniocaudal, anterior–posterior, roll: 2.4 mm, 2.7 mm, 2.4 mm, 0.9° for Catalyst positioning, and 6.1 mm, 3.8 mm, 4.9 mm, 1.1° for laser‐based positioning, respectively. MVCT‐based precision is a combination of the interoperator variability for MVCT fusion and the patient movement during the time it takes for MVCT and fusion. The MVCT fusion interoperator variability for breast patients was evaluated at one SD left–right, craniocaudal, ant–post, roll as: 1.4 mm, 1.8 mm, 1.3 mm, 1.0°. There was no statistically significant difference between the automatic MVCT registration result and the manual adjustment; the automatic fusion results were within the 95% CI of the mean result of 10 users, except for one specific case where the patient was positioned with large yaw. We found that users add variability to the roll correction as the automatic registration was more consistent. The patient position uncertainty confidence interval was evaluated as 1.9 mm, 2.2 mm, 1.6 mm, 0.9° after 4 min, and 2.3 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.2 mm, 1° after 10 min. The combination of this patient movement with MVCT fusion interoperator variability results in total standard deviations of patient position when treatment starts 4 or 10 min after initial positioning of, respectively: 2.3 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.0 mm, 1.3° and 2.7 mm, 3.3 mm, 2.6 mm, 1.4°. Surface based positioning arrives at the same precision when taking into account the time required for MVCT imaging and fusion. These results can be used on a patient‐per‐patient basis to decide which positioning system performs

  9. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  10. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Characterization of epithelial domains in the nasal passages of chick embryos: spatial and temporal mapping of a range of extracellular matrix and cell surface molecules during development of the nasal placode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croucher, S J; Tickle, C

    1989-07-01

    The formation of the nasal passages involves complex morphogenesis and their lining develops a spatially ordered pattern of differentiation, with distinct domains of olfactory and respiratory epithelium. Using antibodies to the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), keratan sulphate and heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) and a panel of lectins (agglutinins of Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Dolichos biflorus (DBA), peanut (PNA), Ricinis communis (RCA1), soybean (SBA), Ulex europaeus (UEA1), and wheatgerm (WGA], we have documented cell surface characteristics of each epithelial domain. Binding of antibodies to N-CAM and to keratan sulphate, and the lectins ConA, PNA, RCA1, SBA and WGA marks the olfactory epithelial domain only. The restriction of N-CAM to the sensory region of the epithelium has also been reported in the developing ear. This striking similarity is consistent with the idea that N-CAM may be involved in the division of functionally and histologically distinct cell groups within an epithelium. We traced the olfactory-specific cell markers during development to gain insights into the origin of the epithelial lining of the nasal passages. All reagents bind at early stages to the thickened nasal placode and surrounding head ectoderm and then become progressively restricted to the olfactory domain. The expression of these characteristics appears to be modulated during development rather than being cell autonomous. The distribution of keratan sulphate was compared with collagen type II in relation to the specification of the chondrocranium. Keratan sulphate and collagen type II are only colocalized at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface during early nasal development. At later stages, only collagen type II is expressed at the interface throughout the nasal passages, whereas keratan sulphate is absent beneath the respiratory epithelium.

  13. Preparation and investigation of burried metal/molecule contact interfaces with surface sensitive methods; Praeparation und Untersuchung verborgener Metall/Molekuel-Kontaktgrenzflaechen mit oberflaechensensitiven Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrdoljak, Pavo

    2011-05-13

    The present thesis establishes an optimised concept of a delamination technique suitable for ultra high vacuum (UHV) with which model systems of buried interfaces were made accessible for surface sensitive methods which were applied to investigate their electronic and topographical properties. A primary focus of this work is on the question how buried interfaces could be accessed successfully for surface sensitive methods using buried metal/NTCDA and metal/PTCDA interfaces as model systems. Contacts of approximately 10 x 15 mm{sup 2} in size were accessed. The second focus of the thesis is on the investigation of the electronical and topographical properties of the buried interfaces, for which some similarities between delaminated metal (Au,Ag)/ PTCDA- and Ag/NTCDA interfaces were found: After the delamination of top-contacts there were inhomogeneous layers of molecules on the metal contacts. Whereas PTCDA covered metal contacts had thicker molecular layers (4-5 ML PTCDA on Ag), NTCDA covered contacts showed only one monolayer coverage over large areas of at least 2 mm in diameter. Regions with multilayer coverage showed smooth surfaces whereas metal surfaces showed a fissured, meander-like and rough surface. Both contact systems also had in common that the adhesive made PES investigations of valence states very difficult. Furthermore, it was possible to thin out the molecular layers thermally but afterwards no valence states could be measured. Investigating in-situ delaminated buried interfaces, the focus was on metal (Au,Ag)/PTCDA interfaces first. The molecular layers could be successfully desorbed thermally at 260 C to 1-3 monolayers so that valence states were investigated. The spectra of the in-situ delaminated and thermally desorbed Ag/PTCDA contact were noticeably broadened so that the positions of HOMO and FLUMO could only be estimated at 1.9 eV and 0.7 eV, respectively. Additionally, interfaces of Ag/NTCDA contacts were investigated. With UPS it was found

  14. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring measurements of biomolecular adsorption events involving structural transformations and variations in coupled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimhult, Erik; Larsson, Charlotte; Kasemo, Bengt; Höök, Fredrik

    2004-12-15

    Simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements are used to analyze the surface kinetics of two biomacromolecular systems, one lipid and one protein based, undergoing surface-induced conformational changes. First we establish a theoretical platform, which allows quantitative analysis of the combined SPR and QCM-D data. With this theoretical base, new information can be extracted, not obtainable with either technique alone. As an example we demonstrate how time-resolved measurements with these two techniques in combination--yielding three independent measured quantities--add new information about (i) kinetics, i.e. number of adsorbed molecules per unit area versus time, and (ii) temporal variation in the mass fraction of coupled water versus coverage. In particular, it is demonstrated for the first time, how the kinetics of the process during which adsorbed vesicles are spontaneously transformed into a supported phospholipid bilayer (SPB) on SiO(2) can be quantitatively separated into its two dominating states: adsorbed vesicles and supported planar bilayer patches. In addition, the relevance of dynamically coupled water for interpretation and modeling of the QCM-D response during bilayer formation is discussed and further illustrated with a second model system: streptavidin adsorption on a biotin-modified SPB. A very strong coverage dependence in the number of water molecules per protein sensed by the QCM is demonstrated, with strong implications for the use of QCM as a tool for quantitative determination of protein mass uptake kinetics.

  15. Rapid degradation of the complex organic molecules in Martian surface rocks due to exposure to cosmic rays. Implications to the search of 'extinct' life on Mars by MSL and ExoMars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; Floyd, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Until recently, long-term exposure to cosmic rays has not been recognized as a major environmental factor, which can alter and destroy organic molecules in the Martian surface rocks. Recent modeling studies (e.g. Pavlov et al., 2012) suggested that organic molecules with masses >100 amu would be degraded in less than 1 billion years in the top 5 cm of the Martian rocks. That poses a serious challenge to the search of ancient molecules in the shallow subsurface of Mars. However, Pavlov et al. calculated the fraction of the survived organic molecules using conservative radiolysis constants derived from the gamma irradiation experiments on pure dry amino acid mixtures (Kminek and Bada, 2006). In this study we conducted a series of gamma irradiations of amino acids and carboxylic acids mixed with silica powder. We report that the addition of silicates dramatically increased the rate of organic degradation under gamma radiation. Using the newly derived radiolysis constants for amino acids and carboxylic acids in mineral mixtures, we recalculated the rate of organic degradation in the Martian rocks as a function of rocks' depth, chemical composition and weathering rates. Our results suggest that isolated organic molecules (acids) are likely to be altered or fully degraded in the surface rocks on Mars by cosmic rays in less than 10 million years unless some additional protective mechanisms are in place. We will discuss possible strategies for the MSL's search of the elusive ancient organic molecules to overcome the adverse effects of cosmic rays in the surface Martian rocks. References. Pavlov et al., 2012 GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, doi:10.1029/2012GL052166 Kminek, G., and J. Bada (2006), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 1-5, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.03.008.

  16. Luminescence stability of porous Si terminated by hydrophilic organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kimihisa; Kamiguchi, Masao; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nomura, Takashi; Suzuki, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    The effects of the surface termination of a porous Si surface by propionic acid and by undecylenic acid on their hydrophilicity and luminescence stability were studied. In the measurements of the contact angle of water droplets on porous Si films, the hydrophilicity of porous Si is improved by the surface termination each types of organic molecule. The PL intensity of as-prepared porous Si decreased with increasing aging time in ambient air. As PL quenching involves PL blue shift and increasing Si-O bonds density, nonradiative recombination centers are formed in the surface oxide. After the hydrosilylation process of propionic acid and undecylenic acid, PL intensity decreased and became 30% that of as-prepared porous Si film. However, the PL intensity was stable and exceeded that of the as-prepared film after 1000 min of aging in the ambient air. The PL stabilities are contributed to the termination by organic molecules that inhibits surface oxidation.

  17. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  18. Surface morphology and dewettability of self-organized thermosets involving epoxy and POSS-capped poly(ethylene oxide) telechelics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and the State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zheng, Sixun, E-mail: szheng@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and the State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-10-15

    A heptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (POSS-capped PEO) telechelics was synthesized via the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between 3-azidopropylheptaphenyl POSS and {alpha},{omega}-dialkynyl-terminated poly(ethylene oxide). The organic-inorganic amphiphile was incorporated into epoxy to obtain the organic-inorganic nanocomposites. The morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). It was found that the epoxy thermosets containing POSS-capped PEO telechelics were microphase-separated. The formation of the nanophases in the thermosets followed a self-assembly mechanism. The static contact angle measurements show that the nanocomposites displayed a significant enhancement in surface hydrophobicity as well as reduction in surface free energy. The improvement in surface dewettability was ascribed to the enrichment of POSS cages at the surface of the nanocomposites and the formation of the specific surface morphology as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface atomic force microscopy (AFM). -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer POSS-capped PEO telechelics was synthesized via click chemistry approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic-inorganic amphiphile can be self-assembled into the nanophases in epoxy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hybrid nanocomposites were successfully prepared via a self-assembly approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocomposites displayed a significant enhancement in surface hydrophobicity.

  19. Surface morphology and dewettability of self-organized thermosets involving epoxy and POSS-capped poly(ethylene oxide) telechelics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Sixun

    2012-01-01

    A heptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (POSS-capped PEO) telechelics was synthesized via the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between 3-azidopropylheptaphenyl POSS and α,ω-dialkynyl-terminated poly(ethylene oxide). The organic–inorganic amphiphile was incorporated into epoxy to obtain the organic–inorganic nanocomposites. The morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). It was found that the epoxy thermosets containing POSS-capped PEO telechelics were microphase-separated. The formation of the nanophases in the thermosets followed a self-assembly mechanism. The static contact angle measurements show that the nanocomposites displayed a significant enhancement in surface hydrophobicity as well as reduction in surface free energy. The improvement in surface dewettability was ascribed to the enrichment of POSS cages at the surface of the nanocomposites and the formation of the specific surface morphology as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface atomic force microscopy (AFM). -- Highlights: ► POSS-capped PEO telechelics was synthesized via click chemistry approach. ► The organic–inorganic amphiphile can be self-assembled into the nanophases in epoxy. ► The hybrid nanocomposites were successfully prepared via a self-assembly approach. ► The nanocomposites displayed a significant enhancement in surface hydrophobicity.

  20. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Family of Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Membrane Proteins (TcSMP) Involved in Mammalian Host Cell Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Nadini Oliveira; Souza, Renata Torres de; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Maldonado, Danielle Cortez; Cortez, Cristian; Marini, Marjorie Mendes; Ferreira, Eden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Almeida, Igor Correia de; Yoshida, Nobuko; Silveira, José Franco da

    2015-11-01

    The surface coat of Trypanosoma cruzi is predominantly composed of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, which have been extensively characterized. However, very little is known about less abundant surface proteins and their role in host-parasite interactions. Here, we described a novel family of T. cruzi surface membrane proteins (TcSMP), which are conserved among different T. cruzi lineages and have orthologs in other Trypanosoma species. TcSMP genes are densely clustered within the genome, suggesting that they could have originated by tandem gene duplication. Several lines of evidence indicate that TcSMP is a membrane-spanning protein located at the cellular surface and is released into the extracellular milieu. TcSMP exhibited the key elements typical of surface proteins (N-terminal signal peptide or signal anchor) and a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence predicted to be a trans-membrane domain. Immunofluorescence of live parasites showed that anti-TcSMP antibodies clearly labeled the surface of all T. cruzi developmental forms. TcSMP peptides previously found in a membrane-enriched fraction were identified by proteomic analysis in membrane vesicles as well as in soluble forms in the T. cruzi secretome. TcSMP proteins were also located intracellularly likely associated with membrane-bound structures. We demonstrated that TcSMP proteins were capable of inhibiting metacyclic trypomastigote entry into host cells. TcSMP bound to mammalian cells and triggered Ca2+ signaling and lysosome exocytosis, events that are required for parasitophorous vacuole biogenesis. The effects of TcSMP were of lower magnitude compared to gp82, the major adhesion protein of metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting that TcSMP may play an auxiliary role in host cell invasion. We hypothesized that the productive interaction of T. cruzi with host cells that effectively results in internalization may depend on diverse adhesion molecules. In the metacyclic forms, the signaling induced by

  2. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  3. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  4. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  5. Theoretical methods for small-molecule ro-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan, E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.u [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-14

    The solution of the first principle equations of quantum mechanics provides an increasingly accurate and predictive approach for solving problems involving atoms and small molecules. A general introduction to the methods used for the ab initio calculation of rotational-vibrational spectra of small molecules is presented, with a strong focus on triatomic systems. The use of multi-reference electronic structure methods to compute molecular potential-energy and dipole-moment surfaces is discussed. Issues related to the construction of such surfaces and the inclusion of corrections due to relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are reviewed. The derivation of exact, internal-coordinate nuclear-motion-effective Hamiltonians and their solution using a discrete-variable representation are discussed. Sample results for the water molecules are used throughout the tutorial to illustrate the theoretical and numerical issues in such calculations. (phd tutorial)

  6. Enlightening mineral iron sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens by surface active maghemite nanoparticles: Involvement of the OprF porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Fasolato, Luca; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Baratella, Davide; Corraducci, Vittorino; Miotto, Giovanni; Cardazzo, Barbara; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Mineral iron(III) recognition by bacteria is considered a matter of debate. The peculiar surface chemistry of novel naked magnetic nanoparticles, called SAMNs (surface active maghemite nanoparticles) characterized by solvent exposed Fe(3+) sites on their surface, was exploited for studying mineral iron sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens. SAMNs were applied for mimicking Fe(3+) ions in solution, acting as magnetically drivable probes to evaluate putative Fe(3+) recognition sites on the microorganism surface. Culture broths and nano-bio-conjugates were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The whole heritage of a membrane porin (OprF) of P. fluorescens Ps_22 cells was recognized and firmly bound by SAMNs. The binding of nanoparticles to OprF porin was correlated to a drastic inhibition of a siderophore (pyoverdine) biosynthesis and to the stimulation of the production and rate of formation of a secondary siderophore. The analysis of metabolic pathways, based on P. fluorescens Ps_22 genomic information, evidenced that this putative secondary siderophore does not belong to a selection of the most common siderophores. In the scenario of an adhesion mechanism, it is plausible to consider OprF as the biological component deputed to the mineral iron sensing in P. fluorescens Ps_22, as well as one key of siderophore regulation. The present work sheds light on mineral iron sensing in microorganisms. Peculiar colloidal naked iron oxide nanoparticles offer a useful approach for probing the adhesion of bacterial surface on mineral iron for the identification of the specific recognition site for this iron uptake regulation in microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linked tetrahedral CO 4 units. From the drinking of soda to the greenhouse effect and global warming, carbon dioxide touches our lives in myriad ways. It is one of the products of the chemical reaction involved in respira- tion and an important ingredient for photosynthesis in plants, both processes that sustain life on earth.

  8. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dendrimers are prepared by a divergent growth method, wherein G-. 1 grows outward, i.e., at the peripheries, to become G-2. The latter generation progresses to G-3 when monomers are appended sym- metrically at their peripheries. The higher dendrimer generations form by the same iterative reactions involving the ...

  9. Instruments Sniff Organic Surface Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Matthew, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    Portable instruments detecting both nonvolatile and volatile organic surface contaminants in real time developed. Instruments easy to use: operate under ordinary ambient atmospheric conditions, without need to use messy liquid solvents or install and remove witness plates, and without need to cut specimens from surfaces to be inspected. Principle of detection involves sweeping pure, activated gas across surface spot inspected, then monitoring light emitted at wavelengths characteristic of excited molecules formed by chemical reactions between activated gas and contaminants. Gas activated by dc discharge, radio-frequency induction, microwave radiation, laser beam, hot filaments, or any other suitable means that excites some of gas molecules.

  10. Raman spectroelectrochemistry of molecules within individual electromagnetic hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegai, Timur; Vaskevich, Alexander; Rubinstein, Israel; Haran, Gilad

    2009-10-14

    The role of chemical enhancement in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) remains a contested subject. We study SERS spectra of 4-mercaptopyridine molecules excited far from the molecular resonance, which are collected from individual electromagnetic hot spots at concentrations close to the single-molecule limit. The hot spots are created by depositing Tollen's silver island films on a transparent electrode incorporated within an electrochemical cell. Analysis of the intensity of the spectra relative to those obtained from individual rhodamine 6G molecules on the same surface provides a lower limit of approximately 3 orders of magnitude for the chemical enhancement. This large enhancement is likely to be due to a charge transfer resonance involving the transfer of an electron from the metal to an adsorbed molecule. Excitation at three different wavelengths, as well as variation of electrode potential from 0 to -1.2 V, lead to significant changes in the relative intensities of bands in the spectrum. It is suggested that while the bulk of the enhancement is due to an Albrecht A-term resonance Raman effect (involving the charge transfer transition), vibronic coupling provides additional enhancement which is sensitive to electrode potential. The measurement of potential-dependent SERS spectra from individual hot spots opens the way to a thorough characterization of chemical enhancement, as well to studies of redox phenomena at the single-molecule level.

  11. Solution of the wave equation for open surfaces involving a line integral over the edge. [for supersonic propeller noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassat, F.

    1984-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of a stationary source distribution for the supersonic-propeller noise-prediction formula of Farassat (1983) is developed to test the validity of the formula solutions. The conventional thickness source term is used in place of the Isom thickness formula; the relative importance of the line and surface integrals in the solutions is evaluated; and the numerical results are compared with those obtained with a conventional retarded-time solution in tables. Good agreement is obtained over elevation angles from 10 to 90 deg, and the line-integral contribution is found to be significant at all elevation angles and of the same order of magnitude as the surface-integral contribution at angles less than 30 deg. The amplitude-normalized directivity patterns for the four cases computed (x = 1.5 or 10; k = 5.0 or 50) are presented graphically.

  12. Misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are targets for autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwa, Ryosuke; Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule is important for immune system through its function of presentation of peptide antigens. MHC is the gene most strongly associated with susceptibility to many autoimmune diseases. We recently found a novel function of MHC class II molecules to transport cellular misfolded proteins to the cell surface without processing to peptides. Interestingly, misfolded proteins transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules were found to be a specific targets for autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is strongly associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules might be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  13. First-principle investigation 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene molecule adsorption on Cu(110)-(2  ×  1)O surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingxiang; Guo, Yuqing; Xu, Xuechun; Jiang, Bo

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) on Cu(110)-(2  ×  1)O was investigated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). We found that, at low EDOT coverage, the most favorable adsorbing geometry is the thiophene ring of EDOT parallel to the Cu (1 1 bar2) and molecule is upright rather than lying. With the increasing of EDOT coverage, the dimer and tetramer can form by new forming Cdbnd C and C-Cu bonds. The dimer and tetramer were neither cis synthesized recently nor traditional anti structure. On the contrary, the EDOT was alternative tilted and formed a zigzag-like molecule arrangement. The binding mechanism of EDOT and substrate was clarified by density of state (DOS) analysis and charge density difference (CDD) calculations. The strong molecule-substrate interaction was confirmed by high adsorption energy for the most stable adsorbing geometry. In addition, the STM images were also simulated by evaluating the contribution of local density of state near fermi energy level.

  14. Time-resolved measurements of laser-induced diffusion of CO molecules on stepped Pt(111)-surfaces; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchung der laser-induzierten Diffusion von CO-Molekuelen auf gestuften Pt(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrenz, M.

    2007-10-30

    In the present work the dynamics of CO-molecules on a stepped Pt(111)-surface induced by fs-laser pulses at low temperatures was studied by using laser spectroscopy. In the first part of the work, the laser-induced diffusion for the CO/Pt(111)-system could be demonstrated and modelled successfully for step diffusion. At first, the diffusion of CO-molecules from the step sites to the terrace sites on the surface was traced. The experimentally discovered energy transfer time of 500 fs for this process confirms the assumption of an electronically induced process. In the following it was explained how the experimental results were modelled. A friction coefficient which depends on the electron temperature yields a consistent model, whereas for the understanding of the fluence dependence and time-resolved measurements parallel the same set of parameters was used. Furthermore, the analysis was extended to the CO-terrace diffusion. Small coverages of CO were adsorbed to the terraces and the diffusion was detected as the temporal evolution of the occupation of the step sites acting as traps for the diffusing molecules. The additional performed two-pulse correlation measurements also indicate an electronically induced process. At the substrate temperature of 40 K the cross-correlation - where an energy transfer time of 1.8 ps was extracted - suggests also an electronically induced energy transfer mechanism. Diffusion experiments were performed for different substrate temperatures. (orig.)

  15. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  16. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  17. [Possible Involvement of Surface Antigen Protein 2 in the Morphological Transition and Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto-Shibayama, Kazuko; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kokubu, Eitoyo; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Surface antigen protein 2 (Csa2) is a member of the Candida albicans Common in Fungal Extracellular Membranes (CFEM) protein superfamily. We previously established its role in iron acquisition in C. albicans. However, the other roles of Csa2 remain unknown. Here, we compared growth, morphological transition, and biofilm formation among wild-type, Csa2-mutant, and complemented strains of C. albicans. Deletion of the Csa2 gene resulted in smaller and reduced colony growth, significant attenuation of the dimorphic transition under serum-inducing conditions, and reduced biofilm formation; complementation restored these levels to those of the wild-type. Our findings demonstrated that Csa2 participated in yeast-to-hyphae morphological switching under serum-inducing conditions and contributed to the biofilm formation of C. albicans. This work, therefore, provides novel insights into the potential roles of Csa2 in virulence of C. albicans.

  18. NMR identification of the binding surfaces involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III secretion tip-translocon protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShan, Andrew C; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2016-08-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. Proteins 2016; 84:1097-1107. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An engineered autotransporter-based surface expression vector enables efficient display of Affibody molecules on OmpT-negative E. coli as well as protease-mediated secretion in OmpT-positive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Andersson, Ken G; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-12-30

    Cell display technologies (e.g. bacterial display) are attractive in directed evolution as they provide the option to use flow-cytometric cell sorting for selection from combinatorial libraries. The aim of this study was to engineer and investigate an expression vector system with dual functionalities: i) recombinant display of Affibody libraries on Escherichia coli for directed evolution and ii) small scale secreted production of candidate affinity proteins, allowing initial downstream characterizations prior to subcloning. Autotransporters form a class of surface proteins in Gram-negative bacteria that have potential for efficient translocation and tethering of recombinant passenger proteins to the outer membrane. We engineered a bacterial display vector based on the E. coli AIDA-I autotransporter for anchoring to the bacterial surface. Potential advantages of employing autotransporters combined with E. coli as host include: high surface expression level, high transformation frequency, alternative promoter systems available, efficient translocation to the outer membrane and tolerance for large multi-domain passenger proteins. The new vector was designed to comprise an expression cassette encoding for an Affibody molecule, three albumin binding domains for monitoring of surface expression levels, an Outer membrane Protease T (OmpT) recognition site for potential protease-mediated secretion of displayed affinity proteins and a histidine-tag for purification. A panel of vectors with different promoters were generated and evaluated, and suitable cultivation conditions were investigated. The results demonstrated a high surface expression level of the different evaluated Affibody molecules, high correlation between target binding and surface expression level, high signal-to-background ratio, efficient secretion and purification of binders in OmpT-positive hosts as well as tight regulation of surface expression for the titratable promoters. Importantly, a mock selection

  20. Chemical moieties and interactions involved in the binding of zearalenone to the surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nezami, Hani; Polychronaki, Nektaria; Lee, Yuan Kun; Haskard, Carolyn; Juvonen, Risto; Salminen, Seppo; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2004-07-14

    Viable, heat-and acid-killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) has shown high binding properties with zearalenone (ZEN). To identify the type of chemical moieties and interactions involved in binding with the ZEN, LGG was subjected to different chemical and enzymatical treatments, prior to the binding experiments. Pretreating the viable, heat- and acid-killed bacteria with m-periodate significantly decreased ZEN binding, suggesting that ZEN binds predominantly to carbohydrate components. Pretreatment with Pronase E had no effect on the ability of viable cells to bind ZEN, however, a reduction in the binding of ZEN by heat- and acid-killed cells, suggesting that the new binding sites exposed by heat or acid are proteins in nature. Pretreatment with urea also decreased binding, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a role in ZEN binding. The binding of ZEN in concentrations ranging from 0.79 to 62.82 microM and its subsequent dissociation by repetitive aqueous washes was also studied. The binding sites of the bacteria were not saturated by the maximum ZEN concentration studied.

  1. Surface structures involved in plant stomata and leaf colonization by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeus eSaldaña

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus (ECP, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus (HCP, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem, where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the LEE pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection.

  2. Surface structures involved in plant stomata and leaf colonization by shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli o157:h7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Zeus; Sánchez, Ethel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Puente, Jose Luis; Girón, Jorge A

    2011-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water, or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection.

  3. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of small drug molecules and high molecular weight synthetic/biological polymers using electrospun composite nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Juan; Olesik, Susan V

    2017-03-27

    Polyacrylonitrile/Nafion®/carbon nanotube (PAN/Nafion®/CNT) composite nanofibers were prepared using electrospinning. These electrospun nanofibers were studied as possible substrates for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) and matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ME-SALDI/TOF-MS) for the first time in this paper. Electrospinning provides this novel substrate with a uniform morphology and a narrow size distribution, where CNTs were evenly and firmly immobilized on polymeric nanofibers. The results show that PAN/Nafion®/CNT nanofibrous mats are good substrates for the analysis of both small drug molecules and high molecular weight polymers with high sensitivity. Markedly improved reproducibility was observed relative to MALDI. Due to the composite formation between the polymers and the CNTs, no contamination of the carbon nanotubes to the mass spectrometer was observed. Furthermore, electrospun nanofibers used as SALDI substrates greatly extended the duration of ion signals of target analytes compared to the MALDI matrix. The proposed SALDI approach was successfully used to quantify small drug molecules with no interference in the low mass range. The results show that verapamil could be detected with a surface concentration of 220 femtomoles, indicating the high detection sensitivity of this method. Analysis of peptides and proteins with the electrospun composite substrate using matrix assisted-SALDI was improved and a low limit of detection of approximately 6 femtomoles was obtained for IgG. Both SALDI and ME-SALDI analyses displayed high reproducibility with %RSD ≤ 9% for small drug molecules and %RSD ≤ 14% for synthetic polymers and proteins.

  4. Evaluation of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) Bioactive Compounds in Increasing the Ratio of T-cell Surface Molecules of CD3+CD4+:CD3+CD8+ In-Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejasari, Dr

    2007-09-01

    The potential ability of ginger bioactive compounds in increasing the ratio of T-cell surface molecules of CD3+CD4+:CD3+CD8+ was investigated using dual tagging FITC and PE of monoclonal antibody anti-human with its fluorescence measured by flow cytometer. Oleoresin was extracted using sinkhole distillation technique. Its components namely, gingerol in fraction-1, shogaol in fraction 2 and zingeron in fraction-3 were separated by column vacuum chromatography method. The doses of oleoresin, gingerol, shogaol, and zingeron tested were 50, 100,150, 200, and 250 μg/ml. Lymphocytes (2x106 cell/ml) from human peripheral blood were isolated using ficoll density gradient technique, and cultured in the presence of the compounds in RPMI-1640 medium and phytohemaglutinin (PHA) mitogen for 96 h under normal conditions. Percentages of T-cell surface molecules (CD4+ and CD8+) were determined using dual-tagging FITC and PE fluorescents labeled on monoclonal antibody anti human. The fluorescence-labeled bands on the T-cell surface molecules were counted using flow cytometer. The experiment revealed that oleoresin and its three fractions increased the percentage of CD3+CD4+. The compound in fraction 3 of oleoresin at 200 μg/ml increased by the highest percentage of CD3+CD4+ of 9%, but slightly decreased the percentage of CD3+CD8+. These ginger bioactive compounds increased the ratio of CD3+CD4:CD3+CD8+ T-cells with the highest increment of 30% from effects of 200 μg/ml fraction 3 of oleoresin. This in vitro finding revealed that ginger bioactive compounds potentially increased cellular and humoral immune response. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the benefits of these ginger bioactive compounds as a potential functional food for testing on HIV infected patients.

  5. SeO2 adsorption on CaO surface: DFT and experimental study on the adsorption of multiple SeO2 molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yaming; Zhuo, Yuqun; Li, Liangliang

    2017-10-01

    SeO2 adsorption mechanisms on CaO surface were firstly investigated by both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and adsorption experiments. Adsorption of multiple SeO2 on the CaO (001) surface was investigated using slab model. Based on the results of adsorption energy and surface property, a double-layer adsorption mechanisms were proposed. In experiments, the SeO2 adsorption products were prepared in a U-shaped quartz reactor at 200 °C. The surface morphology was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The superficial and total SeO2 mass fractions were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), respectively. The surface valence state and bulk structure are determined by XPS and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The experimental results are in good agreement with the DFT results. In conclusion, the fundamental SeO2 chemisorption mechanisms on CaO surface were suggested.

  6. SeO{sub 2} adsorption on CaO surface: DFT study on the adsorption of a single SeO{sub 2} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yaming; Zhuo, Yuqun; Lou, Yu; Zhu, Zhenwu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Liangliang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Adsorption mechanisms of SeO{sub 2} on CaO surface under O{sub 2} were firstly studied by DFT. • The adsorption energies, bond length and electron density maps were calculated. • The electronic structure changes upon adsorption were studied. - Abstract: Selenium is a hazardous element in coal. During coal combustion, most of the selenium will convert to SeO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Ca-based adsorbents, especially CaO, have been considered as a potential sorbent to adsorb SeO{sub 2} due to its low cost. In this paper, the adsorption mechanisms of single SeO{sub 2} on CaO surface were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Both the physisorption and chemisorption structures were determined. It has been identified that the adsorption of SeO{sub 2} on CaO surface is primarily chemisorption, while physisorption takes effects at the initial stage of the process. Under O{sub 2} atmosphere, selenate is hard to form. Most of the adsorption products are selenite. Additionally, the electron density maps were obtained to reveal the surface active sites. The partial density of states (PDOS) was calculated for analyzing the electronic structural change of SeO{sub 2} and CaO surface during adsorption. The results provide fundamental information of the adsorption process, which could be meaningful for the development of new absorbents.

  7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  9. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  10. SeO2 adsorption on CaO surface: DFT study on the adsorption of a single SeO2 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yaming; Zhuo, Yuqun; Lou, Yu; Zhu, Zhenwu; Li, Liangliang

    2017-08-01

    Selenium is a hazardous element in coal. During coal combustion, most of the selenium will convert to SeO2 in the flue gas. Ca-based adsorbents, especially CaO, have been considered as a potential sorbent to adsorb SeO2 due to its low cost. In this paper, the adsorption mechanisms of single SeO2 on CaO surface were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Both the physisorption and chemisorption structures were determined. It has been identified that the adsorption of SeO2 on CaO surface is primarily chemisorption, while physisorption takes effects at the initial stage of the process. Under O2 atmosphere, selenate is hard to form. Most of the adsorption products are selenite. Additionally, the electron density maps were obtained to reveal the surface active sites. The partial density of states (PDOS) was calculated for analyzing the electronic structural change of SeO2 and CaO surface during adsorption. The results provide fundamental information of the adsorption process, which could be meaningful for the development of new absorbents.

  11. Investigation of the mechanisms by which the molecular chaperone HSPA2 regulates the expression of sperm surface receptors involved in human sperm-oocyte recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Anderson, Amanda L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; O'Bryan, Moira K; Aitken, R John; Nixon, Brett

    2013-03-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian spermatozoa is that, upon ejaculation, they are unable to recognize and bind to an ovulated oocyte. These functional attributes are only realized following the cells' ascent of the female reproductive tract whereupon they undergo a myriad of biochemical and biophysical changes collectively referred to as 'capacitation'. We have previously shown that this functional transformation is, in part, engineered by the modification of the sperm surface architecture leading to the assembly and/or presentation of multimeric sperm-oocyte receptor complexes. In this study, we have extended our findings through the characterization of one such complex containing arylsulfatase A (ARSA), sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70kDa protein 2 (HSPA2). Through the application of flow cytometry we revealed that this complex undergoes a capacitation-associated translocation to facilitate the repositioning of ARSA to the apical region of the human sperm head, a location compatible with a role in the mediation of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interactions. Conversely, SPAM1 appears to reorient away from the sperm surface, possibly reflecting its primary role in cumulus matrix dispersal preceding sperm-ZP recognition. The dramatic relocation of the complex was completely abolished by incubation of capacitating spermatozoa in exogenous cholesterol or broad spectrum protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors suggesting that it may be driven by alterations in membrane fluidity characteristics and concurrently by the activation of a capacitation-associated signal transduction pathway. Collectively these data afford novel insights into the sub-cellular localization and potential functions of multimeric protein complexes in human spermatozoa.

  12. The use of a well-defined surface organometallic complex as a probe molecule: [(≡SiO)TaVCl2Me2] shows different isolated silanol sites on the silica surface

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2014-01-01

    TaVCl2Me3 reacts with silica(700) and produces two different [(≡SiO)TaVCl2Me2] surface organometallic species, suggesting a heterogeneity of the highly dehydroxylated silica surface, which was studied with a combined experimental and theoretical approach. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  13. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  14. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  15. Cell surface engineering to control cellular interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface composition determines all interactions of the cell with its environment, thus cell functions such as adhesion, migration and cell–cell interactions can potentially be controlled by engineering and manipulating the cell membrane. Cell membranes present a rich repertoire of molecules, therefore a versatile ground for modification. However the complex and dynamic nature of the cell surface is also a major challenge for cell surface engineering that should also involve strategies co...

  16. Cellular misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules are possible targets for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Noriko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    The major function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is the presentation of peptide antigens to helper T cells. However, when misfolded proteins are associated with MHC class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, they are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without processing to peptides. Of note, misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are specifically recognized by autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules may be recognized as 'neo-self' antigens by the immune system and be involved in the pathogenicity of autoimmune diseases. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Work-Function and Surface Energy Tunable Cyanoacrylic Acid Small-Molecule Derivative Interlayer on Planar ZnO Nanorods for Improved Organic Photovoltaic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Swapnil B; Ambade, Rohan B; Bagde, Sushil S; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2016-12-28

    The issue of work-function and surface energy is fundamental to "decode" the critical inorganic/organic interface in hybrid organic photovoltaics, which influences important photovoltaic events like exciton dissociation, charge transfer, photocurrent (J sc ), open-circuit voltage (V oc ), etc. We demonstrate that by incorporating an interlayer of cyanoacrylic acid small molecular layer (SML) on solution-processed, spin-coated, planar ZnO nanorods (P-ZnO NRs), higher photovoltaic (PV) performances were achieved in both inverted organic photovoltaic (iOPV) and hybrid organic photovoltaic (HOPV) devices, where ZnO acts as an "electron-transporting layer" and as an "electron acceptor", respectively. For the tuned range of surface energy from 52.5 to 33 mN/m, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) iOPVs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C 60 -butyric acid methyl ester (PC 60 BM) increases from 3.16% to 3.68%, and that based on poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b;4,5b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexyl)-3-fluorothieno[3,4-b]thiophene)-2-carboxylate-2-6-diyl)] (PTB7:Th):[6,6]-phenyl C 71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71 BM) photoactive BHJ increases from 6.55% to 8.0%, respectively. The improved PV performance in iOPV devices is majorly attributed to enhanced photocurrents achieved as a result of reduced surface energy and greater electron affinity from the covalent attachment of the strong electron-withdrawing cyano moiety, while that in HOPV devices, where PCE increases from 0.21% to 0.79% for SML-modified devices, is ascribed to a large increase in V oc benefitted due to reduced work function effected from the presence of strong dipole moment in SML that points away from P-ZnO NRs.

  18. The characterization of functions involved in the establishment and maturation of Klebsiella pneumoniae in vitro biofilm reveals dual roles for surface exopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balestrino, D.; Ghigo, J.M.; Charbonnel, N.

    2008-01-01

    that LPS is involved in initial adhesion on both glass and polyvinyl-chloride and the capsule required for the appropriate initial coverage of substratum and the construction of mature biofilm architecture. These results give new insight into the bacterial factors sequentially associated with the ability......The ability to form biofilm is seen as an increasingly important colonization strategy among both pathogenic and environmental Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. The aim of the present study was to identify abiotic surface colonization factors of K. pneumoniae using different models at different phases...... of biofilm development. A 2200 K. pneumoniae mutant library previously obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis was screened in static and dynamic culture models to detect clones impaired at early and/or mature stages of biofilm formation. A total of 28 mutants were affected during late phases of biofilm...

  19. Short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal articular surface of the proximal phalanx: Description of the injury and a technique for repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I M; Minshall, G J

    2018-01-01

    Chip fractures of the dorsoproximal articular margin of the proximal phalanx are common injuries in racehorses. Large fractures can extend distal to the joint capsule insertion and have been described as dorsal frontal fractures. To report the location and morphology of short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal articular surface of the proximal phalanx and describe a technique for repair under arthroscopic and radiographic guidance. Single centre retrospective case study. Case records of horses with frontal plane fractures restricted to the dorsoproximal epiphysis and metaphysis of the proximal phalanx referred to Newmarket Equine Hospital were retrieved, images reviewed and lesion morphology described. A technique for repair and the results obtained are reported. A total of 22 fractures in 21 horses commencing at the proximal articular surface exited the dorsal cortex of the proximal phalanx distal to the metacarpophalangeal/metatarsophalangeal joint capsule in 17 hind- and five forelimbs. All were in Thoroughbred racehorses. In 16 cases these were acute racing or training injuries; 20 fractures were medial, one lateral and one was midline. All were repaired with a single lag screw using arthroscopic and radiographically determined landmarks. A total of 16 horses raced after surgery with performance data similar to their preinjury levels. The study demonstrates substantial morphological similarities between individual lesions supporting a common pathophysiology, but does not identify precise causation. There are no cases managed differently that might permit assessment of the comparative efficacy of the treatment described. Short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal margin of the proximal phalanx that exit the bone distal to the metacarpophalangeal/metatarsophalangeal joint capsule have substantial morphological similarities, are amenable to minimally invasive repair and carry a good prognosis for return to training and racing.

  20. Energy transfer in anisotropic systems: A. Excitation migration in substitutionally disordered one-dimensional solids. B. The spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwemer, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    The energy and dynamics of excited states in a variety of anisotropic environments, including isotopically and chemically mixed crystals and molecular overlayers adsorbed on a nickel (111) surface, are investigated. The relationship between local and long-range structure and spectroscopic properties is explored. A theory for energy transfer in substitutionally disordered solids is presented. Explicit expressions for the ''diffusion'' coefficients and the energy partitioning ratios in binary systems are derived. Energy transfer between localized states is found to be facilitated by concurrent tunnelling and thermal promotion. Experimental results for triplet energy partitioning between mobile and stationary trap states as a function of mobile trap concentration in the ternary d/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--h/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--pyrazine system are analyzed. It is shown that both tunnelling and thermal detrapping contribute to triplet exciton mobility below 4.2 K. Singlet exciton migration makes an important contribution to trap equilibration before intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Spin coherence experiments are used to determine the energy level structure, physical geometry, and exciton dynamics of a series of impurity-induced traps in 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. The uv spectra of pyrazine, pyridine, and naphthalene adsorbed on a nickel single crystal (111) surface are measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry at low temperatures. The excited electronic and vibronic energy levels measured are similar to bulk molecular crystal values, but pyrazine and pyridine show small, but significant deviations. The ordering of molecular overlays is observed spectroscopically and information about overlayer crystal structure is deduced. 148 references, 48 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  2. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Dye and Thiol Molecules Adsorbed on Triangular Silver Nano structures: A Study of Near-Field Enhancement, Localization of Hot-Spots, and Passivation of Adsorbed Carbonaceous Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, M.R.; Marti, O.; Fabian Enderle, F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of thiols and dye molecules adsorbed on triangular silver nanostructures was investigated. The SERS hot-spots are localized at the edges and corners of the silver triangular particles. AFM and SEM measurements permit to observe many small clusters formed at the edges of triangular particles fabricated by nanosphere lithography. Finite-element calculations show that near-field enhancements can reach values of more than 200 at visible wavelengths, in the gaps between small spherical particles and large triangular particles, although for the later no plasmon resonance was found at the wavelengths investigated. The regions near the particles showing strong near-field enhancement are well correlated with spatial localization of SERS hot-spots done by confocal microscopy. Silver nanostructures fabricated by thermal evaporation present strong and fast fluctuating SERS activity, due to amorphous carbon contamination. Thiols and dye molecules seem to be able to passivate the undesired SERS activity on fresh evaporated silver. excitation: by far-field illumination of metal nanostructures or rough metal Raman scattering cross-section of gold-palladium target Temporal Fluctuation in SERS Temporal and spectral fluctuations.

  4. Capillary methacrylate-based monoliths by grafting from/to γ-ray polymerization on a tentacle-type reactive surface for the liquid chromatographic separations of small molecules and intact proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Patrizia; Pierri, Giuseppe; Capitani, Donatella; Ciogli, Alessia; Angelini, Giancarlo; Ursini, Ornella; Gentile, Gennaro; Cavazzini, Alberto; Villani, Claudio; Gasparrini, Francesco

    2017-05-19

    Capillary methacrylate-based monoliths were prepared for the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of both small molecules and large biomolecules. An efficient grafting from/to synthetic approach was adopted introducing a network of activated sites in the inner wall surface using the new silanization agent (N-trimethoxysilylpropyl)-polyethylenimine. Copolymerization of lauryl methacrylate monomer and 1,6-hexanediol dimethacrylate cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents was obtained under continuous γ-ray exposure with high conversion yield. The morphology and porous structure of the resulting monoliths have been investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and 1 H NMR cryoporosimetry. By chromatographic investigation, the new capillary columns attested high kinetic performance (with efficiency larger than 100,000 theoretical plate/m for small molecules at optimum mobile phase linear velocity of about 0.5mm/s) and also excellent mechanical stability and repeatability. The new methacrylate-based monolithic capillary columns have been successfully employed for efficient reversed-phase separation of intact proteins and peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  6. Innate IgG molecules and innate B cells expressed by immunoglobulin constant heavy G chain (Fcγ) genetic marker genes are involved in the 'allergic march' of IgE sensitization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxelius, Vivi-Anne; Krueger, Renate; Ahlstedt, Staffan; Keil, Thomas; Lau, Susanne; Wahn, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Interindividual variations of immunoglobulin constant heavy G chain (IGHG) genes on chromosome 14q32.3 are identified by alternative genetic markers (GM) of IgG3, IgG1 and IgG2, respectively. They express structurally and functionally innate IgG molecules and B cells, associated with allergic disease, replicated in several studies. 1-year-old and 10-year-old, IgE-sensitized and non-sensitized children from the German Multicenter Allergy Study birth cohort were assessed by new serological methods for the mendelian IGHG (Fcγ) (GM) genes, as innate IgG molecules and innate B cells. Food allergy sensitization in thirty-five 1-year-old children (124 not sensitized) was associated with the IGHG*bfn haplotype and B*(bfn) cells (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.1; p = 0.010). Aeroallergen sensitization in ninety-nine 10-year-old children (95 not sensitized) was associated with the same genes (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.02-1.9; p = 0.034). The IgE sensitization was most prominent in the restrictive homozygous IGHG*bfn/*bfn diplotype, 34% at age 1, increasing to 60% at age 10, rating the highest numbers of positive IgE tests, expressing increased levels of IgE and innate IgG2*n. The IGHG*bfn haplotype (B*(bfn) cells) and increased innate IgG2*n levels are predictive factors for IgE sensitization in childhood. IGHG genes can be assessed for prognostic and preventive purposes in clinical care. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In 1912, Bjerrum published the first quantum theory of molecules, to treat the vibrational and rotational energies of diatomic molecules. That theory was incorrect but prepared the next stages of development of quantum mechanics. The first quantum theory, which appeared in 1900, is considered to involve the derivation of a ...

  8. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  9. Cell-surface expression of neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) in heterogeneous cultures of marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie C; Tucker, H Alan; Bunnell, Bruce A; Andreeff, Michael; Schober, Wendy; Gaynor, Andrew S; Strickler, Karen L; Lin, Shuwen; Lacey, Michelle R; O'Connor, Kim C

    2013-10-01

    Cellular heterogeneity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) impedes their use in regenerative medicine. The objective of this research is to identify potential biomarkers for the enrichment of progenitors from heterogeneous MSC cultures. To this end, the present study examines variation in expression of neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) on the surface of MSCs derived from human bone marrow in response to culture conditions and among cell populations. Multipotent cells isolated from heterogeneous MSC cultures exhibit a greater than three-fold increase in surface expression for NG2 and greater than two-fold increase for CD146 as compared with parental and lineage-committed MSCs. For both antigens, surface expression is downregulated by greater than or equal to six-fold when MSCs become confluent. During serial passage, maximum surface expression of NG2 and CD146 is associated with minimum doubling time. Upregulation of NG2 and CD146 during loss of adipogenic potential at early passage suggests some limits to their utility as potency markers. A potential relationship between proliferation and antigen expression was explored by sorting heterogeneous MSCs into rapidly and slowly dividing groups. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that rapidly dividing MSCs display lower scatter and 50% higher NG2 surface expression than slowly dividing cells, but CD146 expression is comparable in both groups. Heterogeneous MSCs were sorted based on scatter properties and surface expression of NG2 and CD146 into high (HI) and low (LO) groups. Sc(LO)NG2(HI) and Sc(LO)NG2(HI)CD146(HI) MSCs have the highest proliferative potential of the sorted groups, with colony-forming efficiencies that are 1.5-2.2 times the value for the parental controls. The Sc(LO) gate enriches for rapidly dividing cells. Addition of the NG2(HI) gate increases cell survival to 1.5 times the parental control. Further addition of the CD146(HI) gate does not significantly

  10. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  11. Upregulation of adhesion molecules on leukemia targets improves the efficacy of cytotoxic T cells transduced with chimeric anti-CD19 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, David; Marin, Virna; Biagi, Ettore; Pizzitola, Irene; Agostoni, Valentina; Gallot, Géraldine; Vié, Henri; Jacob, Marie Christine; Chaperot, Laurence; Aspord, Caroline; Plumas, Joël

    2013-04-01

    T lymphocytes engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) interact directly with cell surface molecules, bypassing MHC antigen presentation dependence. We generated human anti-CD19ζ CAR cytotoxic T lymphocytes and cytokine-induced killer cells and studied their sensitivity to the expression of adhesion molecules for the killing of primary B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) targets. Despite a very low basal expression of surface adhesion molecules, B-ALL blasts were lysed by the anti-CD19ζ-CAR transduced effectors as expected. We next investigated the regulatory role of adhesion molecules during CAR-mediated cytolysis. The blocking of these accessory molecules strongly limited the chimeric effector's cytotoxicity. Thereafter, B-ALL cells surface adhesion molecule level expression was induced by IFN-γ or by the combined use of CD40L and IL-4 and the cells were submitted to anti-CD19ζ-CAR transduced effectors lysis. Upregulation of adhesion molecules expression by blasts potentiated their killing. The improved cytotoxicity observed was dependent on target surface expression of adhesion molecules, particularly CD54. Taken together, these results indicate that adhesion molecules, and principally CD54, are involved in the efficiency of recognition by effector chimeric ζ. These observations have potential implications for the design of immunotherapy treatment approaches for hematological malignancies and tumors based on the adoption of CAR effector cells.

  12. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    , the adult frog Xenopus has a vigorous immune system with many similarities to mammals, a ubiquitous class I molecule, but a much wider class II tissue distribution than human, mouse and chicken. The Xenopus tadpole has a much more restricted immune response, no cell surface class I molecules and a mammalian...... chain on the surface of erythrocytes, those in association with beta 2m and those in association with a disulfide-linked homodimer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Feb...

  13. Type IX secretion: the generation of bacterial cell surface coatings involved in virulence, gliding motility and the degradation of complex biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Paul D; Glew, Michelle D; Gorasia, Dhana G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-10-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is present in over 1000 sequenced species/strains of the Fibrobacteres-Chlorobi-Bacteroidetes superphylum. Proteins secreted by the T9SS have an N-terminal signal peptide for translocation across the inner membrane via the SEC translocon and a C-terminal signal for secretion across the outer membrane via the T9SS. Nineteen protein components of the T9SS have been identified including three, SigP, PorX and PorY that are involved in regulation. The inner membrane proteins PorL and PorM and the outer membrane proteins PorK and PorN interact and a complex comprising PorK and PorN forms a large ring structure of 50 nm in diameter. PorU, PorV, PorQ and PorZ form an attachment complex on the cell surface of the oral pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis T9SS substrates bind to PorV suggesting that after translocation PorV functions as a shuttle protein to deliver T9SS substrates to the attachment complex. The PorU component of the attachment complex is a novel Gram negative sortase which catalyses the cleavage of the C-terminal signal and conjugation of the protein substrates to lipopolysaccharide, anchoring them to the cell surface. This review presents an overview of the T9SS focusing on the function of T9SS substrates and machinery components. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  15. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  16. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  17. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  18. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  19. Prevention of Escherichia coli K1 Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier by Counteracting the Host Cell Receptor and Signaling Molecule Involved in E. coli Invasion of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Longkun; Pearce, Donna; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity, and a key contributing factor is our incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of E. coli meningitis. We have shown that E. coli penetration into the brain requires E. coli invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of HBMEC involves its interaction with HBMEC receptors, such as E. coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) interacti...

  20. Optimization of nutritional and non-nutritional factors involved for production of antimicrobial compounds from Lactobacillus pentosus SJ65 using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukuttan Saraniya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are ribosomal synthesized antibacterial proteins/ peptides having wide range of applications. Lactobacillus pentosus SJ65, isolated from fermented Uttapam batter (used to prepare south Indian pan cake, produces bacteriocin having a broad spectrum of activity against pathogens. Optimization studies are of utmost important to understand the source of utilization and the conditions to enhance the production of metabolites. In the present study, an attempt was made to identify the parameters involved for maximal production of antimicrobial compounds especially bacteriocin from the isolate L. pentosus SJ65. Initially, optimal conditions, such as incubation period, pH, and temperature were evaluated. Initial screening was done using methodology onevariable-at-a-time (OVAT for various carbon and nitrogen sources. Further evaluation was carried out statistically using Plackett-Burman design and the variables were analyzed using response surface methodology using central composite design. The optimum media using tryptone or soy peptone, yeast extract, glucose, triammonium citrate, MnSO4, dipotassium hydrogen phosphate and tween 80 produced maximum bacteriocin activity.

  1. Conformational States of the Spiropyran Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The form of the potential surface of the ground state was investigated on the basis of indoline spiropyran. As a result of this work the rotamers of an open-ring form of the spiropyran molecule were discovered, and the existence of the most probable rotamers was justified. The 3D potential surface of the ground state of the spiropyran molecule was built. The route of the isomerization of the molecule was discovered and values of barriers for this reaction were found. The part of the isomerization route that is responsible for changing the hybridization of spiroatom from sp3 to sp2 was found.

  2. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  3. The method of local increments for the calculation of adsorption energies of atoms and small molecules on solid surfaces. Part I. A single Cu atom on the polar surfaces of ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ilka; Fink, Karin; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-12-21

    The method of local increments is used in connection with the supermolecule approach and an embedded cluster model to calculate the adsorption energy of single Cu atoms at different adsorption sites at the polar surfaces of ZnO. Hartree-Fock calculations for the full system, adsorbed atom and solid surface, and for the fragments are the first step in this approach. In the present study, restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) calculations are performed since the Cu atom possesses a singly-occupied 4s orbital. The occupied Hartree-Fock orbitals are then localized by means of the Foster-Boys localization procedure. The correlation energies are expanded into a series of many-body increments which are evaluated separately and independently. In this way, the very time-consuming treatment of large systems is replaced with a series of much faster calculations for small subunits. In the present application, these subunits consist of the orbitals localized at the different atoms. Three adsorption situations with rather different bonding characteristics have been studied: a Cu atom atop a threefold-coordinated O atom of an embedded Zn(4)O(4) cluster, a Cu atom in an O vacancy site at the O-terminated ZnO(000-1) surface, and a Cu atom in a Zn vacancy site at the Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface. The following properties are analyzed in detail: convergence of the many-body expansion, contributions of the different n-body increments to the adsorption energy, treatment of the singly-occupied orbital as "localized" or "delocalized". Big savings in computer time can be achieved by this approach, particularly if only the localized orbitals in the individual increment under consideration are described by a large correlation adapted basis set, while all other orbitals are treated by a medium-size Hartree-Fock-type basis set. In this way, the method of local increments is a powerful alternative to the widely used methods like DFT or RI-MP2.

  4. Carbon nanotubes for delivery of small molecule drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Bin Sheng; Yoong, Sia Lee; Jagusiak, Anna; Panczyk, Tomasz; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-12-01

    In the realm of drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have gained tremendous attention as promising nanocarriers, owing to their distinct characteristics, such as high surface area, enhanced cellular uptake and the possibility to be easily conjugated with many therapeutics, including both small molecules and biologics, displaying superior efficacy, enhanced specificity and diminished side effects. While most CNT-based drug delivery system (DDS) had been engineered to combat cancers, there are also emerging reports that employ CNTs as either the main carrier or adjunct material for the delivery of various non-anticancer drugs. In this review, the delivery of small molecule drugs is expounded, with special attention paid to the current progress of in vitro and in vivo research involving CNT-based DDSs, before finally concluding with some consideration on inevitable complications that hamper successful disease intervention with CNTs. © 2013.

  5. The Dynamics of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Small Polyatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) is a resonant process in which an electron attaches to a molecule to form an unstable anion which subsequently fragments into stable products. DEA to small polyatomic molecules is often governed by complex electronic and nuclear dynamics that is intrinsically multi-dimensional. One-dimensional treatments of the dissociation dynamics based on resonance scattering theory, while often successful in modeling the energy dependence of total cross sections, can mask the complexity of post-attachment dynamics which is revealed by the observed angular dependence of the reaction products. The dissociation evolves on transient anion potential energy surfaces and often involves conical intersections which can result in a complete breakdown of the axial recoil approximation. I will use the examples of DEA to water, carbon dioxide and methanol to illustrate the discussion. Work performed under auspices of USDOE by LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and supported by OBES, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  6. Surface IgM λ light chain is involved in the binding and infection of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) to DT40 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jiaqi; You, Leiming; Li, Peipei; Teng, Man; Zhang, Gaiping; Luo, Jun; Wang, Aiping

    2018-01-25

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an important immunosuppressive virus in chickens. Surface immunoglobulin M (sIgM)-bearing B lymphocytes act as the major targets of IBDV in the bursa of Fabricius, and sIgM may function as one of the membrane binding sites responsible for IBDV infection. Recently, using the virus overlay protein binding assay, the chicken λ light chain of sIgM was identified to specifically interact with IBDV in a virulence-independent manner in vitro. To further investigate sIgM λ light chain-mediated IBDV binding and infection in pre-B cells, the cell line DT40, which is susceptible to both pathogenic and attenuated IBDV, was used. Based on the RNA interference strategy, the DT40 cell line whose λ light chain of sIgM was stably knocked down, herein termed DT40LKD, was generated by the genomic integration of a specific small hairpin RNA and a green fluorescence protein co-expression construct. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the binding of IBDV to DT40LKD cells was significantly reduced due to the loss of sIgM λ light chain. In particular, reduced viral replication was observed in IBDV-incubated DT40LKD cells, and no viral release into cell culture medium was detected by the IBDV rapid diagnostic strips. In addition, the rescue of sIgM λ light chain expression restored viral binding and replication in DT40LKD cells. These results show that sIgM λ light chain appears to be beneficial for IBDV attachment and infection, suggesting that sIgM acts as a binding site involved in IBDV infection.

  7. Surface targeting of the dopamine transporter involves discrete epitopes in the distal C terminus but does not require canonical PDZ domain interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerggaard, Christian; Fog, Jacob U; Hastrup, Hanne; Madsen, Kenneth; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2004-08-04

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains a C-terminal type 2 PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/zona occludens 1) domain-binding motif (LKV) known to interact with PDZ domain proteins such as PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1). As reported previously, we found that, after deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites of differentiated N2A cells. The inability of +Ala and 3xAla_618-620 to bind PDZ domains was confirmed by lack of colocalization with PICK1 in cotransfected HEK293 cells and by the inability of corresponding C-terminal fusion proteins to pull down purified PICK1. Thus, although residues in the hDAT C terminus are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615-617) with alanines caused retention of the transporter in the ER despite preserved ability of this mutant to bind PICK1. We propose dual roles of the hDAT C terminus: a role independent of PDZ interactions for ER export and surface targeting, and a not fully clarified role involving PDZ interactions with proteins such as PICK1.

  8. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  9. Participation of CD1 molecules in the presentation of bacterial protein antigens in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanova, M; Tarkowski, A; Hahn-Zoric, M; Hanson, L A

    1999-10-01

    Human CD1 molecules, expressed on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (including dendritic cells, Langerhans' cells, B cells and activated monocytes) are structurally homologous to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules. CD1b and CD1c have been shown to present nonpeptide bacterial antigens to T cells. We hypothesized that CD1 molecules may also be involved in the presentation of bacterial protein antigens. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were exposed to two medically important proteins, tetanus toxoid (TT) and purified protein derivative (PPD), with and without murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) specific for CD1a, CD1b and CD1c. All the MoAbs substantially inhibited the proliferative responses of PBMC to TT and PPD. Simultaneous interaction of CD1 and MHC class II molecules was even more inhibitory to these antigen-specific proliferative responses. In contrast, neither mixed lymphocyte reaction nor superantigen and mitogenic responses were affected by CD1-specific antibodies, indicating a certain restriction pattern in antigen presentation. Our findings suggest that, besides MHC class I and II molecules, there is a family of nonpolymorphic cell surface molecules that is able to present certain bacterial protein antigens to T cells.

  10. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  11. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  12. Neural cell adhesion molecules in rodent brains isolated by monoclonal antibodies with cross-species reactivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Chuong, C M; McClain, D A; Streit, P; Edelman, G M

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have led to the identification and purification of a chicken cell surface protein named "neural cell adhesion molecule" (N-CAM) that is involved in neural cell-cell and neurite-neurite interactions. In the present investigation, we have found that a similar molecule exists in the mouse and have confirmed that it is also present in rat neural tissue. A monoclonal antibody to chicken N-CAM that crossreacted with mouse and rat brains and an independently deriv...

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  14. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  15. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Enhanced binding capacity of boronate affinity adsorbent via surface modification of silica by combination of atom transfer radical polymerization and chain-end functionalization for high-efficiency enrichment of cis-diol molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; He, Maofang; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao, E-mail: ymwei@nwu.edu.cn

    2015-07-30

    Boronate affinity materials have been widely used for specific separation and preconcentration of cis-diol molecules, but most do not have sufficient capacity due to limited binding sites on the material surface. In this work, we prepared a phenylboronic acid-functionalized adsorbent with a high binding capacity via the combination of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and chain-end functionalization. With this method, the terminal chlorides of the polymer chains were used fully, and the proposed adsorbent contains dense boronic acid polymers chain with boronic acid on the chain end. Consequently, the proposed adsorbent possesses excellent selectivity and a high binding capacity of 513.6 μmol g{sup −1} for catechol and 736.8 μmol g{sup −1} for fructose, which are much higher than those of other reported adsorbents. The dispersed solid-phase extraction (dSPE) based on the prepared adsorbent was used for extraction of three cis-diol drugs (i.e., epinephrine, isoprenaline and caffeic acid isopropyl ester) from plasma; the eluates were analyzed by HPLC-UV. The reduced amount of adsorbent (i.e., 2.0 mg) could still eliminate interferences efficiently and yielded a recovery range of 85.6–101.1% with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.5 to 9.7% (n = 5). The results indicated that the proposed strategy could serve as a promising alternative to increase the density of surface functional groups on the adsorbent; thus, the prepared adsorbent has the potential to effectively enrich cis-diol substances in real samples. - Highlights: • Boronate adsorbent is prepared via ATRP and chain-end functionalization. • The adsorbent has quite high binding capacity for cis-diols. • Binding capacity is easily manipulated by ATRP condition. • Chain-end functionalization can improve binding capacity significantly. • Reduced adsorbent is consumed in dispersed solid-phase extraction of cis-diols.

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  1. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  3. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  4. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  5. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  6. Towards witnessing quantum effects in complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, T; Taylor, R A; Vedral, V

    2015-01-01

    Whether many-body objects like organic molecules can exhibit full quantum behaviour, including entanglement, is an open fundamental question. We present a generic theoretical protocol for entangling two organic molecules, such as dibenzoterrylene in anthracene. The availability of organic dye molecules with two-level energy structures characterised by sharp and intense emission lines are characteristics that position them favourably as candidates for quantum information processing technologies involving single-photons. Quantum entanglement can in principle be generated between several organic molecules by carefully interfering their photoluminescence spectra. Major milestones have been achieved in the last 10 years showcasing entanglement in diverse systems including ions, cold atoms, superconductors, photons, quantum dots and NV-centres in diamond, but not yet in molecules.

  7. Structure and dynamics of C60 molecules on Au(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Heekeun [Penn State University; Schwarze, A [Penn State University; Diehl, R D [Penn State University; Pussi, K [Lappeenranta University of Technology; Colombier, A [Universite de Lorraine; Gaudry, E. [Universite de Lorraine; Ledieu, J [Universite de Lorraine; McGuirk, G M [Universite de Lorraine; Serkovic Loli, L N [Universite de Lorraine; Fournee, V [Universite de Lorraine; Wang, Lin-Lin [Ames Laboratory; Schull, G [Universite de Strasbourg; Berndt, R [Christian-Albrechts-Universitt zu Kiel

    2014-06-01

    Earlier studies of C60 adsorption on Au(111) reported many interesting and complex features. We have performed coordinated low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory studies to elucidate some of the details of the monolayer commensurate (2√3 × 2√3)R30° phase. We have identified the adsorption geometries of the two states that image as dim and bright in STM. These consist of a C60 molecule with a hexagon side down in a vacancy (hex-vac) and a C60 molecule with a carbon-carbon 6:6 bond down on a top site (6:6-top), respectively. We have studied the detailed geometries of these states and find that there is little distortion of the C60 molecules, but there is a rearrangement of the substrate near the C60 molecules. The two types of molecules differ in height, by about 0.7 Å, which accounts for most of the difference in their contrast in the STM images. The monolayer displays dynamical behavior, in which the molecules flip from bright to dim, and vice versa. We interpret this flipping as the result of the diffusion of vacancies in the surface layers of the substrate. Our measurements of the dynamics of this flipping from one state to the other indicate that the activation energy is 0.66 ± 0.03 eV for flips that involve nearest-neighbor C60 molecules, and 0.93 ± 0.03 for more distant flips. Based on calculated activation energies for vacancies diffusing in Au, we interpret these to be a result of surface vacancy diffusion and bulk vacancy diffusion. These results are compared to the similar system of Ag(111)-(2√3 × 2√3)R30°-C60. In both systems, the formation of the commensurate C60 monolayer produces a large number of vacancies in the top substrate layer that are highly mobile, effectively melting the interfacial metal layer at temperatures well below their normal melting temperatures.

  8. Nonempirical calculations of the LiBO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemukhin, A.V.; Stepanov, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of nonempirical calculations of molecule energies, related to the use of limited basis AO set and configurations were considered taking the LiBO molecule as an example. The version of optimizing parameters of basis functions of the base of the concept of ''atoms in molecules'' was suggested. It is shown that correct description of the potential surface of LiBO molecule is impossible without consideration of electron correlation; main contributions to correlation corrections were distinguished

  9. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  10. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  11. Modeling the binding of fulvic acid by goethite: the speciation of adsorbed FA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filius, Jeroen D.; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Lumsdon, David G.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2003-04-01

    Under natural conditions, the adsorption of ions at the solid-water interface may be strongly influenced by the adsorption of organic matter. In this paper, we describe the adsorption of fulvic acid (FA) by metal(hydr)oxide surfaces with a heterogeneous surface complexation model, the ligand and charge distribution (LCD) model. The model is a self-consistent combination of the nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA) equation and the CD-MUSIC model. The LCD model can describe simultaneously the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the adsorption with a minimum of only three adjustable parameters. Furthermore, the model predicts the coadsorption of protons accurately for an extended range of conditions. Surface speciation calculations show that almost all hydroxyl groups of the adsorbed FA molecules are involved in outer sphere complexation reactions. The carboxylic groups of the adsorbed FA molecule form inner and outer sphere complexes. Furthermore, part of the carboxylate groups remain noncoordinated and deprotonated.

  12. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To identify the main amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the polystyrene surface PolySorp. Methods and Results: Using a combination of phage display and competitive elution revealed that 12-mer peptides of phages from competitive panning with ...

  13. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  14. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  15. APLP2 regulates the expression of MHC class I molecules on irradiated Ewing's sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Haley L; Yan, Ying; Solheim, Joyce C

    2013-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) is a pediatric cancer that is conventionally treated by surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Innovative immunotherapies to treat EWS are currently under development. Unfortunately for EWS patients, when the disease is found to be resistant to current therapeutic approaches, the prognosis is predictably grim. Radiation therapy and immunotherapy could potentially synergize in the eradication of EWS, as some studies have previously shown that irradiation increases the presence of immune receptors, including MHC class I molecules, on the surface of tumor cells. However, EWS cells have been reported to express low levels of MHC class I molecules, a phenotype that would inhibit T-cell mediated lysis. We have previously demonstrated that the transgene-driven overexpression of amyloid β (A4) precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) reduces the expression of MHC class I molecules on the surface of human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. We thus examined whether endogenously expressed APLP2 downregulates MHC class I expression on EWS cells, particularly upon irradiation. We found that irradiation induces the relocalization of APLP2 and MHC class I molecules on the surface of EWS cells, redistributing cells from subpopulations with relatively low APLP2 and high MHC class I into subpopulations with relatively high APLP2 and low MHC class I surface expression. Consistent with these findings, the transfection of an APLP2-targeting siRNA into EWS cells increased MHC class I expression on the cell surface. Furthermore, APLP2 was found by co-immunoprecipitation to bind to MHC class I molecules. Taken together, these findings suggest that APLP2 inhibits MHC class I expression on the surface of irradiated EWS cells by a mechanism that involves APLP2/MHC class I interactions. Thus, therapeutic strategies that limit APLP2 expression may boost the ability of T cells to recognize and eradicate EWS in patients.

  16. Vibrations of a molecule in an external force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J

    2018-05-01

    The oscillation frequencies of a molecule on a surface are determined by the mass distribution in the molecule and the restoring forces that occur when the molecule bends. The restoring force originates from the atomic-scale interaction within the molecule and with the surface, which plays an essential role in the dynamics and reactivity of the molecule. In 1998, a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy with inelastic tunneling spectroscopy revealed the vibrational frequencies of single molecules adsorbed on a surface. However, the probe tip itself exerts forces on the molecule, changing its oscillation frequencies. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy with inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and measure the influence of the forces exerted by the tip on the lateral vibrational modes of a carbon monoxide molecule on a copper surface. Comparing the experimental data to a mechanical model of the vibrating molecule shows that the bonds within the molecule and with the surface are weakened by the proximity of the tip. This combination of techniques can be applied to analyze complex molecular vibrations and the mechanics of forming and loosening chemical bonds, as well as to study the mechanics of bond breaking in chemical reactions and atomic manipulation.

  17. Neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus by polyclonal cat antibody: Simultaneous involvement of hypervariable regions 4 and 5 of the surface glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); W. Huisman (Willem); J.A. Karlas (Jos); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.L. Bosch (Marnix); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSites involved in antibody-mediated neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus were mapped by reciprocal exchange of envelope fragments or amino acids between molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus with different susceptibilities to neutralization by a polyclonal cat

  18. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  19. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  20. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  1. Lysyl Oxidase, a Targetable Secreted Molecule Involved in Cancer Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas Robert; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metastatic cancer remains the single biggest cause of mortality and morbidity across most solid tumors. In breast cancer, 100% of deaths are attributed to metastasis. At present, there are no "cures" for secondary metastatic cancer of any form and there is an urgent unmet clinical need ...

  2. Processes involved in pion capture in hydrogen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.

    1983-03-01

    A systematic analysis is presented of the possible elementary processes determining the fate of negative pions stopped in hydrogen-containing samples. Using a phenomenological description in comparison with the available experimental information on pion capture in hydrogen, it is shown that the formation and decay of pπ - atoms in compounds Zsub(m)Hsub(n) are determined mainly by the processes of Auger capture in a molecular orbit ZHπ - , transition from molecular to atomic orbit, transfer of pions to atoms Z in collisions pπ - +Z, and nuclear capture in collisions pπ - +H. The recent assumption of a considerable role of the processes of radiative atomic capture in bound hydrogen atoms, nuclear capture of pions by protons from the molecular state ZHπ - , or 'inner' transfer of the pion via tunnelling through the bond Z-H is not supported by the theory and contradicts the experimental data

  3. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  4. Chemical sputtering by impact of excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, P.S.; Reinhold, C.O.; Stuart, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    We study chemical sputtering of deuterated amorphous carbon surfaces by D atoms, vibrationally excited D 2 , and dissociating D 3 molecules, in a range of impact energies, 7.5 - 30 eV/D. We analyze the role of the internal state, i.e. the vibrationally excited and dissociating states of the neutral molecules resulting from above-surface neutralization of impacting molecular ions in typical sputtering experiments. The sputtering yields are shown to considerably increase with the internal vibrational energy at the lowest impact energies. By comparison of calculated and measured yields we draw conclusions regarding the possible mechanisms for neutralization. (authors)

  5. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-01-01

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems

  6. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  7. Viruses and Tetraspanins: Lessons from Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Selma; Rubinstein, Eric; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are four-span membrane proteins that are widely distributed in multi-cellular organisms and involved in several infectious diseases. They have the unique property to form a network of protein-protein interaction within the plasma membrane, due to the lateral associations with one another and with other membrane proteins. Tracking tetraspanins at the single molecule level using fluorescence microscopy has revealed the membrane behavior of the tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cell lines, providing a first dynamic view of this network. Single molecule tracking highlighted that these 2 proteins can freely diffuse within the plasma membrane but can also be trapped, permanently or transiently, in tetraspanin-enriched areas. More recently, a similar strategy has been used to investigate tetraspanin membrane behavior in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this review we summarize the main results emphasizing the relationship in terms of membrane partitioning between tetraspanins, some of their partners such as Claudin-1 and EWI-2, and viral proteins during infection. These results will be analyzed in the context of other membrane microdomains, stressing the difference between raft and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, but also in comparison with virus diffusion at the cell surface. New advanced single molecule techniques that could help to further explore tetraspanin assemblies will be also discussed. PMID:24800676

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  9. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  10. MHC class I molecules with superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wooldridge (Linda); M. Clement (Mathew); A. Lissina (Anna); E.S.J. Edwards (Emily); K. Ladell (Kristin); J. Ekeruche (Julia); R.E. Hewitt (Rachel); B. Laugel (Bruno); E. Gostick (Emma); D.K. Cole (David); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.J. Miles (John); S.R. Burrows (Scott); D.A. Price (David); A.K. Sewell (Andrew)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCD8+CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of

  11. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2014-07-15

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  12. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2017-01-03

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  13. CD9-positive microvesicles mediate the transfer of molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Julieta N; Frenette, Gilles; Belleannée, Clémence; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30-120 nm) containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece) as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn(2+) did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26.

  14. α-TEA-induced death receptor dependent apoptosis involves activation of acid sphingomyelinase and elevated ceramide-enriched cell surface membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Ailian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA, an analog of vitamin E (RRR-alpha-tocopherol, is a potent and selective apoptosis-inducing agent for human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. α-TEA induces apoptosis via activation of extrinsic death receptors Fas (CD95 and DR5, JNK/p73/Noxa pathways, and suppression of anti-apoptotic mediators Akt, ERK, c-FLIP and survivin in breast, ovarian and prostate cancer cells. Results In this study, we demonstrate that α-TEA induces the accumulation of cell surface membrane ceramide, leading to co-localization with Fas, DR5, and FADD, followed by activation of caspases-8 and -9 and apoptosis in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. α-TEA treatment leads to increased acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase activity by 30 min, peaking at 4 hrs, which is correlated with ASMase translocation from cytosol to the cell surface membrane. Functional knockdown of ASMase with either the chemical inhibitor, desipramine, or siRNA markedly reduces α-TEA-induced cell surface membrane accumulation of ceramide and its co-localization with Fas, DR5, and FADD, cleavage of caspases-8 and -9 and apoptosis, suggesting an early and critical role for ASMase in α-TEA-induced apoptosis. Consistent with cell culture data, immunohistochemical analyses of tumor tissues taken from α-TEA treated nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts show increased levels of cell surface membrane ceramide in comparison to tumor tissues from control animals. Conclusion Taken together, these studies demonstrate that ASMase activation and membrane ceramide accumulation are early events contributing to α-TEA-induced apoptosis in vitro and perhaps in vivo.

  15. Surface functionalization of HF-treated silicon nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    tron-transfer mediator and immobilizing matrices for biological or chemical molecules. 22. The chemical properties of SiNWs surfaces are crucial to their application in mesoscopic electronic devices in terms of stability and transport properties. Currently, many studies have been involved in the modification and reactivity of ...

  16. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  17. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  18. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  19. Candida krusei form mycelia along agar surfaces towards each other and other Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Jacob; Broeckling, Corey D; Lyons, Sarah

    2017-03-11

    Candida krusei has been known to exhibit communal interactions such as pellicle formation and crawling out of nutritional broth. We noticed another possible interaction on agar surfaces, where C. krusei yeast cells formed mycelia along agar surfaces toward each other. We report here the results of experiments to study this interaction. When C.krusei yeast cells are plated in parallel streaks, they form mycelia along agar surfaces toward other yeasts. They also detect the presence of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata across agar surfaces, while the latter two react neither to their own kind, nor to C. krusei. Secreted molecule(s) are likely involved as C.krusei does not react to heat killed C. krusei. Timing and rate of mycelia formation across distances suggests that mycelia start forming when a secreted molecule(s) on agar surface reaches a certain concentration. We detected farnesol, tyrosol and tryptophol molecules that may be involved with mycelial formation, on the agar surfaces between yeast streaks. Unexpectedly the amounts detected between streaks were significantly higher than would have expected from additive amounts of two streaks. All three Candida species secreted these molecules. When tested on agar surface however, none of these molecules individually or combined induced mycelia formation by C. krusei. Our data confirms another communal interaction by C. krusei, manifested by formation of mycelia by yeast cells toward their own kind and other yeasts on agar surfaces. We detected secretion of farnesol, tyrosol and tryptophol by C. krusei but none of these molecules induced this activity on agar surface making it unlikely that they are the ones utilized by this yeast for this activity.

  20. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  1. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  2. Single molecule SERS: Perspectives of analytical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčková, B.; Pavel, I.; Sládková, M.; Šišková, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    834-836, - (2007), s. 42-47 ISSN 0022-2860. [European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy /28./. Istanbul, 03.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) * surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) * single molecule SERS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.486, year: 2007

  3. Writing with molecules on molecular printboards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo biel, O.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology aspires to create functional materials with characteristic dimensions of the order 1–100 nm. One requirement to make nanotechnology work is to precisely position molecules and nanoparticles on surfaces, so that they may be addressed and manipulated for bottom-up construction of

  4. Applications of the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picquart, M.; Haro P, E.; Bernard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Vibration spectroscopy techniques are used for many times to identify substances, determine molecular structure and quantify them, independently of their physical state. Raman spectroscopy as infrared absorption permit to access the vibration energy levels of molecules. In the second case, the permanent dipolar moment is involved while in the first one it is the polarizability (and the induced dipolar moment). Unfortunately, the classical Raman spectroscopy is low sensitive in particular in the case of biological molecules. On the opposite, the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) offers great potentialities. In this case, the molecules are adsorbed on a rough surface or on nanoparticles of gold or silver and the: signal can be increased by a factor of 10 7 to 10 8 . Moreover, the spectral enhancement is greater for the vibrations of the functional group of the molecule adsorbed on the substrate. In this work, we present the main theoretical bases of SERS, and some results obtain on different systems. (Author)

  5. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells on grid-topographic surface and evidence for involvement of YAP mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Gong, He; Sun, Yan; Huang, Yan; Fan, Yubo

    2016-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown that surface topography can promote cell-substrate associations and deeply influence cell fate. The intracellular mechanism or how micro- or nano-patterned extracellular signal is ultimately linked to activity of nuclear transcription factors remains unknown. It has been reported that Yes-associated protein (YAP) can respond to extracellular matrix microenvironment signals, thus regulates stem cell differentiation process. We propose that YAP may play a role in mediating the topography induced cell differentiation. To this end, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropatterns with grid topology (GT) (3 μm pattern width, 2 μm pattern interval length, 7 μm pattern height); nonpatterned PDMS substrates were used as the planar controls. The MC3T3-E1 cells were then cultured on these surfaces, respectively, in osteogenic inducing medium. Cell differentiation in terms of osteogenesis related gene expression, protein levels, alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization was assessed. It was shown that the cells on GT surfaces had stronger osteogenesis capacity. In addition, expression level of YAP was increased when MC3T3-E1 cells grew on GT substrates, which was similar to the levels of osteogenic differentiation markers. It was also shown that YAP knockdown attenuated GT substrates-induced MC3T3-E1 differentiation, which reduced the osteogenic differentiation effect of the GT substrates. Collectively, our findings indicate that GT substrates-induced MC3T3-E1 differentiation may be associated with YAP. This paper provides new target points for transcriptional mechanism research of microenvironment induced cell differentiation and a useful approach to obtain more biofunctionalization scaffolds for tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cluster ions and van der Waals molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    1992-01-01

    This review discusses current ideas in the physics and chemistry of cluster ions and Van der Waals molecules as well as presenting numerical data on their parameters and the processes involving them. It is also a detailed reference on basic data relating to many species.

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  8. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  10. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  14. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  15. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  19. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: