WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface interfaces implications

  1. Surface-water interface induces conformational changes critical for protein adsorption: Implications for monolayer formation of EAS hydrophobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamron eLey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The class I hydrophobin EAS is part of a family of small, amphiphilic fungal proteins best known for their ability to self-assemble into stable monolayers that modify the hydrophobicity of a surface to facilitate further microbial growth. These proteins have attracted increasing attention for industrial and biomedical applications, with the aim of designing surfaces that have the potential to maintain their clean state by resisting non-specific protein binding. To gain a better understanding of this process, we have employed all-atom molecular dynamics to study initial stages of the spontaneous adsorption of monomeric EAS hydrophobin on fully hydroxylated silica, a commonly used industrial and biomedical substrate. Particular interest has been paid to the Cys3-Cys4 loop, which has been shown to exhibit disruptive behavior in solution, and the Cys7-Cys8 loop, which is believed to be involved in the aggregation of EAS hydrophobin at interfaces. Specific and water mediated interactions with the surface were also analyzed. We have identified two possible binding motifs, one which allows unfolding of the Cys7-Cys8 loop due to the surfactant-like behavior of the Cys3-Cys4 loop, and another which has limited unfolding due to the Cys3-Cys4 loop remaining disordered in solution. We have also identified intermittent interactions with water which mediate the protein adsorption to the surface, as well as longer lasting interactions which control the diffusion of water around the adsorption site. These results have shown that EAS behaves in a similar way at the air-water and surface-water interfaces, and have also highlighted the need for hydrophilic ligand functionalization of the silica surface in order to prevent the adsorption of EAS hydrophobin.

  2. Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Interfaces between solids, liquids, and gases play an important role in a wide range of practical applications and have been a subject of scientific interest since Poisson showed in 1831 that the order parameter of liquids near interfaces must deviate considerably from its bulk value. In particular, polymers at surfaces and interfaces have been a subject of extensive theoretical, experimental and computational studies for a long time due to their use in many diverse applications ranging from antifouling coatings to flexible electronic devices. Understanding the structure and thermodynamic properties of polymers at surfaces and interfaces is thus an area of fundamental and current technological interest. Although encouraging experimental progress has been made over the years in understanding the molecular structure of polymers in contact with various environments, selectively probing their structure and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces has been extremely difficult. Computer simulations, especially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have proven over the years to be an invaluable tool in providing molecular details at interfaces that are usually lacking in the experimental data. In this talk, I'll give an overview of some previous simulation efforts to understand the structure and dynamics of polymers at surfaces and buried interfaces. I will conclude by presenting our current and ongoing work on combining ab initio calculations and MD simulations with Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Spectroscopy to study polymer surfaces. This approach demonstrates the future role of MD in surface science. Work supported by NSF (DMR0847580 and DMR1410290) and Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  3. Surface and Interface Characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...

  4. Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook covers the major developments in surface sciences of recent decades, from experimental tricks and basic techniques to the latest experimental methods and theoretical understanding. It is unique in its attempt to treat the physics of surfaces, thin films and interfaces, surface chemistry, thermodynamics, statistical physics and the physics of the solid/electrolyte interface in an integral manner, rather than in separate compartments. The Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces is designed as a handbook for the researcher as well as a study-text for graduate students in physics or chemistry with special interest in the surface sciences, material science, or the nanosciences. The experienced researcher, professional or academic teacher will appreciate the opportunity to share many insights and ideas that have grown out of the author's long experience. Readers will likewise appreciate the wide range of topics treated, each supported by extensive references. Graduate students will benefit f...

  5. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich...... platform for applications of surface photonics. Most of these surface waves are directional and as such their propagation can be effectively controlled by changing wavelength or material parameters tuning....

  6. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  7. Surface and interface effects in VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1985-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 10: Surface and Interface Effects in VLSI provides the advances made in the science of semiconductor surface and interface as they relate to electronics. This volume aims to provide a better understanding and control of surface and interface related properties. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the intimate link between interfaces and devices. The book is then divided into two parts. The first part covers the chemical and geometric structures of prototypical VLSI interfaces. Subjects detailed include, the technologically most import

  8. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  9. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-01-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to the...

  10. Solid Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Lüth, Hans

    2010-01-01

    This book emphasises both experimental and theoretical aspects of surface, interface and thin film physics. As in previous editions the preparation of surfaces and thin films, their atomic and morphological, their vibronic and electronic properties as well as fundamentals of adsorption are treated. Because of their importance in modern information technology and nanostructure physics particular emphasis is paid to electronic surface and interface states, semiconductor space charge layers and heterostructures as well as to superconductor/semiconductor interfaces and magnetic thin films. The latter topic was significantly extended in this new edition by more details about the giant magnetoresistance and a section about the spin-transfer torque mechanism including one new problem as exercise. Two new panels about Kerr-effect and spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy were added, too. Furthermore, the meanwhile important group III-nitride surfaces and high-k oxide/semiconductor interfaces are shortly discu...

  11. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    In order to make a critical analysis of the discussion of corrosion of copper in pure anoxic water it is necessary to understand the chemical reactivity at the copper-water interface. Even though the most fundamental issue, i.e. the nature and existence of a hypothetical product that is thermodynamically stable, is still under debate, it is clear that if anoxic corrosion really exists, it must be initiated through oxidative surface reactions at the copper-water interface. This report presents a survey of the peer reviewed literature on the reactivity of copper surfaces in water. Reactions discussed involve molecular adsorption of water, dissociation of the OH-bonds in adsorbed water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the disproportionation/synproportionation equilibrium between hydroxyl groups/hydroxide ions, water molecules and atomic oxygen, the surface diffusion of adsorbed species, and the formation of hydrogen gas (molecular hydrogen). Experimental, as well as theoretical (quantum chemical) studies are reviewed. It is concluded that a limited amount of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) should be formed as the result of dissociative water adsorption at certain copper surfaces. Quantitative estimates of the amounts of H2 that could form at the copper-water interface are made. Assuming that the water-cleavage/hydrogen-formation reaction proceeds on an ideal [110] or [100] surface until a hydroxyl monolayer (ML) is reached, the amount of H{sub 2} formed is {approx} 2.4 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Based on the literature cited, this is most likely possible, thermodynamically as well as kinetically. Although not proven, it is not unlikely that the reaction can proceed until an oxide ML is formed, which would give 4.8 ng cm{sup -2}. If the formation of an oxide ML is thermodynamically feasible the surface will probably react further, since Cu{sub 2}O(s) is known to activate and cleave the water molecule when it adsorbs at the Cu{sub 2}O(s) surface. Assuming the formation of a

  12. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs.

  13. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, M.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs

  14. Implant surfaces and interface processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemo, B; Gold, J

    1999-06-01

    The past decades and current R&D of biomaterials and medical implants show some general trends. One major trend is an increased degree of functionalization of the material surface, better to meet the demands of the biological host system. While the biomaterials of the past and those in current use are essentially bulk materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) or special compounds (bioglasses), possibly with some additional coating (e.g., hydroxyapatite), the current R&D on surface modifications points toward much more complex and multifunctional surfaces for the future. Such surface modifications can be divided into three classes, one aiming toward an optimized three-dimensional physical microarchitecture of the surface (pore size distributions, "roughness", etc.), the second one focusing on the (bio) chemical properties of surface coatings and impregnations (ion release, multi-layer coatings, coatings with biomolecules, controlled drug release, etc.), and the third one dealing with the viscoelastic properties (or more generally the micromechanical properties) of material surfaces. These properties are expected to affect the interfacial processes cooperatively, i.e., there are likely synergistic effects between and among them: The surface is "recognized" by the biological system through the combined chemical and topographic pattern of the surface, and the viscoelastic properties. In this presentation, the development indicated above is discussed briefly, and current R&D in this area is illustrated with a number of examples from our own research. The latter include micro- and nanofabrication of surface patterns and topographies by the use of laser machining, photolithographic techniques, and electron beam and colloidal lithographies to produce controlled structures on implant surfaces in the size range 10 nm to 100 microns. Examples of biochemical modifications include mono- or lipid membranes and protein coatings on different surfaces. A new method to evaluate, e

  15. Solid surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Lüth, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This book emphasises both experimental and theoretical aspects of surface, interface and thin-film physics. As in previous editions the preparation of surfaces and thin films, their atomic and morphological structure, their vibronic and electronic properties as well as fundamentals of adsorption are treated. Because of their importance in modern information technology and nanostructure research, particular emphasis is paid to electronic surface and interface states, semiconductor space charge layers and heterostructures. A special chapter of the book is devoted to collective phenomena at interfaces and in thin films such as superconductivity and magnetism. The latter topic includes the meanwhile important issues giant magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque mechanism, both effects being of high interest in information technology. In this new edition, for the first time, the effect of spin-orbit coupling on surface states is treated. In this context the class of the recently detected topological insulators,...

  16. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F

    2004-07-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  17. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  18. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-09-12

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, P. J.; Chambers, J. E.; Uhlemann, S. S.; Binley, A.

    2017-11-01

    Interactions between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) have important implications for water quantity, water quality, and ecological health. The subsurface region proximal to SW bodies, the GW-SW interface, is crucial as it actively regulates the transfer of nutrients, contaminants, and water between GW systems and SW environments. However, geological, hydrological, and biogeochemical heterogeneity in the GW-SW interface makes it difficult to characterise with direct observations. Over the past two decades geophysics has been increasingly used to characterise spatial and temporal variability throughout the GW-SW interface. Geophysics is a powerful tool in evaluating structural heterogeneity, revealing zones of GW discharge, and monitoring hydrological processes. Geophysics should be used alongside traditional hydrological and biogeochemical methods to provide additional information about the subsurface. Further integration of commonly used geophysical techniques, and adoption of emerging techniques, has the potential to improve understanding of the properties and processes of the GW-SW interface, and ultimately the implications for water quality and environmental health.

  20. A surface chemical model of the bentonite-water interface and its implications for modelling the near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Wanner, H.; Albinsson, Y.; Wersin, P.; Karnland, O.

    1994-07-01

    Understanding the surface chemical properties of montmorillonite in near-neutral and alkaline media is essential for establishing a chemical model of the bentonite/water interaction applicable for repository conditions. A pretreated and well-characterised Wyoming MX-80 bentonite has been used for investigating the acid/base characteristics of Na-montmorillonite. The CEC of Na-montmorillonite was determined to 108 meq/100 g for pretreated bentonite and to 85 meq/100 g for the bulk material. The BET surface area was (31.53±0.16)m 2 /g. Potentiometric titrations of montmorillonite suspensions at ionic strengths I=0.005 M, 0.05 M and 0.5 M were conducted as batch-type experiments. Deprotonation of surface OH groups possibly exposed at the edge surface causes an overall negative charge on the surface of montmorillonite in the alkaline pH range. In this pH range, the protolysis degree of OH groups increases with increasing pH and ionic strength. The proton density on the surface of montmorillonite increases with decreasing pH in the acidic pH range (pH + at the structural-charge sites. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a two-site model with structural-charge surface sites (X layer sites) and variable-charge surface sites (edge OH groups) as the reactive surface functionalities. The total population of the surface sites are estimated to TOT-OH=2.84*10 -5 mol/g, TOT-X=2.22*10 -5 mol/g. The intrinsic acidity constants for the OH groups are determined to pK int al = (5.4±0.1) and pK int a2 =(6-7±0.1), respectively, using th configuration of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM). 43 refs, 18 figs, 11 tabs

  1. A surface chemical model of the bentonite-water interface and its implications for modelling the near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Wanner, H. [MBT Umwelttechnik AG, Zuerich, (Switzerland); Albinsson, Y. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wersin, P. [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain); Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1994-07-01

    Understanding the surface chemical properties of montmorillonite in near-neutral and alkaline media is essential for establishing a chemical model of the bentonite/water interaction applicable for repository conditions. A pretreated and well-characterised Wyoming MX-80 bentonite has been used for investigating the acid/base characteristics of Na-montmorillonite. The CEC of Na-montmorillonite was determined to 108 meq/100 g for pretreated bentonite and to 85 meq/100 g for the bulk material. The BET surface area was (31.53{+-}0.16)m{sup 2}/g. Potentiometric titrations of montmorillonite suspensions at ionic strengths I=0.005 M, 0.05 M and 0.5 M were conducted as batch-type experiments. Deprotonation of surface OH groups possibly exposed at the edge surface causes an overall negative charge on the surface of montmorillonite in the alkaline pH range. In this pH range, the protolysis degree of OH groups increases with increasing pH and ionic strength. The proton density on the surface of montmorillonite increases with decreasing pH in the acidic pH range (pH<7.5). In this pH range, two simultaneously occurring surface reactions account for the observed proton density on montmorillonite: Protonation of edge OH groups and ion exchange of the major cations for H{sup +} at the structural-charge sites. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a two-site model with structural-charge surface sites (X layer sites) and variable-charge surface sites (edge OH groups) as the reactive surface functionalities. The total population of the surface sites are estimated to TOT-OH=2.84*10{sup -5} mol/g, TOT-X=2.22*10{sup -5} mol/g. The intrinsic acidity constants for the OH groups are determined to pK{sup int}{sub al}= (5.4{+-}0.1) and pK{sup int}{sub a2}=(6-7{+-}0.1), respectively, using th configuration of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM). 43 refs, 18 figs, 11 tabs.

  2. Surface and Interface Studies with Radioactive Ions

    CERN Multimedia

    Weber, A

    2002-01-01

    Investigations on the atomic scale of magnetic surfaces and magnetic multilayers were performed by Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. The unique combination of the Booster ISOLDE facility equipped with a UHV beamline and the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) is ideally suited for such microscopic studies. Main advantages are the choice of problem-oriented radioactive probes and the purity of mass-separated beams. The following results were obtained: $\\,$i) Magnetic hyperfine fields (B$_{hf}$) of Se on Fe, Co, Ni surfaces were determined. The results prompted a theoretical study on the B$_{hf}$ values of the 4sp-elements in adatom position on Ni and Fe, confirming our results and predicting unexpected behaviour for the other elements. $\\,$ii) Exemplarily we have determined B$_{hf}$ values of $^{111}$Cd at many different adsorption sites on Ni surfaces. We found a strong dependence on the coordination number of the probes. With decreasing coordination nu...

  3. Surface and interface analysis an electrochemists toolbox

    CERN Document Server

    Holze, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    A broad, almost encyclopedic overview of spectroscopic and other analytical techniques useful for investigations of phase boundaries in electrochemistry is presented. The analysis of electrochemical interfaces and interphases on a microscopic, even molecular level, is of central importance for an improved understanding of the structure and dynamics of these phase boundaries. The gained knowledge will be needed for improvements of methods and applications reaching from electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy conversion, biocompatibility of metals, corrosion protection to galvanic surface treatment and finishing. The book provides an overview as complete as possible and enables the reader to choose methods most suitable for tackling his particular task. It is nevertheless compact and does not flood the reader with the details of review papers.

  4. Second harmonic generation spectroscopy on Si surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy studies of Si(111) surfaces and interfaces are reviewed for two types of systems: (1) clean 7 x 7 and root 3 x root 3-Ag reconstructed surfaces prepared under ultra-high vacuum conditions where surface states are excited and (2) interfaces...... in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structures and thin metal films on Si surfaces where several interfaces contribute to the SHG. In all the systems resonances are seen at interband transitions near the bulk critical points E-1 and E-2. On the clean surfaces a number of resonances appear below the onset of bulk...

  5. X-ray scattering studies of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Here we shall briefly review the basics and some applications of x-ray specular reflectivity and diffuse scattering techniques. These x-ray scattering techniques are uniquely suited to study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces at atomic resolutions as they are nondestructive and can probe even interfaces which are buried. The study of structure of surfaces and interfaces is not only required in understanding physics in reduced dimensions but is also essential in developing technologically important materials

  6. Facet‐Engineered Surface and Interface Design of Photocatalytic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Li, Zhengquan

    2016-01-01

    The facet‐engineered surface and interface design for photocatalytic materials has been proven as a versatile approach to enhance their photocatalytic performance. This review article encompasses some recent advances in the facet engineering that has been performed to control the surface of mono‐component semiconductor systems and to design the surface and interface structures of multi‐component heterostructures toward photocatalytic applications. The review begins with some key points which should receive attention in the facet engineering on photocatalytic materials. We then discuss the synthetic approaches to achieve the facet control associated with the surface and interface design. In the following section, the facet‐engineered surface design on mono‐component photocatalytic materials is introduced, which forms a basis for the discussion on more complex systems. Subsequently, we elucidate the facet‐engineered surface and interface design of multi‐component photocatalytic materials. Finally, the existing challenges and future prospects are discussed. PMID:28105398

  7. Quantitative sputter profiling at surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, J.; Etzkorn, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The key problem in quantitative sputter profiling, that of a sliding depth scale has been solved by combined Auger/X-ray microanalysis. By means of this technique and for the model system Ge/Si (amorphous) the following questions are treated quantitatively: shape of the sputter profiles when sputtering through an interface and origin of their asymmetry; precise location of the interface plane on the depth profile; broadening effects due to limited depth of information and their correction; origin and amount of bombardment induced broadening for different primary ions and energies; depth dependence of the broadening, and basic limits to depth resolution. Comparisons are made to recent theoretical calculations based on recoil mixing in the collision cascade and very good agreement is found

  8. Surface complexation at calcium mineral-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liuming

    1994-01-01

    Surface reactions occurring at solid-water interfaces in calcium mineral-ligands systems have been studied. Both hydrous apatite and fluorite surfaces show clear amphoteric properties. An ion exchange process between lattice ions of F- on fluorite and OH- ions in bulk solution is discovered. The surface adsorption of Alizarin Red S and sodium oleate are determined. Surface chemical reaction models are established based on acidbase potentiometric titrations, solubility, adsorption and zeta-pot...

  9. Surface and interface sciences of Li-ion batteries. -Research progress in electrode-electrolyte interface-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The application potential of Li-ion batteries is growing as demand increases in different fields at various stages in energy systems, in addition to their conventional role as power sources for portable devices. In particular, applications in electric vehicles and renewable energy storage are increasing for Li-ion batteries. For these applications, improvements in battery performance are necessary. The Li-ion battery produces and stores electric power from the electrochemical redox reactions between the electrode materials. The interface between the electrodes and electrolyte strongly affects the battery performance because the charge transfer causing the electrode redox reaction begins at this interface. Understanding of the surface structure, electronic structure, and chemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface is necessary to improve battery performance. However, the interface is located between the electrode and electrolyte materials, hindering the experimental analysis of the interface; thus, the physical properties and chemical processes have remained poorly understood until recently. Investigations of the physical properties and chemical processes at the interface have been performed using advanced surface science techniques. In this review, current knowledge and future research prospects regarding the electrode-electrolyte interface are described for the further development of Li-ion batteries.

  10. Aggregation of Heteropolyanions Implicates the Presence of Zundel Ions Near Air-Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Mrinal K. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439 United States; DUBBLE-CRG, ESRF-The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility CS40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 France; Antonio, Mark R. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439 United States

    2016-07-01

    Protons play crucial roles in the interactions between hetero-polyanions (HPAs) in aqueous solutions and solid acid salts. We report the aggregation behaviours of Keggin HPAs near the surfaces of heteropolyacid solutions. The structure of the aggregated HPA layer near the solution-vapour phase boundary closely resembles the solid-state crystal structure of the hetero-polyacids in which the HPAs are connected by Zundel ions. The resemblance not only implicates the presence of protons in the form of planar Zundel ions near the air-water interface but, also, suggests that these align parallel to the interface. This study demonstrates an indirect means of assessing the impact of protons on HPA interactions near air-water interfaces and, in general, provides new insights about interfacial proton chemistry of heteropolyacids.

  11. A facile method for simulating randomly rough membrane surface associated with interface behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaolu; Cai, Xiang; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Leihong, Zhao; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Modeling rough surfaces has emerged as a distinct discipline of considerable research interest in interface behaviors including membrane fouling. In this paper, a facile method was proposed to simulate rough membrane surface morphology. Natural membrane surface was found to be randomly rough, and its height distribution obeys Gaussian distribution. A new method which combines spectrum method, Gaussian distribution and Fourier transform technique was deduced. Simulation of the rough membrane surface showed high similarity in terms of statistical roughness and height distribution between the simulated surface and the real membrane surface, indicating feasibility of the new method. It was found that, correlation length (l) and the number of superposed ridges (N) are key parameters affecting the simulated membrane surface morphology. This new method has evident advantages over conventional modeling methods The proposed method for randomly rough membrane surface modeling could be potentially used to quantify the interfacial interactions between two rough surfaces, giving implications for membrane fouling mitigation.

  12. Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The {\\it Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials} research program provided conceptual understanding of and theoretical methodologies for understanding the properties of surfaces and interfaces involving materials exhibiting strong electronic correlations. The issues addressed in this research program are important for basic science, because the behavior of correlated electron superlattices is a crucial challenge to and crucial test of our understanding of the grand-challenge problem of correlated electron physics and are important for our nation's energy future because correlated interfaces offer opportunities for the control of phenomena needed for energy and device applications. Results include new physics insights, development of new methods, and new predictions for materials properties.

  13. Surface forces between rough and topographically structured interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    and manufactured materials, which possess topographical variations. Further, with technological advances in nanotechnology, fabrication of nano- or micro-structured surfaces has become increasingly important for many applications, which calls for a better understanding of the effect of surface topography...... on the interaction between interfaces. This paper presents a review of the current state of understanding of the effect of surface roughness on DLVO forces, as well as on the interactions between topographically structured hydrophobic surfaces in water. While the first case is a natural choice because it represents...

  14. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 3. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface. Ashim P Jain J Parashar. Brief Report Volume 61 Issue ... Author Affiliations. Ashim P Jain1 J Parashar1. Department of Applied Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha 464 001, India ...

  15. Overview of surface/interface X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haydn H.D.; Aburano, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The theory and nomenclature of 2-D diffraction experiments is described. Some topics deemed essential to understanding the experimental investigations were presented in detail, while others were explained qualitatively. A number of sources available for more detailed and quantitative explanations and examples of surface/interface X-ray scattering are given

  16. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron laser, a fast emerging device of high power coherent radiation. In §2 we derive the dispersion relation for surface plasma waves using a fluid theory. In §3 we study the SPW excitation by an electron beam. A discussion of results is given in §4. 2. SPW propagation. Consider a bismuth (Bi)–free space interface (x = 0) ...

  17. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A surface plasma wave (SPW) over bismuth–vacuum interface has a signature of mass anisotropy of free electrons. For SPW propagation along the trigonal axis there is no birefringence. The frequency cutoff of SPW cutoff= p / 2 ( L + ) lies in the far infrared region and can be accessed using free electron laser.

  18. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A surface plasma wave (SPW) over bismuth–vacuum interface has a signature of mass anisotropy of free electrons. For SPW propagation along the trigonal axis there is no birefringence. The frequency cutoff of SPW ωcutoff = ωp/. Ô. 2(εL +ε) lies in the far infrared region and can be accessed using free electron laser.

  19. Battery electric vehicles - implications for the driver interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Isabel; Krems, Josef F

    2016-03-01

    The current study examines the human-machine interface of a battery electric vehicle (BEV) from a user-perspective, focussing on the evaluation of BEV-specific displays, the relevance of provided information and challenges for drivers due to the concept of electricity in a road vehicle. A sample of 40 users drove a BEV for 6 months. Data were gathered at three points of data collection. Participants perceived the BEV-specific displays as only moderately reliable and helpful for estimating the displayed parameters. This was even less the case after driving the BEV for 3 months. A taxonomy of user requirements was compiled revealing the need for improved and additional information, especially regarding energy consumption and efficiency. Drivers had difficulty understanding electrical units and the energy consumption of the BEV. On the background of general principles for display design, results provide implications how to display relevant information and how to facilitate drivers' understanding of energy consumption in BEVs. Practitioner Summary: Battery electric vehicle (BEV) displays need to incorporate new information. A taxonomy of user requirements was compiled revealing the need for improved and additional information in the BEV interface. Furthermore, drivers had trouble understanding electrical units and energy consumption; therefore, appropriate assistance is required. Design principles which are specifically important in the BEV context are discussed.

  20. Semiconductor surface and interface passivation by cyanide treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H.; Takahashi, M.; Maida, O.; Asano, A.; Kubota, T.; Ivančo, J.; Nakajima, A.; Akimoto, K.

    2004-08-01

    Cyanide treatment which simply involves immersion of semiconductors in cyanide solutions can passivate interface states as well as surface states. When Si surfaces are treated with KCN solutions, a surface photovoltage greatly increases, and the surface recombination velocity is calculated to be decreased from ˜3000 cm/s to less than 200 cm/s. When the cyanide treatment is applied to ultrathin SiO 2/single-crystalline Si structure, interface states are passivated. The passivation of the SiO 2/Si interface states increases the energy conversion efficiency of MOS solar cells to 16.2% and decreases the leakage current density for MOS diodes to 1/3-1/8. When the cyanide treatment is performed on polycrystalline (poly-) Si, defect states in Si up to at least 0.5 μm depth from the surface are passivated, resulting in a vast increase in the energy conversion efficiency of solar cells and a decrease in the dark current density of MOS diodes to 1/100-1/15 that without cyanide treatment. The defect passivation is attributed to the formation of SiCN bonds from defect states. SiCN bonds are found not to be ruptured by heat treatment at 800 °C and AM 1.5 100 mW/cm 2 irradiation for more than 1000 h. Density functional calculations show that the thermal and irradiation stability results from strong SiCN bonds with the bond energy of 4.5 eV. When the cyanide treatment is performed on oxide/GaAs(1 0 0) structure, the interface state density decreases to ˜50%. The cyanide treatment can also passivate defect states in Cu 2O films, resulting in increases in the carrier density and the band-to-band photoluminescence intensity.

  1. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  2. Dust Tolerant Commodity Transfer Interface Mechanisms for Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Tamasy, Gabor J.

    2014-01-01

    Regolith is present on most planetary surfaces such as Earth's moon, Mars, and Asteroids. If human crews and robotic machinery are to operate on these regolith covered surfaces, they must face the consequences of interacting with regolith fines which consist of particles below 100 microns in diameter down to as small as submicron scale particles. Such fine dust will intrude into mechanisms and interfaces causing a variety of problems such as contamination of clean fluid lines, jamming of mechanisms and damaging connector seals and couplings. Since multiple elements must be assembled in space for system level functionality, it will be inevitable that interfaces will be necessary for structural connections, and to pass commodities such as cryogenic liquid propellants, purge and buffer gases, water, breathing air, pressurizing gases, heat exchange fluids, power and data. When fine regolith dust is present in the environment it can be lofted into interfaces where it can compromise the utility of the interface by preventing the connections from being successfully mated, or by inducing fluid leaks or degradation of power and data transmission. A dust tolerant, hand held "quick-disconnect" cryogenic fluids connector housing has been developed at NASA KSC which can be used by astronaut crews to connect flex lines that will transfer propellants and other useful fluids to the end user. In addition, a dust tolerant, automated, cryogenic fluid, multiple connector, power and data interface mechanism prototype has been developed, fabricated and demonstrated by NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The design and operation of these prototypes are explained and discussed.

  3. Correlating the interface resistance and surface adhesion of the Li metal-solid electrolyte interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael; Sakamoto, Jeff

    2018-02-01

    Solid electrolytes could enable stable cycling of metallic Li anodes, which can offer drastic increases to the capacity of Li-ion batteries. However, little is known about the mechanics of the Li-solid electrolyte interface. This study combines electrochemical and mechanical characterization to correlate interface kinetics with adhesive strength. Cubic garnet with the Li6·25Al0·25La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) formulation was selected as a model solid electrolyte based on its high conductivity and stability against Li metal. Symmetric Li-LLZO cells were tested using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine the interfacial resistance, Rint, and the adhesive strength of the Li-LLZO interface, σadh, was measured using a unique tensile test in an inert atmosphere. It was determined that the Rint is directly correlated to the adhesive strength of Li on LLZO. At the highest Rint in this study, 330 k·cm2 the σadh was 1.1 kPa and at the lowest Rint in this study, 7 ·cm2, σadh was 8 MPa. Furthermore, by optimizing the surface chemistry the wettability of LLZO was enhanced resulting in σadh exceeding the ultimate tensile strength of Li metal. The relationship demonstrated provides a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties of the Li-electrolyte interface, which will play an important role in the design of batteries employing metallic Li anodes.

  4. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  5. Adsorption of surface functionalized silica nanoparticles onto mineral surfaces and decane/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metin, Cigdem O.; Baran, Jimmie R.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of silica nanoparticles onto representative mineral surfaces and at the decane/water interface was studied. The effects of particle size (the mean diameters from 5 to 75 nm), concentration and surface type on the adsorption were studied in detail. Silica nanoparticles with four different surfaces [unmodified, surface modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)) or nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant] were used. The zeta potential of these silica nanoparticles ranges from −79.8 to 15.3 mV. The shape of silica particles examined by a Hitachi-S5500 scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is quite spherical. The adsorption of all the nanoparticles (unmodified or surface modified) on quartz and calcite surfaces was found to be insignificant. We used interfacial tension (IFT) measurements to investigate the adsorption of silica nanoparticles at the decane/water interface. Unmodified nanoparticles or surface modified ones with sulfonate or quat do not significantly affect the IFT of the decane/water interface. It also does not appear that the particle size or concentration influences the IFT. However, the presence of PEG as a surface modifying material significantly reduces the IFT. The PEG surface modifier alone in an aqueous solution, without the nanoparticles, yields the same IFT reduction for an equivalent PEG concentration as that used for modifying the surface of nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements of a decane droplet on quartz or calcite plate immersed in water (or aqueous nanoparticle dispersion) showed a slight change in the contact angle in the presence of the studied nanoparticles. The results of contact angle measurements are in good agreement with experiments of adsorption of nanoparticles on mineral surfaces or decane/water interface. This study brings new insights into the understanding and modeling of the adsorption of surface-modified silica nanoparticles onto mineral surfaces and

  6. Physical and chemical characterization methods of surfaces and interfaces; Methodes de caracterisation physico-chimique des surfaces et des interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthes-Labrousse, M.G. [Centre d`Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique, 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France)

    1997-12-31

    The main physical and chemical characterization techniques of surfaces and interfaces are presented. There are: Auger electron spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS), secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS), infrared and Raman spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS and HREELS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For each method is given the theoretical principle, the apparatus and the main uses of the techniques. (O.M.) 27 refs.

  7. Touch Is Everywhere: Floor Surfaces as Ambient Haptic Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visell, Y; Law, A; Cooperstock, J R

    2009-01-01

    Floor surfaces are notable for the diverse roles that they play in our negotiation of everyday environments. Haptic communication via floor surfaces could enhance or enable many computer-supported activities that involve movement on foot. In this paper, we discuss potential applications of such interfaces in everyday environments and present a haptically augmented floor component through which several interaction methods are being evaluated. We describe two approaches to the design of structured vibrotactile signals for this device. The first is centered on a musical phrase metaphor, as employed in prior work on tactile display. The second is based upon the synthesis of rhythmic patterns of virtual physical impact transients. We report on an experiment in which participants were able to identify communication units that were constructed from these signals and displayed via a floor interface at well above chance levels. The results support the feasibility of tactile information display via such interfaces and provide further indications as to how to effectively design vibrotactile signals for them.

  8. Surface- and interface-engineered heterostructures for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyan; Li, Yanrui; Shen, Shaohua

    2018-04-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting based on semiconductor photoelectrodes provides a promising platform for reducing environmental pollution and solving the energy crisis by developing clean, sustainable and environmentally friendly hydrogen energy. In this context, metal oxides with their advantages including low cost, good chemical stability and environmental friendliness, have attracted extensive attention among the investigated candidates. However, the large bandgap, poor charge transfer ability and high charge recombination rate limit the PEC performance of metal oxides as photoelectrodes. To solve this limitation, many approaches toward enhanced PEC water splitting performance, which focus on surface and interface engineering, have been presented. In this topical review, we concentrate on the heterostructure design of some typical metal oxides with narrow bandgaps (e.g. Fe2O3, WO3, BiVO4 and Cu2O) as photoelectrodes. An overview of the surface- and interface-engineered heterostructures, including semiconductor heterojunctions, surface protection, surface passivation and cocatalyst decoration, will be given to introduce the recent advances in metal oxide heterostructures for PEC water splitting. This article aims to provide fundamental references and principles for designing metal oxide heterostructures with high activity and stability as photoelectrodes for PEC solar hydrogen generation.

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Matthias; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    Basic research in surface and interface science is highly interdisciplinary, covering the fields of physics, chemistry, biophysics, geo-, atmospheric and environmental sciences, material science, chemical engineering, and more. The various phenomena are interesting by themselves, and they are most important in nearly all modern technologies, as for example electronic, magnetic, and optical devices, sensors, catalysts, lubricants, hard and thermal-barrier coatings, protection against corrosion and crack formation under harsh environments. In fact, detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces is necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and lifestyle of our society. Current state-of-the-art experimental studies of elementary processes at surfaces, of surface properties and functions employ a variety of sophisticated tools. Some are capable of revealing the location and motion of individual atoms. Others measure excitations (electronic, magnetic and vibronic), employing, for example, special light sources such as synchrotrons, high magnetic fields, or free electron lasers. The surprising variety of intriguing physical phenomena at surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures also pose a persistent challenge for the development of theoretical descriptions, methods, and even basic physical concepts. This second focus issue on the topic of 'Advances in Surface and Interface Science' in New Journal of Physics, following on from last year's successful collection, provides an exciting synoptic view on the latest pertinent developments in the field. Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 Contents Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers Stephan Breuer, Duc T Pham, Sascha Huemann, Knud Gentz, Caroline Zoerlein, Ralf Hunger, Klaus Wandelt and Peter Broekmann Spin polarized d surface resonance state of fcc Co/Cu(001) K Miyamoto, K

  10. A genetic algorithm approach in interface and surface structure optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a global optimization method is developed for the interface and surface structures optimization. Two prototype systems are chosen to be studied. One is Si[001] symmetric tilted grain boundaries and the other is Ag/Au induced Si(111) surface. It is found that Genetic Algorithm is very efficient in finding lowest energy structures in both cases. Not only existing structures in the experiments can be reproduced, but also many new structures can be predicted using Genetic Algorithm. Thus it is shown that Genetic Algorithm is a extremely powerful tool for the material structures predictions. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the explanation of an experimental observation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal structures. The experimental results seems astounding and confusing, yet the theoretical models in the paper revealed the physics insight behind the phenomena and can well reproduced the experimental results.

  11. Surface and Interface Analyses of Polymer Brushes by Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Taiki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Takahara, Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    In the present review, we focus on the characterization of polymer brushes by quantum beam, which is regarded as a promising probe of surface and interface analysis. The polymer brushes were prepared on various shapes of surface, and proved to be benefit to various applications. Among them, the polymer brushes grafted on sphere nanoparticles and flat substrates are investigated as representative cases. The static structure of polymer brushes, especially the chain dimension of polymer brushes grafted on nanoparticles and a flat substrate, have been studied by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and neutron reflectivity (NR), respectively. The microscopic dynamical properties of polymer brushes are also expected to be revealed by quantum beam. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), a technique using a coherent X-ray, is one of the promising methods for microscopically understanding of dynamical properties of polymer brushes. Some of our recent studies about dynamical behavior of polymer brush immobilized nanoparticle by XPCS are also presented.

  12. Noncollinear magnetism in surfaces and interfaces of transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Huahai

    2009-09-15

    Noncollinear (NC) magnetism is common in nature, especially when there exist geometrical frustration and chemical imparity in the system. In this work we studied the NC magnetism and the response to external magnetic fields in surfaces and interfaces of transition metals by using an semi-empirical tight-binding (TB) method that parameterized to the ab initio TB-LMTO calculations. We implemented this method to study two systems. The first one is the system of 6 Mn monolayers on Fe(001) substrate. Due to the complex structure and magnetic properties of Mn, we found 23 collinear magnetic configurations but only one NC configuration. The collinear ground state has a layered antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling which agrees with previous experiments and calculations. In the NC configuration the local AFM coupling in the Mn layers is preserved, but the surface is 90 degree coupled to the substrate. Similar to the experiment in CdCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, we obtained a collinear plateau in the NC evolution of the average magnetic moment in Mn slab under external magnetic fields. Another is the system of a Cr monolayer on a stepped Fe(001) substrate. As expected, the local AFM coupling in the interface of Cr and Fe are preserved. However, the edge Cr atoms is about 90 coupled to their nearest Fe neighbors. We also simulated the procedure of adding more Cr coverages gradually to a Cr bilayer coverage. As coverages increase, the magnetic moments in the Cr interface reduce, and the collinear plateau becomes wider as coverages increase. However, the saturation fields in both the two systems are extremely high, around 10 kT.We expect that when the effect of temperature is taken into account, and in some proper systems, the saturation fields could be largely reduced to the scale that can be implemented in experiment, and our study may shed light on information storage devices with ultrahigh storage density. (orig.)

  13. Surface modes at metallic an photonic crystal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weitao [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A surface mode is an electromagnetic field distribution bounded at a surface. It decays exponentially with the distance from the surface on both sides of the surface and propagates at the surface. The surface mode exists at a metal-dielectric interface as surface plasmon (1) or at a photonic crystal surface terminated properly (34; 35; 36). Besides its prominent near-filed properties, it can connect structures at its propagation surface and results in far-field effects. Extraordinary transmission (EOT) and beaming are two examples and they are the subjects I am studying in this thesis. EOT means the transmission through holes in an opaque screen can be much larger than the geometrical optics limitation. Based on our everyday experience about shadows, the transmission equals the filling ratio of the holes in geometrical optics. The conventional diffraction theory also proved that the transmission through a subwavelength circular hole in an infinitely thin perfect electric conductor (PEC) film converges to zero when the hole's dimension is much smaller than the wavelength (40). Recently it is discovered that the transmission can be much larger than the the filling ratio of the holes at some special wavelengths (41). This cannot be explained by conventional theories, so it is called extraordinary transmission. It is generally believed that surface plasmons play an important role (43; 44) in the EOT through a periodic subwavelength hole array in a metallic film. The common theories in literatures are based on these arguments. The surface plasmons cannot be excited by incident plane waves directly because of momentum mismatch. The periodicity of the hole arrays will provide addition momentum. When the momentum-matching condition of surface plasmons is satisfied, the surface plasmons will be excited. Then these surface plasmons will collect the energy along the input surface and carry them to the holes. So the transmission can be bigger than the filling ratio. Based

  14. Roles of Surface and Interface Spins in Exchange Coupled Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Manh-Huong

    Exchange bias (EB) in magnetic nanostructures has remained a topic of global interest because of its potential use in spin valves, MRAM circuits, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spintronic devices. The exploration of EB on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to overcoming the superparamagnetic limit and increasing the thermoremanence of magnetic nanoparticles, a critical bottleneck for magnetic data storage applications. Recent advances in chemical synthesis have given us a unique opportunity to explore the EB in a variety of nanoparticle systems ranging from core/shell nanoparticles of Fe/γFe2O3, Co/CoO,and FeO/Fe3O4 to hollow nanoparticles of γFe2O3 and hybrid composite nanoparticles of Au/Fe3O4. Our studies have addressed the following fundamental and important questions: (i) Can one decouple collective contributions of the interface and surface spins to the EB in a core/shell nanoparticle system? (ii) Can the dynamic and static response of the core and shell be identified separately? (iii) Can one tune ``minor loop'' to ``exchange bias'' effects in magnetic hollow nanoparticles by varying the number of surface spins? (iv) Can one decouple collective contributions of the inner and outer surface spins to the EB in a hollow nanoparticle system? (v) Can EB be induced in a magnetic nanoparticle by forming its interface with a non-magnetic metal? Such knowledge is essential to tailor EB in magnetic nanostructures for spintronics applications. In this talk, we will discuss the aforementioned findings in terms of our experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies. The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award No. DE-FG02-07ER46438.

  15. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  16. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Freitas

    Full Text Available Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI, collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  17. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    electron states was observed, which can be understood as a higher localization of electronic states and lower crystal quality. In addition, a strong rearrangement of the copper partial density of states was shown. The intimate knowledge of the electric structure was then exploited to demonstrate the valence band discontinuity between CuInSe 2 and CuIn 3 Se 5 . The analysis by photoemission yielded a valence band offset of 0.28 eV, again in reasonable agreement with theoretical results. The p-n-junction in chalcopyrite solar cells is situated near the absorber-buffer interface, which is therefore crucial for the device performance. In this thesis, ZnO deposited from metal-organic precursors on epitaxial CuInSe 2 was investigated as cadmium-free buffer material. In the course of contact formation, the interfacial region of the absorber becomes depleted of copper. Additionally, a thin intrinsic ZnSe layer is formed, prior to the growth of ZnO. The derived band alignments show no dependence on the surface orientation of the chalcopyrite substrate and are consistent with theoretical results. The conduction band lineup is favorable for the application in solar cells.

  18. Enhanced perfume surface delivery to interfaces using surfactant surface multilayer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced surface delivery and retention of perfumes at interfaces are the keys to their more effective and efficient deployment in a wide range of home and personal care related formulations. It has been previously demonstrated that the addition of multivalent counterions, notably Ca(2+), induces multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate, LAS-6. Neutron reflectivity, NR, measurements are reported here which demonstrate that such surfactant surface multilayer structures are a potentially promising vehicle for enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces. The data show that the incorporation of the model perfumes, phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, into the surface multilayer structure formed by LAS-6/Ca(2+) results in the surface structures being retained up to relatively high perfume mole fractions. Furthermore the amount of perfume at the surface is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude, compared to that co-adsorbed with a surfactant monolayer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronic structure at metal-smiconductor surfaces and interfaces: effects of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the study of the electronic structure at metal and semiconductor surfaces or interfaces, with special emphasis in the effects of disorder and local microstructure upon them. Various factors which determine this structure are presented and those of central importance are identified. A model that allows the efficient and exact calculation of the local density of states at disordered interfaces is described. This model is based on a tight-binding hamiltonian that has enough flexibility so as to allow an adequate description of real solids. The disorder is taken into account by including stochastic perturbations in the diagonal elements of the hamiltonian in a site orbital basis. These perturbations are taken at each layer from a lorentzian probability distribution. An exact expression for the calculation of the local density of states is derived and applied to a model surface built up from a type orbitals arranged in a simple cubic lattice. The effects of disorder on the local densities of states and on the existence of surface Tamm states are studied. The properties of the electronic states with this kind of model of disorder are considered. The self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of the Si(111) - (1x1) surface is presented. The effects of disorder on the electronic properties such as the work function or the position of surface states within the gap are evaluated. The surface of the metallic compound NiSi 2 is also treated. The first self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of its (111) surface is presented. The electronic structure of the Si/NiSi 2 (111) interfaces is calculated for the two types of junctions that can be grown experimentally. The origin of the difference between the Schottky barrier heights at both interfaces is discussed. The results are compared with available experimental data. The implications of this calculation on existing theories about the microscopic mechanism that causes

  20. The effect of the shoe-surface interface in the development of anterior cruciate ligament strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Mark C; Hillstrom, Howard; Voos, James E; Miller, Anna N; Kraszewski, Andrew P; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Warren, Russell F; Allen, Answorth A; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The shoe-surface interface has been implicated as a possible risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this study is to develop a biomechanical, cadaveric model to evaluate the effect of various shoe-surface interfaces on ACL strain. There will be a significant difference in ACL strain between different shoe-surface combinations when a standardized rotational moment (a simulated cutting movement) is applied to an axially loaded lower extremity. The study design was a controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric lower extremities were thawed and the femurs were potted with the knee in 30 deg of flexion. Each specimen was placed in a custom-made testing apparatus, which allowed axial loading and tibial rotation but prevented femoral rotation. For each specimen, a 500 N axial load and a 1.5 Nm internal rotation moment were placed for four different shoe-surface combinations: group I (AstroTurf-turf shoes), group II (modern playing turf-turf shoes), group III (modern playing turf-cleats), and group IV (natural grass-cleats). Maximum strain, initial axial force and moment, and maximum axial force and moment were calculated by a strain gauge and a six component force plate. The preliminary trials confirmed a linear relationship between strain and both the moment and the axial force for our testing configuration. In the experimental trials, the average maximum strain was 3.90, 3.19, 3.14, and 2.16 for groups I-IV, respectively. Group IV had significantly less maximum strain (pcleat combination produced less strain in the ACL than the other combinations. The favorable biomechanical properties of the cleat-grass interface may result in fewer noncontact ACL injuries.

  1. Poled-glass devices: Influence of surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Devices in periodically poled glass must have a large periodic variation of the built-in field. We show that the periodic variation can be severely degraded by charge dynamics taking place at the external (glass–air) interface or at internal (glass–glass) interfaces if the interfaces have imperfe...

  2. Observing cassette culture: user interface implications for digital music libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Toal, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Many people keep their collections of music on cassette tape even if they rarely listen to them. Images of these collections can be found online on photo sharing websites. What can we learn from such collections and what might they tell us about designing interfaces for new digital music libraries? The author conducts an online ethnographic study of over two hundred cassette tape collections, and over sixty participants with the aim of guiding future design of music collections. The author pr...

  3. Surface, interface and bulk materials characterization using Indus synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase, Deodatta M.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources, providing intense, polarized and stable beams of ultra violet, soft and hard x-ray photons, are having great impact on physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and other areas research. In particular synchrotron radiation has revolutionized materials characterization techniques by enhancing its capabilities for investigating the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of solids. The availability of synchrotron sources and necessary instrumentation has led to considerable improvements in spectral resolution and intensities. As a result, application scope of different materials characterization techniques has tremendously increased particularly in the analysis of solid surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. The Indian synchrotron storage ring, Indus-1 and Indus-2 are in operation at RRCAT, Indore. The UGC-DAE CSR with the help of university scientist had designed and developed an angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (AlPES) beam line on Indus-1 storage ring of 450 MeV and polarized light beam line for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) on Indus-2 storage ring of 2.5 GeV. (author)

  4. Unmanned Surface Vehicle Human-Computer Interface for Amphibious Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    FIGURES Figure 1. MOCU Baseline HCI using Both Aerial Photo and Digital Nautical Chart ( DNC ) Maps to Control and Monitor Land, Sea, and Air...Action DNC Digital Nautical Chart FNC Future Naval Capability HCI Human-Computer Interface HRI Human-Robot Interface HSI Human-Systems Integration...Digital Nautical Chart ( DNC ) Maps to Control and Monitor Land, Sea, and Air Vehicles. 3.2 BASELINE MOCU HCI The Baseline MOCU interface is a tiled

  5. Electromagnetic surface waves at the interface of a relativistic electron beam with vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.M.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation for electromagnetic surface waves propagating at the interface between a relativistic electron beam and vacuum is derived. The excitation of surface modes in a plasma at rest by a relativistic electron beam is discussed

  6. Coping with human errors through system design: Implications for ecological interface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Vicente, Kim J.

    1989-01-01

    of the adaptive mechanisms involved in learning. In terms of design implications, these findings suggest that reliable human-system interaction will be achieved by designing interfaces which tend to minimize the potential for control interference and support recovery from errors. In other words, the focus should......Research during recent years has revealed that human errors are not stochastic events which can be removed through improved training programs or optimal interface design. Rather, errors tend to reflect either systematic interference between various models, rules, and schemata, or the effects...... be on control of the effects of errors rather than on the elimination of errors per se. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework for interface design that attempts to satisfy these objectives. The goal of our framework, called ecological interface design, is to develop a meaningful representation...

  7. Anomalous water dynamics at surfaces and interfaces: synergistic effects of confinement and surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2018-01-01

    In nature, water is often found in contact with surfaces that are extended on the scale of molecule size but small on a macroscopic scale. Examples include lipid bilayers and reverse micelles as well as biomolecules like proteins, DNA and zeolites, to name a few. While the presence of surfaces and interfaces interrupts the continuous hydrogen bond network of liquid water, confinement on a mesoscopic scale introduces new features. Even when extended on a molecular scale, natural and biological surfaces often have features (like charge, hydrophobicity) that vary on the scale of the molecular diameter of water. As a result, many new and exotic features, which are not seen in the bulk, appear in the dynamics of water close to the surface. These different behaviors bear the signature of both water–surface interactions and of confinement. In other words, the altered properties are the result of the synergistic effects of surface–water interactions and confinement. Ultrafast spectroscopy, theoretical modeling and computer simulations together form powerful synergistic approaches towards an understanding of the properties of confined water in such systems as nanocavities, reverse micelles (RMs), water inside and outside biomolecules like proteins and DNA, and also between two hydrophobic walls. We shall review the experimental results and place them in the context of theory and simulations. For water confined within RMs, we discuss the possible interference effects propagating from opposite surfaces. Similar interference is found to give rise to an effective attractive force between two hydrophobic surfaces immersed and kept fixed at a separation of d, with the force showing an exponential dependence on this distance. For protein and DNA hydration, we shall examine a multitude of timescales that arise from frustration effects due to the inherent heterogeneity of these surfaces. We pay particular attention to the role of orientational correlations and modification of

  8. Ultrafast self-action of surface-plasmon polaritons at an air/metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alexandre; Hoang, Thang B.; Fang, Chao; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Smith, David R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of surface-plasmon polaritons (SPP) on a single air/metal interface. Inspired by nonlinear dielectric waveguide theory, we analytically derive a model that describes the nonlinear propagation of SPPs, thus bridging the description of plasmonic and dielectric waveguides. The model, the numerical simulations, and the experiments, which are carried out in the 100 fs regime, reveal that the SPP undergoes strong ultrafast self-action which manifests itself through self-induced absorption. Our observations are consistent with a large, bulk, third-order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3 )) of gold and provide a self-consistent theory of self-action of SPPs at an air/metal interface. Experimentally, we find Im {χ-(3 )} ˜3 ×10-16m2/V2 . These findings have important implications in the nonlinear physics of plasmonics and metamaterials as they provide evidence that nonlinear absorption has a significant effect on the propagation of SPPs excited by intense optical pulses. This self-action is also expected to affect the anomalous absorption of light near subwavelength structures as well as the strength of desirable nonlinear processes such as third-harmonic generation and four-wave mixing, which will inevitably compete with nonlinear absorption.

  9. Surface and interface electronic structure: Three year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3-year activity report covers surface structure and phonon anomalies (surface reconstruction on W(001) and Mo(001), adsorbate lateral ordering, surface Fermi contours and phonon anomalies on Pt(111) and Pd(001)), adsorbate vibrational damping, charge transfer in momentum space: W(011)-K, surface states and resonances (relativistic effects ampersand computations, surface resonances)

  10. Quantitative strain analysis of surfaces and interfaces using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimoto, Koichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, Takashi, E-mail: akimoto@nagoya-u.j [Toyota National College of Technology, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    Strain can reduce carrier mobility and the reliability of electronic devices and affect the growth mode of thin films and the stability of nanometer-scale crystals. To control lattice strain, a technique for measuring the minute lattice strain at surfaces and interfaces is needed. Recently, an extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction method has been developed for this purpose. By employing Darwin's dynamical x-ray diffraction theory, quantitative evaluation of strain at surfaces and interfaces becomes possible. In this paper, we review our quantitative strain analysis studies on native SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces, reconstructed Si surfaces, Ni/Si(111)-H interfaces, sputtered III-V compound semiconductor surfaces, high-k/Si interfaces, and Au ion-implanted Si. (topical review)

  11. Competitive Adsorption between Nanoparticles and Surface Active Ions for the Oil-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoqing; Bevan, Michael A; Frechette, Joelle

    2018-04-16

    Nanoparticles (NPs) can add functionality (e.g., catalytic, optical, rheological) to an oil-water interface. Adsorption of ∼10 nm NPs can be reversible; however, the mechanisms for adsorption and its effects on surface pressure remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate how the competitive reversible adsorption of NPs and surfactants at fluid interfaces can lead to independent control of both the adsorbed amount and surface pressure. In contrast to prior work, both species investigated (NPs and surfactants) interact reversibly with the interface and without the surface active species binding to NPs. Independent measurements of the adsorption and surface pressure isotherms allow determination of the equation of state (EOS) of the interface under conditions where the NPs and surfactants are both in dynamic equilibrium with the bulk phase. The adsorption and surface pressure measurements are performed with gold NPs of two different sizes (5 and 10 nm), at two pH values, and across a wide concentration range of surfactant (tetrapentylammonium, TPeA + ) and NPs. We show that free surface active ions compete with NPs for the interface and give rise to larger surface pressures upon the adsorption of NPs. Through a competitive adsorption model, we decouple the contributions of NPs wetting at the interface and their surface activity on the measured surface pressure. We also demonstrate reversible control of adsorbed amount via changes in the surfactant concentration or the aqueous phase pH.

  12. modelling the behaviour of interface surfaces using the finite eleme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    against pressure. 0 b distance of the unloading branch of the τ-δ curve from the original. 1. 2. 3 b , b , b coefficients of the τ-δ curve (loading branch). 1. 2. 3 slope and intercept of the straight lines obtained when b , b , b are plotted against pressure c constant determined by the characteristic of the interface an defined by.

  13. Interfaces in aquatic ecosystems: Implications for transport and impact of anthropogenic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knulst, J.

    1996-11-01

    Mechanisms that govern transport, accumulation and toxicity of persistent pollutants at interfaces in aquatic ecosystems were the foci of this thesis. Specific attention was paid to humic substances, their occurrence, composition, and role in exchange processes across interfaces. It was concluded that: The composition of humic substances in aquatic surface microlayers is different from that of the subsurface water and terrestrial humic matter. Levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aquatic surface microlayer reflect the DOC levels in the subsurface water. While the levels and enrichment of DOC in the microlayer generally show small variations, the levels and enrichment of particulate organic carbon (POC) vary to a great extent. Similarities exist between aquatic surface films, artificial semi-permeable and biological membranes regarding their structure and functioning. Acidification and liming of freshwater ecosystems affect DOC:POC ratio and humic composition of the surface film, thus influencing the partitioning of pollutants across aquatic interfaces. Properties of lake catchment areas extensively govern DOC:POC ratio both in the surface film and subsurface water. Increased UV-B irradiation changes the DOC:POC ratio in the surface film and thus affect transfer of matter across the interface. Transport of lipophilic, persistent organic pollutants across semi-permeable membranes is influenced by the solutes organic composition. 106 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  14. The complex dispersion relation of surface plasmon polaritons at gold/para-hexaphenylene interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Christoph; Leißner, Till; Klick, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon photoemission electron microscopy (2P-PEEM) is used to measure the real and imaginary part of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon polaritons at different interface systems. A comparison of calculated and measured dispersion data for a gold/vacuum interface demonstrates...

  15. Magnetic and Nematic Orders of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at Oxide (111) Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Nazim; Wachtel, Gideon; Paramekanti, Arun

    2018-02-01

    Recent experiments have explored two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at oxide (111) surfaces and interfaces, finding evidence for hexagonal symmetry breaking in SrTiO3 at low temperature. We discuss many-body instabilities of such (111) 2DEGs, incorporating multiorbital interactions in the t2 g manifold which can induce diverse magnetic and orbital orders. Such broken symmetries may partly account for the observed nematicity, cooperating or competing with phonon mechanisms. We present an effective field theory for the interplay of magnetism and nematic charge order, and discuss implications of the nematicity for transport and superconductivity in (111) 2DEGs.

  16. High Speed Surface Thermocouples Interface to Wireless Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    0.0055 - Oxy Acetylene Platinum Surface TC - Diesel Piston Platinum Surface TC - Oxy Acetylene Platinum Surface TC Pt Photo Pickup --Cr Photo ...Astrophysicists and astronomers On asteroids, meteors, moons , planets, or in the coronas of stars Plans to Transition this SBIR Technology to the Customer...analysis, and research and development work. Images Depicting the Developed Technology See Figure 2 for a photo containing both a MesoScribe sample

  17. Free surface modelling with two-fluid model and reduced numerical diffusion of the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, Luka; Tiselj, Izrok

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The free surface flows are successfully modelled with one of existing free surface models, such as: level set method, volume of fluid method (with/without surface reconstruction), front tracking, two-fluid model (two momentum equations) with modified interphase force and others. The main disadvantage of two-fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows is numerical diffusion of the interface, which can be significantly reduced using the method presented in this paper. Several techniques for reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface have been implemented in the volume of fluid model and are based on modified numerical schemes for advection of volume fraction near the interface. The same approach could be used also for two-fluid method, but according to our experience more successful reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface can be achieved with conservative level set method. Within the conservative level set method, continuity equation for volume fraction is solved and after that the numerical diffusion of the interface is reduced in such a way that the thickness of the interface is kept constant during the simulation. Reduction of the interface diffusion can be also called interface sharpening. In present paper the two-fluid model with interface sharpening is validated on Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Under assumptions of isothermal and incompressible flow of two immiscible fluids, we simulated a system with the fluid of higher density located above the fluid of smaller density in two dimensions. Due to gravity in the system, fluid with higher density moves below the fluid with smaller density. Initial condition is not a flat interface between the fluids, but a sine wave with small amplitude, which develops into a mushroom-like structure. Mushroom-like structure in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability later develops to small droplets as result of numerical dispersion of interface (interface sharpening

  18. Simulation of foulant bioparticle topography based on Gaussian process and its implications for interface behavior research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Lin, Hongjun; Yu, Genying; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of randomly rough bioparticle surface is crucial to better understand and control interface behaviors and membrane fouling. Pursuing literature indicated a lack of effective method for simulating random rough bioparticle surface. In this study, a new method which combines Gaussian distribution, Fourier transform, spectrum method and coordinate transformation was proposed to simulate surface topography of foulant bioparticles in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The natural surface of a foulant bioparticle was found to be irregular and randomly rough. The topography simulated by the new method was quite similar to that of real foulant bioparticles. Moreover, the simulated topography of foulant bioparticles was critically affected by parameters correlation length (l) and root mean square (σ). The new method proposed in this study shows notable superiority over the conventional methods for simulation of randomly rough foulant bioparticles. The ease, facility and fitness of the new method point towards potential applications in interface behaviors and membrane fouling research.

  19. Surface and interface electronic structure: Sixth year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Several productive runs were made on beamline U4A at NSLS. An upgrade of angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer was largely completed on the beamline. Progress was made on studies of surface states and reconstruction on Mo(001) and W(001), and of surface states and resonances on Pt(111)

  20. modelling the behaviour of interface surfaces using the finite eleme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Norwell, M.A.. 36. Wingo, etal, Hardware assisted self-collision for rigid and deformable surfaces, Journal of. Tele-operators and Virtual Environments. Dec., 2004. Vol. 13, No 6 pp 681-691. 37. Brian Von Herzen, etal. Geometric Collisions for Time- dependent parametric surfaces. ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics, Aug.,.

  1. X-ray and neutron scattering from surface and interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metoki, Naoto

    1995-01-01

    Recent X-ray and neutron surface scattering studies of magnetic metal thin films and superlattices are reviewed. The Fresnel and Master formula for the specular reflectivity of ideal and real surfaces, respectively, are explained. We show some experimental results of X-ray specular reflectivity of Si, Co thin film, and Co/Cr superlattices as well as spin-polarized neutron reflectivity of a non-colinearly coupled Fe/Cr superlattice. A recent surface scattering study of hcp-bcc structural change of Co layers in Co/Cr (001) superlattices is reviewed as an example of this method. (author)

  2. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion wit...

  3. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Rosengaard, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    We have implemented an efficient self-consistent Green’s-function technique for calculating ground-state properties of surfaces and interfaces, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In this approach the interlayer interaction is extremely short...... ranged, and only a few layers close to the interface need be treated self-consistently via a Dyson equation. For semi-infinite jellium, the technique gives work functions and surface energies that are in excellent agreement with earlier calculations. For the bcc(110) surface of the alkali metals, we find...

  4. Effect of surface stress and irregularity of the interface on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 27 May 2007; revised 4 March 2009. Abstract. The object of the present paper is to investigate plane SH waves through a magneto-elastic crustal layer based over an elastic, solid semi space under the influence of surface stress on the free surface of the crustal layer and irregularity of the interface. Two types of ...

  5. Analysis of bacterial detachment from substratum surfaces by the passage of air-liquid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Suarez, C; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria

  6. Effects of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-09-27

    In this paper, we report the results of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The surface scattering effect has been extracted from the total anomalous Hall effect. By scaling surface scattering contribution with ρAHs∼ργss, the exponent γ has been found to decrease with the increase of surface scattering resistivity, which could account for the thickness-dependent anomalous Hall effect. Interface diffusion induced by rapid thermal annealing modifies not only the magnetization and longitudinal resistivity but also the anomalous Hall effect; a large exponent γ ∼ 5.7 has been attributed to interface scattering-dominated anomalous Hall effect.

  7. The Contribution of Antimonide Surface Reconstructions to Heterostructure Interface Roughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bracker, A. S; Barvosa-Carter, W; Culbertson, J. C; Nosho, B. Z; Whitman, L. J; Shanabrook, B. V; Bennett, B. R; Yang, M. J

    1999-01-01

    ... for the 6.1 Angstrom family of compound semiconductors (InAs, GaSb, AlSb). The structure and stoichiometry of MBE-grown antimonide surfaces lead to growth and roughening mechanisms that are distinctly different from other III-V materials...

  8. Predicting protein-protein interface residues using local surface structural similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Rafael A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the residues in protein-protein interaction sites has a significant impact in problems such as drug discovery. Motivated by the observation that the set of interface residues of a protein tend to be conserved even among remote structural homologs, we introduce PrISE, a family of local structural similarity-based computational methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Results We present a novel representation of the surface residues of a protein in the form of structural elements. Each structural element consists of a central residue and its surface neighbors. The PrISE family of interface prediction methods uses a representation of structural elements that captures the atomic composition and accessible surface area of the residues that make up each structural element. Each of the members of the PrISE methods identifies for each structural element in the query protein, a collection of similar structural elements in its repository of structural elements and weights them according to their similarity with the structural element of the query protein. PrISEL relies on the similarity between structural elements (i.e. local structural similarity. PrISEG relies on the similarity between protein surfaces (i.e. general structural similarity. PrISEC, combines local structural similarity and general structural similarity to predict interface residues. These predictors label the central residue of a structural element in a query protein as an interface residue if a weighted majority of the structural elements that are similar to it are interface residues, and as a non-interface residue otherwise. The results of our experiments using three representative benchmark datasets show that the PrISEC outperforms PrISEL and PrISEG; and that PrISEC is highly competitive with state-of-the-art structure-based methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Our comparison of PrISEC with PredUs, a recently

  9. Interfacing biomembrane mimetic polymer surfaces with living cells - Surface modification for reliable bioartificial liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takami, Utae; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2008-01-01

    The surface design used for reducing nonspecific biofouling is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. We present here a newly synthesized a carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymer for surface modification of medical devices to control the interface with living cells. A random copolymer composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate (LAMA) was synthesized by conventional radical polymerization. The monomer feeding ratio in the copolymer was adjusted to 24/75/1 (MPC/BMA/LAMA). The copolymer (PMBL1.0) could be coated by solvent evaporation from an ethanol solution. Cells of the human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) having asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) were seeded on PMBL1.0 or poly(BMA) (PBMA)-coated PET plates. On PBMA, many adherent cells were observed and were well spread with monolayer adhesion. HepG2 adhesion was observed on PMBL1.0 because the cell has ASGPRs. Furthermore, some of the cells adhering to PMBL1.0 had a spheroid formation and similarly shaped spheroids were scattered on the surface. According to confocal laser microscopic observation after 96 h cultivation, it was found that albumin production preferentially occurred in the center of the spheroid. The albumin production of the cells that adhered to PBMA was sparse. The amount of albumin production per unit cell that adhered to PMBL1.0 was determined by ELISA and was significantly higher than that which adhered to PBMA. Long-term cultivation of HepG2 was also performed using hollow fiber mini-modules coated with PMBL1.0. The concentration of albumin produced from HepG2 increased continuously for one month. In the mini-module, the function of HepG2 was effectively preserved for that period. On the hollow fiber membrane, spheroid formation of HepG2 cells was also observed. In conclusion, PMBL1.0 can provide a suitable surface for the cultivation of

  10. A finite-density calculation of the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.G.; McMullen, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The surface tension of the isotropic-nematic interface in a fluid of intermediate-sized hard particles is studied and calculated. The transition from isotropic to nematic is fixed to occur in a continuous fashion by varying the biaxiality of the model particles. A reversal in the preferred orientation of the bulk nematic relative to the isotropic-nematic interface suggests an oblique orientation of the bulk nematic. 32 refs., 8 figs

  11. Incorporating contact angles in the surface tension force with the ACES interface curvature scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owkes, Mark

    2017-11-01

    In simulations of gas-liquid flows interacting with solid boundaries, the contact line dynamics effect the interface motion and flow field through the surface tension force. The surface tension force is directly proportional to the interface curvature and the problem of accurately imposing a contact angle must be incorporated into the interface curvature calculation. Many commonly used algorithms to compute interface curvatures (e.g., height function method) require extrapolating the interface, with defined contact angle, into the solid to allow for the calculation of a curvature near a wall. Extrapolating can be an ill-posed problem, especially in three-dimensions or when multiple contact lines are near each other. We have developed an accurate methodology to compute interface curvatures that allows for contact angles to be easily incorporated while avoiding extrapolation and the associated challenges. The method, known as Adjustable Curvature Evaluation Scale (ACES), leverages a least squares fit of a polynomial to points computed on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) representation of the gas-liquid interface. The method is tested by simulating canonical test cases and then applied to simulate the injection and motion of water droplets in a channel (relevant to PEM fuel cells).

  12. Characterization of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces by high energy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narusawa, Tadashi; Kobayashi, K.L.I.; Nakashima, Hisao

    1984-01-01

    The use of surface peak, which appears in MeV ion channeling experiments, is demonstrated as a local probe for direct and quantitative measurements of atomic displacements smaller than --0.1A. The atomic structures of GaAs(001)-c(4x4) clean surface and hydrogen-absorbed (1x1) surface are analyzed by this technique as well as the interface atomic structures of GaAs(001)-SiOsub(x) and Si(111)-Pd systems. (author)

  13. Third-harmonic generation at a silver/vacuum interface using surface plasmon polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Deutsch, Miriam

    2014-07-01

    We present an analytical study of a third-harmonic generation process by surface plasmon polaritons at a Kerr-nonlinear-metal/dielectric interface. Using a planar silver/vacuum interface, we obtain a solution to the frequency-tripling process, showing a semibound third-harmonic surface wave. Unlike the fundamental surface-bound mode, the nonlinear signal radiates into the metal, while remaining bound at the dielectric side of the interface. The propagation of the tripled frequency wave into the metal is generally lossy, except within a narrow range of ultraviolet frequencies, where it is minimally attenuated. The latter is enabled by a transparency window that is unique to the permittivity of silver.

  14. Generation of Electricity at Graphene Interface Governed by Underlying Surface Dipole Induced Ion Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanshan; Su, Yudan; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Tian, Chuanshan

    Aqueous droplet moving along graphene surface can produce electricity This interesting phenomenon provided environment-friendly means to harvest energy from graphene interface in contact with sea wave or rain droplets. However, microscopically, the nature of charge adsorption at the graphene interface is still unclear. Here, utilizing sum-frequency spectroscopy in combined with measurement of electrical power generation, the origin of charge adsorption on graphene was investigated. It was found that the direct ion-graphene interaction is negligibly small, contrary to the early speculation, but the ordered surface dipole from the supporting substrate, such as PET, is responsible for ion adsorption at the interface. Graphene serves as a conductive layer with mild screening of Coulomb interaction when aqueous droplet slips over the surface. These results pave the way for optimization of energy harvesting efficiency of graphene-based device.

  15. Origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleoni, Davide; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    Through first-principles simulation methods, we assign the origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces to the bistability between the As-As dimer and two As dangling bonds, which transform into each other upon charge trapping. This defect is shown to be naturally formed both at GaAs surfaces upon oxygen deposition and in the near-interface substoichiometric oxide. Using electron-counting arguments, we infer that the identified defect occurs in opposite charge states. The Fermi-level pinning then results from the amphoteric nature of this defect which drives the Fermi level to its defect level. These results account for the experimental characterization at both GaAs surfaces and interfaces within a unified picture, wherein the role of As antisites is elucidated.

  16. Impurity diffusion, point defect engineering, and surface/interface passivation in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2012-01-26

    In recent years germanium has been emerging as a mainstream material that could have important applications in the microelectronics industry. The principle aim of this study is to review investigations of the diffusion of technologically important p- and n-type dopants as well as surface and interface passivation issues in germanium. The diffusion of impurities in germanium is interrelated to the formation of clusters whenever possible, and possibilities for point defect engineering are discussed in view of recent results. The importance of electrically active defects on the Ge surface and interfaces is addressed considering strategies to suppress them and to passivate the surfaces/interfaces, bearing in mind their importance for advanced devices. © 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Revealing textural variations at the groundwater-surface water interface using induced polarisation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, P.; Binley, A. M.; Chambers, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    The groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interface actively governs the transfer of water, nutrients and contaminants between groundwater systems and surface water environments. It is capable of mitigating environmental pollution by attenuating and transforming contaminants transported by groundwater discharging to the surface or by surface water recharging to the subsurface. The ability of the GW-SW interface to mitigate pollution is linked to its hydrological and physiochemical properties, the presence of grain surfaces, and its consequent ability to host diverse microbial populations. Despite its importance, characterising the GW-SW interface remains a challenge as traditional methods are often intrusive, environmentally damaging or labour intensive and so they often provide spatially sparse, or spatially restricted, information. There is therefore a requirement for methods which can provide information about the GW-SW interface at high spatial resolution and over large areas. In recent years there has been increased interest in using induced polarisation in field based exploration to characterise grain surface properties of unconsolidated geological materials. Induced polarisation may offer the potential to interrogate textural properties of the GW-SW interface, such as cation exchange and grain surface area which are important for determining the biogeochemical properties of the subsurface. Here we demonstrate the ability of induced polarisation measurements to reveal contrasts in the textural properties of two sites on a 200 m river meander (River Leith, Cumbria, UK). Previous work has revealed that both sites are distinctive in terms of their hydrology, fluvial deposits and biogeochemistry. We present in-stream induced polarisation measurements in addition to lab based measurements of induced polarisation, cation exchange capacity, grain size distribution and surface area on samples obtained from drilling.

  18. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-09-01

    The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution Dit(E), and density Dit,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on concentrated solutions. Therefore, special attention was put on the development of more environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing e.g. hot pure water with low contents of oxygen or hydrochloric acid, and of ozone, working at ambient temperatures. According to our results, these methods could be a high quality and low cost alternative to current approaches with liquid chemicals for the preparation of hydrophobic Si substrate surfaces and ultra-thin passivating oxide layers. As demonstrated for selected examples, the effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositions of Si oxides (SiOx), or amorphous materials such as Si (a-Si:H), Si nitride (a

  19. Interface nano-confined acoustic waves in polymeric surface phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travagliati, Marco, E-mail: marco.travagliati@iit.it [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation@NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Nardi, Damiano [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, 440 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Giannetti, Claudio; Ferrini, Gabriele; Banfi, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.banfi@unicatt.it [i-LAMP and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Gusev, Vitalyi [LAUM, UMR-CNRS 6613, Université du Maine, av. O. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Pingue, Pasqualantonio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Piazza, Vincenzo [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation@NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-01-12

    The impulsive acoustic dynamics of soft polymeric surface phononic crystals is investigated here in the hypersonic frequency range by near-IR time-resolved optical diffraction. The acoustic response is analysed by means of wavelet spectral methods and finite element modeling. An unprecedented class of acoustic modes propagating within the polymer surface phononic crystal and confined within 100 nm of the nano-patterned interface is revealed. The present finding opens the path to an alternative paradigm for characterizing the mechanical properties of soft polymers at interfaces and for sensing schemes exploiting polymers as embedding materials.

  20. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  1. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of metallic surface and interface states of oxide insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Nicholas C.; Radović, Milan

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, conducting states embedded in insulating transition metal oxides (TMOs) have served as gateways to discovering and probing surprising phenomena that can emerge in complex oxides, while also opening opportunities for engineering advanced devices. These states are commonly realized at thin film interfaces, such as the well-known case of LaAlO3 (LAO) grown on SrTiO3 (STO). In recent years, the use of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the k-space electronic structure of such materials led to the discovery that metallic states can also be formed on the bare surfaces of certain TMOs. In this topical review, we report on recent studies of low-dimensional metallic states confined at insulating oxide surfaces and interfaces as seen from the perspective of ARPES, which provides a direct view of the occupied band structure. While offering a fairly broad survey of progress in the field, we draw particular attention to STO, whose surface is so far the best-studied, and whose electronic structure is probably of the most immediate interest, given the ubiquitous use of STO substrates as the basis for conducting oxide interfaces. The ARPES studies provide crucial insights into the electronic band structure, orbital character, dimensionality/confinement, spin structure, and collective excitations in STO surfaces and related oxide surface/interface systems. The obtained knowledge increases our understanding of these complex materials and gives new perspectives on how to manipulate their properties.

  3. Transmission/reflection behaviors of surface plasmons at an interface between two plasmonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Fuxin; Sun, Shulin; Ma, Shaojie; Fang, Zhening; Zhu, Baocheng; Li, Xin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Zhou, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Although surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have been intensively studied in past years, the transmission/reflection properties of SPPs at an interface between two plasmonic media are still not fully understood. In this article, we employ a mode expansion method (MEM) to systematically study such a problem based on a model system jointing two superlattices, each consisting of a periodic stacking of dielectric and plasmonic slabs with different material properties. Such a generic model can represent two widely used plasmonic structures (i.e. interfaces between two single dielectric/metal systems or between two metal–insulator–metal waveguides) under certain conditions. Our MEM calculations, in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations, uncover the rich physics behind the SPP reflections at generic plasmonic interfaces. In particular, we successfully derive from the MEM several analytical formulas that can quantitatively describe the SPP reflections at different plasmonic interfaces, and show that our formulas exhibit wider applicable regions than previously proposed empirical ones.

  4. Proceedings of the first workshop on Peripheral Machine Interfaces: Going beyond traditional surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eCastellini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the hottest topics in rehabilitation robotics is that of proper control of prosthetic devices. Despite decades of research, the state of the art is dramatically behind the expectations. To shed light on this issue, in June, 2013 the first international workshop on Present and future of non-invasive PNS-Machine Interfaces was convened, hosted by the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. The keyword PNS-Machine Interface (PMI has been selected to denote human-machine interfaces targeted at the limb-deficient, mainly upper-limb amputees, dealing with signals gathered from the peripheral nervous system (PNS in a non-invasive way, that is, from the surface of the residuum. The workshop was intended to provide an overview of the state of the art and future perspectives of such interfaces; this paper represents is a collection of opinions expressed by each and every researcher/group involved in it.

  5. Adhesion Evaluation of Asphalt-Aggregate Interface Using Surface Free Energy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ji

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of organic additives (Sasobit and RH and water on the adhesion of the asphalt-aggregate interface was studied according to the surface free energy theory. Two asphalt binders (SK-70 and SK-90, and two aggregate types (limestone and basalt were used in this study. The sessile drop method was employed to test surface free energy components of asphalt, organic additives and aggregates. The adhesion models of the asphalt-aggregate interface in dry and wet conditions were established, and the adhesion work was calculated subsequently. The energy ratios were built to evaluate the effect of organic additives and water on the adhesiveness of the asphalt-aggregate interface. The results indicate that the addition of organic additives can enhance the adhesion of the asphalt-aggregate interface in dry conditions, because organic additives reduced the surface free energy of asphalt. However, the organic additives have hydrophobic characteristics and are sensitive to water. As a result, the adhesiveness of the asphalt-aggregate interface of the asphalt containing organic additives in wet conditions sharply decreased due to water damage to asphalt and organic additives. Furthermore, the compatibility of asphalt, aggregate with organic additive was noted and discussed.

  6. Air–water interface of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Moosmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Underwater air retention of superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces is of increasing interest for technical applications. Persistent air layers (the Salvinia effect are known from biological species, for example, the floating fern Salvinia or the backswimmer Notonecta. The use of this concept opens up new possibilities for biomimetic technical applications in the fields of drag reduction, antifouling, anticorrosion and under water sensing. Current knowledge regarding the shape of the air–water interface is insufficient, although it plays a crucial role with regards to stability in terms of diffusion and dynamic conditions. Optical methods for imaging the interface have been limited to the micrometer regime. In this work, we utilized a nondynamic and nondestructive atomic force microscopy (AFM method to image the interface of submerged superhydrophobic structures with nanometer resolution. Up to now, only the interfaces of nanobubbles (acting almost like solids have been characterized by AFM at these dimensions. In this study, we show for the first time that it is possible to image the air–water interface of submerged hierarchically structured (micro-pillars surfaces by AFM in contact mode. By scanning with zero resulting force applied, we were able to determine the shape of the interface and thereby the depth of the water penetrating into the underlying structures. This approach is complemented by a second method: the interface was scanned with different applied force loads and the height for zero force was determined by linear regression. These methods open new possibilities for the investigation of air-retaining surfaces, specifically in terms of measuring contact area and in comparing different coatings, and thus will lead to the development of new applications.

  7. Spatially-dispersive surface modes on interfaces of layered hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popov, Vladislav; Novitsky, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present the study of influence of spatial dispersion on the existence of surface modes on the interfaces with multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs). To that end we employ operator effective medium approximation correcting the Maxwell Garnett approximation. We find out...

  8. Drug delivery to the bone-implant interface: Functional hydroxyapatite surfaces and particles

    OpenAIRE

    Schüssele, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    With the goal of controlling the events at the bone-implant interface, it was the main objective of this thesis to provide a basis for the conjugation of cell stimulating molecules or targeting motifs to the surface of hydroxyapatite ceramic discs and particles. To this end, methods for surface functionalization have been investigated for the attachment of biomolecules. The approach focused on combining three approved and effective principles for enhanced osseointegration of implants: hydroxy...

  9. Calculation of surface potentials at the silica-water interface using molecular dynamics: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Benjamin M.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Green, Nicolas G.; Shibuta, Yasushi; Sakata, Toshiya

    2018-04-01

    Continuum-based methods are important in calculating electrostatic properties of interfacial systems such as the electric field and surface potential but are incapable of providing sufficient insight into a range of fundamentally and technologically important phenomena which occur at atomistic length-scales. In this work a molecular dynamics methodology is presented for interfacial electric field and potential calculations. The silica-water interface was chosen as an example system, which is highly relevant for understanding the response of field-effect transistors sensors (FET sensors). Detailed validation work is presented, followed by the simulated surface charge/surface potential relationship. This showed good agreement with experiment at low surface charge density but at high surface charge density the results highlighted challenges presented by an atomistic definition of the surface potential. This methodology will be used to investigate the effect of surface morphology and biomolecule addition; both factors which are challenging using conventional continuum models.

  10. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R.; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with ‘resilience’ defined in this study as a biofilm’s capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation. PMID:27746774

  11. Two Surface-Tension Formulations For The Level Set Interface-Tracking Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepel, S.V.; Smith, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes a comparative study of two surface-tension models for the Level Set interface tracking method. In both models, the surface tension is represented as a body force, concentrated near the interface, but the technical implementation of the two options is different. The first is based on a traditional Level Set approach, in which the surface tension is distributed over a narrow band around the interface using a smoothed Delta function. In the second model, which is based on the integral form of the fluid-flow equations, the force is imposed only in those computational cells through which the interface passes. Both models have been incorporated into the Finite-Element/Finite-Volume Level Set method, previously implemented into the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX-4. A critical evaluation of the two models, undertaken in the context of four standard Level Set benchmark problems, shows that the first model, based on the smoothed Delta function approach, is the more general, and more robust, of the two. (author)

  12. MeV ion-induced strain at nanoisland-semiconductor surface and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, J. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Umananda, M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Satyam, P.V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)]. E-mail: satyam@iopb.res.in; Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ito, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, T. [Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    Strain at surfaces and interfaces play an important role in the optical and electronic properties of materials. MeV ion-induced strain determination in single crystal silicon substrates and in Ag (nanoisland)/Si(1 1 1) at surface/interfaces has been carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface-sensitive X-ray diffraction. Irradiation has been carried out with 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ions at various fluences and impact angles. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and lattice imaging (using TEM) has been used to determine the strain at surface and interfaces. Preliminary results on the use of surface-sensitive asymmetric X-ray Bragg reflection method have been discussed. The TEM results directly indicate a contraction in the silicon lattice due to ion-induced effects. The nanoislands have shadowed the ion beam resulting in lesser strain beneath the island structures in silicon substrates. High-resolution lattice imaging has also been used to determine the strain in and around amorphization zones caused by the ion irradiation.

  13. Surface history of Mercury - Implications for terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Strom, R. G.; Trask, N. J.; Gault, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A plausible surface history of Mercury is presented which is suggested by Mariner 10 television pictures. Five periods are postulated which are delineated by successive variations in the modification of the surface by external and internal processes: accretion and differentiation, terminal heavy bombardment, formation of the Caloris basin, flooding of that basin and other areas, and light cratering accumulated on the smooth plains. Each period is described in detail; the overall history is compared with the surface histories of Venus, Mars, and the moon; and the implications of this history for earth are discussed. It is tentatively concluded that: Mercury is a differentiated planet most likely composed of a large iron core enclosed by a relatively thin silicate layer; heavy surface bombardment occurred about four billion years ago, which probably affected all the inner planets, and was followed by a period of volcanic activity; no surface modifications caused by tectonic, volcanic, or atmospheric processes took place after the volcanic period.

  14. The Rapid Assessment Interface and Discharge service and its implications for patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh I

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Inderpal Singh,1 Sharan Ramakrishna,1 Kathryn Williamson21Department of Geriatric Medicine, 2Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Ysbyty Ystrad Fawr, Ystrad Mynach, Caerphilly, United KingdomAbstract: The rising prevalence of dementia will have an effect on acute care hospitals around the world. At present, around 40% of patients older than 70 years with acute medical admissions have dementia, but only half of these patients have been diagnosed. Patients with dementia have poorer health outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher rates of readmissions and institutionalization. Worldwide, health care budgets are severely constrained. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE has listed ten quality standards for supporting people in living well with dementia. NICE resource implications and commissioning support to implement these guidelines and improve dementia services have been recently published. Although most of the frail elderly patients with dementia are cared for by geriatricians, obstacles to making a diagnosis and to the management of dementia have been recognized. To provide a timely diagnosis of dementia, better care in acute hospital settings, and continuity of care in the community, services integrating all these elements are warranted. Extra resources also will be required for intermediate, palliative care, and mental health liaison services for people with dementia. The Birmingham Rapid Assessment Interface and Discharge service model uses a multiskilled team that provides comprehensive assessment of a person's physical and psychological well-being in a general hospital setting. It has been shown to be an effective model in terms of reducing both length of stay and avoiding readmission. The aim of this review is to discuss the implications of the Rapid Assessment Interface and Discharge model in people with dementia and to critically compare this model with similar published service provisions.Keywords: comorbidity, aged

  15. Surface and interface analysis of poly-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-coated anodic aluminium oxide membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Nurshahidah [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia); Murdoch Applied Nanotechnology Research Group, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia); Duan, Xiaofei [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jiang, Zhong-Tao, E-mail: Z.Jiang@murdoch.edu.au [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia); Goh, Bee Min [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia); Lamb, Robert [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Tadich, Anton [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, VIC 3086 (Australia); Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Fawcett, Derek [Murdoch Applied Nanotechnology Research Group, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia); Chapman, Peter [Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, WA 6102 (Australia); Singh, Pritam [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    The surface and interface of poly (2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) and anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes were comprehensively investigated using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. It was found that 1s→π* (C=O) and 1s→σ* (C-O) transitions were dominant on the surface of both bulk PHEMA polymer and PHEMA-surface coated AAO (AAO–PHEMA) composite. Findings from NEXAFS, Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses suggest the possibility of chemical interaction between carbon from the ester group of polymer and AAO membrane.

  16. Engineering the Surface/Interface Structures of Titanium Dioxide Micro and Nano Architectures towards Environmental and Electrochemical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Yanyan; Mølhave, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    advances in the surface and interface engineering and applications in environmental and electrochemical applications. We analyze the advantages of surface/interface engineered TiO₂ micro and nano structures, and present the principles and growth mechanisms of TiO₂ nanostructures via different strategies...

  17. Removal of colloidal particles from quartz collector surfaces as stimulated by the passage of liquid-air interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez, CG; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Micron-sized particles adhering to collector surfaces can be detached by passing a liquid-air interface over the adhering particles. Theoretically, the efficiency of particle detachment depends on the interface velocity, the liquid surface tension, the viscosity, and the particle-substratum

  18. Proceedings of the first workshop on Peripheral Machine Interfaces: going beyond traditional surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Claudio; Artemiadis, Panagiotis; Wininger, Michael; Ajoudani, Arash; Alimusaj, Merkur; Bicchi, Antonio; Caputo, Barbara; Craelius, William; Dosen, Strahinja; Englehart, Kevin; Farina, Dario; Gijsberts, Arjan; Godfrey, Sasha B.; Hargrove, Levi; Ison, Mark; Kuiken, Todd; Marković, Marko; Pilarski, Patrick M.; Rupp, Rüdiger; Scheme, Erik

    2014-01-01

    One of the hottest topics in rehabilitation robotics is that of proper control of prosthetic devices. Despite decades of research, the state of the art is dramatically behind the expectations. To shed light on this issue, in June, 2013 the first international workshop on Present and future of non-invasive peripheral nervous system (PNS)–Machine Interfaces (MI; PMI) was convened, hosted by the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. The keyword PMI has been selected to denote human–machine interfaces targeted at the limb-deficient, mainly upper-limb amputees, dealing with signals gathered from the PNS in a non-invasive way, that is, from the surface of the residuum. The workshop was intended to provide an overview of the state of the art and future perspectives of such interfaces; this paper represents is a collection of opinions expressed by each and every researcher/group involved in it. PMID:25177292

  19. The Impact of Solid Surface Features on Fluid-Fluid Interface Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, J. B.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2017-12-01

    Pore-scale fluid processes in geological media are critical for a broad range of applications such as radioactive waste disposal, carbon sequestration, soil moisture distribution, subsurface pollution, land stability, and oil and gas recovery. The continued improvement of high-resolution image acquisition and processing have provided a means to test the usefulness of theoretical models developed to simulate pore-scale fluid processes, through the direct quantification of interfaces. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography is used in combination with advanced visualization tools to characterize fluid distributions in natural geologic media. The studies revealed the presence of fluid-fluid interface associated with macroscopic features on the surfaces of the solids such as pits and crevices. These features and respective fluid interfaces, which are not included in current theoretical or computational models, may have a significant impact on accurate simulation and understanding of multi-phase flow, energy, heat and mass transfer processes.

  20. Surface stress and large-scale self-organization at organic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollinger, Florian

    2009-01-22

    The role of elastic interactions, particularly for the self-organized formation of periodically faceted interfaces, was investigated in this thesis for archetype organic-metal interfaces. The cantilever bending technique was applied to study the change of surface stress upon formation of the interface between 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(111). The main focus of this work was on the investigation of the formation of the long-range ordered, self-organized faceted PTCDA/Ag(10 8 7) interface. Reciprocal space maps of this interface were recorded both by spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) in selected area LEED mode. Complementary to the reciprocal data, also microscopic real-space LEEM data were used to characterize the morphology of this interface. Six different facet faces ((111), (532), (743), (954), (13 9 5), and (542)) were observed for the preparation path of molecular adsorption on the substrate kept at 550 K. Facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM localized these facets to grow in homogeneous areas of microscopic extensions. The temperature-dependence of the interface formation was studied in a range between 418 K and 612 K in order to learn more about the kinetics of the process. Additional steeper facets of 27 inclination with respect to the (111) surface were observed in the low temperature regime. Furthermore, using facet-sensitive dark-field LEEM, spatial and size distributions of specific facets were studied for the different temperatures. Moreover, the facet dimensions were statistically analyzed. The total island size of the facets follows an exponential distribution, indicating a random growth mode in absence of any mutual facet interactions. While the length distribution of the facets also follows an exponential distribution, the width distribution is peaked, reflecting the high degree of lateral order. This anisotropy is temperature-dependent and occurs

  1. Analysis of defects near the surface and the interface of semiconductors by monoenergetic positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro

    1989-01-01

    A monoenergetic low-speed positron beam line is constructed and a study is made on defects near the surface and the interface of semiconductors by using the beam line. Sodium-22 is used as beam source. Ion implantation, though being an essential technique for semiconductor integrated circuit production, can introduce lattice defects, affecting the yield and reliability of the resultant semiconductor devices. Some observations are made on the dependence of the Doppler broadening on the depth, and the ΔS-E relationship in P + -ion implanted SiO 2 (43nm)-Si. These observations demonstrate that monoenergetic positron beam is useful to detect hole-type defects resulting from ion implantation over a very wide range of defect density. Another study is made for the detection of defects near an interface. Positrons are expected to drift when left in an electric field with a gradient. Observations made here show that positrons can be concentrated at any desired interface by introducing an electric field intensity gradient in the oxide. This process also serves for accurate measurement of the electronic structure at the interface, and the effect of ion implantation and radiations on the interface. (N.K.)

  2. The role of brand loyalty and social media in e-commerce interfaces: survey results and implications for user interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Rigas, Dimitrios; Hussain, Hammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the role of brand loyalty and social media in e-commerce interfaces. A survey consisting of 118 respondents was contacted to address the questions relating to online shopping and brand loyalty. Link between the frequency of access and time spent on an e-commerce user interface, and brand loyalty, gender and age profile differences, and the role of social media to branding and on-line shopping was analyzed. It was found that online loyalty differs from offline loyalty and l...

  3. Interface pressure mapping pilot study to select surfaces that effectively redistribute pediatric occipital pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higer, Samantha; James, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to better inform clinical decisions to prevent pediatric occipital pressure ulcers with quantitative data to choose an appropriate reactive support surface. A commercially available capacitive pressure mapping system (XSENSOR, X3 Medical Seat System, Calgary, Canada) was used to evaluate a standard pediatric mattress and four commercially available pressure-redistributing support surfaces. The pressure mapping system was validated for use in the pediatric population through studies on sensitivity, accuracy, creep, and repeatability. Then, a pilot pressure mapping study on healthy children under 6 years old (n = 22) was performed to determine interface pressure and pressure distribution between the occipital region of the skull and each surface: standard mattress, gel, foam, air and fluidized. The sensor was adequate to measure pressure generated by pediatric occipital loading, with 0.5-9% error in accuracy in the 25-95 mmHg range. The air surface had the lowest mean interface pressure (p pressure index (PPI), defined as the peak pressure averaged over four sensels, (p pressure for mattress, foam, fluidized, gel, and air materials were 24.8 ± 4.42, 24.1 ± 1.89, 19.4 ± 3.25, 17.9 ± 3.10, and 14.2 ± 1.41 mmHg, respectively. The air surface also had the most homogenous pressure distribution, with the highest mean to PPI ratio (p surfaces (p surface was the most effective pressure-redistributing material for pediatric occipital pressure as it had the lowest interface pressure and a homogeneous pressure distribution. This implies effective envelopment of the bony prominence of the occiput and increasing contact area to decrease peak pressure points. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Support surface interface pressure, microenvironment, and the prevalence of pressure ulcers: an analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Steven I; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Sahgal, Vinod

    2007-10-01

    External pressure is the most frequently considered stress factor in the formation of ulcers. A review and analysis of existing literature addressing the relationship between pressure ulcer prevalence and interface pressures at various anatomic sites was conducted. Results suggest a nearly non-existent or slightly negative correlation between interface pressure and ulcer prevalence in general and spinal cord injured populations, respectively. Despite limitations of the analysis methods used, the observed lack of a direct relationship confirms the results of other studies and suggests that ulcer formation also may involve factors secondary to pressure and mechanical factors (eg, temperature, moisture, duration of the applied load, atrophy, and posture). Based on currently available information, clinicians should include these considerations when selecting a support surface. Studies directly relating primary stress factors and tissue viability with prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers are needed to better understand the benefits of pressure-relieving support surfaces and to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment.

  5. Propagation of high frequency electrostatic surface waves along the planar interface between plasma and dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rinku; Dey, M.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical model is developed that explains the propagation of a high frequency electrostatic surface wave along the interface of a plasma system where semi-infinite electron-ion plasma is interfaced with semi-infinite dusty plasma. The model emphasizes that the source of such high frequency waves is inherent in the presence of ion acoustic and dust ion acoustic/dust acoustic volume waves in electron-ion plasma and dusty plasma region. Wave dispersion relation is obtained for two distinct cases and the role of plasma parameters on wave dispersion is analyzed in short and long wavelength limits. The normalized surface wave frequency is seen to grow linearly for lower wave number but becomes constant for higher wave numbers in both the cases. It is observed that the normalized frequency depends on ion plasma frequencies when dust oscillation frequency is neglected.

  6. Micro and nanostructural characterization of surfaces and interfaces of Portland cement mortars using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of Portland cement mortars is very important in the study the interfaces and surfaces that make up the system grout/ceramic block. In this sense, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer are important tools in investigating the morphology and chemical aspects. However, more detailed topographic information can be necessary in the characterization process. In this work, the aim was to characterize topographically surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied onto ceramic blocks. This has been accomplished by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) - MFP-3D-SA Asylum Research. To date, the results obtained from this research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with the help of AFM has an important contribution in the investigation and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, ettringite and calcium carbonate by providing morphological and micro topographical data, which are extremely important and reliable for the understanding of cementitious materials. (author)

  7. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  8. Modular "click" chemistry for electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to tin oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Michelle C; Ruther, Rose E; Gerken, James B; Rigsby, Matthew L; Bishop, Lee M; Tan, Yizheng; Stahl, Shannon S; Hamers, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of "click" chemistry to form electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to SnO(2) nanoparticle thin films. By using photochemical grafting to link a short-chain alcohol to the surface followed by conversion to a surface azide group, we enable use of the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, a form of "click" chemistry, on metal oxide surfaces. Results are shown with three model compounds to test the surface chemistry and subsequent ability to achieve electrochemical and photoelectrochemical charge transfer. Surface-tethered ferrocene groups exhibit good electron-transfer characteristics with thermal rates estimated at >1000 s(-1). Time-resolved surface photovoltage measurements using a ruthenium terpyridyl coordination compound demonstrate photoelectron charge transfer on time scales of nanoseconds or less, limited by the laser pulse width. The results demonstrate that the CuAAC "click" reaction can be used to form electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to SnO(2) and other metal oxide semiconductors.

  9. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-08-15

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  10. Interface formation between hydrocarbon ring molecules and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passmann, Regina

    2008-01-01

    In this work a systematical study to investigate the adsorption structures of small hydrocarbon ring shaped molecules on III-V semiconductor surfaces with Photo-Emission Spectroscopy (PES), Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as Low Electron Energy Diffraction (LEED) was performed. To investigate the influence of the surface structure in detail the surface dimer configuration to the adsorption process of organic molecules GaAs(001) surfaces, the c(4 x 4), the (2 x 4) and the (4 x 2) have been investigated as well as the adsorption of cyclopentene on the InP(001)(2 x 4) reconstructed surface. In the direct comparison it is shown that cyclopentene bonds to the InP(001)(2 x 4) surface via a cycloaddition like reaction. During this adsorption the double bond splits which is in contrast to the adsorption of cyclopentene on the GaAs(001) surfaces. Therefrom it is concluded that the surface geometry has an influence on the resulting adsorption structure. In order to investigate the influence of the intra-molecular double bonds, cyclopentene (one double bond), 1,4-cyclohexadiene (two double bonds) and benzene (three double bonds) were used for the characterization of the interface formation. With the investigations on the GaAs(001) reconstructed surfaces it was shown that a dependency of the bonding configuration on the intra-molecular double bonds exists. During the adsorption of cyclopentene no evidence was found that the double bond has to be involved in the interface formation while during the adsorption of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and benzene the double bonds are involved. Furthermore it was found that a bonding to As atoms of the surface is more likely than a bonding to Ga atoms. (orig.)

  11. Pairwise structure alignment specifically tuned for surface pockets and interaction interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-09-09

    To detect and evaluate the similarities between the three-dimensional (3D) structures of two molecules, various kinds of methods have been proposed for the pairwise structure alignment problem [6, 9, 7, 11]. The problem plays important roles when studying the function and the evolution of biological molecules. Recently, pairwise structure alignment methods have been extended and applied on surface pocket structures [10, 3, 5] and interaction interface structures [8, 4]. The results show that, even when there are no global similarities discovered between the global sequences and the global structures, biological molecules or complexes could share similar functions because of well conserved pockets and interfaces. Thus, pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments are promising to unveil such shared functions that cannot be discovered by the well-studied global sequence and global structure alignments. State-of-the-art methods for pairwise pocket and interface structure alignments [4, 5] are direct extensions of the classic pairwise protein structure alignment methods, and thus such methods share a few limitations. First, the goal of the classic protein structure alignment methods is to align single-chain protein structures (i.e., a single fragment of residues connected by peptide bonds). However, we observed that pockets and interfaces tend to consist of tens of extremely short backbone fragments (i.e., three or fewer residues connected by peptide bonds). Thus, existing pocket and interface alignment methods based on the protein structure alignment methods still rely on the existence of long-enough backbone fragments, and the fragmentation issue of pockets and interfaces rises the risk of missing the optimal alignments. Moreover, existing interface structure alignment methods focus on protein-protein interfaces, and require a "blackbox preprocessing" before aligning protein-DNA and protein-RNA interfaces. Therefore, we introduce the PROtein STucture Alignment

  12. Dynamics at Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces, Volume 1 Current Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Bovensiepen, Uwe; Wolf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This two-volume work covers ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics of elementary processes at solid surfaces and interfaces, presenting the current status of photoinduced processes. Providing valuable introductory information for newcomers to this booming field of research, it investigates concepts and experiments, femtosecond and attosecond time-resolved methods, as well as frequency domain techniques. The whole is rounded off by a look at future developments.

  13. Scattering of acoustic waves from a surface in the presence of an anharmonic interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulak, A.; Lodziana, Zbigniew; Srokowski, T.

    2002-01-01

    Energy transfer coefficient (analogue of LDOS) and aperiodicity index are defined to characterise the nonlinear response and the surface resonances in a thin layer separated from the underlying bulk crystal by an anharmonic interface. Regions of periodic, aperiodic and intermittent motion of the ...... of the system are found by analysing the electric circuit obeying the same delayed differential equations. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Monolithic dielectric surfaces as new low-loss light-matter interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Frank; Clausnitzer, Tina; Burmeister, Oliver; Friedrich, Daniel; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Tünnermann, Andreas; Schnabel, Roman

    2008-02-01

    We propose a new mirror architecture, which is solely based upon structuring of the surface of a monolithic, possibly monocrystalline, bulk material. We found that a structure of T-shaped ridges of a subwavelength grating can theoretically provide 100% reflectivity. Since no material needs to be added to the mirror device, lowest mechanical loss can also be expected. Our approach might have compelling applications as a new light-matter interface.

  15. Monolithic dielectric surfaces as new low-loss light-matter interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brückner, Frank; Clausnitzer, Tina; Burmeister, Oliver; Friedrich, Daniel; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Tünnermann, Andreas; Schnabel, Roman

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new mirror architecture, which is solely based upon structuring of the surface of a monolithic, possibly monocrystalline, bulk material. We found that a structure of T-shaped ridges of a subwavelength grating can theoretically provide 100% reflectivity. Since no material needs to be added to the mirror device, lowest mechanical loss can also be expected. Our approach might have compelling applications as a new light-matter interface. (C) 2008 Optical Society of America.

  16. On the physics of both surface overcharging and charge reversal at heterophase interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Pengli; Ma, Zengwei

    2018-02-07

    The conventional paradigm for characterizing surface overcharging and charge reversal is based on the so-called Stern layer, in which surface dissociation reaction and specific chemical adsorption are assumed to take place. In this article, a series of Monte Carlo simulations have been applied to obtain useful insights into the underlying physics responsible for these two kinds of anomalous phenomena at the interface of two dielectrics, with special emphasis on the case of divalent counterions that are more relevant in natural and biological environments. At a weakly charged surface, it is found that independent of the type of surface charge distribution and the dielectric response of the solution, the overcharging event is universally driven by the ion size-asymmetric effect. Exceptionally, the overcharging still persists when the surface is highly charged but is only restricted to the case of discrete surface charge in a relatively low dielectric medium. As compared to the adsorption onto the homogeneously smeared charge surface that has the same average affinity for counterions, on the other hand, charge reversal under the action of a dielectric response can be substantially enhanced in the discrete surface charge representation due to strong association of counterions with interfacial groups, and the degree of enhancement depends in a nontrivial way on the reduction of the medium dielectric constant and the steric effects of finite ion size. Rather interestingly, the charge reversal is of high relevance to the overcharging of interfaces because the overwhelming interfacial association forces the coions closer to the surface due to their smaller size than the counterions. Upon the addition of a monovalent salt to the solution, the interfacial association with divalent counterions makes surface overcharging and charge reversal widely unaffected, in contrast to the prevailing notion that screening of surface charge of a homogeneous nature is determined by the

  17. Atlas-free surface reconstruction of the cortical grey-white interface in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Leroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The segmentation of the cortical interface between grey and white matter in magnetic resonance images (MRI is highly challenging during the first post-natal year. First, the heterogeneous brain maturation creates important intensity fluctuations across regions. Second, the cortical ribbon is highly folded creating complex shapes. Finally, the low tissue contrast and partial volume effects hamper cortex edge detection in parts of the brain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We present an atlas-free method for segmenting the grey-white matter interface of infant brains in T2-weighted (T2w images. We used a broad characterization of tissue using features based not only on local contrast but also on geometric properties. Furthermore, inaccuracies in localization were reduced by the convergence of two evolving surfaces located on each side of the inner cortical surface. Our method has been applied to eleven brains of one- to four-month-old infants. Both quantitative validations against manual segmentations and sulcal landmarks demonstrated good performance for infants younger than two months old. Inaccuracies in surface reconstruction increased with age in specific brain regions where the tissue contrast decreased with maturation, such as in the central region. CONCLUSIONS: We presented a new segmentation method which achieved good to very good performance at the grey-white matter interface depending on the infant age. This method should reduce manual intervention and could be applied to pathological brains since it does not require any brain atlas.

  18. Efficient interfacing of light and surface plasmon polaritons for quantum optics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eran, Kot

    oscillations propagating on the surface of metals have been shown to be useful in coupling to quantum dots, nanodiamond NV-centers defects and other quantum emitters. However, being lossy these modes too need to be efficiently coupled out to photons in order to facilitate experimental control of the system...... in a proximity to a metallic interface. Concentric grating rings then couple light propagating normal to the surface to a inward propagating plasmons, showing coupling efficiencies of 70% and enhancement of the emitters decay rate by up to 45 times that of the isolated emitter’s decay rate. Finally, we explore...

  19. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8-30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid-liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying.

  20. Continuous versus Arrested Spreading of Biofilms at Solid-Gas Interfaces: The Role of Surface Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinschek, Sarah; John, Karin; Lecuyer, Sigolène; Thiele, Uwe

    2017-08-01

    We introduce and analyze a model for osmotically spreading bacterial colonies at solid-air interfaces that includes wetting phenomena, i.e., surface forces. The model is based on a hydrodynamic description for liquid suspensions which is supplemented by bioactive processes. We show that surface forces determine whether a biofilm can expand laterally over a substrate and provide experimental evidence for the existence of a transition between continuous and arrested spreading for Bacillus subtilis biofilms. In the case of arrested spreading, the lateral expansion of the biofilm is confined, albeit the colony is biologically active. However, a small reduction in the surface tension of the biofilm is sufficient to induce spreading. The incorporation of surface forces into our hydrodynamic model allows us to capture this transition in biofilm spreading behavior.

  1. Visualization of an air-water interface on superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Hyungmin

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, three-dimensional deformation of air-water interface on superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent channel flows at the Reynolds numbers of Re = 3000 and 10000 is measured with RICM (Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy) technique. Two different types of roughness feature of circular hole and rectangular grate are considered, whose depth is 20 μm and diameter (or width) is varied between 20-200 μm. Since the air-water interface is always at de-pinned state at the considered condition, air-water interface shape and its sagging velocity is maintained to be almost constant as time goes one. In comparison with the previous results under the laminar flow, due to turbulent characteristics of the flow, sagging velocity is much faster. Based on the measured sagging profiles, a modified model to describe the air-water interface dynamics under turbulent flows is suggested. Supported by City of Seoul through Seoul Urban Data Science Laboratory Project (Grant No 0660-20170004) administered by SNU Big Data Institute.

  2. Dynamics of Defects and Dopants in Complex Systems: Si and Oxide Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Taras; Yu, Decai; Banarjee, Sanjay; Hwang, Gyeong

    2004-10-01

    Fabrication of forthcoming nanometer scale electronic devices faces many difficulties including formation of extremely shallow and highly doped junctions. At present, ultra-low-energy ion implantation followed by high-temperature thermal annealing is most widely used to fabricate such ultra-shallow junctions. In the process, a great challenge lies in achieving precise control of redistribution and electrical activation of dopant impurities. Native defects (such as vacancies and interstitials) generated during implantation are known to be mainly responsible for the TED and also influence significantly the electrical activation/deactivation. Defect-dopant dynamics is rather well understood in crystalline Si and SiO2. However, little is known about their diffusion and annihilation (or precipitation) at the surfaces and interfaces, despite its growing importance in determining junction profiles as device dimensions get smaller. In this talk, we will present our density functional theory calculation results on the atomic and electronic structure and dynamical behavior of native defects and dopant-defect complexes in disordered/strained Si and oxide systems, such as i) clean and absorbent-modified Si(100) surface and subsurface layers, ii) amorphous-crystalline Si interfaces and iii) amorphous SiO2/Si interfaces. The fundamental understanding and data is essential in developing a comprehensive kinetic model for junction formation, which would contribute greatly in improving current process technologies.

  3. Ice growth and interface oscillation of water droplets impinged on a cooling surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yoshimichi; Ishikawa, Shoji; Kimura, Ryota; Toyohara, Kazumasa

    2017-06-01

    We focused on the attenuation of air-water interface oscillation for impinged water droplets freezing on a cooling surface. We carried out not only experiments but also two-dimensional numerical simulation on the droplets using a Phase-field method and an immersed boundary method. The Reynolds number and Weber number were in the range of 35-129 and 1.6-22, respectively. The experimental and computational results showed that the height of the impinged droplets on the symmetrical axis started to oscillate as a result of the impact of the collision of droplets with the surfaces in all the cases that we investigated. The measured frequency of the oscillations in the case of the adiabatic droplets was equal to the frequency estimated from the equation for the capillary-gravity waves on sessile droplets (Temperton, 2013) [30]. The oscillations converged rapidly in all impinged water droplets that froze on the cooling surface. This is due partly to the growth of ice shells along the air-water interface and partly to decreases in water volume as a result of the ice growth mainly on the cooling surface. In addition, the thermal field was disturbed not only by the latent heat transfer but also by the upward component of recirculating flow induced by the droplet impingement.

  4. Evaluation of underground pipe-structure interface for surface impact load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple method is proposed for the evaluation of underground pipelines for surface impact load considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. • The proposed simple method can be used to evaluate the magnitude of damage within a short period of time after accidental drop occurs. • The proposed method is applied in a practical example and compared by using finite element analysis. - Abstract: Nuclear safety related buried pipelines need to be assessed for the effects of postulated surface impact loads. In published solutions, the buried pipe is often considered within an elastic half space without interference with other underground structures. In the case that a surface impact occurs in short distance from an underground pipe-structure interface, this boundary condition will further complicate the buried pipe evaluation. Neglecting such boundary effect in the assessment may lead to underestimating potential damage of buried pipeline, and jeopardizing safety of the nuclear power plant. Comprehensive analysis of such structure-pipe-soil system is often subjected to availability of state-of-art finite element tools, as well as costly and time consuming. Simple, but practical conservative techniques have not been established. In this study, a mechanics based solution is proposed in order to assess the magnitude of damage to a buried pipeline beneath a heavy surface impact considering the effect of a nearby pipe-structure interface. The proposed approach provides an easy to use tool in the early stage of evaluation before the decision of applying more costly technique can be made by owner of the nuclear facility.

  5. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  6. Specific noncovalent interactions at protein-ligand interface: implications for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Huang, J; Tian, F

    2012-01-01

    Specific noncovalent interactions that are indicative of attractive, directional intermolecular forces have always been of key interest to medicinal chemists in their search for the "glue" that holds drugs and their targets together. With the rapid increase in the number of solved biomolecular structures as well as the performance enhancement of computer hardware and software in recent years, it is now possible to give more comprehensive insight into the geometrical characteristics and energetic landscape of certain sophisticated noncovalent interactions present at the binding interface of protein receptors and small ligands based on accumulated knowledge gaining from the combination of two quite disparate but complementary approaches: crystallographic data analysis and quantum-mechanical ab initio calculation. In this perspective, we survey massive body of published works relating to structural characterization and theoretical investigation of three kinds of strong, specific, direct, enthalpy-driven intermolecular forces, including hydrogen bond, halogen bond and salt bridge, involved in the formation of protein-ligand complex architecture in order to characterize their biological functions in conferring affinity and specificity for ligand recognition by host protein. In particular, the biomedical implications of raised knowledge are discussed with respect to potential applications in rational drug design.

  7. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-01-01

    , sputtering is not the dominant driving force responsible for the ripple formation. Processes like bulk and surface defect kinetics dominate the surface morphology evolution. Only at grazing incidence the sputtering has been found to be a direct cause of the ripple formation. Bradley and Harper theory fails in explaining the ripple dynamics because it is based on the second-order-effect 'sputtering'. However, taking into account the new mechanisms, a 'Bradley-Harper equation' with redefined parameters can be derived, which describes pattern formation satisfactorily. (ii) Kinetics of (bulk) defects has been revealed as the dominating driving force of pattern formation. Constantly created defects within the collision cascade, are responsible for local surface topography fluctuation and cause surface mass currents. The mass currents smooth the surface at normal and close to normal ion incidence angles, while ripples appear first at θ ≥ 40 . The evolution of bimetallic interfaces under ion irradiation is another application of TRIDER described in this thesis. The collisional mixing is in competition with diffusion and phase separation. The irradiation with He + ions is studied for two extreme cases of bimetals: (i) Irradiation of interfaces formed by immiscible elements, here Al and Pb. Ballistic interface mixing is accompanied by phase separation. Al and Pb nanoclusters show a self-ordering (banding) parallel to the interface. (ii) Irradiation of interfaces by intermetallics forming species, here Pt and Co. Well-ordered layers of phases of intermetallics appear in the sequence Pt/Pt 3 Co/PtCo/PtCo 3 /Co. The TRIDER program package has been proven to be an appropriate technique providing a complete picture of mixing mechanisms.

  8. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-03-24

    general, sputtering is not the dominant driving force responsible for the ripple formation. Processes like bulk and surface defect kinetics dominate the surface morphology evolution. Only at grazing incidence the sputtering has been found to be a direct cause of the ripple formation. Bradley and Harper theory fails in explaining the ripple dynamics because it is based on the second-order-effect 'sputtering'. However, taking into account the new mechanisms, a 'Bradley-Harper equation' with redefined parameters can be derived, which describes pattern formation satisfactorily. (ii) Kinetics of (bulk) defects has been revealed as the dominating driving force of pattern formation. Constantly created defects within the collision cascade, are responsible for local surface topography fluctuation and cause surface mass currents. The mass currents smooth the surface at normal and close to normal ion incidence angles, while ripples appear first at θ ≥ 40 . The evolution of bimetallic interfaces under ion irradiation is another application of TRIDER described in this thesis. The collisional mixing is in competition with diffusion and phase separation. The irradiation with He{sup +} ions is studied for two extreme cases of bimetals: (i) Irradiation of interfaces formed by immiscible elements, here Al and Pb. Ballistic interface mixing is accompanied by phase separation. Al and Pb nanoclusters show a self-ordering (banding) parallel to the interface. (ii) Irradiation of interfaces by intermetallics forming species, here Pt and Co. Well-ordered layers of phases of intermetallics appear in the sequence Pt/Pt{sub 3}Co/PtCo/PtCo{sub 3}/Co. The TRIDER program package has been proven to be an appropriate technique providing a complete picture of mixing mechanisms.

  9. Surface segregation at the aluminum interface of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orimo, Akiko; Masuda, Kohji; Honda, Satoshi; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo; Ohkita, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The effects of thermal annealing before and after Al deposition on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend solar cells were investigated by current density-voltage measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compared to the preannealed device, the postannealed device exhibited enhanced open-circuit voltage (V OC ), which is ascribed to the decrease in the reverse saturation current density J 0 . The XPS measurements demonstrated that P3HT is dominant at the Al interface in the preannealed device while PCBM is instead dominant in the postannealed device. This surface-segregated PCBM formed in the postannealed device can serve as a hole-blocking layer at the Al interface to reduce J 0 , and therefore improve V OC .

  10. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sîretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid–liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to

  11. Micro-Foundations of Product Interfaces and Their Implications on Product and Organization Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donmez, Mehmet; Hsuan, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of product interfaces for product development organizations, little is known about how product interfaces manage component interdependencies. In order to answer this question, we make one of the initial attempts to define micro-foundational interface properties by building...... on and extending the seminal works of Simon (1962) and Parnas (1972) on which the literature on modularity and product architecture is built. Rather than being simple linkages, we show that interfaces exhibit a core-periphery structure by underlining the importance of functional interdependencies managed...... by interfaces in addition to structural interdependencies. Our theoretical reasoning illustrates that the differentiation and integration role of interfaces and the functional and structural interdependencies managed by product interfaces inform three interface properties: structural thickness, functional...

  12. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  13. Manipulating Magnetism at Organic/Ferromagnetic Interfaces by Molecule-Induced Surface Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Rui; Shi, Xingqiang; Van Hove, Michel A

    2016-03-30

    Fullerenes have several advantages as potential materials for organic spintronics. Through a theoretical first-principles study, we report that fullerene C60 adsorption can induce a magnetic reconstruction in a Ni(111) surface and expose the merits of the reconstructed C60/Ni(111) spinterface for molecular spintronics applications. Surface reconstruction drastically modifies the magnetic properties at both sides of the C60/Ni interface. Three outstanding properties of the reconstructed structure are revealed, which originate from reconstruction enhanced spin-split π-d coupling between C60 and Ni(111): (1) the C60 spin polarization and conductance around the Fermi level are enhanced simultaneously, which can be important for read-head sensor miniaturization; (2) localized spin-polarized states appear in C60 with a spin-filter functionality; and (3) magnetocrystalline anisotropic energy and exchange coupling in the outermost Ni layer are reduced enormously. Surface reconstruction can be realized simply by controlling the annealing temperature in experiments.

  14. Atomic interactions at the (100) diamond surface and the impact of surface and interface changes on the electronic transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferme, Wim

    Centuries and centuries already, diamond is a material that speaks to ones imagination. Till the 18th century it was only mined in India, after it was also found in Brazil and South-Africa. But along the fascinating properties of diamond, it is also a very interesting material for industry. After the discovery at the end of the 18th century that diamond consists of carbon, it took until the 50's of the previous century before research groups from Russia, Japan and the USA were able to reproduce the growth process of diamond. In 1989 it was discovered that the surface of intrinsic, insulation diamond can be made conductive by hydrogenating the surface. It was clear that not only hydrogen at the surface but also the so called "adsorbates" were responsible for this conductivity. It was still not completely clear what was the influence of other species (like oxygen) on the mechanism of surface conductivity and therefore in this thesis the influence of oxygen on the electronic transport properties of atomically flat diamond are researched. Besides the growth of atomically flat diamond with the use of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) en the study of the grown surfaces with characterising techniques such as AFM (atomic force microscopy) and STM (scanning tunnelling microscopy), the study of the surface treatment with plasma techniques is the main topic of this thesis. The influence of oxygen on the surface conductivity is studied and with the ToF (Time-of-Flight) technique the transport properties of the freestanding diamond are examined. With a short laserflash, electrons and holes are created at the diamond/aluminium interface and due to an electric field (up to 500V) the charge carriers are translated to the back contact. In this way the influence of the surface and the changes at the aluminum contacts is studied leading to very interesting results.

  15. Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Gas Cluster Ion Beam Prepared GaSb Substrates: Towards Improved Surfaces and Interfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnaswami, Kannan; Vangala, Shivashankar R; Dauplaise, Helen M; Allen, Lisa P; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Bliss, David F; Goodhue, WIlliam D

    2007-01-01

    .... X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of O2-, CF4/O2-, and HBr-GCIB surface oxides is presented indicating the presence of mixed Ga- and Sb-oxides, with mostly Ga-oxides at the interface, desorbing...

  16. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng, E-mail: y-liang@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi, E-mail: y-liang@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Environment and Resource System Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Sakka, Tetsuo [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  17. Femtosecond microscopy of surface plasmon polariton wave packet evolution at the silver/vacuum interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Pontius, Niko; Petek, Hrvoje

    2007-02-01

    A movie of the dispersive and dissipative propagation of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave packets at a silver/vacuum interface is recorded by the interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy with 60 nm spatial resolution and 330 as frame interval. The evolution of SPP wave packets is imaged through a two-path interference created by a pair of 10 fs phase correlated pump-probe light pulses at 400 nm. The wave packet evolution is simulated using the complex dielectric function of silver.

  18. TEM observation on phase separation and interfaces of laser surface alloyed high-entropy alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaobing; Cui, Xiufang; Jin, Guo; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yang; Dong, Meiling

    2017-12-01

    Phase separation is a common phenomenon in traditional alloys. Under the condition of appropriate undercooling, the segregation phenomenon can be also found in blue-chip high-entropy alloys (HEAs). In this work, the phase separation behavior and interfacial investigation of laser surface alloyed HEA coating with high content Ti were studied principally by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that crystal structure and elementary composition on both sides of the interface of coating/substrate are quite different, and the interfaces between different phases are incoherent or semi-coherent boundarys, resolved by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the interface of (Co, Ni)Ti 2 phase/β-Ti phase, there is angle of 80° between BCC〈100〉 and FCC〈201〉. An interesting 'island' structure, that β-Ti phases are embraced by (Co, Ni)Ti 2 compounds in the BCC matrix, was observed definitely, which is attributed to the combined action of Ti segregation and inter-attraction of Ti and other elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions: Processes and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, A. I.; Harvey, J. W.; Worman, A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Tank, J. L.; Stonedahl, S. H.

    2009-05-01

    Site-based investigations of stream-subsurface interactions normally focus on a limited range of spatial scales - typically either very shallow subsurface flows in the hyporheic zone, or much larger scale surface- groundwater interactions - but subsurface flows are linked across this entire continuum. Broad, multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions produce complex patterns in porewater flows, and interfacial fluxes do not average in a simple fashion because of the competitive effects of flows induced at different scales. For example, reach-scale stream-groundwater interactions produce sequences of gaining and losing reaches that can either suppress or enhance local-scale hyporheic exchange. Many individual topographic features also produce long power-law tails in surface residence time distributions, and the duration of these tails is greatly extended by interactions over a wide range of spatial scales. Simultaneous sediment transport and landscape evolution further complicates the analysis of porewater flow dynamics in rivers. Finally, inhomogeneity in important biogeochemical processes, particularly microbial processes that are stimulated near the sediment- water interface, leads to a great degree of non-linearity in chemical transformation rates in stream channels. This high degree of complexity in fluvial systems requires that careful approaches be used to extend local observations of hyporheic exchange and associated nutrient, carbon, and contaminant transformations to larger spatial scales. It is important to recognize that conventional advection-dispersion models are not expected to apply, and instead anomalous transport models must be used. Unfortunately, no generally applicable model is available for stream-groundwater interactions at the present time. Alternative approaches for modeling conservative and reactive transport will be discussed, and a strategy articulated for coping with the complexity of coupled surface-subsurface dynamics in fluvial

  20. Mécanique de surface du verre et physico-chimie d'interface

    OpenAIRE

    Barthel , Etienne

    2006-01-01

    Dans notre ère d'innovation technologique, la surface des matériauxest le terrain d'expression de procédés de fonctionnalisationpuissants et souvent peu coûteux. Ces procédés, les propriétés ainsiobtenues, ou souhaitées, suscitent une grande variété dedéveloppements de nature fondamentale. Parmi ceux-ci, la mécaniquede surface allie physico-chimie de l'interface et réponse mécanique.Je décris ici un ensemble de projets de recherche que j'aidéveloppés dans ce domaine. Je traite de la question ...

  1. Section-constrained local geological interface dynamic updating method based on the HRBF surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiateng; Wu, Lixin; Zhou, Wenhui; Li, Chaoling; Li, Fengdan

    2018-02-01

    Boundaries, attitudes and sections are the most common data acquired from regional field geological surveys, and they are used for three-dimensional (3D) geological modelling. However, constructing topologically consistent 3D geological models from rapid and automatic regional modelling with convenient local modifications remains unresolved. In previous works, the Hermite radial basis function (HRBF) surface was introduced for the simulation of geological interfaces from geological boundaries and attitudes, which allows 3D geological models to be automatically extracted from the modelling area by the interfaces. However, the reasonability and accuracy of non-supervised subsurface modelling is limited without further modifications generated through explanations and analyses performed by geology experts. In this paper, we provide flexible and convenient manual interactive manipulation tools for geologists to sketch constraint lines, and these tools may help geologists transform and apply their expert knowledge to the models. In the modified modelling workflow, the geological sections were treated as auxiliary constraints to construct more reasonable 3D geological models. The geometric characteristics of section lines were abstracted to coordinates and normal vectors, and along with the transformed coordinates and vectors from boundaries and attitudes, these characteristics were adopted to co-calculate the implicit geological surface function parameters of the HRBF equations and form constrained geological interfaces from topographic (boundaries and attitudes) and subsurface data (sketched sections). Based on this new modelling method, a prototype system was developed, in which the section lines could be imported from databases or interactively sketched, and the models could be immediately updated after the new constraints were added. Experimental comparisons showed that all boundary, attitude and section data are well represented in the constrained models, which are

  2. Surface preparation of FeS[sub 2] via electrochemical etching and interface formation with metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronold, M. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst. Berlin (Germany)); Bueker, K. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst. Berlin (Germany)); Kubala, S. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst. Berlin (Germany)); Pettenkofer, C. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst. Berlin (Germany)); Tributsch, H. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst. Berlin (Germany))

    1993-01-16

    The effect of passing cathodic currents at potentials of hydrogen evolution through differently pretreated n-type pyrite (FeS[sub 2]) electrodes is studied by XPS. It is shown that hydrogen evolution results in an etching of the crystal via dissolution of FeS[sub 2]. Surfaces that are destroyed through sputtering or polishing are restored through this etching procedure. (100) and (111) surfaces behave similar to each other. When depositing gold onto the electrochemically etched surface in ultrahigh vacuum no change of the band bending of the clean surface (650 meV) is observed. An abrupt interface with FeS-like defects in the pyrite is formed. deposition of platinum yields a ternary Pt-Fe-S interlayer between pyrite and metallic Pt. The band bending is reduced by 200 meV during contact formation. Concerning the chemical composition and the electronic structure the etched surfaces behave nearly identical to clean (100) cleavage planes of pyrite. (orig.)

  3. Surface treatment in a cathodic arc plasma. Key step for interface engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenjahn, C.

    2001-02-01

    The effect of substrate surface treatment (substrate sputter cleaning) in a cathodic arc plasma prior to unbalanced magnetron deposition of transition metal nitride coatings on the performance of the coated components has been investigated. In particular the influence of parameters such as ion species, ion energy and exposure time on the changes in substrate surface topography, microstructure and microchemistry were studied employing transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. The consequences for both the microstructure of subsequently grown transition metal nitride coatings and their adhesion were elucidated. The relevance for practical applications was demonstrated using the example of dry high-speed milling tests, which showed that an appropriate choice of substrate surface pre-treatment parameters can double the life time of the coated tools. This was found to be due to an improved adhesion as a result of a combination of reduced oxygen incorporation at the interface between coating and substrate and local epitaxial growth of the coating. The latter is promoted by certain substrate surface pre-treatment procedures, which provide clean surfaces with preserved crystallographic order. (author)

  4. Protein conformational transitions at the liquid-gas interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Boris A

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results on the dynamic dilational surface elasticity of protein solutions are analyzed and compared. Short reviews of the protein behavior at the liquid-gas interface and the dilational surface rheology precede the main sections of this work. The kinetic dependencies of the surface elasticity differ strongly for the solutions of globular and non-globular proteins. In the latter case these dependencies are similar to those for solutions of non-ionic amphiphilic polymers and have local maxima corresponding to the formation of the distal region of the surface layer (type I). In the former case the dynamic surface elasticity is much higher (>60 mN/m) and the kinetic dependencies are monotonical and similar to the data for aqueous dispersions of solid nanoparticles (type II). The addition of strong denaturants to solutions of bovine serum albumin and β-lactoglobulin results in an abrupt transition from the type II to type I dependencies if the denaturant concentration exceeds a certain critical value. These results give a strong argument in favor of the preservation of the protein globular structure in the course of adsorption without any denaturants. The addition of cationic surfactants also can lead to the non-monotonical kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity indicating destruction of the protein tertiary and secondary structures. The addition of anionic surfactants gives similar results only for the protein solutions of high ionic strength. The influence of cationic surfactants on the local maxima of the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity for solutions of a non-globular protein (β-casein) differs from the influence of anionic surfactants due to the heterogeneity of the charge distribution along the protein chain. In this case one can use small admixtures of ionic surfactants as probes of the adsorption mechanism. The effect of polyelectrolytes on the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of protein

  5. Surface and interface characterization of thin-film silicon solar cell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Dominic

    2013-02-21

    our Si L{sub 2,3} XES analysis. Spatially resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support this and even suggest the formation of sub-oxides or zinc silicate as an interface species. The electronic structure of the buried a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al and {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interfaces are unraveled with ''depth resolved'' hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A surface band bending limited to the very surface of the silicon layers is found. The valence band maxima for the Si cover layers and the ZnO:Al TCO are determined and interface induced band bending for both interfaces are derived. At the a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface a tunnel barrier of (0.22 {+-} 0.31) eV and at {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface a tunnel barrier of (-0.08 {+-} 0.31) eV is determined. This explains a previously empirically found solar cell efficiency increase produced by introducing a {mu}c-Si:H(B) buffer layer between an a-Si p-i-n cell and the ZnO:Al/glass substrate.

  6. Bond strength enhancement of zirconia-porcelain interfaces via Nd:YAG laser surface structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Filipe S; Carvalho, Óscar; Fredel, Márcio C; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser surface structuring on the bond strength of feldspar-based porcelain to zirconia, as compared to conventional sandblasting treatment. Thirty cylindrical zirconia substrates, previously sintered, were divided in three groups according to the type of surface conditioning: 1) sandblasting with 50 µm Al 2 O 3 ; 2) laser structuring (Ø25 µm holes); and 3) laser structuring (Ø50 µm holes). Porcelain was injected onto the zirconia substrates. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used to evaluate the influence of the laser treatment on zirconia crystallographic phases. Shear bond strength test was performed. Micrographs using SEM were used to evaluate the zirconia surface after each surface treatment and to evaluate the fracture surface after the shear test. The laser-structured groups presented the highest shear bond strength (65 ± 16 MPa and 65 ± 11 MPa, for the 25 µm and 50 µm holes, respectively). The sandblasting samples presented shear bond strength of 37 ± 16 MPa. XRD analysis showed that there was no phase transformation on the thermally affected surface due to laser action. Microcracks were created at some holes due to the high temperature gradient generated by laser. Laser structuring significantly increased (up to 75%) the shear bond strength of zirconia to veneering porcelain as compared to conventional sandblasting treatment. Therefore, laser structuring arises as a surface conditioning method for producing stronger and long lasting zirconia-porcelain interfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulating spin and Fermi surface topology of a quantum metal film by the surface (interface) monatomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Iwao

    2012-02-01

    Spin and current controls in solids have been one of the central issues in researches of electron and spin transport. Nowadays, electronics/spintronics deals with nanometer- or atomic-scale structures and miniaturization of these systems implies emergence of various quantum phenomena, intimately linked to the formation of electronic states different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. For example, valence electrons of films with the thickness comparable to the electron wavelength form discrete quantum-well states (QWSs) under opportune conditions of confinement (quantum size effect). Furthermore, the size reduction also increases the surface/volume ratio and a film possibly changes its electronic (spin) properties by the surface effect. Concerning metal films, the quantum size effect requires the thickness in a range of nanometers and the length corresponds to several tens of atoms, indicating the very large ratio of a surface (interface) monatomic layer to film atomic layers. Thus, we have been interested in combining the quantum size effects and the surface effect on the metal films to induce new physical phenomena. In the present talk, two research cases are shown. 1) Instead of isotropic two-dimensional in-plane states expected for an isolated metal film, quasi-one-dimensional quantized states were measured by photoemission spectroscopy in an epitaxial Ag(111) ultra thin film, prepared on an array of atomic chains [1]. 2) High-resolution spin-resolved photoemission and magneto-transport experiments of ultrathin Ag(111) films, covered with a /3x/3-Bi/Ag surface ordered alloy, were performed. The surface state (SS) bands, spin-split by the Rashba interaction, selectively couple to the originally spin-degenerate QWS bands in the metal film, making the spin-dependent hybridization [2,3]. Magnetoconductance of the films, measured in situ by the micro-four-point probe method as a function of the applied magnetic field [4], has shown that the formation of

  8. Molecular dimensions and surface diffusion assisted mechanically robust slippery perfluoropolyether impregnated mesoporous alumina interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowthu, Sriharitha; Balic, Edin E.; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2017-12-01

    Accomplishing mechanically robust omniphobic surfaces is a long-existing challenge, and can potentially find applications in bioengineering, tribology and paint industries. Slippery liquid impregnated mesoporous α-Al2O3 interfaces are achieved with water, alkanes, water based and oil based high viscosity acrylic paints. Incredibly high abrasion-resistance (wear coefficients ≤10‑8 mm3 N‑1 m‑1) and ultra-low friction coefficients (≥0.025) are attained, attributing to the hard alumina matrix and continuous replenishment of perfluoropolyether aided by capillarity and surface diffusion processes. A variety of impregnating liquids employed suggest that large molecules, faster surface diffusion and lowest evaporation rate generate the rare combination of high wear-resistance and omniphobicity. It is noteworthy that these novel liquid impregnated Al2O3 composites exhibit outstanding load bearing capacity up to 350 MPa; three orders of magnitude higher than achievable by the state of the art omniphobic surfaces. Further, our developed thermodynamic calculations suggest that the relative thermodynamic stability of liquid impregnated composites is linearly proportional to the spreading coefficient (S) of the impregnating liquid with the matrix material and is an important tool for the selection of an appropriate matrix material for a given liquid.

  9. Surface modification of gold nanoparticles and their monolayer behavior at the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chaio-Ling; Wang, Ke-Hsuan; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Hsu, Wen-Ping; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared by two different methods. The first method was chemically grafting the particles with different lengths of alkylthiol (C6SH, C12SH and C18SH). For the second method, the Au particles were surface modified first by mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) to render a surface with carboxylic acid groups which play a role to physically adsorb cationic surfactant in chloroform. This method was termed physical/chemical method. In the first method, the effects of alkyl chain length and dispersion solvent on the monolayer behavior of surface modified gold nanoparticles was evaluated. The gold nanoparticles prepared by 1-hexanthiol demonstrated the narrowest size distribution. Most of them showed narrower particle size distributions in chloroform than in hexane. For the physical/chemical method, the particles can spread more uniformly on the water surface which is attributed to the amphiphilic character of the particles at the air/water interface. However, the particles cannot pack closely due to the relatively weak particle-particle interaction. The effect of alkyl chain length was also assessed for the second method.

  10. Excess electrons at anatase TiO2 surfaces and interfaces: insights from first principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, Sencer; Selloni, Annabella

    2017-07-01

    TiO2 is an important technological material with widespread applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics and self-cleaning surfaces. Excess electrons from intrinsic defects, dopants and photoexcitation play a key role in the properties of TiO2 that are relevant to its energy-related applications. The picture of excess and photoexcited electrons in TiO2 is based on the polaron model, where the electron forms a localized state that is stabilized by an accompanying lattice distortion. Here, we focus on excess and photoexcited electrons in anatase, the TiO2 polymorph most relevant to photocatalysis and solar energy conversion. For anatase, evidence of both small and large electron polarons has been reported in the literature. In addition, several studies have revealed a remarkable dependence of the photocatalytic activity of anatase on the crystal surface. After an overview of experimental studies, we briefly discuss recent progress in the theoretical description of polaronic states in TiO2, and finally present a more detailed account of our computational studies on the trapping and dynamics of excess electrons near the most common anatase surfaces and aqueous interfaces. The results of these studies provide a bridge between surface science experiments under vacuum conditions and observations of crystal-face-dependent photocatalysis on anatase, and support the idea that optimization of the ratio between different anatase facets can help enhance the photocatalytic activity of this material.

  11. Controllable load sharing for soft adhesive interfaces on three-dimensional surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sukho; Drotlef, Dirk-Michael; Majidi, Carmel; Sitti, Metin

    2017-05-01

    For adhering to three-dimensional (3D) surfaces or objects, current adhesion systems are limited by a fundamental trade-off between 3D surface conformability and high adhesion strength. This limitation arises from the need for a soft, mechanically compliant interface, which enables conformability to nonflat and irregularly shaped surfaces but significantly reduces the interfacial fracture strength. In this work, we overcome this trade-off with an adhesion-based soft-gripping system that exhibits enhanced fracture strength without sacrificing conformability to nonplanar 3D surfaces. Composed of a gecko-inspired elastomeric microfibrillar adhesive membrane supported by a pressure-controlled deformable gripper body, the proposed soft-gripping system controls the bonding strength by changing its internal pressure and exploiting the mechanics of interfacial equal load sharing. The soft adhesion system can use up to ˜26% of the maximum adhesion of the fibrillar membrane, which is 14× higher than the adhering membrane without load sharing. Our proposed load-sharing method suggests a paradigm for soft adhesion-based gripping and transfer-printing systems that achieves area scaling similar to that of a natural gecko footpad.

  12. Application of the functional surface/interface of Nano/Micro systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiping

    Investigation of the surface/ interface of Nano/Micro systems plays an essential role in lots of areas, include the synthesis and assembly of nanostructures, evaporation of liquid, etc. Through studying the interaction between the polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and the surface of the silver nanowires (AgNWs), it was found that the PVP, serving as a capping agent, has a great impact on the morphology and structure of AgNWs. By means of a series of experiments, the critical minimum PVP chain length for successful formation of uniform nanowires was discovered, below which, only nanoparticles or short Nano rods can be obtained. Surprisingly, a core-shell structure of nanowire with a polycrystal was observed when the PVP with very long chain length was employed in the processing. By controlling the interaction between the Ag NWs and the surface of the substrates, a one-step method was developed for the fabrication of electrodes with patterns. Such film comprising Ag NWs were only self-growing or grafted on a hydrophilic surface area instead of the hydrophobic one. Thus, the selective patterning of the conducting film on the hybrid substrate surface can be realized, which is etching-free method for metal removal usually for the fabrication of electrodes by lithographic process or laser cutting. Therefore, such technique for producing conducting film is green and environmental friendly. A biochip based silver nano dendritic structures was fabricated to detect Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is a common tumor marker in clinical tests. Results show that the Raman signal of the CEA enhanced by about 10 4 times compared with silver nanowires, which is capable of detecting CEA at 1 fg/mL. The surface of liquid water, especial the hydration of ions on the surface, which are of fundamental interest and have potential applications, remain unclear. A fantastic and extraordinary phenomenon was observed during the evaporation of a water droplet doped with manganese chloride. As

  13. Pressure and surface tension of soild-liquid interface using Tarazona density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tarazona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this resarch we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is plotted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. Dynamics of two-phase interfaces and surface tensions: A density-functional theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Sibley, David N.; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a statistical mechanical framework for the description of fluids at the nanoscale, where the inhomogeneity of the fluid structure needs to be carefully accounted for. By expressing the grand free-energy of the fluid as a functional of the one-body density, DFT offers a theoretically consistent and computationally accessible way to obtain two-phase interfaces and respective interfacial tensions in a ternary solid-liquid-gas system. The dynamic version of DFT (DDFT) can be rigorously derived from the Smoluchowsky picture of the dynamics of colloidal particles in a solvent. It is generally agreed that DDFT can capture the diffusion-driven evolution of many soft-matter systems. In this context, we use DDFT to investigate the dynamic behaviour of two-phase interfaces in both equilibrium and dynamic wetting and discuss the possibility of defining a time-dependent surface tension, which still remains in debate. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council of the UK via Grants No. EP/L027186 and EP/L020564.

  15. Subthreshold radiation-induced processes in the bulk and on surfaces and interfaces of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, N.

    1998-01-01

    A review is given on the processes induced under irradiation by electronic encounters and by elastic encounters below the knock-on threshold. It is pointed out that electronic encounters cause bond scission that results in defect formation and sputtering in a variety of materials. The conditions for generation of permanent radiation-induced process as a consequence of electronic encounters are critically examined. Two critical issues are localization of electronic excitation energy and energetics. Self-trapping of excitons is one way of localization; otherwise defects are involved in localization and therefore in radiation-induced processes (RIP) by electronic excitation. Arguments on energetics indicate presence of linear and nonlinear electronic process with respect to the density of excitation. The registration of energetic heavy-ion tracks is explained in terms of non-linear electronic processes. The difference in the processes in the bulk, on surfaces and at interfaces is critically discussed. The possible contribution of subthreshold elastic encounters to thermodynamically driven interface reaction is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Interface Trap Density Reduction for Al2O3/GaN (0001) Interfaces by Oxidizing Surface Preparation prior to Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M; Negara, Muhammad A; Long, Rathnait D; Aloni, Shaul; Nordlund, Dennis; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-06-17

    We correlate interfacial defect state densities with the chemical composition of the Al2O3/GaN interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures using synchrotron photoelectron emission spectroscopy (PES), cathodoluminescence and high-temperature capacitance-voltage measurements. The influence of the wet chemical pretreatments involving (1) HCl+HF etching or (2) NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were investigated on n-type GaN (0001) substrates. Prior to ALD, PES analysis of the NH4OH(aq) treated surface shows a greater Ga2O3 component compared to either HCl+HF treated or as-received surfaces. The lowest surface concentration of oxygen species is detected on the acid etched surface, whereas the NH4OH treated sample reveals the lowest carbon surface concentration. Both surface pretreatments improve electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors compared to untreated samples by reducing the Al2O3/GaN interface state density. The lowest interfacial trap density at energies in the upper band gap is detected for samples pretreated with NH4OH. These results are consistent with cathodoluminescence data indicating that the NH4OH treated samples show the strongest band edge emission compared to as-received and acid etched samples. PES results indicate that the combination of reduced carbon contamination while maintaining a Ga2O3 interfacial layer by NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to ALD results in fewer interface traps after Al2O3 deposition on the GaN substrate.

  17. Hofmeister Effect on PNIPAM in Bulk and at an Interface: Surface Partitioning of Weakly Hydrated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Saeed Zajforoushan; Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sodium fluoride, sodium trichloroacetate, and sodium thiocyanate on the stability and conformation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), in bulk solution and at the gold-aqueous interface, is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal...... microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate a surface partitioning of the weakly hydrated anions, i.e., thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, and the findings are discussed in terms of anion-induced electrostatic stabilization. Although attractive polymer-ion interactions are suggested...... for thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, a salting-out effect is found for sodium trichloroacetate. This apparent contradiction is explained by a combination of previously suggested mechanisms for the salting-out effect by weakly hydrated anions....

  18. Surface, interface and thin film characterization of nano-materials using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    From the results of studies in the nanotechnology support project of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, several investigations on the surface, interface and thin film characterization of nano-materials are described; (1) the MgB 2 thin film by X-ray diffraction, (2) the magnetism of the Pt thin film on a Co film by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurement, (3) the structure and physical properties of oxygen molecules absorbed in a micro hole of the cheleted polymer crystal by the direct observation in X-ray powder diffraction, and (4) the thin film gate insulator with a large dielectric constant, thermally treated HfO 2 /SiO 2 /Si, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (M.H.)

  19. Mechanochemistry at Solid Surfaces: Polymerization of Adsorbed Molecules by Mechanical Shear at Tribological Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jejoon; He, Xin; Martini, Ashlie; Kim, Seong H

    2017-01-25

    Polymerization of allyl alcohol adsorbed and sheared at a silicon oxide interface is studied using tribo-tests in vapor phase lubrication conditions and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The load dependences of product formation obtained from experiments and simulations were consistent, indicating that the atomic-scale processes observable in the simulations were relevant to the experiments. Analysis of the experimental results in the context of mechanically assisted thermal reaction theory, combined with the atomistic details available from the simulations, suggested that the association reaction pathway of allyl alcohol molecules induced by mechanical shear is quite different from chemically induced polymerization reactions. Findings suggested that some degree of distortion of the molecule from its equilibrium state is necessary for mechanically induced chemical reactions to occur and such a distortion occurs during mechanical shear when molecules are covalently anchored to one of the sliding surfaces.

  20. Confinement of surface waves at the air-water interface to control aerosol size and dispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Wilson, Rab; King, Xi; Reboud, Julien; Tassieri, Manlio; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2017-11-01

    The precise control over the size and dispersity of droplets, produced within aerosols, is of great interest across many manufacturing, food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Amongst these applications, the delivery of new classes of high value drugs to the lungs has recently attracted significant attention from pharmaceutical companies. This is commonly achieved through the mechanical excitation of surface waves at the air liquid interface of a parent liquid volume. Previous studies have established a correlation between the wavelength on the surface of liquid and the final aerosol size. In this work, we show that the droplet size distribution of aerosols can be controlled by constraining the liquid inside micron-sized cavities and coupling surface acoustic waves into different volumes of liquid inside micro-grids. In particular, we show that by reducing the characteristic physical confinement size (i.e., either the initial liquid volume or the cavities' diameters), higher harmonics of capillary waves are revealed with a consequent reduction of both aerosol mean size and dispersity. In doing so, we provide a new method for the generation and fine control of aerosols' sizes distribution.

  1. Advanced growth and surface analysis system for in situ studies of interface formation. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, D.E.; Nemanich, R.J.; Wang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first annual report for developing an advanced integrated in situ UHV growth/analysis system for synchrotron radiation studies of interface and surface reactions which lead to epitaxial structures on Si, Ge, and Si 1-x Ge x alloys. This equipment will allow one to use techniques based on synchrotron radiation, such as photoemission, x-ray standing wave (XSW), and surface x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAFS) to determining the electronic states and atomic configurations of surfaces in metal-silicon, metal-germanium and metal-silicon-germanium alloys. Since the award of the contract the authors have completed a detailed design of the overall system, identified commercially available equipment which fits the requirements and have purchased or ordered all of this equipment. They have also custom designed a considerable amount of equipment which is not available commercially because of the special requirements. This includes both of the UHV chambers, sample manipulators, and a mobile support stand. In this report, they will describe the design and purchase status of the system. An overview of the equipment purchase status is given in Appendix 1. The details of their custom designed growth and analytical chambers are given in Appendix 2

  2. Formation of Reversible Solid Electrolyte Interface on Graphite Surface from Concentrated Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dongping; Tao, Jinhui; Yan, Pengfei; Henderson, Wesley A.; Li, Qiuyan; Shao, Yuyan; Helm, Monte L.; Borodin, Oleg; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong-Min; Engelhard, Mark; Zhang, Ji-Guang; De Yoreo, James J.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Interfacial phenomena have always been key determinants for the performance of energy storage technologies. The solid electrolyte interfacial (SEI) layer, pervasive on the surfaces of battery electrodes for numerous chemical couples, directly affects the ion transport, charge transfer and lifespan of the entire energy system. Almost all SEI layers, however, are unstable resulting in the continuous consumption of the electrolyte. Typically, this leads to the accumulation of degradation products on/restructuring of the electrode surface and thus increased cell impedance, which largely limits the long-term operation of the electrochemical reactions. Herein, a completely new SEI formation mechanism has been discovered, in which the electrolyte components reversibly self-assemble into a protective surface coating on a graphite electrode upon changing the potential. In contrast to the established wisdom regarding the necessity of employing the solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) to form a protective SEI layer on graphite, a wide range of EC-free electrolytes are demonstrated for the reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ cations within a graphite lattice, thereby providing tremendous flexibility in electrolyte tailoring for battery couples. This novel finding is broadly applicable and provides guidance for how to control interfacial reactions through the relationship between ion aggregation and solvent decomposition at polarized interfaces.

  3. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1 -0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012), 10.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  4. Effect of interface on surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Akihiro; Kuroda, Seiichi; Mohamed, Hamdy F M; Tavernier, Bruno

    2013-07-21

    To understand the relationship between surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films, perfluorinated ionomer Nafion® thin films were prepared on different substrates such as glassy carbon (GC), hydrophilic-GC (H-GC), and platinum (Pt) as models for the ionomer film within a catalyst layer. Atomic force microscopy coupled with an electrochemical (e-AFM) technique revealed that proton conduction decreased with film thickness; an abrupt decrease in proton conductance was observed when the film thickness was less than ca. 10 nm on GC substrates in addition to a significant change in surface morphology. Furthermore, thin films prepared on H-GC substrates with UV-ozone treatment exhibited higher proton conduction than those on untreated GC substrates. However, Pt substrates exhibited proton conduction comparable to that of GCs for films thicker than 20 nm; a decrease in proton conduction was observed at ∼5 nm thick film but was still much higher than for carbon substrates. These results indicate that the number of active proton-conductive pathways and/or the connectivity of the proton path network changed with film thickness. The surface morphology of thinner films was significantly affected by the film/substrate interface and was fundamentally different from that of the bulk thick membrane.

  5. Physical interface dynamics alter how robotic exosuits augment human movement: implications for optimizing wearable assistive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandell, Matthew B; Quinlivan, Brendan T; Popov, Dmitry; Walsh, Conor; Zelik, Karl E

    2017-05-18

    Wearable assistive devices have demonstrated the potential to improve mobility outcomes for individuals with disabilities, and to augment healthy human performance; however, these benefits depend on how effectively power is transmitted from the device to the human user. Quantifying and understanding this power transmission is challenging due to complex human-device interface dynamics that occur as biological tissues and physical interface materials deform and displace under load, absorbing and returning power. Here we introduce a new methodology for quickly estimating interface power dynamics during movement tasks using common motion capture and force measurements, and then apply this method to quantify how a soft robotic ankle exosuit interacts with and transfers power to the human body during walking. We partition exosuit end-effector power (i.e., power output from the device) into power that augments ankle plantarflexion (termed augmentation power) vs. power that goes into deformation and motion of interface materials and underlying soft tissues (termed interface power). We provide empirical evidence of how human-exosuit interfaces absorb and return energy, reshaping exosuit-to-human power flow and resulting in three key consequences: (i) During exosuit loading (as applied forces increased), about 55% of exosuit end-effector power was absorbed into the interfaces. (ii) However, during subsequent exosuit unloading (as applied forces decreased) most of the absorbed interface power was returned viscoelastically. Consequently, the majority (about 75%) of exosuit end-effector work over each stride contributed to augmenting ankle plantarflexion. (iii) Ankle augmentation power (and work) was delayed relative to exosuit end-effector power, due to these interface energy absorption and return dynamics. Our findings elucidate the complexities of human-exosuit interface dynamics during transmission of power from assistive devices to the human body, and provide insight into

  6. Effect of PECVD SiNx/SiOy Nx –Si interface property on surface passivation of silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiao-Jie; Zhou Chun-Lan; Zhou Su; Wang Wen-Jing; Zhu Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    It is studied in this paper that the electrical characteristics of the interface between SiO y N x /SiN x stack and silicon wafer affect silicon surface passivation. The effects of precursor flow ratio and deposition temperature of the SiO y N x layer on interface parameters, such as interface state density Di t and fixed charge Q f , and the surface passivation quality of silicon are observed. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that inserting a thin SiO y N x layer between the SiN x and the silicon wafer can suppress Q f in the film and D it at the interface. The positive Q f and D it and a high surface recombination velocity in stacks are observed to increase with the introduced oxygen and minimal hydrogen in the SiO y N x film increasing. Prepared by deposition at a low temperature and a low ratio of N 2 O/SiH 4 flow rate, the SiO y N x /SiN x stacks result in a low effective surface recombination velocity (S eff ) of 6 cm/s on a p-type 1 Ω·cm–5 Ω·cm FZ silicon wafer. The positive relationship between S eff and D it suggests that the saturation of the interface defect is the main passivation mechanism although the field-effect passivation provided by the fixed charges also make a contribution to it. (paper)

  7. Coating magnesium hydroxide on surface of carbon microspheres and interface binding with poly (ethylene terephthalate) matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Baoxia [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Niu, Mei, E-mail: niumei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Bai, Jie; Song, Yinghao; Peng, Yun [College of Textile Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yuci 030600 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Magnesium hydroxide (MH) as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs by liquid phase deposition method. • An organic layer of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was then introduced on the surface of MH@CMSs. • The formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties. - Abstract: In this account, magnesium hydroxide (MH) employed as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs using liquid phase deposition, then was modified by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to form FMH@CMSs. To investigate the interface binding forces, a series of PET composites was prepared by melt compounding with MH@CMSs or FMH@CMSs. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the morphology, chemical structure, and effect of functionalization of CMSs. The coating degree and thermal stability were investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. The results showed that CMSs were coated by an inorganic shell layer of MH as a capsule wall. On the other hand, MH@CMSs were coated with an organic layer of APTS. When compared to MH@CMSs, the interface binding forces between FMH@CMSs and PET matrix were significantly improved, and the tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET was higher than that of MH@CMSs/PET. At 1 wt% mass fraction of FMH@CMSs, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of PET composites increased from 21% to 27.6% following a V-0 rating. The tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET increased by 66.2% to reach 47.20 MPa, a value nearly similar to that of PET. Overall, the formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties, which would broaden their scope of application.

  8. Elastic waves at periodically-structured surfaces and interfaces of solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Every

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple treatment of elastic wave scattering at periodically structured surfaces and interfaces of solids, and the existence and nature of surface acoustic waves (SAW and interfacial (IW waves at such structures. Our treatment is embodied in phenomenological models in which the periodicity resides in the boundary conditions. These yield zone folding and band gaps at the boundary of, and within the Brillouin zone. Above the transverse bulk wave threshold, there occur leaky or pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW, which are attenuated via radiation into the bulk wave continuum. These have a pronounced effect on the transmission and reflection of bulk waves. We provide examples of pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW for which the coupling to the bulk wave continuum vanishes at isloated points in the dispersion relation. These supersonic guided waves correspond to embedded discrete eigenvalues within a radiation continuum. We stress the generality of the phenomena that are exhibited at widely different scales of length and frequency, and their relevance to situations as diverse as the guiding of seismic waves in mine stopes, the metrology of periodic metal interconnect structures in the semiconductor industry, and elastic wave scattering by an array of coplanar cracks in a solid.

  9. Tool for assessment of process importance at the groundwater/surface water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakodeti, Ravi C; LeBoeuf, Eugene J; Clarke, James H

    2009-10-01

    The groundwater/surface water interface (GWSWI) represents an important transition zone between groundwater and surface water environments that potentially changes the nature and flux of contaminants exchanged between the two systems. Identifying dominant and rate-limiting contaminant transformation processes is critically important for estimating contaminant fluxes and compositional changes across the GWSWI. A new, user-friendly, spreadsheet- and Visual Basic-based analytical screening tool that assists in evaluating the dominance of controlling kinetic processes across the GWSWI is presented. Based on contaminant properties, first-order processes that may play a significant role in solute transport/transformation are evaluated in terms of a ratio of process importance (P(i)) that relates the process rate to the rate of fluid transfer. Besides possessing several useful compilations of contaminant and process data, the screening tool also includes 1-D analytical models that assist users in evaluating contaminant transport across the GWSWI. The tool currently applies to 29 organics and 10 inorganics of interest within the context of the GWSWI. Application of the new screening tool is demonstrated through an evaluation of natural attenuation at a site with trichloroethylene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane contaminated groundwater discharging into wetlands.

  10. Doped and codoped silicon nanocrystals: The role of surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Ivan; Degoli, Elena; Ossicini, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Si nanocrystals have been extensively studied because of their novel properties and their potential applications in electronic, optoelectronic, photovoltaic, thermoelectric and biological devices. These new properties are achieved through the combination of the quantum confinement of carriers and the strong influence of surface chemistry. As in the case of bulk Si the tuning of the electronic, optical and transport properties is related to the possibility of doping, in a controlled way, the nanocrystals. This is a big challenge since several studies have revealed that doping in Si nanocrystals differs from the one of the bulk. Theory and experiments have underlined that doping and codoping are influenced by a large number of parameters such as size, shape, passivation and chemical environment of the silicon nanocrystals. However, the connection between these parameters and dopant localization as well as the occurrence of self-purification effects are still not clear. In this review we summarize the latest progress in this fascinating research field considering free-standing and matrix-embedded Si nanocrystals both from the theoretical and experimental point of view, with special attention given to the results obtained by ab-initio calculations and to size-, surface- and interface-induced effects.

  11. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland [Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.3584815 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  12. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  13. Reverse Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Demonstrate That Surface Passivation Controls Thermal Transport at Semiconductor-Solvent Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Daniel C; Gezelter, J Daniel; Schaller, Richard D; Schatz, George C

    2015-06-23

    We examine the role played by surface structure and passivation in thermal transport at semiconductor/organic interfaces. Such interfaces dominate thermal transport in semiconductor nanomaterials owing to material dimensions much smaller than the bulk phonon mean free path. Utilizing reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the interfacial thermal conductance (G) between a hexane solvent and chemically passivated wurtzite CdSe surfaces. In particular, we examine the dependence of G on the CdSe slab thickness, the particular exposed crystal facet, and the extent of surface passivation. Our results indicate a nonmonotonic dependence of G on ligand-grafting density, with interfaces generally exhibiting higher thermal conductance for increasing surface coverage up to ∼0.08 ligands/Å(2) (75-100% of a monolayer, depending on the particular exposed facet) and decreasing for still higher coverages. By analyzing orientational ordering and solvent penetration into the ligand layer, we show that a balance of competing effects is responsible for this nonmonotonic dependence. Although the various unpassivated CdSe surfaces exhibit similar G values, the crystal structure of an exposed facet nevertheless plays an important role in determining the interfacial thermal conductance of passivated surfaces, as the density of binding sites on a surface determines the ligand-grafting densities that may ultimately be achieved. We demonstrate that surface passivation can increase G relative to a bare surface by roughly 1 order of magnitude and that, for a given extent of passivation, thermal conductance can vary by up to a factor of ∼2 between different surfaces, suggesting that appropriately tailored nanostructures may direct heat flow in an anisotropic fashion for interface-limited thermal transport.

  14. Differences in friction and torsional resistance in athletic shoe-turf surface interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, R S; Dormer, S G; Cawley, P W; Scranton, P E; Losse, G; Howard, M

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the shoe-surface interaction of 15 football shoes made by 3 manufacturers in both anterior translation and rotation using a specially designed pneumatic testing system. The shoes included traditional cleated football shoes, "court" shoes (basketball-style shoes), molded-cleat shoes, and turf shoes. Under an 11.35-kg (25-pound) axial load, all shoes were tested on synthetic turf under wet and dry conditions and on natural stadium grass. Test-retest reliability, as calculated using the Pearson Product-Moment Correlation test, was 0.85 for force of translation and 0.55 for the moment of rotation. The wet versus dry surface values on translation were significantly different for rotation about the tibial axis. Spatting, which is protective taping of the ankle and heel applied on the outside of the shoe, resulted in a reduction of forces generated in both translation and rotation. No overall difference between shoes on grass versus AstroTurf was noted. However, there were significant differences for cleated and turf shoes. Shoes tested in conditions for which they were not designed exhibited reproducible excessive or extreme minimal friction characteristics that may have safety implications. On the basis of this study, we urge shoe manufacturers to display suggested indications and playing surface conditions for which their shoes are recommended.

  15. Coating magnesium hydroxide on surface of carbon microspheres and interface binding with poly (ethylene terephthalate) matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baoxia; Niu, Mei; Yang, Yongzhen; Bai, Jie; Song, Yinghao; Peng, Yun; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-08-01

    In this account, magnesium hydroxide (MH) employed as a capsule wall was firstly coated on the surface of carbon microspheres (CMSs) to obtain MH@CMSs using liquid phase deposition, then was modified by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to form FMH@CMSs. To investigate the interface binding forces, a series of PET composites was prepared by melt compounding with MH@CMSs or FMH@CMSs. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the morphology, chemical structure, and effect of functionalization of CMSs. The coating degree and thermal stability were investigated by thermogravimetry analysis. The results showed that CMSs were coated by an inorganic shell layer of MH as a capsule wall. On the other hand, MH@CMSs were coated with an organic layer of APTS. When compared to MH@CMSs, the interface binding forces between FMH@CMSs and PET matrix were significantly improved, and the tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET was higher than that of MH@CMSs/PET. At 1 wt% mass fraction of FMH@CMSs, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of PET composites increased from 21% to 27.6% following a V-0 rating. The tensile strength of FMH@CMSs/PET increased by 66.2% to reach 47.20 MPa, a value nearly similar to that of PET. Overall, the formed two layers provided the FMH@CMSs/PET with good mechanical and flame-retardant properties, which would broaden their scope of application.

  16. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption mechanism of surfactin biosurfactant at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaizi, Sagheer A

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic adsorption of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, at the air-water interface has been investigated in this work and compared to those of two synthetic surfactants: the anionic sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and the nonionic octaethylene glycol monotetradecyl ether (C 14 E 8 ). The results revealed that surfactin adsorption at the air-water interface is purely controlled by diffusion mechanism at the initial stage of the adsorption process (i.e., [Formula: see text]), but shifts towards a mixed diffusion-barrier mechanism when surface tension approaches equilibrium (i.e., [Formula: see text]) due to the development of an energy barrier for adsorption. Such energy barrier has been found to be a function of the surfactin bulk concentration (increases with increasing surfactin concentration) and it is estimated to be in the range of 1.8-9.5 kJ/mol. Interestingly, such a trend (pure diffusion-controlled mechanism at [Formula: see text] and mixed diffusion-barrier mechanism at [Formula: see text]) has been also observed for the nonionic C 14 E 8 surfactant. Unlike the pure diffusion-controlled mechanism of the initial surfactin adsorption, which was the case in the presence and the absence of the sodium ion (Na + ), SDBS showed a mixed diffusion-barrier controlled at both short and long time, with an energy barrier of 3.0-9.0 and 3.8-18.0 kJ/mol, respectively. Such finding highlights the nonionic-like adsorption mechanism of surfactin despite its negative charge.

  17. Better Educational Website Interface Design: The Implications from Gender-Specific Preferences in Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-chang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated graduate students gender-specific preferences for certain website interface design features, intending to generate useful information for instructors in choosing and for website designers in creating educational websites. The features investigated in this study included colour value, major navigation buttons placement, and…

  18. Defect interactions with stepped CeO₂/SrTiO₃ interfaces: implications for radiation damage evolution and fast ion conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholabhai, Pratik P; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P

    2014-05-21

    Due to reduced dimensions and increased interfacial content, nanocomposite oxides offer improved functionalities in a wide variety of advanced technological applications, including their potential use as radiation tolerant materials. To better understand the role of interface structures in influencing the radiation damage tolerance of oxides, we have conducted atomistic calculations to elucidate the behavior of radiation-induced point defects (vacancies and interstitials) at interface steps in a model CeO2/SrTiO3 system. We find that atomic-scale steps at the interface have substantial influence on the defect behavior, which ultimately dictate the material performance in hostile irradiation environments. Distinctive steps react dissimilarly to cation and anion defects, effectively becoming biased sinks for different types of defects. Steps also attract cation interstitials, leaving behind an excess of immobile vacancies. Further, defects introduce significant structural and chemical distortions primarily at the steps. These two factors are plausible origins for the enhanced amorphization at steps seen in our recent experiments. The present work indicates that comprehensive examination of the interaction of radiation-induced point defects with the atomic-scale topology and defect structure of heterointerfaces is essential to evaluate the radiation tolerance of nanocomposites. Finally, our results have implications for other applications, such as fast ion conduction.

  19. Engineering the Surface/Interface Structures of Titanium Dioxide Micro and Nano Architectures towards Environmental and Electrochemical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 materials have been intensively studied in the past years because of many varied applications. This mini review article focuses on TiO2 micro and nano architectures with the prevalent crystal structures (anatase, rutile, brookite, and TiO2(B, and summarizes the major advances in the surface and interface engineering and applications in environmental and electrochemical applications. We analyze the advantages of surface/interface engineered TiO2 micro and nano structures, and present the principles and growth mechanisms of TiO2 nanostructures via different strategies, with an emphasis on rational control of the surface and interface structures. We further discuss the applications of TiO2 micro and nano architectures in photocatalysis, lithium/sodium ion batteries, and Li–S batteries. Throughout the discussion, the relationship between the device performance and the surface/interface structures of TiO2 micro and nano structures will be highlighted. Then, we discuss the phase transitions of TiO2 nanostructures and possible strategies of improving the phase stability. The review concludes with a perspective on the current challenges and future research directions.

  20. Recent Developments in the X-Ray Reflectivity Analysis for Rough Surfaces and Interfaces of Multilayered Thin Film Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Fujii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray reflectometry is a powerful tool for investigations on rough surface and interface structures of multilayered thin film materials. The X-ray reflectivity has been calculated based on the Parratt formalism, accounting for the effect of roughness by the theory of Nevot-Croce conventionally. However, in previous studies, the calculations of the X-ray reflectivity often show a strange effect where interference effects would increase at a rough surface. And estimated surface and interface roughnesses from the X-ray reflectivity measurements did not correspond to the TEM image observation results. The strange result had its origin in a used equation due to a serious mistake in which the Fresnel transmission coefficient in the reflectivity equation is increased at a rough interface because of a lack of consideration of diffuse scattering. In this review, a new accurate formalism that corrects this mistake is presented. The new accurate formalism derives an accurate analysis of the X-ray reflectivity from a multilayer surface of thin film materials, taking into account the effect of roughness-induced diffuse scattering. The calculated reflectivity by this accurate reflectivity equation should enable the structure of buried interfaces to be analyzed more accurately.

  1. Cigarette smoke toxins deposited on surfaces: implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Martins-Green

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered - Thirdhand smoke (THS - the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential health threat to children, spouses of smokers and workers in environments where smoking is or has been allowed. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of THS on liver, lung, skin healing, and behavior, using an animal model exposed to THS under conditions that mimic exposure of humans. THS-exposed mice show alterations in multiple organ systems and excrete levels of NNAL (a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker similar to those found in children exposed to SHS (and consequently to THS. In liver, THS leads to increased lipid levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a precursor to cirrhosis and cancer and a potential contributor to cardiovascular disease. In lung, THS stimulates excess collagen production and high levels of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting propensity for fibrosis with implications for inflammation-induced diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. In wounded skin, healing in THS-exposed mice has many characteristics of the poor healing of surgical incisions observed in human smokers. Lastly, behavioral tests show that THS-exposed mice become hyperactive. The latter data, combined with emerging associated behavioral problems in children exposed to SHS/THS, suggest that, with prolonged exposure, they may be at significant risk for developing more severe neurological disorders. These results provide a basis for studies on the toxic effects of THS in humans and inform potential regulatory policies to prevent involuntary exposure to THS.

  2. A Force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ratan K.; Fernández Carrasco, Lucía; Flatt, Robert J.; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integ...

  3. Surface activity of thymol: implications for an eventual pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mariela E; Turina, Anahí del V; García, Daniel A; Nolan, M Verónica; Perillo, María A

    2004-03-15

    In the present work, we studied the ability of thymol to affect the organization of model membranes and the activity of an intrinsic membrane protein, the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R). In this last aspect, we tried to elucidate if the action mechanism of this terpene at the molecular level, involves its binding to the receptor protein, changes in the organization of the receptor molecular environment, or both. The self-aggregation of thymol in water with a critical micellar concentration approximately = 4 microM and its ability to penetrate in monomolecular layers of soybean phosphatidylcholine (sPC) at the air-water interface, even at surface pressures above the equilibrium, lateral pressure of natural bilayers were demonstrated. Thymol affected the self-aggregation of Triton X-100 and the topology of sPC vesicles. It also increased the polarity of the membrane environment sensed by the electrochromic dye merocyanine. A dipolar moment of 1.341 Debye was calculated from its energy-minimized structure. Its effect on the binding of [3H]-flunitrazepam ([3H]-FNZ) to chick brain synaptosomal membranes changed qualitatively from a tendency to the inhibition to a clear activatory regime, up on changing the phase state of the terpene (from a monomeric to a self-aggregated state). Above its CMC, thymol increased the affinity of the binding of [3H]-FNZ (K(d-control)= 2.9, K(d-thymol)= 1.7 nM) without changing the receptor density (B(max-control)= 910, B(max-thymol)= 895 fmol/mg protein). The activatory effect of thymol on the binding of [ [3H]-FNZ was observed even in the presence of the allosteric activator gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at a concentration of maximal activity, and was blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. Changes in the dipolar arrangement and in the molecular packing of GABA(A)-R environment are discussed as possible mediators of the action mechanism of thymol.

  4. Surface and interface properties of carbon fiber composites under cyclical aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinying; Wang, Rongguo; Liu, Wenbo; Jiang, Long

    2011-10-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced BMI composites have been subjected to combination accelerated aging comprising a hygrothermal process, a thermal-oxidative process, and a freezing process in order to simulate their responses under complicated service environments. This cyclical condition, including the freezing process, has not been investigated by other researchers so far. The effects of this combination accelerated aging on the mechanical properties have been characterized by FTIR, SEM/EDXA, XRD, and moisture-uptake determination. The results indicated that combination accelerated aging had great effects on the mechanical properties of the composite, the network structure of the BMI matrix, and the moisture uptake by the composite. After a third cycle of accelerated aging, moisture reached the center layer of the composite and as a result led to an obvious decrease in ILSS due to deterioration of the carbon fiber-BMI interface. Sufficient moisture absorption on the composite surface made the network structure of the BMI matrix more open, which facilitated stress relaxation and the creation of micro-cracks, with a consequent obvious decrease in flexural strength. With increasing number of combined-action accelerated aging cycles, ever more moisture was absorbed during each hygrothermal process due to the plasticizing effect of water, and micro-cracks propagated as a result of internal stresses caused by the hygrothermal process, the thermal-oxidative process, and the freezing process of each cycle. XRD analysis indicated that moisture penetrated through the amorphous region of the BMI matrix.

  5. Tailoring ferroelectric interfaces: surface modification of PZT mediated through functionalized thiophene derivates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milde, Peter; Koehler, Denny; Zerweck, Ulrich; Eng, Lukas M. [Department of Applied Photophysics, TU Dresden (Germany); Haubner, Kinga [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, TU Dresden (Germany); Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry and Textile Chemistry, TU Dresden (Germany); Jaehne, Evelyn [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry and Textile Chemistry, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with a gate ''electrode'' that is made out of a ferroelectric (FE) have become a field of intense research. Non-volatile memory functionality is expected due to the strong and remanent electric field arising from bound surface charges at the FE/molecular interface. In order to achieve excellent electric transport properties, a high degree of intermolecular ordering is inevitable. In our approach, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is used as material of choice for the design of an ultra-thin ferroelectric gate electrode in a Ferroelectric-OFET. The focus of the present work lays on the growth process of the molecularly thin organic conduction layer, based on {alpha},{omega}-dicyano-{beta},{beta}*-dibutylquaterthiophene (DCNDBQT). Film formation is effectively promoted through specifically designed, bifunctional self-assembling molecules (CNBTPA: 5-cyano-2-(butyl-4-phosphonic acid)-3-butylthiophene) which act as template layer. We report on nc-AFM and KPFM investigation of the template layer's structural and electronic properties.

  6. Floating dielectric slab optical interconnection between metal-dielectric interface surface plasmon polariton waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minsu; Park, Junghyun; Lee, Il-Min; Lee, Byoungho

    2009-01-19

    A simple and effective optical interconnection which connects two distanced single metal-dielectric interface surface plasmon waveguides by a floating dielectric slab waveguide (slab bridge) is proposed. Transmission characteristics of the suggested structure are numerically studied using rigorous coupled wave analysis, and design rules based on the study are given. In the wave-guiding part, if the slab bridge can support more than the fundamental mode, then the transmission efficiency of the interconnection shows strong periodic dependency on the length of the bridge, due to the multi-mode interference (MMI) effect. Otherwise, only small fluctuation occurs due to the Fabry-Pérot effect. In addition, light beating happens when the slab bridge is relatively short. In the wave-coupling part, on the other hand, gap-assisted transmission occurs at each overlapping region as a consequence of mode hybridization. Periodic dependency on the length of the overlap region also appears due to the MMI effect. According to these results, we propose design principles for achieving both high transmission efficiency and stability with respect to the variation of the interconnection distance, and we show how to obtain the transmission efficiency of 68.3% for the 1mm-long interconnection.

  7. Fate of Uranium During Transport Across the Groundwater-Surface Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, Peter R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-30

    Discharge of contaminated groundwater to surface waters is of concern at many DOE facilities. For example, at F-Area and TNX-Area on the Savannah River Site, contaminated groundwater, including uranium, is already discharging into natural wetlands. It is at this interface where contaminants come into contact with the biosphere. These this research addressed a critical knowledge gap focusing on the geochemistry of uranium (or for that matter, any redox-active contaminant) in wetland systems. Understanding the interactions between hydrological, microbial, and chemical processes will make it possible to provide a more accurate conceptual and quantitative understanding of radionuclide fate and transport under these unique conditions. Understanding these processes will permit better long-term management and the necessary technical justification for invoking Monitored Natural Attenuation of contaminated wetland areas. Specifically, this research did provide new insights on how plant-induced alterations to the sediment biogeochemical processes affect the key uranium reducing microorganisms, the uranium reduction, its spatial distribution, the speciation of the immobilized uranium, and its long-term stability. This was achieved by conducting laboratory mesocosm wetland experiments as well as field measurements at the SRNL. Results have shown that uranium can be immobilized in wetland systems. To a degree some of the soluble U(VI) was reduced to insoluble U(IV), but the majority of the immobilized U was incorporated into iron oxyhydroxides that precipitated onto the root surfaces of wetland plants. This U was immobilized mostly as U(VI). Because it was immobilized in its oxidized form, results showed that dry spells, resulting in the lowering of the water table and the exposure of the U to oxic conditions, did not result in U remobilization.

  8. Opto-mechanical coupling in interfaces under static and propagative conditions and its biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes are vital for studying static and dynamic patterns and pattern formation in cell biology. Emission properties of the dyes incorporated in a biological interface are known to be sensitive to their local environment. We report that the fluorescence intensity of dye molecules embedded in lipid interfaces is indeed a thermodynamic observable of the system. Opto-mechanical coupling of lipid-dye system was measured as a function of the thermodynamic state of the interface. The corresponding state diagrams quantify the thermodynamic coupling between intensity I and lateral pressure π. We further demonstrate that the coupling is conserved upon varying the temperature T. Notably, the observed opto-mechanical coupling is not limited to equilibrium conditions, but also holds for propagating pressure pulses. The non-equilibrium data show, that fluorescence is especially sensitive to dynamic changes in state such as the LE-LC phase transition. We conclude that variations in the thermodynamic state (here π and T, in general pH, membrane potential V, etc also) of lipid membranes are capable of controlling fluorescence intensity. Therefore, interfacial thermodynamic state diagrams of I should be obtained for a proper interpretation of intensity data.

  9. Opto-mechanical coupling in interfaces under static and propagative conditions and its biological implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamit Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Fluorescent dyes are vital for studying static and dynamic patterns and pattern formation in cell biology. Emission properties of the dyes incorporated in a biological interface are known to be sensitive to their local environment. We report that the fluorescence intensity of dye molecules embedded in lipid interfaces is indeed a thermodynamic observable of the system. Opto-mechanical coupling of lipid-dye system was measured as a function of the thermodynamic state of the interface. The corresponding state diagrams quantify the thermodynamic coupling between intensity I and lateral pressure π. We further demonstrate that the coupling is conserved upon varying the temperature T. Notably, the observed opto-mechanical coupling is not limited to equilibrium conditions, but also holds for propagating pressure pulses. The non-equilibrium data show, that fluorescence is especially sensitive to dynamic changes in state such as the LE-LC phase transition. We conclude that variations in the thermodynamic state (here π and T, in general pH, membrane potential V, etc also of lipid membranes are capable of controlling fluorescence intensity. Therefore, interfacial thermodynamic state diagrams of I should be obtained for a proper interpretation of intensity data.

  10. PEEM microscopy and DFT calculations of catalytically active platinum surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiel, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the properties of catalytically active platinum surfaces and interfaces both with experimental and theoretical methods. Using experimental methods, catalytic CO oxidation on individual grains of a polycrystalline platinum foil was studied in situ under high vacuum (HV) conditions. A polycrystalline platinum foil consists of individual µm-sized crystal grains that are mainly [100]-, [110]- and [111]-oriented and differ significantly in their catalytic activity. In order to elucidate the differences existing between the reactivity of the individual grains, a combination of photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used in this work. The working principle of PEEM is based on the photoelectric effect where illumination of the sample with (UV-)light causes emission of photoelectrons. The emitted photoelectrons are used to visualize the sample surface (with typical resolution in the low micrometer range). The PEEM image contrast originates from differences in the local work function that may arise due to different crystallographic orientations and/or changes in the adsorbate coverage. With a combination of PEEM and QMS, it was possible to study the kinetics of catalytic CO oxidation on polycrystalline platinum foil both in a global and a laterally-resolved way simultaneously. If catalytic CO oxidation on surfaces of platinum is followed at constant temperature and oxygen partial pressure under cyclic variation of the CO pressure, a hysteresis in the CO2 production rate is observed in the bistability region with two noticeable kinetic transitions (called tA and tB) taking place at different CO pressures when the catalyst surface switches back-and-forth between two steady states of high and low reactivity while the Pt-surface is, correspondingly, either oxygen- or CO-covered. In the bistability region between τ A and τ B , the system stays (at the same values of the external parameters p

  11. Interface properties of organic molecules on metal surfaces; Grenzflaecheneigenschaften organischer Molekuele auf Metalloberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacuban, Hatice

    2010-01-28

    In this work, the growth of the archetype molecules CuPc and PTCDA was investigated on Cu(111). PTCDA was also studied on NaCl/Cu(111). The main experiments were carried out with a scanning tunneling microscope. Structural analysis of CuPc on Cu (111) is only possible at low temperatures, since at room temperature the molecules exhibit a high surface mobility. For the investigation of these structures and especially to enable scanning tunneling spectroscopy, a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was developed. Using this home built STM the experiments could be carried out at about 10 K. After the adsorption of CuPc on Cu (111) a substrate-induced symmetry reduction of the molecules can be observed in scanning tunneling microscopy. When the occupied states of the molecules are imaged, a switching between two distinct levels is found. These modifications are determined by the adsorption geometry of the molecules. Based on high resolution STM data, an on-top adsorption geometry of the CuPc-molecules on Cu (111)-substrate can be deducted. At low temperatures, two new superstructures of PTCDA on Cu(111) are observed. The molecules within these superstructures are tilted with respect to the substrate. Intermolecular interactions may be the crucial factor for the realignment of the molecules. If PTCDA molecules are adsorbed on a NaCl/Cu (111) substrate, at room temperature, also two new superstructures on the copper substrate were found. They indicate the formation of a metall-organic-complex. On top of the NaCl layer the molecules exclusively grow at polar NaCl step edges. This is an indication for electrostatic interaction between the PTCDA molecules and the NaCl layer. When the molecule density is further increased, a Vollmer-Weber growth sets in. If both molecules PTCDA and CuPc are present on the sample at the same time, local spectroscopy provides information on the metal-organic interface in direct comparison. The STS-results of CuPc/PTCDA on Cu (111

  12. A Novel Feature Optimization for Wearable Human-Computer Interfaces Using Surface Electromyography Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel human-computer interface (HCI using bioelectrical signals as input is a valuable tool to improve the lives of people with disabilities. In this paper, surface electromyography (sEMG signals induced by four classes of wrist movements were acquired from four sites on the lower arm with our designed system. Forty-two features were extracted from the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. Optimal channels were determined from single-channel classification performance rank. The optimal-feature selection was according to a modified entropy criteria (EC and Fisher discrimination (FD criteria. The feature selection results were evaluated by four different classifiers, and compared with other conventional feature subsets. In online tests, the wearable system acquired real-time sEMG signals. The selected features and trained classifier model were used to control a telecar through four different paradigms in a designed environment with simple obstacles. Performance was evaluated based on travel time (TT and recognition rate (RR. The results of hardware evaluation verified the feasibility of our acquisition systems, and ensured signal quality. Single-channel analysis results indicated that the channel located on the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU performed best with mean classification accuracy of 97.45% for all movement’s pairs. Channels placed on ECU and the extensor carpi radialis (ECR were selected according to the accuracy rank. Experimental results showed that the proposed FD method was better than other feature selection methods and single-type features. The combination of FD and random forest (RF performed best in offline analysis, with 96.77% multi-class RR. Online results illustrated that the state-machine paradigm with a 125 ms window had the highest maneuverability and was closest to real-life control. Subjects could accomplish online sessions by three sEMG-based paradigms, with average times of 46.02, 49.06 and 48.08 s

  13. Spin-wave mode profiles versus surface/interface conditions in ferromagnetic Fe/Ni layered composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, M; Puszkarski, H; Levy, J-C S; Mercier, D

    2003-01-01

    Spin-wave excitations in ferromagnetic layered composite (AB · · · BA; A and B being different homogeneous ferromagnetic materials) are analysed theoretically, by means of the transfer matrix approach. The properties of multilayer spin-wave mode profiles are discussed in relation to multilayer characteristics, such as the filling fraction and the exchange or magnetization contrast; also, surface spin pinning conditions and dipolar interactions are taken into account. The interface conditions are satisfied by introducing an effective exchange field expressed by interface gradients of the exchange constant and the magnetization. This approach provides an easy way to find frequencies and amplitudes of standing spin waves in the multilayer. The developed theory is applied to interpretation of spin wave resonance (SWR) spectra obtained experimentally by Chambers et al in two systems: a bilayer Fe/Ni and a trilayer Ni/Fe/Ni, in perpendicular (to the multilayer surface) configuration of the applied magnetic field. By fitting the SWR spectra obtained experimentally and those found numerically, the surface anisotropies are estimated on multilayer surfaces; then, the observed resonance lines are identified as associated with bulk, surface or interface modes. The theory can be extended to a general case of any multi-component layered system

  14. Surface second harmonic generation from coumarin 343 dye-attached TiO2 nanoparticles at liquid–liquid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, Debi D.; Joshi, Sunita; Girault, Hubert H.

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of coumarin 343 (C343) dye-attached TiO 2 nanoparticles in the size range 5–8 nm adsorbed at the interface of water/1,2-dichloroethane have been studied by using the surface second harmonic generation technique. No second harmonic (SH) response was observed from the bare TiO 2 nanoparticles adsorbed at the interface, however, a strong SH response was measured from the dye molecules attached at the surfaces of the nanoparticles. The increase in the SH intensity with the increase of TiO 2 nanoparticle concentration in the aqueous solution of C343 is mainly due to the pre-alignment of the dye molecules at the surfaces of nanoparticles and is partly due to the third-order polarization contribution of the nanoparticles to the observed total SH response.

  15. Vibrational properties of homopolar and heteropolar surfaces and interfaces of the CdTe/HgTe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey Gonzalez, R.; Camacho B, A.; Quiroga, L.

    1993-08-01

    We present results of calculations for the density of vibrational modes for (001) and (111) homopolar, as well as for (011) heteropolar free surfaces of CdTe and HgTe. A rigid-ion model with a dynamical matrix parametrization including force constants up to second neighbours is used. We report on the existence of highly localized surface resonant modes at the top of the acoustic branch for CdTe and the bottom of the optical branch for HgTe. A different behaviour in the three directions analysed is found. The interface atomic planes show themselves as phonon gapless layers. The contribution of in-plane and out-of-plane vibration is analysed for both the surface and interface cases. (author). 7 refs, 7 figs

  16. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  17. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analyses For circumferential Part-through Surface Cracks At The Interface Between Elbows and Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plastic limit loads and approximate J-integral estimates for circumferential part-through surface crack at the interface between elbows and pipes. Based on finite element limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials, plastic limit moments under in-plane bending are obtained and it is found that they are similar those for circumferential part-through surface cracks in the center of elbow. Based on present FE results, closed-form limit load solutions are proposed. Welds are not explicitly considered and all materials are assumed to be homogeneous. And the method to estimate the elastic-plastic J-integral for circumferential part-through surface cracks at the interface between elbows and straight pipes is proposed based on the reference stress approach, which was compared with corresponding solutions for straight pipes

  18. Surface and Interface Engineering of Conjugated Polymers and Nanomaterials in Applications of Supercapacitors and Surface-functionalization

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Yuanfang

    2016-05-23

    In this dissertation, three aspects about surface and interface engineering of conjugated polymers and nanomaterials will be discussed. (i) There is a significant promise for electroactive conjugated polymers (ECPs) in applications of electrochemical devices including energy harvesting, electrochromic displays, etc. Among these, ECPs has also been developed as electroactive materials in electrochemical supercapacitors (ESCs). Compared with metal oxides, ECPs are attractive because they have good intrinsic conductivity, low band-gaps, relatively fast doping-and-undoping process, the ease of synthesis, and tunable electronic and structural properties through structural modifications. Here, Multiple-branch-chain 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) derivatives was designed as crosslinkers in the co-electropolymerization of EDOT to optimize its morphology and improve the cycling stability of PEDOT in the supercapacitor applications. High-surface-area π-conjugated polymeric networks can be synthesized via the electrochemical copolymerization of the 2D (trivalent) motifs benzo[1,2-b:3,4-b’:5,6-b’’]trithiophene (BTT) and tris-EDOT-benzo[1,2-b:3,4-b’:5,6-b’’]trithiophene (TEBTT) with EDOT. Of all the material systems studied, P(TEBTT/EDOT)-based frameworks achieved the highest areal capacitance with values as high as 443.8 mF cm-2 (at 1 mA cm-2), higher than those achieved by the respective homopolymers (PTEBTT and PEDOT) in the same experimental conditions of electrodeposition (PTEBTT: 271.1 mF cm-2 (at 1 mA cm-2); PEDOT: 12.1 mF cm-2 (at 1 mA cm-2). (ii) In electrochemical process, the suitable choice of appropriate electrolytes to enlarge the safe working potential window with electrolyte stability is well known to improve ECPs’ performance in ESCs applications. Ionic liquids (ILs) are ion-composed salts and usually fluid within a wide temperature range with low melting points. There are many unique characteristics for these intrinsic ion conductors

  19. The effect of surface texture on total reflection of neutrons and X-rays from modified interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Roser, S.J.; Hughes, A.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray and neutron scattering from macroscopically rough surfaces and interfaces is considered and a new method of analysis based on the variation of the shape of the total reflection edge in the reflectivity profile is proposed. It was shown that in the limit that the correlation length...... and the height of the surface roughness are larger than the wavelength (at least 100 times bigger) of the incoming beam, the total reflection edge in the reflection profile becomes rounded. This technique allows direct analysis of the variation of the reflectivity pro le in terms of the structure of the surface...

  20. An Exploration into Framing Effects and Information Preferences: Implications for the Design of Energy Feedback Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Brown, Peter

    A recent topic in the energy industry involves developing strategies to reduce the necessary peak production capacity of our future electricity infrastructure. One of these strategies is promoting behavioral change among individual energy consumers. An inherent problem with electricity consumption is that electricity is invisible, intangible, and abstract. Interfaces that provide people with useful feedback on their usage can help with understanding and reduction of consumption. These interfaces intend to empower individuals with ability to adopt less wasteful energy consumption behaviors. Skillful HCI design will include attention to informational preferences, and framing effects due to presentation choices. An online questionnaire was utilized to explore this domain, and the results identified design requirements for a home feedback interface. The final dataset contained responses from 36 male and 49 female United States residents. Cost () was perceived as the most useful metric and kW as the least useful. Respondent preference was expressed for lower levels of automation, which was not attributable to distrust of automation. Further, a test of framings effects showed a higher likelihood to change behavior to save 100 dollars per year than 2 per week (U=1248.5, p=0.001). A feedback interface design based on the questionnaire results was used in the second phase of the research. A 2x2x2 factorial design compared the effects of goal-type (specific vs. open-ended), metric-use ( vs. kWh), and visualization (graphical vs. text-only) on user experience, learning and behavior during a consumption reduction task. Results showed that goal-type affects the amount of diagnostic behavior conducted by participants (U=351.0, p=0.001). Goal-type and metric-use independently affect participant belief that they could reduce their consumption in their real home with the same feedback shown in the task, F(df=1,39)=24.77, p=0.001; F(df=1,39)=5.55, p=0.05. In addition, visualization

  1. Study of surface activity of piroxicam at the interface of palm oil esters and various aqueous phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna Fawzy; Abdullah, Ghassan Zuhair; Chitneni, Mallikarjun; Yam, Mun Fei; Mahdi, Elrashid Saleh; Salman, Ibrahim Muhammad; Ameer, Omar Ziad; Sattar, Munavvar Abdul; Basri, Mahiran; Noor, Azmin Mohd

    2012-04-01

    The surface activity of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents like ibuprofen was investigated extensively. This fact has attracted the researchers to extend this behavior to other agents like piroxicam. Piroxicam molecules are expected to orient at the interface of oil and aqueous phase. The aim of this study was, firstly, to assess the surface and interfacial tension behaviour of newly synthesised palm oil esters and various pH phosphate buffers. Furthermore, the surface and interfacial tension activity of piroxicam was studied. All the measurements of surface and interfacial tension were made using the tensiometer. The study revealed that piroxicam has no effect on surface tension values of all pH phosphate buffers and palm oil esters. Similarly, various concentrations of piroxicam did not affect the interfacial tensions between the oil phase and the buffer phases. Accordingly, the interfacial tension values of all mixtures of oil and phosphate buffers were considerably high which indicates the immiscibility. It could be concluded that piroxicam has no surface activity. Additionally, there is no surface pressure activity of piroxicam at the interface of plam oil esters and phosphate buffers in the presence of Tweens and Spans.

  2. Chemodynamics of Soft Nanoparticulate Metal Complexes: From the Local Particle/Medium Interface to a Macroscopic Sensor Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Raewyn M; Pinheiro, José Paulo; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2017-01-17

    The lability of a complex species between a metal ion M and a binding site S, MS, is conventionally defined with respect to an ongoing process at a reactive interface, for example, the conversion or accumulation of the free metal ion M by a sensor. In the case of soft charged multisite nanoparticulate complexes, the chemodynamic features that are operative within the micro environment of the particle body generally differ substantially from those for dissolved similar single-site complexes in the same medium. Here we develop a conceptual framework for the chemodynamics and the ensuing lability of soft (3D) nanoparticulate metal complexes. The approach considers the dynamic features of MS at the intraparticulate level and their impact on the overall reactivity of free metal ions at the surface of a macroscopic sensing interface. Chemodynamics at the intraparticulate level is shown to involve a local reaction layer at the particle/medium interface, while at the macroscopic sensor level an operational reaction layer is invoked. Under a certain window of conditions, volume exclusion of the nanoparticle body near the medium/sensor interface is substantial and affects the properties of the reaction layer and the overall lability of the nanoparticulate MS complex toward the reactive surface.

  3. Spin-wave mode profiles versus surface/interface conditions in ferromagnetic Fe/Ni layered composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, M; Levy, J C S; Mercier, D

    2003-01-01

    Spin-wave excitations in ferromagnetic layered composite (AB centre dot centre dot centre dot BA; A and B being different homogeneous ferromagnetic materials) are analysed theoretically, by means of the transfer matrix approach. The properties of multilayer spin-wave mode profiles are discussed in relation to multilayer characteristics, such as the filling fraction and the exchange or magnetization contrast; also, surface spin pinning conditions and dipolar interactions are taken into account. The interface conditions are satisfied by introducing an effective exchange field expressed by interface gradients of the exchange constant and the magnetization. This approach provides an easy way to find frequencies and amplitudes of standing spin waves in the multilayer. The developed theory is applied to interpretation of spin wave resonance (SWR) spectra obtained experimentally by Chambers et al in two systems: a bilayer Fe/Ni and a trilayer Ni/Fe/Ni, in perpendicular (to the multilayer surface) configuration of th...

  4. Non-equilibrium surface tension of the vapour-liquid interface of active Lennard-Jones particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Siddharth; Prymidis, Vasileios; Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-08-01

    We study a three-dimensional system of self-propelled Brownian particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones potential. Using Brownian dynamics simulations in an elongated simulation box, we investigate the steady states of vapour-liquid phase coexistence of active Lennard-Jones particles with planar interfaces. We measure the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the direction perpendicular to the interface and verify mechanical equilibrium of the two coexisting phases. In addition, we determine the non-equilibrium interfacial tension by integrating the difference of the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor and show that the surface tension as a function of strength of particle attractions is well fitted by simple power laws. Finally, we measure the interfacial stiffness using capillary wave theory and the equipartition theorem and find a simple linear relation between surface tension and interfacial stiffness with a proportionality constant characterized by an effective temperature.

  5. The effect of a curvature-dependent surface tension on the singularities at the tips of a straight interface crack

    KAUST Repository

    Zemlyanova, A. Y.

    2013-03-08

    A problem of an interface crack between two semi-planes made out of different materials under an action of an in-plane loading of general tensile-shear type is treated in a semi-analytical manner with the help of Dirichlet-to-Neumann mappings. The boundaries of the crack and the interface between semi-planes are subjected to a curvature-dependent surface tension. The resulting system of six singular integro-differential equations is reduced to the system of three Fredholm equations. It is shown that the introduction of the curvature-dependent surface tension eliminates both classical integrable power singularity of the order 1/2 and an oscillating singularity present in a classical linear elasticity solutions. The numerical results are obtained by solving the original system of singular integro-differential equations by approximating unknown functions with Taylor polynomials. © 2013 The Author.

  6. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  7. Local Environment and Interactions of Liquid and Solid Interfaces Revealed by Spectral Line Shape of Surface Selective Nonlinear Vibrational Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Fu, Li; Chase, Zizwe A.; Gan, Wei; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-11-10

    Vibrational spectral lineshape contains important detailed information of molecular vibration and reports its specific interactions and couplings to its local environment. In this work, recently developed sub-1 cm-1 high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) was used to measure the -C≡N stretch vibration in the 4-n-octyl-4’-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir or Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer as a unique vibrational probe, and the spectral lineshape analysis revealed the local environment and interactions at the air/water, air/glass, air/calcium fluoride and air/-quartz interfaces for the first time. The 8CB Langmuir or LB film is uniform and the vibrational spectral lineshape of its -C≡N group has been well characterized, making it a good choice as the surface vibrational probe. Lineshape analysis of the 8CB -C≡N stretch SFG vibrational spectra suggests the coherent vibrational dynamics and the structural and dynamic inhomogeneity of the -C≡N group at each interface are uniquely different. In addition, it is also found that there are significantly different roles for water molecules in the LB films on different substrate surfaces. These results demonstrated the novel capabilities of the surface nonlinear spectroscopy in characterization and in understanding the specific structures and chemical interactions at the liquid and solid interfaces in general.

  8. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Grissmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery in the electroencephalogram (EEG in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  9. Steric control of the donor/acceptor interface: Implications in organic photovoltaic charge generation

    KAUST Repository

    Holcombe, Thomas W.

    2011-08-10

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is currently limited by modest short-circuit current densities. Approaches toward improving this output parameter may provide new avenues to advance OPV technologies and the basic science of charge transfer in organic semiconductors. This work highlights how steric control of the charge separation interface can be effectively tuned in OPV devices. By introducing an octylphenyl substituent onto the investigated polymer backbones, the thermally relaxed charge-transfer state, and potentially excited charge-transfer states, can be raised in energy. This decreases the barrier to charge separation and results in increased photocurrent generation. This finding is of particular significance for nonfullerene OPVs, which have many potential advantages such as tunable energy levels and spectral breadth, but are prone to poor exciton separation efficiencies. Computational, spectroscopic, and synthetic methods were combined to develop a structure-property relationship that correlates polymer substituents with charge-transfer state energies and, ultimately, device efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. A modified Lattice Boltzmann model for pore-scale simulation of desorption process at surface water-groundwater interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Galindo Torres, Sergio; Tang, Hongwu; Scheuermann, Alexander; Jin, Guangqiu; Li, Ling

    2017-04-01

    A pore-scale numerical model is introduced to simulate the desorption process at surface water-groundwater interface. The Navier-Stokes equations for fluid and Advection-Diffusion equation for scalar transport are solved by Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). In previous studies, the macroscopic desorption kinetic equations are usually applied as a boundary condition. However, it may be problematic for pore-scale simulation since most desorption kinetic equations are fitted from macroscopic global variables. We avoid this problem by discretizing the particle surface into a large number of adsorption sites to mimic the microscopic desorption process. The state of each adsorption site follows the Langmuir's theory. Furthermore, benefiting from the mesoscopic inherent of the LBM, the total number of adsorbate which really contacted with the particle surface can be calculated rather than the local concentration. The predicted desorption Isotherm and concentration profile match well with theoretical solutions and experimental data. By using presented model, we find that the desorption process at surface water-groundwater interface shows a complex response to surface water flow.

  11. Toward an understanding of surface layer formation, growth, and transformation at the glass-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Eskelsen, J. R.; Chiu, M.; Ievlev, A. V.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.; Leonard, D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicate glass is a metastable and durable solid that has application to a number of energy and environmental challenges (e.g., microelectronics, fiber optics, and nuclear waste storage). If allowed to react with water over time silicate glass develops an altered layer at the solid-fluid interface. In this study, we used borosilicate glass (LAWB45) as a model material to develop a robust understanding of altered layer formation (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products). Experiments were conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratio (∼200,000 m-1) and 90 °C in the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus for 1.5-years to facilitate the formation of thick altered layers and allow for the effluent solution chemistry to be monitored continuously. A variety of microscopy techniques were used to characterize reacted grains and suggest the average altered layer thickness is 13.2 ± 8.3 μm with the hydrated and clay layer representing 74.8% and 25.2% of the total altered layer, respectively. The estimate of hydrated layer thickness is within the experimental error of the value estimated from the B release rate data (∼10 ± 1 μm/yr) over the 1.5-year duration. PeakForce® quantitative nanomechanical mapping results suggest the hydrated layer has a modulus that ranges between ∼20 and 40 GPa, which is in the range of porous silica that contains from ∼20 to ∼50% porosity, yet significantly lower than dense silica (∼70-80 GPa). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images confirm the presence of pores and an analysis of a higher resolution image provides a qualitative estimate of ≥22% porosity in the hydrated layer with variations in void volume with increasing distance from the unaltered glass. Chemical composition analyses, based on a combination of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and STEM-EDS, clearly show

  12. Surface Reconstruction for Preparation of Plasmonic Au/TiO₂ Nanoparticle with Perfect Hetero Interface and Improved Photocatalytic Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guoqiu; Ping, Chen; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Min; Jin, Yonglong; Ge, Cunwang

    2018-07-01

    The photocatalytic activity of plasmonic Au/TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) is dependent on distances between Au and TiO2. The preparation of plasmonic NPs is still a challenge because of an inherent lattice mismatch on heterogeneous interfaces. The combination between Au and TiO2 NPs often exhibits physical adsorption, which affect block the electron transferring process by photo-induction from TiO2 to Au NPs and weaken the photocatalytic activity. In this work an approach for preparing plasmonic Au/TiO2 NPs with perfect hetero-interface was proposed based on reconstruction of anatase TiO2 with (101) surface and in-situ reduction of Au NPs. Under UV-irradiation, anatase TiO2 NPs with a high percentage of (001) facets in formaldehyde solution undergo photochemical reactions to reconstruct the (101) surface of TiO2 and simultaneously allow polyformaldehyde to absorb on the same surface. Thus, Au(OH)-4 ions could be adsorbed on the (101) surfaces of TiO2 through electrostatic adsorption and reduced to form nano-Au in situ after recrystallization at 180 °C. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images showed clear nanoscale lattice transition on heterogeneous interfaces of Au/TiO2 NPs. The surface structure of TiO2 NPs and the growth mechanism of Au/TiO2 NPs were evaluated with HRTEM, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was demonstrated that the as-prepared plasmonic Au/TiO2 NPs had higher photocatalytic activity and corrosion resistance in comparison with primary TiO2 NPs by photo-electrochemical measurements. The reinforcing mechanism could be interpreted with Mott-Schottky analysis in terms of quantum mechanics. Our study implied that the reconstruction based synthesis may open up more opportunities to obtain lattice-mismatch nanomaterials for photocatalysis.

  13. A force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ratan K; Fernández-Carrasco, Lucia; Flatt, Robert J; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-07-21

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integrated into multiple potential energy expressions, including the PCFF, CVFF, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS, and INTERFACE force fields. This choice enables the simulation of a wide range of inorganic-organic interfaces at the 1 to 100 nm scale at a million times lower computational cost than DFT methods. Molecular models of dry and partially hydrated surfaces are introduced to examine cleavage, agglomeration, and the role of adsorbed organic molecules. Cleavage of crystalline tricalcium aluminate requires approximately 1300 mJ m(-2) and superficial hydration introduces an amorphous calcium hydroxide surface layer that reduces the agglomeration energy from approximately 850 mJ m(-2) to 500 mJ m(-2), as well as to lower values upon surface displacement. The adsorption of several alcohols and amines was examined to understand their role as grinding aids and as hydration modifiers in cement. The molecules mitigate local electric fields through complexation of calcium ions, hydrogen bonds, and introduction of hydrophobicity upon binding. Molecularly thin layers of about 0.5 nm thickness reduce agglomeration energies to between 100 and 30 mJ m(-2). Molecule-specific trends were found to be similar for tricalcium aluminate and tricalcium silicate. The models allow quantitative predictions and are a starting point to provide fundamental understanding of the role of C3A and organic additives in cement. Extensions to impure phases and advanced hydration stages are feasible.

  14. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  15. Spatial arrangement of organic compounds on a model mineral surface: implications for soil organic matter stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Loukas; Ambaye, Haile; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, S Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Lauter, Valeria; Mayes, Melanie A

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral-organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise.

  16. Motor cortical control of movement speed with implications for brain-machine interface control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Matthew D; Yu, Byron M; Schwartz, Andrew B; Chase, Steven M

    2014-07-15

    Motor cortex plays a substantial role in driving movement, yet the details underlying this control remain unresolved. We analyzed the extent to which movement-related information could be extracted from single-trial motor cortical activity recorded while monkeys performed center-out reaching. Using information theoretic techniques, we found that single units carry relatively little speed-related information compared with direction-related information. This result is not mitigated at the population level: simultaneously recorded population activity predicted speed with significantly lower accuracy relative to direction predictions. Furthermore, a unit-dropping analysis revealed that speed accuracy would likely remain lower than direction accuracy, even given larger populations. These results suggest that the instantaneous details of single-trial movement speed are difficult to extract using commonly assumed coding schemes. This apparent paucity of speed information takes particular importance in the context of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), which rely on extracting kinematic information from motor cortex. Previous studies have highlighted subjects' difficulties in holding a BMI cursor stable at targets. These studies, along with our finding of relatively little speed information in motor cortex, inspired a speed-dampening Kalman filter (SDKF) that automatically slows the cursor upon detecting changes in decoded movement direction. Effectively, SDKF enhances speed control by using prevalent directional signals, rather than requiring speed to be directly decoded from neural activity. SDKF improved success rates by a factor of 1.7 relative to a standard Kalman filter in a closed-loop BMI task requiring stable stops at targets. BMI systems enabling stable stops will be more effective and user-friendly when translated into clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Interface Design Implications for Recalling the Spatial Configuration of Virtual Auditory Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Kyla A.

    Although the concept of virtual spatial audio has existed for almost twenty-five years, only in the past fifteen years has modern computing technology enabled the real-time processing needed to deliver high-precision spatial audio. Furthermore, the concept of virtually walking through an auditory environment did not exist. The applications of such an interface have numerous potential uses. Spatial audio has the potential to be used in various manners ranging from enhancing sounds delivered in virtual gaming worlds to conveying spatial locations in real-time emergency response systems. To incorporate this technology in real-world systems, various concerns should be addressed. First, to widely incorporate spatial audio into real-world systems, head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) must be inexpensively created for each user. The present study further investigated an HRTF subjective selection procedure previously developed within our research group. Users discriminated auditory cues to subjectively select their preferred HRTF from a publicly available database. Next, the issue of training to find virtual sources was addressed. Listeners participated in a localization training experiment using their selected HRTFs. The training procedure was created from the characterization of successful search strategies in prior auditory search experiments. Search accuracy significantly improved after listeners performed the training procedure. Next, in the investigation of auditory spatial memory, listeners completed three search and recall tasks with differing recall methods. Recall accuracy significantly decreased in tasks that required the storage of sound source configurations in memory. To assess the impacts of practical scenarios, the present work assessed the performance effects of: signal uncertainty, visual augmentation, and different attenuation modeling. Fortunately, source uncertainty did not affect listeners' ability to recall or identify sound sources. The present

  18. Effect of surface stress and irregularity of the interface on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stress plays a vital role in the propagation of waves due to the fact that the surface of a body exhibits properties quite .... Usual summation convention for the repeated index is applicable. To suit the actual .... where ρ0 is the mass per unit surface area of the geometrical surface representing the region in which surface stress ...

  19. Surface activity, lipid profiles and their implications in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profiles of lipids in normal and cancerous tissues may differ revealing information about cancer development and progression. Lipids being surface active, changes in lipid profiles can manifest as altered surface activity profiles. Langmuir monolayers offer a convenient model for evaluating surface activity of biological membranes. Aims: The aims of this study were to quantify phospholipids and their effects on surface activity of normal and cancerous human cervical tissues as well as to evaluate the role of phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM in cervical cancer using Langmuir monolayers. Methods and Materials: Lipid quantification was done using thin layer chromatography and phosphorus assay. Surface activity was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. Monolayers were formed on the surface of deionized water by spreading tissue organic phase corresponding to 1 mg of tissue and studying their surface pressure-area isotherms at body temperature. The PC and SM contents of cancerous human cervical tissues were higher than those of the normal human cervical tissues. Role of PC and SM were evaluated by adding varying amounts of these lipids to normal cervical pooled organic phase. Statistical analysis: Student′s t-test (p < 0.05 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. Results: Our results reveals that the phosphatidylglycerol level in cancerous cervical tissue was nearly five folds higher than that in normal cervical tissue. Also PC and sphingomyelin SM were found to be the major phospholipid components in cancerous and normal cervical tissues respectively. The addition of either 1.5 µg DPPC or 0.5 µg SM /mg of tissue to the normal organic phase changed its surface activity profile to that of the cancerous tissues. Statistically significant surface activity parameters showed that PC and SM have remarkable roles in shifting the normal cervical lipophilic surface activity towards that of cancerous lipophilic

  20. Construction and surface/interface behavior of bio-functional surface layer by microwave-excited Ar/H2O plasma-induced polyethylene glycol polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Z.; Ogino, A.; Nagatsu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Ar/H2O microwave-excited surface-wave plasma-induced grafting-polymerization and crosslinking technique was presented to construct a bio-functional surface layer. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to diagnose Ar/H2O plasma. The surface/interface behavior especially the aging effect of hydroxyl groups over the grafted PEG spacer layer was investigated by measuring water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the addition of water vapor into Ar plasma can optimize the concentration of hydroxyl functional groups on surface; grafted PEG spacer layer can provide a long-term hydrophilicity of PU films, and alleviate the aging effect of hydroxyl functional groups.

  1. 'Biologizing' Psychopathy: Ethical, Legal, and Research Implications at the Interface of Epigenetics and Chronic Antisocial Conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamatea, Armon J

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetics, a field that links genetics and environmental influences on the expression of phenotypic traits, offers to increase our understanding of the development and trajectory of disease and psychological disorders beyond that thought of traditional genetic research and behavioural measures. By extension, this new perspective has implications for risk and risk management of antisocial behaviour where there is a biological component, such as psychopathy. Psychopathy is a personality disorder associated with repeat displays of antisocial behaviour, and is associated with the disproportionate imposition of harm on communities. Despite advances in our knowledge of psychopathic individuals, the construct remains complex and is hampered by a lack of integration across a range of fundamental domains. The clinical and forensic research on psychopathy is brought into conversation with the emerging field of epigenetics to highlight critical issues of (1) clinical definition and diagnosis, (2) assessment, (3) aetiology of psychopathic phenotypes, and (4) treatment and rehabilitation approaches. Broader ethical and legal questions of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the management of psychopathy beyond the criminal justice arena are also outlined. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Response matrix properties and convergence implications for an interface-current nodal formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    An analytic study was performed of the properties and the associated convergence implications of the response matrix equations derived via the widely used nodal expansion method. By using the DIF3D nodal formulation in hexagonal-z geometry as a concrete example, an analytic expression for the response matrix is first derived by using the hexagonal prism symmetry transformations. The spectral radius of the local response matrix is shown to be always 2 -norm of the response matrix is shown to be ∞ -norm is not always 2 - and l ∞ -norms of the response matrix are found to increase as the removal cross section decreases. On the other hand, for a given removal cross section, each of these matrix norms takes its minimum at a certain diffusion coefficient and increases as the diffusion coefficient deviates from this value. Based on these matrix norms, sufficient conditions for the convergence of the iteration schemes for solving the response matrix equations are discussed. The range of node-height-to-hexagon-pitch ratios that guarantees a positive solution is derived as a function of the diffusion coefficient and the removal cross section

  3. Suppression of material transfer at contacting surfaces: the effect of adsorbates on Al/TiN and Cu/diamond interfaces from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbauer, Gregor; Wolloch, Michael; Bedolla, Pedro O.; Redinger, Josef; Vernes, András; Mohn, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The effect of monolayers of oxygen (O) and hydrogen (H) on the possibility of material transfer at aluminium/titanium nitride (Al/TiN) and copper/diamond (Cu/Cdia) interfaces, respectively, were investigated within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). To this end the approach, contact, and subsequent separation of two atomically flat surfaces consisting of the aforementioned pairs of materials were simulated. These calculations were performed for the clean as well as oxygenated and hydrogenated Al and Cdia surfaces, respectively. Various contact configurations were considered by studying several lateral arrangements of the involved surfaces at the interface. Material transfer is typically possible at interfaces between the investigated clean surfaces; however, the addition of O to the Al and H to the Cdia surfaces was found to hinder material transfer. This passivation occurs because of a significant reduction of the adhesion energy at the examined interfaces, which can be explained by the distinct bonding situations.

  4. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    This special issue is devoted to describing recent applications of x-ray and neutron scattering techniques to the exploration of surfaces and buried interfaces of various functional materials. Unlike many other surface-sensitive methods, these techniques do not require ultra high vacuum, and therefore, a variety of real and complicated surfaces fall within the scope of analysis. It must be particularly emphasized that the techniques are capable of seeing even buried function interfaces as well as the surface. Furthermore, the information, which ranges from the atomic to mesoscopic scale, is highly quantitative and reproducible. The non-destructive nature of the techniques is another important advantage of using x-rays and neutrons, when compared with other atomic-scale analyses. This ensures that the same specimen can be measured by other techniques. Such features are fairly attractive when exploring multilayered materials with nanostructures (dots, tubes, wires, etc), which are finding applications in electronic, magnetic, optical and other devices. The Japan Applied Physics Society has established a group to develop the research field of studying buried function interfaces with x-rays and neutrons. As the methods can be applied to almost all types of materials, from semiconductor and electronic devices to soft materials, participants have fairly different backgrounds but share a common interest in state-of-the-art x-ray and neutron techniques and sophisticated applications. A series of workshops has been organized almost every year since 2001. Some international interactions have been continued intensively, although the community is part of a Japanese society. This special issue does not report the proceedings of the recent workshop, although all the authors are in some way involved in the activities of the above society. Initially, we intended to collect quite long overview papers, including the authors' latest and most important original results, as well as

  5. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  6. First-principles approaches to intrinsic strength and deformation of materials: perfect crystals, nano-structures, surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Shigenobu; Umeno, Yoshitaka; Kohyama, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    First-principles studies on the intrinsic mechanical properties of various materials and systems through ab initio tensile and shear testing simulations based on density-functional theory are reviewed. For various materials, ideal tensile and shear strength and features of the deformation of bulk crystals without any defects have been examined, and the relation with the bonding nature has been analyzed. The surfaces or low-dimensional nano-structures reveal peculiar strength and deformation behavior due to local different bonding nature. For grain boundaries and metal/ceramic interfaces, tensile and shear behaviors depend on the interface bonding, which impacts on the research of real engineering materials. Remaining problems and future directions in this research field are discussed. (topical review)

  7. Comparison of the surfaces and interfaces formed for sputter and electroless deposited gold contacts on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Steven J.; Baker, Mark A.; Duarte, Diana D.; Schneider, Andreas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J.; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) is a leading sensor material for spectroscopic X/γ-ray imaging in the fields of homeland security, medical imaging, industrial analysis and astrophysics. The metal-semiconductor interface formed during contact deposition is of fundamental importance to the spectroscopic performance of the detector and is primarily determined by the deposition method. A multi-technique analysis of the metal-semiconductor interface formed by sputter and electroless deposition of gold onto (111) aligned CdZnTe is presented. Focused ion beam (FIB) cross section imaging, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and current-voltage (IV) analysis have been applied to determine the structural, chemical and electronic properties of the gold contacts. In a novel approach, principal component analysis has been employed on the XPS depth profiles to extract detailed chemical state information from different depths within the profile. It was found that electroless deposition forms a complicated, graded interface comprised of tellurium oxide, gold/gold telluride particulates, and cadmium chloride. This compared with a sharp transition from surface gold to bulk CdZnTe observed for the interface formed by sputter deposition. The electronic (IV) response for the detector with electroless deposited contacts was symmetric, but was asymmetric for the detector with sputtered gold contacts. This is due to the electroless deposition degrading the difference between the Cd- and Te-faces of the CdZnTe (111) crystal, whilst these differences are maintained for the sputter deposited gold contacts. This work represents an important step in the optimisation of the metal-semiconductor interface which currently is a limiting factor in the development of high resolution CdZnTe detectors.

  8. Implication of surface modified NZVI particle retention in the porous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Retention of surface-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles in the porous media near the point of injection has been reported in the recent studies. Retention of excess particles in porous media can alter the media properties. The main objectives of this study are, therefore, to evaluate the effect of particle ...

  9. Surface-Segregation-Induced Nanopapillae on FDTS-Blended PDMS Film and Implications in Wettability, Adhesion, and Friction Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zihe; Peng, Ran; Tang, Juntao; Chen, Li; Cheng, Fangqin; Zhao, Boxin

    2018-02-28

    Polymer composites have been extensively used to tune the surface property (e.g., wettability, friction, and adhesion) for its advantages of cost-effectiveness, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. In this work, different amount of trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane (FDTS) was added into poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer to prepare polymer composite films and were selected as a model to illustrate the effects of surface segregation on surface topology, wettability, friction, and adhesion. The results show that the added FDTS forms aggregations and increasing the content of FDTS leads to the difficulty of air bubble elimination, increase in viscosity, and drop in transparency. Driven by the differences of chemical potential, FDTS aggregations migrate to the air-polymer interface, resulting in surface enrichment and formation of nanopapillae (1-200 nm). This phenomenon becomes more significant with the increment in FDTS. The change in surface composition and structure generates profound effects on wettability, friction, and adhesion. The addition of FDTS makes the surface relatively oleophobic and further increasing the content of FDTS does not helpful in improving the oleophobicity due to the notable aggregation. Friction forces first grow with the increasing content of FDTS and then decline after the maximum point at 1.0 wt % of FDTS, which is attributed to the generated regular larger nanopappillae at high concentration. However, these larger nanopapillae lead to the increase in adhesion because more interactions are formed. The findings demonstrate the behaviors of FDTS in polymer composites and provide important guidance for controlling the formation of nanostructures via aggregation and phase segregation and exploring their implications on surface properties.

  10. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity.

  11. Impedance and dielectric characterizations of ionic partitioning in interfaces that membranous, biomimetic and gold surfaces form with electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcott, Terry C.; Guo, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Silicon dioxide, organic monolayers covalently attached to silicon and gold are used as biosensor substrates and anchoring platforms for hybrid, tethered and supported lipid membranes used in membrane-protein studies. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies of gold in contact with potassium chloride electrolytes of concentrations ranging from 1 mM to 300 mM, characterized the gold–electrolyte interface as principally a Stern layer 20–30 Å thick and conductivity many orders of magnitude less than that of the bulk electrolyte. EIS studies of SiO 2 –electrolyte system that were similar to studies of a tetradecane–electrolyte system are presented herein that reveal an interface comprised of at least two interfacial layers and extending some 10 5 Å into the electrolyte. The average conductivity and thickness values for the layer in contact with the SiO 2 surface (∼10 −6 S m −1 and ∼28 Å, respectively) were of the order of magnitude expected for the Gouy–Chapman layer but the dependency of the thickness on concentration did not reflect the expected dependency of the Debye length over the full range of concentrations. The average values for the next layer (∼10 −3 S m −1 and ∼10 5 Å) exhibited a dependency on concentration similar to that expected for the bulk electrolyte. The theoretical derivations of ionic partitioning arising from the Born (dielectric) energy distributions in both the SiO 2 and gold interfaces were generally consistent with the respective EIS studies and revealed that partitioning in the SiO 2 interface mimicked that in bio-membranous interfaces. The dielectric characterizations suggest that; ionic partitioning in biomimetic interfaces play a role in long-ranging sequestration of organic molecules, the extensiveness of these interfaces contributes to differences in the lipid densities of bilayers formed on biomimetic substrates, and chloride ions have a greater affinity than the smaller potassium ions for gold

  12. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/373433484; Rozemeijer, Joachim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838403; Griffioen, Jasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091129265; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in

  13. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  14. Efficient numerical methods for simulating surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-08-01

    Surface tension significantly impacts subsurface flow and transport, and it is the main cause of capillary effect, a major immiscible two-phase flow mechanism for systems with a strong wettability preference. In this paper, we consider the numerical simulation of the surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces. Major numerical challenges include that the system of the Euler-Lagrange equations is solved on the infinite interval and the coefficient matrix is not positive definite. We construct a linear transformation to reduce the Euler-Lagrange equations, and naturally introduce a path function, which is proven to be a monotonic function of the spatial coordinate variable. By using the linear transformation and the path function, we overcome the above difficulties and develop the efficient methods for calculating the interface and its interior compositions. Moreover, the computation of the surface tension is also simplified. The proposed methods do not need to solve the differential equation system, and they are easy to be implemented in practical applications. Numerical examples are tested to verify the efficiency of the proposed methods. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite: Implications for surface dynamics and dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2014-02-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces continue to present significant changes in topography, while for others the topography tends to remain approximately constant. The observed variation of dissolution rates are attributed to a decrease of the density of step edges on the surface and the continuous increase in exposure of more stable surfaces. Calculations of dissolution rates, which assume that dissolution rates are directly proportional to surface area, are not valid for the type of surfaces studied. Instead, to develop accurate kinetic dissolution models and more realistic stochastic dissolution simulations the surface reactivity, determined by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure.

  16. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machesky, M.L.; Předota, Milan; Wesolowski, D.J.; Vlček, Lukáš; Cummings, P. T.; Rosenqvist, J.; Ridley, M.K.; Kubicki, J.D.; Bandura, A.V.; Kumar, N.; Sofo, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 21 (2008), s. 12331-12339 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0094; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:M.K.R.(US) EAR/0124001; M.L.M(US) DE/AC05/00OR22725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : solid-liquid interface * surface * simulation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.097, year: 2008

  17. Seasonal and spatial variations in microbial activity at various phylogenetic resolutions at a groundwater – surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ran; Smets, Barth F.; Gan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal and spatial variation in activity and density of the metabolically active in situ microbial community (AIMC) at a landfill leachate-impacted groundwater – surface water interface (GSI). A series of AIMC traps were designed and implemented for AIMC sampling and microbial...... analysis. Consistently higher microbial activities with less variation in depth were measured in the AIMC traps than in the ambient sediments. Flood disturbance appeared to control AIMC activity distributions at the gradually elevated GSI. The highest AIMC activities were generally obtained from locations...

  18. Presence, distribution, and diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria at a landfill leachate-impacted groundwater surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, R.; Gan, P.; Mackay, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) at a groundwater surface water interface (GSI) impacted by reduced groundwater originating as leachate from an upgradient landfill. IOB enrichments and quantifications were obtained, at high vertical resolution, by an iron/oxygen opposing...... gradient cultivation method. The depth-resolved soil distribution profiles of water content, Fe2+, and total Fe indicated sharp gradients within the top 10 cm sediments of the GSI, where the IOB density was the highest. In addition, the vertical distribution of iron-reducing bacteria at the same sampling...

  19. Ternary Complexation on Bacterial Surfaces: Implications for Subsurface Anion Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, L. C.; Higginbottom, C. M.; Fowle, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological controls on contaminant mobilities in aquatic ecosystems must be determined to establish the threat that contamination poses to the environment. Quantitative models of contaminant mobilities are required as a prerequisite to guide remediation efforts and to prioritize the potential hazard to the ecosystem of each contaminated site. It is well established that mineral surface adsorption is an important control on contaminant mobilities, and many studies have utilized thermodynamics to quantify metal/organic adsorption in order to yield predictive models of contaminant transport. However, these models of contaminant transport may not be representative of the reactions which control contaminant mobilities as most mineral surfaces are coated with organic acids, bacteria, and extracellular polymers. Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated that bacterial cell walls have a high affinity for binding metal cations, and field studies indicate that a significant proportion of bacteria cells and associated extracellular matrices are coated with small scale hydrous metal oxides. The small size of bacteria, and in many cases the nanoscale of their associated mineral phases, suggests these bacteria-mineral composites may represent a large proportion of surface area exposed to fluid flow. Therefore, due to the affinity of bacterial cell walls for cations and biominerals, bacteria may also have a significant impact on anionic contaminant mobility in many natural systems. The extent of metal-bacteria adsorption reactions varies drastically as a function of pH and solution chemistry. Current adsorption models have focused on the interactions of positively charged metal cations with bacterial surfaces, however in many oxidizing environments metals such as Cr exist as anions or anionic complexes. We have studied the ability of non-metabolizing cells of the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrifaciens to adsorb aqueous Cr

  20. Photoinduced charge dissociation and transport at P3HT/ITO interfaces: studied by modulated surface spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujisamphan, Nopporn; Supasai, Thidarat; Dittrich, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Results of a temperature dependence study of photoinduced charge separation across P3HT nanocrystals at P3HT/ITO interfaces have been investigated by modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy in a fixed capacitor arrangement. The SPV measurements were correlated with the crystalline sizes of P3HT nanocrystals determined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The crystalline sizes of P3HT nanocrystals were varied systematically by progressive heating/cooling cycles identical for SPV and GIXRD measurements. Photovoltage signals, indication of photoinduced charge dissociation in space, at the P3HT/ITO interface were collected, and electrons were separated across the first monolayer of P3HT nanocrystals at the P3HT/ITO interface due to band bending. The activation energies for quenching of the in-phase and phase-shifted by 90 SPV signals were 0.7 and 0.6 eV, respectively. Thermal activation of the formation of P3HT nanocrystals was of the same order as the enthalpy of fusion of ideal crystals from regioregular P3HT. A schematic drawing of photoinduced charge separation at the P3HT/ITO is proposed. (orig.)

  1. Photoinduced charge dissociation and transport at P3HT/ITO interfaces: studied by modulated surface spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rujisamphan, Nopporn [King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Bangkok (Thailand); Institute of Heterogeneous Materials, Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, Berlin (Germany); Supasai, Thidarat [Kasetsart University, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Bangkok (Thailand); Dittrich, Thomas [Institute of Heterogeneous Materials, Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Results of a temperature dependence study of photoinduced charge separation across P3HT nanocrystals at P3HT/ITO interfaces have been investigated by modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy in a fixed capacitor arrangement. The SPV measurements were correlated with the crystalline sizes of P3HT nanocrystals determined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The crystalline sizes of P3HT nanocrystals were varied systematically by progressive heating/cooling cycles identical for SPV and GIXRD measurements. Photovoltage signals, indication of photoinduced charge dissociation in space, at the P3HT/ITO interface were collected, and electrons were separated across the first monolayer of P3HT nanocrystals at the P3HT/ITO interface due to band bending. The activation energies for quenching of the in-phase and phase-shifted by 90 SPV signals were 0.7 and 0.6 eV, respectively. Thermal activation of the formation of P3HT nanocrystals was of the same order as the enthalpy of fusion of ideal crystals from regioregular P3HT. A schematic drawing of photoinduced charge separation at the P3HT/ITO is proposed. (orig.)

  2. Atomic scale studies of interface formation between oxides and III-V semiconductor surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens, Jonathon Boyd

    2010-01-01

    The surface reconstructions of InAs(0 0 1)-(4 x 2) and In₀.₅₃Ga₀.₄₇As(0 0 1)-(4 x 2) were investigated at 300 K and 80 K. At 300 K, the surfaces reconstruct to form the group III rich [beta]3'(4 x 2) reconstructions and at 80 K, the surfaces reconstruct to form the [beta]3'(4 x 4) reconstruction. A novel hybridization scheme is required for these reconstructions. Oxidation of the InAs(0 0 1)-(4 x 2) surface by O₂ was studied and it was determined that this occurs via an autocatalytic process,...

  3. Surface drainage in leveled land: Implication of slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniony S. Winkler

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the lowlands of Rio Grande do Sul, land leveling is mostly carried out with no slope for the purpose of rice production. In this environment, soils with a low hydraulic conductivity are predominant owing to the presence of a practically impermeable B-horizon near the surface. Land leveling leads to soil accommodation resulting in the formation of depressions where water accumulates after heavy rainfalls, subsequently leading to problems with crops implanted in succession to rice, such as soybeans. The objective of this research was to quantify the areas and volumes of water accumulation in soil as a function of the slope of land leveling. Five typical leveled lowland areas were studied as a part of this research. The original areas presented slopes of 0, 0.20, 0.25, 0.28 and 0.40%, which were used to generate new digital elevation models with slopes between 0 and 0.5%. These newly generated digital models were used to map the depressions with surface water storage. In conclusion, land leveling with slopes higher than 0.1% is recommended to minimize problems with superficial water storage in rice fields.

  4. The structure of the interface in the solvent mediated interaction of dipolar surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavakhidze, P.G.; Levadny, V.G.

    1987-08-01

    Interaction of two dipolar surfaces separated by a polar medium is considered within the framework of nonlocal electrostatics. The dipolar surface layers are modelled as regular lattices with fixed orientation of dipoles which are immersed into the solvent; solvent response is characterized by nonlocal dielectric function. The model is elaborated in order to reveal the role of the dipolar layer discreteness in the electric field produced by one surface and the interaction between two surfaces (which gives rise to the so called ''hydration'' or ''structural'' force acting between mineral surfaces and phospholipid bilayers). The discreteness effects are present only for commensurate lattices. Their special mutual arrangement then may lead to considerable reduction of structural forces, viz. the usual repulsion regime may change at short distances to attraction. Conditions are considered when repulsion is entirely replaced by attraction, i.e. the ''hydration barrier'' disappears. In appended note we discuss the role of solvation of surface dipolar groups. We propose an explanation of why two modes of decay (one with oscillative fine structure) may be present in the dependence of the force upon distance if the surface dipolar groups are immersed deep enough in the solvent and how the long-range oscillative mode disappears when the surface is but weakly solvated. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  5. Laboratory measurement of the interface pressures applied by active therapy support surfaces: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    A key element in pressure ulcer prevention and management is the selection of appropriate pressure redistributing (PR) patient support surfaces for use while seated and in bed. However little explicit guidance exists allowing standardised quantitative comparison of different PR surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from anatomical landmarks such as the heels and sacrum. In 2008 a working group was established in Europe through the US National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) support surface standardisation initiative (S3I) and under the aegis of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel with the specific remit of developing test methods for the evaluation of active therapy support surfaces (alternating pressure air mattresses). This report describes a consensus development process to agree test methods appropriate to compare active therapy surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from the sacrum and the heels. Copyright 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New Analytical Methods for the Surface/ Interface and the Micro-Structures in Advanced Nanocomposite Materials by Synchrotron Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamae

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical methods of surface/interface structure and micro-structure in advanced nanocomposite materials by using the synchrotron radiation are introduced. Recent results obtained by the energy-tunable and highly collimated brilliant X-rays, in-situ wide angle/small angle X-ray diffraction with high accuracy are reviewed. It is shown that small angle X-ray scattering is one of the best methods to characterize nanoparticle dispersibility, filler aggregate/agglomerate structures and in-situ observation of hierarchical structure deformation in filled rubber under cyclic stretch. Grazing Incidence(small and wide angle X-ray Scattering are powerful to analyze the sintering process of metal nanoparticle by in-situ observation as well as the orientation of polymer molecules and crystalline orientation at very thin surface layer (ca 7nm of polymer film. While the interaction and conformation of adsorbed molecule at interface can be investigated by using high energy X-ray XPS with Enough deep position (ca 9 micron m.

  7. Tuning gold nanoparticles interfaces by specific peptide interaction for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and separation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikas, Anastasios C; Causa, Filippo; Della Moglie, Raffaella; Netti, Paolo A

    2013-08-28

    Surface functionalization and control over nanostructured interfaces represents a key aspect in nanoscience and nanobiotechnology. Nanoplasmonic structures for analyte detection typically require sophisticated nanofabrication techniques, as well as bioactivated nanostructures that need multistep conjugations for chemical ligation. An alternative to such complex processes is to rely on specific biomolecules adsorption for decoration or self-assembly of nanoparticles at solid/liquid interface. In principle, small biomolecules with specific binding properties to nanostructures could control the assembly without modifying the nanoparticle chemistry, pH of the solution or salt concentration. Importantly, such an approach could be direct, robust, and reversible. In this work, we report about the use of a specific peptide for direct and reversible adsorption on gold nanoparticles with tuned interfacial properties just by simply adjusting the ratio between the numbers of peptide molecules to the number of gold nanoparticles. This easy, direct and reversible assembly of gold nanoparticles mediated by the specific peptide makes this platform ideal for small-volume samples and low concentrations detection using surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, as well as for the capture or separation of biomolecules in complex mix.

  8. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cabec, Adeline; Tang, Nancy; Tafforeau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine) and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias) are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands). Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were found to form over

  9. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Le Cabec

    Full Text Available Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands. Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were

  10. Temporal variability of exchange between groundwater and surface water based on high-frequency direct measurements of seepage at the sediment-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Sheibley, Rich W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Simonds, Frederic W.; Naftz, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage at the sediment-water interface in several lakes, a large river, and an estuary exhibits substantial temporal variability when measured with temporal resolution of 1 min or less. Already substantial seepage rates changed by 7% and 16% in response to relatively small rain events at two lakes in the northeastern USA, but did not change in response to two larger rain events at a lake in Minnesota. However, seepage at that same Minnesota lake changed by 10% each day in response to withdrawals from evapotranspiration. Seepage increased by more than an order of magnitude when a seiche occurred in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Near the head of a fjord in Puget Sound, Washington, seepage in the intertidal zone varied greatly from −115 to +217 cm d−1 in response to advancing and retreating tides when the time-averaged seepage was upward at +43 cm d−1. At all locations, seepage variability increased by one to several orders of magnitude in response to wind and associated waves. Net seepage remained unchanged by wind unless wind also induced a lake seiche. These examples from sites distributed across a broad geographic region indicate that temporal variability in seepage in response to common hydrological events is much larger than previously realized. At most locations, seepage responded within minutes to changes in surface-water stage and within minutes to hours to groundwater recharge associated with rainfall. Likely implications of this dynamism include effects on water residence time, geochemical transformations, and ecological conditions at and near the sediment-water interface.

  11. Irreversible particle motion in surfactant-laden interfaces due to pressure-dependent surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-09-01

    The surface shear viscosity of an insoluble surfactant monolayer often depends strongly on its surface pressure. Here, we show that a particle moving within a bounded monolayer breaks the kinematic reversibility of low-Reynolds-number flows. The Lorentz reciprocal theorem allows such irreversibilities to be computed without solving the full nonlinear equations, giving the leading-order contribution of surface pressure-dependent surface viscosity. In particular, we show that a disc translating or rotating near an interfacial boundary experiences a force in the direction perpendicular to that boundary. In unbounded monolayers, coupled modes of motion can also lead to non-intuitive trajectories, which we illustrate using an interfacial analogue of the Magnus effect. This perturbative approach can be extended to more complex geometries, and to two-dimensional suspensions more generally.

  12. Interfacing capillary electrophoresis and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for the determination of dye compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arraez Roman, D.; Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Segura Carretero, A.; Gooijer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The at-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) was optimized for the separation and subsequent spectroscopic identification of charged analytes (dye compounds). Raman spectra were recorded following deposition of the electropherogram

  13. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaede, Holly Caroline [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    129Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 105times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13C signal of CO2 of xenon occluded in solid CO2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ~1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6.

  14. The effect of age on human motor electrocorticographic signals and implications for brain-computer interface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Jarod; Miller, Kai; Freudenburg, Zac; Sharma, Mohit; Smyth, Matthew; Gaona, Charles; Breshears, Jonathan; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2011-08-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have emerged as a new signal platform for neuroprosthetic application. ECoG-based platforms have shown significant promise for clinical application due to the high level of information that can be derived from the ECoG signal, the signal's stability, and its intermediate nature of surgical invasiveness. However, before long-term BCI applications can be realized it will be important to also understand how the cortical physiology alters with age. Such understanding may provide an appreciation for how this may affect the control signals utilized by a chronic implant. In this study, we report on a large population of adult and pediatric invasively monitored subjects to determine the impact that age will have on surface cortical physiology. We evaluated six frequency bands—delta (age on the magnitude of power change, cortical area of activation, and cortical networks. When significant trends are evaluated as a whole, it appears that the aging process appears to more substantively alter thalamocortical interactions leading to an increase in cortical inefficiency. Despite this, we find that higher gamma rhythms appear to be more anatomically constrained with age, while lower frequency rhythms appear to broaden in cortical involvement as time progresses. From an independent signal standpoint, this would favor high gamma rhythms' utilization as a separable signal that could be maintained chronically.

  15. Ice sintering timescales at the surface of Europa and implications for surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Molaro, J.; Meirion-Griffith, G.

    2017-12-01

    The planned exploration of Europa by NASA's Europa Clipper Mission and the possibility of a future Europa lander have driven the need to characterize its surface strength, roughness, porosity, thermal conductivity, and regolith depth in order to accurately interpret remote sensing data and develop appropriate spacecraft landing systems. Many processes contribute to Europa's landscape evolution, such as sputtering, mass wasting, thermal segregation, and impact gardening, driving the creation and distribution of icy regolith across the surface. While the efficacy of these processes are not well constrained, any amount of regolith emplaced at the surface will undergo subsequent processing due to sintering. Ice sintering is a form of frost metamorphism whereby contacting ice grains experience the diffusion of material into their contact region, forming a "neck" between them and densifying over time. Over long enough timescales, ice aggregates will sinter into solid material, which may contribute to the incorporation of non-ice material into Europa's subsurface and help to drive subsurface chemistry. Sintering also interacts with other processes, adding to the complexity of icy surface evolution. For example, sputtering preferentially removes larger grains and may enhance sintering rates, and changes in ice porosity may affect the response of the surface to micrometeorite impacts. Quantifying the effects of ice sintering will allow us to predict the microstructural properties of Europa's surface at spacecraft scales. To this end, we have modeled pressure-less (no overburden) sintering of spherical water-ice grains and validated the results with a laboratory experiment. We also modeled ice at the surface of Europa to obtain a first-order approximation of the sintering timescale and surface properties. Preliminary results indicate that ice grains will experience neck growth but not significant densification over Europa's surface age, suggesting that loose surface ice

  16. Titanium dioxide surfaces and interfaces studied using ESDIAD, LEED and STM

    CERN Document Server

    Cocks, I D

    1998-01-01

    resolved into two contributions: H atoms bonded at the oxide substrate, and the rupture of the C-H bonds of the acetate. It is proposed that acetates are bridge bonded with five-fold coordinated Ti sup 4 sup + ions, with their molecular plane perpendicular to the surface. Decomposition of acetate at room temperature occurs under electron beam radiation, desorbing CH sub 2 CO and CH sub 3 /CH sub 4. Adsorption of benzoic acid at the TiO sub 2 (110) surface is dissociative, forming benzoate and surface hydroxyls. Adsorbed benzoate is bonded with the five-fold coordinated Ti sup 4 sup + cations, forming a pseudo (2x1) overlayer at a saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Attractive interactions between benzoate aromatic rings leads to the formation of dimerised benzoate rows along the [001] direction. TiO sub 2 surfaces have been studied by electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The TiO sub 2 (100) surface was stu...

  17. In situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of the copper-electrolyte interface. Atomic structure and homoepitaxial grwoth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golks, Frederik

    2011-05-19

    Copper electrodeposition is the predominantly used technique for on-chip wiring in the fabrication of ultra-large scale integrated (ULSI) microchips. In this 'damascene copper electroplating' process, multicomponent electrolytes containing organic additives realize void-free filling of trenches with high aspect ratio ('superconformal deposition'). Despite manifold studies, motivated by the continuous trend to shrink wiring dimensions and thus the demand of optimized plating baths, detailed knowledge on the growth mechanism - in presence and absence of additives - is still lacking. Using a recently developed hanging meniscus X-ray transmission cell, brilliant synchrotron x-rays and a fast, one-dimensional detector system, unique real-time in situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of copper electrodeposition were performed under realistic reaction conditions, approaching rates of technological relevance. Preparatory measurements of the electrochemical dissolution of Au(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte demonstrated the capability of this powerful technique, specifically the possibility to follow atomic-scale deposition or dissolution processes with a time resolution down to five milliseconds. The electrochemical as well as structural characterization of the Cu(001)- and Cu(111)-electrolyte interfaces provided detailed insight into the complex atomic-scale structures in presence of specifically adsorbed chloride on these surfaces. The interface of Cu(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte exhibits a continuous surface phase transition of a disordered Cl adlayer to a c(2 x 2) Cl adlayer with increasing potential. The latter was found to induce a small vertical corrugation of substrate atoms, which can be ascribed to lattice relaxations induced by the presence of coadsorbed water molecules and cations in the outer part of the electrochemical double layer. The study of the specific adsorption of chloride on Cu(111) from acidic aqueous

  18. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    to the development of illusionistic realism within computer graphics and games. The article compares the pragmatic realism of HCI with aesthetic notions of realism in the computer game Max Payne (illusionistic realism), the artist Jodi's game modifications (media realism), and Adrian Ward's software art work......This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...

  19. Utilization of surface active sites on gold in preparation of highly reactive interfaces for alcohols electrooxidation in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherevko, Serhiy; Kulyk, Nadiia; Chung, Chan-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Pt/Au and Pd/Au surface interfaces show very high activity in electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols in alkaline media. In this work, we present a method for preparation of such structures, which is based on galvanic displacement of the more noble gold with the less noble elements, and investigate their electrocatalytic properties. We propose that active states atoms on the surface of gold may be replaced with Pt and Pd. The generation of active sites on gold is achieved by cathodization in acidic solution. We show that depending on the cathodization time (active sites amount) gold surface electrochemistry changes from that resembling Au to the one typical for pure Pt. The Pt/Au structures prepared with a trace amount of platinum show extremely high electrocatalytic activity. The peak current of methanol oxidation on the Pt/Au electrode is more than an order of magnitude higher than that of the platinum film electrode and more than two orders of magnitude higher than that on the gold unactivated electrode. The difference in the peak current of ethanol oxidation between the Pt/Au and Pt electrodes is ca. 25 times. Moreover, similar deposition of Pt and Pd on active sites on high surface area gold prepared by hydrogen evolution assisted deposition and improved electrocatalytic properties of such structures toward alcohols oxidation is shown.

  20. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media.

  1. Biodegradable polymer brush as nanocoupled interface for improving the durability of polymer coating on metal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedair, Tarek M; Cho, Youngjin; Joung, Yoon Ki; Han, Dong Keun

    2014-10-01

    Metal-based drug-eluting stents (DESs) have severe drawbacks such as peeling-off and cracking of the coated polymer. To prevent the fracture of polymer-coated layer and improve the durability of DES, poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) brushes were synthesized onto cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr or CC) surface through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) followed by surface-initiated ring opening polymerization (SI-ROP) of l-lactide. The polymer brushes were then characterized by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), water contact angle, ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All of the unmodified and modified Co-Cr surfaces were coated with a matrix of poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) and sirolimus (SRL). The in vitro drug release profile was measured for 70 days. The PLLA-modified Co-Cr showed a biphasic release pattern in the initial burst followed by a slow release. On the other hand, the unmodified Co-Cr showed fast drug release and detachment of the coated polymer layer due to the instability of the polymer layer on Co-Cr surface. In comparison, the PLLA-modified Co-Cr preserved a uniform coating without detachment even after 6 weeks of degradation test. The platelet morphology and low density of platelet adhered on the modified layer and the SRL-in-PDLLA coated Co-Cr surfaces demonstrated that these samples would be blood compatible. Therefore, the introduction of PLLA brush onto Co-Cr surface is proved to dramatically improve the durability of the coating layer, and it is a promising strategy to prevent the coating defects found in DESs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface induced ordering of micelles at the solid-liquid interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstenberg, M.C.; Pedersen, J.S.; Smith, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    The surface induced ordering of triblock copolymer micelles in aqueous solution was measured with neutron reflectivity far above the critical micelle concentration. The scattering length density profiles showed a clear indication of ordered layers of micelles perpendicular to a quartz surface....... The structure and interactions of the micelles were modeled in detail. The convolution of the center distribution of the micelles, obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of hard spheres at a hard wall, and the projected density of the micelle showed excellent agreement with the experimental profiles. [S1063-651X...

  3. An adaptive finite element method for simulating surface tension with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2014-01-01

    The gradient theory for the surface tension of simple fluids and mixtures is rigorously analyzed based on mathematical theory. The finite element approximation of surface tension is developed and analyzed, and moreover, an adaptive finite element method based on a physical-based estimator is proposed and it can be coupled efficiently with Newton\\'s method as well. The numerical tests are carried out both to verify the proposed theory and to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of passive surface-wave noise in surface microseismic data and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, F.; Willis, M.; Haines, S.; Batzle, M.; Davidson, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tight gas reservoirs are projected to be a major portion of future energy resources. Because of their low permeability, hydraulic fracturing of these reservoirs is required to improve the permeability and reservoir productivity. Passive seismic monitoring is one of the few tools that can be used to characterize the changes in the reservoir due to hydraulic fracturing. Although the majority of the studies monitoring hydraulic fracturing exploit down hole microseismic data, surface microseismic monitoring is receiving increased attention because it is potentially much less expensive to acquire. Due to a broader receiver aperture and spatial coverage, surface microseismic data may be more advantageous than down hole microseismic data. The effectiveness of this monitoring technique, however, is strongly dependent on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Cultural and ambient noise can mask parts of the waveform that carry information about the subsurface, thereby decreasing the effectiveness of surface microseismic analysis in identifying and locating the microseismic events. Hence, time and spatially varying suppression of the surface-wave noise ground roll is a critical step in surface microseismic monitoring. Here, we study a surface passive dataset that was acquired over a Barnett Shale Formation reservoir during two weeks of hydraulic fracturing, in order to characterize and suppress the surface noise in this data. We apply techniques to identify the characteristics of the passive ground roll. Exploiting those characteristics, we can apply effective noise suppression techniques to the passive data. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  7. Approaches to characterizing biogeochemistry effects of groundwater and surface water interaction at the riparian interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater-surface water interaction (GSI) in riparian ecosystems strongly influences biological activity that controls nutrient flux and processes. Shallow groundwater in riparian zones is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for solutes, and a target for ...

  8. Surface studies of YBa2Cu3O7-x -matching oxide substrates and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enevold Thaulov Andersen, J.

    1990-11-01

    Crystallographic changes as a result of heat-treatment at 700-900 deg. C are found for SrTiO 3 (100), MgO(100) and LaAlO 3 (100). The p(2x2) reconstruction of the SrTiO 3 (100) and the superstructures on MgO(100) and on LaAlO 3 (100) thus observed are suggested to be induced by segregation of impurities to the surface. The surface charge-effects which disturb electron- and photon-impact experiments with these insulators are removed by heat-treatments. Deposition of copper results in formation of copper islands on SrTiO 3 (100) and on LaAlO 3 (100). Yttrium forms islands on LaAlO 3 (100) and grows in a layer-by-layer mode on SrTiO 3 (100) and on MgO(100). An yttrium 1x1 epitaxy is observed on the MgO(100) surface, which is suggested to be an YO superstructure. Oxidation of the 1x1 Y/MgO(100) systems diminishes the charge-effects and improves all diffraction and spectroscopic measurements. This may be due to the formation of metallic states around the Fermi level when the film is oxidized. An in situ synthesized YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 thin film on SrTiO 3 (100) compared to a thick epitaxial YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (001) film on MgO(100) reveals differences in surface electronic structures but not in surface stoichiometries. (au) 18 refs

  9. Interface States Densities Effect at SiO2/ Polysilicon and SiO2/ Monosilicon Surfaces on N-polysilicon /Oxide/ P-Monosilicon Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dib

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available the interface states have a very significant role in the components containing MOS structures. In this paper we study the interface states densities effect at SiO2/ N-polysilicon and SiO2/ P- monosilicon surfaces on metal/polysilicon /oxide/ monosilicon capacitance. The numerical solution of poisson's equation and the determination of the charge variation in the structure induced by application of external bias (Vg allow simulating the capacitance-voltage MSPOS characteristics. The results show that the interface states at SiO2/ polysilicon and SiO2/ monosilicon surfaces translate the CT (V curve about positive voltage and cause the increase of the minimum value of capacitance. The effect of interface states on C (V curves is neglected for the polysilicon doping concentration in order to 1019 cm-3. For this doping level, the C (V curves are identical to the C (V of the monocristalline MOS structure.

  10. Formation of Mn3O4(001) on MnO(001): Surface and interface structural stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Veronika; Podloucky, Raimund; Franchini, Cesare; Allegretti, Francesco; Xu, Bo; Parteder, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G.; Surnev, Svetlozar; Netzer, Falko P.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory calculations are employed to study the growth of (001) oriented Mn 3 O 4 surfaces on a Pd(100)-supported MnO(001) substrate, with the Hausmannite planar lattice constants aligned along the [110] direction of the underlying MnO(001) support. We show that despite the rather large lattice mismatch, abrupt interfaces may exist between rocksalt MnO and Hausmannite. We argue that this process is facilitated by the relatively low computed strain energy and we propose realistic models for the interface. An atop site registry between the Mn(O) atoms of the oxygen rich Mn 3 O 4 termination and the MnO(001) O(Mn) atoms underneath is found to be the energetically most favorable configuration. The significant planar expansion is accompanied by a large compression of the Mn 3 O 4 vertical lattice constant, yielding structural distortion of the O-Mn-O octahedral axis. Spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction experiments show that the conversion reaction proceeds easily in both directions, thus indicating the reversible redox character of the transition

  11. Free surfaces and multilayer interfaces in the GaAs/AlAs system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. K.; Takai, T.; Erkoc, S.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    Semiempirical potential energy functions have been utilized for a variety of calculations in the Ga-Al-As system. Surface energies have been calculated for several orientations of GaAs. Ledge energies for the GaAs (0 0 -1) (As-terminated) surface show long-range interaction effects with the ledge energy increasing with spacing. GaAs (001)/AlAs (001) superlattices have been simulated for a range of interlayer spacings with the excess interfacial energy per interlayer increasing from 5 erg/sq cm at an interlayer spacing of 1 molecular layer (5.8 A) to 50 erg/sq cm at an interlayer spacing of 18 molecular layers (103.8 A).

  12. Atomic-scale Modelling of Electro-catalytic Surfaces and Dynamic Electrochemical Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard

    or phases are responsible for the observed catalytic activities. For nickel di-phosphide, which is another recently discovered catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction, it was possible to determine several facets and active sites, which have advantageous catalytic properties. Chapter 5 presents the new...... evolution reaction. The results show that molybdenum carbides and borides have reactive surfaces, which is not in consistency with their high catalytic activity. A possible active facet is suggested for the molybdenum boride. It is likely, however, that other unexplored active sites, surface terminations...... with experimental observations show that there is a natural limit to how far the reactivity of the catalysts can can be fine-tuned, exclusively using the strain effect, that is imposed by alloying with lanthanides. In chapter 4, calculations are presented for several newly discovered catalysts for the hydrogen...

  13. Efficient interfacing of light and surface plasmon polaritons for quantum optics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eran, Kot

    light and quantum emitters proves a difficult task. Current days solutions range from cavities, atomic ensembles, photonic band gaps structures, ion traps and optical latices are all being improved and studied but none has yet to emerge as superior. Recently, another proposal for such a strong coupling......The research of light and matter interactions is the most fascinating and powerful tool in advancing our understanding of both atomic and light physics. From the pioneering work of Niels Bohr in devising a model for the atom to recent research in manipulation of single atoms, light matter...... system has been put forward. By exploiting the strong confinement of light in a surface plasmon mode, a cavity-free, broadband tool can be designed to engineer the light-emitter interaction in the vicinity of metallic nano-structures. These surface plasmons, hybrid waves of light and electronic...

  14. High temperature in operando and in situ spectroscopy on electrified surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hansen, Karin Vels; Holtappels, Peter

    Electrochemical cells, such as fuel cells, electrolyzers and batteries are considered as important technologies for storing electricity from renewable sources and also provide an efficient way of converting chemical energy into electricity. The processes in the electrodes are strongly influenced...... electrodes without contaminants have demanded a better insight into the electrode surface reactions and chemistries. Spectroscopic techniques can be applied to these cells but are still experimentally challenging due to the high temperature operation conditions. DTU Energy has in the recent years invested...

  15. Surface analysis of model systems: From a metal-graphite interface to an intermetallic catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwolek, Emma J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This thesis summarizes research completed on two different model systems. In the first system, we investigate the deposition of the elemental metal dysprosium on highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its resulting nucleation and growth. The goal of this research is to better understand the metal-carbon interactions that occur on HOPG and to apply those to an array of other carbon surfaces. This insight may prove beneficial to developing and using new materials for electronic applications, magnetic applications and catalysis.

  16. Monolayered Bi2WO6 nanosheets mimicking heterojunction interface with open surfaces for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangen; Zhang, Yongfan; Lin, Mousheng; Long, Jinlin; Zhang, Zizhong; Lin, Huaxiang; Wu, Jeffrey C.-S.; Wang, Xuxu

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional-layered heterojunctions have attracted extensive interest recently due to their exciting behaviours in electronic/optoelectronic devices as well as solar energy conversion systems. However, layered heterojunction materials, especially those made by stacking different monolayers together by strong chemical bonds rather than by weak van der Waal interactions, are still challenging to fabricate. Here the monolayer Bi2WO6 with a sandwich substructure of [BiO]+–[WO4]2−–[BiO]+ is reported. This material may be characterized as a layered heterojunction with different monolayer oxides held together by chemical bonds. Coordinatively unsaturated Bi atoms are present as active sites on the surface. On irradiation, holes are generated directly on the active surface layer and electrons in the middle layer, which leads to the outstanding performances of the monolayer material in solar energy conversion. Our work provides a general bottom-up route for designing and preparing novel monolayer materials with ultrafast charge separation and active surface. PMID:26359212

  17. Modeling the Role of Bulk and Surface Characteristics of Carbon Fiber on Thermal Conductance across the Carbon Fiber/Matrix Interface (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-09

    energy exchange is investigated in terms of interface thermal conductance across the carbon fiber and the matrix. 15. SUBJECT TERMS BMI resin ; carbon ... carbon features. KEYWORDS: carbon fibers, BMI resin , molecular dynamics, interfaces, thermal conductance 1. INTRODUCTION Today, laser technology is...the near-surface region of carbon fiber to a much larger scale than what is reported to date); (b) model high-temperature BMI monomeric resins

  18. Incorporating classic adsorption isotherms into modern surface complexation models: implications for sorption of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Computer-aided surface complexation models (SCM) tend to replace the classic adsorption isotherm (AI) analysis in describing mineral-water interface reactions such as radionuclide sorption onto (hydr) oxides and clays. Any site-binding SCM based on the mole balance of surface sites, in fact, reproduces the (competitive) Langmuir isotherm, optionally amended with electrostatic Coulomb's non-ideal term. In most SCM implementations, it is difficult to incorporate real-surface phenomena (site heterogeneity, lateral interactions, surface condensation) described in classic AI approaches other than Langmuir's. Thermodynamic relations between SCMs and AIs that remained obscure in the past have been recently clarified using new definitions of standard and reference states of surface species [1,2]. On this basis, a method for separating the Langmuir AI into ideal (linear) and non-ideal parts [2] was applied to multi-dentate Langmuir, Frumkin, and BET isotherms. The aim of this work was to obtain the surface activity coefficient terms that make the SCM site mole balance constraints obsolete and, in this way, extend thermodynamic SCMs to cover sorption phenomena described by the respective AIs. The multi-dentate Langmuir term accounts for the site saturation with n-dentate surface species, as illustrated on modeling bi-dentate U VI complexes on goethite or SiO 2 surfaces. The Frumkin term corrects for the lateral interactions of the mono-dentate surface species; in particular, it has the same form as the Coulombic term of the constant-capacitance EDL combined with the Langmuir term. The BET term (three parameters) accounts for more than a monolayer adsorption up to the surface condensation; it can potentially describe the surface precipitation of nickel and other cations on hydroxides and clay minerals. All three non-ideal terms (in GEM SCMs implementation [1,2]) by now are used for non-competing surface species only. Upon 'surface dilution

  19. Optimisation of electronic interface properties of a-Si:H/c-Si hetero-junction solar cells by wet-chemical surface pre-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermann, H.; Korte, L.; Rappich, J.; Conrad, E.; Sieber, I.; Schmidt, M.; Huebener, K.; Hauschild, J.

    2008-01-01

    The relation between structural imperfections at structured silicon surfaces, energetic distribution of interface state densities, recombination loss at a-Si:H/c-Si interfaces and solar cell characteristics have been intensively investigated using non-destructive, surface sensitive techniques, surface photovoltage (SPV) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM). Sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and etching steps were optimised with respect to the etching behaviour of Si(111) pyramids. Special wet-chemical smoothing and oxide removal procedures for structured substrates were developed, in order to reduce the preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and density of electronically active defects. H-termination and passivation by wet-chemical oxides were used to inhibit surface contamination and native oxidation during the technological process. We achieved significantly lower micro-roughness, densities of surface states D it (E) and recombination loss at a-Si:H/c-Si interfaces on wafers with randomly distributed pyramids, compared to conventional pre-treatments. For amorphous-crystalline hetero-junction solar cells (ZnO/a-Si:H/c-Si/BSF/Al), the c-Si surface becomes part of the a-Si:H/c-Si interface, whose recombination activity determines cell performance. With textured substrates, the smoothening procedure results in a significant increase of short circuit current, fill factor and efficiency

  20. Optical characterization of surface and interface oxygen content in YBa2Cu3O/sub x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.K.; Chan, S.; Jenkin, K. II; Aspnes, D.E.; Barboux, P.; Tarascon, J.

    1988-01-01

    Because YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub x/ exists over a range of oxygen content and low oxygen material is nonsuperconducting, it is important to be able to measure and control this parameter for application purposes. We present an optical technique for determining oxygen loss at surfaces and interfaces, where processing and contacts with other materials may affect composition and where usual techniques are insensitive. Using a strong absorption feature at 4.1 eV which appears at low oxygen composition, we find that overlayers of Al and In remove oxygen from YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub x/, but Ag, Au, and room-temperature exposure to moderate vacuum do not

  1. Evolution of interface and surface structures of ZnO/Al2 O3 multilayers upon rapid thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chang, C. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Wadekar, P. V.; Huang, H. C.; Liao, H. H.; Seo, H. W.; Chu, W. K.

    2015-03-01

    ZnO ∖Al2O3 multilayers were deposited on sapphires by atomic layer deposition at 85°C. This low substrate temperature ensures good interface smoothness useful for study of interfacial reaction or interdiffusion. Our study aimed at the effects of rapid thermal annealing at different annealing temperatures, times and PAr:PO2. XRR and XRD techniques were used to investigate the kinetics from which various terms of the activation energies could be determined. HR-TEM and electron diffraction were carried out to correlate the microstructures and interfacial alignments as a result of the reactions. AFM were used to assist SEM profiling of the surface morphological evolution in association with the TEM observations.

  2. Correlation of surface pressure and hue of planarizable push–pull chromophores at the air/water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Neuhaus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is currently not possible to directly measure the lateral pressure of a biomembrane. Mechanoresponsive fluorescent probes are an elegant solution to this problem but it requires first the establishment of a direct correlation between the membrane surface pressure and the induced color change of the probe. Here, we analyze planarizable dithienothiophene push–pull probes in a monolayer at the air/water interface using fluorescence microscopy, grazing-incidence angle X-ray diffraction, and infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy. An increase of the lateral membrane pressure leads to a well-packed layer of the ‘flipper’ mechanophores and a clear change in hue above 18 mN/m. The fluorescent probes had no influence on the measured isotherm of the natural phospholipid DPPC suggesting that the flippers probe the lateral membrane pressure without physically changing it. This makes the flipper probes a truly useful addition to the membrane probe toolbox.

  3. Epitaxial ferromagnetic Fe3Si on GaAs(111)A with atomically smooth surface and interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Hung, H. Y.; Kwo, J.; Chen, Y. W.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, C. K.; Hong, M.; Tseng, S. C.; Hsu, C. H.; Chang, M. T.; Lo, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Single crystal ferromagnetic Fe 3 Si(111) films were grown epitaxially on GaAs(111)A by molecular beam epitaxy. These hetero-structures possess extremely low surface roughness of 1.3 Å and interfacial roughness of 1.9 Å, measured by in-situ scanning tunneling microscope and X-ray reflectivity analyses, respectively, showing superior film quality, comparing to those attained on GaAs(001) in previous publications. The atomically smooth interface was revealed by the atomic-resolution Z (atomic number)-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images using the correction of spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected electron probe. Excellent crystallinity and perfect lattice match were both confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction. Measurements of magnetic property for the Fe 3 Si/GaAs(111) yielded a saturation moment of 990 emu/cm 3 with a small coercive field ≤1 Oe at room temperature

  4. Surface and interface engineering of anatase TiO2 anode for sodium-ion batteries through Al2O3 surface modification and wise electrolyte selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Gulzar, Umair; Bai, Xue; Monaco, Simone; Longoni, Gianluca; Prato, Mirko; Marras, Sergio; Dang, Zhiya; Capiglia, Claudio; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, Al2O3 is utilized for the first time as coating agent on nanostructured anatase TiO2 in order to investigate its effect on sodium-ion batteries performance. Our results show that the Al2O3 coating, introduced by a facile two-step approach, provides beneficial effects to the TiO2-based anodes. However, the coated TiO2 still suffers of capacity fading upon cycling when using 1.0 M of NaClO4 in propylene carbonate (PC) as electrolyte. To address this issue, the influence of different electrolytes (NaClO4 salt in various solvents) is further studied. It is found that the modified TiO2 exhibits significant improvements in cycling performance using binary ethylene carbonate (EC) and PC solvent mixture without the need of the commonly used fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive. Under the best configuration, our battery could deliver a high reversible capacity of 188.1 mAh g-1 at 0.1C after 50 cycles, good rate capability up to 5C, and remarkable long-term cycling stability at 1C rate for 650 cycles. This excellent performance can be ascribed to the synergistic effects of surface and interface engineering enabling the formation of a stable and highly ionic conductive interface layer in EC:PC based electrolyte which combines the native SEI film and an 'artificial' SEI layer of irreversibly formed Na-Al-O.

  5. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics; Elektronische Struktur epitaktischer Chalkopyrite und deren Heterokontakte fuer die Photovoltaik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-02-14

    valence band dispersion and a broadening of electron states was observed, which can be understood as a higher localization of electronic states and lower crystal quality. In addition, a strong rearrangement of the copper partial density of states was shown. The intimate knowledge of the electric structure was then exploited to demonstrate the valence band discontinuity between CuInSe{sub 2} and CuIn{sub 3}Se{sub 5}. The analysis by photoemission yielded a valence band offset of 0.28 eV, again in reasonable agreement with theoretical results. The p-n-junction in chalcopyrite solar cells is situated near the absorber-buffer interface, which is therefore crucial for the device performance. In this thesis, ZnO deposited from metal-organic precursors on epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2} was investigated as cadmium-free buffer material. In the course of contact formation, the interfacial region of the absorber becomes depleted of copper. Additionally, a thin intrinsic ZnSe layer is formed, prior to the growth of ZnO. The derived band alignments show no dependence on the surface orientation of the chalcopyrite substrate and are consistent with theoretical results. The conduction band lineup is favorable for the application in solar cells.

  6. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  7. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  8. Interface Properties and Surface Leakage of HgCdTe Photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory DELNV-NVRD Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 TD7 IC ELECTE TIP" January 1980 -a MAR 3 1980 A I)ISTRIBUTION STA M Appioved toi public teeas...ANC ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT . PROJECT. TASK7 AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Martin Marietta Corp., Martin Marietta Labs, 1450 South Rolling Road Baltimore...PropeiesI~l I . ... Anl yzled AS (Auger Electron Electron (C-S keY) LO-20 1 . Surface composition (emi-quanticative) * Depth composiion prof Us a

  9. Adsorption of 2 Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide on Silica: Binding Mechanism and Energy of a Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bond Acceptor at the Gas Surface Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    hydroxylated silica to help construct an understanding of how sulfur mustard gas adheres to hydroxyl-containing surfaces. In this study, infrared spectroscopy...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This work investigates the fundamental nature of sulfur mustard surface adsorption by characterizing interfacial hydrogen...Hydrogen-Bond Acceptor at the Gas –Surface Interface The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and

  10. Lung segmentation refinement based on optimal surface finding utilizing a hybrid desktop/virtual reality user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanhui; Sonka, Milan; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the optimal surface finding (OSF) and layered optimal graph image segmentation of multiple objects and surfaces (LOGISMOS) approaches have been reported with applications to medical image segmentation tasks. While providing high levels of performance, these approaches may locally fail in the presence of pathology or other local challenges. Due to the image data variability, finding a suitable cost function that would be applicable to all image locations may not be feasible. This paper presents a new interactive refinement approach for correcting local segmentation errors in the automated OSF-based segmentation. A hybrid desktop/virtual reality user interface was developed for efficient interaction with the segmentations utilizing state-of-the-art stereoscopic visualization technology and advanced interaction techniques. The user interface allows a natural and interactive manipulation of 3-D surfaces. The approach was evaluated on 30 test cases from 18 CT lung datasets, which showed local segmentation errors after employing an automated OSF-based lung segmentation. The performed experiments exhibited significant increase in performance in terms of mean absolute surface distance errors (2.54±0.75 mm prior to refinement vs. 1.11±0.43 mm post-refinement, p≪0.001). Speed of the interactions is one of the most important aspects leading to the acceptance or rejection of the approach by users expecting real-time interaction experience. The average algorithm computing time per refinement iteration was 150 ms, and the average total user interaction time required for reaching complete operator satisfaction was about 2 min per case. This time was mostly spent on human-controlled manipulation of the object to identify whether additional refinement was necessary and to approve the final segmentation result. The reported principle is generally applicable to segmentation problems beyond lung segmentation in CT scans as long as the underlying segmentation utilizes the

  11. Electrical properties of surface and interface layers of the N- and In-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers grown by PA MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarova, T. A.; Kampert, E.; Law, J.; Jmerik, V. N.; Paturi, P.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical properties of N-polar undoped and Mg-doped InN layers and In-polar undoped InN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA MBE) were studied. Transport parameters of the surface and interface layers were determined from the measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity as well as the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at magnetic fields up to 60 T. Contributions of the 2D surface, 3D near-interface, and 2D interface layers to the total conductivity of the InN films were defined and discussed to be dependent on InN surface polarity, Mg doping, and PA MBE growth conditions.

  12. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  13. Surface acoustic wave nebulization of peptides as a microfluidic interface for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Scott R; Wilson, Rab; Shaffer, Scott A; Goodlett, David R; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-05-15

    We describe the fabrication of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a LiNbO(3) piezoelectric transducer for the transfer of nonvolatile analytes to the gas phase at atmospheric pressure (a process referred to as nebulization or atomization). We subsequently show how such a device can be used in the field of mass spectrometry (MS) detection, demonstrating that SAW nebulization (SAWN) can be performed either in a discontinuous or pulsed mode, similar to that for matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) or in a continuous mode like electrospray ionization (ESI). We present data showing the transfer of peptides to the gas phase, where ions are detected by MS. These peptide ions were subsequently fragmented by collision-induced dissociation, from which the sequence was assigned. Unlike MALDI mass spectra, which are typically contaminated with matrix ions at low m/z, the SAWN generated spectra had no such interference. In continuous mode, the SAWN plume was sampled on a microsecond time scale by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer and produced multiply charged peptide precursor ions with a charge state distribution shifted to higher m/z compared to an identical sample analyzed by ESI. The SAWN technology also provides the opportunity to re-examine a sample from a flat surface, repeatedly. The process can be performed without the need for capillaries, which can clog, reservoirs, which dilute the sample, and electrodes, which when in direct contact with sample, cause unwanted electrochemical oxidation. In both continuous and pulsed sampling modes, the quality of precursor ion scans and tandem mass spectra of peptides was consistent across the plume's lifetime.

  14. Anisotropic surface physicochemical properties of spodumene and albite crystals: Implications for flotation separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longhua; Peng, Tiefeng; Tian, Jia; Lu, Zhongyuan; Hu, Yuehua; Sun, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Aluminosilicate minerals (e.g., spodumene, albite) have complex crystal structures and similar surface chemistries, but they have poor selectivity compared to traditional fatty acid collectors, making flotation separation difficult. Previous research has mainly considered the mineral crystal structure as a whole. In contrast, the surface characteristics at the atomic level and the effects of different crystal interfaces on the flotation behavior have rarely been investigated. This study focuses on investigating the surface anisotropy quantitatively, including the chemical bond characteristics, surface energies, and broken bond densities, using density functional theory and classical theoretical calculations. In addition, the anisotropy of the surface wettability and adsorption characteristics were examined using contact angle, zeta potential, and Fourier-transform infrared measurements. Finally, these surface anisotropies with different flotation behaviors were investigated and interpreted using molecular dynamics simulations, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This systematic research offers new ideas concerning the selective grinding and stage flotation of aluminosilicate minerals based on the crystal characteristics.

  15. Fasciola hepatica Surface Tegument: Glycoproteins at the Interface of Parasite and Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravidà, Alessandra; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Aldridge, Allison M; Clarke, Paul; Thompson, Roisin; Gerlach, Jared Q; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Hokke, Cornelis H; Dalton, John P; O'Neill, Sandra M

    2016-10-01

    Fasciola hepatica, commonly known as liver fluke, is a trematode that causes Fasciolosis in ruminants and humans. The outer tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is a complex metabolically active biological matrix that is continually exposed to the host immune system and therefore makes a good vaccine target. F. hepatica tegumental coat is highly glycosylated and helminth-derived immunogenic oligosaccharide motifs and glycoproteins are currently being investigated as novel vaccine candidates. This report presents the first systematic characterization of FhTeg glycosylation using lectin microarrays to characterize carbohydrates motifs present, and lectin histochemistry to localize these on the F. hepatica tegument. We discovered that FhTeg glycoproteins are predominantly oligomannose oligosaccharides that are expressed on the spines, suckers and tegumental coat of F. hepatica and lectin blot analysis confirmed the abundance of N- glycosylated proteins. Although some oligosaccharides are widely distributed on the fluke surface other subsets are restricted to distinct anatomical regions. We selectively enriched for FhTeg mannosylated glycoprotein subsets using lectin affinity chromatography and identified 369 proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Among these proteins are a number of potential vaccine candidates with known immune modulatory properties including proteases, protease inhibitors, paramyosin, Venom Allergen-like II, Enolase and two proteins, nardilysin and TRIL, that have not been previously associated with F. hepatica Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive insight regarding the putative glycosylation of FhTeg components that could highlight the importance of further studies examining glycoconjugates in host-parasite interactions in the context of F. hepatica infection and the development of an effective vaccine. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Fasciola hepatica Surface Tegument: Glycoproteins at the Interface of Parasite and Host*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravidà, Alessandra; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Aldridge, Allison M.; Clarke, Paul; Thompson, Roisin; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Dalton, John P.; O'Neill, Sandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, commonly known as liver fluke, is a trematode that causes Fasciolosis in ruminants and humans. The outer tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is a complex metabolically active biological matrix that is continually exposed to the host immune system and therefore makes a good vaccine target. F. hepatica tegumental coat is highly glycosylated and helminth-derived immunogenic oligosaccharide motifs and glycoproteins are currently being investigated as novel vaccine candidates. This report presents the first systematic characterization of FhTeg glycosylation using lectin microarrays to characterize carbohydrates motifs present, and lectin histochemistry to localize these on the F. hepatica tegument. We discovered that FhTeg glycoproteins are predominantly oligomannose oligosaccharides that are expressed on the spines, suckers and tegumental coat of F. hepatica and lectin blot analysis confirmed the abundance of N- glycosylated proteins. Although some oligosaccharides are widely distributed on the fluke surface other subsets are restricted to distinct anatomical regions. We selectively enriched for FhTeg mannosylated glycoprotein subsets using lectin affinity chromatography and identified 369 proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Among these proteins are a number of potential vaccine candidates with known immune modulatory properties including proteases, protease inhibitors, paramyosin, Venom Allergen-like II, Enolase and two proteins, nardilysin and TRIL, that have not been previously associated with F. hepatica. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive insight regarding the putative glycosylation of FhTeg components that could highlight the importance of further studies examining glycoconjugates in host-parasite interactions in the context of F. hepatica infection and the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:27466253

  17. Electronic Properties of Metallic Nanoclusters on Semiconductor Surfaces: Implications for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Takhee; Liu Jia; Chen, N.-P.; Andres, R.P.; Janes, D.B.; Reifenberger, R.

    2000-01-01

    We review current research on the electronic properties of nanoscale metallic islands and clusters deposited on semiconductor substrates. Reported results for a number of nanoscale metal-semiconductor systems are summarized in terms of their fabrication and characterization. In addition to the issues faced in large-area metal-semiconductor systems, nano-systems present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. Imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy as well as electrical characterization by current-voltage spectroscopy enable the study of the electrical properties of nanoclusters/semiconductor systems at the nanoscale. As an example of the low-resistance interfaces that can be realized, low-resistance nanocontacts consisting of metal nanoclusters deposited on specially designed ohmic contact structures are described. To illustrate a possible path to employing metal/semiconductor nanostructures in nanoelectronic applications, we also describe the fabrication and performance of uniform 2-D arrays of such metallic clusters on semiconductor substrates. Using self-assembly techniques involving conjugated organic tether molecules, arrays of nanoclusters have been formed in both unpatterned and patterned regions on semiconductor surfaces. Imaging and electrical characterization via scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy indicate that high quality local ordering has been achieved within the arrays and that the clusters are electronically coupled to the semiconductor substrate via the low-resistance metal/semiconductor interface

  18. Interface between Sr2RuO4 and Ru-metal inclusion: Implications for its superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soham S.; Xin, Yan; Mao, Zhiqiang; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2017-11-01

    Under various conditions of the growth process, when the presumably unconventional superconductor Sr2RuO4 (SRO) contains microinclusions of Ru metal, the superconducting critical temperature increases significantly. An atomic resolution high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy study shows a sharp interface geometry which allows crystals of SRO and of Ru metal to grow side by side by forming a commensurate superlattice structure at the interface. In an attempt to shed light on why this happens, we investigated the atomic structure and electronic properties of the interface between the oxide and the metal microinclusions using density functional theory calculations. Our results support the observed structure, indicating that it is energetically favored over other types of Ru-metal/SRO interfaces. We find that t2 g-eg orbital mixing occurs at the interface with significantly enhanced magnetic moments. Based on our findings, we argue that an inclusion-mediated interlayer coupling reduces phase fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter, which could explain the observed enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature in SRO samples containing microinclusions.

  19. Adsorbed carbon nanomaterials for surface and interface-engineered stable rubidium multi-cation perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Md Arafat; Elumalai, Naveen Kumar; Upama, Mushfika Baishakhi; Wang, Dian; Zarei, Leila; Gonçales, Vinicius R; Wright, Matthew; Xu, Cheng; Haque, Faiazul; Uddin, Ashraf

    2018-01-03

    The current work reports the simultaneous enhancement in efficiency and stability of low-temperature, solution-processed triple cation based MA 0.57 FA 0.38 Rb 0.05 PbI 3 (MA: methyl ammonium, FA: formamidinium, Rb: rubidium) perovskite solar cells (PSCs) by means of adsorbed carbon nanomaterials at the perovskite/electron transporting layer interface. The quantity and quality of the adsorbents are precisely controlled to electronically modify the ETL surface and lower the energy barrier across the interface. Carbon derivatives namely fullerene (C 60 ) and PC 71 BM ([6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester) are employed as adsorbents in conjunction with ZnO and together serve as a bilayer electron transporting layer (ETL). The adsorbed fullerene (C 60 -ZnO, abbreviated as C-ZnO) passivates the interstitial trap-sites of ZnO with interstitial intercalation of oxygen atoms in the ZnO lattice structure. C-ZnO ETL based PSCs demonstrate about a 19% higher average PCE compared to conventional ZnO ETL based devices and a nearly 9% higher average PCE than PC 71 BM adsorbed-ZnO (P-ZnO) ETL based PSCs. In addition, the interstitial trap-state passivation with a C-ZnO film upshifts the Fermi-level position of the C-ZnO ETL by 130 meV, with reference to the ZnO ETL, which contributes to an enhanced n-type conductivity. The photocurrent hysteresis phenomenon in C-ZnO PSCs is also substantially reduced due to mitigated charge trapping phenomena and concomitant reduction in an electrode polarization process. Another major highlight of this work is that, C-ZnO PSCs demonstrate a superior device stability retaining about 94% of its initial PCE in the course of a month-long, systematic degradation study conducted in our work. The enhanced device stability with C-ZnO PSCs is attributed to their high resistance to aging-induced recombination phenomena and a water-induced perovskite degradation process, due to a lower content of oxygen-related chemisorbed species on the C-ZnO ETL

  20. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    IrO3/IrOx catalyst significantly outperforms rutile IrO2 and RuO2, the only other OER catalysts to have reasonable stability and activity in acidic electrolyte, and in fact demonstrates the best activity for any known OER catalyst measured in either acidic or in alkaline electrolyte. For alkaline conditions we have demonstrated that the combined effect of cerium as a dopant and gold as a metal support, significantly enhances the OER activity of electrodeposited NiOx films. This NiCeOx-Au catalyst delivers high OER activity in alkaline media, and is among the most active OER electrocatalysts reported to date (Nature Energy, accepted 2016). These studies of new catalysts for the OER, both in acid and in base, are fundamental to enabling new technologies of interest for the DOE, including the production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. ORR: One method to significantly reduce the Pt loading in fuel cell devices is to increase the ORR activity of Pt based systems. To this end we have synthesized a high surface area supported meso-structured PtxNi alloy thin film with a double gyroid morphology that both exhibits high activity and stability for the ORR (submitted, 2016). We have furthermore developed a Ru-core, Pt-shell system that improves the per Pt site activity by more than a factor of 2 (ChemElectroChem, 2014). Further refinement, optimizing Pt-shell thickness and reducing particle sintering during processing, enabled us to obtain a mass activity that is 2 times higher than commercial Pt/C from TKK. These are important contributions to the DOE goal of reducing Pt loading since an improved understanding of how to increase mass activity and stability helps enable low Pt content fuel cells.

  1. Chemical functionalization of ceramic tile surfaces by silane coupling agents: polymer modified mortar adhesion mechanism implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ancelmo Piscitelli Mansur

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between tiles and mortars are crucial to the stability of ceramic tile systems. From the chemical point of view, weak forces such as van der Waals forces and hydrophilic interactions are expected to be developed preferably at the tiles and polymer modified Portland cement mortar interface. The main goal of this paper was to use organosilanes as primers to modify ceramic tile hydrophilic properties to improve adhesion between ceramic tiles and polymer modified mortars. Glass tile surfaces were treated with several silane derivatives bearing specific functionalities. Contact angle measurements and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR were used for evaluating the chemical changes on the tile surface. In addition, pull-off tests were conducted to assess the effect on adhesion properties between tile and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, modified mortar. The bond strength results have clearly shown the improvement of adherence at the tile-polymer modified mortar interface, reflecting the overall balance of silane, cement and polymer interactions.

  2. Surface Crystallization of Cloud Droplets: Implications for Climate Change and Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Djikaev, Y. S.; Reiss, H.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The process of supercooled liquid water crystallization into ice is still not well understood. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice nucleation in supercooled water droplets show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 C, the reported freezing nucleation rates vary by as much as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Until now, experimental data on the freezing of supercooled water has been analyzed under the assumption that nucleation of ice took place in the interior volume of a water droplet. Here, the same data is reanalyzed assuming that the nucleation occurred "pseudoheterogeneously" at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface of the droplet. Our analysis suggest that the scatter in the nucleation data can be explained by two main factors. First, the current assumption that nucleation occurs solely inside the volume of a water droplet is incorrect. Second, because the nucleation process most likely occurs on the surface, the rates of nuclei formation could differ vastly when oil or air interfaces are involved. Our results suggest that ice freezing in clouds may initiate on droplet surfaces and such a process can allow for low amounts of liquid water (approx. 0.002 g per cubic meters) to remain supercooled down to -40 C as observed in the atmosphere.

  3. Surface pKa of octanoic, nonanoic, and decanoic fatty acids at the air-water interface: applications to atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, Bethany A; Lach, Evan A; Allen, Heather C

    2017-10-11

    There exists large uncertainty in the literature as to the pK a of medium-chain fatty acids at the air-water interface. Via surface tension titration, the surface-pK a values of octanoic (C 8 ), nonanoic (C 9 ), and decanoic (C 10 ) fatty acids are determined to be 4.9, 5.8, and 6.4, respectively. The surface-pK a determined with surface tension differs from the bulk value obtained during a standard acid-base titration. Near the surface-pK a of the C 8 and C 9 systems, surface tension minima are observed and are attributed to the formation of surface-active acid-soap complexes. The direction of the titration is shown to affect the surface-pK a of the C 9 system, as the value shifts to 5.2 with NaOH titrant due to a higher concentration of Na + ions at pH values close to the surface-pK a . As the reactivity and climate-relevant properties of sea spray aerosols (SSA) are partially dictated by the charge and surface activity of the organics at the aerosol-atmosphere interface, the results presented here on SSA-identified C 8 -C 10 fatty acids can be used to better predict the health and climate impact of particles with significant concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids.

  4. Surface/Interface Carrier-Transport Modulation for Constructing Photon-Alternative Ultraviolet Detectors Based on Self-Bending-Assembled ZnO Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Zhou, Lianqun; Tang, Yuguo; Li, Lin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Yang, Hongbo; Ma, Hanbin; Nathan, Arokia; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-09-13

    Surface/interface charge-carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport modulation are especially important in the construction of photodetectors with high efficiency in the field of nanoscience. In the paper, a kind of ultraviolet (UV) detector is designed based on ZnO nanostructures considering photon-trapping, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR), piezophototronic effects, interface carrier-trapping/transport control, and collection. Through carefully optimized surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, a designed device with detectivity as high as 1.69 × 10 16 /1.71 × 10 16 cm·Hz 1/2 /W irradiating with 380 nm photons under ultralow bias of 0.2 V is realized by alternating nanoparticle/nanowire active layers, respectively, and the designed UV photodetectors show fast and slow recovery processes of 0.27 and 4.52 ms, respectively, which well-satisfy practical needs. Further, it is observed that UV photodetection could be performed within an alternative response by varying correlated key parameters, through efficient surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, spectrally resolved photoresponse of the detector revealing controlled detection in the UV region based on the ZnO nanomaterial, photodetection allowed or limited by varying the active layers, irradiation distance from one of the electrodes, standing states, or electric field. The detailed carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport processes are well illustrated to explain charge-carrier dynamics contributing to the photoresponse behavior.

  5. Enhancing Electron Mobility at the LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 Interface by Surface Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yanwu; Bell, Christopher; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Harashima, Satoshi; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2013-07-15

    Mobility of electrons confined at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface is significantly enhanced by surface control using surface charges and adsorbates, reaching a low temperature value more than 20 000 cm2 V-1s-1. A uniform trend that mobility increases with decreasing sheet carrier density is observed.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of the Au-pentacene interface: a combined experimental and theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, D; Guha, S

    2013-07-28

    It has recently been shown [D. Adil and S. Guha, J. Phys. Chem. C 116, 12779 (2012)] that a large enhancement in the Raman intensity due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is observed from pentacene when probed through the Au contact in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) structures. Here, the SERS spectrum is shown to exhibit a high sensitivity to disorder introduced in the pentacene film by Au atoms. The Raman signature of the metal-semiconductor interface in pentacene OFETs is calculated with density-functional theory by explicitly considering the Au-pentacene interaction. The observed enhancement in the 1380 cm(-1) and the 1560 cm(-1) regions of the experimental Raman spectrum of pentacene is successfully modeled by Au-pentacene complexes, giving insights into the nature of disorder in the pentacene sp(2) network. Finally, we extend our previous work on high-operating voltage pentacene OFETs to low-operating voltage pentacene OFETs. No changes in the SERS spectra before and after subjecting the OFETs to a bias stress are observed, concurrent with no degradation in the threshold voltage. This shows that bias stress induced performance degradation is, in part, caused by field-induced structural changes in the pentacene molecule. Thus, we confirm that the SERS spectrum can be used as a visualization tool for correlating transport properties to structural changes, if any, in organic semiconductor based devices.

  7. Electron density in surface barrier discharge emerging at argon/water interface: quantification for streamers and leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanović, Nikola; Galmiz, Oleksandr; Synek, Petr; Zemánek, Miroslav; Brablec, Antonín; Hoder, Tomáš

    2018-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy, fast intensified CCD imaging and electrical measurements were applied to investigate the basic plasma parameters of surface barrier discharge emerging from a conductive water electrode. The discharge was generated at the triple-line interface of atmospheric pressure argon gas and conductive water solution at the fused silica dielectrics using a sinusoidal high-voltage waveform. The spectroscopic methods of atomic line broadening and molecular spectroscopy were used to determine the electron densities and the gas temperature in the active plasma. These parameters were obtained for both applied voltage polarities and resolved spatially. Two different spectral signatures were identified in the spatially resolved spectra resulting in electron densities differing by two orders of magnitude. It is shown that two discharge mechanisms take a place: the streamer and the leader one, with electron densities of 1014 and 1016 cm‑3, respectively. This spectroscopic evidence is supported by the combined diagnostics of electrical current measurements and phase-resolved intensified CCD camera imaging.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of the Au-pentacene interface: A combined experimental and theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, D.; Guha, S.

    2013-07-01

    It has recently been shown [D. Adil and S. Guha, J. Phys. Chem. C 116, 12779 (2012)], 10.1021/jp3031804 that a large enhancement in the Raman intensity due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is observed from pentacene when probed through the Au contact in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) structures. Here, the SERS spectrum is shown to exhibit a high sensitivity to disorder introduced in the pentacene film by Au atoms. The Raman signature of the metal-semiconductor interface in pentacene OFETs is calculated with density-functional theory by explicitly considering the Au-pentacene interaction. The observed enhancement in the 1380 cm-1 and the 1560 cm-1 regions of the experimental Raman spectrum of pentacene is successfully modeled by Au-pentacene complexes, giving insights into the nature of disorder in the pentacene sp2 network. Finally, we extend our previous work on high-operating voltage pentacene OFETs to low-operating voltage pentacene OFETs. No changes in the SERS spectra before and after subjecting the OFETs to a bias stress are observed, concurrent with no degradation in the threshold voltage. This shows that bias stress induced performance degradation is, in part, caused by field-induced structural changes in the pentacene molecule. Thus, we confirm that the SERS spectrum can be used as a visualization tool for correlating transport properties to structural changes, if any, in organic semiconductor based devices.

  9. Smart Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    piezoelectric thin films were deposited on AISI 304 stainless steel coupons, (100) silicon wafers and glas substrates by pulsed closed field unbalanced...the DSC tests , XRD measurements of the annealed films were carried out on a Philips X-ray diffractometer in the θ/2θ geometry using Cu Kα radiation...size and higher texturing in preffered (002) orientation. In order to test the stability of AlN thin films at higher temperature, DSC method was

  10. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  11. Electronic structure of the buried interface between an organic semiconductor, N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), and metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko; Sato, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structures of buried interfaces between an organic semiconductor, N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) and metal surfaces of Au, Ag, Al and Ca were examined by the new experimental method that we have developed recently. In this method the energy levels at the organic/metal interface can be examined without changing the film thickness and related physical parameters e.g., the vacuum levels of the sample in contrast to the widely-used thickness-dependent photoemission experiments. The results were discussed in view of large interfacial dipole moment of the TPD and metal (Au and Ag) contacts.

  12. Evidence for two-dimensional solitary sound waves in a lipid controlled interface and its implications for biological signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2014-08-06

    Biological membranes by virtue of their elastic properties should be capable of propagating localized perturbations analogous to sound waves. However, the existence and the possible role of such waves in communication in biology remain unexplored. Here, we report the first observations of two-dimensional solitary elastic pulses in lipid interfaces, excited mechanically and detected by FRET. We demonstrate that the nonlinearity near a maximum in the susceptibility of the lipid monolayer results in solitary pulses that also have a threshold for excitation. These experiments clearly demonstrate that the state of the interface regulates the propagation of pulses both qualitatively and quantitatively. Finally, we elaborate on the striking similarity of the observed phenomenon to nerve pulse propagation and a thermodynamic basis of cell signalling in general. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Electronic Processes at Organic−Organic Interfaces: Insight from Modeling and Implications for Opto-electronic Devices †

    KAUST Repository

    Beljonne, David

    2011-02-08

    We report on the recent progress achieved in modeling the electronic processes that take place at interfaces between π-conjugated materials in organic opto-electronic devices. First, we provide a critical overview of the current computational techniques used to assess the morphology of organic: organic heterojunctions; we highlight the compromises that are necessary to handle large systems and multiple time scales while preserving the atomistic details required for subsequent computations of the electronic and optical properties. We then review some recent theoretical advances in describing the ground-state electronic structure at heterojunctions between donor and acceptor materials and highlight the role played by charge-transfer and long-range polarization effects. Finally, we discuss the modeling of the excited-state electronic structure at organic:organic interfaces, which is a key aspect in the understanding of the dynamics of photoinduced electron-transfer processes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  15. Adhesion of CO2 on hydrated mineral surfaces and its implications to geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.; Persily, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most mineral surfaces are water wetting, which has important implications for the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids, such as CO2, through porous media. In this work, contact angle experiments were carried out wherein unusual wetting behavior was observed between mineral surfaces and liquid or supercritical CO2 under certain geochemical conditions. This behavior can be understood in the context of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface. When adhesion occurs, the wettability characteristics of the surfaces are significantly altered. More importantly, the CO2 exhibits a strong affinity for the surface and is highly resistant to shear forces in the aqueous phase. A static pendant drop method was used on a variety of polished mineral surfaces to measure contact angles. The composition of the aqueous phase (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and the characteristics of the mineral surface (e.g., composition, roughness), were evaluated to understand their impact on the prevalence of adhesion. Pressure and temperature conditions were selected to represent those that would be prevalent in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) or during leakage from target repositories. Adhesion was widely observed on phlogopite mica, silica, and calcite surfaces with roughness on the order of ~10 nanometers. CO2 exhibited no adhesion on mineral surfaces with higher roughness (e.g., quartz). On smoother surfaces, the CO2 is thought to have more effective contact area with the mineral, enabling the weak van der Waals forces that drive most adhesion processes. Brine chemistry also had an important role in controlling CO2 adhesion. Increases in CO2 partial pressure and ionic strength both increased the incidence of adhesion. The addition of strong acid or strong base permanently inhibited the development of adhesion. These results suggest that the development of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface is dependent on the integrity and thickness of the hydration layer between the CO2

  16. Cryptic oxygen oases: Hypolithic photosynthesis in hydrothermal areas and implications for Archean surface oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, J. R.; Hamilton, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Mounting geochemical evidence suggests microorganisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis (e.g., Cyanobacteria) colonized Archean continental surfaces, driving oxidative weathering of detrital pyrites prior to the 2.5 Ga great oxidation event. Modern terrestrial environments dominated by single-celled phototrophs include hydrothermal systems (e.g., Yellowstone National Park) and hypolithic communities found in arid to hyper-arid deserts (e.g., McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, Atacama Desert of Chile). Recent work indicates terrestrial hydrothermal systems date back at least as far as 3.5 Ga. Here, we explore phototrophic communities in both hypolithic (sub-sinter) and hydrothermal (subaqueous and subaerial) environments in Yellowstone National Park as potential analogs to Archean continental surfaces. Hydrothermal sub-sinter environments provide ideal conditions for phototrophic microbial communities, including blocking of harmful UV radiation, trapping and retention of moisture, and protection from erosion by rain and surface runoff. Hypolithic communities in geothermal settings were similar in both composition and carbon uptake rates to nearby hot spring communities. We hypothesize that hydrothermal area hypolithic communities represent modern analogs of phototrophic microbial communities that colonized Archean continental surfaces, producing oxygen locally and facilitating microbially-mediated pyrite oxidation prior to the presence of free oxygen in the global atmosphere. These results have implications for oxidation of the early Earth surface, the search for biosignatures in the rock record, as well as for potential harbors of past life on Mars and the search for life on Exoplanets.

  17. Bulk and Surface Aqueous Speciation of Calcite: Implications for Low-Salinity Waterflooding of Carbonate Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Yutkin, Maxim P.

    2017-08-25

    Low-salinity waterflooding (LSW) is ineffective when reservoir rock is strongly water-wet or when crude oil is not asphaltenic. Success of LSW relies heavily on the ability of injected brine to alter surface chemistry of reservoir crude-oil brine/rock (COBR) interfaces. Implementation of LSW in carbonate reservoirs is especially challenging because of high reservoir-brine salinity and, more importantly, because of high reactivity of the rock minerals. Both features complicate understanding of the COBR surface chemistries pertinent to successful LSW. Here, we tackle the complex physicochemical processes in chemically active carbonates flooded with diluted brine that is saturated with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and possibly supplemented with additional ionic species, such as sulfates or phosphates. When waterflooding carbonate reservoirs, rock equilibrates with the injected brine over short distances. Injected-brine ion speciation is shifted substantially in the presence of reactive carbonate rock. Our new calculations demonstrate that rock-equilibrated aqueous pH is slightly alkaline quite independent of injected-brine pH. We establish, for the first time, that CO2 content of a carbonate reservoir, originating from CO2-rich crude oil and gas, plays a dominant role in setting aqueous pH and rock-surface speciation. A simple ion-complexing model predicts the calcite-surface charge as a function of composition of reservoir brine. The surface charge of calcite may be positive or negative, depending on speciation of reservoir brine in contact with the calcite. There is no single point of zero charge; all dissolved aqueous species are charge determining. Rock-equilibrated aqueous composition controls the calcite-surface ion-exchange behavior, not the injected-brine composition. At high ionic strength, the electrical double layer collapses and is no longer diffuse. All surface charges are located directly in the inner and outer Helmholtz planes. Our evaluation of

  18. Controlling the Transient Interface Shape and Deposition Profile Left by Desiccation of Colloidal Droplets on Multiple Polymer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter David

    . Implementation of this technique requires that the colloidal droplet be separated from the active electrode by a dielectric layer to prevent electrolysis. A variety of polymer layers have been used in EWOD devices for a variety of applications. In applications that involve desiccation of colloidal suspensions, the material for this layer should be chosen carefully as it can play an important role in the resulting deposition pattern. An experimental method to monitor the transient evolution of the shape of an evaporating colloidal droplet and optically quantify the resultant deposition pattern is presented. Unactuated colloidal suspensions will be desiccated on a variety of substrates commonly used in EWOD applications. Transient image profiles and particle deposition patterns are examined for droplets containing fluorescent micro-particles. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of these results will be used to compare multiple different cases in an effort to provide insight into the effects of polymer selection on the drying dynamics and resultant deposition patterns of desiccated colloidal materials. It was found that the equilibrium and receding contact angles between the surface and the droplet play a key role in the evaporation dynamics and the resulting deposition patterns left by a desiccated colloidal suspension. The equilibrium contact angle controls the initial contact diameter for a droplet of a given volume. As a droplet on a surface evaporates, the evolution of the interface shape and the contact diameter can generally be described by three different regimes. The Constant Contact Radius (CCR) regime occurs when the contact line is pinned while the contact angle decreases. The Constant Contact Angle (CCA) regime occurs when the contact line recedes while the contact angle remains constant. The Mixed regime occurs when the contact radius and angle both reduce over time. The presence of the CCA regime allows the contact line to recede creating a more uniform

  19. Study of silicon-silicon nitride interface properties on planar (1 0 0), planar (1 1 1) and textured surfaces using deep-level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chun; Simoen, Eddy; Posthuma, Niels E; Van Kerschaver, Emmanuel; Poortmans, Jef; Mertens, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors fabricated on planar (1 0 0), planar (1 1 1) orientations and textured n-type silicon wafers. Low frequency direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition Si-SiN x interface properties with and without plasma NH 3 pre-treatment, with and without rapid thermal annealing (RTA) have been investigated. It is shown that three different kinds of defect states are identified at the Si-SiN x interface. For the planar (1 0 0) surface, samples with plasma NH 3 pre-treatment plus RTA show the lowest DLTS signals, which suggests the lowest overall interface states density. For planar (1 1 1) Si surfaces, plasma NH 3 pre-treatment and RTA yield a small improvement. With the textured surface, the RTA step improves the surface passivation quality further but no obvious impact is found with plasma NH 3 pre-treatment. Energy-dependent electron capture cross sections were also measured by small-pulse DLTS. The capture cross sections depend strongly on the energy level and decrease towards the conduction band edge.

  20. Charge-controlled fixation of DNA molecules on silicon surface and electro-physical properties of Au–DNA–Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazlov, N.V., E-mail: nikolay.bazlov@gmail.com [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyvenko, O.F.; Sokolov, P.A.; Kas’yanenko, N.A.; Petrov, Yu V. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Light-induced fixation of DNA molecules on silicon surface was done and electro-physical properties of Schottky diodes with DNA on interfaces were investigated. Thymus DNA molecules were deposited on silicon from a water solution. Fixed molecular structures were observed with helium ionic microscopy and atomic force microscopy and then they were covered with thermal sputtered gold film. Obtained structures Au–DNA–(n-Si) were examined with current–voltage and frequency dependent admittance measurements. In darkness immobilizing of molecules leaded to form DNA ropes with thickness up to 10 nm and distances between them about 1 mkm. Fixation under illumination resulted in forming of single DNA mesh with thickness about 1 nm and cell size about 100 nm. Presence of molecular mesh on interface leaded to increasing of charge density controlled by metal Fermi level and improved diode quality. Presence of molecular ropes resulted in increasing of charge density controlled by semiconductor. From the estimation of interface state density values the origin of the states at the interface between DNA and silicon substrate is suggested to be DNA phosphate groups contacting or being close to the substrate surface.

  1. Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air-water interface: oxidation kinetics, reaction products and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrang, Christian; Sebastiani, Federica; Lucas, Claire O M; King, Martin D; Hoare, Ioan D; Chang, Debby; Campbell, Richard A

    2014-07-14

    Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air-water interface results in surprisingly rapid loss of material through cleavage of the C=C bond and evaporation/dissolution of reaction products. We determine using neutron reflectometry a rate coefficient of (5.7 ± 0.9) × 10(-10) cm(2) molecule(-1) s(-1) and an uptake coefficient of ∼3 × 10(-5) for the oxidation of a methyl ester monolayer: the atmospheric lifetime is ∼10 min. We obtained direct experimental evidence that atmospheric timescales. Therefore known long atmospheric residence times of unsaturated fatty acids suggest that these molecules cannot be present at the interface throughout their ageing cycle, i.e. the reported atmospheric longevity is likely to be attributed to presence in the bulk and viscosity-limited reactive loss. Possible reaction products were characterized by ellipsometry and uncertainties in the atmospheric fate of organic surfactants such as oleic acid and its methyl ester are discussed. Our results suggest that a minor change to the structure of the molecule (fatty acid vs. its methyl ester) considerably impacts on reactivity and fate of the organic film.

  2. AFM Colloidal Probe Measurements Implicate Capillary Condensation in Punch-Particle Surface Interactions during Tableting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal Tejedor, Maria; Nordgren, Niklas; Schuleit, Michael; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna; Rutland, Mark W

    2017-11-21

    Adhesion of the powders to the punches is a common issue during tableting. This phenomenon is known as sticking and affects the quality of the manufactured tablets. Defective tablets increase the cost of the manufacturing process. Thus, the ability to predict the tableting performance of the formulation blend before the process is scaled-up is important. The adhesive propensity of the powder to the tableting tools is mostly governed by the surface-surface adhesive interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is a surface characterization technique that allows the measurement of the adhesive interactions between two materials of interest. In this study, AFM steel colloidal probe measurements were performed on ibuprofen, MCC (microcrystalline cellulose), α-lactose monohydrate, and spray-dried lactose particles as an approach to modeling the punch-particle surface interactions during tableting. The excipients (lactose and MCC) showed constant, small, attractive, and adhesive forces toward the steel surface after a repeated number of contacts. In comparison, ibuprofen displayed a much larger attractive and adhesive interaction increasing over time both in magnitude and in jump-in/jump-out separation distance. The type of interaction acting on the excipient-steel interface can be related to a van der Waals force, which is relatively weak and short-ranged. By contrast, the ibuprofen-steel interaction is described by a capillary force profile. Even though ibuprofen is not highly hydrophilic, the relatively smooth surfaces of the crystals allow "contact flooding" upon contact with the steel probe. Capillary forces increase because of the "harvesting" of moisture-due to the fast condensation kinetics-leaving a residual condensate that contributes to increase the interaction force after each consecutive contact. Local asperity contacts on the more hydrophilic surface of the excipients prevent the flooding of the contact zone, and there is no such adhesive

  3. Graphene assisted effective hole-extraction on In2O3:H/CH3NH3PbI3 interface: Studied by modulated surface spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth Kumar, Sri Hari Bharath; Muydinov, Ruslan; Kol'tsova, Tat‘yana; Erfurt, Darja; Steigert, Alexander; Tolochko, Oleg; Szyszka, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Charge separation in CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) films deposited on a hydrogen doped indium oxide (In2O3:H) photoelectrode was investigated by modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy in a fixed capacitor arrangement. It was found that In2O3:H reproducibly extracts photogenerated-holes from MAPbI3 films. The oxygen-plasma treatment of the In2O3:H surface is suggested to be a reason for this phenomenon. Introducing graphene interlayer increased charge separation nearly 6 times as compared to that on the In2O3:H/MAPbI3 interface. Furthermore, it is confirmed by SPV spectroscopy that the defects of the MAPbI3 interface are passivated by graphene.

  4. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to

  5. Mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of solid surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities under the capillary and electromigration forces in anisotropic three-dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer

    2006-04-14

    A theory of irreversible thermodynamics of curved surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities is elaborated to give a full consideration of the effects of the specific surface Gibbs free energy anisotropy in addition to the diffusional anisotropy, on the morphological evolution of surfaces and interfaces in crystalline solids. To entangle this intricate problem, the internal entropy production associated with arbitrary virtual displacements of triple junction and ordinary points on the interfacial layers, embedded in a multicomponent, multiphase, anisotropic composite continuum system, is formulated by adapting a mesoscopic description of the orientation dependence of the chemical potentials in terms of the rotational degree of freedom of individual microelements. The rate of local internal entropy production resulted generalized forces and conjugated fluxes not only for the grain boundary triple junction transversal and longitudinal movements, but also for the ordinary points. The natural combination of the mesoscopic approach coupled with the rigorous theory of irreversible thermodynamics developed previously by the global entropy production hypothesis yields a well-posed, nonlinear, moving free-boundary value problem in two-dimensional (2D) space, as a unified theory. The results obtained for 2D space are generalized into the three-dimensional continuum by utilizing the invariant properties of the vector operators in connection with the descriptions of curved surfaces in differential geometry. This mathematical model after normalization and scaling procedures may be easily adapted for computer simulation studies without introducing any additional phenomenological system parameters (the generalized mobilities), other than the enlarged concept of the surface stiffness.

  6. Distinct Polymer Architecture Mediates Switching of Complement Activation Pathways at the Nanosphere-Serum Interface: Implications for Stealth Nanoparticle Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, I.; Al-Hanbali, O.; Hunter, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in 'mushroom-brush' and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic Imaging. We...... report on the "structure-activity' relationship pertaining to surface immobilized PEO of various configurations on model nanoparticles, and the initiation of complement cascade, which is the most ancient component of innate human immunity, and its activation may induce clinically significant adverse...... reactions in some individuals Conformational states of surface chains, arising from the block copolymer poloxamine 908 adsorption, on polystyrene nanoparticles trigger complement activation differently. Alteration of copolymer architecture on nanospheres from mushroom to brush configuration not only...

  7. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Facet personality and surface-level diversity as team mental model antecedents: implications for implicit coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David M; Bell, Suzanne T; Dierdorff, Erich C; Belohlav, James A

    2012-07-01

    Team mental models (TMMs) have received much attention as important drivers of effective team processes and performance. Less is known about the factors that give rise to these shared cognitive structures. We examined potential antecedents of TMMs, with a specific focus on team composition variables, including various facets of personality and surface-level diversity. Further, we examined implicit coordination as an important outcome of TMMs. Results suggest that team composition in terms of the cooperation facet of agreeableness and racial diversity were significantly related to team-focused TMM similarity. TMM similarity was also positively predictive of implicit coordination, which mediated the relationship between TMM similarity and team performance. Post hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between the trust facet of agreeableness and racial diversity in predicting TMM similarity. Results are discussed in terms of facilitating the emergence of TMMs and corresponding implications for team-related human resource practices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Nonlinear optics at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of surface nonlinear optics are explored in this thesis. The first part is a theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear intraction of surface plasmons and bulk photons at metal-dielectric interfaces. The second part is a demonstration and study of surface enhanced second harmonic generation at rough metal surfaces. A general formulation for nonlinear interaction of surface plasmons at metal-dielectric interfaces is presented and applied to both second and third order nonlinear processes. Experimental results for coherent second and third harmonic generation by surface plasmons and surface coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are shown to be in good agreement with the theory

  10. Implications on the composition of Titan's mid-latitude surface region from Cassini/VIMS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Drossart, P.; Elachi, C.; Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Hirtzig, M.; Wall, S. D.; Lawrence, K. J.; Altobelli, N.; Bratsolis, E.; Radebaugh, J.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. C.; Le Gall, A. A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Bloom, A. A.; Villanueva, E.; Witasse, O. G.; Matsoukas, C.; Schoenfeld, A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the surface of Titan using spectro-imaging near-infrared data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We apply a radiative transfer code to first determine the contributions of atmospheric haze to the Titan spectrum and then derive the surface albedo (Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2016). We focus here on the geological major units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2016), Malaska et al. (2016) and Radebaugh et al. (2016) from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, including mountains, different types of plains, labyrinths, impact craters, dune fields, and alluvial fans. We find that all regions classified as being the same geomorphological unit in SAR exhibit a coherent spectral response after the VIMS data analysis, thus suggesting a good correlation in the classification between SAR and VIMS. The Huygens landing site appears to be compositionally similar to one type of plains unit (variable plains), suggesting similar plain formation mechanisms. We have sub-categorized the VIMS data into three albedo categories (high, medium, low). By matching the extracted albedos with candidate materials for Titan's surface (GhoSST database), we find that all regions of interest fall into one of three main types of major candidate constituents: water ice, or tholin-like material, or an unknown, very dark material. This suggests that Titan's surface is possibly dominated by tholin-like material and a very dark unknown (most likely organic) material, suggesting that most of the surface is covered by atmospheric/organic deposits. Water-ice is also present at a number of regions as major constituent at latitudes higher than 30ºN and lower than 30ºS. The surface albedo differences and similarities among the various geomorphological units constrain the implications for the geological processes that govern Titan's surface and interior (e.g. aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, cryovolcanic, tectonic). References: Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus

  11. Long-Term Stability of Motor Cortical Activity: Implications for Brain Machine Interfaces and Optimal Feedback Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Robert D; Scheid, Michael R; Wright, Zachary A; Solla, Sara A; Slutzky, Marc W

    2016-03-23

    The human motor system is capable of remarkably precise control of movements--consider the skill of professional baseball pitchers or surgeons. This precise control relies upon stable representations of movements in the brain. Here, we investigated the stability of cortical activity at multiple spatial and temporal scales by recording local field potentials (LFPs) and action potentials (multiunit spikes, MSPs) while two monkeys controlled a cursor either with their hand or directly from the brain using a brain-machine interface. LFPs and some MSPs were remarkably stable over time periods ranging from 3 d to over 3 years; overall, LFPs were significantly more stable than spikes. We then assessed whether the stability of all neural activity, or just a subset of activity, was necessary to achieve stable behavior. We showed that projections of neural activity into the subspace relevant to the task (the "task-relevant space") were significantly more stable than were projections into the task-irrelevant (or "task-null") space. This provides cortical evidence in support of the minimum intervention principle, which proposes that optimal feedback control (OFC) allows the brain to tightly control only activity in the task-relevant space while allowing activity in the task-irrelevant space to vary substantially from trial to trial. We found that the brain appears capable of maintaining stable movement representations for extremely long periods of time, particularly so for neural activity in the task-relevant space, which agrees with OFC predictions. It is unknown whether cortical signals are stable for more than a few weeks. Here, we demonstrate that motor cortical signals can exhibit high stability over several years. This result is particularly important to brain-machine interfaces because it could enable stable performance with infrequent recalibration. Although we can maintain movement accuracy over time, movement components that are unrelated to the goals of a task (such

  12. Distinct polymer architecture mediates switching of complement activation pathways at the nanosphere-serum interface: implications for stealth nanoparticle engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Islam; Al-Hanbali, Othman; Hunter, A Christy; Rutt, Kenneth J; Andresen, Thomas L; Moghimi, S Moein

    2010-11-23

    Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in "mushroom-brush" and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site-specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic imaging. We report on the "structure-activity" relationship pertaining to surface-immobilized PEO of various configurations on model nanoparticles, and the initiation of complement cascade, which is the most ancient component of innate human immunity, and its activation may induce clinically significant adverse reactions in some individuals. Conformational states of surface-projected PEO chains, arising from the block copolymer poloxamine 908 adsorption, on polystyrene nanoparticles trigger complement activation differently. Alteration of copolymer architecture on nanospheres from mushroom to brush configuration not only switches complement activation from C1q-dependent classical to lectin pathway but also reduces the level of generated complement activation products C4d, Bb, C5a, and SC5b-9. Also, changes in adsorbed polymer configuration trigger alternative pathway activation differently and through different initiators. Notably, the role for properdin-mediated activation of alternative pathway was only restricted to particles displaying PEO chains in a transition mushroom-brush configuration. Since nanoparticle-mediated complement activation is of clinical concern, our findings provide a rational basis for improved surface engineering and design of immunologically safer stealth and targetable nanosystems with polymers for use in clinical medicine.

  13. A study of the effect of surface pretreatment on atomic layer deposited Al2O3 interface with GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianyi; Li, Wenwen; Mandal, Saptarshi; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2017-08-01

    Al2O3 has been an attractive gate dielectric for GaN power devices owing to its large conduction band offset with GaN ( 2.13eV), relatively high dielectric constant ( 9.0) and high breakdown electric field ( 10 MV/cm). Due to exceptional control over film uniformity and deposition rate, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely used for Al2O3 deposition. The major obstacle to ALD Al2O3 on GaN is its high interface-state density (Dit) caused by incomplete chemical bonds, native oxide layer and impurities at the Al2O3/GaN interface. Therefore, an appropriate surface pretreatment prior to deposition is essential for obtaining high-quality interface. In this study, we investigated the effect of TMA, H2O and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment on Dit and border traps (Nbt). 5 cycles of TMA purge, 5 cycles of H2O purge and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment were conducted on GaN prior to deposition of ALD Al2O3. Al2O3/GaN metaloxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated for the characterization of Dit and Nbt using UV-assisted capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique. The results show that TMA and H2O pretreatment had trivial effects on interface engineering whereas Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment slightly reduced Dit and significantly reduced Nbt.

  14. Studies on micro-structures at vapor-liquid interfaces of film boiling on hot liquid surface at arriving of a shock pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, S. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    In vapor explosions, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role in the generation, propagation and escalation of the explosion. Transient volume change by rapid heat flow from a high temperature liquid to a low temperature volatile one and phase change generate micro-scale flow and the pressure wave. One of key issues for the vapor explosion is to make clear the mechanism to support the explosive energy release from hot drop to cold liquid. According to our observations by an Image Converter Camera, growth rate of vapor film around a hot tin drop became several times higher than that around a hot Platinum tube at the same conditions when a pressure pulse collapsed the film. The thermally induced fragmentation was followed by the explosive growth rate of the hot drop. In the previous report, we have proposed that the interface instability and fragmentation model in which the fine Taylor instability of vapor-liquid interface at the collapsing and re-growth phase of vapor film and the instability induced by the high pressure spots at the drop surface were assumed. In this study, the behavior of the vapor-liquid interface region at arrival of a pressure pulse was investigated by the CIPRIS code which is able to simulate dynamics of transient multi-phase interface regions. It is compared with the observation results. Through detailed investigations of these results, the mechanisms of the thermal fragmentation of single drop are discussed. (J.P.N.)

  15. Implications of the dependence of neuronal activity on neural network states for the design of brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ePanzeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brains. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  16. The Interplay of Host Microbiota and Parasitic Protozoans at Mucosal Interfaces: Implications for the Outcomes of Infections and Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Katrein Bär

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections by parasitic protozoans are largely neglected, despite threatening millions of people, particularly in developing countries. With descriptions of the microbiota in humans, a new frontier of investigation is developing to decipher the complexity of host-parasite-microbiota relationships, instead of the classic reductionist approach, which considers host-parasite in isolation. Here, we review with specific examples the potential roles that the resident microbiota can play at mucosal interfaces in the transmission of parasitic protozoans and in the progress of infection and disease. Although the mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood, some examples provide compelling evidence that specific components of the microbiota can potentially alter the outcomes of parasitic infections and diseases in humans. Most findings suggest a protective role of the microbiota, which might lead to exploratory research comprising microbiota-based interventions to prevent and treat protozoal infections in the future. However, these infections are often accompanied by an unbalanced microbiota and, in some specific cases, apparently, these bacteria may contribute synergistically to disease progression. Taken together, these findings provide a different perspective on the ecological nature of protozoal infections. This review focuses attention on the importance of considering polymicrobial associations, i.e., parasitic protozoans and the host microbiota, for understanding these human infections in their natural microbial context.

  17. Preparation and investigation of burried metal/molecule contact interfaces with surface sensitive methods; Praeparation und Untersuchung verborgener Metall/Molekuel-Kontaktgrenzflaechen mit oberflaechensensitiven Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrdoljak, Pavo

    2011-05-13

    The present thesis establishes an optimised concept of a delamination technique suitable for ultra high vacuum (UHV) with which model systems of buried interfaces were made accessible for surface sensitive methods which were applied to investigate their electronic and topographical properties. A primary focus of this work is on the question how buried interfaces could be accessed successfully for surface sensitive methods using buried metal/NTCDA and metal/PTCDA interfaces as model systems. Contacts of approximately 10 x 15 mm{sup 2} in size were accessed. The second focus of the thesis is on the investigation of the electronical and topographical properties of the buried interfaces, for which some similarities between delaminated metal (Au,Ag)/ PTCDA- and Ag/NTCDA interfaces were found: After the delamination of top-contacts there were inhomogeneous layers of molecules on the metal contacts. Whereas PTCDA covered metal contacts had thicker molecular layers (4-5 ML PTCDA on Ag), NTCDA covered contacts showed only one monolayer coverage over large areas of at least 2 mm in diameter. Regions with multilayer coverage showed smooth surfaces whereas metal surfaces showed a fissured, meander-like and rough surface. Both contact systems also had in common that the adhesive made PES investigations of valence states very difficult. Furthermore, it was possible to thin out the molecular layers thermally but afterwards no valence states could be measured. Investigating in-situ delaminated buried interfaces, the focus was on metal (Au,Ag)/PTCDA interfaces first. The molecular layers could be successfully desorbed thermally at 260 C to 1-3 monolayers so that valence states were investigated. The spectra of the in-situ delaminated and thermally desorbed Ag/PTCDA contact were noticeably broadened so that the positions of HOMO and FLUMO could only be estimated at 1.9 eV and 0.7 eV, respectively. Additionally, interfaces of Ag/NTCDA contacts were investigated. With UPS it was found

  18. The surface diffusion coefficient for an arbitrarily curved fluidfluid interface.(II). Coefficient for plane-parallel diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we developed an expression for the coefficient for plane-parallel diffusion for an arbitrarily curved fluid–fluid interface. The expression is valid for ordinary diffusion in binary mixtures, with isotropic bulk phases and an interfacial region that is isotropic in the plane parallel

  19. Partial hydration of n-alkyl halides at the water-vapor interface: a molecular simulation study with atmospheric implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Habartová, Alena; Obisesan, A.; Minofar, Babak; Roeselová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 3 (2014), 1455/1-1455/15 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/10/1724; GA MŠk ME09064 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08651S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : haloalkanes * adsorption * interfacial solvation * halogenated organics * interfacial partitioning * surface orientation * heterogeneous chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2014

  20. Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se₂/CdS) solar cell interfaces and implications for improving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2014-09-07

    The laboratory performance of CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2) based solar cells (20.8% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic devices. However, there remains little understanding of how defects at the CIGS/CdS interface affect the band offsets and interfacial energies, and hence the performance of manufactured devices. To determine these relationships, we use density functional theory with the B3PW91 hybrid functional that we validate to provide very accurate descriptions of the band gaps and band offsets. This confirms the weak dependence of band offsets on surface orientation observed experimentally. We predict that the conduction band offset (CBO) of perfect CuInSe2/CdS interface is large, 0.79 eV, which would dramatically degrade performance. Moreover we show that band gap widening induced by Ga adjusts only the valence band offset, and we find that Cd impurities do not significantly affect the CBO. Thus we show that Cu vacancies at the interface play the key role in enabling the tunability of CBO. We predict that Na further improves the CBO through electrostatically elevating the valence levels to decrease the CBO, explaining the observed essential role of Na for high performance. Moreover we find that K leads to a dramatic decrease in the CBO to 0.05 eV, much better than Na. We suggest that the efficiency of CIGS devices might be improved substantially by tuning the ratio of Na to K, with the improved phase stability of Na balancing phase instability from K. All these defects reduce interfacial stability slightly, but not significantly.

  1. Adsorption and magnetism of bilayer graphene on the MnO polar surface with oxygen vacancies in the interface: First principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyasov, Victor V.; Ershov, Igor V.; Popova, Inna G.; Pham, Khang D.; Nguyen, Chuong V.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate systematically the structural, electronic, magnetic and adsorption properties of Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene on MnO(111) surface terminated by an oxygen atom, as a function of nonstoichiometric composition of the BLG/MnOx(111) interface. For additional functionalization of the BLG/MnOx(111) system, we also studied the adsorption properties of oxygen adsorbed on the BLG/MnOx(111) interface. Our results showed that the BLG is bound to the MnOx(111) substrate by the weak interaction for both spin-up and spin-down. Furthermore, we found that BLG adsorbed on the MnOx(111) substrate with a reduced oxygen symmetry in the interface is accompanied with a downshift of the Fermi level, which identifies the band structure of BLG as a p-type semiconductor. Upon interaction between BLG and MnOx(111) substrate, a forbidden gap of about 350 meV was opened between its bonding and antibonding π bands. A forbidden gap and the local magnetic moments in bilayer graphene can be controlled by changing the oxygen nonstoichometry or by oxygen adsorption. Additionally, magnetism has been predicted in the bilayer graphene adsorbed on the polar MnOx(111) surface with oxygen vacancies in the BLG/MnOx(111) interface, and its nature has also been discussed in this work. These results showed that the adsorption of bilayer graphene on the MnO(111) substrate can be used for developing novel generation of electronic and spintronic devices.

  2. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  3. Surface and interface properties of polar gallium nitride layers; Oberflaechen- und Grenzflaecheneigenschaften von polaren Galliumnitrid-Schichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Pierre

    2010-07-09

    The material properties of group III-nitrides allows manifold applications. Especially for the GaN-based gas and biosensor technology, an understanding of the GaN surfaces and their interaction with molecules is crucial for the successful development of sensor systems. Especially the influence of crystal orientation, surface termination and reconstruction on the interaction was analysed. To study the interaction of the GaN surface with molecules the reproducible and controllable preparation of GaN surfaces is necessary. Polar GaN layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The surface reconstruction and termination could be selectively adjusted by the growth parameters or further preparation steps. On the Ga-polar surface, gallium-induced and nitrogen-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed as well as non-reconstructed surface modifications could be generated and on the N-polar surface non-reconstructed. The different surface modifications differ considerably in the formation of surface states. The Ga-induced and N-induced 2 x 2 reconstructed surfaces presented two surface states (SS) at 1.4 eV and 3 eV as well as 2 eV and 3 eV, respectively. The non-reconstructed GaN(0001) presented three SS (1.5 eV, 2.5 eV and 3.4 eV) and the GaN(000-1) one SS (2.5 eV). The theoretical predicted surfaces sates (density functional theory) shows a good agreement with the measurements. The analysis revealed a dependence of the interaction of GaN surfaces with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the orientation, reconstruction, and surface termination of the films. The GaN(000-1) surface is much more reactive to oxygen and water than the (0001) orientated surfaces, while GaN is in general significantly more sensitive to water than to oxygen. The chemical bond configuration of the adsorbed species shows a significant dependence on surface termination. The measurements presented that the formation of nitrogen oxide and/or gallium oxide bonds depends on the surface modification. Furthermore the interaction

  4. Study of solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces in Cu–isoleucine complex by surface X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, Pilar, E-mail: ferreres@esrf.fr [SpLine Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, 38000 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R. [SpLine Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, 38000 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The enzymes could be understood like structures formed by amino acids bonded with metals, which act as active sites. The research on the coordination of metal–amino acid complexes will bring light on the behavior of metal enzymes, due to the close relation existing between the atomic structure and the functionality. The Cu–isoleucine bond is considered as a good model system to attain a better insight into the characteristics of naturally occurring copper metalloproteins. The surface structure of metal–amino acid complex could be considered as a more realistic model for real systems under biologic working conditions, since the molecular packing is decreased. In the surface, the structural constrains are reduced, keeping the structural capability of surface complex to change as a function of the surrounding environment. In this work, we present a surface X-ray diffraction study on Cu–isoleucine complex under different ambient conditions. Cu(Ile){sub 2} crystals of about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm have been growth, by seeding method in a supersaturated solution, presenting a surface of high quality. The sample for the surface diffraction study was mounted on a cell specially designed for solid/liquid or solid/gas interface analysis. The Cu–isoleucine crystal was measured under a protective dry N{sub 2} gas flow and in contact with a saturated metal amino acid solution. The bulk and the surface signals were compared, showing different atomic structures. In both cases, from surface diffraction data, it is observed that the atomic structure of the top layer undergoes a clear structural deformation. A non-uniform surface relaxation is observed producing an inhomogeneous displacement of the surface atoms towards the surface normal.

  5. Using neutron reflectometry and reflection geometry 'near-surface' SANS to investigate surfactant micelle organization at a solid-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.A.; Porcar, L.; Magid, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used simultaneous neutron reflectometry (NR) and reflection geometry 'near-surface' small angle neutron scattering (NS-SANS) to investigate the ordering of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles in aqueous (D2O) solution in the proximity of a quartz surface as a function of concentration and temperature. The NR measurements allow us to determine coherent micellar organization within a few thousand angstroms of the interface while NS-SANS allows simultaneous monitoring of 'bulk' states to the greater depth of grazing incidence penetration into the solution, typically 10-100μm. We illustrate the utility of this monitoring using the example of an apparent Poiseuille surface shear-induced change in micellar organization which is more probably the result of slight temperature increase

  6. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Evaluation of the Interface between a Nanostructured Calcium-Incorporated Dental Implant Surface and the Human Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco; Raspanti, Mario; Maghaireh, Hassan; Mangano, Carlo

    2017-12-17

    Purpose . The aim of this scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was to investigate the interface between the bone and a novel nanostructured calcium-incorporated dental implant surface in humans. Methods . A dental implant (Anyridge ® , Megagen Implant Co., Gyeongbuk, South Korea) with a nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Xpeed ® , Megagen Implant Co., Gyeongbuk, South Korea), which had been placed a month earlier in a fully healed site of the posterior maxilla (#14) of a 48-year-old female patient, and which had been subjected to immediate functional loading, was removed after a traumatic injury. Despite the violent trauma that caused mobilization of the fixture, its surface appeared to be covered by a firmly attached, intact tissue; therefore, it was subjected to SEM examination. The implant surface of an unused nanostructured calcium-incorporated implant was also observed under SEM, as control. Results . The surface of the unused implant showed a highly-structured texture, carved by irregular, multi-scale hollows reminiscent of a fractal structure. It appeared perfectly clean and devoid of any contamination. The human specimen showed trabecular bone firmly anchored to the implant surface, bridging the screw threads and filling the spaces among them. Conclusions . Within the limits of this human histological report, the sample analyzed showed that the nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface was covered by new bone, one month after placement in the posterior maxilla, under an immediate functional loading protocol.

  8. Nano-Scale Interface Modification of the Co/Cu System: Metallic Surface Modifiers in the Growth of Smooth Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolny-Marszalek, M.

    2007-10-01

    This review is a collection of twelve original papers concerning growth and interface modification in the Co/Cu system. Most of this research has been carried out in the Laboratory of Surface and Thin Film Physics at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The Laboratory was created by the author of this review in 1996 in strong collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics Wilhelms-Universitaet in Muenster, Germany and the Institute of Applied Physics Ukrainian Academy of Science in Sumy, Ukraine. The big international team worked under the leadership of Dr Marta Marszalek, initially developing a multicomponent ultrahigh vacuum setup for thin film preparation and analysis, and next accompanying her in studies of the structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of Co/Cu multilayers. Systems that exhibit giant magnetoresistance effect have been receiving intensive attentions over recent years since they are possible candidates for applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this research is the growth of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers modified by using metallic surface modifiers called surfactants. The different approaches have been used. Surfactant metals were introduced once into growth process as a buffer layer or they were deposited sequentially at each interface of Co/Cu multilayers. The growth was performed by molecular beam epitaxy technique which allows to tailor carefully deposition conditions. The results showed that two approaches gave different results. Surfactant buffer layers resulted in loss of layered character of multilayers being a kind of an intermediate cluster-like phase combined with a layered area. Small amount of surfactants introduced at each interface lead to well-ordered structures with small roughness and smoother interfaces than in the case of pure Co/Cu multilayers. Despite of the differences, in both cases the improvement of magnetoresistance value was observed. The atomic scale study

  9. Modifying Surface Energy of Graphene via Plasma-Based Chemical Functionalization to Tune Thermal and Electrical Transport at Metal Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Brian M; Hernández, Sandra C; Duda, John C; Robinson, Jeremy T; Walton, Scott G; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2015-08-12

    The high mobility exhibited by both supported and suspended graphene, as well as its large in-plane thermal conductivity, has generated much excitement across a variety of applications. As exciting as these properties are, one of the principal issues inhibiting the development of graphene technologies pertains to difficulties in engineering high-quality metal contacts on graphene. As device dimensions decrease, the thermal and electrical resistance at the metal/graphene interface plays a dominant role in degrading overall performance. Here we demonstrate the use of a low energy, electron-beam plasma to functionalize graphene with oxygen, fluorine, and nitrogen groups, as a method to tune the thermal and electrical transport properties across gold-single layer graphene (Au/SLG) interfaces. We find that while oxygen and nitrogen groups improve the thermal boundary conductance (hK) at the interface, their presence impairs electrical transport leading to increased contact resistance (ρC). Conversely, functionalization with fluorine has no impact on hK, yet ρC decreases with increasing coverage densities. These findings indicate exciting possibilities using plasma-based chemical functionalization to tailor the thermal and electrical transport properties of metal/2D material contacts.

  10. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  11. A novel test method for evaluation of the abrasive wear behaviour of total hip stems at the interface between implant surface and bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Holzwarth, U; Schmitt, M; Mittelmeier, W

    2004-01-01

    After total hip replacement, some cemented titanium stems show above-average early loosening rates. Increased release of wear particles and resulting reaction of the peri-prosthetic tissue were considered responsible. The objective was to develop a test method for analysing the abrasive wear behaviour of cemented stems and for generating wear particles at the interface with the bone cement. By means of the novel test device, cemented hip stems with different designs, surface topographies and material compositions using various bone cements could be investigated. Before testing, the cemented stems were disconnected from the cement mantle to simulate the situation of stem loosening (debonding). Subsequently, constant radial contact pressures were applied on to the stem surface by a force-controlled hydraulic cylinder. Oscillating micromotions of the stem (+/- 250 microm; 3 x 10(6)cycles; 5 Hz) were carried out at the cement interface initiating the wear process. The usability of the method was demonstrated by testing geometrically identical Ti-6A1-7Nb and Co-28Cr-6Mo hip stems (n= 12) with definite rough and smooth surfaces, combined with commercially available bone cement containing zirconium oxide particles. Under identical frictional conditions with the rough shot-blasted stems, clearly more wear particles were generated than with the smooth stems, whereas the material composition of the hip stems had less impact on the wear behaviour.

  12. Ion association at discretely-charged dielectric interfaces: Giant charge inversion [Dielectric response controlled ion association at physically heterogeneous surfaces: Giant charge reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi -Yong [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China); Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Wu, Jianzhong [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Giant charge reversal has been identified for the first time by Monte Carlo simulation for a discretely charged surface in contact with a trivalent electrolyte solution. It takes place regardless of the surface charge density under study and the monovalent salt. In stark contrast to earlier predictions based on the 2-dimensional Wigner crystal model to describe strong correlation of counterions at the macroion surface, we find that giant charge reversal reflects an intricate interplay of ionic volume effects, electrostatic correlations, surface charge heterogeneity, and the dielectric response of the confined fluids. While the novel phenomenon is yet to be confirmed with experiment, the simulation results appear in excellent agreement with a wide range of existing observations in the subregime of charge inversion. Lastly, our findings may have far-reaching implications to understanding complex electrochemical phenomena entailing ionic fluids under dielectric confinements.

  13. Competitive adsorption from mixed hen egg-white lysozyme/surfactant solutions at the air-water interface studied by tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface dilational rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahverdjieva, V S; Grigoriev, D O; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R; Möhwald, H

    2008-02-21

    The competitive adsorption at the air-water interface from mixed adsorption layers of hen egg-white lysozyme with a non-ionic surfactant (C10DMPO) was studied and compared to the mixture with an ionic surfactant (SDS) using bubble and drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface dilational rheology. The set of equilibrium and kinetic data of the mixed solutions is described by a thermodynamic model developed recently. The theoretical description of the mixed system is based on the model parameters for the individual components.

  14. Brownian diffusion of a particle at an air/liquid interface: the elastic (not viscous) response of the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Rodriguez-Lopez, Gieberth; Paredes-Altuve, Oscar

    2017-03-29

    Here, the effect of the elastic response of the surface on the translational diffusion coefficient of a partly submerged-in-water spherical Brownian particle is considered. The elastic nature of the surface, mediated by the surface tension, generates an additional dissipative mechanism. Therefore, the collisions at the surface contribute to the diffusion as the source of the driving force and the dissipation results from the combined action of both elastic reaction of the surface and viscous dissipation. However, it can be estimated that the surface elastic mechanism is several orders of magnitude greater than the viscous one. This simple yet physically plausible approach leads us to assume that the diffusion on the surface is proportional to a power of the number of collisions and, consequently, the dissipative mechanisms are proportional to an inverse power of it. The lowering in dimensionality from 3 (bulk) to 2 (surface) also contributes to the decrease of diffusion. This model allows the reproduction of the reported experimental values of the surface/bulk dissipative force ratio. Additionally, we also compared the traditional viscous approach with other theoretical hydrodynamic treatments of the problem, which drastically failed to explain the experiments.

  15. Influence of cell surface appendages on the bacterium-substratum interface measured real-time using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Adam L J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2009-02-03

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) utilizes an oscillating quartz crystal to register adsorption of rigid masses through a decrease in its resonance frequency f. In addition, QCM-D has the ability to measure the dissipative nature of nonrigid masses adhering to the crystal surface in the form of oscillation amplitude decay time. Although QCM has been applied to register bacterial adhesion to the crystal surface, full interpretation of the frequency change and dissipation signal has hitherto been impossible due to the complex interactions within the distance of 250 nm between the substratum and the bacterial cell surface. Here, we study adhesion of a series of Streptococcus salivarius mutants, possessing various surface appendages of known lengths, as a function of time using QCM-D. In addition, the number of bacteria adhering to the crystal surface was determined. The results show that adhesion of a "bald" bacterium, completely devoid of surface appendages, is registered as a frequency decrease. Adhesion of bacteria possessing surface appendages yields either a much smaller decrease or an increase in frequency, despite the fact they adhere in higher numbers. Furthermore, the magnitude of frequency and dissipation shifts was found to be influenced by the distance at which the cell body was held from the sensor surface by its surface appendages.

  16. Fluid Pressures at the Shoe-Floor-Contaminant Interface During Slips: Effects of Tread & Implications on Slip Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschorner, Kurt E.; Albert, Devon L.; Chambers, April J.; Redfern, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Previous research on slip and fall accidents has suggested that pressurized fluid between the shoe and floor is responsible for initiating slips yet this effect has not been verified experimentally. This study aimed to 1) measure hydrodynamic pressures during slipping for treaded and untreaded conditions; 2) determine the effects of fluid pressure on slip severity; and 3) quantify how fluid pressures vary with instantaneous resultant slipping speed, position on the shoe surface, and throughout the progression of the slip. Eighteen subjects walked on known dry and unexpected slippery floors, while wearing treaded and untreaded shoes. Fluid pressure sensors, embedded in the floor, recorded hydrodynamic pressures during slipping. The maximum fluid pressures (mean+/−standard deviation) were significantly higher for the untreaded conditions (124 +/−75 kPa) than the treaded conditions (1.1 +/−0.29 kPa). Maximum fluid pressures were positively correlated with peak slipping speed (r = 0.87), suggesting that higher fluid pressures, which are associated with untreaded conditions, resulted in more severe slips. Instantaneous resultant slipping speed and position of sensor relative to the shoe sole and walking direction explained 41% of the fluid pressure variability. Fluid pressures were primarily observed for untreaded conditions. This study confirms that fluid pressures are relevant to slipping events, consistent with fluid dynamics theory (i.e. the Reynolds equation), and can be modified with shoe tread design. The results suggest that the occurrence and severity of unexpected slips can be reduced by designing shoes/floors that reduce underfoot fluid pressures. PMID:24267270

  17. Simulation of surface dynamics during dissolution as a function of the surface orientation: Implications for non-constant dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Evans, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important problem in geochemistry is the understanding of how changes occurring on a surface during dissolution affect the variability of measured dissolution rates. In this study a new approach to study the effect of surface dynamics on dissolution rates is tested by coupling experimental data with a numerical model that simulates the retreat of surface profiles during dissolution. We present specific results from the simulation of dissolution of fluorite surfaces. The equations that determine the retreat of a surface are based on experimentally obtained equations that relate the retreat rate of a surface to a single variable, the crystallographic orientation of the surface. Our results show that depending on the starting orientation, different types of topography are developed, similar to those observed experimentally. During the initial dissolution phase, changes of topography are rapid and associated with fast dissolution rates. The progressively slower dissolution rates are coupled with the development of surface segments with orientations that dissolve at a slower rate. Consequently, the overall retreat rate of a profile decreases during the simulation, and tends to a near-constant value. The results show a close relationship between dissolution rates, surface orientation and surface dynamics, which suggests that the dissolution rate of a specific mineral phase is not constant but varies with dissolution time and surface structure. This variability needs to be considered in the evaluation of experimentally derived dissolution rates, future dissolution experiments, and predictive kinetic models of dissolution.

  18. Mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups of titanium oxide and its interface with an aqueous solution: the state of the art and a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, George D; Petsi, Theano; Bourikas, Kyriakos; Garoufalis, Christos S; Tsevis, Athanassios; Spanos, Nikos; Kordulis, Christos; Lycourghiotis, Alexis

    2008-10-01

    In this article the "titanium oxide/electrolyte solution" interface is studied by taking in advantage the recent developments in the field of Surface and Interface Chemistry relevant to this oxide. Ab-initio calculations were performed in the frame of the DFT theory for estimating the charge of the titanium and oxygen atoms exposed on the anatase (1 0 1), (1 0 0), (0 0 1), (1 0 3)(f) and rutile (1 1 0) crystal faces. These orientations have smaller surface energy with respect to other ones and thus it is more probable to be the real terminations of the anatase and rutile nanocrystallites in the titania polycrystalline powders. Potentiometric titrations for obtaining "fine structured" titration curves as well as microelectrophoresis and streaming potential measurements have been performed. On the basis of ab-initio calculations, and taking into account the relative contribution of each crystal face to the whole surface of the nanocrystals involved in the titania aggregates of a suspension, the three most probable surface ionization models have been derived. These models and the Music model are then tested in conjunction with the "Stern-Gouy-Chapman" and "Basic Stern" electrostatic models. The finally selected surface ionization model (model A) in combination with each one of the two electrostatic models describes very well the protonation/deprotonation behavior of titania. The description is also very good if this model is combined with the Three Plane (TP) model. The application of the "A/(TP)" model allowed mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups [TiO(H) and Ti(2)O(H)] of titania exposed in aqueous solutions. At pH>pzc almost all terminal oxygens [TiO] are non-protonated whereas even at low pH values the non-protonated terminal oxygens predominate. The acid-base behavior of the bridging oxygens [Ti(2)O] is different. Thus, even at pH=10 the greater portion of them is protonated. The application of the "A/TP" model in conjunction with potentiometric titrations

  19. Gate-controlled diodes for characterization of the Si-SiO sub 2 interface with respect to surface effects of silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, C; Lichau, C; Wuebben, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R

    2000-01-01

    In future high-energy physics experiments silicon detectors with a high spatial resolution will be used for tracking close to the interaction point. Besides crystal damage, the surface damage caused by ionizing irradiation is very important for the long-term performance of these devices. Therefore, systematic characterization of surface effects is necessary. For these investigations we designed a test field consistent of MOS structures and gate-controlled diodes to be produced with different vendors. A new gate-controlled diode with different current and capacitance measurement options will be introduced and first results of parameters evaluated on the unirradiated device as well as after irradiation with low energetic electrons, neutrons and charged hadrons will be presented. The gate-controlled diode with new features has been shown to be a powerful tool to investigate the oxide and interface quality before and after irradiation.

  20. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  1. Effect of architecture on the formation of surface multilayer structures at the air-solution interface from mixtures of surfactant with small poly(ethyleneimine)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halacheva, Silvia S; Penfold, Jeff; Thomas, Robert K; Webster, John R P

    2012-04-17

    The impact of ethyleneimine architecture on the adsorption behavior of mixtures of small poly(ethyleneimines) and oligoethyleneimines (OEIs) with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) at the air-solution interface has been studied by surface tension (ST) and neutron reflectivity (NR). The strong surface interaction between OEI and SDS gives rise to complex surface tension behavior that has a pronounced pH dependence. The NR data provide more direct access to the surface structure and show that the patterns of ST behavior are correlated with substantial OEI/SDS adsorption and the spontaneous formation of surface multilayer structures. The regions of surface multilayer formation depend upon SDS and OEI concentrations, on the solution pH, and on the OEI architecture, linear or branched. For the linear OEIs (octaethyleneimine, linear poly(ethyleneimine) or LPEI(8), and decaethyleneimine, LPEI(10)) with SDS, surface multilayer formation occurs over a range of OEI and SDS concentrations at pH 7 and to a much lesser extent at pH 10, whereas at pH 3 only monolayer adsorption occurs. In contrast, for branched OEIs BPEI(8) and BPEI(10) surface multilayer formation occurs over a wide range of OEI and SDS concentrations at pH 3 and 7, and at pH 10, the adsorption is mainly in the form of a monolayer. The results provide important insight into how the OEI architecture and pH can be used to control and manipulate the nature of the OEI/surfactant adsorption. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  2. Soft Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, Ireneusz

    1997-01-01

    This book presents an extended form of the 1994 Dirac Memorial Lecture delivered by Pierre Gilles de Gennes at Cambridge University. The main task of the presentation is to show the beauty and richness of structural forms and phenomena which are observed at soft interfaces between two media. They are much more complex than forms and phenomena existing in each phase separately. Problems are discussed including both traditional, classical techniques, such as the contact angle in static and dynamic partial wetting, as well as the latest research methodology, like 'environmental' scanning electron microscopes. The book is not a systematic lecture on phenomena but it can be considered as a compact set of essays on topics which particularly fascinate the author. The continuum theory widely used in the book is based on a deep molecular approach. The author is particularly interested in a broad-minded rheology of liquid systems at interfaces with specific emphasis on polymer melts. To study this, the author has developed a special methodology called anemometry near walls. The second main topic presented in the book is the problem of adhesion. Molecular processes, energy transformations and electrostatic interaction are included in an interesting discussion of the many aspects of the principles of adhesion. The third topic concerns welding between two polymer surfaces, such as A/A and A/B interfaces. Of great worth is the presentation of various unsolved, open problems. The kind of topics and brevity of description indicate that this book is intended for a well prepared reader. However, for any reader it will present an interesting picture of how many mysterious processes are acting in the surrounding world and how these phenomena are perceived by a Nobel Laureate, who won that prize mainly for his investigations in this field. (book review)

  3. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  4. Biological Activity of Mesoporous Dendrimer-Coated Titanium Dioxide: Insight on the Role of the Surface-Interface Composition and the Framework Crystallinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Rybczyńska, Aneta; Mosiolek, Joanna; Durdyn, Joanna; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Katir, Nadia; Brahmi, Younes; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bousmina, Mosto; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2015-09-16

    Hitherto, the field of nanomedicine has been overwhelmingly dominated by the use of mesoporous organosilicas compared to their metal oxide congeners. Despite their remarkable reactivity, titanium oxide-based materials have been seldom evaluated and little knowledge has been gained with respect to their "structure-biological activity" relationship. Herein, a fruitful association of phosphorus dendrimers (both "ammonium-terminated" and "phosphonate-terminated") and titanium dioxide has been performed by means of the sol-gel process, resulting in mesoporous dendrimer-coated nanosized crystalline titanium dioxide. A similar organo-coating has been reproduced using single branch-mimicking dendrimers that allow isolation of an amorphous titanium dioxide. The impact of these materials on red blood cells was evaluated by studying cell hemolysis. Next, their cytotoxicity toward B14 Chinese fibroblasts and their antimicrobial activity were also investigated. Based on their variants (cationic versus anionic terminal groups and amorphous versus crystalline titanium dioxide phase), better understanding of the role of the surface-interface composition and the nature of the framework has been gained. No noticeable discrimination was observed for amorphous and crystalline material. In contrast, hemolysis and cytotoxicity were found to be sensitive to the nature of the interface composition, with the ammonium-terminated dendrimer-coated titanium dioxide being the most hemolytic and cytotoxic material. This surface-functionalization opens the door for creating a new synergistic machineries mechanism at the cellular level and seems promising for tailoring the biological activity of nanosized organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  5. Energy spectroscopy studies of radiation-induced damaged surfaces and interfaces in SiO 2/Si by light charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongquan, Ma; Qi, Guo; Tao, Jin

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, the three different experimental techniques of AES (Auger electron spectroscopy), ARXPS (angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) with C- V measurements have been applied to study damaged surfaces and interfaces of SiO 2Si in MOS. The defects, appearing at the surface of the dielectric layer and the interface between SiO 2 and Si, induced by energetic electron and/or hydrogen ion (H +) beams, were independently investigated using ARXPS and AES combined with DLTS, respectively. The more intermediate oxidation states, such as Si 1+, Si 2+ and Si 3+, corresponding to Si 2O, SiO and Si 2O 3 clusters formed at the surface and the transition regions, were obtained for the irradiated sample. The changes of the intensity, full width at half maximum (fwhm) and binding energy of each ARXPS spectrum with take-off angle showed that silicon-rich clusters or chains, and about 4.8 Å of an amorphous silicon, actually existed in the outermost surface as a result of preferential sputtering of oxygen by electron ionization and displacement by H +. The Si 2p core-level spectra were analyzed in terms of five chemically shifted components corresponding to the basic Si binding units SiO n with n = 0, 1, ⋯, 4. The concentration of these bonding units as a function of effective depth of emission was essentially in agreement with the random-bonding model. But some separation into a silicon-rich phase was also evident at intermediate stoichiometries and stacks. In addition, more dangling bonds of Si were present overall in the oxide layer, which acted with an amphoteric character and caused the defect states to lie in the lower half of the bandgap.

  6. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  7. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...... because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... number of geochemical processes, allows the simulation of soil geochemical transformations when microbial by-products are released to surface water, and the consideration of non-linear feedbacks on bacterial growth and pollutant transformations. Sensitivity analysis is performed through Monte Carlo...

  8. Vibrational Analysis of Brucite Surfaces and the Development of an Improved Force Field for Molecular Simulation of Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Todd R; Greathouse, Jeffery A; Gale, Julian D; Cygan, Randall T

    2014-04-17

    We introduce a nonbonded three-body harmonic potential energy term for Mg-O-H interactions for improved edge surface stability in molecular simulations. The new potential term is compatible with the Clayff force field and is applied here to brucite, a layered magnesium hydroxide mineral. Comparisons of normal mode frequencies from classical and density functional theory calculations are used to verify a suitable spring constant ( k parameter) for the Mg-O-H bending motion. Vibrational analysis of hydroxyl librations at two brucite surfaces indicates that surface Mg-O-H modes are shifted to frequencies lower than the corresponding bulk modes. A comparison of DFT and classical normal modes validates this new potential term. The methodology for parameter development can be applied to other clay mineral components (e.g., Al, Si) to improve the modeling of edge surface stability, resulting in expanded applicability to clay mineral applications.

  9. Surface Structural Studies of Methane Sulfonic Acid at Air/Aqueous Solution Interfaces using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, H

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric gas phase species such as methane sulfonic acid (MSA) are adsorbed and accommodated into atmospheric aqueous-phase aerosols and in some cases MSA is thought to be produced via aerosol surface chemistry...

  10. Comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of surface plasmon polariton modes at uniaxial liquid crystal-metal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yin-Ray; Lee, Tsun-Hsiun; Wu, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hung, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes the derivation of surface plasmon polariton modes associated with the generalized three-dimensional rotation of liquid crystal molecules on a metal film. The calculated dispersion relation was verified by coupling laser light into surface plasmon polariton waves in a one-dimensional grating device. The grating-assisted plasmon coupling condition was consistent with the formulated k(spp) value. This provides a general rule for the design of liquid-crystal tunable plasmonic devices.

  11. Manipulating Interfaces through Surface Confinement of Poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(vinyldimethylazlactone), a Dually Reactive Block Copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokitz, Bradley S.; Wei, Jifeng; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan P.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Browning, James B.; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, S. Michael II; Messman, Jamie M.

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of dually reactive, well-defined diblock copolymers incorporating the chemoselective/functional monomer, 4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (VDMA) and the surface-reactive monomer glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is examined to understand how competition between surface attachment and microphase segregation influences interfacial structure. Reaction of the PGMA block with surface hydroxyl groups not only anchors the copolymer to the surface, but limits chain mobility, creating brush-like structures comprising PVDMA blocks, which contain reactive azlactone groups. The block copolymers are spin coated at various solution concentrations and annealed at elevated temperature to optimize film deposition to achieve a molecularly uniform layer. The thickness and structure of the polymer thin films are investigated by ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectometry. The results show that deposition of PGMA-b-PVDMA provides a useful route to control film thickness while preserving azlactone groups that can be further modified with biotin-poly(ethylene glycol)amine to generate designer surfaces. The method described herein offers guidance for creating highly functional surfaces, films, or coatings through the use of dually reactive block copolymers and postpolymerization modification.

  12. SURFACE CHEMKIN-III: A Fortran package for analyzing heterogeneous chemical kinetics at a solid-surface - gas-phase interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coltrin, M.E.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the SURFACE CHEMKIN-III package. Together with CHEMKIN-III, this software facilitates the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary heterogeneous and gas-phase chemical kinetics in the presence of a solid surface. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Surface Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of a user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Surface Subroutine Library, which is a collection of about seventy modular Fortran subroutines that may be called from a user`s application code to return information on chemical production rates and thermodynamic properties. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III includes many modifications to allow treatment of multi-fluid plasma systems, for example modeling the reactions of highly energetic ionic species with a surface. Optional rate expressions allow reaction rates to depend upon ion energy rather than a single thermodynamic temperature. In addition, subroutines treat temperature as an array, allowing an application code to define a different temperature for each species. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III allows use of real (non-integer) stoichiometric coefficients; the reaction order with respect to species concentrations can also be specified independent of the reaction`s stoichiometric coefficients. Several different reaction mechanisms can be specified in the Interpreter input file through the new construct of multiple materials.

  13. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Predota, M.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO 2 ) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 (angstrom) of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 ± 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH znpc values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH znpc value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 ± 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic strength. Additionally, the H

  14. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Predota, M. [University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 {angstrom} of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 {+-} 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH{sub znpc} values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH{sub znpc} value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 {+-} 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic

  15. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface modifications of Ti alloy with tunable hierarchical structures and chemistry for improved metal-polymer interface used in deepwater composite riser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peigang; Chen, Ke; Yang, Jinglei

    2015-02-01

    Ti-based fiber reinforced plastic (Ti-FRP) composites have attracted increasing attentions in the marine and offshore applications due their excellent specific mechanical and physical properties. Among those, interface issues play important role to determine the failure modes of the hybrid composites. In this paper, tunable hierarchical structures and oxidation states on Ti alloy (Ti6Al4V) were achieved via physical and chemical surface treatment techniques including sandblasting, anodization, etching and annealing. Wetability and interfacial bonding strength between the treated Ti alloy surfaces and epoxy resin were systemically investigated in consideration of surface microstructures, oxidation states of Ti, and possible chemical reaction between oxidized Ti and amine. After the combined treatments, the epoxy-adhered specimen showed fully cohesive failure mode in epoxy with the highest shear strength and work of fracture. The great increase in the shear bonding strength was attributed to the nano- to macro-scale hierarchical structure on the Ti alloy surface which resulted in the enhanced adhesive strength between epoxy and adherend in terms of the excellent wettability, significant interfacial chemical reaction and reasonable mechanical interlocking.

  17. Structure formation and surface chemistry of ionic liquids on model electrode surfaces—Model studies for the electrode | electrolyte interface in Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Florian; Uhl, Benedikt; Forster-Tonigold, Katrin; Bansmann, Joachim; Groß, Axel; Behm, R. Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as attractive electrolyte solvents in modern battery concepts such as Li-ion batteries. Here we present a comprehensive review of the results of previous model studies on the interaction of the battery relevant IL 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([BMP]+[TFSI]-) with a series of structurally and chemically well-defined model electrode surfaces, which are increasingly complex and relevant for battery applications [Ag(111), Au(111), Cu(111), pristine and lithiated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and rutile TiO2(110)]. Combining surface science techniques such as high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterizing surface structure and chemical composition in deposited (sub-)monolayer adlayers with dispersion corrected density functional theory based calculations, this work aims at a molecular scale understanding of the fundamental processes at the electrode | electrolyte interface, which are crucial for the development of the so-called solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer in batteries. Performed under idealized conditions, in an ultrahigh vacuum environment, these model studies provide detailed insights on the structure formation in the adlayer, the substrate-adsorbate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions responsible for this, and the tendency for chemically induced decomposition of the IL. To mimic the situation in an electrolyte, we also investigated the interaction of adsorbed IL (sub-)monolayers with coadsorbed lithium. Even at 80 K, postdeposited Li is found to react with the IL, leading to decomposition products such as LiF, Li3N, Li2S, LixSOy, and Li2O. In the absence of a [BMP]+[TFSI]- adlayer, it tends to adsorb, dissolve, or intercalate into the substrate (metals, HOPG) or to react with the substrate (TiO2) above a critical temperature, forming LiOx and Ti3+ species in the latter case. Finally, the formation of stable

  18. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kan; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George; Zhang, Jiachen; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Yanli; Tao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    The response of surface ozone (O3) concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR) analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage between basin-scale SST

  19. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of surface ozone (O3 concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage

  20. Influence of Cell Surface Appendages on the Bacterium-Substratum Interface Measured Real-Time Using QCM-D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsson, Adam L. J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2009-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) utilizes an oscillating quartz crystal to register adsorption of rigid masses through a decrease in its resonance frequency f. In addition, QCM-D has the ability to measure the dissipative nature of nonrigid masses adhering to the crystal surface

  1. Interactions of the Calcite {10.4} Surface with Organic Compounds: Structure and Behaviour at Mineral – Organic Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim, S. S.; Olsson, M. H. M.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the strength of organic compound adsorption on mineral surfaces are of interest for a number of industrial and environmental applications, oil recovery, CO2 storage and contamination remediation. Biomineralised calcite plays an essential role in the function of many organisms...

  2. A MATLAB-based graphical user interface for the identification of muscular activations from surface electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Verdini, Federica; Burattini, Laura; Fioretti, Sandro; Di Nardo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a graphical user interface (GUI) built in MATLAB® environment is presented. This interactive tool has been developed for the analysis of superficial electromyography (sEMG) signals and in particular for the assessment of the muscle activation time intervals. After the signal import, the tool performs a first analysis in a totally user independent way, providing a reliable computation of the muscular activation sequences. Furthermore, the user has the opportunity to modify each parameter of the on/off identification algorithm implemented in the presented tool. The presence of an user-friendly GUI allows the immediate evaluation of the effects that the modification of every single parameter has on the activation intervals recognition, through the real-time updating and visualization of the muscular activation/deactivation sequences. The possibility to accept the initial signal analysis or to modify the on/off identification with respect to each considered signal, with a real-time visual feedback, makes this GUI-based tool a valuable instrument in clinical, research applications and also in an educational perspective.

  3. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  4. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  5. Quantitative roughness characterization of geological surfaces and implications for radar signature analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic surface models are useful for analyzing in situ roughness profiles and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of geological terrain. In this paper, two different surface models are discussed: surfaces with a stationary random roughness (conventional model) and surfaces with a power...

  6. Development of wireless, chipless neural stimulator by using one-port surface acoustic wave delay line and diode-capacitor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisung; Kim, Saehan; Lee, Keekeun

    2017-06-01

    For the first time, a wireless and chipless neuron stimulator was developed by utilizing a surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line, a diode-capacitor interface, a sharp metal tip, and antennas for the stimulation of neurons in the brain. The SAW delay line supersedes presently existing complex wireless transmission systems composed of a few thousands of transistors, enabling the fabrication of wireless and chipless transceiver systems. The diode-capacitor interface was used to convert AC signals to DC signals and induce stimulus pulses at a sharp metal probe. A 400 MHz RF energy was wirelessly radiated from antennas and then stimulation pulses were observed at a sharp gold probe. A ˜5 m reading distance was obtained using a 1 mW power from a network analyzer. The cycles of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from an antenna were controlled by shielding the antenna with an EM absorber. Stimulation pulses with different amplitudes and durations were successfully observed at the probe. The obtained pulses were ˜0.08 mV in amplitude and 3-10 Hz in frequency. Coupling-of-mode (COM) and SPICE modeling simulations were also used to determine the optimal structural parameters for SAW delay line and the values of passive elements. On the basis of the extracted parameters, the entire system was experimentally implemented and characterized.

  7. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  8. Role of air-water interfaces in colloid transport in porous media: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Markus; Aramrak, Surachet

    2017-07-01

    Air-water interfaces play an important role in unsaturated porous media, giving rise to phenomena like capillarity. Less recognized and understood are interactions of colloids with the air-water interface in porous media and the implications of these interactions for fate and transport of colloids. In this review, we discuss how colloids, both suspended in the aqueous phase and attached at pore walls, interact with air-water interfaces in porous media. We discuss the theory of colloid/air-water interface interactions, based on the different forces acting between colloids and the air-water interface (DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary forces) and based on thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs free energy). Subsurface colloids are usually electrostatically repelled from the air-water interface because most subsurface colloids and the air-water are negatively charged. However, hydrophobic interactions can lead to attraction to the air-water interface. When colloids are at the air-water interface, capillary forces are usually dominant over other forces. Moving air-water interfaces are effective in mobilizing and transporting colloids from surfaces. Thermodynamic considerations show that, for a colloid, the air-water interface is the favored state as compared with the suspension phase, except for hydrophilic colloids in the nanometer size range. Experimental evidence indicates that colloid mobilization in soils often occurs through macropores, although matrix transport is also prevalent in absence of macropores. Moving air-water interfaces, e.g., occurring during infiltration, imbibition, or drainage, have been shown to scour colloids from surfaces and translocate colloids. Colloids can also be pinned to surfaces by thin water films and capillary menisci at the air-water-solid interface line, causing colloid retention and immobilization. Air-water interfaces thus can both mobilize or immobilize colloids in porous media, depending on hydrodynamics and colloid and surface

  9. On the implications of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission for hydrologic science and applications (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission will provide surface water elevation and extent information with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution globally. All of the implications of thedata that SWOT will produce for the hydrologic science and applications communities are not yet apparent. The SWOT data will, however, certainly offer groundbreaking opportunities for estimation of two key terms in the land surface water budget: surface water storage (in almost all water bodies with surface area exceeding about 1 km2) and derived discharge for many of the world’s large rivers (widths greater than roughly 100-250 m). Among just a few of the science questions that the observations should allow us to address are a) what are the dynamics of floods and overbank flows in large rivers? b) what is the contribution of long-term, seasonal, and interannual storage in reservoirs, lakes, and wetlands to sea level? c) what is the magnitude of surface water storage changes at seasonal to decadal time scales and continental spatial scales relative to soil moisture and groundwater? d) what will be the implications of SWOT-based estimates of reservoir storage and storage change to the management of transboundary rivers? These quite likely are among just a few of the questions that SWOT will help elucidate. Others no doubt will arise from creative analyses of SWOT data in combination with data from other missions I conclude with a discussion of mechanisms that will help foster a community to investigate these and other questions, and the implications of a SWOT data policy.

  10. On the molecular mechanism of surface charge amplification and related phenomena at aqueous polyelectrolyte-graphene interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Simonson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we illustrate the occurrence of a recently reported new phenomenon of surface-charge amplification, SCA, (originally dubbed overcharging, OC, [Jimenez-Angeles F. and Lozada-Cassou M., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2004, 108, 7286] by means of molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous electrolytes solutions involving multivalent cations in contact with charged graphene walls and the presence of short-chain lithium polystyrene sulfonates where the solvent water is described explicitly with a realistic molecular model. We show that the occurrence of SCA in these systems, in contrast to that observed in primitive models, involves neither contact co-adsorption of the negatively charged macroions nor divalent cations with a large size and charge asymmetry as required in the case of implicit solvents. In fact the SCA phenomenon hinges around the preferential adsorption of water (over the hydrated ions with an average dipolar orientation such that the charges of the water's hydrogen and oxygen sites induce magnification rather than screening of the positive-charged graphene surface, within a limited range of surface-charge density.

  11. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  12. Effects of engineered nano-titanium dioxide on pore surface properties and phosphorus adsorption of sediment: Its environmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Wang, Zhenhong; Wei, QunShan; Yan, Changzhou; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The attachment of Enano-TiO 2 to surface enhanced markedly sediment BET surface area and t-Plot external surface area. → The fill of Enano-TiO 2 into the micropores reduced significantly the sediment t-Plot micropore surface area. → Enano-TiO 2 could increase sediment phosphorus (P) adsorption maximum and decrease in sediment P binding energy. → P would be easily released because of the decreasing P binding energy of the sediment with elevated Enano-TiO 2 . - Abstract: Understanding the environmental safety and human health implications of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is of worldwide importance. As an important ENPs, engineered nano-TiO 2 (Enano-TiO 2 ) may have been substantially deposited in aquatic sediments because of its widely uses. Sediment pore surface properties would be thus significantly influenced due to the large surface area of Enano-TiO 2 . In this study, Enano-TiO 2 was found to greatly impact on sediment pore surface properties. The attachment of Enano-TiO 2 particles to sediment surfaces enhanced markedly BET specific surface area and t-Plot external specific surface area, and thereby increased sediment phosphorus (P) adsorption maximum (S max ). Contrarily, the fill of Enano-TiO 2 particles into the micropores of sediments could significantly reduce t-Plot micropore specific surface area, and cause slight decrease in sediment P binding energy (K). Clearly, P sorbed in sediment would be easily released because of the decreasing P binding energy of the sediment with elevated Enano-TiO 2 . Enano-TiO 2 would thus cause aggravated endogenous pollution in water if such sediment was re-suspended on disturbance. The results obtained in this study contribute to our increasing knowledge of how to regulate physicochemical behavior of pollutants in sediments under the influences of Enano-TiO 2 and/or similar ENPs.

  13. Application and outlook of the pulsed neutron beam at J-PARC (3). Introduction of high-pressure science and surface/interface analysis at J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takanori; Akutsu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    At the MLF (Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility) of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex), eighteen neutron beam lines equipped with experimental apparatus are in operation and deliver the world highest intensity pulsed neutron beam for fundamental sciences such as solid state physics, materials science, life science, elementary particle physics, nuclear science, and for industrial applications. We introduce studies using an ultra-high pressure neutron diffractometer 'PLANET' for the structure analysis under high-pressure surroundings and a polarized neutron reflectometer 'SHARAKU' for the analysis of surface/interface structure with scales ranging from nano- to submicron-meter. We also introduce briefly all the apparatus for neuron experiments at the MLF. (J.P.N.)

  14. N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Treated Gold Surfaces in Pentacene Organic Field-Effect Transistors: Improved Stability and Contact at the Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Aifeng; Freitag, Matthias; Chepiga, Kathryn M; Schäfer, Andreas H; Glorius, Frank; Chi, Lifeng

    2018-02-16

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) molecules, which reacted with the surface of Au electrodes, have been successfully applied in the pentacene transistors. With the application of NHCs, the charge carrier mobility of pentacene transistors increased by five times, while the contact resistance at the pentacene-Au interface reduced down to 85%. Even after annealing the NHC-Au electrodes at 200 oC for two hours before pentacene deposition, the charge carrier mobility of the pentacene transistors did not decrease. The distinguished performance renders the NHCs as excellent alternatives to thiols as metal modifiers for the application in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Study of surfaces and interfaces in CdS-Cu2S and (Cd sub(x) Zn sub(1-x))S-Cu2S solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhere, N.G.; Dhere, R.G.; Bloss, W.H.; Schock, H.W.; Bauer, E.; Cyris, P.

    1983-01-01

    Auger microprobe was used for the analysis of interfaces and surfaces in several stages involved in the preparation of solar cells, in order to study the origin of adhesion problems and to study the formation of CdS-Cu 2 S barrier by the wet method. The detachment of the first CdS and (Cd sub(x) Zn sub(1-x))S films, during the dip process, was attributed to the contamination of Cr-Ag metallic substrates by existing chlorine from the environment next to the sea, due to long film stocking, by degasified species from the evaporating material and by the ejection of particles together with CdS vapour during deposition. The formation of conical mounds on the surface and of the CdS-Cu 2 S barrier at aproximatelly 3000 A depth in the dipped samples were observed. The migration of copper towards surface direction and the formation of a superficial thin layer of copper oxide after treatment in H 2 plasma and air heating, were also verified. (C.L.B.) [pt

  16. Effects of engineered nano-titanium dioxide on pore surface properties and phosphorus adsorption of sediment: its environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Wang, Zhenhong; Wei, Qunshan; Yan, Changzhou; Liu, Feng

    2011-09-15

    Understanding the environmental safety and human health implications of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is of worldwide importance. As an important ENPs, engineered nano-TiO(2) (Enano-TiO(2)) may have been substantially deposited in aquatic sediments because of its widely uses. Sediment pore surface properties would be thus significantly influenced due to the large surface area of Enano-TiO(2). In this study, Enano-TiO(2) was found to greatly impact on sediment pore surface properties. The attachment of Enano-TiO(2) particles to sediment surfaces enhanced markedly BET specific surface area and t-Plot external specific surface area, and thereby increased sediment phosphorus (P) adsorption maximum (S(max)). Contrarily, the fill of Enano-TiO(2) particles into the micropores of sediments could significantly reduce t-Plot micropore specific surface area, and cause slight decrease in sediment P binding energy (K). Clearly, P sorbed in sediment would be easily released because of the decreasing P binding energy of the sediment with elevated Enano-TiO(2). Enano-TiO(2) would thus cause aggravated endogenous pollution in water if such sediment was re-suspended on disturbance. The results obtained in this study contribute to our increasing knowledge of how to regulate physicochemical behavior of pollutants in sediments under the influences of Enano-TiO(2) and/or similar ENPs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanoplasmonic Sensing at the Carbon-Bio Interface: Study of Protein Adsorption at Graphitic and Hydrogenated Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Federico; Karanikolas, Vasilios D; Behan, James A; Andersson, Jenny; Ciapetti, Guido; Bradley, A Louise; Colavita, Paula E

    2017-05-02

    Various forms of carbon are known to perform well as biomaterials in a variety of applications and an improved understanding of their interactions with biomolecules, cells, and tissues is of interest for improving and tailoring their performance. Nanoplasmonic sensing (NPS) has emerged as a powerful technique for studying the thermodynamics and kinetics of interfacial reactions. In this work, the in situ adsorption of two proteins, bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen, were studied at carbon surfaces with differing chemical and optical properties using nanoplasmonic sensors. The carbon material was deposited as a thin film onto NPS surfaces consisting of 100 nm Au nanodisks with a localized plasmon absorption peak in the visible region. Carbon films were fully characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Two types of material were investigated: amorphous carbon (a-C), with high graphitic content and high optical absorptivity, and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), with low graphitic content and high optical transparency. The optical response of the Au/carbon NPS elements was modeled using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, yielding simulated analytical sensitivities that compare well with those observed experimentally at the two carbon surfaces. Protein adsorption was investigated on a-C and a-C:H, and the protein layer thicknesses were obtained from FDTD simulations of the expected response, yielding values in the 1.8-3.3 nm range. A comparison of the results at a-C and a-C:H indicates that in both cases fibrinogen layers are thicker than those formed by albumin by up to 80%.

  18. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  19. Surface tectonics of nanoporous networks of melamine-capped molecular building blocks formed through interface Schiff-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Control over the assembly of molecules on a surface is of great importance for the fabrication of molecule-based miniature devices. Melamine (MA) and molecules with terminal MA units are promising candidates for supramolecular interfacial packing patterning, owing to their multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. Herein, we report the formation of self-assembled structures of MA-capped molecules through a simple on-surface synthetic route. MA terminal groups were successfully fabricated onto rigid molecular cores with 2-fold and 3-fold symmetry through interfacial Schiff-base reactions between MA and aldehyde groups. Sub-molecular scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of the resultant adlayer revealed the formation of nanoporous networks. Detailed structural analysis indicated that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the MA groups persistently drove the formation of nanoporous networks. Herein, we demonstrate that functional groups with strong hydrogen-bond-formation ability are promising building blocks for the guided assembly of nanoporous networks and other hierarchical 2D assemblies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The Application of Minimally Invasive Devices with Nanostructured Surface Functionalization: Antisticking Behavior on Devices and Liver Tissue Interface in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the thermal injury and adhesion property of a novel electrosurgery of liver using copper-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu surface treatment. It is necessary to reduce the thermal damage of surrounding tissues for clinical electrosurgeries. The surface morphologies of stainless steel (SS coated with DLC (DLC-Cu-SS films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Bionic liver models were reconstructed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to simulate electrosurgery. Cell cytotoxicity assays showed that the DLC-Cu thin film was nontoxic. The temperature of tissue decreased significantly with use of the electrosurgical device with nanostructured DLC-Cu films and increased with increasing thickness of the films. Thermography revealed that the surgical temperature in the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device was significantly lower than that in the untreated device in the animal model. Moreover, compared to the SS electrosurgical device, the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device caused a relatively small injury area and lateral thermal effect. The results indicate that the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device decreases excessive thermal injury and ensures homogeneous temperature transformation in the tissues.

  1. Effects of DNP on the cell surface properties of marine bacteria and its implication for adhesion to surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Nishad, K.K.; Bhosle, N.B.

    of hydrogen peroxide as model antimicrobial agent for examining resisitance mechanisms. Methods Enzymol 310 : 599-608. Haque H, Cutright TJ & Zhang newby BM (2005) Effectiveness of sodium benzoate as a freshwater low toxicity antifoulant when dispersed... and the Environment (D Almorza C A, Brebbia D Sales & V Popov) (Editors),ISBN 1-85312-907- 0. Min Seok chae, Heidi Schraft, Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen & Robet Mackereth (2006) Effect of physiochemical surface characteristic of Listeria monocytogenes strains...

  2. Surface Immobilized His-tagged Azurin as a Model Interface for the Investigation of Vectorial Electron Transfer in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalini, Stefano; Berto, Marcello; Kovtun, Alessandro; Operamolla, Alessandra; Di Rocco, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Liscio, Andrea; Farinola, Gianluca M.; Borsari, Marco; Bortolotti, Carlo A.

    2015-01-01

    A model system for the electrochemical investigation of vectorial electron transfer in biological systems was designed, assembled and characterized. Gold electrodes, functionalized with a -OCH 3 terminated, aromatic self-assembled monolayer, were used as a substrate for the adsorption of variants of copper-containing, redox metalloprotein azurin. The engineered azurin bears a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus. Thanks to the presence of the solvent exposed tag, which chelates Cu 2+ ions in solution, we introduced an exogenous redox centre. The different reduction potentials of the two redox centres and their positioning with respect to the surface are such that electron transfer from the exogenous copper centre and the electrode is mediated by the native azurin active site, closely paralleling electron transfer processes in naturally occurring multicentre metalloproteins.

  3. Microconical interface fitting and interface grasping tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L. (Inventor); Wightman, William D. (Inventor); Johnston, Alistair P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A small and light weight microconical interface fitting may be attached to the surface of a space vehicle or equipment to provide an attachment device for an astronaut or robot to capture the space vehicle or equipment. The microconical interface fitting of the present invention has an axisymmetrical conical body having a base portion with a torque reaction surface for preventing rotation of the interface grasping tool; a cavitated, sunken or hollowed out intermediate locking portion which has a cavity shaped for receiving the latches of the grasping tool and an upper guiding portion for guiding the grasping tool into axial alignment with the microconical interface fitting. The capture is accomplished with an interface grasping tool. The grasping tool comprises an outer sleeve with a handle attached, an inner sleeve which may be raised and lowered within the outer sleeve with a plurality of latches supported at the lower end and a cam to raise and lower the inner sleeve. When the inner sleeve is at its lowest position, the latches form the largest diameter opening for surrounding the microconical fitting and the latches form the smallest diameter or a locking, grasping position when raised to the highest position within the outer sleeve. The inner sleeve may be at an intermediate, capture position which permits the latches to be biased outwardly when contacting the microconical fitting under very low forces to grasp the fitting and permits capture (soft docking) without exact alignment of the fitting and the tool.

  4. Friction characteristics of Cd-rich carbonate films on calcite surfaces: implications for compositional differentiation at the nanometer scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubillas Pablo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM studies were carried out on cleaved calcite sections in contact with solutions supersaturated with respect to otavite (CdCO3 or calcite-otavite solid solutions (SS as a means to examine the potential for future application of LFM as a nanometer-scale mineral surface composition mapping technique. Layer-by-layer growth of surface films took place either by step advancement or by a surface nucleation and step advancement mechanisms. Friction vs. applied load data acquired on the films and the calcite substrate were successfully fitted to the Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR model for single asperity contacts. Following this model, friction differences between film and substrate at low loads were dictated by differences in adhesion, whereas at higher load they reflect differences in contact shear strength. In most experiments at fixed load, the film showed higher friction than the calcite surface, but the friction-load dependence for the different surfaces revealed that at low loads (0–40 nN, a calcian otavite film has lower friction than calcite; a result that is contrary to earlier LFM reports of the same system. Multilayer films of calcian-otavite displayed increasing friction with film thickness, consistent with the expectation that the film surface composition will become increasingly Cd-rich with increasing thickness. Both load- and thickness-dependence trends support the hypothesis that the contact shear strength correlates with the hydration enthalpy of the surface ions, thereby imparting friction sensitivity in the LFM to mineral-water interface composition.

  5. Chemistry of Frozen NaCl and MgSO4 Brines - Implications for Surface Expression of Europa's Ocean Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. V.; Hodyss, R. P.; Choukroun, M.; Vu, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Europa's subsurface ocean is a critical determinant of its habitability, but current analysis of the ocean composition is limited to its expression on the Europan surface. While there is observational evidence indicating that ocean materials make their way to the surface, our understanding of the chemical processes that can alter this material under Europan surface conditions is limited. We present experimental data on the chemistry of mixed solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 as they are frozen to 100 K, replicating the conditions that may occur when subsurface ocean fluids are emplaced onto Europa's surface. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the formation of salts during the freezing process, and the interaction of ions in the frozen brines. Our data indicate that mixed aqueous solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 form Na2SO4 and MgCl2 preferentially when frozen, rather than making NaCl and MgSO4 precipitates. The detection of epsomite (MgSO4Ÿ•7H2O) on Europa's surface may therefore imply an ocean composition relatively low in sodium, unless radiolytic chemistry converts MgCl2 to MgSO4 as suggested by Hand and Brown 2013 (ApJ 145 110). These results have important implications for the interpretation of remote sensing data of Europa's surface.

  6. 6.5 Years of Slow Slip Events in Cascadia: A Catalogue of SSE Surface Expressions, Interface Slip Distributions, Event Magnitudes and Relationship to Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Wallace, L. M.; Haines, A. J.; Bartlow, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) in Cascadia occur at ~30-50 km depth, every 10-19 months, and typically involve slip of a few cm, producing surface displacements on the order of a few mm up to ~1cm. Are there smaller SSE signals that are currently not recognized geodetically? What is the spatial, temporal and size distribution of SSEs, and how are SSE related to tremor? We address these questions with a catalogue of all detectable SSEs spanning the last 6.5 years using a new methodology based on Vertical Derivatives of Horizontal Stress (VDoHS) rates obtained from cGPS times series. VDoHS rates, calculated by solving the force balance equations at the Earth's surface, represent the most inclusive and spatially compact surface expressions of subsurface deformation sources: VDoHS rate vectors are tightly localized above the sources and point in the direction of push or pull. We compare our results with those from the Network Inversion Filter (NIF) for selected events. We identify and characterize a spectrum of SSEs, including events with moment release at least two orders of magnitudes smaller than has been previously identified with GPS data. We catalogue events timing, interface slip distribution and moment release, and compare our results with existing tremor catalogues. VDoHS rates also reveal the boundaries between the locked and unlocked portions of the megathrust, and we can track how this varies throughout the SSE cycle. Above the locked interface, the pull of the subducted plate generates shear tractions in the overlying plate in the direction of subduction, while above the creeping section shear tractions are in the opposite direction, which is reflected in the VDoHS rates. We show that sections of the Cascadia megathrust unlock prior to some SSEs and lock thereafter, with the locked zone propagating downdip and eastward after the SSEs over weeks to months. The catalogue and movies of events will be available at http://www.ig.utexas.edu/people/staff/lada/SSEs.

  7. Theoretical study of the acid-base properties of the montmorillonite/electrolyte interface: influence of the surface heterogeneity and ionic strength on the potentiometric titration curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Thomas, Fabien

    2006-10-15

    The parallel shape of the potentiometric titration curves for montmorillonite suspension is explained using the surface complexation model and taking into account the surface heterogeneity. The homogeneous models give accurate predictions only if they assume unphysically large values of the equilibrium constants for the exchange process occurring on the basal plane. However, the assumption that the basal plane is energetically heterogeneous allows to fit the experimental data (reported by Avena and De Pauli [M. Avena, C.P. De Pauli, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 202 (1998) 195-204]) for reasonable values of exchange equilibrium constant equal to 1.26 (suggested by Fletcher and Sposito [P. Fletcher, G. Sposito, Clay Miner. 24 (1989) 375-391]). Moreover, we observed the typical behavior of point of zero net proton charge (pznpc) as a function of logarithm of the electrolyte concentration (log[C]). We showed that the slope of the linear dependence, pznpc=f(log[C]), is proportional to the number of isomorphic substitutions in the crystal phase, which was also observed in the experimental studies.

  8. Granitic boulder erosion caused by chaparral wildfire: Implications for cosmogenic radionuclide dating of bedrock surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Katherine J.; Camille Partin,; Graham, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Rock surface erosion by wildfire is significant and widespread but has not been quantified in southern California or for chaparral ecosystems. Quantifying the surface erosion of bedrock outcrops and boulders is critical for determination of age using cosmogenic radionuclide techniques, as even modest surface erosion removes the accumulation of the cosmogenic radionuclides and causes significant underestimate of age. This study documents the effects on three large granitic boulders following the Esperanza Fire of 2006 in southern California. Spalled rock fragments were quantified by measuring the removed rock volume from each measured boulder. Between 7% and 55% of the total surface area of the boulders spalled in this single fire. The volume of spalled material, when normalized across the entire surface area, represents a mean surface lowering of 0.7–12.3 mm. Spalled material was thicker on the flanks of the boulders, and the height of the fire effects significantly exceeded the height of the vegetation prior to the wildfire. Surface erosion of boulders and bedrock outcrops as a result of wildfire spalling results in fresh surfaces that appear unaffected by chemical weathering. Such surfaces may be preferentially selected by researchers for cosmogenic surface dating because of their fresh appearance, leading to an underestimate of age.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE MODIFICATIONS PRODUCED AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN THE PERIODONTAL ADHESIVE SPLINTS AND THE DENTAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan VÂSCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the market offer for bioadhesive materials is constantly increasing, while the dental surfaces on which they are applied show specific features, different from those commonly resulting from the preparation of carious processes, knowledge on their behavioral characteristics is absolutely necessary for their utilization under optimum conditions, through methods assuming prolongued clinical performances, assured by dimensional and colouristic stability and by a reduced cure contraction, for diminishing as much as possible the space of marginal percolation and fracture of the free enamel-free margins, as well as for delamination of immobilization from the afferent dental structure. Selection of the type of material for periodonthic teeth immobilization and of the technique to be applied is decided on the basis of a systematic, clinical and radiological analysis meant at establishing: the number of affected teeth, the type of occlusion and the possible parafunctions, oral hygiene, the aesthetic requirements of the patient, his/her age and motivation for a periodical monitorization. Numerous modern materials employed in the immobilization of periodonthic teeth are closely related not only to their physical properties and long-term stability, but also to the oral environment in which they are functioning. Modern adhesive materials are well-suited for dental recovery of the remaining healthy structures, due to their capacity of chemically and micromechanically adhering onto them.

  10. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides' structure: implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively...

  11. Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnell, Dawn A. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Final Report to the Department of Energy for period 6/1/2000 to 11/30/2014 for Grant # DE-FG02-00ER45813-A000 to the University of Pennsylvania Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces PI: Dawn Bonnell The behavior of grain boundaries and interfaces has been a focus of fundamental research for decades because variations of structure and composition at interfaces dictate mechanical, electrical, optical and dielectric properties in solids. Similarly, the consequence of atomic and electronic structures of surfaces to chemical and physical interactions are critical due to their implications to catalysis and device fabrication. Increasing fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces has materially advanced technologies that directly bear on energy considerations. Currently, exciting developments in materials processing are enabling creative new electrical, optical and chemical device configurations. Controlled synthesis of nanoparticles, semiconducting nanowires and nanorods, optical quantum dots, etc. along with a range of strategies for assembling and patterning nanostructures portend the viability of new devices that have the potential to significantly impact the energy landscape. As devices become smaller the impact of interfaces and surfaces grows geometrically. As with other nanoscale phenomena, small interfaces do not exhibit the same properties as do large interfaces. The size dependence of interface properties had not been explored and understanding at the most fundamental level is necessary to the advancement of nanostructured devices. An equally important factor in the behavior of interfaces in devices is the ability to examine the interfaces under realistic conditions. For example, interfaces and boundaries dictate the behavior of oxide fuel cells which operate at extremely high temperatures in dynamic high pressure chemical environments. These conditions preclude the characterization of local properties during fuel cell

  12. inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, Mora K. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Hiemstra, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Van Riemsdijk, Willem H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL

    2009-01-01

    Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  13. Climate change and water table fluctuation: Implications for raised bog surface variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminskas, Julius; Linkevičienė, Rita; Šimanauskienė, Rasa; Jukna, Laurynas; Kibirkštis, Gintautas; Tamkevičiūtė, Marija

    2018-03-01

    Cyclic peatland surface variability is influenced by hydrological conditions that highly depend on climate and/or anthropogenic activities. A low water level leads to a decrease of peatland surface and an increase of C emissions into the atmosphere, whereas a high water level leads to an increase of peatland surface and carbon sequestration in peatlands. The main aim of this article is to evaluate the influence of hydrometeorological conditions toward the peatland surface and its feedback toward the water regime. A regional survey of the raised bog water table fluctuation and surface variability was made in one of the largest peatlands in Lithuania. Two appropriate indicators for different peatland surface variability periods (increase and decrease) were detected. The first one is an 200 mm y- 1 average net rainfall over a three-year range. The second one is an average annual water depth of 25-30 cm. The application of these indicators enabled the reconstruction of Čepkeliai peatland surface variability during a 100 year period. Processes of peatland surface variability differ in time and in separate parts of peatland. Therefore, internal subbasins in peatland are formed. Subbasins involve autogenic processes that can later affect their internal hydrology, nutrient status, and vegetation succession. Internal hydrological conditions, surface fluctuation, and vegetation succession in peatland subbasins should be taken into account during evaluation of their state, nature management projects, and other peatland research works.

  14. Atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and implications for atmospheric evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodakovsky, I.L.

    1982-01-01

    The physico-chemical processes controlling the Venusian tropospheric chemical composition surface rock mineral assemblages and volatile element distribution in the atmosphere and planetary crust is considered. (author)

  15. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  16. Implications of surface noise for the motional coherence of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, I.; Gorman, D. J.; Daniilidis, N.; Schindler, P.; Ebadi, S.; Kaufmann, H.; Zhang, T.; Häffner, H.

    2016-04-01

    Electric noise from metallic surfaces is a major obstacle towards quantum applications with trapped ions due to motional heating of the ions. Here, we discuss how the same noise source can also lead to pure dephasing of motional quantum states. The mechanism is particularly relevant at small ion-surface distances, thus imposing a constraint on trap miniaturization. By means of a free induction decay experiment, we measure the dephasing time of the motion of a single ion trapped 50 μ m above a Cu-Al surface. From the dephasing times we extract the integrated noise below the secular frequency of the ion. We find that none of the most commonly discussed surface noise models for ion traps describes both the observed heating as well as the measured dephasing satisfactorily. Thus, our measurements provide a benchmark for future models for the electric noise emitted by metallic surfaces.

  17. Reductions in soil surface albedo as a function of biochar application rate: implications for global radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheijen, Frank G A; Bastos, Ana Catarina; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Jeffery, Simon; Van der Velde, Marijn; Penížek, Vít; Beland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biochar can be defined as pyrolysed (charred) biomass produced for application to soils with the aim of mitigating global climate change while improving soil functions. Sustainable biochar application to soils has been estimated to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 71–130 Pg CO 2 -C e over 100 years, indicating an important potential to mitigate climate change. However, these estimates ignored changes in soil surface reflection by the application of dark-coloured biochar. Through a laboratory experiment we show a strong tendency for soil surface albedo to decrease as a power decay function with increasing biochar application rate, depending on soil moisture content, biochar application method and land use. Surface application of biochar resulted in strong reductions in soil surface albedo even at relatively low application rates. As a first assessment of the implications for climate change mitigation of these biochar–albedo relationships, we applied a first order global energy balance model to compare negative radiative forcings (from avoided CO 2 emissions) with positive radiative forcings (from reduced soil surface albedos). For a global-scale biochar application equivalent to 120 t ha −1 , we obtained reductions in negative radiative forcings of 5 and 11% for croplands and 11 and 23% for grasslands, when incorporating biochar into the topsoil or applying it to the soil surface, respectively. For a lower global biochar application rate (equivalent to 10 t ha −1 ), these reductions amounted to 13 and 44% for croplands and 28 and 94% for grasslands. Thus, our findings revealed the importance of including changes in soil surface albedo in studies assessing the net climate change mitigation potential of biochar, and we discuss the urgent need for field studies and more detailed spatiotemporal modelling. (letter)

  18. Organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, W.A.; Tempelman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the consequences for product designers resulting from the replacement of traditional interfaces by responsive materials. Part 1 presents a theoretical framework regarding a new paradigm for man-machine interfacing. Part 2 provides an analysis of the opportunities offered by new

  19. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  20. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J, E-mail: carl.j.palmer@gmail.co [Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town, 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  1. Properties of the c-Si/Al2O3 interface of ultrathin atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layers capped by SiNx for c-Si surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldis, D.; Richter, A.; Benick, J.; Saint-Cast, P.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a detailed study of c-Si/Al2O3 interfaces of ultrathin Al2O3 layers deposited with atomic layer deposition (ALD), and capped with SiNx layers deposited with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A special focus was the characterization of the fixed charge density of these dielectric stacks and the interface defect density as a function of the Al2O3 layer thickness for different ALD Al2O3 deposition processes (plasma-assisted ALD and thermal ALD) and different thermal post-deposition treatments. Based on theoretical calculations with the extended Shockley-Read-Hall model for surface recombination, these interface properties were found to explain well the experimentally determined surface recombination. Thus, these interface properties provide fundamental insights into to the passivation mechanisms of these Al2O3/SiNx stacks, a stack system highly relevant, particularly for high efficiency silicon solar cells. Based on these findings, it was also possible to improve the surface passivation quality of stacks with thermal ALD Al2O3 by oxidizing the c-Si surface prior to the Al2O3 deposition.

  2. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Characterization and control of surface/interface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon thin films; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Silicon kessho usumaku ni okeru hyomen kaimen saiketsugo sokudo no hyoka to seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the result obtained during fiscal 1994 on characterization and control of surface/interface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon thin films. To optimize design and manufacture of solar cells, it is necessary to identify correctly resistance factor (or doping) of bulk of materials, bulk minority carrier life, and recombination velocity on surface, passivation interface and electrode interface. A group in the Hokkaido University has been working since a few years ago on development of non-contact and non-destructive photo-luminescence surface level spectroscopy (PLS{sup 3}). A new non-contact C-V method was also introduced. Using these methods, basic discussions were given on possibility of separate measurements on surface/interface and bulk characteristics of solar cell materials. The PLS{sup 3} method and the non-contact C-V method were used for experimental discussions on evaluation of silicon mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline materials. Discussions were given on separate evaluations by using the DLTS method. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic and mechan...... these interfaces and interfaced compartments and processes. Climate, sea-level, oceanographic currents and hydrological processes are all affected, while anthropogenic changes are often intense in the geographic settings corresponding to such interfaces.......The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic...... and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  4. New Observations of Crustal Plateau Surface Histories, Venus: Implications for Crustal Plateau Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V. L.

    2005-03-01

    Geohistories documented for four crustal plateaus surface presents challenges to both downwelling and plume hypotheses of plateau formation, and lead to a third hypothesis, plateau formation involving crystallization of a huge lava pond.

  5. Microimpact phenomena on Australasian microtektites: Implications for ejecta plume characteristics and lunar surface processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.; Sudhakar, M.

    and dust, craters generated by projectiles defining an oblique trajectory, high-velocity "pitless" craters, and the conventional hypervelocity craters with well-defined central pits and radial and concentric cracks-found commonly on lunar surface materials...

  6. At the Knowledge Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine; Buono, Anthony; Poulfelt, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    researchers. The paper addresses this challenge in terms of moving across this interface, developing the abilities and proficiency for co-creating research that meets the needs of academics and practitioners. The competency drivers behind strengthening research-practice impact are examined within the context......-produced research projects. Based on this analysis, the implications for research-oriented consulting and our interventions with a view to developing co-created academic- and practice-oriented impact are discussed...

  7. Increased Propensity of I-aq(-) for the Water Surface in Non-neutral Solutions: Implications for the Interfacial Behavior of H3Oaq+ and OHaq-

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ottosson, N.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Söderström, J.; Björneholm, O.; Öhrwall, G.; Jungwirth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 9 (2011), s. 972-976 ISSN 1948-7185 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surfaces * interfaces * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.213, year: 2011

  8. Variability of the temporal bone surface's topography: implications for otologic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoeur, Jérémy; Noble, Jack H.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2012-02-01

    Otologic surgery is performed for a variety of reasons including treatment of recurrent ear infections, alleviation of dizziness, and restoration of hearing loss. A typical ear surgery consists of a tympanomastoidectomy in which both the middle ear is explored via a tympanic membrane flap and the bone behind the ear is removed via mastoidectomy to treat disease and/or provide additional access. The mastoid dissection is performed using a high-speed drill to excavate bone based on a pre-operative CT scan. Intraoperatively, the surface of the mastoid component of the temporal bone provides visual feedback allowing the surgeon to guide their dissection. Dissection begins in "safe areas" which, based on surface topography, are believed to be correlated with greatest distance from surface to vital anatomy thus decreasing the chance of injury to the brain, large blood vessels (e.g. the internal jugular vein and internal carotid artery), the inner ear, and the facial nerve. "Safe areas" have been identified based on surgical experience with no identifiable studies showing correlation of the surface with subsurface anatomy. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether such a correlation exists. Through a three-step registration process, we defined a correspondence between each of twenty five clinically-applicable temporal bone CT scans of patients and an atlas and explored displacement and angular differences of surface topography and depth of critical structures from the surface of the skull. The results of this study reflect current knowledge of osteogenesis and anatomy. Based on two features (distance and angular difference), two regions (suprahelical and posterior) of the temporal bone show the least variability between surface and subsurface anatomy.

  9. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, R W

    2009-01-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number (∼0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid prohibitive

  10. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, R W

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ( approximately 0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid

  11. Thermo-Compositional Evolution of a Brine Reservoir Beneath Ceres' Occator Crater and Implications for Cryovolcanism at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has imaged several putative cryovolcanic features on Ceres (Buczkowski et al., 2016; Ruesch et al., 2016), and several lines of evidence point to past cryovolcanic activity at Occator crater (De Sanctis et al., 2016; Krohn et al., 2016; Buczkowski et al., 2017; Nathues et al., 2017; Ruesch et al., 2017; Zolotov, 2017). Hence it is possible that cryovolcanism played a key role in delivering carbonate and/or chloride brines to Ceres' surface in the past. As any cryolavas delivered to the surface would have issued from a briny subsurface reservoir, or, cryomagma chamber, it is necessary to consider the thermal and compositional evolution of such a reservoir. The detection of a 200 km x 200 km negative Bouguer anomaly beneath Occator suggests the presence of a low-density region beneath the crater (Ermakov et al., 2017). If this region is a residual cryomagma chamber, excess pressures caused by its gradual freezing, or stresses produced by the Occator-forming impact, could have once facilitated the delivery of cryolavas to the Cerean surface. I have investigated the progressive solidification of a cryomagma chamber beneath Occator and implications for the changing compositions of cryolavas on Ceres. I will present the results of this study as well as discuss the dynamics and heat transfer associated with cryomagmatic ascent to the surface. Preliminary results suggest that a 200 km wide cryomagma chamber situated beneath Ceres' crust would take approximately 1 Gyr to completely crystallize. However, such a reservoir would be depleted in chloride and carbonate salts after only 54 Myr of cooling. If the reservoir contained NH3-bearing fluids, eruptions could proceed for another 100 Myr before increased reservoir crystallization rendered cryomagmatic fluids completely immobile. In addition, it is likely that cryomagmas delivered to Ceres' surface had viscosities < 108 Pa s, and were delivered in fractures with propagation speeds ≥ 10-5 m/s. I will

  12. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  13. Driven by excess? Climatic implications of new global mapping of near-surface water-equivalent hydrogen on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Asmin V.; Feldman, William C.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2018-02-01

    We present improved Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer (MONS) maps of near-surface Water-Equivalent Hydrogen (WEH) on Mars that have intriguing implications for the global distribution of "excess" ice, which occurs when the mass fraction of water ice exceeds the threshold amount needed to saturate the pore volume in normal soils. We have refined the crossover technique of Feldman et al. (2011) by using spatial deconvolution and Gaussian weighting to create the first globally self-consistent map of WEH. At low latitudes, our new maps indicate that WEH exceeds 15% in several near-equatorial regions, such as Arabia Terra, which has important implications for the types of hydrated minerals present at low latitudes. At high latitudes, we demonstrate that the disparate MONS and Phoenix Robotic Arm (RA) observations of near surface WEH can be reconciled by a three-layer model incorporating dry soil over fully saturated pore ice over pure excess ice: such a three-layer model can also potentially explain the strong anticorrelation of subsurface ice content and ice table depth observed at high latitudes. At moderate latitudes, we show that the distribution of recently formed impact craters is also consistent with our latest MONS results, as both the shallowest ice-exposing crater and deepest non-ice-exposing crater at each impact site are in good agreement with our predictions of near-surface WEH. Overall, we find that our new mapping is consistent with the widespread presence at mid-to-high Martian latitudes of recently deposited shallow excess ice reservoirs that are not yet in equilibrium with the atmosphere.

  14. Surface emission from neutron stars and implications for the physics of their interiors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özel, Feryal

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars are associated with diverse physical phenomena that take place in conditions characterized by ultrahigh densities as well as intense gravitational, magnetic and radiation fields. Understanding the properties and interactions of matter in these regimes remains one of the challenges in compact object astrophysics. Photons emitted from the surfaces of neutron stars provide direct probes of their structure, composition and magnetic fields. In this review, I discuss in detail the physics that governs the properties of emission from the surfaces of neutron stars and their various observational manifestations. I present the constraints on neutron star radii, core and crust composition, and magnetic field strength and topology obtained from studies of their broadband spectra, evolution of thermal luminosity, and the profiles of pulsations that originate on their surfaces. (review article)

  15. Surface emission from neutron stars and implications for the physics of their interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Feryal

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars are associated with diverse physical phenomena that take place in conditions characterized by ultrahigh densities as well as intense gravitational, magnetic and radiation fields. Understanding the properties and interactions of matter in these regimes remains one of the challenges in compact object astrophysics. Photons emitted from the surfaces of neutron stars provide direct probes of their structure, composition and magnetic fields. In this review, I discuss in detail the physics that governs the properties of emission from the surfaces of neutron stars and their various observational manifestations. I present the constraints on neutron star radii, core and crust composition, and magnetic field strength and topology obtained from studies of their broadband spectra, evolution of thermal luminosity, and the profiles of pulsations that originate on their surfaces.

  16. Extensional terrain formation on Europa and Ganymede: Implications for ocean-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. M.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    Europa and Ganymede, Galilean satellites of Jupiter, exhibit geologic activity in their outer H2O ice shells that might convey material from water oceans within the satellites to their surfaces. Imagery from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft reveal surfaces rich with tectonic deformation, including dilational bands on Europa and groove lanes on Ganymede. These features are generally attributed to the extension of a brittle ice lithosphere overlaying a possibly convecting ice asthenosphere. To explore band formation and interaction with interior oceans, we employ fully visco-elasto-plastic 2-D models of faulting and convection with complex, realistic pure ice rheologies. In these models, material entering from below is tracked and considered to be "fossilized ocean," ocean material that has frozen into the ice shell and evolves through geologic time. We track the volume fraction of fossil ocean material in the ice shell as a function of depth, and the exposure of both fresh ice and fossil ocean material at the ice shell surface. We vary ice shell thickness, fault localization, melting-temperature ice viscosity, and the presence of pre-existing weaknesses. Mechanisms which act to weaken the ice shell and thin the lithosphere (e.g. vigorous convection, thinner shells, pre-existing weaknesses) tend to plastically yield to form smooth bands at high strains, and are more likely to incorporate fossil ocean material in the ice shell and expose it at the surface. In contrast, lithosphere strengthened by rapid fault annealing or increased viscosity, for example, exhibits large-scale tectonic rifting at low strains superimposed over pre-existing terrains, and inhibits the incorporation and delivery of fossil ocean material to the surface. Thus, our results identify a spectrum of extensional terrain formation mechanisms as linked to lithospheric strength, rather than any specific mechanism being unique to each type of band, and where in this spectrum ocean material

  17. Pterygium concomitant with other ocular surface lesions: Clinical implications and pathogenetic links

    OpenAIRE

    DETORAKIS, EFSTATHIOS T.; KYMIONIS, GEORGE; TSATSOS, MICHAEL; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the co-existence of ophthalmic pterygium with other ocular surface lesions in a cohort of patients from the Cretan population. This is a retrospective evaluation of all pterygia in patients examined and treated at the Department of Ophthalmology of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Greece during an 8-year period (from June 2006 to June 2014). A total of 158 cases was examined. Ocular surface images and medical history were evaluated in order to d...

  18. Comparison of discrete-trial based SMR and SCP training and the interrelationship between SCP and SMR networks: Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces and Neurofeedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, D.H.; Arns, M.W.; Spronk, D.B.; Breteler, M.H.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Operant conditioning of one's slow cortical potential (SCP) or sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) can be used to control epilepsy or to manipulate external devices, as applied in BCI (Brain-Computer Interface). A commonly accepted view that both SCP and SMR are reflections of central arousal

  19. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic and mechan......The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic...... these interfaces and interfaced compartments and processes. Climate, sea-level, oceanographic currents and hydrological processes are all affected, while anthropogenic changes are often intense in the geographic settings corresponding to such interfaces....

  20. Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface. Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozley, Peter [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Evans, James [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2014-10-31

    We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault-to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire

  1. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  2. Interface Anywhere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  3. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering.

  4. Sensitivity of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and implications for surface wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercato, Michele

    2018-04-01

    The use of Rayleigh wave ellipticity has gained increasing popularity in recent years for investigating earth structures, especially for near-surface soil characterization. In spite of its widespread application, the sensitivity of the ellipticity function to the soil structure has been rarely explored in a comprehensive and systematic manner. To this end, a new analytical method is presented for computing the sensitivity of Rayleigh wave ellipticity with respect to the structural parameters of a layered elastic half-space. This method takes advantage of the minor decomposition of the surface wave eigenproblem and is numerically stable at high frequency. This numerical procedure allowed to retrieve the sensitivity for typical near surface and crustal geological scenarios, pointing out the key parameters for ellipticity interpretation under different circumstances. On this basis, a thorough analysis is performed to assess how ellipticity data can efficiently complement surface wave dispersion information in a joint inversion algorithm. The results of synthetic and real-world examples are illustrated to analyse quantitatively the diagnostic potential of the ellipticity data with respect to the soil structure, focusing on the possible sources of misinterpretation in data inversion.

  5. Pterygium concomitant with other ocular surface lesions: Clinical implications and pathogenetic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detorakis, Efstathios T; Kymionis, George; Tsatsos, Michael; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the co-existence of ophthalmic pterygium with other ocular surface lesions in a cohort of patients from the Cretan population. This is a retrospective evaluation of all pterygia in patients examined and treated at the Department of Ophthalmology of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Greece during an 8-year period (from June 2006 to June 2014). A total of 158 cases was examined. Ocular surface images and medical history were evaluated in order to detect concomitant ocular surface pathological conditions. Concomitant lesions included conjunctival nevi (5 cases, 3.16%), iris nevi (4 cases, 2.53%), conjunctival papillomas (8 cases, 5.06%), conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN; 4 cases, 2.53%) and 6 cases of hypertophy of the plica semilunaris (3.79%). Of note, pterygium was overlying the iris which was occupied by the iris nevus in 2 out of the 4 cases of iris nevus. Overall, our data indicate that ophthalmic pterygium may often co-exist with other clinically significant ocular surface lesions. The association of ophthalmic pterygium with conjunctival papillomas or CIN stresses the potential involvement of human papilloma virus in the pathogenesis of ophthalmic pterygium, whereas the topographical association of pterygium with iris nevus may offer support to the transcameral light pathway pathogenetic mechanism.

  6. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, An [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Cooperative Research and Education Centre for Environmental Technology, Kyoto University–Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Guan, Yuntao, E-mail: guanyt@tsinghua.edu.cn [Research Centre of Environmental Engineering and Management, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse.

  7. Behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water (Crouzille, Limousin). Geochemical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, J.

    2008-06-01

    Understanding natural radionuclides behaviour in surface water is a required step to achieve uranium mine rehabilitation and preserve water quality. The first objective of this thesis is to determine which are the radionuclides sources in a drinking water reservoir. The second objective is to improve the knowledge about the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides, especially actinium. The investigated site is a brook (Sagnes, Limousin, France) which floods a peat bog contaminated by a former uranium mine and which empties into the Crouzille lake. It allows studying radionuclides transport in surface water and radionuclides retention through organic substance or water reservoir. Radionuclides distribution in particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases is determined thanks to ultra-filtrations. Gamma spectrometry allows measuring almost all natural radionuclides with only two counting stages. However, low activities of 235 U series radionuclides impose the use of very low background well-type Ge detectors, such as those of the Underground Laboratory of Modane (France). Firstly, this study shows that no or few radionuclides are released by the Sagnes peat bog, although its radioactivity is important. Secondly, it provides details on the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water. More specifically, it provides the first indications of actinium solubility in surface water. Actinium's behaviour is very close to uranium's even if it is a little less soluble. (author)

  8. Range and geophysical corrections in coastal regions: and implications for mean sea surface determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Scharroo, Remko

    2011-01-01

    The determination of sea surface height from the altimeter range measurement involves a number of corrections: those expressing the behavior of the radar pulse through the atmosphere, and those correcting for sea state and other geophysical signals. A number of these corrections need special...

  9. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: Implication for stormwater reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a “fit-for-purpose” road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. - Highlights: • Heavy metal (HM) build-up varies with traffic and road surface conditions. • Traffic congestion and surface roughness exert a higher impact on HM build-up. • A “fit-for-purpose” strategy could suit urban road stormwater reuse

  10. IMPLICATIONS OF MICROBIAL ADHESION TO HYDROCARBONS FOR EVALUATING CELL-SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY .2. ADHESION MECHANISMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERMEI, HC; VANDEBELTGRITTER, B; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) is generally considered to be a measure of the organisms cell surface hydrophobicity. Recent observations that the zeta potentials of hydrocarbons can be highly negative in the various solutions commonly used in MATH, have suggested that MATH may measure a

  11. Can environmental conditions trigger cyanobacterial surfaces and following carbonate formation: implication for biomineralization and biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, C.; Dittrich, M.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview what kind of the factors may trigger carbonate formations at the cell surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. As examples, we will present the results from our recent studies on formation of calcium carbonates, dolomites and bio-cements. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the Synechococcuscell envelope are recognized key players in the nucleation of carbonates in marine and freshwater environments. Yet, little is known about a nutrient contents control over the molecular composition of Synechococcus cell envelope, and consequently, biomineralization. In the first study, we investigated how a variation of the phosphorus (P) in the growth media can lead to changes in the surface reactivity of the cells and impact their ability to form carbonates. The objective of the second study is to gain insights into the spatial distribution of cyanobacterial EPS and dolomite from different sediment layers of Khor Al-Adaid sabkha (Qatar). Here, we characterized microbial mats on molecular level in respect of organic and inorganic components using in-situ 2D Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used. Additionally, 2D chemical maps of sediment layers documented spectral characterizations of minerals and organic matter of microbial origins at high spatial resolution. Finally, we will show the results from the experiments with auto-phototrophic cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa PCC73106, which habitat on the monument surfaces, towards its application for bio-concrete, a product of microbial carbonate precipitation. We studied the biomineralization in biofilm forming Gloeocapsa PCC73106 on the concrete surface as a pre-requirement for microbial carbonate precipitation. Biomineralization on the concrete surface by live cells and killed cells were compared with that under the abiotic condition. Our experiments allow us to conclude that environmental conditions play a significant role in the control of

  12. Saturn's Titan: Surface change, ammonia, and implications for atmospheric and tectonic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Matson, D.L.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Jaumann, R.; Smythe, W.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Pearl, J.C.; Hapke, B.W.; Lunine, J.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, R.Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is known to have a young surface. Here we present evidence from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer that it is currently geologically active. We report that changes in the near-infrared reflectance of a 73,000 km2 area on Titan (latitude 26° S, longitude 78° W) occurred between July 2004 and March of 2006. The reflectance of the area increased by a factor of two between July 2004 and March–April 2005; it then returned to the July 2004 level by November 2005. By late December 2005 the reflectance had surged upward again, establishing a new maximum. Thereafter, it trended downward for the next three months. Detailed spectrophotometric analyses suggest these changes happen at or very near the surface. The spectral differences between the region and its surroundings rule out changes in the distribution of the ices of reasonably expected materials such as H2O, CO2, and CH4 as possible causes. Remarkably, the change is spectrally consistent with the deposition and removal of NH3 frost over a water ice substrate. NH3 has been proposed as a constituent of Titan's interior and has never been reported on the surface. The detection of NH3 frost on the surface might possibly be explained by episodic effusive events occur which bring juvenile ammonia from the interior to the surface. If so, its decomposition would feed nitrogen to the atmosphere now and in the future. The lateral extent of the region exceeds that of active areas on the Earth (Hawaii) or Io (Loki).

  13. Quantitative AES at Interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Hofmann, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2011), s. 241-246 ISSN 1341-1756 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/0369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantitative AES * interfaces * grain boundaries * fracture surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    Conventional photonic band gap (PBG) structures are composed of regions with periodic modulation of refractive index that do not allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain interval of wavelengths, i.e., that exhibit the PBG effect. The PBG effect is essentially an interference...... phenomenon related to strong multiple scattering of light in periodic media. The interest to the PBG structures has dramatically risen since the possibility of efficient waveguiding around a sharp corner of a line defect in the PBG structure has been pointed out. Given the perspective of integrating various...... PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...

  15. Surface properties of the Orgueil meteorite - Implications for the early history of solar system volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, F. P.; Cannon, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Kr and H2O adsorption properties of Orgueil were studied. Dehydration by stepwise calcination produced a tenfold change in its B.E.T. surface area, which increased to 120 and then fell to 40 square meters per gram. Water exchangeability was measured by water regain from lab air between calcination cycles. Dehydration at room temperature showed that Orgueil contained 6 per cent by weight of water adsorbed on free surfaces. These results are consistent with an identification of Orgueil as montmorillonite, although chemical data conflict with this. High D/H ratios in CI carbonaceous chondrites may result from D enrichment in OH- groups during equilibration of dispersed phyllosilicate dust with preplanetary nebula gas at temperatures much less than 0 C.

  16. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  17. Groundwater-surface water interactions in a large semi-arid floodplain: implications for salinity management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Sébastien; Leaney, Fred W.; Herczeg, Andrew L.

    2005-10-01

    Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably impacted the exchange of surface water between the Murray River and its floodplains. However, the way in which river regulation has impacted groundwater-surface water interactions is not completely understood, especially in regards to the salinization and accompanying vegetation dieback currently occurring in many of the floodplains. Groundwater-surface water interactions were studied over a 2 year period in the riparian area of a large floodplain (Hattah-Kulkyne, Victoria) using a combination of piezometric surface monitoring and environmental tracers (Cl-, 2H, and 18O). Despite being located in a local and regional groundwater discharge zone, the Murray River is a losing stream under low flow conditions at Hattah-Kulkyne. The discharge zone for local groundwater, regional groundwater and bank recharge is in the floodplain within 1 km of the river and is probably driven by high rates of transpiration by the riparian Eucalyptus camaldulensis woodland. Environmental tracers data suggest that the origin of groundwater is principally bank recharge in the riparian zone and a combination of diffuse rainfall recharge and localized floodwater recharge elsewhere in the floodplain. Although the Murray River was losing under low flows, bank discharge occurred during some flood recession periods. The way in which the water table responded to changes in river level was a function of the type of stream bank present, with point bars providing a better connection to the alluvial aquifer than the more common clay-lined banks. Understanding the spatial variability in the hydraulic connection with the river channel and in vertical recharge following inundations will be critical to design effective salinity remediation strategies for large semi-arid floodplains.

  18. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2009-01-01

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that re-ported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial re-analysis suggest...

  19. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  20. Sulfur dioxide reactions on ice surfaces: Implications for dry deposition to snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha H. Conklin; Richard A. Sommerfeld; S. Kay Laird; John E. Villinski

    1993-01-01

    Controlled exposure of ice to a reactive gas, SO2, demonstrated the importance of the chemical composition of the ice surface on the accumulation of acidity in snow. In a series of bench-scale continuous-flow column experiments run at four temperatures (-1, -8, -30 and -60°C), SO2 was shown to dissolve and to react with other species in the ice-air interfacial region...

  1. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment.

  2. Surface morphology of Saccinobaculus (Oxymonadida): implications for character evolution and function in oxymonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kevin J; Waller, Ross F; Keeling, Patrick J

    2008-04-01

    Examination of surface morphology of the oxymonad genus Saccinobaculus from the gut of the wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus with scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals several new characters not observable with light microscopy. These include small concavities covering the external surface, a glycocalyx, coated pinocytotic vesicles, and, in one species, unidentified, membrane-bounded organelles with a granular matrix that may represent peroxisomal or mitochondrial derivatives. Unlike representatives of some other oxymonad families, Saccinobaculus lacks extracellular surface structures, a holdfast, and, generally, ectobiotic bacteria. We examined the evolution of these and other characters in light of previously published phylogenies of oxymonads based on molecular data. The presence of concavities in Saccinobaculus and families Pyrsonymphidae and Oxymonadidae strengthens support for a clade comprising these three families. A glycocalyx appears to be a synapomorphy of all oxymonads, and the presence of ectobiotic bacteria also appears to be ancestral to oxymonads, but lost in Saccinobaculus. A holdfast appears to have arisen multiple times. We hypothesize that concavities may play a role in a two-step mechanism for the accumulation and internalization of specific solutes, and that the highly motile and morphologically plastic nature of Saccinobaculus cells limits the possibility of retaining a covering of ectobiotic bacteria.

  3. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  4. Failure of heterogeneous materials: Scaling properties of fracture surfaces and implications on models of cracks in disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    While there exists a unified theoretical framework - Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) - to describe the failure of homogeneous materials, understanding and modelling the mechanical properties of heterogeneous media continue to raise significant fundamental challenges. These mechanical properties, observed at the macroscopic scale, result from microscopic processes occurring at the scale of the material. To include these local processes into a statistical description constitutes then a crucial step toward the setup of predictive macroscopic models. Crack surface roughness is a consequence of these local processes. Consequently, many fractography experiments have focussed on their analysis. In this context, it was recently evidenced that, in many materials, fracture surfaces exhibit anisotropic scaling properties reminiscent to interface growth problems, fully characterized by two couples of parameters: The roughness exponents and the characteristic length-scales measured along and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth respectively. While the characteristic length-scales do depend on the considered material, the exponents are surprisingly universal: Two distinct sets of critical exponents are observed whether the surfaces are examined at scales below or above the size of the damaged zone at the crack front. Models of crack growth in disordered media are discussed at the light of these experimental observations. In particular, one can derive a model from LEFM which describe the development o