WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface energy transfer

  1. Triangulating Nucleic Acid Conformations Using Multicolor Surface Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Ryan A; Armstrong, Rachel E; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2016-02-23

    Optical ruler methods employing multiple fluorescent labels offer great potential for correlating distances among several sites, but are generally limited to interlabel distances under 10 nm and suffer from complications due to spectral overlap. Here we demonstrate a multicolor surface energy transfer (McSET) technique able to triangulate multiple points on a biopolymer, allowing for analysis of global structure in complex biomolecules. McSET couples the competitive energy transfer pathways of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) with gold-nanoparticle mediated Surface Energy Transfer (SET) in order to correlate systematically labeled points on the structure at distances greater than 10 nm and with reduced spectral overlap. To demonstrate the McSET method, the structures of a linear B-DNA and a more complex folded RNA ribozyme were analyzed within the McSET mathematical framework. The improved multicolor optical ruler method takes advantage of the broad spectral range and distances achievable when using a gold nanoparticle as the lowest energy acceptor. The ability to report distance information simultaneously across multiple length scales, short-range (10-50 Å), mid-range (50-150 Å), and long-range (150-350 Å), distinguishes this approach from other multicolor energy transfer methods.

  2. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  3. Supramolecular Surface Photochemistry: Cascade Energy Transfer between Encapsulated Dyes Aligned on a Clay Nanosheet Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takamasa; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-03-29

    Three coumarin derivatives (7-propoxy coumarin, coumarin-480, and coumarin-540a, 2, 3, and 4, respectively) having different absorption and emission spectra were encapsulated within a water-soluble organic capsule formed by the two positively charged ammonium-functionalized cavitand octaamine (OAm, 1). Guests 2, 3, and 4 absorb in ultraviolet, violet, and blue regions and emit in violet, blue, and green regions, respectively. Energy transfer between the above three coumarin@(OAm)2 complexes assembled on the surface of a saponite clay nanosheet was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques. Judging from their emission and excitation spectra, we concluded that the singlet-singlet energy transfer proceeded from 2 to 3, from 2 to 4, and from 3 to 4 when OAm-encapsulated 2, 3, and 4 were aligned on a clay surface as two-component systems. Under such conditions, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were calculated to be 33, 36, and 50% in two-component systems. When all three coumarins were assembled on the surface and 2 was excited, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were estimated to be 32, 34, and 33%. A comparison of energy transfer efficiencies of the two-component and three-component systems revealed that excitation of 2 leads to emission from 4. Successful merging of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry by demonstrating novel multi-step energy transfer in a three-component dye encapsulated system on a clay surface opens up newer opportunities for exploring such systems in an artificial light-harvesting phenomenon.

  4. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational energy transfer is studied using the new potential energy surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.

  5. Resonance Energy Transfer in Hybrid Devices in the Presence of a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We have studied room-temperature, nonradiative resonant energy transfer from InGaN/GaN quantum wells to CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals separated by aluminum oxide layers of different thicknesses. Nonradiative energy transfer from the quantum wells to the nanocrystals at separation distances of up...... to approximately 10 nm was observed. By comparing the carrier dynamics of the quantum wells and the nanocrystals, we found that nonradiative recombination via surface states, generated during dry etching of the wafer, counteracts the nonradiative energy-transfer process to the nanocrystals and therefore decreases...

  6. An optimized surface plasmon photovoltaic structure using energy transfer between discrete nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Albert; Fu, Sze-Ming; Chung, Yen-Kai; Lai, Shih-Yun; Tseng, Chi-Wei

    2013-01-14

    Surface plasmon enhancement has been proposed as a way to achieve higher absorption for thin-film photovoltaics, where surface plasmon polariton(SPP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) are shown to provide dense near field and far field light scattering. Here it is shown that controlled far-field light scattering can be achieved using successive coupling between surface plasmonic (SP) nano-particles. Through genetic algorithm (GA) optimization, energy transfer between discrete nano-particles (ETDNP) is identified, which enhances solar cell efficiency. The optimized energy transfer structure acts like lumped-element transmission line and can properly alter the direction of photon flow. Increased in-plane component of wavevector is thus achieved and photon path length is extended. In addition, Wood-Rayleigh anomaly, at which transmission minimum occurs, is avoided through GA optimization. Optimized energy transfer structure provides 46.95% improvement over baseline planar cell. It achieves larger angular scattering capability compared to conventional surface plasmon polariton back reflector structure and index-guided structure due to SP energy transfer through mode coupling. Via SP mediated energy transfer, an alternative way to control the light flow inside thin-film is proposed, which can be more efficient than conventional index-guided mode using total internal reflection (TIR).

  7. Effect of surface free energy on PDMS transfer in microcontact printing and its application to ToF-SIMS to probe surface energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Shirahata, Naoto; Saini, Gaurav; Zhang, Feng; Pei, Lei; Asplund, Matthew C; Kurth, Dirk G; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Sautter, Ken; Nakanishi, Takashi; Smentkowski, Vincent; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-05-19

    Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) transfer during microcontact printing (microCP) has been observed in previous reports, which generally focused on only one or a few different substrates, in this work we investigate the extent of PDMS transfer onto a series of surfaces with a wide range of hydrophobicities using an uninked, unpatterned PDMS stamp. These surfaces include clean silicon, clean titanium, clean gold, "dirty" silicon, polystyrene, Teflon, surfaces modified with PEG, amino, dodecyl, and hexadecyl monolayers, and also two loose molecular materials. The PDMS transferred onto planar surfaces is, in general, easily detected by wetting and spectroscopic ellipsometry. More importantly, it is detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) because of the sensitivity of this technique to PDMS. The effect of surface free energy on PDMS transfer in microcontact printing is investigated, and the relationship between the amount of PDMS in ToF-SIMS spectra and the surface tensions of initial surfaces is revealed. We show that PDMS transfer can be applied as a probe of surface free energies using ToF-SIMS, where PDMS preferentially transfers onto more hydrophilic surface features during stamping, with little being transferred onto very hydrophobic surface features. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the ToF-SIMS image data further confirms and clarifies these results. Our data lend themselves to the hypothesis that it is the free energy of the surface that plays a major role in determining the degree of PDMS transfer during microCP.

  8. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-21

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis.

  9. Cascaded exciton energy transfer in a monolayer semiconductor lateral heterostructure assisted by surface plasmon polariton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinwei; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Chen, I-Tung; Mohammadi Estakhri, Nasim; Zhang, Xin-Quan; Wang, Yanrong; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Chun-An; Shih, Chih-Kang; Alù, Andrea; Li, Xiaoqin; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Gwo, Shangjr

    2017-06-26

    Atomically thin lateral heterostructures based on transition metal dichalcogenides have recently been demonstrated. In monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, exciton energy transfer is typically limited to a short range (~1 μm), and additional losses may be incurred at the interfacial regions of a lateral heterostructure. To overcome these challenges, here we experimentally implement a planar metal-oxide-semiconductor structure by placing a WS 2 /MoS 2 monolayer heterostructure on top of an Al 2 O 3 -capped Ag single-crystalline plate. We find that the exciton energy transfer range can be extended to tens of microns in the hybrid structure mediated by an exciton-surface plasmon polariton-exciton conversion mechanism, allowing cascaded exciton energy transfer from one transition metal dichalcogenides region supporting high-energy exciton resonance to a different transition metal dichalcogenides region in the lateral heterostructure with low-energy exciton resonance. The realized planar hybrid structure combines two-dimensional light-emitting materials with planar plasmonic waveguides and offers great potential for developing integrated photonic and plasmonic devices.Exciton energy transfer in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides is limited to short distances. Here, Shi et al. fabricate a planar metal-oxide-semiconductor structure and show that exciton energy transfer can be extended to tens of microns, mediated by an exciton-surface-plasmon-polariton-exciton conversion mechanism.

  10. Investigation of inelastic scattering of ultracold neutrons with small energy transfer at solid state surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lychagin, E.V.; Muzychka, A.Yu.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Strelkov, A.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Nesvizhevskij, V.V.; Tal'daev, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of neutrons with small energy transfer of ∼10 -7 eV was investigated using gravitational UCN spectrometer. The probability of such a process at stainless steel and beryllium surfaces was measured. It was also estimated at copper surface. The measurement showed that the detected flux of neutrons scattered at beryllium and copper surfaces is ∼ 2 times higher at room temperature compared to that at the liquid nitrogen temperature. (author)

  11. Molecular beam studies of energy transfer in scattering from crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    The translational energy distributions and angular distributions of D 2 O produced from the reaction of incident D 2 and O 2 on a (111) platinum single crystal surface have been measured through the use of a molecular beam-surface scattering apparatus equipped with a time-of-flight spectrometer. The translation energies were measured over the surface temperature range T/sub s/ = 664 K - 913 K and at scattering angles of 7 0 and 40 0 from the surface normal. The D 2 O translational energy, , was found to be approximately half the equilibrium value over the temperature range examined, with /2k varying from 280 K to 480 K. These results are discussed in terms of a non-equilibrium desorption model. The two-photon ionization spectrometer was built to investigate the internal rotational and vibrational energy distributions of NO scattered from Pt(111) surfaces. The rotational energy distributions were measured over the crystal temperature range of T/sub s/ = 400 K - 1200 K. The translational energy distributions and angular distributions were measured using the time-of-flight spectrometer over the crystal temperature range of 400 K - 110 K and for beam translational energies of 0.046 eV, 0.11 eV and 0.24 eV, so that complete energy exchange information for translation, rotation and vibration is available for this gas-surface system. Significant energy transfer was observed in all three modes

  12. Surface modification and laser pulse length effects on internal energy transfer in DIOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guanghong; Chen, Yong; Siuzdak, Gary; Vertes, Akos

    2005-12-29

    Benzyl-substituted benzylpyridinium (BP) chloride salts were used as a source of thermometer ions to probe the internal energy (IE) transfer in desorption/ionization on porous silicon (DIOS). To modify their wetting properties and the interaction energies with the thermometer ions, the DIOS surfaces were silylated to produce trimethylsilyl- (TMS), amine- (NH2), perfluoroalkyl- (PFA), and perfluorophenyl-derivatized (PFP) surfaces. Two laser sources--a nitrogen laser with pulse length of 4 ns and a mode locked 3 x omega Nd:YAG laser with a pulse length of 22 ps--were utilized to induce desorption/ionization and fragmentation at various laser fluence levels. The corresponding survival yields were determined as indicators of the IE transfer and the IE distributions were extracted. In most cases, with increasing the laser fluence in a broad range (approximately 20 mJ/cm2), no change in IE transfer was observed. For ns excitation, this was in remarkable contrast with MALDI, where increasing the laser fluence resulted in sharply (within approximately 5 mJ/cm2) declining survival yields. Derivatization of the porous silicon surface did not affect the survival yields significantly but had a discernible effect on the threshold fluence for ion production. The IE distributions determined for DIOS and MALDI from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid reveal that the mean IE value is always lower for the latter. Using the ps laser, the IE distribution is always narrower for DIOS, whereas for ns laser excitation the width depends on surface modification. Most of the differences between MALDI and DIOS described here are compatible with the different dimensionality of the plume expansion and the differences in the activation energy of desorption due to surface modifications.

  13. Energy transfer and photochemistry on a metal surface: Mo(CO)6 on Rh(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germer, T.A.; Ho, W.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of photoinduced reactions on solid surfaces depends on the relative rates between the excited-state decomposition and the energy transfer to the surface. In this study, the photodecomposition of Mo(CO) 6 on Rh(100) at 90 K by 325-nm UV irradiation has been studied as a function of coverage and surface preparation using thermal desorption spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and photoinduced desorption spectroscopy. It is found that Mo(CO) 6 adsorbs dissociatively on Rh(100) into carbonyl fragments and CO in the first monolayer and molecularly in multilayers. Photoinduced desorption of CO is observed for the multilayers adsorbed onto the dissociated first layer via a nonthermal electronic excitation of adsorbed metal carbonyls. The presence of the metal surface prevents complete decarbonylation as in the gas phase; deexcitation of electronically excited carbonyls is not sufficiently fast to quench all the observed photochemistry. It is also found that Mo(CO) 6 adsorbs molecularly on a presaturated CO ordered overlayer on Rh(100) and undergoes photodissociation to a greater degree than on the dissociated and disordered surface of carbonyl fragments. The ordered CO layer effectively screens the interaction between the molecular carbonyls and the Rh(100) layer surface

  14. Electronic energy transfer from molecules to metal and semiconductor surfaces, and chemisorption-induced changes in optical response of the nickel (111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmore, P.M.

    1982-10-01

    The evolution of molecular excited states near solid surfaces is investigated. The mechanisms through which energy is transferred to the surface are described within a classical image dipole picture of the interaction. More sophisticated models for the dielectric response of the solid surface add important new decay channels for the energy dissipation. The predictions and applicability of three of these refined theories are discussed.

  15. Electronic energy transfer from molecules to metal and semiconductor surfaces, and chemisorption-induced changes in optical response of the nickel (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, P.M.

    1982-10-01

    The evolution of molecular excited states near solid surfaces is investigated. The mechanisms through which energy is transferred to the surface are described within a classical image dipole picture of the interaction. More sophisticated models for the dielectric response of the solid surface add important new decay channels for the energy dissipation. The predictions and applicability of three of these refined theories are discussed

  16. Localized surface plasmon mediated energy transfer in the vicinity of core-shell nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh, E-mail: manmohan@gbu.ac.in; Juneja, Soniya [Department of Applied Physics, School of Vocational Studies and Applied Sciences, Gautam Buddha University, Greater Noida 201308 (India)

    2016-05-28

    Multipole spectral expansion based theory of energy transfer interactions between a donor and an acceptor molecule in the vicinity of a core-shell (nanoshell or core@shell) based plasmonic nanostructure is developed. In view of the diverse applications and rich plasmonic features such as tuning capability of surface plasmon (SP) frequencies, greater sensitivity to the change of dielectric environment, controllable redirection of electromagnetic radiation, closed form expressions for Energy Transfer Rate Enhancement Factor (ETREF) near core-shell particle are reported. The dependence of ETREF on different parameters is established through fitting equations, perceived to be of key importance for developing appropriate designs. The theoretical approach developed in the present work is capable of treating higher order multipoles, which, in turn, are also shown to play a crucial role in the present context. Moreover, closed form expressions derived in the present work can directly be used as formula, e.g., for designing SP based biosensors and estimating energy exchange between proteins and excitonic interactions in quantum dots.

  17. Surface-Tunable Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer via Geometry-Controlled ZnO Nanorod Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Park, Geun Chul; Lee, Seung Muk; Lee, Jung Heon; Lim, Butaek; Hwang, Soo Min; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Hansoo; Joo, Jinho; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-01

    The use of ZnO nanorods (NRs) as an effective coordinator and biosensing platform to create bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is reported. Herein, a hydrothermal approach is applied to obtain morphologically controlled ZnO NRs, which are directly bound to luciferase (Luc) and carboxy-modified quantum dot (QD) acting as a donor-acceptor pair for BRET. BRET efficiency varies significantly with the geometry of ZnO NRs, which modulates the coordination between hexahistidine-tagged Luc (Luc-His6 ) and QD, owing to the combined effect of the total surface area consisting of (001) and (100) planes and their surface polarities. Unlike typical QD-BRET reactions with metal ions (e.g., zinc ions), a geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can facilitate the design of surface-initiated BRET sensors without being supplemented by copious metal ions: the geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can therefore pave the way for nanostructure-based biosensors with enhanced analytical performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer between gold nanorods and fluorophores: application to endocytosis study and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Wei, Guoke; Yu, Jun; Birch, David J S; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer between fluorophores and gold nanorods under two-photon excitation using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in both solution and intracellular phases. These studies demonstrated that gold nanoparticle-dye energy transfer combinations are appealing, not only in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging, but also energy transfer-based fluorescence lifetime sensing of bio-analytes. Here, we apply this approach to study the internalization of gold nanorods (GNRs) in HeLa cells using the early endosome labeling marker GFP. The observed energy transfer between GFP and the GNRs indicates the involvement of endocytosis in GNR uptake. Moreover, a novel nanoprobe based on oligonucleotide functionalized gold nanorods for nucleic acid sensing via dye-GNRs energy transfer is demonstrated, potentially opening up new possibilities in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The influence of oligonucleotide design on such nanoprobe performance was studied for the first time using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, bringing new insights to the optimization of the nanoprobe.

  19. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-28

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  20. Surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer of electrically-pumped excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kwang Hyup; Shtein, Max; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-08-25

    An electrically pumped light emitting device emits a light when powered by a power source. The light emitting device includes a first electrode, a second electrode including an outer surface, and at least one active organic semiconductor disposed between the first and second electrodes. The device also includes a dye adjacent the outer surface of the second electrode such that the second electrode is disposed between the dye and the active organic semiconductor. A voltage applied by the power source across the first and second electrodes causes energy to couple from decaying dipoles into surface plasmon polariton modes, which then evanescently couple to the dye to cause the light to be emitted.

  1. Vapor shielding effects on energy transfer from plasma-gun generated ELM-like transient loads to material surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Isono, W.; Nakazono, T.; Nakane, M.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer processes from ELM-like pulsed helium (He) plasmas with a pulse duration of ˜0.1 ms to aluminum (Al) and tungsten (W) surfaces were experimentally investigated by the use of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device. The surface absorbed energy density of the He pulsed plasma on the W surface measured with a calorimeter was ˜0.44 MJ m-2, whereas it was ˜0.15 MJ m-2 on the Al surface. A vapor layer in front of the Al surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was clearly identified by Al neutral emission line (Al i) measured with a high time resolution spectrometer, and fast imaging with a high-speed visible camera filtered around the Al i emission line. On the other hand, no clear evaporation in front of the W surface exposed to the He pulsed plasma was observed in the present condition. Discussions on the reduction in the surface absorbed energy density on the Al surface are provided by considering the latent heat of vaporization and radiation cooling due to the Al vapor cloud.

  2. Classical Trajectory Study of Collision Energy Transfer between Ne and C2H2 on a Full Dimensional Accurate Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Yin; Ma, Jianyi; Li, Jun

    2018-02-15

    Collision energy transfer plays an important role in gas phase reaction kinetics and relaxation of excited molecules. However, empirical treatments are generally adopted for the collisional energy transfer in the master equation based approach. In this work, classical trajectory approach is employed to investigate the collision energy transfer dynamics in the C 2 H 2 -Ne system. The entire potential energy surface is described as the sum of the C 2 H 2 potential and interaction potential between C 2 H 2 and Ne. It is highlighted that both parts of the entire potential are highly accurate. In particular, the interaction potential is fit to ∼41 300 configurations determined at the level of CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pCVTZ-F12 with the counterpoise correction. Collision energy transfer dynamics are then carried out on this benchmark potential and the widely used Lennard-Jones and Buckingham interaction potentials. Energy transfers and related probability densities at different collisional energies are reported and discussed.

  3. Clean Firetube Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #7 (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A steam energy tip sheet for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO). The prevention of scale formation in firetube boilers can result in substantial energy savings. Scale deposits occur when calcium, magnesium, and silica, commonly found in most water supplies, react to form a continuous layer of material on the waterside of the boiler heat exchange tubes. Scale creates a problem because it typically possesses a thermal conductivity, an order of magnitude less than the corresponding value for bare steel. Even thin layers of scale serve as an effective insulator and retard heat transfer. The result is overheating of boiler tube metal, tube failures, and loss of energy efficiency. Fuel consumption may increase by up to 5% in firetube boilers because of scale. The boilers steam production may be reduced if the firing rate cannot be increased to compensate for the decrease in combustion efficiency. Energy losses as a function of scale thickness and composition are given. Any scale in a boiler is undesirable. The best way to deal with scale is not to let it form in the first place. Prevent scale formation by: (1) Pretreating of boiler makeup water (using water softeners, demineralizers, and reverse osmosis to remove scale-forming minerals); (2) Injecting chemicals into the boiler feedwater; and (3) Adopting proper boiler blowdown practices.

  4. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  5. Energy imparted, energy transferred, and net energy transferred

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attix, F.H.

    1983-01-01

    The ICRU-defined non-stochastic quantity absorbed dose is related to the stochastic quantity energy imparted. In the present paper the corresponding stochastic quantities energy transferred and net energy transferred are defined as precursors for kerma and collision kerma, respectively. This forms a rational fundamental framework for radiation dosimetry which facilitates its teaching and understanding. For neutrons collision kerma coincides with kerma, because the heavy secondaries do not lose significant energy by radiative processes (e.g., bremsstrahlung)

  6. Solvent-assisted multistage nonequilibrium electron transfer in rigid supramolecular systems: Diabatic free energy surfaces and algorithms for numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskov, Serguei V.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to the construction of diabatic free energy surfaces (FESs) for ultrafast electron transfer (ET) in a supramolecule with an arbitrary number of electron localization centers (redox sites) is developed, supposing that the reorganization energies for the charge transfers and shifts between all these centers are known. Dimensionality of the coordinate space required for the description of multistage ET in this supramolecular system is shown to be equal to N - 1, where N is the number of the molecular centers involved in the reaction. The proposed algorithm of FES construction employs metric properties of the coordinate space, namely, relation between the solvent reorganization energy and the distance between the two FES minima. In this space, the ET reaction coordinate zn n' associated with electron transfer between the nth and n'th centers is calculated through the projection to the direction, connecting the FES minima. The energy-gap reaction coordinates zn n' corresponding to different ET processes are not in general orthogonal so that ET between two molecular centers can create nonequilibrium distribution, not only along its own reaction coordinate but along other reaction coordinates too. This results in the influence of the preceding ET steps on the kinetics of the ensuing ET. It is important for the ensuing reaction to be ultrafast to proceed in parallel with relaxation along the ET reaction coordinates. Efficient algorithms for numerical simulation of multistage ET within the stochastic point-transition model are developed. The algorithms are based on the Brownian simulation technique with the recrossing-event detection procedure. The main advantages of the numerical method are (i) its computational complexity is linear with respect to the number of electronic states involved and (ii) calculations can be naturally parallelized up to the level of individual trajectories. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated for a model

  7. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond. Dipak K. Palit Radaition & Photochemistry Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Mumbai 400 085, India.

  8. Laser induced energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcone, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two related methods of rapidly transferring stored energy from one excited chemical species to another are described. The first of these, called a laser induced collision, involves a reaction in which the energy balance is met by photons from an intense laser beam. A collision cross section of ca 10 - 17 cm 2 was induced in an experiment which demonstrated the predicted dependence of the cross section on wavelength and power density of the applied laser. A second type of laser induced energy transfer involves the inelastic scattering of laser radiation from energetically excited atoms, and subsequent absorption of the scattered light by a second species. The technique of producing the light, ''anti-Stokes Raman'' scattering of visible and infrared wavelength laser photons, is shown to be an efficient source of narrow bandwidth, high brightness, tunable radiation at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths by using it to excite a rare gas transition at 583.7 A. In addition, this light source was used to make the first measurement of the isotopic shift of the helium metastable level at 601 A. Applications in laser controlled chemistry and spectroscopy, and proposals for new types of lasers using these two energy transfer methods are discussed

  9. Insight into a reversible energy transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming Xuan; Zou, Hong Yan; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Yue; Li, Na; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-09-15

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) processes have wide applications; these processes involve a unidirectional energy transfer from a particular donor to a particular acceptor. Here, we report a plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET), which occurs from the surface of gold nanoparticles to fluorescent organic dyes, and coexists with a nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) that operates in the reverse direction. The coexistence of both PRET and NSET in opposite directions means that the roles of both donor and acceptor can be interchanged, which could be identified by using spectrofluorometric measurements and light scattering dark field microscopic imaging. The experimental data could be further theoretically supported using Persson and Lang's model, the quasi-static approximation and finite-difference time-domain simulation. Moreover, disruption of the PRET process by altering the energy transfer pairs suggests that interactions occur inside the reversible energy transfer system, which manifest by increasing the fluorescence quenching efficiency of the NSET process.

  10. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  11. ENERGY-TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonemann, P.C.; Cowhig, W.T.; Davenport, P.A.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to the transfer of energy in a traveling electromagnetic wave to direct-current electrical energy in a gaseous medium. The traveling wave is generated by means of a radio-frequency oscillator connected across a capacitance-loaded helix wound around a sealed tube enclosing the gaseous medium. The traveling wave causes the electrons within the medium to drift towards one end of the tube. The direct current appearing across electrodes placed at each end of the tube is then used by some electrical means. (AEC)

  12. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Mechanism of energy transfer from an optical-breakdown plasma to a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, E. A.; Kovalev, A. S.; Popov, Aleksandr M.; Seleznev, B. V.

    1990-03-01

    A two-dimensional theoretical model is developed for the description of the transfer of energy from a surface-breakdown plasma, maintained by CO2 laser radiation, to a target. An investigation is reported of the efficiency of the interaction of laser radiation with a target as a function of the radiation intensity and spot size. A strong localization of the laser interaction is shown to be due to a heat-conduction energy flux, whereas the energy deposited outside the irradiation spot is due to radiative energy transfer at ultraviolet frequencies.

  13. The analysis of mass and energy transfer from a surface by means of a physical model conceived as a teaching tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressotti, A.; Zerbi, G.; Delle Vedove, G.; Ham, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    A physical model representing an evapotranspirating field on a scale 1:100 is described. The model, having a moderate cost, was devised as a teaching tool for agronomy and agrometeorology classes; it permits the measurement and the continuous monitoring of the parameters involved in mass and energy transfer over an evaporating surface (radiation, turbulence, temperature of the air and of the surface, heat fluxes, vapor pressure gradients). The physical characteristics of the surface can be changed to simulate different situations of a cultivated field. The surface resistance is calculated by the measurement of the Bowen ratio and directly from the measurement of the surface temperature [it

  14. Ultrafast vibrational energy transfer at the water/air interface revealed by two-dimensional surface vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water is very different from liquids of similar molecular weight, and one of its unique properties is the very efficient transfer of vibrational energy between molecules, which arises as a result of strong dipole-dipole interactions between the O-H oscillators. Although we have a sound understanding

  15. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  16. Electron energy transfer effect in Au NS/CH3NH3PbI3-xClx heterostructures via localized surface plasmon resonance coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunfeng; Zhai, Jizhi; Bi, Gang; Wu, Huizhen

    2016-09-15

    Localized surface plasmon resonance coupling effects (LSPR) have attracted much attention due to their interesting properties. This Letter demonstrates significant photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in the Au NS/CH3NH3PbI3-xClx heterostructures via the LSPR coupling. The observed PL emission enhancement is mainly attributed to the hot electron energy transfer effect related to the LSPR coupling. For the energy transfer effect, photo-generated electrons will be directly extracted into Au SPs, rather than relaxed into exciton states. This energy transfer process is much faster than the diffusion and relaxation time of free electrons, and may provide new ideas on the design of high-efficiency solar cells and ultrafast response photodetectors.

  17. Core-and-surface-functionalized polyphenylene dendrimers for solution-processed, pure-blue light-emitting diodes through surface-to-core energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Baumgarten, Martin; Auer, Manuel; Trattnig, Roman; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    Several pyrene-based polyphenylene dendrimers (PYPPDs) with different peripheral chromophores (PCs) are synthesized and characterized. Deep blue emissions solely from the core are observed for all of them in photoluminescence spectra due to good steric shielding of the core and highly efficient surface-to-core Förster resonant energy transfers (FRETs). Device performances are found in good correlation with the energy gaps between the work function of the electrodes and the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) levels of the PCs. Pure blue emission, luminance as high as 3700 cd m(-2) with Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage 1931 (CIE(xy)) = (0.16, 0.21), and a peak current efficiency of 0.52 cd A(-1) at CIE(xy) = (0.17, 0.20) are achieved. These dendrimers are among the best dendritic systems so far for fluorescent blue light-emitting materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} ions sorbed on SrTiO{sub 3} surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, G. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Radiochemistry Group, University Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay (France); Mercier-Bion, F., E-mail: mercier@ipno.in2p3.fr [Nuclear Physics Institute, Radiochemistry Group, University Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay (France); Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Roques, J.; Simoni, E. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Radiochemistry Group, University Paris-Sud 11, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2012-05-15

    The energy transfer at room temperature between Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions sorbed onto SrTiO{sub 3} powders is investigated, using Time-Resolved Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS). Several published works deal with the energy transfer between two lanthanide ions in co-doped matrices but it is the first time that transfer processes between two lanthanide ions sorbed on a solid surface is reported. The results show that the energy transfer between sorbed Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions on strontium titanate is a non-radiative process and follows a dipole-dipole type interaction. Moreover, the higher the acceptor ions Eu{sup 3+} concentration, the more efficient the energy transfer. It is shown that no energy migration between the Tb{sup 3+} donor ions occurs. A formalism based on the model of Inokuti-Hirayama is used and allows one to fit the non-exponential Tb{sup 3+} fluorescence decay. It is thus possible to evaluate the critical radius (R{sub 0}) of the influence sphere of the sorbed Tb{sup 3+} ions. According to the previous works, two sorption sites are considered for the sorbed rare-earth. The calculated radii are similar to those obtained for other couples of donor-acceptor lanthanide ions reported in the literature.

  19. Energy transfer properties and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Since no single experimental technique is the best method for energy transfer experiments, we have used both time-dependent infrared fluorescence (IRF) and time-dependent thermal lensing (TDTL) to study energy transfer in various systems. We are investigating pump-probe techniques employing resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). IRF was used to study benzene, azulene, and toluene. TDTL was used to study CS 2 and SO 2 (data not given for latter). Large molecule energy transfer mechanisms are discussed. 10 figs

  20. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  1. Energy transfer in anisotropic systems: A. Excitation migration in substitutionally disordered one-dimensional solids. B. The spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwemer, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    The energy and dynamics of excited states in a variety of anisotropic environments, including isotopically and chemically mixed crystals and molecular overlayers adsorbed on a nickel (111) surface, are investigated. The relationship between local and long-range structure and spectroscopic properties is explored. A theory for energy transfer in substitutionally disordered solids is presented. Explicit expressions for the ''diffusion'' coefficients and the energy partitioning ratios in binary systems are derived. Energy transfer between localized states is found to be facilitated by concurrent tunnelling and thermal promotion. Experimental results for triplet energy partitioning between mobile and stationary trap states as a function of mobile trap concentration in the ternary d/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--h/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--pyrazine system are analyzed. It is shown that both tunnelling and thermal detrapping contribute to triplet exciton mobility below 4.2 K. Singlet exciton migration makes an important contribution to trap equilibration before intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Spin coherence experiments are used to determine the energy level structure, physical geometry, and exciton dynamics of a series of impurity-induced traps in 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. The uv spectra of pyrazine, pyridine, and naphthalene adsorbed on a nickel single crystal (111) surface are measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry at low temperatures. The excited electronic and vibronic energy levels measured are similar to bulk molecular crystal values, but pyrazine and pyridine show small, but significant deviations. The ordering of molecular overlays is observed spectroscopically and information about overlayer crystal structure is deduced. 148 references, 48 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Stray energy transfer during endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward L; Madani, Amin; Overbey, Douglas M; Kiourti, Asimina; Bojja-Venkatakrishnan, Satheesh; Mikami, Dean J; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Arcomano, Todd R; Robinson, Thomas N

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopy is the standard tool for the evaluation and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. While the risk of complication is low, the use of energy devices can increase complications by 100-fold. The mechanism of increased injury and presence of stray energy is unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine if stray energy transfer occurs during endoscopy and if so, to define strategies to minimize the risk of energy complications. A gastroscope was introduced into the stomach of an anesthetized pig. A monopolar generator delivered energy for 5 s to a snare without contacting tissue or the endoscope itself. The endoscope tip orientation, energy device type, power level, energy mode, and generator type were varied to mimic in vivo use. The primary outcome (stray current) was quantified as the change in tissue temperature (°C) from baseline at the tissue closest to the tip of the endoscope. Data were reported as mean ± standard deviation. Using the 60 W coag mode while changing the orientation of the endoscope tip, tissue temperature increased by 12.1 ± 3.5 °C nearest the camera lens (p energy transfer (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively) as did utilizing the low-voltage cut mode (6.6 ± 0.5 °C, p energy transfer compared to a standard generator (1.5 ± 3.5 °C vs. 9.5 ± 0.8 °C, p energy is transferred within the endoscope during the activation of common energy devices. This could result in post-polypectomy syndrome, bleeding, or perforation outside of the endoscopist's view. Decreasing the power, utilizing low-voltage modes and/or an impedance-monitoring generator can decrease the risk of complication.

  3. Application of a coupled microwave, energy and water transfer model to relate passive microwave emission from bare soils to near-surface water content and evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Simmonds

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the stability of the relation between microwave emission from the soil and the average near-surface water content in the case of relatively smooth, bare soils, and then considers the extent to which microwave radiometry can be used to estimate the effective surface resistance to vapour transfer, which is also related to the near-surface water status. The analysis is based on the use of a model (MICRO-SWEAT which couples a microwave radiative transfer model with a SVAT scheme that describes the exchanges of water vapour, energy and sensible heat at the land surface. Verification of MICRO-SWEAT showed good agreement (about 3K RMSE between predicted L band (1.4 GHz brightness temperature over soils with contrasting texture during a multi-day drydown, and those measured using a truck-mounted radiometer. There was good agreement between the measured and predicted relations between the average water content of the upper 2 cm of the soil profile and the brightness temperature normalised with respect to the radiometric surface temperature. Some of the scatter in this relationship was attributable to diurnal variation in the magnitude of near-surface gradients in temperature and water content, and could be accounted for by using the physically-based simulation model. The influence of soil texture on this relationship was well-simulated using MICRO-SWEAT. The paper concludes by demonstrating how MICRO-SWEAT can be used to establish a relationship between the normalised brightness temperature and the surface resistance for use in the prediction of evaporation using the Penman-Montheith equation.

  4. Heat transfer from rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1980-11-01

    The transformation of the friction data obtained with experiments in annuli can be performed either with the assumption of universal logarithmic velocity profile or of an universal eddy momentum diffusivity profile. For the roughness of practical interest both methods, when properly applied, give good results. For these roughnesses the transformed friction factors seem not to be unduly affected if one assumes a constant slope of the velocity profile equal to 2.5. All the transformation methods of the heat transfer data so far proposed predict too high wall temperatures in the central channels of a 19-rod bundle with three-dimensional roughness. Preliminary calculations show that the application of the superimposition principle with the logarithmic temperature profiles gives good results for the three-dimensional roughness as well. Although the measurements show that the slope of the logarithmic temperature profiles is different from 2.5, the assumption of a constant slope equal to 2.5 does not affect the transformed heat transfer data appreciably. For moderately high roughness ribs the turbulent Prandtl number, averaged over the cross section of a tube, is about the same (approx. 0.8) for rough as for smooth surfaces. The temperature effect on the heat transfer data with air cooling is stronger than originally assumed in the general correlation of Dalle Donne and Meyer. With helium cooling this temperature effect is even stronger. (orig.) [de

  5. Liquid-Infused Smooth Surface for Improved Condensation Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hirotaka; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Moriya, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Ryohei; Sasaki, Kaichi; Togasawa, Ryo; Yamazaki, Taku; Manabe, Kengo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2017-09-12

    Control of vapor condensation properties is a promising approach to manage a crucial part of energy infrastructure conditions. Heat transfer by vapor condensation on superhydrophobic coatings has garnered attention, because dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with rough structures leads to favorable heat-transfer performance. However, pinned condensed water droplets within the rough structure and a high thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation of superhydrophobic surfaces limit their heat-transfer increase. Recently, slippery liquid-infused surfaces (SLIPS) have been investigated, because of their high water sliding ability and surface smoothness originating from the liquid layer. However, even on SLIPS, condensed water droplets are eventually pinned to degrade their heat-transfer properties after extended use, because the rough base layer is exposed as infused liquid is lost. Herein, we report a liquid-infused smooth surface named "SPLASH" (surface with π electron interaction liquid adsorption, smoothness, and hydrophobicity) to overcome the problems derived from the rough structures in previous approaches to obtain stable, high heat-transfer performance. The SPLASH displayed a maximum condensation heat-transfer coefficient that was 175% higher than that of an uncoated substrate. The SPLASH also showed higher heat-transfer performance and more stable dropwise condensation than superhydrophobic surfaces and SLIPS from the viewpoints of condensed water droplet mobility and the thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation. The effects of liquid-infused surface roughness and liquid viscosity on condensation heat transfer were investigated to compare heat-transfer performance. This research will aid industrial applications using vapor condensation.

  6. Pumped energy transfer stations (STEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournery, Jean-Francois

    2015-12-01

    As objectives of development are high for renewable energies (they are supposed to cover 50 per cent of new energy needs by 2035), pumped energy transfer stations are to play an important role in this respect. The author first discusses the consequences of the development of renewable energies on the exploitation of electric grids: issue of intermittency for some of them, envisaged solutions. Then, he addresses one of the solutions: the storage of electric power. He notices that increasing the potential energy of a volume of water is presently the most mature solution to face massive needs of the power system. Dams and pumped energy transfer stations represent now almost the whole installed storage power in the world. The author then presents these pumped energy transfer stations: principle, brief history (the first appeared in Italy and Switzerland at the end of the 1890's). He indicates the various parameters of assessment of such stations: maximum stored energy, installed power in pumping mode and turbine mode, time constant, efficiency, level of flexibility. He discusses economic issues. He describes and comments the operation of turbine-pump groups: ternary groups, reversible binary groups. He discusses barriers to be overcome and technical advances to be made for varying speed groups and for marine stations. He finally gives an overview (table with number of stations belonging to different power ranges, remarkable installations) of existing stations in China, USA, Japan, Germany, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Switzerland, France and UK, and indicate predictions regarding storage needs at the world level. Some data are finally indicated for the six existing French installations

  7. Prevention of biofouling on heat transfer surfaces of ocean thermal energy converters. Progress report, May 1, 1975--November 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrozynski, R.L.; Jones, P.E.

    1975-12-01

    The objectives of the program were to develop chemical processes utilizing a combination of certain fluorochemicals and tribulyltin based toxicants for treating the surfaces of metals which may be used to fabricate OTEC heat exchangers, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of these surface treatments as antibiofoulants. Aluminium alloy No. 3003-H14 and titanium were testd, neither of which proved satisfactory. (WDM)

  8. Heat Transfer Manipulation via Switchable Wettability Surfaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research seeks to manipulate heat transfer during flow condensation in low-gravity environments by employing switchable wettability surfaces....

  9. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  10. Laser-Induced Energy Transfer in Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, J.B.W.; Rullmann, Johan; Wiersma, Douwe

    1981-01-01

    Laser-induced energy transfer was observed and studied in the system pentacene doped into naphthalene. The transfer spectrum shows a remarkable correspondence with the host density of states function. The rate for laser-induced energy transfer is given and it is concluded that most likely,

  11. Electromechanical capacitor for energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, T.A.; Chowdhuri, P.; Marshall, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inductive energy transfer between two magnets can be achieved with almost 100% efficiency with a transfer capacitor. However, the bulk and cost will be high, and reliability low if conventional capacitors are used. A homopolar machine, used as a capacitor, will be compact and economical. A homopolar machine was designed with counter-rotating copper disks completely immersed in a liquid metal (NaK-78) to work as a pulse capacitor. Absence of solid-brush collectors minimized wear and frictional losses. Wetting of the copper disks throughout the periphery by the liquid metal minimized the resistive losses at the collector interface. A liquid-metal collector would, however, introduce hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic losses. The selected liquid metal, e.g., NaK-78 will produce the lowest of such losses among the available liquid metals. An electromechanical capacitor of this design was tested at various dc magnetic fields. Its measured capacitance was about 100 farads at a dc magnetic field of 1.15 tesla

  12. Boiling and quenching heat transfer advancement by nanoscale surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Ziegler, Kirk J; Chung, J N

    2017-07-21

    All power production, refrigeration, and advanced electronic systems depend on efficient heat transfer mechanisms for achieving high power density and best system efficiency. Breakthrough advancement in boiling and quenching phase-change heat transfer processes by nanoscale surface texturing can lead to higher energy transfer efficiencies, substantial energy savings, and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This paper reports breakthrough advancements on both fronts of boiling and quenching. The critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling and the Leidenfrost point temperature (LPT) in quenching are the bottlenecks to the heat transfer advancements. As compared to a conventional aluminum surface, the current research reports a substantial enhancement of the CHF by 112% and an increase of the LPT by 40 K using an aluminum surface with anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous texture finish. These heat transfer enhancements imply that the power density would increase by more than 100% and the quenching efficiency would be raised by 33%. A theory that links the nucleation potential of the surface to heat transfer rates has been developed and it successfully explains the current finding by revealing that the heat transfer modification and enhancement are mainly attributed to the superhydrophilic surface property and excessive nanoscale nucleation sites created by the nanoporous surface.

  13. Heat transfer from rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1977-01-01

    Artificial roughness is often used in nuclear reactors to improve the thermal performance of the fuel elements. Although these are made up of clusters of rods, the experiments to measure the heat transfer and friction coefficients of roughness are performed with single rods contained in smooth tubes. This work illustrated a new transformation method to obtain data applicable to reactor fuel elements from these annulus experiments. New experimental friction data are presented for ten rods, each with a different artificial roughness made up of two-dimensional rectangular ribs. For each rod four tests have been performed, each in a different outer smooth tube. For two of these rods, each for two different outer tubes, heat transfer data are also given. The friction and heat transfer data, transformed with the present method, are correlated by simple equations. In the paper, these equations are applied to a case typical for a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor fuel element. (orig.) [de

  14. 2013 MOLECULAR ENERGY TRANSFER GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JANUARY 13-18, 2013 - VENTURA BEACH MARRIOTT, VENTURA CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Scott A. [Marquette University

    2012-10-18

    Sessions covered all areas of molecular energy transfer, with 10 sessions of talks and poster sessions covering the areas of :  Energy Transfer in Inelastic and Reactive Scattering  Energy Transfer in Photoinitiated and Unimolecular Reactions  Non-adiabatic Effects in Energy TransferEnergy Transfer at Surfaces and Interfaces  Energy Transfer in Clusters, Droplets, and Aerosols  Energy Transfer in Solution and Solid  Energy Transfer in Complex Systems  Energy Transfer: New vistas and horizons  Molecular Energy Transfer: Where Have We Been and Where are We Going?

  15. Microscale surface modifications for heat transfer enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Huseyin; Singh, Virendra; Kizito, John P; Rini, Daniel P; Seal, Sudipta; Chow, Louis C

    2013-10-09

    In this experimental study, two surface modification techniques were investigated for their effect on heat transfer enhancement. One of the methods employed the particle (grit) blasting to create microscale indentations, while the other used plasma spray coating to create microscale protrusions on Al 6061 (aluminum alloy 6061) samples. The test surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Because of the surface modifications, the actual surface area was increased up to 2.8× compared to the projected base area, and the arithmetic mean roughness value (Ra) was determined to vary from 0.3 μm for the reference smooth surface to 19.5 μm for the modified surfaces. Selected samples with modified surfaces along with the reference smooth surface were then evaluated for their heat transfer performance in spray cooling tests. The cooling system had vapor-atomizing nozzles and used anhydrous ammonia as the coolant in order to achieve heat fluxes up to 500 W/cm(2) representing a thermal management setting for high power systems. Experimental results showed that the microscale surface modifications enhanced heat transfer coefficients up to 76% at 500 W/cm(2) compared to the smooth surface and demonstrated the benefits of these practical surface modification techniques to enhance two-phase heat transfer process.

  16. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Approach to Energy Transfer in Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Duran, John M; Sereda, Yuriy V; Abi-Mansour, Andrew; Ortoleva, Peter

    2018-02-13

    After local transient fluctuations are dissipated, in an energy transfer process, a system evolves to a state where the energy density field varies slowly in time relative to the dynamics of atomic collisions and vibrations. Furthermore, the energy density field remains strongly coupled to the atomic scale processes (collisions and vibrations), and it can serve as the basis of a multiscale theory of energy transfer. Here, a method is introduced to capture the long scale energy density variations as they coevolve with the atomistic state in a way that yields insights into the basic physics and implies an efficient algorithm for energy transfer simulations. The approach is developed based on the N-atom Liouville equation and an interatomic force field and avoids the need for conjectured phenomenological equations for energy transfer and other processes. The theory is demonstrated for sodium chloride and silicon dioxide nanoparticles immersed in a water bath via molecular dynamics simulations of the energy transfer between a nanoparticle and its aqueous host fluid. The energy density field is computed for different sets of symmetric grid densities, and the multiscale theory holds when slowly varying energy densities at the nodes are obtained. Results strongly depend on grid density and nanoparticle constituent material. A nonuniform temperature distribution, larger thermal fluctuations in the nanoparticle than in the bath, and enhancement of fluctuations at the surface, which are expressed due to the atomic nature of the systems, are captured by this method rather than by phenomenological continuum energy transfer models.

  17. Energy traps of excited energy transfer processes in polymer solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahide Yamamoto; Kenji Hisada; Shinzaburo Ito

    1999-01-01

    In this report, the singlet and triplet exciton behaviors of the polymers containing carbazole (Cz) or phenanthrene (Ph) chromophores as the side group were studied in the solid state. The role of electronic energy traps in energy transfer process will be discussed and controlling factors of energy transfer processes will be given

  18. Nanophotonics: Energy Transfer towards Enhanced Luminescent Chemosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Aad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a recently proposed novel photonic approach for enhancing the fluorescence of extremely thin chemosensing polymer layers. We present theoretical and experimental results demonstrating the concept of gain-assisted waveguided energy transfer (G-WET on a very thin polymer nanolayer spincoated on an active ZnO thin film. The G-WET approach is shown to result in an 8-fold increase in polymer fluorescence. We then extend the G-WET concept to nanostructured media. The benefits of using active nanostructured substrates on the sensitivity and fluorescence of chemosensing polymers are discussed. Preliminary theoretical results on enlarged sensing surface and photonic band-gap are presented.

  19. Energy transfer in (bio)molecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milder, Maaike Theresia Wilhelmina

    This thesis reports, using a variety of optical techniques, the energy transfer pathways in different potential building blocks for molecular electronic devices, namely an antenna, a molecular wire and fluorescent switches. Using pump-probe spectroscopy the time constants of these transfer processes

  20. Interactive Joint Transfer of Energy and Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovski, Petar; Fouladgar, A. M.; Simeone, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    In some communication networks, such as passive RFID systems, the energy used to transfer information between a sender and a recipient can be reused for successive communication tasks. In fact, from known results in physics, any system that exchanges information via the transfer of given physical...

  1. Energy transfer in oligothiophene inclusion compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loi, M.A.; Mura, A.; Bongiovanni, G.; Botta, C.; Silvestro, G. Di; Tubino, R.

    2001-01-01

    Energy transfer between terthiophene and quinquethiophene oligomers embedded in the nanochannels of perhydrotriphenylene crystals is investigated by fs-time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Excitonic effects in these compounds are suppressed due to the large intermolecular distances imposed

  2. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  3. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grete, Philipp; O'Shea, Brian W.; Beckwith, Kris; Schmidt, Wolfram; Christlieb, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields, compressibility, and turbulence are important factors in many terrestrial and astrophysical processes. While energy dynamics, i.e., how energy is transferred within and between kinetic and magnetic reservoirs, has been previously studied in the context of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, we extend shell-to-shell energy transfer analysis to the compressible regime. We derive four new transfer functions specifically capturing compressibility effects in the kinetic and magnetic cascade, and capturing energy exchange via magnetic pressure. To illustrate their viability, we perform and analyze four simulations of driven isothermal MHD turbulence in the sub- and supersonic regime with two different codes. On the one hand, our analysis reveals robust characteristics across regime and numerical method. For example, energy transfer between individual scales is local and forward for both cascades with the magnetic cascade being stronger than the kinetic one. Magnetic tension and magnetic pressure related transfers are less local and weaker than the cascades. We find no evidence for significant nonlocal transfer. On the other hand, we show that certain functions, e.g., the compressive component of the magnetic energy cascade, exhibit a more complex behavior that varies both with regime and numerical method. Having established a basis for the analysis in the compressible regime, the method can now be applied to study a broader parameter space.

  4. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  5. Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy data - over 200 satellite-derived meteorology and solar energy parameters, monthly averaged from 22 years of data, global solar...

  6. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José, E-mail: jsdehesa@upv.es

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  7. Ultrafast intermolecular energy transfer in heavy water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piatkowski, L.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Bakker, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study of the vibrational energy relaxation and resonant vibrational (Forster) energy transfer of the OD vibrations of D2O and mixtures of D2O and H2O using femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy. We observe the lifetime of the OD vibrations of bulk D2O to be 400 +/- 30 fs. The rate of

  8. Energy transfer in turbulence under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzicotti, Michele; Aluie, Hussein; Biferale, Luca; Linkmann, Moritz

    2018-03-01

    It is known that rapidly rotating turbulent flows are characterized by the emergence of simultaneous upscale and downscale energy transfer. Indeed, both numerics and experiments show the formation of large-scale anisotropic vortices together with the development of small-scale dissipative structures. However the organization of interactions leading to this complex dynamics remains unclear. Two different mechanisms are known to be able to transfer energy upscale in a turbulent flow. The first is characterized by two-dimensional interactions among triads lying on the two-dimensional, three-component (2D3C)/slow manifold, namely on the Fourier plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. The second mechanism is three-dimensional and consists of interactions between triads with the same sign of helicity (homochiral). Here, we present a detailed numerical study of rotating flows using a suite of high-Reynolds-number direct numerical simulations (DNS) within different parameter regimes to analyze both upscale and downscale cascade ranges. We find that the upscale cascade at wave numbers close to the forcing scale is generated by increasingly dominant homochiral interactions which couple the three-dimensional bulk and the 2D3C plane. This coupling produces an accumulation of energy in the 2D3C plane, which then transfers energy to smaller wave numbers thanks to the two-dimensional mechanism. In the forward cascade range, we find that the energy transfer is dominated by heterochiral triads and is dominated primarily by interaction within the fast manifold where kz≠0 . We further analyze the energy transfer in different regions in the real-space domain. In particular, we distinguish high-strain from high-vorticity regions and we uncover that while the mean transfer is produced inside regions of strain, the rare but extreme events of energy transfer occur primarily inside the large-scale column vortices.

  9. Energy transfer in crystalline alkali nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan' ev, Vladimir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Kemerovo State University, Krasnaya Str., 6, Kemerovo 650043 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: eprlab@kemsu.ru

    2007-08-15

    The radiation annealing of peroxynitrite ions in pre-photolyzed (253.7nm) alkali nitrate crystals has been studied. This process is stated to be due to interaction with high-energy excited states of the nitrate ion symmetry E' than to low-energy excited states symmetry A{sub 1}{sup '}'. The distance of energy transfer has been found to be {approx}10nm.

  10. Energy technology transfer to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives some examples of how technology transfer can successfully be given to third world countries to allow them to benefit in their quest for economic growth and better standards of living through reduced energy consumption and environmental pollution. It also suggests methods by which obstacles such as high investment costs, lack of information, market demand, etc., can be overcome in order to motivate technological transfer by industrialized countries

  11. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  12. The surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1998-01-01

    We have used density functional theory to establish a database of surface energies for low index surfaces of 60 metals in the periodic table. The data may be used as a consistent starting point for models of surface science phenomena. The accuracy of the database is established in a comparison...

  13. Energy transfer in structured and unstructured environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iles-Smith, Jake; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Lambert, Neill

    2016-01-01

    We explore excitonic energy transfer dynamics in a molecular dimer system coupled to both structured and unstructured oscillator environments. By extending the reaction coordinate master equation technique developed by Iles-Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 032114 (2014)], we go beyond the commonly...... used Born-Markov approximations to incorporate system-environment correlations and the resultant non-Markovian dynamical effects. We obtain energy transfer dynamics for both underdamped and overdamped oscillator environments that are in perfect agreement with the numerical hierarchical equations....... We find that though an enhancement of the dimer energy transfer rate can be obtained when compared to an unstructured environment, its magnitude is rather sensitive to both the dimer-peak resonance conditions and the relative strengths of the underdamped and overdamped contributions. (C) 2016 AIP...

  14. Theory of coherent resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Cheng, Y.-C.; Reichman, David R.; Eaves, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    A theory of coherent resonance energy transfer is developed combining the polaron transformation and a time-local quantum master equation formulation, which is valid for arbitrary spectral densities including common modes. The theory contains inhomogeneous terms accounting for nonequilibrium initial preparation effects and elucidates how quantum coherence and nonequilibrium effects manifest themselves in the coherent energy transfer dynamics beyond the weak resonance coupling limit of the Foerster and Dexter (FD) theory. Numerical tests show that quantum coherence can cause significant changes in steady state donor/acceptor populations from those predicted by the FD theory and illustrate delicate cooperation of nonequilibrium and quantum coherence effects on the transient population dynamics.

  15. Rotational Energy Transfer in N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1994-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 intermolecular potential of van der Avoird et al. rotational energy transfer cross sections have been calculated using both the coupled state (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximations. The rotational energy transfer rate constants at 300 K, calculated in the CS approximation, are in reasonable agreement with the measurements of Sitz and Farrow. The IOS approximation qualitatively reproduces the dependence of the rate constants on the rotational quantum numbers, but consistently overestimates their magnitudes. The treatment of exchange symmetry will be discussed.

  16. Intramolecular energy transfer reactions in polymetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.

    1990-11-01

    This report is concerned with intramolecular, energy-transfer reactions. The concept of preparing synthetically a complex molecular species, capable of absorbing a photon at one metal center (antenna fragment), transferring that energy to a second metal center (reactive fragment) via a bridging ligand was first reported by our group in 1979. It is now apparent that a major emphasis in inorganic chemistry in the future will involve these types of molecular ensembles. Complexes discussed include Rh, Ru, and Cu complexes. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  17. A New Global Potential Energy Surface for the Hydroperoxyl Radical, HO2: Reaction Coefficients for H + O2 and Vibrational Splittings for H Atom Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new analytic global potential energy surface describing the hydroperoxyl radical system H((sup 2)S) + O2(X (sup 3)Sigma((sup -)(sub g))) (reversible reaction) HO2 ((X-tilde) (sup 2)A'') (reversible reaction) O((sup 3)P) + O H (X (sup 2)Pi) has been fitted using the ab initio complete active space SCF (self-consistent-field)/externally contracted configuration interaction (CASSCF/CCI) energy calculations of Walch and Duchovic. Results of quasiclassical trajectory studies to determine the rate coefficients of the forward and reverse reactions at combustion temperatures will be presented. In addition, vibrational energy levels were calculated using the quantum DVR-DGB (discrete variable representation-distributed Gaussian basis) method and the splitting due to H atom migration is investigated. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  18. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  19. Nonclassical energy transfer in photosynthetic FMO complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramavicius Vytautas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation energy transfer in a photosynthetic FMO complex has been simulated using the stochastic Schrödinger equation. Fluctuating chromophore transition energies are simulated from the quantum correlation function which allows to properly include the finite temperature. The resulting excitation dynamics shows fast thermalization of chromophore occupations into proper thermal equilibrium. The relaxation process is characterized by entropy dynamics, which shows nonclassical behavior.

  20. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 ...

  1. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2001-10-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency improvements are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and apprehension about potential disputes over these savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building commissioning), financial risk transfer techniques are less developed in the energy management arena than in other more mature segments of the economy. Energy Savings Insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - is one method of transferring financial risks away from the facility owner or energy services contractor. ESI offers a number of significant advantages over other forms of financial risk transfer, e.g. savings guarantees or performance bonds. ESI providers manage risk via pre-construction design review as well as post-construction commissioning and measurement and verification of savings. We found that the two mos t common criticisms of ESI - excessive pricing and onerous exclusions - are not born out in practice. In fact, if properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy savings projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Debt service can also be ensured by matching loan payments to projected energy savings while designing the insurance mechanism so that payments are made by the insurer in the event of a savings shortfall. We estimate the U.S. ESI market potential of $875 million/year in premium income. From an energy-policy perspective, ESI offers a number of potential benefits: ESI transfers performance risk from the balance sheet of the entity implementing the energy savings project, thereby freeing up capital otherwise needed to ''self-insure'' the savings. ESI reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy services firms who do not have sufficiently strong balance

  2. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Evan

    2001-01-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency improvements are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and apprehension about potential disputes over these savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building commissioning), financial risk transfer techniques are less developed in the energy management arena than in other more mature segments of the economy. Energy Savings Insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - is one method of transferring financial risks away from the facility owner or energy services contractor. ESI offers a number of significant advantages over other forms of financial risk transfer, e.g. savings guarantees or performance bonds. ESI providers manage risk via pre-construction design review as well as post-construction commissioning and measurement and verification of savings. We found that the two mos t common criticisms of ESI - excessive pricing and onerous exclusions - are not born out in practice. In fact, if properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy savings projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Debt service can also be ensured by matching loan payments to projected energy savings while designing the insurance mechanism so that payments are made by the insurer in the event of a savings shortfall. We estimate the U.S. ESI market potential of$875 million/year in premium income. From an energy-policy perspective, ESI offers a number of potential benefits: ESI transfers performance risk from the balance sheet of the entity implementing the energy savings project, thereby freeing up capital otherwise needed to ''self-insure'' the savings. ESI reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy services firms who do not have sufficiently strong balance sheets to self

  3. Risk transfer via energy-savings insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Evan

    2003-01-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and potential disputes over stipulated savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building diagnostics and commissioning), financial methods are less developed in the energy management arena than in other segments of the economy. Energy-savings insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - transfers and spreads both types of risk over a larger pool of energy efficiency projects and reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy service firms who lack sufficiently strong balance sheets to self-insure the savings. ESI encourages those implementing energy-saving projects to go beyond standard measures and thereby achieve more significant levels of energy savings. Insurance providers are proponents of improved savings measurement and verification techniques, as well as maintenance, thereby contributing to national energy-saving objectives. If properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy-saving projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Governmental agencies have been pioneers in the use of ESI and could continue to play a role

  4. Perspective of energy transfer from light energy into biological energy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Mingjun; Zhao, Jie; Shao, Jingxin; Li, Qi; Li, Junbai

    2016-01-01

    Energy has always been the most concerned topic in the world due to the large consumption. Various types of energy have been exploited and developed to enhance the output amount so that high requirements can be met. Like the hydro-energy, wind energy, and tidal energy, light energy as a renewable, clean, and widespread energy can be easily harvested. In microcosmic scale, some specific proteins and enzymes in green plants and bacteria play an important role in light harvest and energy convers...

  5. Low Energy Transfer to the Moon

    OpenAIRE

    Koon, W. S.; Lo, M. W.; Marsden, J. E.; Ross, S. D.

    2001-01-01

    In 1991, the Japanese Hiten mission used a low energy transfer with a ballistic capture at the Moon which required less Delta V than a standard Hohmann transfer. In this paper, we apply the dynamical systems techniques developed in our earlier work to reproduce systematically a Hiten-like mission. We approximate the Sun–Earth–Moon-spacecraft 4-body system as two 3-body systems. Using the invariant manifold structures of the Lagrange points of the 3-body systems, we are able to construct low e...

  6. Collision Frequency for Energy Transfer in Unimolecular Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira

    2018-03-01

    Pressure dependence of unimolecular reaction rates is governed by the energy transfer in collisions of reactants with bath gas molecules. Pressure-dependent rate constants can be theoretically determined by solving master equations for unimolecular reactions. In general, master equation formulations describe energy transfer processes using a collision frequency and a probability distribution model of the energy transferred per collision. The present study proposes a novel method for determining the collision frequency from the results of classical trajectory calculations. Classical trajectories for collisions of several polyatomic molecules (ethane, methane, tetrafluoromethane, and cyclohexane) with monatomic colliders (Ar, Kr, and Xe) were calculated on potential energy surfaces described by the third-order density-functional tight-binding method in combination with simple pairwise interaction potentials. Low-order (including non-integer-order) moments of the energy transferred in deactivating collisions were extracted from the trajectories and compared with those derived using some probability distribution models. The comparison demonstrates the inadequacy of the conventional Lennard-Jones collision model for representing the collision frequency and suggests a robust method for evaluating the collision frequency that is consistent with a given probability distribution model, such as the exponential-down model. The resulting collision frequencies for the exponential-down model are substantially higher than the Lennard-Jones collision frequencies and are close to the (hypothetical) capture rate constants for dispersion interactions. The practical adequacy of the exponential-down model is also briefly discussed.

  7. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  8. Stochastic Modelling of Wireless Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Shaun; Almaghasilah, Ahmed; Abedi, Ali; Wilkerson, DeLisa

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of a new method of powering remote sensors by the means of wireless energy transfer. The increased use of sensors for data collection comes with the inherent cost of supplying power from sources such as power cables or batteries. Wireless energy transfer technology eliminates the need for power cables or periodic battery replacement. The time and cost of setting up or expanding a sensor network will be reduced while allowing sensors to be placed in areas where running power cables or battery replacement is not feasible. This paper models wireless channels for power and data separately. Smart scheduling for the data channel is proposed to avoid transmitting data on a noisy channel where the probability of data loss is high to improve power efficiency. Analytical models have been developed and verified using simulations.

  9. Resonance Energy Transfer in Upconversion Nanoplatforms for Selective Biodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Yang, Dongpeng; Li, Fuyou

    2017-01-17

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) describes the process that energy is transferred from an excited donor to an acceptor molecule, leading to a reduction in the fluorescence emission intensity of the donor and an increase in that of the acceptor. By this technique, measurements with the good sensitivity can be made about distance within 1 to 10 nm under physiological conditions. For this reason, the RET technique has been widely used in polymer science, biochemistry, and structural biology. Recently, a number of RET systems incorporated with nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and upconversion nanoparticles, have been developed. These nanocrystals retain their optical superiority and can act as either a donor or a quencher, thereby enhancing the performance of RET systems and providing more opportunities in excitation wavelength selection. Notably, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their inherent advantages of large anti-Stoke shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, and absence of autofluorescence under low energy near-infrared (NIR) light excitation. These nanoparticles are promising for the biodetection of various types of analytes. Undoubtedly, the developments of those applications usually rely on resonance energy transfer, which could be regarded as a flexible technology to mediate energy transfer from upconversion phosphor to acceptor for the design of luminescent functional nanoplatforms. Currently, researchers have developed many RET-based upconversion nanosystems (RET-UCNP) that respond to specific changes in the biological environments. Specifically, small organic molecules, biological molecules, metal-organic complexes, or inorganic nanoparticles were carefully selected and bound to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles for the preparation of RET-UCNP nanosystems. Benefiting from the advantage and versatility offered by this technology, the research of RET

  10. Energy and electron transfers in photosensitive chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuizhu; Zeng, Fang; Zhu, Hongping; Tong, Zhen

    2005-02-23

    Novel photosensitive chitosan was synthesized. The modified chitosan contains photoactive anthracene chromophore moieties. Because of the presence of anthracene chromophores, the polymer absorbs light in the UV-vis spectral region. Electronically excited polymeric chromophores could participate in energy and electron transfer processes to the suitable acceptor molecules. The photosensitive chitosan developed herein could could act as an efficient photosensitizer and lead to the application of the environmentally friendly photocatalytic system for an efficient degradation of a wide range of pollutants.

  11. Energy transfer problems of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egely, G.

    1986-04-01

    The paper analyzes the energy transport phenomenon of ball lightnings, but momentum and charge transport phenomena are considered as well. The physical properties as energy density and transfer are investigated using several observers' accounts of interactions with different objects. It is shown that contrary to previous assumptions the ball lightning has negative electric charge, and very high internal energy density. Both internal and external energy source models are analyzed, and it is shown that regardless to the details of a given model neither of them can explain actual observations. This has been validated by a well documented case study, and by several additional observations. An entirely new, testable model is suggested, which is able to stand for all observed properties of ball lightnings, and it explains the cause of rarity of ball lightnings, and the reasons of the unsuccessful experimental efforts. It is shown that the plasma sphere is just a visible side effect of a more important phenomenon.

  12. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI) can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET) is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly...

  13. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  14. Energy transfer and kinetics in mechanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Shengyong; Mao, Qiongjing; Buekens, Alfons; Wang, Yuting; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-11-01

    Mechanochemistry (MC) exerts extraordinary degradation and decomposition effects on many chlorinated, brominated, and even fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, its application is still limited by inadequate study of its reaction kinetic aspects. In the present work, the ball motion and energy transfer in planetary ball mill are investigated in some detail. Almost all milling parameters are summarised in a single factor-total effective impact energy. Furthermore, the MC kinetic between calcium oxide/Al and hexachlorobenzene is well established and modelled. The results indicate that total effective impact energy and reagent ratio are the two factors sufficient for describing the MC degradation degree of POPs. The reaction rate constant only depends on the chemical properties of reactants, so it could be used as an important index to appraise the quality of MC additives. This model successfully predicts the reaction rate for different operating conditions, indicating that it could be suitably applied for conducting MC reactions in other reactors.

  15. The 1999 Conference on Molecular Energy Transfer (COMET XVI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The Final Proceedings for The 1999 Conference on Molecular Energy Transfer (COMET XVI), 20-25 June 1999. This is an interdisciplinary conference that concerns energy transfer in nonequilibrium gases and liquids...

  16. Immersion condensation on oil-infused heterogeneous surfaces for enhanced heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing condensation heat transfer is important for broad applications from power generation to water harvesting systems. Significant efforts have focused on easy removal of the condensate, yet the other desired properties of low contact angles and high nucleation densities for high heat transfer performance have been typically neglected. In this work, we demonstrate immersion condensation on oil-infused micro and nanostructured surfaces with heterogeneous coatings, where water droplets nucleate immersed within the oil. The combination of surface energy heterogeneity, reduced oil-water interfacial energy, and surface structuring enabled drastically increased nucleation densities while maintaining easy condensate removal and low contact angles. Accordingly, on oil-infused heterogeneous nanostructured copper oxide surfaces, we demonstrated approximately 100% increase in heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensation surfaces in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work offers a distinct approach utilizing surface chemistry and structuring together with liquid-infusion for enhanced condensation heat transfer.

  17. Energy redistribution in diatomic molecules on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asscher, M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    Translational and internal degrees of freedom of a scattered beam of NO molecules from a Pt(111) single crystal surface were measured as a function of scattering angle and crystal temperature in the range 450 to 1250K. None of the three degrees of freedom were found to fully accommodate to the crystal temperature, the translational degree being the most accommodated and the rotational degree of freedom the least. A precursor state model is suggested to account for the incomplete accommodation of translational and vibrational degrees of freedom as a function of crystal temperature and incident beam energy. The vibrational accommodation is further discussed in terms of a competition between desorption and vibrational excitation processes, thus providing valuable information on the interaction between vibrationally excited molecules and surfaces. Energy transfer into rotational degrees of freedom is qualitatively discussed

  18. Surface energy of explosive nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Nicolas; Bidault, Xavier; Soulard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Recent experimental studies show that nanostructuration has a substantial impact on the detonation of high explosives: a nanostructured one leads to smaller nanodiamonds than a microstructured one. Whether it comes from a higher surface energy or from porosity, the origin of these different behaviors must be investigated. The surface energy of TATB nanoparticles with a radius from 2 nm upto 60 nm has been determined by means of ReaxFF-based simulations. Then, using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the equation of states of the bulk material, the contribution of this excess energy to the heating of a shock-compressed nanostructured (and porous) material is evaluated and compared to the thermal effect due to its porosity collapse. A maximum temperature increase of 50 K is found for 4-nm nanoparticles, which remains negligible when compared to the few hundred degrees induced by the compaction work.

  19. Wireless energy transfer through non-resonant magnetic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Breinbjerg, Olav; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate by theoretical analysis and experimental verification that mid-range wireless energy transfer systems may take advantage of de-tuned coupling devices, without jeopardizing the energy transfer efficiency. Allowing for a modest de-tuning of the source coil, energy transfer systems co...

  20. SAFARI 2000 Surface Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART), Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Surface-sensing Measurements for Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) consist...

  1. Energy transfer during the hydroentanglement of fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moyo, D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available , an objective comparison was made. METHODOLOGY The hydroentangled nonwovens were produced from viscose and polylactic fibres according to the 3x3 Box-Behnken experimental design. The processing variables, namely, average fabric weight, machine speed... discharge coefficient, ?w is the water density = 1 000 kg/m3, and ni?li is the number of waterjets on the ith injector.1 Energy transfer during the hydroentanglement of fi bres D MOYO CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 1124, Port Elizabeth...

  2. Quantum dot-dye hybrid systems for energy transfer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Ting

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we focus on the preparation of energy transfer-based quantum dot (QD)-dye hybrid systems. Two kinds of QD-dye hybrid systems have been successfully synthesized: QD-silica-dye and QD-dye hybrid systems. In the QD-silica-dye hybrid system, multishell CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were adsorbed onto monodisperse Stoeber silica particles with an outer silica shell of thickness 2-24 nm containing organic dye molecules (Texas Red). The thickness of this dye layer has a strong effect on the total sensitized acceptor emission, which is explained by the increase in the number of dye molecules homogeneously distributed within the silica shell, in combination with an enhanced surface adsorption of QDs with increasing dye amount. Our conclusions were underlined by comparison of the experimental results with Monte-Carlo simulations, and by control experiments confirming attractive interactions between QDs and Texas Red freely dissolved in solution. New QD-dye hybrid system consisting of multishell QDs and organic perylene dyes have been synthesized. We developed a versatile approach to assemble extraordinarily stable QD-dye hybrids, which uses dicarboxylate anchors to bind rylene dyes to QD. This system yields a good basis to study the energy transfer between QD and dye because of its simple and compact design: there is no third kind of molecule linking QD and dye; no spacer; and the affinity of the functional group to the QD surface is strong. The FRET signal was measured for these complexes as a function of both dye to QD ratio and center-to-center distance between QD and dye by controlling number of covered ZnS layers. Data showed that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer in our QD-dye hybrid system. FRET efficiency can be controlled by not only adjusting the number of dyes on the QD surface or the QD to dye distance, but also properly choosing different dye and QD components. Due to the strong stability, our QD

  3. Quantum dot-dye hybrid systems for energy transfer applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ting

    2010-07-01

    In this thesis, we focus on the preparation of energy transfer-based quantum dot (QD)-dye hybrid systems. Two kinds of QD-dye hybrid systems have been successfully synthesized: QD-silica-dye and QD-dye hybrid systems. In the QD-silica-dye hybrid system, multishell CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were adsorbed onto monodisperse Stoeber silica particles with an outer silica shell of thickness 2-24 nm containing organic dye molecules (Texas Red). The thickness of this dye layer has a strong effect on the total sensitized acceptor emission, which is explained by the increase in the number of dye molecules homogeneously distributed within the silica shell, in combination with an enhanced surface adsorption of QDs with increasing dye amount. Our conclusions were underlined by comparison of the experimental results with Monte-Carlo simulations, and by control experiments confirming attractive interactions between QDs and Texas Red freely dissolved in solution. New QD-dye hybrid system consisting of multishell QDs and organic perylene dyes have been synthesized. We developed a versatile approach to assemble extraordinarily stable QD-dye hybrids, which uses dicarboxylate anchors to bind rylene dyes to QD. This system yields a good basis to study the energy transfer between QD and dye because of its simple and compact design: there is no third kind of molecule linking QD and dye; no spacer; and the affinity of the functional group to the QD surface is strong. The FRET signal was measured for these complexes as a function of both dye to QD ratio and center-to-center distance between QD and dye by controlling number of covered ZnS layers. Data showed that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer in our QD-dye hybrid system. FRET efficiency can be controlled by not only adjusting the number of dyes on the QD surface or the QD to dye distance, but also properly choosing different dye and QD components. Due to the strong stability, our QD

  4. Potential energy surface of triplet O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukku, Yuliya; Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2018-03-28

    We present a global ground-state potential energy surface (PES) for the triplet spin state of O 4 that is suitable for treating high-energy vibrational-rotational energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation in electronically adiabatic spin-conserving O 2 -O 2 collisions. The surface is based on MS-CASPT2/maug-cc-pVTZ electronic structure calculations with scaled external correlation; the active space has 16 electrons in 12 orbitals. The global ground-state potential energy surface was fitted by a many-body approach with an accurate O-O pairwise interaction and a fit of the many-body interaction potential to 10 180 electronic structure data points. The many-body fit is based on permutationally invariant polynomials in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances; the bond-order functions are mixed exponential-Gaussian functions. The geometries calculated and used for the fit include geometry scans corresponding to dissociative and vibrationally excited diatom-diatom collisions of O 2 , scans corresponding to O 3 interacting with O, additional geometries identified by running trajectories, and geometries along linear synchronous transit paths connecting randomly selected points. The global O 4 PES includes subsurfaces describing the interaction of diatomic molecules with other diatomic molecules or interactions of triatomic molecules and an atom. The interaction of ozone with a ground-state oxygen atom occurs on the triplet O 4 surface, and our surface includes high-energy points with O 3 -O geometries as well as O 2 -O 2 geometries and O 2 -O-O geometries.

  5. Energy transfer in the hybrid system dynamics (energy transfer in the axially moving double belt system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanovic-Hedrih, Katica R. [University of Nis, Mathematical Institute SANU, Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Nis (RS)

    2009-07-15

    First, as an introduction, using the author's published references, a short survey of an analytical study of the energy transfer between two coupled subsystems, as well as between a linear and nonlinear oscillators of a hybrid system, in the free and forced vibrations of a different type of inter connections between subsystems is presented. Second, as author's new research result, an analytical study of the energy transfer between two coupled like-string belts interconnected by light pure elastic layer in the axially moving sandwich double belt system, in the free vibrations is presented. On the basis of the obtained analytical expressions for the kinetic and potential energy of the belts and potential energy of the of light pure elastic distributed layer numerous conclusions are derived. In the pure linear elastic double belt system no transfer energy between different eigen modes of transversal vibrations of the axially moving double belt system, but in every from of the set of the infinite numbers eigen modes, there are transfer energy between belts. Each of the eigen modes of the free transversal vibrations are like two-frequency. The change of the potential energy of the booth belts is four frequency, and interaction part of the potential energy is one frequency in the each eigen mode. Changes of the kinetic energy of the both belts of the sandwich double axially moving bet system is two frequency like oscillatory regimes with two time multiplicities of the eineg frequencies of the corresponding eigen amplitude mode. (orig.)

  6. Condensation Heat Transfer Performance of Nano- Engineered Cu Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsik; Nam, Youngsuk

    2014-11-01

    We investigated condensate mobility and resulting heat transfer performance on Cu based water repellent surfaces including hydrophobic, superhydrophobic and oil-infused surfaces. We observed the transient microscale condensation behaviours up to 3 hours with controlling the supersaturation level at 1.64. We experimentally characterized the nucleation density, droplet size distribution and growth rate, and then incorporated them into the developed condensation heat transfer model to compare the condensation heat transfer performance of each surface. Due to the spontaneous coalescence induced jumping, superhydrophobic surface can maintain the high heat transfer performance while other surfaces show a gradual decrease in heat transfer performance due to the increase in the thermal resistance across the growing droplets. We also quantified each thermal resistance values from the vapor to the surface through the droplets to find out the relative importance of each thermal resistance term.

  7. Role of projectile energy and surface work function on charge transfer of negative ions grazing scattering on dissociated H2O-covered Cu(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhu, Yachao; Shi, Yuanqing; Liu, Pinyang; Xiao, Yunqing; Ren, Fei; Chen, Lin; Guo, Yanling; Chen, Ximeng

    2018-01-01

    Shifted Fermi sphere model and parallel velocity effects on clean metals have been verified by a number of previous studies. However, for fast F- and Cl- ions scattering on dissociated water covered Cu(110) at grazing incidence, the negative-ion fraction is projectile dependent and monotonically increases with the increase of impact velocity, which cannot be explained by the conventional parallel velocity effect. The positive-ion fraction increases with the increase of perpendicular velocity, which can be well described by the exponential scaling. Positive ions efficiently formed at large perpendicular velocities strongly suppress the negative ion yield at short distances from the surface, so that negative ions are only formed at large distances. In addition, the large surface work function further promotes a transition between two kinds of parallel velocity effects. The calculation taking into account these contributions is in rough agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Subcooled boiling heat transfer on a finned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, J.E.; Tran, V.T.; Mills, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies have been performed to determine the heat transfer coefficients from a finned cylindrical surface to subcooled boiling water. The heat transfer rates were measured in an annular test section consisting of an electrically heated fuel element simulator (FES) with eight longitudinal, rectangular fins enclosed in a glass tube. A two-dimensional finite-element heat transfer model using the Galerkin method was employed to determine the heat transfer coefficients along the periphery of the FES surface. An empirical correlation was developed to predict the heat transfer coefficients during subcooled boiling. The correlation agrees well with the measured data. (6 figures) (Author)

  9. Surface meteorology and Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Release 5.1 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data contains parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems. Parameters fall under 11 categories including: Solar cooking, solar thermal applications, solar geometry, tilted solar panels, energy storage systems, surplus product storage systems, cloud information, temperature, wind, other meteorological factors, and supporting information. This latest release contains new parameters based on recommendations by the renewable energy industry and it is more accurate than previous releases. On-line plotting capabilities allow quick evaluation of potential renewable energy projects for any region of the world. The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Mission Objectives] The SSE project contains insolation and meteorology data intended to aid in the development of renewable energy systems. Collaboration between SSE and technology industries such as the Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables ( HOMER ) may aid in designing electric power systems that employ some combination of wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, or diesel generators to produce electricity. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  10. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  11. On the Stress Transfer of Nanoscale Interlayer with Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved shear-lag model is proposed to investigate the mechanism through which the surface effect influences the stress transfer of multilayered structures. The surface effect of the interlayer is characterized in terms of interfacial stress and surface elasticity by using Gurtin–Murdoch elasticity theory. Our calculation result shows that the surface effect influences the efficiency of stress transfer. The surface effect is enhanced with decreasing interlayer thickness and elastic modulus. Nonuniform and large residual surface stress distribution amplifies the influence of the surface effect on stress concentration.

  12. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  13. Fluorescence energy transfer on erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.M.; Hof, M.; Lawaczeck, R.

    1995-08-01

    Stationary and time-dependent fluorescence have been measured for a donor/acceptor (DA) pair bound to membrane proteins of bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The donor N-(p-(2-benzoxazolyl)phenyl)-maleimid (BMI) and the acceptor fluram bind to SH- and NH 2 -residues, respectively. The fluorescence spectra and the time-dependent emission are consistent with a radiationless fluorescence energy transfer (RET). The density of RET-effective acceptor binding sites c=0.072 nm -2 was calculated on the basis of the two-dimensional Foerster-kinetic. Band3 protein is the only membrane spanning protein with accessible SH-groups, and therefore only effective binding sites on the band3 protein are counted for the RET measurements performed. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Comparison of the proton-transfer paths in hydrogen bonds from theoretical potential-energy surfaces and the concept of conservation of bond order III. O-H-O hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerz, Irena; Olovsson, Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The quantum-mechanically derived reaction coordinates (QMRC) for the proton transfer in O-H-O hydrogen bonds have been derived from ab initio calculations of potential-energy surfaces. A comparison is made between the QMRC and the corresponding bond-order reaction coordinates (BORC) derived by applying the Pauling bond order concept together with the principle of conservation of bond order. In agreement with earlier results for N-H-N(+) hydrogen bonds there is virtually perfect agreement between the QMRC and BORC curves for intermolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds. For intramolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds, the donor and acceptor parts of the molecule impose strong constraints on the O···O distance and the QMRC does not follow the BORC relation in the whole range. The neutron-determined proton positions are located close to the theoretically calculated potential-energy minima, and where the QMRC and the BORC curves coincide with each other. The results confirm the universal character of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: BORC is identical with QMRC and the proton can be moved from donor to acceptor keeping its valency equal to 1. The shape of PES for intramolecular hydrogen bonds is more complex as it is sensitive to the geometry of the molecule as well as of the hydrogen bridge. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2010

  15. Surface wettability and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroto, Bambang Joko; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2018-02-01

    The effect of varying surface wettabilities and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer at intermediate heat flux has been examined and investigated. The experiments were performed using pure water as the working fluid and subcooling ranging from 0, 5 and 10 K, respectively. The three types of heat transfer block were used that are bare surface/hydrophilic (polished copper), superhydrophilic/TiO2-coated on copper and hydrophobic/PTFE surface. The experimental results will be examined by the existing model. The results show that the heat transfer performance of surfaces with PTFE coating is better at low heat flux. While for an intermediate heat flux, superhydrophilic surface (TiO2) is superior compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It is observed that the heat transfer performance is decreasing when the sub cooling degree is increased.

  16. Plasmon-Enhanced Energy Transfer in Photosensitive Nanocrystal Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Shahab; Akgul, Mehmet Zafer; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2017-06-27

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interacted with localized surface plasmon (LSP) gives us the ability to overcome inadequate transfer of energy between donor and acceptor nanocrystals (NCs). In this paper, we show LSP-enhanced FRET in colloidal photosensors of NCs in operation, resulting in substantially enhanced photosensitivity. The proposed photosensitive device is a layered self-assembled colloidal platform consisting of separated monolayers of the donor and the acceptor colloidal NCs with an intermediate metal nanoparticle (MNP) layer made of gold interspaced by polyelectrolyte layers. Using LBL assembly, we fabricated and comparatively studied seven types of such NC-monolayer devices (containing only donor, only acceptor, Au MNP-donor, Au MNP-acceptor, donor-acceptor bilayer, donor-Au MNP-acceptor trilayer, and acceptor-Au MNP-donor reverse trilayer). In these structures, we revealed the effect of LSP-enhanced FRET and exciton interactions from the donor NCs layer to the acceptor NCs layer. Compared to a single acceptor NC device, we observed a significant extension in operating wavelength range and a substantial photosensitivity enhancement (2.91-fold) around the LSP resonance peak of Au MNPs in the LSP-enhanced FRET trilayer structure. Moreover, we present a theoretical model for the intercoupled donor-Au MNP-acceptor structure subject to the plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer. The obtained numerical results are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental studies done in our work. The potential to modify the energy transfer through mastering the exciton-plasmon interactions and its implication in devices make them attractive for applications in nanophotonic devices and sensors.

  17. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  18. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    and free energy change for the process have been reported. The AODIQ–HSA complex results in fluores- cence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the tryptophan moiety of HSA to the probe. The critical energy-transfer distance (R0) for FRET and the Stern–Volmer constant (Ksv) for the fluorescence quench- ing of the ...

  20. Surface free energy for systems with integrable boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehmann, Frank; Bortz, Michael; Frahm, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The surface free energy is the difference between the free energies for a system with open boundary conditions and the same system with periodic boundary conditions. We use the quantum transfer matrix formalism to express the surface free energy in the thermodynamic limit of systems with integrable boundary conditions as a matrix element of certain projection operators. Specializing to the XXZ spin-1/2 chain we introduce a novel 'finite temperature boundary operator' which characterizes the thermodynamical properties of surfaces related to integrable boundary conditions

  1. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    No. 97-62 ANNIVERSARY Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence F. Bataille INSA, Centre for Thermique de Lyon, France Ye...19480 November 1997 1997112 ENERGY TRANSFER AND TRIADIC INTERACTIONS IN COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE* F. BATAILLE t , YE ZHOU1 , AND JEAN-PIERRE BERTOGLIO...Abstract. Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer

  2. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hoke, Eric T.

    2010-02-11

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  3. The security energy encryption in wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadzali, M. N.; Ali, A.; Azizan, M. M.; Albreem, M. A. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a concept of security in wireless power transfer (WPT) by applying chaos theory. Chaos theory is applied as a security system in order to safeguard the transfer of energy from a transmitter to the intended receiver. The energy encryption of the wireless power transfer utilizes chaos theory to generate the possibility of a logistic map for the chaotic security key. The simulation for energy encryption wireless power transfer system was conducted by using MATLAB and Simulink. By employing chaos theory, the chaotic key ensures the transmission of energy from transmitter to its intended receiver.

  4. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  5. SAFARI 2000 Surface Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART), Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface-sensing Measurements for Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) consist of a suite...

  6. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    culture raceway for biofuel production. According to the proposed flow field design of ARID-HV algal raceway, experiments and numerical simulation have been conducted to understand the enhancement of flow mixing in the flow field of ARID-HV raceway by cutting slots on top of the dam near the dead zones. A new method was proposed to quantitatively evaluate the flow mixing by using the statistics of temporal and spatial distribution of the massless fluid particles (centered in each cell at the inlet surface) in the raceway collecting the data of path-lines of fluid particles from CFD results. It is hoped that this method can be applied to assist the algal raceway flow field design as well as other engineering applications. The third part introduces the details about the construction work of a high temperature molten salt test loop. Because of the limited operating temperature of conventional synthetic oils, in order to obtain higher energy conversion efficiency, higher operating temperature is always desirable in a CSP plant which leads to the requirement of new generation of HTF. Currently, a halide salt eutectic mixture (NaCl-KCl-ZnCl2) as a potential HTF for future CSP applications has been proposed by a multi-institute research team, led by University of Arizona. The thermophysical properties of the halide eutectic salt have been measured. However, this new developed halide eutectic salt has not been tested in a circulating loop at a high operating temperature for the measurement of heat transfer coefficient. It is a significant effort to build such a test system due to extremely high operating temperature. As a consequence, in the third part of this dissertation, details about the design of the lab-scale test system and all the equipment items will be introduced. The investigations included in this dissertation for the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems are of particular interest to the renewable energy engineering community. It is expected

  7. Forster resonance energy transfer and kinesin motor proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prevo, B.; Peterman, E.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is the phenomenon of non-radiative transfer of electronic excitations from a donor fluorophore to an acceptor, mediated by electronic dipole-dipole coupling. The transfer rate and, as a consequence, efficiency depend non-linearly on the distance between the

  8. Estimating and modeling charge transfer from the SAPT induction energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shi; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu

    2017-10-05

    Recent studies using quantum mechanics energy decomposition methods, for example, SAPT and ALMO, have revealed that the charge transfer energy may play an important role in short ranged inter-molecular interactions, and have a different distance dependence comparing with the polarization energy. However, the charge transfer energy component has been ignored in most current polarizable or non-polarizable force fields. In this work, first, we proposed an empirical decomposition of SAPT induction energy into charge transfer and polarization energy that mimics the regularized SAPT method (ED-SAPT). This empirical decomposition is free of the divergence issue, hence providing a good reference for force field development. Then, we further extended this concept in the context of AMOEBA polarizable force field, proposed a consistent approach to treat the charge transfer phenomenon. Current results show a promising application of this charge transfer model in future force field development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Non-steady-state heat transfer of finned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Kameoka, T.

    1974-01-01

    For many purposes, the finned surface is being used to increase heat transfer. Heat exchangers and fuel elements of gas cooled nuclear reactors require the use of the finned surface for high flux heat transfer. The problem is analytically treated by deriving a non-steady-state equation of radiative and convective heat transfer of annular and radial fins in case of sudden change of the fin-root temperature or heat flux. The numerical solution of temperature distribution along the fin is obtained for several typical transient cases. (U.S.)

  10. Ultrafast Energy Transfer in an Artificial Photosynthetic Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Grondelle R.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We temporally resolved energy transfer kinetics in an artificial light-harvesting dyad composed of a phthalocyanine covalently linked to a carotenoid. Upon carotenoid photo-excitation, energy transfers within ≈100fs (≈52% efficiency to the phthalocyanine.

  11. Reversible Triplet Energy Transfer between Neo- Alloocimene and Anthracene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, A. A.; Hamblett, I.; Jensen, Niels-Henrik

    1984-01-01

    The rate constants for triplet energy transfer between neo-alloocimene and anthracene have been redetermined by a combination of pulsed laser photolysi......The rate constants for triplet energy transfer between neo-alloocimene and anthracene have been redetermined by a combination of pulsed laser photolysi...

  12. Significance of a Recurring Function in Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subodha

    2017-01-01

    The appearance of a unique function in the energy transfer from one system to the other in different physical situations such as electrical, mechanical, optical, and quantum mechanical processes is established in this work. Though the laws governing the energy transformation and its transfer from system to system are well known, here we notice a…

  13. Luminescence and energy transfer in hexavalent uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author investigates the luminescence of uranate groups in uranates and examines the possible role of excitation energy transfer between the uranate groups in these compounds. Some uranyl compounds were investigated in order to compare the energy transfer in these compounds with that in the uranates. (G.T.H.)

  14. Mode-to-mode energy transfers in convective patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the energy transfer between various Fourier modes in a low- dimensional model for thermal convection. We have used the formalism of mode-to-mode energy transfer rate in our calculation. The evolution equations derived using this scheme is the same as those derived using the hydrodynamical ...

  15. Momentum transfer in a Brillouin surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of acoustic excitation scattering in the surface of Brilloiun of opaque materials, is related to the question of momentum transfexed from radiation fields to the material when the incident eight is scattered in a measurable spectrum. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  16. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at z = 3.32 Å. It was observed ...

  17. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the ...

  18. Potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.F. III.

    1976-01-01

    Research into potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 is described. Topics covered include: the fuzzy interface between surface chemistry catalysis and organometallic chemistry; potential energy surfaces for elementary fluorine hydrogen reactions; structure, energetics, and reactivity of carbenes; and the theory of self-consistent electron pairs

  19. Energy technology transfer to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butera, F.; Farinelli, U.

    1992-01-01

    With the use of critical analyses of some examples of technology transfer by industrialized to third world countries, this paper illustrates the importance, in technology transfer, of giving due consideration to the specific social and marketing contexts of the targeted developing country and its physical and financial capability to acquire all the technology necessary to make the total realization of a desired industrial scheme feasible from the economic, technical and social points of view. It also indicates that the most effective transfers are those in which efforts are made to optimize local work force learning levels, process scheme efficiency and cost through the careful integration of innovative with conventional technologies

  20. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-11-15

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, Tb n Gd 9-n clusters ([Tb n Gd 9-n (μ-OH) 10 (butylsalicylate) 16 ] + NO 3 - , n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of Tb n Gd 9-n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in Tb n Gd 9-n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials.

  1. Experimental heat transfer coefficients between a surface and fixed and fluidized beds with PCM

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo-Barrientos, María Asunción; Sobrino, Celia; Almendros-Ibáñez, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study to determine the capacity of a phase change material (PCM) in granular form to be used in fixed and bubbling fluidized beds for thermal energy storage. The experimental measurements are focused on determination of the heat transfer coefficient between a heated surface immersed in the bed and the granular PCM. The flow rate is varied to quantify its influence on the heat transfer coefficient. The PCM used is Rubitherm GR50 with a phase change tem...

  2. Visual prosthesis wireless energy transfer system optimal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueping; Yang, Yuan; Gao, Yong

    2014-01-16

    Wireless energy transfer system is an effective way to solve the visual prosthesis energy supply problems, theoretical modeling of the system is the prerequisite to do optimal energy transfer system design. On the basis of the ideal model of the wireless energy transfer system, according to visual prosthesis application condition, the system modeling is optimized. During the optimal modeling, taking planar spiral coils as the coupling devices between energy transmitter and receiver, the effect of the parasitic capacitance of the transfer coil is considered, and especially the concept of biological capacitance is proposed to consider the influence of biological tissue on the energy transfer efficiency, resulting in the optimal modeling's more accuracy for the actual application. The simulation data of the optimal model in this paper is compared with that of the previous ideal model, the results show that under high frequency condition, the parasitic capacitance of inductance and biological capacitance considered in the optimal model could have great impact on the wireless energy transfer system. The further comparison with the experimental data verifies the validity and accuracy of the optimal model proposed in this paper. The optimal model proposed in this paper has a higher theoretical guiding significance for the wireless energy transfer system's further research, and provide a more precise model reference for solving the power supply problem in visual prosthesis clinical application.

  3. ENERGY TRANSFERS IN THREE-FREQUENCY CIRCUITS WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts concern an analysis of frequency conversion systems. The energy transfers in three-frequency circuits coupled through a nonlinear magnetic...core are studied. Rules are given to determine the type of nonlinear characteristic needed to make energy transfers possible for given frequency...combinations. General energy relations of the Manley Rowe type are discussed, examining the validity and limitations of these relations for the practical

  4. The Grover energy transfer algorithm for relativistic speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Grover's algorithm for quantum search can also be applied to classical energy transfer. The procedure takes a system in which the total energy is equally distributed among N subsystems and transfers most of it to one marked subsystem. We show that in a relativistic setting the efficiency of this procedure can be improved. We will consider the transfer of relativistic kinetic energy in a series of elastic collisions. In this case, the number of steps of the energy transfer procedure approaches 1 as the initial velocities of the objects become closer to the speed of light. This is a consequence of introducing nonlinearities in the procedure. However, the maximum attainable transfer will depend on the particular combination of speed and number of objects. In the procedure, we will use N elements, as in the classical non-relativistic case, instead of the log 2 (N) states of the quantum algorithm.

  5. Pair transfer processes probed at deep sub barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradi, L.; Mason, P.; Fioretto, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Szinler, S.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N.; Pollarolo, G.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C.A.; Gadea, A.; Haas, F.; Marginean, N.

    2011-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer cross sections in the system 40 Ca+ 96 Zr have been measured at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼ 25% below. Target-like (lighter) recoils in inverse kinematics have been completely identified in A,Z and Q-value with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental slopes of the neutron transfer probabilities at large internuclear separation are consistent with the values derived from the binding energies. A phenomenological interpretation of the transfer probabilities indicates the presence of enhanced values for the even number of neutron transfers. (authors)

  6. Investigation into the heat transfer performance of helically ribbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    The first part of an investigation into flow and heat transfer in annular channels and seven pin clusters is described. One of the main aims of the project is to improve cluster heat transfer prediction codes for helically ribbed surfaces. A study is made of the heat transfer and flow characteristics of a helically ribbed pin in an annular channel. It is shown that the swirling flow, which is induced by the helical ribs, gives rise to substantially enhanced diffusivity levels. This phenomenon had not been taken into account by previous analysis techniques. The methods for analysing heat transfer and pressure drop data from annular channels which were originally developed for non-swirling flow are generalised to accommodate swirling flow. The new methods are shown to be consistent with empirical data. Roughness parameter data is presented for helically ribbed surfaces with an axial rib pitch into height ratio of about 7. (author)

  7. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Heat Transfer Enhancement During Water and Hydrocarbon Condensation on Lubricant Infused Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J; Lu, Zhengmao; Song, Youngsup; Zhao, Yajing; Wilke, Kyle L; Antao, Dion S; Louis, Marcel; Wang, Evelyn N

    2018-01-11

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat or separating fluids. Dropwise condensation, where discrete droplets form on the condenser surface, offers a potential improvement in heat transfer of up to an order of magnitude compared to filmwise condensation, where a liquid film covers the surface. Low surface tension fluid condensates such as hydrocarbons pose a unique challenge since typical hydrophobic condenser coatings used to promote dropwise condensation of water often do not repel fluids with lower surface tensions. Recent work has shown that lubricant infused surfaces (LIS) can promote droplet formation of hydrocarbons. In this work, we confirm the effectiveness of LIS in promoting dropwise condensation by providing experimental measurements of heat transfer performance during hydrocarbon condensation on a LIS, which enhances heat transfer by ≈450% compared to an uncoated surface. We also explored improvement through removal of noncondensable gases and highlighted a failure mechanism whereby shedding droplets depleted the lubricant over time. Enhanced condensation heat transfer for low surface tension fluids on LIS presents the opportunity for significant energy savings in natural gas processing as well as improvements in thermal management, heating and cooling, and power generation.

  9. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, F.; Zhou, Ye; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer process and triadic interactions of compressible turbulence. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the Helmholtz decomposition is used. The following issues were addressed: (1) What is the mechanism of energy exchange between the solenoidal and compressible modes, and (2) Is there an energy cascade in the compressible energy transfer process? It is concluded that the compressible energy is transferred locally from the solenoidal part to the compressible part. It is also found that there is an energy cascade of the compressible mode for high turbulent Mach number (M(sub t) greater than or equal to 0.5). Since we assume that the compressibility is weak, the magnitude of the compressible (radiative or cascade) transfer is much smaller than that of solenoidal cascade. These results are further confirmed by studying the triadic energy transfer function, the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer.

  10. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  11. Surface Energy and Setting Process of Contacting Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Musokhranov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a challenge in terms of ensuring an accuracy of the relative position of the conjugated surfaces that is to determine a coefficient of friction. To solve it, there is a proposal to use the surface energy, as a tool that influences the contacting parts nature. Presently, energy of the surface layers at best is only stated, but not used in practice.Analysis of the conditions of interaction between two contacting surfaces, such as seizing and setting cannot be explained only from the position of the roughness parameters. It is found that these phenomena are explained by the appearing gripe (setting bridges, which result from the energy of interaction between two or more adjacent surfaces. The emerging phenomenon such as micro welding, i.e. occurring bonds, is caused by the overflow of energy, according to the theory of physics, from the surface with a high level of energy to the surface with the smaller one to balance the system as a whole.The paper shows that through the use of process, controlling the depth of the surface layer and creating a certain structure, the energy level of the material as a whole can be specified. And this will allow us to provide the necessary performance and mechanical properties. It means to create as many gripe bridges as possible to ensure continuous positioning i.e. a fixed connection of the contacting surfaces.It was determined that to increase a value of the friction coefficient, the physical and mechanical properties of the surface layer of the parts material must be taken into account, namely, in the part body accumulate the energy to be consumed for forming the surface.The paper gives recommendations for including the parts of the surface energy in the qualitative indicators of characteristics. This will make a technologist, when routing a process, to choose such operations and modes to provide the designer-specified parameters not only of the accuracy and surface finish, but also of the

  12. Experimental Study on Momentum Transfer of Surface Texture in Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yabo; Yao, Zhenqiang; Cheng, De

    2017-05-01

    The behavior of Taylor-Couette (TC) flow has been extensively studied. However, no suitable torque prediction models exist for high-capacity fluid machinery. The Eckhardt-Grossmann-Lohse (EGL) theory, derived based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is proposed to model torque behavior. This theory suggests that surfaces are the significant energy transfer interfaces between cylinders and annular flow. This study mainly focuses on the effects of surface texture on momentum transfer behavior through global torque measurement. First, a power-law torque behavior model is built to reveal the relationship between dimensionless torque and the Taylor number based on the EGL theory. Second, TC flow apparatus is designed and built based on the CNC machine tool to verify the torque behavior model. Third, four surface texture films are tested to check the effects of surface texture on momentum transfer. A stereo microscope and three-dimensional topography instrument are employed to analyze surface morphology. Global torque behavior is measured by rotating a multi component dynamometer, and the effects of surface texture on the annular flow behavior are observed via images obtained using a high-speed camera. Finally, torque behaviors under four different surface conditions are fitted and compared. The experimental results indicate that surface textures have a remarkable influence on torque behavior, and that the peak roughness of surface texture enhances the momentum transfer by strengthening the fluctuation in the TC flow.

  13. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebzukhov A.A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  14. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebzukhova, M. A.; Shebzukhov, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  15. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    OpenAIRE

    Shebzukhov A.A.; Shebzukhova M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  16. Heat transfer and energy efficiency in infrared paper dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Magnus

    1999-11-01

    Infrared (IR) dryers are widely used in the paper industry, mainly in the production of coated paper grades. The thesis deals with various aspects of heat transfer and energy use in infrared heaters and dryers as employed in the paper industry. Both gas-fired and electric IR dryers are considered and compared. The thesis also provides an introduction to infrared heaters and infrared drying, including a review of recent literature in the field. The transport of thermal radiation inside a paper sheet was investigated and different IR dryers were compared in terms of their ability to transfer energy to the internal parts of a paper sheet. Although there were evident differences in the absorption of radiation between gas-fired and electric IR dryers, the distinction was found not to be as important as has generally been believed. The main differences appeared to be due to the choice of a one- or a two-sided dryer solution, rather than the spectral distributions emitted by the dryers. A method for evaluating the radiation efficiency of IR heaters was proposed. An electric IR heater was evaluated in the laboratory. The radiation efficiency of the heater was shown to be strongly dependent on the power level. The maximum efficiency, found at high power level, was close to 60 %. A procedure for evaluation of the total energy transfer efficiency of an infrared paper dryer was proposed and used in the evaluation of an electric IR dryer operating in an industrial coating machine. The efficiency of the dryer was roughly 40 %. A model for an electric IR heater was developed. The model includes non-grey radiative heat transfer between the different parts of the heater, as well as conduction in reflector material and convective cooling of the surfaces. Using IR module voltage as the only input, model predictions of temperatures and heat flux were found to agree well with experimental data both at steady state and under transient conditions. The model was also extended to include

  17. Plasma transferred arc surface alloying of Cr-Ni-Mo powders on compacted graphite iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Jijun; Pan, Chunxu; Lu, Liulin; Huang, Qiwen; Cao, Huatang

    2016-01-01

    A Cr-Ni-Mo overlayer was deposited on the surface of compacted graphite iron (CGI) by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) alloying technique. The microstructure of Cr-Ni-Mo overlayer was characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive

  18. Energy efficient building design. A transfer guide for local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the building design process, energy codes and standards, and energy budgets are introduced. These tools were combined into Energy Design Guidelines and design contract requirements. The Guidelines were repackaged for a national audience and a videotape for selling the concept to government executives. An effort to test transfer of the Guidelines to outside agencies is described.

  19. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  20. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  1. Some observations on boiling heat transfer with surface oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of surface oscillation on pool boiling heat transfer are experimentally studied. Experiments were performed in saturated ethanol and distilled water, covering the range from nucleate to film boiling except in the transition region. Two different geometries were employed as the heating surface with the same wetting area, stainless steel pipe and molybdenum ribbon. The results confirm earlier work on the effect of surface oscillation especially in lower heat flux region of nucleate boiling. Interesting boiling behavior during surface oscillation is observed, which was not referred to in previous work. (2 figures) (Author)

  2. Light Emission and Energy Transfer in Nanoscale Semiconductor Photonic Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolbas, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this experimental program is to control the light emission properties and energy transfer mechanisms in nanoscale semiconductor structures in order to realize new or improved photonic devices...

  3. Fluorescence and Intramolecular Energy Transfer in Polyphenylene Dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Daojun; Feyter, Steven De; Cotlet, Mircea; Stefan, Alina; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Herrmann, Andreas; Grebel-Koehler, Dörthe; Qu, Jianqiang; Müllen, Klaus; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2003-01-01

    The fluorescence of polyphenylene dendrimers and the intramolecular energy transfer in polyphenylene dendrimers containing a perylenediimide core have been investigated in this paper. Polyphenylene dendrimers composed of tens or hundreds of out-of-plane twisted phenyl units exhibit strong

  4. Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sarthak; Carey, Anne-Marie; Locsin, Joshua; Gao, Bing-Rong; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2017-07-13

    In purple bacterial reaction centers, triplet excitation energy transfer occurs from the primary donor P, a bacteriochlorophyll dimer, to a neighboring carotenoid to prevent photodamage from the generation of reactive oxygen species. The B B bacteriochlorophyll molecule that lies between P and the carotenoid on the inactive electron transfer branch is involved in triplet energy transfer between P and the carotenoid. To expand the high-resolution spectral and kinetic information available for describing the mechanism, we investigated the triplet excited state formation and energy transfer pathways in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy over a broad spectral region on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale at both room temperature and at 77 K. Wild-type reaction centers were compared with a reaction center mutant (M182HL) in which B B is replaced by a bacteriopheophytin (Φ), as well as to reaction centers that lack the carotenoid. In wild-type reaction centers, the triplet energy transfer efficiency from P to the carotenoid was essentially unity at room temperature and at 77 K. However, in the M182HL mutant reaction centers, both the rate and efficiency of triplet energy transfer were decreased at room temperature, and at 77 K, no triplet energy transfer was observed, attributable to a higher triplet state energy of the bacteriopheophytin that replaces bacteriochlorophyll in this mutant. Finally, detailed time-resolved spectral analysis of P, carotenoid, and B B (Φ in the M182HL mutant) reveals that the triplet state of the carotenoid is coupled fairly strongly to the bridging intermediate B B in wild-type and Φ in the M182HL mutant, a fact that is probably responsible for the lack of any obvious intermediate 3 B B / 3 Φ transient formation during triplet energy transfer.

  5. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20 on 10243 grid using the pseudospectral method. We demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers moves towards lower wave numbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason why the integral scale of the magnetic field increases with time. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. Copyright © EPLA, 2013.

  6. Numerical Simulations of the Kinetic Energy Transfer in the Bath of a BOF Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobin; Ersson, Mikael; Zhong, Liangcai; Jönsson, Pär

    2016-02-01

    The paper focuses on the fundamental aspects of the kinetic energy transfer from a top and bottom gas injection to the bath of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) by applying a mathematical model. The analyses revealed that the energy transfer is less efficient when top lance height is lowered or the flowrate is increased in the top blowing operations. However, an inverse trend was found that the kinetic energy transfer is increased when the bottom flowrate is increased for the current bottom blowing operation conditions. The kinetic energy transfer index results indicated that the energy transfer for the bottom blowing is much more efficient than that of the top blowing operations. To understand the effects of the upper buoyant phase on the energy dissipation of the bulk liquid in the bath, different mass and physical properties of slag and foam were considered in the bottom blowing simulations. The slag on top of the bath is found to dissipate by 6.6, 9.4, and 11.2 pct for slag mass values of 5, 9, and 15 t compared to the case without slag atop the surface of the bath, respectively. The results showed that the kinetic energy transfer is not largely influenced by the viscosity of the upper slag or the foaming phases.

  7. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  8. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-02-08

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

  9. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values

  10. Energy Transfer in Dye-Coupled Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles: From Design to Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Deng, Renren

    2018-03-16

    Surface modification with organic dye molecules is a useful strategy to manipulate the optical properties of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles (LnNPs). It enables energy transfer between dyes and LnNPs, which provides unprecedented possibilities to gain new optical phenomena from the dye-LnNPs composite systems. This has led to a wide range of emerging applications, such as biosensing, drug delivery, gene targeting, information storage, and photon energy conversion. Herein, the mechanism of energy transfer and the structural-dependent energy-transfer properties in dye-coupled LnNPs are reviewed. The design strategies for achieving effective dye-LnNP functionalization are presented. Recent advances in these composite nanomaterials in biomedicine and energy conversion applications are highlighted. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Exciton Transfer in Carbon Nanotube Aggregates for Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoody, Amirhossein; Karimi, Farhad; Knezevic, Irena

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising building blocks for organic photovoltaic devices, owing to their tunable band gap, mechanical and chemical stability. We study intertube excitonic energy transfer between pairs of CNTs with different orientations and band gaps. The optically bright and dark excitonic states in CNTs are calculated by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We calculate the exciton transfer rates due to the direct and exchange Coulomb interactions, as well as the second-order phonon-assisted processes. We show the importance of phonons in calculating the transfer rates that match the measurements. In addition, we discuss the contribution of optically inactive excited states in the exciton transfer process, which is difficult to determine experimentally. Furthermore, we study the effects of sample inhomogeneity, impurities, and temperature on the exciton transfer rate. The inhomogeneity in the CNT sample dielectric function can increase the transfer rate by about a factor of two. We show that the exciton confinement by impurities has a detrimental effect on the transfer rate between pairs of similar CNTs. The exciton transfer rate increases monotonically with increasing temperature. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-SC0008712.

  12. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  13. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl; Kamińska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  14. Energy transfer in porous anodic alumina/rhodamine 110 nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhouichet, H., E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, University of Tunis Elmanar 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Harima, N.; Koyama, H. [Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Gaponenko, N.V. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browki St. 6, 220013 Minsk (Belarus)

    2012-09-15

    We have used porous anodic alumina (PAA) films as templates for embedding rhodamine 110 (Rh110) molecules and examined their photoluminescence (PL) properties in detail. The analysis of the polarization memory (PM) of PL strongly suggests that there is a significant energy transfer from PAA to Rh110 molecules. The effect of annealing the PAA layer on the PL properties of the nanocomposite has been studied. The results show that the energy transfer becomes more efficient in annealed PAA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous anodic alumina-rhodamine 110 nanocomposites are elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient energy transfer from the host to Rh110 molecules is evidenced from measurements of photoluminescence and degree of polarization memory spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal annealing of porous anodic alumina can improve the process of excitation transfer.

  15. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  16. Bridging the Radiative Transfer Models for Meteorology and Solar Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative transfer models are used to compute solar radiation reaching the earth surface and play an important role in both meteorology and solar energy studies. Therefore, they are designed to meet the needs of specialized applications. For instance, radiative transfer models for meteorology seek to provide more accurate cloudy-sky radiation compared to models used in solar energy that are geared towards accuracy in clear-sky conditions associated with the maximum solar resource. However, models for solar energy applications are often computationally faster, as the complex solution of the radiative transfer equation is parameterized by atmospheric properties that can be acquired from surface- or satellite-based observations. This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to combine the advantages of radiative transfer models designed for meteorology and solar energy applictions. A fast all-sky radiation model, FARMS-NIT, was developed to efficiently compute narrowband all-sky irradiances over inclined photovoltaic (PV) panels. This new model utilizes the optical preperties from a solar energy model, SMARTS, to computes surface radiation by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. For cloudy-sky conditions, cloud bidirectional transmittance functions (BTDFs) are provided by a precomputed lookup table (LUT) by LibRadtran. Our initial results indicate that FARMS-NIT has an accuracy that is similar to LibRadtran, a highly accurate multi-stream model, but is significantly more efficient. The development and validation of this model will be presented.

  17. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  18. Energy transfer in scattering by rotating potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    In this section we study bounds of the kinetic energy on incoming and outgoing scattering states. These bounds follow from ... Let H(t) = H0 + Vt be a self-adjoint family of operators which satisfies (2.1), (2.2) and generates a unitary propagator U(t,s) ...... Math. Soc. Transl. of Math. Monographs (RI: Providence) (1992) vol. 105.

  19. Energy transfer in scattering by rotating potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum mechanical scattering theory is studied for time-dependent Schrödinger operators, in particular for particles in a rotating potential. Under various assumptions about the decay rate at infinity we show uniform boundedness in time for the kinetic energy of scattering states, existence and completeness of wave ...

  20. Energy Transfer in Scattering by Rotating Potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum mechanical scattering theory is studied for time-dependent Schrödinger operators, in particular for particles in a rotating potential. Under various assumptions about the decay rate at infinity we show uniform boundedness in time for the kinetic energy of scattering states, existence and completeness of wave ...

  1. Energy transfer in scattering by rotating potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Quantum mechanical scattering theory is studied for time-dependent. Schrödinger operators, in particular for particles in a rotating potential. Under various assumptions about the decay rate at infinity we show uniform boundedness in time for the kinetic energy of scattering states, existence and completeness of ...

  2. Numerical study on condensation heat transfer of trapezoid grooved surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojin Qi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical analysis and experimental study on condensation heat transfer and fluid flow for filmwise condensation on trapezoid grooved surfaces. First, a physical model was properly simplified based on some reasonable assumptions. Then, the coupled non-linear governing equations for the mass transfer, fluid flow, and two-dimensional thermal conduction were developed. The relationship between z-coordinate and heat transfer was obtained by solving the equations numerically. The influences of groove length and basic angle were discussed. The calculation results showed that the heat flux decreased with increase in groove length, and the decline range also decreased gradually. The calculation results also suggested that the heat flux through groove with α = 60° was lower than the groove with α = 75° at the top of the groove, while the opposite conclusion was obtained at the low parts. The distributions of wall temperature and heat flux on trapezoid groove were also studied systematically. The distribution of surface temperature and heat flux presents obvious lateral inhomogeneity, and the maximum wall temperature and heat flux were both obtained in region II. The thermal resistance of groove with α = 60° was lower but the liquid-discharged ability was better than that of groove with α = 75°. In order to validate the feasibility and reliability of the present analyses and to further investigate the heat transfer performance of trapezoid grooved surfaces, experiments were carried out with three condensing plates including two trapezoid grooved surfaces in different physical dimensions and one smooth surface. The experimental data obtained under various schooling were compared with the calculations, and the experimental results for different condensing plates are all in good agreement with the numerical model, with a maximum deviation less than 15%. Moreover, the trapezoid grooves can enhance the

  3. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too ‘warm and wet’ to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the ‘dry’ hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The ‘tubulin’ subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. PMID:25232047

  4. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-11-06

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too 'warm and wet' to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the 'dry' hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The 'tubulin' subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The mass energy transfer and mass absorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomljenovic, I.; Stankovic, S.; Ninkovic, M.

    2002-01-01

    The calculation of the mass energy transfer and the mass absorption coefficients is presented and data for their change by energy, in range from 0,01 MeV to 10 MeV, are given. Data are numerically and graphically presented for following materials: air, water, polyethylene, lucite and polystyrene (author)

  6. Nanostructure enhanced near-field radiative heat transfer and designs for energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingnan; Lin, Chungwei; Teo, Koon Hoo

    2017-09-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer can exceed the blackbody limit, and this property has been explored toward energy transfer and conversion applications, such as thermophtovoltaic (TPV) devices, radiative cooling devices, and thermoradiative (TR) devices. The coupling of resonant modes between two surfaces is important in near- field heat transfer and near-field TPV and TR systems. It was shown that the coupling of resonant modes enhances the transmissivity between two coupled objects, which further determines the radiative heat transfer and energy conversion. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are surface resonances existing on metal surfaces, are commonly used for such systems. While the frequency of SPP resonance is fixed for a planar emitter, a nanostructured emitter supports additional resonances such as SPP or cavity modes with lower frequencies that are closer to the bandgap energy of a typical PV cell. We show that the nanostructured designs significantly improves the near-field radiative power transfer, and electric power output for a TR system.

  7. Surface shear stress dependence of gas transfer velocity parameterizations using DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Air-water gas-exchange is studied in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free-surface flows driven by natural convection and weak winds. The wind is modeled as a constant surface-shear-stress and the gas-transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The simulations are characterized via a Richardson number Ri=Bν/u*4 where B, ν, and u* are the buoyancy flux, kinematic viscosity, and friction velocity respectively. The simulations comprise 0water gas-exchange, (ii) determine, for a given buoyancy flux, the wind speed at which gas transfer becomes primarily shear driven, and (iii) find an expression for the gas-transfer velocity for flows driven by both convection and shear. The evaluated gas transfer-velocity parametrizations are based on either the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, the surface flow-divergence, the surface heat-flux, or the wind-speed. The parametrizations based on dissipation or divergence show an unfavorable Ri dependence for flows with combined forcing whereas the parametrization based on heat-flux only shows a limited Ri dependence. The two parametrizations based on wind speed give reasonable estimates for the transfer-velocity, depending however on the surface heat-flux. The transition from convection- to shear-dominated gas-transfer-velocity is shown to be at Ri≈0.004. Furthermore, the gas-transfer is shown to be well represented by two different approaches: (i) additive forcing expressed as kg,sum =AShearu*|Ri/Ric+1| 1/4Sc-n where Ric=|AShear/ABuoy|4, and (ii) either buoyancy or shear dominated expressed as, kg=ABuoy|Bν| 1/4Sc-n, Ri>Ric or kg=AShearu*Sc-n, Riwater surface-characteristics.

  8. Nuclear response functions at large energy and momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, W.; Moniz, E.J.; Lourie, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Quasifree nucleon processes are expected to dominate the nuclear electromagnetic response function for large energy and momentum transfers, i.e., for energy transfers large compared with nuclear single particle energies and momentum transfers large compared with typical nuclear momenta. Despite the evident success of the quasifree picture in providing the basic frame work for discussing and understanding the large energy, large momentum nuclear response, the limits of this picture have also become quite clear. In this article a selected set of inclusive and coincidence data are presented in order to define the limits of the quasifree picture more quantitatively. Specific dynamical mechanisms thought to be important in going beyond the quasifree picture are discussed as well. 75 refs, 37 figs

  9. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  10. Ultrafast energy transfer within the photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Gelzinis, Andrius; Chorošajev, Vladimir; Vengris, Mikas; Senlik, S Seckin; Shen, Jian-Ren; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2017-06-14

    We report 2D electronic spectroscopy on the photosystem II core complex (PSII CC) at 77 K under different polarization conditions. A global analysis of the high time-resolution 2D data shows rapid, sub-100 fs energy transfer within the PSII CC. It also reveals the 2D spectral signatures of slower energy equilibration processes occurring on several to hundreds of picosecond time scales that are consistent with previous work. Using a recent structure-based model of the PSII CC [Y. Shibata, S. Nishi, K. Kawakami, J. R. Shen and T. Renger, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 6903], we simulate the energy transfer in the PSII CC by calculating auxiliary time-resolved fluorescence spectra. We obtain the observed sub-100 fs evolution, even though the calculated electronic energy shows almost no dynamics at early times. On the other hand, the electronic-vibrational interaction energy increases considerably over the same time period. We conclude that interactions with vibrational degrees of freedom not only induce population transfer between the excitonic states in the PSII CC, but also reshape the energy landscape of the system. We suggest that the experimentally observed ultrafast energy transfer is a signature of excitonic-polaron formation.

  11. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  12. Paths to Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B. R.

    2014-02-01

    Theodor Förster (1910-1974) developed a phenomenological theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer which proved to be transformative in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. This paper explores the experimental and the theoretical antecedents of Förster's theory of resonance energy transfer (FRET). Early studies of sensitized fluorescence, fluorescence depolarization, and photosynthesis demonstrated the phenomena of long-range energy transfer. At the same time physicists developed theoretical models which contained common physical mechanisms and parameters: oscillating dipoles as models for the atoms or molecules, dipole-dipole coupling for the interaction, and a distance R0 that is optimal for resonance energy transfer. Early theories predicted R0 that was too large as compared to experiments. Finally, in 1946 Förster developed a classical theory and in 1948 he developed a quantum mechanical theory; both theories predicted an inverse sixth power dependence of the rate of energy transfer and a R0 that agreed with experiments. This paper attempts to determine why Förster succeeded when the other theoreticians failed to develop the correct theory. The putative roles of interdisciplinary education and collaborative research are discussed. Furthermore, I explore the role of science journals and their specific audiences in the popularization of FRET to a broad interdisciplinary community.

  13. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  14. Energy from Biomass Research and Technology Transfer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of CPBR is to foster and facilitate research that will lead to commercial applications. The goals of CPBR’s Energy from Biomass Research and Technology Transfer Program are to bring together industry, academe, and federal resources to conduct research in plant biotechnology and other bio-based technologies and to facilitate the commercialization of the research results to: (1) improve the utilization of plants as energy sources; (2) reduce the cost of renewable energy production; (3) facilitate the replacement of petroleum by plant-based materials; (4) create an energy supply that is safer in its effect on the environment, and (5) contribute to U.S. energy independence.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  16. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Experimental determinations of the performances of heat transfer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirovano, Alain; Viannay, Stephane; Mazeas, C.Y.

    1974-01-01

    With the help of flow schemes and of assumptions on the heat transfer, it is possible, in some cases, to predict the thermal and aerodynamical performances of a new heat transfer surface with moderate accuracy. These estimates, valid for an approximate classification of a new surface among known surfaces, are not accurate enough to be taken as a basis for the design of heat exchangers. In the present state of knowledge, the performances of a new heat transfer surface can only be determined accurately with experimental measurements. Bertin and Co have at their disposal two air test rigs especially designed for this purpose. The first one, more directly concerned with the measurements on tube bundles with fluid flow perpendicular to the generatrices of the tubes, is a semi-closed loop equipped with a high-efficiency ejector which amplifies the air flow rate supplied by an external source and thus allows high values of Reynolds number to be reached. The second one is adapted to other types of surfaces: tubes with external flow parallel to the generatrices, tubes with sophisticated cross section and with internal flow, compact surfaces with finned plates, etc. Both test rigs, the relevant equipment, the methods of data acquisition and of test results analysis are described in this paper. During the 5 past years, 60 configurations were tested. It was possible to compare some of the test results with the results of measurements performed later, on entire heat exchangers working with numbers of tubes, fluids, and temperature levels different from those prevailing during the tests on the small scale mock-up; the agreement is quite good [fr

  18. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  19. Flow and heat transfer regimes during quenching of hot surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnea, Y.; Elias, E.

    1993-05-01

    Reflooding experiments have been performed to study flow and heat transfer regimes in a heated annular vertical channel under supercooled inlet conditions. A gamma densitometer was employed to determine the void fraction as a function of the distance from the quench front. Surface heat fluxes were determined by fast measurements of the temperature spatial distribution. Two quench front is shown to lie in the transition boiling region which spreads into the dry and wet segments of the heated surface. (authors) 5 refs, 3 figs

  20. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  1. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  2. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  3. Computational prediction of heat transfer to gas turbine nozzle guide vanes with roughened surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.M.; Jones, T.V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Science; Lock, G.D. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dancer, S.N. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    The local Mach number and heat transfer coefficient over the aerofoil surfaces and endwalls of a transonic gas turbine nozzle guide vane have been calculated. the computations were performed by solving the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a fully three-dimensional computational code (CFDS), which is well established at Rolls-Royce. A model to predict the effects of roughness has been incorporated into CFDS and heat transfer levels have been calculated for both hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough surfaces. The roughness influences the calculations in two ways; first the mixing length at a certain height above the surface is increased; second the wall function used to reconcile the wall condition with the first grid point above the wall is also altered. The first involves a relatively straightforward shift of the origin in the van Driest damping function description, the second requires an integration of the momentum equation across the wall layer. A similar treatment applies to the energy equation. The calculations are compared with experimental contours of heat transfer coefficient obtained using both thin-film gages and the transient liquid crystal technique. Measurements were performed using both hydraulically smooth and roughened surfaces, and at engine-representative Mach and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer results are discussed and interpreted in terms of surface-shear flow visualization using oil and dye techniques.

  4. Efficient Energy Transfer from Near-Infrared Emitting Gold Nanoparticles to Pendant Ytterbium(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Scott E; Andolina, Christopher M; Kaseman, Derrick C; Ryoo, Bo Hyung; Smith, Ashley M; Johnston, Kathryn A; Millstone, Jill E

    2017-12-13

    Here, we demonstrate efficient energy transfer from near-infrared-emitting ortho-mercaptobenzoic acid-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to pendant ytterbium(III) cations. These functional materials combine the high molar absorptivity (1.21 × 10 6 M -1 cm -1 ) and broad excitation features (throughout the UV and visible regions) of AuNPs with the narrow emissive properties of lanthanides. Interaction between the AuNP ligand shell and ytterbium is determined using both nuclear magnetic resonance and electron microscopy measurements. In order to identify the mechanism of this energy transfer process, the distance of the ytterbium(III) from the surface of the AuNPs is systematically modulated by changing the size of the ligand appended to the AuNP. By studying the energy transfer efficiency from the various AuNP conjugates to pendant ytterbium(III) cations, a Dexter-type energy transfer mechanism is suggested, which is an important consideration for applications ranging from catalysis to energy harvesting. Taken together, these experiments lay a foundation for the incorporation of emissive AuNPs in energy transfer systems.

  5. Advances in energy-transfer technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpstra, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the technology of drying and curing inks, coatings and adhesives which is changing rapidly as converters and manufacturers strive to comply with regulations governing airborne emissions as well as discharge of liquid and solid wastes. Compliance with these regulations will become more difficult in the coming decade as the Clean Air Act's increasingly stringent limitations on emissions of volatile organic compounds are implemented to support the intentions of the Montreal protocol. Many of the customary solvents are being eliminated, and the volume of production for many others will be severely reduced. For some companies, the switch to the new materials means updating or replacing antiquated hot-air drying systems with high-velocity impingement ovens with higher temperature capabilities. Probably the least-expansive alternative to replacing the entire oven is to retrofit the installation with infrared (IR) energy in the form of separate predryers or postheaters or, in some cases, to install auxiliary IR heaters between the hot-air nozzles within the oven

  6. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  7. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lipeng; Shenai, Prathamesh; Zheng, Fulu; Somoza, Alejandro; Zhao, Yang

    2015-08-20

    Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  8. Fouling of roughened stainless steel surfaces during convective heat transfer to aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herz, A.; Malayeri, M.R.; Mueller-Steinhagen, H.

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of heat transfer performance due to fouling is the prime cause for higher energy consumption and inefficiency in many industrial heat exchangers such as those in power plants, refineries, food and dairy industries. Fouling is also a very complex process in which many geometrical, physical and operating parameters are involved with poorly understood interaction. Among them, the surface roughness is an important surface characteristic that would greatly influence crystallisation fouling mechanisms and hence deposition morphology and stickability to the surface. In this work, the effect of the surface roughness of AISI 304 BA stainless steel surfaces on fouling of an aqueous solution with inverse solubility behaviour has been investigated under convective heat transfer. Several experiments have been performed on roughened surfaces ranging from 0.18 to 1.55 μm for different bulk concentrations and heat fluxes. The EDTA titration method was used to measure the concentration of the calcium sulphate salt in order to maintain it at constant value during each fouling run. Experimental results show that the heat transfer coefficient of very rough surfaces (1.55 μm) decreases more rapidly than that of 0.54 μm. Several facts contribute to this behaviour notably (1) increased of primary heterogeneous nucleation rate on the surfaces; (2) reduction of local shear stress in the valleys and (3) reduced removal rate of the crystals from the surfaces where the roughness elements protrude out of the viscous sub-layer. The results also show linear and proportional variation of the fouling rate and heat flux within the range of operating conditions. In addition, the deposition process in terms of fouling rate could only be affected at lower surface contact angles. Such results would particularly be of interest for new surface treatment technologies which aim at altering the surface texture

  9. Flow boiling heat transfer on nanowire-coated surfaces with highly wetting liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Choi, Geehong; Kim, Beom Seok; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the recent advances in nanotechnology, one significant progress in energy technology is increased cooling ability. It has recently been shown that nanowires can improve pool boiling heat transfer due to the unique features such as enhanced wetting and enlarged nucleation sites. Applying such nanowires on a flow boiling, which is another major class of boiling phenomenon that is associated with forced convection, is yet immature and scarce despite its importance in various applications such as liquid cooling of energy, electronics and refrigeration systems. Here, we investigate flow boiling heat transfer on surfaces that are coated with SiNWs (silicon nanowires). Also, we use highly-wetting dielectric liquid, FC-72, as a working fluid. An interesting wetting behavior is observed where the presence of SiNWs reduces wetting and wicking that in turn leads to significant decrease of CHF (critical heat flux) compared to the plain surface, which opposes the current consensus. Also, the effects of nanowire length and Reynolds number on the boiling heat transfer are shown to be highly nonmonotonic. We attempt to explain such an unusual behavior on the basis of wetting, nucleation and forced convection, and we show that such factors are highly coupled in a way that lead to unusual behavior. - Highlights: • Observation of suppressed wettability in the presence of surface roughness (nanowires). • Significant reduction of critical heat flux in the presence of nanowires. • Nonmonotonic behavior of heat transfer coefficient vs. nanowire length and Reynolds number

  10. Effect of droplet morphology on growth dynamics and heat transfer during condensation on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2012-02-28

    Condensation on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces offers new opportunities for enhanced energy conversion, efficient water harvesting, and high performance thermal management. These surfaces are designed to be Cassie stable and favor the formation of suspended droplets on top of the nanostructures as compared to partially wetting droplets which locally wet the base of the nanostructures. These suspended droplets promise minimal contact line pinning and promote passive droplet shedding at sizes smaller than the characteristic capillary length. However, the gas films underneath such droplets may significantly hinder the overall heat and mass transfer performance. We investigated droplet growth dynamics on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces to elucidate the importance of droplet morphology on heat and mass transfer. By taking advantage of well-controlled functionalized silicon nanopillars, we observed the growth and shedding behavior of suspended and partially wetting droplets on the same surface during condensation. Environmental scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that initial droplet growth rates of partially wetting droplets were 6× larger than that of suspended droplets. We subsequently developed a droplet growth model to explain the experimental results and showed that partially wetting droplets had 4-6× higher heat transfer rates than that of suspended droplets. On the basis of these findings, the overall performance enhancement created by surface nanostructuring was examined in comparison to a flat hydrophobic surface. We showed these nanostructured surfaces had 56% heat flux enhancement for partially wetting droplet morphologies and 71% heat flux degradation for suspended morphologies in comparison to flat hydrophobic surfaces. This study provides insights into the previously unidentified role of droplet wetting morphology on growth rate, as well as the need to design Cassie stable nanostructured surfaces with tailored droplet

  11. Surface energy and viscoelasticity influence caramel adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Ty B; Foegeding, Edward Allen

    2017-08-26

    Adhesion is an important textural attribute that directs consumer eating patterns and behaviors and can be a negative attribute during food processing. The objectives of this study were to modify caramel formulation and compare adhesion to different materials to quantify the influence of surface energetics and viscoelasticity on caramel adhesiveness. Mechanical adhesion was viewed in the context of pressure sensitive tack theory, where adhesion is controlled by viscoelasticity of the adhesive material and the surface energy relationship of material and probe. Caramel samples varied in total amount of fat and protein, and mechanical adhesion was measured using a series of materials with total surface energies of 39.7-53.2 mJ/m 2 . Adhesiveness decreased as fat and protein content increased, with a significant effect of total surface energy. Viscoelasticity was modeled using creep recovery data fit to a four-element Burger mechanistic model. Burger model parameters representing retarded elasticity correlated strongly with adhesiveness. The results suggest two zones of adhesion based on formulation, one driven by both surface energy relationships-most notably dispersive and total surface energy-and viscoelasticity, and the other driven solely by viscoelasticity. Relationships between mechanical properties and adhesion have been explored but are still not well understood, and could aid in the design of food products with a controlled level of adhesion. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering material surface energy when measuring mechanical adhesion or texture profile analysis. Understanding the relationships between viscoelastic behavior and adhesion can be used to make inferences on perceived texture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Filtering Non-Linear Transfer Functions on Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Eric; Nowrouzezahrai, Derek; Poulin, Pierre; Neyret, Fabrice

    2014-07-01

    Applying non-linear transfer functions and look-up tables to procedural functions (such as noise), surface attributes, or even surface geometry are common strategies used to enhance visual detail. Their simplicity and ability to mimic a wide range of realistic appearances have led to their adoption in many rendering problems. As with any textured or geometric detail, proper filtering is needed to reduce aliasing when viewed across a range of distances, but accurate and efficient transfer function filtering remains an open problem for several reasons: transfer functions are complex and non-linear, especially when mapped through procedural noise and/or geometry-dependent functions, and the effects of perspective and masking further complicate the filtering over a pixel's footprint. We accurately solve this problem by computing and sampling from specialized filtering distributions on the fly, yielding very fast performance. We investigate the case where the transfer function to filter is a color map applied to (macroscale) surface textures (like noise), as well as color maps applied according to (microscale) geometric details. We introduce a novel representation of a (potentially modulated) color map's distribution over pixel footprints using Gaussian statistics and, in the more complex case of high-resolution color mapped microsurface details, our filtering is view- and light-dependent, and capable of correctly handling masking and occlusion effects. Our approach can be generalized to filter other physical-based rendering quantities. We propose an application to shading with irradiance environment maps over large terrains. Our framework is also compatible with the case of transfer functions used to warp surface geometry, as long as the transformations can be represented with Gaussian statistics, leading to proper view- and light-dependent filtering results. Our results match ground truth and our solution is well suited to real-time applications, requires only a few

  13. Surface Charge Transfer Doping of Monolayer Phosphorene via Molecular Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanyuan; Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; Zhao, Jianwei; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-12-03

    Monolayer phosphorene has attracted much attention owing to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and structural properties. Rationally tuning the electrical transport characteristics of monolayer phosphorene is essential to its applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, we study the electronic transport behaviors of monolayer phosphorene with surface charge transfer doping of electrophilic molecules, including 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), NO2, and MoO3, using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. F4TCNQ shows optimal performance in enhancing the p-type conductance of monolayer phosphorene. Static electronic properties indicate that the enhancement is originated from the charge transfer between adsorbed molecule and phosphorene layer. Dynamic transport behaviors demonstrate that additional channels for hole transport in host monolayer phosphorene were generated upon the adsorption of molecule. Our work unveils the great potential of surface charge transfer doping in tuning the electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene and is of significance to its application in high-performance devices.

  14. Fundamental research on supercooling phenomenon on heat transfer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, A.; Okawa, S.; Koganezawa, S.

    1991-01-01

    In relation to the problem of supercooling for ice storage devices, experiments on freezing a relatively large volume of supercooled water is carried out. In the experiment, an experimental method to determine a probability of freezing a large volume of supercooled water with a uniform temperature distribution is introduced. It is accomplished by dividing the water into many smaller droplets. In a statistical analysis, a method to improve an accuracy in a case of having a limited number of experiments is introduced, and the probability of freezing is calculated for each degree of supercooling. The average freezing temperature for the experiment is placed just at the extended region of the other researchers results worked on small droplets. By relating the value with the probability of freezing on various kinds of heat transfer surfaces, the probability of freezing which is independent of the surface is calculated. In this paper it is confirmed to be negligible compared with the one on the surface

  15. Successive energy transfer within multiple photosensitizers assembled in a hexameric hemoprotein scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Tsuyoshi; Oohora, Koji; Hayashi, Takashi

    2018-01-31

    An assembly of multiple photosensitizers is demonstrated by development of a hexameric hemoprotein (HTHP) scaffold as a light harvesting model to replicate the successive energy transfer occuring within photosensitizer assemblies of natural systems. In our model, six zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) molecules are arrayed at the heme binding site of HTHP by supramolecular interactions and five fluorescein (Flu) molecules and one Texas Red (Tex) molecule as donor and acceptor photosensitizers, respectively, are attached to the HTHP protein surface with covalent linkages. The flow of excited energy from photoexcited Flu to Tex occurs via two pathways: direct energy transfer from Flu to Tex (path 1) and energy transfer via ZnPP (path 2). Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal that the energy transfer ratio of these pathways (path 1 : path 2) is 39 : 61. These findings indicate that the excited energy originating at five Flu and six ZnPP molecules is collected at one Tex molecule as a funnel-like bottom for light harvesting. The present system using the hexameric hemoprotein scaffold is a promising candidate for construction of an artificial light harvesting system having multiple photosensitizers to promote efficient use of solar energy.

  16. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 77; Issue 6. Adhesion energy, surface ... 2 G A Adebayo1. Department of Physics, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria; Department of Pure and Applied Physics, College of Pure and Applied Science, Caleb University, Imota, Lagos, Nigeria ...

  17. SURFACE ENERGY BALANCE OVER ORANGE ORCHARD USING SURFACE RENEWAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reliable estimation of surface sensible and latent heat flux is the most important process to appraise energy and mass exchange among atmosphere and biosphere. In this study the surface energy fluxes were measured over an irrigated orange orchard during 2005-2008 monitoring periods using a Surface Renewal- Energy Balance approach. The experimental area is located in a representative orchard growing area of eastern Sicily (Italy. The performance of Surface Renewal (SR analysis for estimating sensible heat flux (H was analysed and evaluated in terms of correlation with H fluxes from the eddy covariance (EC method. Study revealed that the mean available energy (RN- G and latent heat flux (LE were of about 300 W m-2 and 237 W m-2, respectively, during dry periods and unstable-case atmospheric conditions. The estimated crop coefficient Kc values for the orchard crop averaged close to 0.80, which is considerably higher than previous FAO studies that found the value to be 0.65 for citrus with 70% of ground cover. The intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (LI PAR by the crop was measured and relationships between LAI and crop coefficient (Kc were established.

  18. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to graphene. Recent experiments that have been per- formed after our theoretical studies have infact found efficient energy transfer to graphene and the process was found to be useful in identifying graphene flakes both on substrates and in solution.4 Quenching by graphene was also found to be useful in obtaining good.

  19. Metaphors Describing Energy Transfer through Ecosystems: Helpful or Misleading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernecke, Ulrike; Schwanewedel, Julia; Harms, Ute

    2018-01-01

    Energy transfer in ecosystems is an abstract and challenging topic for learners. Metaphors are widely used in scientific and educational discourse to communicate ideas about abstract phenomena. However, although considered valuable teaching tools, metaphors are ambiguous and can be misleading when used in educational contexts. Educational…

  20. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of energy transfer to graphene.15,16 We imagine that the. Fermi level is shifted into the conduction band to a level with magnitude of wave vector, kF . To keep the calcu- lations simple, we use the Dirac cone approximation, which allows us to get analytical expressions for the rate at large distances. We note that as we are ...

  1. Energy transfer in photosynthesis: experimental insights and quantitative models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grondelle, R.; Novoderezhkin, V.

    2006-01-01

    We overview experimental and theoretical studies of energy transfer in the photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes LH1, LH2, and LHCII performed during the past decade since the discovery of high-resolution structure of these complexes. Experimental findings obtained with various spectroscopic

  2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in chemistry and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a popular tool to study equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers and biopolymers in condensed phases and is now widely used in conjunc- tion with single molecule spectroscopy. In the data analysis, one usually employs the Förster expression.

  3. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube.

  4. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the ...

  5. Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a bile salt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 153 (C153) to Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in a secondary aggregate of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The emission spectrum of C153 in NaDC is analysed in terms of two spectra-one with emission maximum at ...

  6. Nanophotonic control of the Forster resonance energy transfer efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Aart; Wubs, M.; Mosk, Allard; Subramaniam, Vinod; Vos, Willem L.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS is

  7. Energy transfer processes in rare-earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buijs, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of an investigation into the radiationless transfer of electronic excitation energies in various Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ compounds, which show structural peculiarities in the rare-earth sublattice. These peculiarities are an one-dimensional sublattice as well as two different crystallographic locations for the rare-earth ion. 154 refs.; 43 figs.; 12 tabs

  8. Femtosecond carotenoid to retinal energy transfer in xanthorhodopsin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Balashov, S.P.; Chábera, P.; Imasheva, E.S.; Yartsev, A.; Sundström, V.; Lanyi, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2009), s. 2268-2277 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : energy transfer * carotenoids * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2009

  9. Energy Exchange between Weakly Ionized Gas and a Metal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, A. Ph.; Polikarpov, Ph. J.; Borisov, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    An attempt to describe heat exchange of low ionized gas with a metal surface has been made with the use of DSMC approach and kinetic Monte-Carlo method. Modeling is adhered to concrete experimental conditions at which thin tungsten wire is placed in plasma and dependence of a heat flow on wire surface temperature, gas pressure, gas nature and a degree of ionization is investigated. As a result of simulation temperature profiles near the wire surface for nitrogen and argon as well as dependence of relative heat flow in a gas/surface system on temperature and degree of ionization with consideration of energy accommodation have been obtained. In the case of nitrogen the chemical charge-transfer reaction is taken into account.

  10. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  11. The charge transfer structure and effective energy transfer in multiplayer assembly film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mingqiang; Jian Xigao

    2005-01-01

    Charge transfer multiplayer films have been prepared by layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. The films incorporate the rare-earth-containing polyoxometalate K 11 [Eu{PW 11 O 39 } 2 ].nH 2 O and the rich electron polyelectrolyte poly(3-viny-1-methyl-pyridine) quaternary ammonium and display a linear increase in the absorption and film thickness with the number of deposition cycles. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra, atomic force micrographs, small-angle X-ray reflectivity measurements, and photoluminescence spectra were used to determine the structure of films. Linear and regular multilayer growth was observed. We can observe the formation of charge transfer complex compound in multiplayer by layer-by-layer assembly method. Most importantly, the luminescence spectra show the charge transfer band in assembly films, which suggest that energy could be effectively transferred to rare earth ions in assembly multiplayer films

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigations of rotational energy transfer in HBr + He collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Antonov, Ivan O; Merritt, Jeremy M; Heaven, Michael C

    2010-10-28

    Rotational relaxation rates for HBr(v = 1) colliding with helium atoms at room temperature have been measured using a time-resolved optical-optical double resonance technique. Rotational state selective excitation of v = 1 for rotational levels in the range J = 1-9 was achieved by stimulated Raman pumping. The population decay in the prepared states and the transfer of population to nearby rotational states was monitored via 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy using the g(3)Σ(-)-X(1)Σ(+) (0-1) band. Collision-induced population evolution for transfer events with |ΔJ| ≤ 8 was observed at pressures near 0.7 Torr. The experimental data were analyzed using fitting and scaling functions to generate state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constant matrices. Total depopulation rate constants were found to be in the range (1.3 to 2.0) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). As a test of current computational methods, state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants were calculated using ab initio theory. The total removal rate constants were in good agreement with the measured values, but the transfer probabilities for events with |ΔJ| ≥ 3 were underestimated. Inspection of the anisotropic characteristics of the potential energy surface did not yield an obvious explanation for the discrepancies, but it is most likely that the problem stems from inaccuracies in the potential surface.

  13. Light increases energy transfer efficiency in a boreal stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesutienė, Jūratė; Gorokhova, Elena; Stankevičienė, Daiva; Bergman, Eva; Greenberg, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Periphyton communities of a boreal stream were exposed to different light and nutrient levels to estimate energy transfer efficiency from primary to secondary producers using labeling with inorganic (13)C. In a one-day field experiment, periphyton grown in fast-flow conditions and dominated by opportunistic green algae were exposed to light levels corresponding to sub-saturating (forest shade) and saturating (open stream section) irradiances, and to N and P nutrient additions. In a two-week laboratory experiment, periphyton grown in low-flow conditions and dominated by slowly growing diatoms were incubated under two sub-saturating light and nutrient enrichment levels as well as grazed and non-grazed conditions. Light had significant positive effect on (13)C uptake by periphyton. In the field experiment, P addition had a positive effect on (13)C uptake but only at sub-saturating light levels, whereas in the laboratory experiment nutrient additions had no effect on the periphyton biomass, (13)C uptake, biovolume and community composition. In the laboratory experiment, the grazer (caddisfly) effect on periphyton biomass specific (13)C uptake and nutrient content was much stronger than the effects of light and nutrients. In particular, grazers significantly reduced periphyton biomass and increased biomass specific (13)C uptake and C:nutrient ratios. The energy transfer efficiency, estimated as a ratio between (13)C uptake by caddisfly and periphyton, was positively affected by light conditions, whereas the nutrient effect was not significant. We suggest that the observed effects on energy transfer were related to the increased diet contribution of highly palatable green algae, stimulated by higher light levels. Also, high heterotrophic microbial activity under low light levels would facilitate energy loss through respiration and decrease overall trophic transfer efficiency. These findings suggest that even a small increase in light intensity could result in community

  14. Higher order energy transfer. Quantum electrodynamical calculations and graphical representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    In Chapter 1, a novel method of calculating quantum electrodynamic amplitudes is formulated using combinatorial theory. This technique is used throughout instead of conventional time-ordered methods. A variety of hyperspaces are discussed to highlight isomorphism between a number of A generalisation of Pascal's triangle is shown to be beneficial in determining the form of hyperspace graphs. Chapter 2 describes laser assisted resonance energy transfer (LARET), a higher order perturbative contribution to the well-known process resonance energy transfer, accommodating an off resonance auxiliary laser field to stimulate the migration. Interest focuses on energy exchanges between two uncorrelated molecular species, as in a system where molecules are randomly oriented. Both phase-weighted and standard isotropic averaging are required for the calculations. Results are discussed in terms of a laser intensity-dependent mechanism. Identifying the applied field regime where LARET should prove experimentally significant, transfer rate increases of up to 30% are predicted. General results for three-center energy transfer are elucidated in chapter 3. Cooperative and accretive mechanistic pathways are identified with theory formulated to elicit their role in a variety of energy transfer phenomena and their relative dominance. In multichromophoric the interplay of such factors is analysed with regard to molecular architectures. The alignments and magnitudes of donor and acceptor transition moments and polarisabilities prove to have profound effects on achievable pooling efficiency for linear configurations. Also optimum configurations are offered. In ionic lattices, although both mechanisms play significant roles in pooling and cutting processes, only the accretive is responsible for sensitisation. The local, microscopic level results are used to gauge the lattice response, encompassing concentration and structural effects. (author)

  15. Triplet-Triplet Energy Transfer Study in Hydrogen Bonding Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijia; Zhao, Jianzhang; Guo, Song

    2015-01-01

    The 2,6-diiodoBodipy-styrylBodipy hydrogen bonding system was prepared to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the triplet-triplet-energy-transfer (TTET) process. 2,6-DiiodoBodipy linked with N-acetyl-2,6-diaminopyridine (D-2) was used as the triplet energy donor, and the styrylBodipy connected with thymine (A-1) was used as triplet energy acceptor, thus the TTET process was established upon photoexcitation. The photophysical processes of the hydrogen bonding system were studied with steady-state UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime measurement and nanosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopies. The TTET of the intramolecular/hydrogen bonding/intermolecular systems were compared through nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The TTET process of the hydrogen bonding system is faster and more efficient (kTTET = 6.9 × 10(4) s(-1), ΦTTET = 94.0%) than intermolecular triplet energy transfer (kTTET = 6.0 × 10(4) s(-1), ΦTTET = 90.9%), but slower and less efficient than intramolecular triplet energy transfer (kTTET > 10(8) s(-1)). These results are valuable for designing self-assembly triplet photosensitizers and for the study of the TTET process of hydrogen bonding systems.

  16. The transfer of technologies for biomass energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiders, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    The first part of the paper presents the common perception of technology transfer as a trade relationship rather than a systematic approach to establish a complex technological capacity in a given field. It aims to correct this misperception by introducing some other ideas: (a) the need to support the people, adjust the relevant organizations and establish the capacities to provide the products and services; (b) the typical life cycles of technologies from the initial concept to the final stages of transfer and sustainable dissemination; (c) the needs and expectations of the groups targeted by the technologies for biomass energy utilization. The second part of the paper discusses one example of successful technology transfer: the use of large biomass-burning stoves for food preparation in public institutions and private restaurants in East Africa. The third part of the paper highlights two non-technological barriers to the transfer of biomass energy technologies: (a) weak market forces and business interests and a large number of State activities and projects and (b) conflicting interests of end-users, craftsmen, private and public project partners, which can threaten the success of the attempted technology transfer, even after local adaptation. Finally, suggestions are made for overcoming some of these problems. (author)

  17. Long range energy transfer in graphene hybrid structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, Hugo; Bernardo, César; Moura, Cacilda; Belsley, Michael; Schellenberg, Peter; Ferreira, R A S; André, P S; Stauber, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this work we quantify the distance dependence for the extraction of energy from excited chromophores by a single layer graphene flake over a large separation range. To this end hybrid structures were prepared, consisting of a thin (2 nm) layer of a polymer matrix doped with a well chosen strongly fluorescent organic molecule, followed by an un-doped spacer layer of well-defined thicknesses made of the same polymer material and an underlying single layer of pristine, undoped graphene. The coupling strength is assessed through the variation of the fluorescence decay kinetics as a function of distance between the graphene and the excited chromophore molecules. Non-radiative energy transfer to the graphene was observed at distances of up to 60 nm; a range much greater than typical energy transfer distances observed in molecular systems. (paper)

  18. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, A; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at

  19. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-10-04

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures.

  20. State-of-the-Art Developments of Acoustic Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rabiul Awal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic energy transfer (AET technology has drawn significant industrial attention recently. This paper presents the reviews of the existing AETs sequentially, preferably, from the early stage. From the review, it is evident that, among all the classes of wireless energy transfer, AET is the safest technology to adopt. Thus, it is highly recommended for sensitive area and devices, especially implantable devices. Though, the efficiency for relatively long distances (i.e., >30 mm is less than that of inductive or capacitive power transfer; however, the trade-off between safety considerations and performances is highly suitable and better than others. From the presented statistics, it is evident that AET is capable of transmitting 1.068 kW and 5.4 W of energy through wall and in-body medium (implants, respectively. Progressively, the AET efficiency can reach up to 88% in extension to 8.6 m separation distance which is even superior to that of inductive and capacitive power transfer.

  1. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  2. Environmental Mechanics: Water, Mass and Energy Transfer in the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raats, Peter A. C.; Smiles, David; Warrick, Arthur W.

    Modern theories of mass and heat transfer in the biosphere, based on notions of a soil-plant-atmosphere thermodynamic continuum focused on water, were generally formulated by the mid-20th century. They tended to be reductionist and flow equations combined macroscopic laws of flow and of material and energy balance. They were difficult to solve because material transfer properties tend to be strongly related to the local concentration of an entity of concern, to the location, or to both. The architecture of the soil and the plant canopy also complicated their formulation, the scale of their application and their test.

  3. Obtaining evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land), a remote sensing based evapotranspiration model, has been applied with Landsat ETM+ sensor for the estimation of actual ... The land uses in this study area consists of irrigated agriculture, rain-fed agriculture and livestock grazing. The obtained results ...

  4. Potential energy surface of alanine polypeptide chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2006-01-01

    The multidimensional potential energy surfaces of the peptide chains consisting of three and six alanine (Ala) residues have been studied with respect to the degrees of freedom related to the twist of these molecules relative to the peptide backbone (these degrees of freedom are responsible...

  5. Surface characterization and surface electronic structure of organic quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have thoroughly characterized the surfaces of the organic charge-transfer salts TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF)(2)PF6 which are generally acknowledged as prototypical examples of one-dimensional conductors. In particular x-ray-induced photoemission spectroscopy turns out to be a valuable nondestructive d...

  6. Energy and Charge Transfer in Dinuclear Ru-based Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Valeria

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the excited state dynamics of a series of dinuclear compounds combining Ru based cromophores with M =Ru(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) are explored. Ru- μ-NC-M dimers are good candidates to investigate the competition between electron and energy transfer in arrays of chromophores. The presence of a μ-NC bridge affords a strong coupling between the moieties without providing acceptor states that might act as electron traps. Polypyridyl Ru based compounds play an important role on light-harvesting antennas for energy conversion. With proper knowledge of the excited state dynamics, multinuclear arrays of chromophores can be developed. Our studies focus on (i) energy/electron transfer from the Ru(II) to a 2nd M center through the cyanide bridge, and (ii) geometry changes due to the exchange of one of the Ru(II) polypiridyl ligands . Broadband ultrafast spectroscopy shows excited state dynamics in the psec time regime. These dynamics depend strongly on the nature of the acceptor and the orientation of the ligand involved in the photoinduced transition. Hence, the competition between energy and electron transfer across the bridge is modulated by the selective choice of the secondary M center. We conclude that transition metals from the 3rd row are good candidates for longer arrays since their lack of low-lying MC states precludes thermal deactivation. This work is based upon work supported by NSF (CHE-1058638) and CONICET.

  7. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Functionalized polymer film surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Li, J.S.; Yang, W.T.; Xu, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of polymer films, without altering the substrate properties, is crucial to their wide-spread applications. In this work, a simple one-step method for the direct immobilization of benzyl chloride groups (as the effective atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators) on the polymer films was developed via benzophenone-induced coupling of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC). Polyethylene (PE) and nylon films were selected as examples of polymer films to illustrate the functionalization of film surfaces via surface-initiated ATRP. Functional polymer brushes of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, sodium 4-styrenesulfonate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate, as well as their block copolymer brushes, have been prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the VBC-coupled PE or nylon film surfaces. With the development of a simple approach to the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on polymer film surfaces and the inherent versatility of surface-initiated ATRP, the surface functionality of polymer films can be precisely tailored. - Highlights: ► Atom transfer radical polymerization initiators were simply immobilized. ► Different functional polymer brushes were readily prepared. ► Their block copolymer brushes were also readily prepared

  9. Regulation control and energy management scheme for wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M.

    2015-12-29

    Power transfer rate at a charging facility can be maximized by employing a feedback scheme. The state of charge (SOC) and temperature of the regenerative energy storage system (RESS) pack of a vehicle is monitored to determine the load due to the RESS pack. An optimal frequency that cancels the imaginary component of the input impedance for the output signal from a grid converter is calculated from the load of the RESS pack, and a frequency offset f* is made to the nominal frequency f.sub.0 of the grid converter output based on the resonance frequency of a magnetically coupled circuit. The optimal frequency can maximize the efficiency of the power transfer. Further, an optimal grid converter duty ratio d* can be derived from the charge rate of the RESS pack. The grid converter duty ratio d* regulates wireless power transfer (WPT) power level.

  10. Nano Sensing and Energy Conversion Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltai (Isaac Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic technique has been attracting much attention in applications of nano-bio-chemical sensing and energy conversion of solar energy harvesting and enhanced energy transfer. One approach for nano-bio-chemical sensing is surface plasmon resonance (SPR imaging, which can detect the material properties, such as density, ion concentration, temperature, and effective refractive index in high sensitivity, label-free, and real-time under ambient conditions. Recent study shows that SPR can successfully detect the concentration variation of nanofluids during evaporation-induced self-assembly process. Spoof surface plasmon resonance based on multilayer metallo-dielectric hyperbolic metamaterials demonstrate SPR dispersion control, which can be combined with SPR imaging, to characterize high refractive index materials because of its exotic optical properties. Furthermore, nano-biophotonics could enable innovative energy conversion such as the increase of absorption and emission efficiency and the perfect absorption. Localized SPR using metal nanoparticles show highly enhanced absorption in solar energy harvesting. Three-dimensional hyperbolic metamaterial cavity nanostructure shows enhanced spontaneous emission. Recently ultrathin film perfect absorber is demonstrated with the film thickness is as low as ~1/50th of the operating wavelength using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ phenomena at the wavelength close to SPR. It is expected to provide a breakthrough in sensing and energy conversion applications using the exotic optical properties based on the nanophotonic technique.

  11. Morphing continuum analysis of energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Mohamad Ibrahim; Wonnell, Louis B.; Chen, James

    2018-02-01

    A shock-preserving finite volume solver with the generalized Lax-Friedrichs splitting flux for morphing continuum theory (MCT) is presented and verified. The numerical MCT solver is showcased in a supersonic turbulent flow with Mach 2.93 over an 8∘ compression ramp. The simulation results validated MCT with experiments as an alternative for modeling compressible turbulence. The required size of the smallest mesh cell for the MCT simulation is shown to be almost an order larger than that in a similar direct numerical simulation study. The comparison shows MCT is a much more computationally friendly theory than the classical Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamics of energy cascade at the length scale of individual eddies is illuminated through the subscale rotation introduced by MCT. In this regard, MCT provides a statistical averaging procedure for capturing energy transfer in compressible turbulence, not found in classical fluid theories. Analysis of the MCT results show the existence of a statistical coupling of the internal and translational kinetic energy fluctuations with the corresponding eddy rotational energy fluctuations, indicating a multiscale transfer of energy. In conclusion, MCT gives a new characterization of the energy cascade within compressible turbulence without the use of excessive computational resources.

  12. Fabrication of Robust and Antifouling Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2015-04-22

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of fluorinated methacrylates on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics. The hydrophobicity of the PET fabric was systematically tunable by controlling the polymerization time. The obtained superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent chemical robustness even after exposure to different chemicals, such as acid, base, salt, acetone, and toluene. Importantly, the fabrics maintained superhydrophobicity after 2500 abrasion cycles, 100 laundering cycles, and long time exposure to UV irradiation. Also, the surface of the superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent antifouling properties.

  13. Homopolar machine for reversible energy storage and transfer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillwagon, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A homopolar machine designed to operate as a generator and motor in reversibly storing and transferring energy between the machine and a magnetic load coil for a thermonuclear reactor is described. The machine rotor comprises hollow thin-walled cylinders or sleeves which form the basis of the system by utilizing substantially all of the rotor mass as a conductor thus making it possible to transfer substantially all the rotor kinetic energy electrically to the load coil in a highly economical and efficient manner. The rotor is divided into multiple separate cylinders or sleeves of modular design, connected in series and arranged to rotate in opposite directions but maintain the supply of current in a single direction to the machine terminals

  14. Photosynthetic Energy Transfer at the Quantum/Classical Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2018-04-03

    Quantum mechanics diverges from the classical description of our world when very small scales or very fast processes are involved. Unlike classical mechanics, quantum effects cannot be easily related to our everyday experience and are often counterintuitive to us. Nevertheless, the dimensions and time scales of the photosynthetic energy transfer processes puts them close to the quantum/classical border, bringing them into the range of measurable quantum effects. Here we review recent advances in the field and suggest that photosynthetic processes can take advantage of the sensitivity of quantum effects to the environmental 'noise' as means of tuning exciton energy transfer efficiency. If true, this design principle could be a base for 'nontrivial' coherent wave property nano-devices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive control of the power transferred to an implanted device by an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmilovitz, Doron; Ozeri, Shaul; Wang, Chua-Chin; Spivak, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer is an effective method for powering implanted devices noninvasively. Nevertheless, the amount of power harvested by the implanted receiver is sensitive to the distance and orientation of the external transmitting transducer attached to the skin with respect to the implanted receiving transducer. This paper describes an ultrasonic power transfer link whose harvested power is controlled by an inductive link. A small (5 μF) storage capacitor voltage, which is part of the implanted unit, is allowed to swing between 3.8 and 3.5 V using hysteretic control. The two control states are indicated by excitation (while the implanted storage capacitor voltage decreases) or the absence of excitation of an implanted coil that is magnetically coupled to an external coil attached to the skin surface. A 35 mW Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer link was fabricated using two piezoelectric transducers of equal size (Fuji Ceramics C-2 PZT disc 15 mm × 3 mm) operated at a vibration frequency of 720 kHz. By applying the proposed hysteretic control, the captured power was effectively regulated for implantation depths of up to 85 mm.

  16. Energy Transfer in Microhydrated Uracil, 5-Fluorouracil, and 5-Bromouracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poštulka, J.; Slavíček, P.; Fedor, Juraj; Fárník, Michal; Kočišek, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 38 (2017), s. 8965-8974 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-10995Y; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04068S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Aromatic compounds * Electrons * Energy transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  17. Spatial propagation of excitonic coherence enables ratcheted energy transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Stephan; Ishizaki, Akihito; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows that a variety of photosynthetic systems can preserve quantum beats in the process of electronic energy transfer, even at room temperature. However, whether this quantum coherence arises in vivo and whether it has any biological function have remained unclear. Here we present a theoretical model that suggests that the creation and recreation of coherence under natural conditions is ubiquitous. Our model allows us to theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for a ratch...

  18. Electromagnetic Energy Absorption due to Wireless Energy Transfer: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafiq A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews an implementation of evaluating compliance of wireless power transfer systems with respect to human electromagnetic exposure limits. Methods for both numerical analysis and measurements are discussed. The objective is to evaluate the rate of which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a wireless energy transfer, although it can be referred to the absorption of other forms of energy by tissue. An exposure assessment of a representative wireless power transfer system, under a limited set of operating conditions, is provided in order to estimate the maximum SAR levels. The aim of this review is to conclude the possible side effect to the human body when utilizing wireless charging in daily life so that an early severe action can be taken when using wireless transfer.

  19. Isotope separation process by transfer of vibrational energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelie, C.; Cauchetier, M.; Paris, J.

    1983-01-01

    This process consists in exciting A molecules by absorption of a pulsed light beam, then in exciting until their dissociation X molecules, present in several isotopic forms, by a vibrational transfer between the A molecules and the X molecules, the A molecules having a dissociation energy greater than that of the X molecules, the duration and energy of the light pulses being such that the absorption time by the A molecules is less than the excitation time of the X molecules and the temperature conditions such that the thermal width of the vibration rays is at the most near the isotopic difference between the resonance rays of the two isotopic varieties [fr

  20. Coherence and relaxation in energy transfer processes in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelby, R.M.

    1978-03-01

    Investigations of electronic triplet and vibrational energy transfer dynamics and relaxation processes are presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of coherence and interactions which tend to destroy the coherence. In the case of triplet excitons at low temperatures, the importance of coherence in energy migration can be established, and the average coherence parameters can be experimentally determined. In the case of vibrational excitations, both picosecond spectroscopic studies of vibrational relaxation and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the dynamics and give increased insight into the nature of the mechanisms responsible for vibrational dephasing. The design and operation of the picosecond apparatus used in these experiments is also described

  1. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  2. Analysis of the Coupling Coefficient in Inductive Energy Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mendes Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless energy transfer systems, the energy is transferred from a power source to an electrical load without the need of physical connections. In this scope, inductive links have been widely studied as a way of implementing these systems. Although high efficiency can be achieved when the system is operating in a static state, it can drastically decrease if changes in the relative position and in the coupling coefficient between the coils occur. In this paper, we analyze the coupling coefficient as a function of the distance between two planar and coaxial coils in wireless energy transfer systems. A simple equation is derived from Neumann’s equation for mutual inductance, which is then used to calculate the coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is computed using CST Microwave Studio and compared to calculation and experimental results for two coils with an excitation signal of up to 10 MHz. The results showed that the equation presents good accuracy for geometric parameters that do not lead the solution of the elliptic integral of the first kind to infinity.

  3. Resonance energy transfer and interface forces: quantum electrodynamical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David S.; Leeder, Jamie M.; Rodríguez, Justo; Andrews, David L.

    2007-01-01

    On the propagation of radiation with a suitably resonant optical frequency through a dense chromophoric system - a doped solid for example - photon capture is commonly followed by one or more near-field transfers of the resulting optical excitation, usually to closely neighboring chromophores. Since the process results in a change to the local electronic environment, it can be expected to also shift the electromagnetic interactions between the participant optical units, producing modified inter-particle forces. Significantly, it emerges that energy transfer, when it occurs between chromophores or particles with electronically dissimilar properties (such as differing polarizabilities), engenders hitherto unreported changes in the local potential energy landscape. This paper reports the results of quantum electrodynamical calculations which cast a new light on the physical link between these features. The theory also elucidates a significant relationship with Casimir-Polder forces; it transpires that there are clear and fundamental links between dispersion forces and resonance energy transfer. Based on the results, we highlight specific effects that can be anticipated when laser light propagates through an interface between two absorbing media. Both steady-state and pulsed excitation conditions are modeled and the consequences for interface forces are subjected to detailed analysis.

  4. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kočišek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M.; Slavíček, P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H 2 O) n clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar + and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar + * and water opens leading to new products Ar n H + and (H 2 O) n H + . On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H 2 O) n H 2 2+ and (H 2 O) n 2+ ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent

  5. Luminescence and energy transfer processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J.P.M. van.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis some studies are presented of the luminescence and energy transfer in compounds containing Eu 3+ , Pr 3+ and Gd 3+ ions. Ch. 2 deals with the energy migration in the system Gd 1 - xEu x(IO 3) 3. In ch 3 the luminescence properties of the Pr 3+ ion in the system La 1 - xPr xMgAl 1 10 1 9 are reported. Ch. 4 discusses the luminescence properties of alkali europium double tungstates and molybdates AEuW 20 8 and AEuMo 20 * (A + = alkali metal atom). The luminiscence and energy migration characteristics of the isostructural system LiGd 1 - xEu xF 4 and Gd 1 - xEu xNbO 4 are reported in ch. 5. In ch. 6 the mechanism of energy migration in (La,Gd)AlO 3 and (Gd,Eu)AlO 3 is discussed. Ch. 7 deals with the system Na 5(Gd,Eu) (WO 4) 4. In ch. 8 the luminescence and energy transfer properties of two europium tellurite anti-glass phases are reported. The two phases are Eu 1 . 7 9TeO x, which has a pseudotetragonal structure, and Eu 1 . 0 6TeO x, which has a monoclinic, ordered structure. (author). 201 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  6. Surface analysis with low energy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglauer, E.; Heiland, W.

    1976-01-01

    Principles and applications of low energy ion scattering for surface analysis are presented. Basic features are the binary collision concept, the scattering cross-sections and the ion neutralization process. The potential and the limitations of the method are outlined. Some pertinent experimental aspects are considered. In a number of examples the performance of the technique is demonstrated for qualitative composition analysis and for studies of surface structures. Finally a few comparisons are made with other techniques, such as AES, LEED, or SIMS. (orig.) [de

  7. Model Property Based Material Balance and Energy Conservation Analysis for Process Industry Energy Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumin Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional historical data based material and energy balance analyses are static and isolated computations. Such methods cannot embody the cross-coupling effect of energy flow, material flow and information flow in the process industry; furthermore, they cannot easily realize the effective evaluation and comparison of different energy transfer processes by alternating the model module. In this paper, a novel method for material balance and energy conservation analysis of process industry energy transfer system is developed based on model property. Firstly, a reconfigurable energy transfer process model, which is independent of energy types and energy-consuming equipment, is presented from the viewpoint of the cross-coupling effect of energy flow, material flow and information flow. Thereafter the material balance determination is proposed based on both a dynamic incidence matrix and dynamic balance quantity. Moreover, the model-weighted conservation determination theorem is proved, and the energy efficiency analysis method is also discussed. Results confirmed the efficacy of the proposed methods, confirming its potential for use by process industry in energy efficiency analyses.

  8. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  9. Energy-donor phosphorescence quenching study of triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Nakabai, Yuya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Oguchi-Fujiyama, Nozomi; Miyazawa, Kazuyuki [Shiseido Research Center, Hayabuchi, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama 224-8558 (Japan); Yagi, Mikio, E-mail: yagimiki@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer from a photounstable UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4′-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM), to UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (octyl methoxycinnamate, OMC), octocrylene (OCR) and dioctyl 4-methoxybenzylidenemalonate (DOMBM) has been observed using a 355 nm laser excitation in rigid solutions at 77 K. The decay curves of the energy-donor phosphorescence in the presence of the UV-B absorbers deviate from the exponential decay at the initial stage of the decay. The Stern–Volmer formulation is not valid in rigid solutions because molecular diffusion is impossible. The experimental results indicate that the rate constant of triplet–triplet energy transfer from BMDBM to the UV-B absorbers, k{sub T–T}, decreases in the following order: k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–DOMBM)>k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–OMC)≥k{sub T–T} (BMDBM–OCR). The presence of DOMBM enhances the photostability of the widely used combination of UV-A and UV-B absorbers, BMDBM and OCR. The effects of the triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability of BMDBM are discussed. - Highlights: • The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers was observed. • The phosphorescence decay deviates from exponential at the initial stage of decay. • The effects of triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability are discussed.

  10. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  11. Energy transfer from quantum dots to metal-organic frameworks for enhanced light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shengye; Son, Ho-Jin; Farha, Omar K; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-01-23

    Because of their efficient energy-transport properties, porphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are attractive compounds for solar photochemistry applications. However, their absorption bands provide limited coverage in the visible spectral range for light-harvesting applications. We report here the functionalization of porphyrin-based MOFs with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) for the enhancement of light harvesting via energy transfer from the QDs to the MOFs. The broad absorption band of the QDs in the visible region offers greater coverage of the solar spectrum by QD-MOF hybrid structures. We show through time-resolved emission studies that photoexcitation of the QDs is followed by energy transfer to the MOFs with efficiencies of more than 80%. This sensitization approach can result in a >50% increase in the number of photons harvested by a single monolayer MOF structure with a monolayer of QDs on the surface of the MOF.

  12. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  13. Molten Materials Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Sen, Subhayu

    2008-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction processes as a means to provide pure elements for lunar resource utilization have many advantages. Such processes have. the potential of removing all the oxygen from the lunar soil for use in life support and for propellant. Electrochemical reduction also provides a direct path for the. production of pure metals and silicon which can be utilized for in situ manufacturing and power production. Some of the challenges encountered in the electrolytic reduction processes include the feeding of the electrolytic cell (the transfer of electrolyte containing lunar soil), the withdrawal of reactants and refined products such as the liquidironsiliconalloy with a number of impurities, and the spent regolith slag, produced in the hot electrolytic cell for the reduction of lunar regolith. The paper will discuss some of the possible solutions to the challenges of handling molten materials on the lunar surface, as well as the path toward the construction and testing of a proof-of-concept facility.

  14. Surface heat transfer in a channel with porous insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortyshov, Yu. F.

    1993-05-01

    One of the possible ways of the effective intensification is the realization of heat carrier flows in porous structures. For this purpose inserts are placed in moving heat carrier channels. Despite a large number of publications, net-like, fibrous, brush, caked and powder structures of low and mean porosity (epsilon less than or equal to 0.6) are studied. Application of high-porous permeable honeycomb materials (HPHM) shows, that among the the well-known porous materials possessing maximal permeability (penetrability factors are 10(exp -8) ...10(exp -9) sq m). HPHM's have a characteristic three-dimensional net-like honeycomb structure with high repeatability of cells. All the frame substance is concentrated in stripping ribs, which bound each separate cell. In coolant flowing in the channel with porous insert the transfer of energy from the heated wall into the channel interior originates at the expense of the frame material heat conduction and lateral conduction and lateral convective mixing of flow. In this paper we present the results of analytical and experimental heat transfer investigation at forced heat carrier, flowing in the channel that is filled-in by porous HPHM medium.

  15. New theory of radiative energy transfer in free electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.

    1976-01-01

    A new theory of radiative energy transfer in free, statistically stationary electromagnetic fields is presented. It provides a model for energy transport that is rigorous both within the framework of the stochastic theory of the classical field as well as within the framework of the theory of the quantized field. Unlike the usual phenomenological model of radiative energy transfer that centers around a single scalar quantity (the specific intensity of radiation), our theory brings into evidence the need for characterizing the energy transport by means of two (related) quantities: a scalar and a vector that may be identified, in a well-defined sense, with ''angular components'' of the average electromagnetic energy density and of the average Poynting vector, respectively. Both of them are defined in terms of invariants of certain new electromagnetic correlation tensors. In the special case when the field is statistically homogeneous, our model reduces to the usual one and our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density, when multiplied by the vacuum speed of light, then acquires all the properties of the specific intensity of radiation. When the field is not statistically homogeneous our model approximates to the usual phenomenological one, provided that the angular correlations between plane wave modes of the field extend over a sufficiently small solid angle of directions about the direction of propagation of each mode. It is tentatively suggested that, when suitably normalized, our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density may be interpreted as a quasi-probability (general quantum-mechancial phase-space distribution function, such as Wigner's) for the position and the momentum of a photon

  16. Membranes: A Variety of Energy Landscapes for Many Transfer Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    A membrane can be represented by an energy landscape that solutes or colloids must cross. A model accounting for the momentum and the mass balances in the membrane energy landscape establishes a new way of writing for the Darcy law. The counter-pressure in the Darcy law is no longer written as the result of an osmotic pressure difference but rather as a function of colloid-membrane interactions. The ability of the model to describe the physics of the filtration is discussed in detail. This model is solved in a simplified energy landscape to derive analytical relationships that describe the selectivity and the counter-pressure from ab initio operating conditions. The model shows that the stiffness of the energy landscape has an impact on the process efficiency: a gradual increase in interactions (such as with hourglass pore shape) can reduce the separation energetic cost. It allows the introduction of a new paradigm to increase membrane efficiency: the accumulation that is inherent to the separation must be distributed across the membrane. Asymmetric interactions thus lead to direction-dependent transfer properties and the membrane exhibits diode behavior. These new transfer opportunities are discussed. PMID:29470440

  17. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Argete

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass and SEE = 81 Wm-2 over corn canopy. The calculated fluxes compared reasonably well with those obtained using the Penman equations.For an energy budget research with limited instrumentation, the aerodynamic method performed satisfactorily in estimating the daytime fluxes, when atmospheric conditions are fully convective, but failed when conditions were stably stratified as during nighttime.

  18. Computer analysis of transient heat transfer from coated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, A.; Holmes, D.

    1983-01-01

    The transient thermal response of internally heated, coated surfaces in contact with liquid helium was investigated with a previously developed computer model. The coatings were found to affect the time required to initiate film boiling or to quench a superconductor in the substrate. The energy which can be absorbed without an unacceptably large temperature rise depends most strongly upon the coating thermal property group (kpC /SUB p/ ) /SUP 1/2/ and on the peak nucleate boiling heat flux. Dielectric materials for electrical insulation usually have low thermal property group values, but a new class of ceramic materials shows great promise for application with superconducting devices as electrical insulations with good thermal properties. Coating materials with thermal property group values greater than that of OFHC copper at liquid helium temperatures provide the same thermal stability as a bare copper surface exposed to the helium bath. Possible applications of the new materials to potted windings are also discussed

  19. Alternative heat transfer surfaces for AGR fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkie, D.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced gas-cooled reactors employing stainless-steel clad fuel pins must be economical in the use of steel to avoid incurring crippling penalties arising from neutron absorption. Any means of enhancing heat transfer by altering the surface of the pin by the adoption of projections necessitates that these projections are of low height relative to the equivalent diameter of the surrounding passage. This rules out the use of extended surfaces in the form of large fins, which in any case would be ruled out on thermal efficiency grounds owing to the large temperature drop down the poorly conducting steel but it does not rule out the use of many fins of low height. Longitudinal fins of low height for which results have been obtained for single pins tested in smooth circular channels and multi-start ribs for which single-pin and cluster results are available, are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of these and other ideas are considered in relation to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor. (author)

  20. Western China energy development and west to east energy transfer: Application of the Western China Sustainable Energy Development Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenying; Li Hualin; Wu Zongxin

    2010-01-01

    China is striving for coordinated regional economic development and to solve the energy shortage in eastern China through a western China development plan with one focus being energy development and west to east energy transfer. This paper describes Western China Sustainable Energy Development Model (WSED) to evaluate various energy development scenarios for western China. The model includes a Western China MARKAL model, a Computable General Equilibrium Model for Western China (WCGE), and an Energy Service Demand Projection Model (ESDP). The ESDP provides energy service demand projections for the Western China MARKAL model, while the WCGE provides macroeconomic inputs for the ESDP and analyzes the impact of different energy development scenarios on western China economy. A reference scenario and several different west to east energy transfer scenarios with and without consideration of the water constraints and the endogenous technology learning are presented. The modeling describes the energy consumption, carbon emissions, water consumption, energy investment cost, and the impact on western China GDP of the different scenarios through the year 2050. These results have implications on sustainable energy development policies and sustainable west to east energy transfer strategies.

  1. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Antunez, Emilio u.

    1996-01-24

    In order to remain competitive it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them is also given.

  2. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

  3. Vibrational energy transfer in hydrogen liquid and its isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.M.; Delalande, C.

    1978-01-01

    The transfer of vibrational energy (V-V) from H 2 to isotopic impurities (HD or D 2 ) has been studied in the liquid state, between 15 and 30 K. The subsequent ralaxation (V-T) of the excited impurity by the H 2 liquid host has also been measured and contrasted with the vibrational relaxation behaviour of pure H 2 and D 2 liquids. The isothermal density dependence of both V-V and V-T transfer has been investigated in the fluid state at 30 K. High density relaxation rates are also compared to the data in the pure gases and to other available gas phase results. Measurements in the solid, near the triple-point temperature, are equally reported for each process studied. (Auth.)

  4. Rotational Energy Transfer and Collisional Induced Raman Linewidths in N2 Gas. 1; Energy Transfer Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotationally inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigidrotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range. The CC and CS cross sections have been obtained both with and without identical molecule exchange symmetry, whereas exchange was neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well; between 113 - 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp -1), shows that IOS is sensitive to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subject to larger errors. It is found that the state-to-state cross sections with even and odd exchange symmetry agree to better than 2% and are well represented as a sum of direct and exchange cross sections for distinguishable molecules, an indication of the applicability of a classical treatment for this system. This result, however, does not apply to partial cross sections for given total J, but arises from a near cancellation in summing over partial waves. In order to use rigid-rotor results for the calculation of effective rotational excitation rates of N2 in the v=1 vibrational level colliding with bath N2 molecules in the v=0 level, it is assumed that exchange scattering between molecules in different vibrational levels is negligible and direct scattering is independent of Y. Good agreement with room temperature experimental data is obtained. The effective rates determined using the IOS and energy corrected sudden (ECS) approximations are also in reasonable agreement with experiment, with the ECS results being somewhat better. The problem with a degeneracy factor in earlier cross section expressions for collisions between identical molecules is pointed out

  5. On the Heat Transfer through a Solid Slab Heated Uniformly and Continuously on One of Its Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Lara-Bernal, A.; Calderon, A.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Some peculiarities of the heat transfer through a sample that is heated by the superficial absorption of light energy under continuous uniform illumination are discussed. We explain, using a different approach to that presented in a recent article published in this journal (Salazar "et al" 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 1053-9), that the front surface of…

  6. Multiple scattering effects with cyclical terms in active remote sensing of vegetated surface using vector radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy transport in a vegetated (corn) surface layer is examined by solving the vector radiative transfer equation using a numerical iterative approach. This approach allows a higher order that includes the multiple scattering effects. Multiple scattering effects are important when the optical t...

  7. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  8. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażkiewicz Michalina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee – Right Hip (p = 0.0035, Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201, Torso – Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122 and Right Elbow – Right Wrist (p = 0.0001. Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  9. Conformation and energy transfer in single conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolinger, Joshua C; Traub, Matthew C; Brazard, Johanna; Adachi, Takuji; Barbara, Paul F; Vanden Bout, David A

    2012-11-20

    In contrast to the detailed understanding of inorganic materials, researchers lack a comprehensive view of how the properties of bulk organic materials arise from their individual components. For conjugated polymers to eventually serve as low cost semiconductor layers in electronic devices, researchers need to better understand their functionality. For organics, traditional materials science measurements tend to destroy the species of interest, especially at low concentrations. However, fluorescence continues to be a remarkably flexible, relatively noninvasive tool for probing the properties of individual molecules and allows researchers to carry out a broad range of experiments based on a relatively simple concept. In addition, the sensitivity of single-molecule spectroscopy allows researchers to see the properties of an individual component that would be masked in the bulk phase. In this Account, we examine several photophysical properties of different conjugated polymers using single-molecule spectroscopy. In these experiments, we probed the relationship between the conformation of single conjugated polymer chains and the distance scale and efficiency of energy transfer within the polymer. Recent studies used polarization anisotropy measurements on single polymer chains to study chain folding following spin-casting from solution. This Account summarizes the effects of monomer regioregularity and backbone rigidity, by comparing a regiorandom phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) with both a regiorandom and regioregular thiophene (P3HT). Synthesis of novel polymers allowed us to explore the role of different conformation-directing inclusions in a PPV backbone. We showed that these inclusions control the conformation of individual chains and that molecular dynamics can predict these structural effects. In situ solvent vapor annealing studies explored the dynamics of polymer chains as well as the effect of solvent evaporation on the structural equilibrium of the polymer. We

  10. Cell Microtubules as Cavities Quantum Coherence and Energy Transfer?

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    2000-01-01

    A model is presented for dissipationless energy transfer in cell microtubules due to quantum coherent states. The model is based on conjectured (hydrated) ferroelectric properties of microtubular arrangements. Ferroelectricity is essential in providing the necessary isolation against thermal losses in thin interior regions, full of ordered water, near the tubulin dimer walls of the microtubule. These play the role of cavity regions, which are similar to electromagnetic cavities of quantum optics. As a result, the formation of (macroscopic) quantum coherent states of electric dipoles on the tubulin dimers may occur. Some experiments, inspired by quantum optics, are suggested for the falsification of this scenario.

  11. Nanoparticles for heat transfer and thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Timofeeva, Elena V.; Moravek, Michael

    2015-07-14

    An article of manufacture and method of preparation thereof. The article of manufacture and method of making the article includes an eutectic salt solution suspensions and a plurality of nanocrystalline phase change material particles having a coating disposed thereon and the particles capable of undergoing the phase change which provides increase in thermal energy storage. In addition, other articles of manufacture can include a nanofluid additive comprised of nanometer-sized particles consisting of copper decorated graphene particles that provide advanced thermal conductivity to heat transfer fluids.

  12. Energy-dependent applications of the transfer matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztunali, O.I.; Aronson, R.

    1975-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is applied to energy-dependent neutron transport problems for multiplying and nonmultiplying media in one-dimensional plane geometry. Experimental cross sections are used for total, elastic, and inelastic scattering and fission. Numerical solutions are presented for the problem of a unit point isotropic source in an infinite medium of water and for the problem of the critical 235 U slab with finite water reflectors. No iterations were necessary in this method. Numerical results obtained are consistent with physical considerations and compare favorably with the moments method results for the problem of the unit point isotropic source in an infinite water medium. (U.S.)

  13. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  14. Manipulation of Energy Transfer Processes in Nano channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, A.; Calzaferri, G.

    2010-01-01

    The realisation of molecular assemblies featuring specific macroscopic properties is a prime example for the versatility of supramolecular organisation. Microporous materials such as zeolite L are well suited for the preparation of host-guest composites containing dyes, complexes, or clusters. This short tutorial focuses on the possibilities offered by zeolite L to study and influence Forster resonance energy transfer inside of its nano channels. The highly organised host-guest materials can in turn be structured on a larger scale to form macroscopic patterns, making it possible to create large-scale structures from small, highly organised building blocks for novel optical applications.

  15. Energy transfer mechanism in the hydroentaglement nonwoven process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moyo, D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available transfer mechanism in the hydroentaglement nonwoven process D MOYO AND R ANADJIWALA CSIR Material Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa Email: dmoyo@csir.co.za – www.csir.co.za NoNwoveNs Nonwoven fabrics are engineered... since no additional chemicals used • High productivity. reseArcH objecTives The main objective of the research is to address the high energy utilisation of the non-woven production process which has limited investment in this technology in south...

  16. Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Emig, Thorsten; Aghamohamadnia, Milad

    2018-02-02

    Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

  17. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site, first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1), second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2), and third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) at Oliktok Point (OLI). A SEBS was also deployed with the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site, before it was decommissioned. Data from these sites, including the retired TWP, are available in the ARM Data Archive. The SEBS consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes.

  18. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, L.B. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  19. Modular organization of cardiac energy metabolism: energy conversion, transfer and feedback regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzun, R.; Kaambre, T.; Bagur, R.; Grichine, A.; Usson, Y.; Varikmaa, M.; Anmann, T.; Tepp, K.; Timohhina, N.; Shevchuk, I.; Chekulayev, V.; Boucher, F.; Santos, P. Dos; Schlattner, U.; Wallimann, T.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Dzeja, P.; Aliev, M.; Saks, V.

    2014-01-01

    To meet high cellular demands, the energy metabolism of cardiac muscles is organized by precise and coordinated functioning of intracellular energetic units (ICEUs). ICEUs represent structural and functional modules integrating multiple fluxes at sites of ATP generation in mitochondria and ATP utilization by myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma ion-pump ATPases. The role of ICEUs is to enhance the efficiency of vectorial intracellular energy transfer and fine tuning of oxidative ATP synthesis maintaining stable metabolite levels to adjust to intracellular energy needs through the dynamic system of compartmentalized phosphoryl transfer networks. One of the key elements in regulation of energy flux distribution and feedback communication is the selective permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) which represents a bottleneck in adenine nucleotide and other energy metabolite transfer and microcompartmentalization. Based on the experimental and theoretical (mathematical modelling) arguments, we describe regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis within ICEUs allowing heart workload to be linearly correlated with oxygen consumption ensuring conditions of metabolic stability, signal communication and synchronization. Particular attention was paid to the structure–function relationship in the development of ICEU, and the role of mitochondria interaction with cytoskeletal proteins, like tubulin, in the regulation of MOM permeability in response to energy metabolic signals providing regulation of mitochondrial respiration. Emphasis was given to the importance of creatine metabolism for the cardiac energy homoeostasis. PMID:24666671

  20. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient.

  1. Protein Transfer Free Energy Obeys Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Eric A; Plotkin, Steven S

    2015-11-05

    We have found significant entropy-enthalpy compensation for the transfer of a diverse set of two-state folding proteins from water into water containing a diverse set of cosolutes, including osmolytes, denaturants, and crowders. In extracting thermodynamic parameters from experimental data, we show the potential importance of accounting for the cosolute concentration-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding, as well as the potential importance of the temperature-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding. We introduce a new Monte Carlo method to estimate the experimental uncertainty in the thermodynamic data and use this to show by bootstrapping methods that entropy-enthalpy compensation is statistically significant, in spite of large, correlated scatter in the data. We show that plotting the data at the transition midpoint provides the most accurate experimental values by avoiding extrapolation errors due to uncertainty in the heat capacity, and that this representation exhibits the strongest evidence of compensation. Entropy-enthalpy compensation is still significant at lab temperature however. We also find that compensation is still significant when considering variations due to heat capacity models, as well as typical measurement discrepancies lab-to-lab when such data is available. Extracting transfer entropy and enthalpy along with their uncertainties can provide a valuable consistency check between experimental data and simulation models, which may involve tests of simulated unfolded ensembles and/or models of the transfer free energy; we include specific applications to cold shock protein and protein L.

  2. Dust Tolerant Commodity Transfer Interface Mechanisms for Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Tamasy, Gabor J.

    2014-01-01

    Regolith is present on most planetary surfaces such as Earth's moon, Mars, and Asteroids. If human crews and robotic machinery are to operate on these regolith covered surfaces, they must face the consequences of interacting with regolith fines which consist of particles below 100 microns in diameter down to as small as submicron scale particles. Such fine dust will intrude into mechanisms and interfaces causing a variety of problems such as contamination of clean fluid lines, jamming of mechanisms and damaging connector seals and couplings. Since multiple elements must be assembled in space for system level functionality, it will be inevitable that interfaces will be necessary for structural connections, and to pass commodities such as cryogenic liquid propellants, purge and buffer gases, water, breathing air, pressurizing gases, heat exchange fluids, power and data. When fine regolith dust is present in the environment it can be lofted into interfaces where it can compromise the utility of the interface by preventing the connections from being successfully mated, or by inducing fluid leaks or degradation of power and data transmission. A dust tolerant, hand held "quick-disconnect" cryogenic fluids connector housing has been developed at NASA KSC which can be used by astronaut crews to connect flex lines that will transfer propellants and other useful fluids to the end user. In addition, a dust tolerant, automated, cryogenic fluid, multiple connector, power and data interface mechanism prototype has been developed, fabricated and demonstrated by NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The design and operation of these prototypes are explained and discussed.

  3. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  4. Structure, assembly and energy transfer of plant photosystem II supercomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peng; Su, Xiaodong; Pan, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhenfeng; Chang, Wenrui; Li, Mei

    2018-03-14

    Around photosystem II (PSII), the peripheral antenna system absorbs sunlight energy and transfers it to the core complex where the water-splitting and oxygen-evolving reaction takes place. The peripheral antennae in plants are composed of various light-harvesting complexes II (LHCII). Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the C 2 S 2 M 2 -type PSII-LHCII supercomplex from Pisum sativum (PsPSII) has been solved at 2.7-Å resolution using the single-particle cryo-electron microscopy method. The large homodimeric supercomplex has a total molecular weight of >1400 kDa. Each monomer has a core complex surrounded by strongly and moderately bound LHCII trimers, as well as CP29, CP26, and CP24 monomers. Here, we review and present a detailed analysis of the structural features of this supramolecular machinery. Specifically, we discuss the structural differences around the oxygen-evolving center of PSII from different species. Furthermore, we summarize the existing knowledge of the structures and locations of peripheral antenna complexes, and dissect the excitation energy transfer pathways from the peripheral antennae to the core complex. This detailed high-resolution structural information provides a solid basis for understanding the functional behavior of plant PSII-LHCII supercomplex. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrafast Single and Multiexciton Energy Transfer in Semiconductor Nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Richard

    Photophysical processes such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enable optical antennas, wavelength down-conversion in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and optical bio-sensing schemes. The rate and efficiency of this donor to acceptor transfer of excitation between chromophores dictates the utility of FRET and can unlock new device operation motifs including quantum-funnel solar cells and reduced gain thresholds. However, the fastest reported FRET time constants involving spherical quantum dots (QDs) (0.12-1 ns), do not outpace biexciton Auger recombination (0.01-0.1 ns), which impedes multiexciton-driven applications including electrically-pumped lasers and carrier-multiplication-enhanced photovoltaics. Precisely controlled, few-monolayer thick semiconductor nano-platelets with tens-of-nanometer diameters exhibit intense optical transitions and hundreds-of-picosecond Auger recombination, but heretofore lack FRET characterizations. We examine binary CdSe NPL solids and show that inter-plate FRET (~6-23 ps, presumably for co-facial arrangements) can occur 15-50 times faster than Auger recombination and demonstrate multiexcitonic FRET, making such materials ideal candidates for advanced technologies. This work was performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Energy transfer mechanism in CsI:Eu crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, V.; Trefilova, L.; Karnaukhova, A.; Ovcharenko, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the scintillation process in CsI:Eu crystal exposed to the pulse electron irradiation (E=0.25 MeV, t 1/2 =15 ns and W=0.003 J/cm 2 ). It has been proved that the energy transfer from the lattice to Eu 2+ ions in CsI:Eu occurs through the re-absorption of STE emission. The proposed model rests on the following experimental facts: (1) the activator emission at 2.68 eV rises gradually after the decay of the excitation pulse even at temperature lower than 90 K when V k centers are immobile; (2) the rise time of 2.68 eV emission and the decay time of STE emission have the same temperature dependences at T=78–300 K; (3) the excitation spectrum of 2.68 eV emission overlaps the emission spectrum of STE. -- Highlights: • The scintillation process in CsI:Eu was studied under pulsed electron irradiation. • A model of the energy transfer from the lattice to Eu 2+ ions in CsI:Eu was proposed. • Eu 2+ ions in CsI:Eu reabsorb the π-emission of self-trapped excitons

  7. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  8. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  9. Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a nanowire solar cell with photon-harvesting shells is presented. In this architecture, organic molecules which absorb strongly in the near infrared where silicon absorbs weakly are coupled to silicon nanowires (SiNWs). This enables an array of 7-μm -long nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm to absorb over 85% of the photons above the bandgap of silicon. The organic molecules are bonded to the surface of the SiNWs forming a thin shell. They absorb the low-energy photons and subsequently transfer the energy to the SiNWs via Förster resonant energy transfer, creating free electrons and holes within the SiNWs. The carriers are then separated at a radial p-n junction in a nanowire and extracted at the respective electrodes. The shortness of the nanowires is expected to lower the dark current due to the decrease in p-n junction surface area, which scales linearly with wire length. The theoretical power conversion efficiency is 15%. To demonstrate this concept, we measure a 60% increase in photocurrent from a planar silicon-on-insulator diode when a 5 nm layer of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′ -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene is applied to the surface of the silicon. This increase is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  11. Structural and orientation effects on electronic energy transfer between silicon quantum dots with dopants and with silver adsorbates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, N; Freitag, H; Micha, D A

    2014-06-28

    Starting from the atomic structure of silicon quantum dots (QDs), and utilizing ab initio electronic structure calculations within the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) treatment, a model has been developed to characterize electronic excitation energy transfer between QDs. Electronic energy transfer rates, KEET, between selected identical pairs of crystalline silicon quantum dots systems, either bare, doped with Al or P, or adsorbed with Ag and Ag3, have been calculated and analyzed to extend previous work on light absorption by QDs. The effects of their size and relative orientation on energy transfer rates for each system have also been considered. Using time-dependent density functional theory and the hybrid functional HSE06, the FRET treatment was employed to model electronic energy transfer rates within the dipole-dipole interaction approximation. Calculations with adsorbed Ag show that: (a) addition of Ag increases rates up to 100 times, (b) addition of Ag3 increases rates up to 1000 times, (c) collinear alignment of permanent dipoles increases transfer rates by an order of magnitude compared to parallel orientation, and (d) smaller QD-size increases transfer due to greater electronic orbitals overlap. Calculations with dopants show that: (a) p-type and n-type dopants enhance energy transfer up to two orders of magnitude, (b) surface-doping with P and center-doping with Al show the greatest rates, and (c) KEET is largest for collinear permanent dipoles when the dopant is on the outer surface and for parallel permanent dipoles when the dopant is inside the QD.

  12. 78 FR 13661 - Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on February 15, 2013, Energy Transfer Fuel, LP filed for approval of rates for transportation...

  13. 76 FR 49764 - Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer... transferred ownership of its exempted project property and facilities for Project No. 7742 to Green Energy...

  14. Photophysical properties and energy transfer mechanism of PFO/Fluorol 7GA hybrid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Asbahi, Bandar Ali, E-mail: alasbahibandar@gmail.com [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sana' a University (Yemen); Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Haji, E-mail: hafizhj@ukm.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Chi Chin; Flaifel, Moayad Husein [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-10-15

    Photophysical properties of poly (9,9′-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2.7-diyl) (PFO)/2-butyl-6- (butylamino)benzo [de] isoquinoline-1,3-dione (Fluorol 7GA) and energy transfer between them have been investigated. In this work, both PFO and Fluorol 7GA act as donor and acceptor, respectively. Based on the absorption and luminescence measurements, the photophysical and energy transfer properties such as fluorescence quantum yield (Φ{sub f}), fluorescence lifetime (τ), radiative rate constant (k{sub r}), non-radiative rate constant (k{sub nr}), quenching rate constant (k{sub SV}), energy transfer rate constant (k{sub ET}), energy transfer probability (P{sub DA}), energy transfer efficiency (η), critical concentration of acceptor (C{sub o}), energy transfer time (τ{sub ET}) and critical distance of energy transfer (R{sub o}) were calculated. Large values of k{sub SV}, k{sub ET} and R{sub o} suggested that Förster-type energy transfer was the dominant mechanism for the energy transfer between the excited donor and ground state acceptor molecules. It was observed that the Förster energy transfer together with the trapping process are crucial for performance improvement in ITO/(PFO/Fluorol7GA)/Al device. -- Highlights: • The efficient of energy transfer from PFO to Fluorol 7GA was evidenced. • The resonance energy transfer (Förster type) is the dominant mechanism. • Hsu et al. model was used to calculate Φ{sub f}, τ, k{sub r} and k{sub nr} of PFO thin film. • Several of the photophysical and energy transfer properties were calculated. • Trapping process and Förster energy transfer led to improve the device performance.

  15. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  16. Remote Electric Power Transfer Between Spacecrafts by Infrared Beamed Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Boris E.; Evdokimov, Roman A.; Legostaev, Victor P.; Lopota, Vitaliy A.; Sokolov, Boris A.; Tugaenko, Vjacheslav Yu.

    2011-11-01

    High efficient wireless electric energy transmission (WET) technology between spacecrafts by laser channel is proposed. WET systems could be used for remote power supplying of different consumers in space. First of all, there are autonomous technology modules for microgravity experiments, micro and nano satellites, different equipment for explorations of planetary surfaces, space transport vehicles with electric rocket propulsion systems. The main components of the WET technology consist of radiation sources on the base of semiconductor IR laser diodes; systems for narrow laser beam creation; special photovoltaic receivers for conversion of monochromatic IR radiation with high energy density to electric power. The multistage space experiment for WET technology testing is described. During this experiment energy will be transmitted from International Space Station to another spacecrafts like cargo transport vehicles (Progress or/and ATV) and micro satellites.

  17. Heat transfer characteristics in closed-loop spray cooling of micro-structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wang Zhaoliang; Xu Minghai

    2012-01-01

    With water as the working fluid, experiments on the heat transfer characteristics of spray cooling of micro-structured surfaces were performed in a closed loop system. Experimental data were analyzed in the view of the ratio between convective heat transfer and phase change heat transfer. The results indicate that heat transfer is obviously enhanced for micro-channel surfaces relative to the flat surface because of higher phase change heat transfer. For the geometries tested at lower surface temperature, the straight finned surface has the largest heat flux; while at higher surface temperature, the cubic pin finned surface has the largest heat flux. Heat fluxes of all the surfaces grow with increasing flow rates, except for the straight finned surface under lower surface temperature. The ratio of phase change to total heat transfer is bigger than 20% for the flat surface, and higher than 50% for micro-structured surface. Critical heat fluxes of 159.1 W/cm 2 , 120.2 W/cm 2 , and 109.8 W/cm 2 are attained respectively for cubic pin finned, straight finned and flat surfaces when the flow rate is 15.9 mL/min, and the corresponding evaporation efficiency are 96.0%, 72.5%, 67.1%. (authors)

  18. The Clean Energy Transfer : preliminary assesment of the potential for a clean energy transfer between Manitoba and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    Ontario may have an electrical power shortfall of as much as 25,000 MW by 2020, due to phase-out of coal fired plants, a general increase in demand and existing plants reaching the end of their design lives. Manitoba has approximately 5,000 MW of new hydroelectric power potential which could help to reduce this shortfall. This document reports on a study between the Manitoba government, the Ontario government, Manitoba Hydro, Hydro One, and the Ontario Independent Electricity Market Operator to provide an incremental transfer capability of 1,500 MW between the provinces. This is known as the Clean Energy Transfer Initiative (CETI). The current east-west transmission grid is limited to about 200 MW and is thus not sufficient for this project. Three transmission options have been studied. The report claims that CETI would be the largest single project in terms of greenhouse gas reductions. It is also claimed to potentially benefit Aboriginal groups by increasing employment and business opportunities. Also, tax revenues would be substantial. The most likely alternative energy supply is considered to be the combined cycle gas turbine which, according to the study, would cost about the same amount per MWh, excluding environmental credits. 4 tabs., 11 figs

  19. Mass transfer from smooth alabaster surfaces in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, Bradley N.; Gust, Giselher; Ledwell, James R.

    1987-11-01

    The mass transfer velocity for alabaster plates in smooth-wall turbulent flow is found to vary with the friction velocity according to an analytic solution of the advective diffusion equation. Deployment of alabaster plates on the sea floor can perhaps be used to estimate the viscous stress, and transfer velocities for other species.

  20. Nanoscale control of energy and matter in plasma-surface interactions: towards energy-efficient nanotech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrikov, Kostya

    2010-11-01

    This presentation focuses on the plasma issues related to the solution of the grand challenge of directing energy and matter at nanoscales. This ability is critical for the renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies for sustainable future development. It will be discussed how to use environmentally and human health benign non-equilibrium plasma-solid systems and control the elementary processes of plasma-surface interactions to direct the fluxes of energy and matter at multiple temporal and spatial scales. In turn, this makes it possible to achieve the deterministic synthesis of self- organised arrays of metastable nanostructures in the size range beyond the reach of the present-day nanofabrication. Such structures have tantalising prospects to enhance performance of nanomaterials in virtually any area of human activity yet remain almost inaccessible because the Nature's energy minimisation rules allow only a small number of stable equilibrium states. By using precisely controlled and kinetically fast nanoscale transfer of energy and matter under non-equilibrium conditions and harnessing numerous plasma- specific controls of species creation, delivery to the surface, nucleation and large-scale self-organisation of nuclei and nanostructures, the arrays of metastable nanostructures can be created, arranged, stabilised, and further processed to meet the specific requirements of the envisaged applications. These approaches will eventually lead to faster, unprecedentedly- clean, human-health-friendly, and energy-efficient nanoscale synthesis and processing technologies for the next-generation renewable energy and light sources, biomedical devices, information and communication systems, as well as advanced functional materials for applications ranging from basic food, water, health and clean environment needs to national security and space missions.

  1. Proxy studies of energy transfer to the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scurry, L.; Russell, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transfer of energy into the magnetosphere is studied using as proxy the Am geomagnetic index and multilinear regressions and correlations with solar wind data. In particular, the response of Am to the reconnection mechanism is examined in relation to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field as well as the upstream plasma parameters. A functional dependence of Am on clock angle, the orientation of the IMF in the plane perpendicular to the flow, is derived after first correcting the index for nonreconnection effects due to dynamic pressure and velocity. An examination of the effect of upstream magnetosonic Mach number shows the reconnection mechanism to become less efficient at high Mach numbers. The reconnection mechanism is shown to be slightly enhanced by higher dynamic pressures

  2. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  3. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  4. H eat transfer betw een tw o surfaces usually in- creases w h en th e ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    H eat transfer betw een tw o surfaces usually in- creases w h en th e tem p eratu re d i® eren ce b etw een the tw o surfaces increases. H ere w e highlight an unusual situation in radiation heat transfer w herein the heat transfer decreases w hen the tem perature di®erence increases. In tro d u ctio n. In 1701,N ew ton ...

  5. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  6. A land surface scheme for atmospheric and hydrologic models: SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Warrach, K.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    A soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme is presented here which solves the coupled system of the Surface Energy and Water Balance (SEWAB) equations considering partly vegetated surfaces. It is based on the one-layer concept for vegetation. In the soil the diffusion equations for heat and moisture are solved on a multi-layer grid. SEWAB has been developed to serve as a land-surface scheme for atmospheric circulation models. Being forced with atmospheric data from either simulations or measurements it calculates surface and subsurface runoff that can serve as input to hydrologic models. The model has been validated with field data from the FIFE experiment and has participated in the PILPS project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes. From these experiments we feel that SEWAB reasonably well partitions the radiation and precipitation into sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as into runoff and soil moisture Storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Landoberflaechenschema wird vorgestellt, das den Transport von Waerme und Wasser zwischen dem Erdboden, der Vegetation und der Atmosphaere unter Beruecksichtigung von teilweise bewachsenem Boden beschreibt. Im Erdboden werden die Diffusionsgleichungen fuer Waerme und Feuchte auf einem Gitter mit mehreren Schichten geloest. Das Schema SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance) beschreibt die Landoberflaechenprozesse in atmosphaerischen Modellen und berechnet den Oberflaechenabfluss und den Basisabfluss, die als Eingabedaten fuer hydrologische Modelle genutzt werden koennen. Das Modell wurde mit Daten des FIFE-Experiments kalibriert und hat an Vergleichsexperimenten fuer Landoberflaechen-Schemata im Rahmen des PILPS-Projektes teilgenommen. Dabei hat sich gezeigt, dass die Aufteilung der einfallenden Strahlung und des Niederschlages in den sensiblen und latenten Waermefluss und auch in Abfluss und Speicherung der Bodenfeuchte in SEWAB den beobachteten Daten recht gut entspricht. (orig.)

  7. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Foester resonance energy transfer in solution-processed Si-nanoparticle/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Xiaowei; Liu Nan; Zheng Dingxiang; Shi Minmin; Wu Gang; Wang Mang; Chen Hongzheng, E-mail: hzchen@zju.edu.c [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization of Ministry of Education, State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2009-10-14

    By exploiting a simple solution approach, we bound ethoxy-terminated Si nanoparticles to surface functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via covalent bonds. Quenching of photoluminescence (PL) of the Si nanoparticles was observed once they were conjugated to the MWCNTs. Analysis of the time-resolved PL decay and calculation indicated that Foester resonance energy transfer from the Si nanoparticles to the MWCNTs may be responsible for the PL quenching. The results suggest novel potential applications of the unique Si/MWCNT nanocomposites in optoelectronic devices.

  9. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  10. Energy transfer in reactive and non-reactive H2 + OH collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, O.; Brown, N.J.

    1985-04-01

    We have used the methods of quasi-classical dynamics to compute energy transfer properties of non-reactive and reactive H 2 + OH collisions. Energy transfer has been investigated as function of translational temperature, reagent rotational energy, and reagent vibrational energy. The energy transfer mechanism is complex with ten types of energy transfer possible, and evidence was found for all types. There is much more exchange between the translational degree of freedom and the H 2 vibrational degree of freedom than there is between translation and OH vibration. Translational energy is transferred to the rotational degrees of freedom of each molecule. There is a greater propensity for the transfer of translation to OH rotation than H 2 rotation. In reactive collisions, increases in reagent translational temperature predominantly appear as vibrational energy in the water molecule. Energy transfer in non-reactive and reactive collisions does not depend strongly on the initial angular momentum in either molecule. In non-reactive collisions, vibrational energy is transferred to translation, to the rotational degree of freedom of the same molecule, and to the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the other molecule. In reactive collisions, the major effect of increasing the vibrational energy in reagent molecules is that, on the average, the vibrational energy of the reagents appears as product vibrational energy. 18 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  11. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-05-07

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  12. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  13. People bouncing on trampolines: dramatic energy transfer, a table-top demonstration, complex dynamics and a zero sum game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Jumping on trampolines is a popular backyard recreation. In some trampoline games (e.g., "seat drop war", when two people land on the trampoline with only a small time-lag, one person bounces much higher than the other, as if energy has been transferred from one to the other. First, we illustrate this energy-transfer in a table-top demonstration, consisting of two balls dropped onto a mini-trampoline, landing almost simultaneously, sometimes resulting in one ball bouncing much higher than the other. Next, using a simple mathematical model of two masses bouncing passively on a massless trampoline with no dissipation, we show that with specific landing conditions, it is possible to transfer all the kinetic energy of one mass to the other through the trampoline - in a single bounce. For human-like parameters, starting with equal energy, the energy transfer is maximal when one person lands approximately when the other is at the bottom of her bounce. The energy transfer persists even for very stiff surfaces. The energy-conservative mathematical model exhibits complex non-periodic long-term motions. To complement this passive bouncing model, we also performed a game-theoretic analysis, appropriate when both players are acting strategically to steal the other player's energy. We consider a zero-sum game in which each player's goal is to gain the other player's kinetic energy during a single bounce, by extending her leg during flight. For high initial energy and a symmetric situation, the best strategy for both subjects (minimax strategy and Nash equilibrium is to use the shortest available leg length and not extend their legs. On the other hand, an asymmetry in initial heights allows the player with more energy to gain even more energy in the next bounce. Thus synchronous bouncing unstable is unstable both for passive bouncing and when leg lengths are controlled as in game-theoretic equilibria.

  14. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tammie; Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    Cycloalkanes are important components in conventional fuels and oil shale derived fuels and the combustion of cyclohexane fuels leads to the production of benzene, a pollutant precursor. One of the pathways from cyclohexane to benzene is through sequential hydrogen loss, including the cyclohexyl radical as an intermediate. The ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of the cyclohexyl (c-C6H11) radical was studied for the first time using the high- n Rydberg atom time-of-flight (HRTOF) technique in the range of 232-262 nm. The translational energy distributions of the H-atom loss product channel, P (ET) 's, show a large translational energy release and a large fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , from 232-262 nm. The H-atom product angular distribution is anisotropic with a positive β parameter. The most likely H-atom loss pathway is an axial H ejection from the β-carbon in cyclohexyl to form cyclohexene + H, which along with the positive β parameter, indicates that the transition dipole moment, μ, is perpendicular to the ring. The P (ET) and anisotropy of the H-atom loss product channel are significantly larger than those expected for a statistical unimolecular dissociation of a hot radical, indicating a non-statistical dissociation mechanism. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with direct dissociation on a repulsive excited state surface or on the repulsive part of the ground state surface to produce cyclohexene + H, possibly mediated by a conical intersection. Cyclohexyl is the largest radical so far showing a direct dissociation mechanism.

  15. Internal high linear energy transfer (LET) targeted radiotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J

    2006-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for internal targeted therapy has been a long time coming on to the medical therapy scene. While fundamental principles were established many decades ago, the clinical implementation has been slow. Localized neutron capture therapy, and more recently systemic targeted alpha therapy, are at the clinical trial stage. What are the attributes of these therapies that have led a band of scientists and clinicians to dedicate so much of their careers? High LET means high energy density, causing double strand breaks in DNA, and short-range radiation, sparing adjacent normal tissues. This targeted approach complements conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such therapies fail on several fronts. Foremost is the complete lack of progress for the control of primary GBM, the holy grail for cancer therapies. Next is the inability to regress metastatic cancer on a systemic basis. This has been the task of chemotherapy, but palliation is the major application. Finally, there is the inability to inhibit the development of lethal metastatic cancer after successful treatment of the primary cancer. This review charts, from an Australian perspective, the developing role of local and systemic high LET, internal radiation therapy. (review)

  16. Multiplex detection of collisional energy transfer using KCSFI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Heiko; Lenzer, Thomas; Luther, Klaus; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2005-02-21

    A new detection method for obtaining collisional transition probabilities P(E',E) of highly vibrationally excited molecules in the gas phase is presented. The technique employs energy-selective probing of the time-dependent vibrational population distribution by "kinetically controlled selective fluorescence (KCSF)". We present experimental results for a test system, the collisional deactivation of toluene by argon, where we use the well-known "kinetically controlled selective ionization (KCSI)" scheme as a reference for comparison. A newly designed setup is employed that allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and ionization signals under identical experimental conditions ("kinetically controlled selective fluorescence and ionization = KCSFI"). For the system toluene + argon it is demonstrated that KCSF and KCSI yield identical results. A rate-equation model is presented to understand common features and differences of both approaches. The fluorescence detection scheme shows promise for future investigations on collisional energy transfer. The experimental setup is simpler, because it requires no additional ionization wavelength. This will hopefully give access to the P(E',E) of systems where, e.g., ionization schemes are difficult to implement due to short wavelengths required for the ionization step. A few examples will be outlined briefly.

  17. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  18. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion

  19. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae-ik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Chiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sungkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong, E-mail: sblee@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hyun [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Sook [Department of refinement education, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung Keun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Incerti, Sebastien [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université Bordeaux 1, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  20. Can nanophotonics control the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, C.; Zijlstra, N.; Lagendijk, A.

    2013-01-01

    of the energy donor by the LDOS, the energy transfer efficiency can be enhanced or reduced. If a donor with unit quantum efficiency is placed in a 3D photonic bandgap, the energy transfer efficiency will approach 100 %, independent of the acceptor, and of the distances and orientations between the FRET partners....

  1. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect.

  2. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect

  3. Gibbs free energy, surface stress and melting point of nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Wenhua; Hu, Wangyu

    2013-01-01

    Two approaches to calculating Gibbs free energy of nanoparticle are compared. It is found that the contribution from the vibrational entropy of surface atoms of nanoparticle to its Gibbs free energy can be ignored, and Jiang et al.'s formula [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6275] [27] for calculating surface stress is only valid around room temperature. Furthermore, an approximate relationship between surface stress and surface free energy of nanoparticles is revealed. Finally, the reason why effect of size dependent surface energy on melting point of nanoparticle was neglected is clarified

  4. Finite-elements modeling of radiant heat transfers between mobile surfaces; Modelisation par elements finis de transferts radiatifs entre surfaces mobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daurelle, J.V.; Cadene, V.; Occelli, R. [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1996-12-31

    In the numerical modeling of thermal industrial problems, radiant heat transfers remain difficult to take into account and require important computer memory and long computing time. These difficulties are enhanced when radiant heat transfers are coupled with finite-elements diffusive heat transfers because finite-elements architecture is complex and requires a lot of memory. In the case of radiant heat transfers along mobile boundaries, the methods must be optimized. The model described in this paper concerns the radiant heat transfers between diffuse grey surfaces. These transfers are coupled with conduction transfers in the limits of the diffusive opaque domain. 2-D and 3-D geometries are analyzed and two configurations of mobile boundaries are considered. In the first configuration, the boundary follows the deformation of the mesh, while in the second, the boundary moves along the fixed mesh. Matter displacement is taken into account in the term of transport of the energy equation, and an appropriate variation of the thermophysical properties of the transition elements between the opaque and transparent media is used. After a description of the introduction of radiative limit conditions in a finite-elements thermal model, the original methods used to optimize calculation time are explained. Two examples of application illustrate the approach used. The first concerns the modeling of radiant heat transfers between fuel rods during a reactor cooling accident, and the second concerns the study of heat transfers inside the air-gap of an electric motor. The method of identification of the mobile surface on the fixed mesh is described. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  5. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  6. Comment on 'Modelling of surface energies of elemental crystals'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinping; Luo Xiaoguang; Hu Ping; Dong Shanliang

    2009-01-01

    Jiang et al (2004 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16 521) present a model based on the traditional broken-bond model for predicting surface energies of elemental crystals. It is found that bias errors can be produced in calculating the coordination numbers of surface atoms, especially in the prediction of high-Miller-index surface energies. (comment)

  7. Metal-organic framework materials for light-harvesting and energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Monica C; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Mondloch, Joseph E; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-02-28

    A critical review of the emerging field of MOFs for photon collection and subsequent energy transfer is presented. Discussed are examples involving MOFs for (a) light harvesting, using (i) MOF-quantum dots and molecular chromophores, (ii) chromophoric MOFs, and (iii) MOFs with light-harvesting properties, and (b) energy transfer, specifically via the (i) Förster energy transfer and (ii) Dexter exchange mechanism.

  8. Monthly Variations of Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of low-energy transfers between the Earth and Moon vary from one month to the next largely due to the Earth's and Moon's non-circular, non-coplanar orbits in the solar system. This paper characterizes those monthly variations as it explores the trade space of low-energy lunar transfers across many months. Mission designers may use knowledge of these variations to swiftly design desirable low-energy lunar transfers in any given month.

  9. Heat Transfer Enhancement By Three-Dimensional Surface Roughness Technique In Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Umair

    This thesis experimentally investigates the enhancement of single-phase heat transfer, frictional loss and pressure drop characteristics in a Single Heater Element Loop Tester (SHELT). The heater element simulates a single fuel rod for Pressurized Nuclear reactor. In this experimental investigation, the effect of the outer surface roughness of a simulated nuclear rod bundle was studied. The outer surface of a simulated fuel rod was created with a three-dimensional (Diamond-shaped blocks) surface roughness. The angle of corrugation for each diamond was 45 degrees. The length of each side of a diamond block is 1 mm. The depth of each diamond block was 0.3 mm. The pitch of the pattern was 1.614 mm. The simulated fuel rod had an outside diameter of 9.5 mm and wall thickness of 1.5 mm and was placed in a test-section made of 38.1 mm inner diameter, wall thickness 6.35 mm aluminum pipe. The Simulated fuel rod was made of Nickel 200 and Inconel 625 materials. The fuel rod was connected to 10 KW DC power supply. The Inconel 625 material of the rod with an electrical resistance of 32.3 kO was used to generate heat inside the test-section. The heat energy dissipated from the Inconel tube due to the flow of electrical current flows into the working fluid across the rod at constant heat flux conditions. The DI water was employed as working fluid for this experimental investigation. The temperature and pressure readings for both smooth and rough regions of the fuel rod were recorded and compared later to find enhancement in heat transfer coefficient and increment in the pressure drops. Tests were conducted for Reynold's Numbers ranging from 10e4 to 10e5. Enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at all Re was recorded. The maximum heat transfer co-efficient enhancement recorded was 86% at Re = 4.18e5. It was also observed that the pressure drop and friction factor increased by 14.7% due to the increased surface roughness.

  10. The energy balance of the earth's surface : a practical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis of Encapsulated Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmozughi, Ali F.

    Thermal analysis of high temperature phase change materials (PCMs) is conducted. Transient two dimensional heat transfer analysis is performed to investigate high temperature energy storage and retrieval for concentrated solar power applications. The phase change materials are considered are NaNO 3 and the eutectic of MgCl2 and NaCl. Phase change material is encapsulated by a stainless steel in a cylindrical shaped capsule. Energy storage/retrieval into/from various sizes of encapsulated phase change material (EPCM) capsules is simulated for both laminar and turbulent flow conditions of the heat transfer fluid (HTF) by an accurate modeling of the propagating liquid/solid interface in a PCM. Heat transfer inside EPCM capsule and the phase change of PCM are modeled by an enthalpy - porosity method. A two-dimensional cylindrical shaped EPCM capsule or tube is considered in simulations using gas (air) and liquid (Therminol/VP-1) as heat transfer fluids in a cross flow and an axial flow arrangement. The energy storage/retrieval times into/out of the EPCM capsule is dictated by the surface heat transfer of the EPCM for the capsule sizes considered in this study. A single horizontally placed rod in a channel with different blockage ratios for laminar and turbulence flows of HTF is studied in the present study. It is illustrated by the present work that enthalpy-porosity method can be applied to simulate heat transfer at the capsule level and the system level. System level storage module is a thermocline that includes an arrangement of several EPCMs for several megawatts of thermal energy storage (TES) for several hours used in concentrated solar power applications and other industrial thermal systems. Transport phenomena inside the EPCM are modeled accurately by considering a 20% air void and the buoyancy-driven convection in a stainless steel capsule. The effects of the thermal expansion and the volume expansion due to phase change on the energy storage and retrieval

  12. Heat transfer in the post dryout region and on wetting heated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassokhin, N.G.; Kabanov, L.P.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the works published in the Soviet Union during 1983 and 1984 on heat transfer in the post dryout region and on wetting heated surfaces. New experimental data, heat transfer models, and computational techniques are analysed. The complexities of the heat transfer process under the above conditions are noted. The differences and common features of the heat transfer processes in the post dryout region and on wetting heated surfaces are indicated as well as the necessity for the development of computational techniques that would consider the two processes simultaneously. (author)

  13. Near-field thermal upconversion and energy transfer through a Kerr medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Chinmay; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

    2017-09-18

    We present an approach for achieving large Kerr χ (3) -mediated thermal energy transfer at the nanoscale that exploits a general coupled-mode description of triply resonant, four-wave mixing processes. We analyze the efficiency of thermal upconversion and energy transfer from mid- to near-infrared wavelengths in planar geometries involving two slabs supporting far-apart surface plasmon polaritons and separated by a nonlinear χ (3) medium that is irradiated by externally incident light. We study multiple geometric and material configurations and different classes of intervening mediums-either bulk or nanostructured lattices of nanoparticles embedded in nonlinear materials-designed to resonantly enhance the interaction of the incident light with thermal slab resonances. We find that even when the entire system is in thermodynamic equilibrium (at room temperature) and under typical drive intensities ~ W/μm 2 , the resulting upconversion rates can approach and even exceed thermal flux rates achieved in typical symmetric and non-equilibrium configurations of vacuum-separated slabs. The proposed nonlinear scheme could potentially be exploited to achieve thermal cooling and refrigeration at the nanoscale, and to actively control heat transfer between materials with dramatically different resonant responses.

  14. Mathematical Heat Transfer Model of Surface Quenching Process for Hot Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Wang, Qian; Li, Yugang; Zhang, Shaoda; Yan, Chen

    Online surface quenching technology has been developed for the hot charging process to prevent the surface cracks in high strength low-alloy steel slabs. In this paper, a two-dimensional heat transfer model of surface quenching process was presented. This finite element model includes nonlinear thermodynamic properties, by which the slab temperature distributions were computed. The model predicted temperatures show reasonable agreement with the measurements. The effects of the water flow rate and slab movement velocity on temperature variation during the quenching and subsequent tempering process were investigated. The result shows that the temperature drop increases but the tempering temperature changes slightly with increasing water flow rate and decreasing slab velocity. Keeping the slab movement velocity at 1.2-2.1m/min and the water flow rate at 55-70m3/h, the slab surface experiences a temperature drop of 400-600°C firstly, then recovers above 650°C, the quenching and energy-saving effect are remarkable.

  15. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''

  16. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J.; Fell, Christopher J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of Förster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells. PMID:23235328

  17. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  18. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Dastoor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  19. Shell thickness effects on quantum dot brightness and energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Margaret; Nguyen, Thuy T; Mahler, Andrew H; Dennis, Allison M

    2017-11-02

    Heterostructured core/shell quantum dots (QDs) are prized in biomedical imaging and biosensing applications because of their bright, photostable emission and effectiveness as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donors. However, as nanomaterials chemistry has progressed beyond traditional QDs to incorporate new compositions, ultra-thick shells, and alloyed structures, few of these materials have had their optical properties systematically characterized for effective application. For example, thick-shelled QDs, also known as 'giant' QDs (gQDs) are useful in single-particle tracking microscopy because of their reduced blinking, but we know only that CdSe/CdS gQDs are qualitatively brighter than thin-shelled CdSe/CdS in aqueous media. In this study, we quantify the impact of shell thickness on the nanoparticle molar extinction coefficient, quantum yield, brightness, and effectiveness as a FRET donor for CdSe/xCdS core/shell and CdSe/xCdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs, with variable thicknesses of the CdS shell (x). Molar extinction coefficients up to three orders of magnitude higher than conventional dyes and forty-fold greater than traditional QDs are reported. When thick CdS shells are combined with ZnS capping, quantum yields following thiol ligand exchange reach nearly 40%-5-10× higher than either the commercially available QDs or gQDs without ZnS caps treated the same way. These results clearly show that thick CdS shells and ZnS capping shells work in concert to provide the brightest possible CdSe-based QDs for bioimaging applications. We demonstrate that thicker shelled gQDs are over 50-fold brighter than their thin-shelled counterparts because of significant increases in their absorption cross-sections and higher quantum yield in aqueous milieu. Consistent with the point-dipole approximation commonly used for QD-FRET, these data show that thick shells contribute to the donor-acceptor distance, reducing FRET efficiency. Despite the reduction in FRET efficiency

  20. Exploiting energy transfer in hybrid metal and semiconductor nanoparticle systems for biosensing and energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayilo, Sergiy

    2009-06-19

    In this work, gold and semiconductor nanoparticles are used as building blocks for nanostructures, in which energy transfer is investigated. Fluorescence quenching by gold nanoparticles is investigated and used to develop novel immunoassays for medically relevant molecules. The influence of gold nanoparticles on radiative and non-radiative rates of Cy3 and Cy3B dyes is studied here. A competitive, homogeneous immunoassay for digoxigenin and digoxin, a drug used to cure heart diseases, is developed. The assay has a limit of detection of 0.5 nM in buffer and 50 nM in serum. Time resolved spectroscopy reveals that the quenching is due to energy transfer with an efficiency of 70%. A homogeneous sandwich immunoassay for cardiac troponin T, an indicator of damage to the heart muscle, is developed. Gold nanoparticles and fluorophores are functionalized with anti-troponin T antibodies. In the presence of troponin T the nanoparticles and fluorophores form a sandwich structure, in which the dye fluorescence is quenched by a gold nanoparticle. The limit of detection of the immunoassay in buffer is 0.02 nM and 0.11 nM in serum. Energy transfer is demonstrated in clusters of CdTe nanocrystals assembled using three methods. In the first method, clusters of differently-sized water soluble CdTe nanocrystals capped by negatively charged mercaptoacid stabilizers are produced through electrostatic interactions with positively charged Ca{sup 2+} cations. The two other methods employ covalent binding through dithiols and thiolated DNA as linkers between nanocrystals. Energy transfer from smaller nanocrystals to larger nanocrystals in aggregates is demonstrated by means of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, paving the way for nanocrystal-based light harvesting structures in solution. Multi-shell onion-like CdSe/ZnS/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals are presented. The shade of the white light can be controlled by annealing the particles. Evidence for intra

  1. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Magnetopause energy and mass transfer: results from a global MHD simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palmroth

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We use the global MHD model GUMICS-4 to investigate the energy and mass transfer through the magnetopause and towards the closed magnetic field as a response to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF clock angle θ=arctan (BY/BZ, IMF magnitude, and solar wind dynamic pressure. We find that the mass and energy transfer at the magnetopause are different both in spatial characteristics and in response to changes in the solar wind parameters. The energy transfer follows best the sin2 (θ/2 dependence, although there is more energy transfer after large energy input, and the reconnection line follows the IMF rotation with a delay. There is no clear clock angle dependence in the net mass transfer through the magnetopause, but the mass transfer through the dayside magnetopause and towards the closed field occurs preferably for northward IMF. The energy transfer occurs through areas at the magnetopause that are perpendicular to the subsolar reconnection line. In contrast, the mass transfer occurs consistently along the reconnection line, both through the magnetopause and towards the closed field. Both the energy and mass transfer are enhanced in response to increased solar wind dynamic pressure, while increasing the IMF magnitude does not affect the transfer quantities as much.

  3. Effects of dopamine concentration on energy transfer between dendrimer-QD and dye-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Rahm [Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Sungnam-shi, Gyunggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ik-Joong, E-mail: ijkang@kyungwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Sungnam-shi, Gyunggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is currently used to assess Parkinson's disease, and is a key method for determining the progression of disease based on the gross findings of patients. However, this method cannot quantify the extent of disease of patients, which means the administration of drugs cannot be determined on a real-time basis. Thalamotomy also causes discomfort and pain to the patients, and adversely affects treatment as it is performed following the onset of symptoms. Accordingly, the dopamine concentration, which is one of the key factors in determining this disease, needs to be detected quantitatively at ordinary times. Hence, the development of a bio-kit or a bio-sensor is essential for effectively prescribing the correct dopamine concentration in a customizable manner. In this study, the effect of dopamine level on this phenomenon was observed using the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon generated between a donor and acceptor. By confirming the photoluminescence (PL) and lifetime data, it was demonstrated that the degree of energy transfer increased with increasing dopamine concentration. To apply this phenomenon to an optical sensor, a glass surface was modified with a quantum dot (QD)-encapsulated dendrimer, and analyzed using the contact angle and ATR-FTIR. The topology of surface was determined by an atomic force microscope (AFM).

  4. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel, E-mail: luisma.frutos@uah.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Acuña, A. Ulises [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, C.S.I.C., Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  5. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Acuña, A Ulises; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  6. Interaction mechanism for energy transfer from Ce to Tb ions in silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed Ahmed, H.A.A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan); Chae, W.S. [Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Ntwaeaborwa, O.M. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa); Kroon, R.E., E-mail: KroonRE@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer phenomena can play an important role in the development of luminescent materials. In this study, numerical simulations based on theoretical models of non-radiative energy transfer are compared to experimental results for Ce, Tb co-doped silica. Energy transfer from the donor (Ce) to the acceptor (Tb) resulted in a decrease in the Ce luminescence intensity and lifetime. The decrease in intensity corresponded best with the energy transfer models based on the exchange interaction and the dipole-dipole interaction. The critical transfer distance obtained from the fitting using both these models is around 2 nm. Since the exchange interaction requires a distance shorter than 1 nm to occur, the mechanism most likely to account for the energy transfer is concluded to be the dipole–dipole interaction. This is supported by an analysis of the lifetime data.

  7. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295 0 K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295 0 K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ΔJ transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references

  8. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  9. The FLUFF code for calculating finned surface heat transfer -description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, C.J.

    1985-08-01

    FLUFF is a computer code for calculating heat transfer from finned surfaces by convection and radiation. It can also represent heat transfer by radiation to a partially emitting and absorbing medium within the fin cavity. The FLUFF code is useful not only for studying the behaviour of finned surfaces but also for deriving heat fluxes which can be applied as boundary conditions to other heat transfer codes. In this way models of bodies with finned surfaces may be greatly simplified since the fins need not be explicitly represented. (author)

  10. Low-energy charge transfer excitations in NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V I; Yermakov, A Ye; Uimin, M A; Gruzdev, N B; Pustovarov, V A; Churmanov, V N; Ivanov, V Yu; Sokolov, P S; Baranov, A N; Moskvin, A S

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of NiO poly- and nanocrystals in the spectral range 2-5.5 eV reveals two PLE bands peaked near 3.7 and 4.6 eV with a dramatic rise in the low-temperature PLE spectral weight of the 3.7 eV PLE band in the nanocrystalline NiO as compared with its polycrystalline counterpart. In frames of a cluster model approach we assign the 3.7 eV PLE band to the low-energy bulk-forbidden p-d (t 1g (π)-e g ) charge transfer (CT) transition which becomes the allowed one in the nanocrystalline state while the 4.6 eV PLE band is related to a bulk allowed d-d (e g -e g ) CT transition scarcely susceptible to the nanocrystallization. The PLE spectroscopy of the nanocrystalline materials appears to be a novel informative technique for inspection of different CT transitions.

  11. Study of primary energy transfer process in ultrafast plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, B.; Moszynski, M.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the light-pulse shape, the initial delay of light pulses and the light yield of plastics prepared by a modification of the NE111 scintillator were performed. The NE111 scintillator doped with several quench agents, the plastics prepared as a solution of butyl PBD in PVT of different concentration and PVT alone were studied. The study confirmed that the light pulse shape from fast binary plastics is well described analytically by the convolution of the clipped Gaussian and exponential functions. The investigation of the PVT-butyl PBD plastics shows that even more than three times larger concentration of butyl PBD compared to that of PBD in the NE111 solution does not improve the rise of the light pulse. Thus the rise time seems to be not controlled by the intermolecular energy transfer process. Finally, the observed rise time of the light pulse from the PVT sample was also approximated well by the Gaussian function. Altogether it brought a strong support for the earlier hypothesis that the initial slow rise of light pulses from plastic scintillators may come from the deexcitation of several higher levels of the solvent molecules excited by nuclear particles. (Auth.)

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Systems in Supramolecular Macrocyclic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yue Lou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of smart materials is gradually becoming a research focus in nanotechnology and materials science. An important criterion of smart materials is the capacity of stimuli-responsiveness, while another lies in selective recognition. Accordingly, supramolecular host-guest chemistry has proven a promising support for building intelligent, responsive systems; hence, synthetic macrocyclic hosts, such as calixarenes, cucurbiturils, cyclodextrins, and pillararenes, have been used as ideal building blocks. Meanwhile, manipulating and harnessing light artificially is always an intensive attempt for scientists in order to meet the urgent demands of technological developments. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, known as a well-studied luminescent activity and also a powerful tool in spectroscopic area, has been investigated from various facets, of which the application range has been broadly expanded. In this review, the innovative collaboration between FRET and supramolecular macrocyclic chemistry will be presented and depicted with typical examples. Facilitated by the dynamic features of supramolecular macrocyclic motifs, a large variety of FRET systems have been designed and organized, resulting in promising optical materials with potential for applications in protein assembly, enzyme assays, diagnosis, drug delivery monitoring, sensing, photosynthesis mimicking and chemical encryption.

  13. Energy Accommodation from Surface Catalyzed Reactions in Air Plasmas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding energy transport at the gas-surface interface between catalytic/reacting surfaces exposed to highly dissociated plasmas remains a significant research...

  14. Surface free energy of alkali and transition metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Size dependent surface free energy of spherical, cubic and disk Au nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A model to account for the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles is described. • The model requires only the cohesive energy of the nanoparticle. • The surface free energy of a number of metallic nanoparticles has been calculated, and the obtained values agree well with existing data. • Surface energy falls down very fast when the number of atoms is less than hundred. • The model is applicable to any metallic nanoparticle. - Abstract: This paper addresses an interesting issue on the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles as compared to the bulk material. Starting from a previously reported equation, a theoretical model, that involves a specific term for calculating the cohesive energy of nanoparticle, is established in a view to describe the behavior of surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles (using different shapes of particle: sphere, cube and disc). The results indicate that the behavior of surface energy is very appropriate for spherical nanoparticle, and thus, it is the most realistic shape of a nanoparticle. The surface energy of copper, silver, gold, platinum, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, paladium and alkali metallic nanoparticles is only prominent in the nanoscale size, and it decreases with the decrease of nanoparticle size. Thus, the surface free energy plays a more important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles than in bulk materials. It differs from shape to another, and falls down as the number of atoms (nanoparticle size) decreases. In the case of spherical nanoparticles, the onset of the sharp decrease in surface energy is observed at about 110 atom. A decrease of 16% and 45% in surface energy is found by moving from bulk to 110 atom and from bulk to 5 atom, respectively. The predictions are consistent with the reported data

  15. Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization - a Technique to Develop Biofunctional Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The initial formation of initiating sites for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on various polymer surfaces and numerous inorganic and metallic surfaces is elaborated. The subsequent ATRP grafting of a multitude of monomers from such surfaces to generate thin covalently linked polymer...

  16. Aptamer sensor for cocaine using minor groove binder based energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinwen; Ellis, Amanda V; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2012-03-16

    We report on an optical aptamer sensor for cocaine detection. The cocaine sensitive fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled aptamer underwent a conformational change from a partial single-stranded DNA with a short hairpin to a double-stranded T-junction in the presence of the target. The DNA minor groove binder Hoechst 33342 selectively bound to the double-stranded T-junction, bringing the dye within the Förster radius of FITC, and therefore initiating minor groove binder based energy transfer (MBET), and reporting on the presence of cocaine. The sensor showed a detection limit of 0.2 μM. The sensor was also implemented on a carboxy-functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface by covalently immobilizing DNA aptamers. The ability of surface-bound cocaine detection is crucial for the development of microfluidic sensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Helical polycarbodiimide cloaking of carbon nanotubes enables inter-nanotube exciton energy transfer modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2014-11-05

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly.

  18. On the heat transfer of enhancement condensation of vapor over the surface of an axisymmetric cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiou, W.J.; Ru, Y.A.; Mo, C.S.; Yi, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The heat transfer of enhancement condensation of the vapor over the surface of an axisymmetric cylinder has been first studied theoretically in this paper. The problems of an axisymmetric cylinder are transformed into plate problems. The effects of some parameters on heat transfer coefficients of the vapor condensation over the surface of an axisymmetric cylinder have been discussed here. The heat transfer of the vapor condensation over an elliptical cylinder and an axisymmetric wing-shape cylinder has compared with the heat transfer of the vapor condensation over a tube surface. The conclusion is that the heat transfer of the vapor condensation over an elliptical cylinder and an axisymmetric wing-shape cylinder is greater than that over tubes

  19. Vibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O2-N2 collisions at hyperthermal temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2018-02-01

    Simulation of vibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O2-N2 collisions is conducted using the quasi-classical trajectory method on an ab initio potential energy surface. Vibrationally resolved rate coefficients are obtained in a high-temperature region between 8000 and 20 000 K by means of the cost-efficient classical trajectory propagation method. A system of master equations is constructed using the new dataset in order to simulate thermal and chemical nonequilibrium observed in shock flows. The O2 relaxation time derived from a solution of the master equations is in good agreement with the Millikan and White correlation at lower temperatures with an increasing discrepancy toward the translational temperature of 20 000 K. At the same time, the N2 master equation relaxation time is similar to that derived under the assumption of a two-state system. The effect of vibrational-vibrational energy transfer appears to be crucial for N2 relaxation and dissociation. Thermal equilibrium and quasi-steady state dissociation rate coefficients in O2-N2 heat bath are reported.

  20. Vibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O2-N2collisions at hyperthermal temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2018-02-28

    Simulation of vibrational energy transfer and dissociation in O 2 -N 2 collisions is conducted using the quasi-classical trajectory method on an ab initio potential energy surface. Vibrationally resolved rate coefficients are obtained in a high-temperature region between 8000 and 20 000 K by means of the cost-efficient classical trajectory propagation method. A system of master equations is constructed using the new dataset in order to simulate thermal and chemical nonequilibrium observed in shock flows. The O 2 relaxation time derived from a solution of the master equations is in good agreement with the Millikan and White correlation at lower temperatures with an increasing discrepancy toward the translational temperature of 20 000 K. At the same time, the N 2 master equation relaxation time is similar to that derived under the assumption of a two-state system. The effect of vibrational-vibrational energy transfer appears to be crucial for N 2 relaxation and dissociation. Thermal equilibrium and quasi-steady state dissociation rate coefficients in O 2 -N 2 heat bath are reported.

  1. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  2. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamam, Rafif E; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  3. Cascade energy transfer and tunable emission from nanosheet hybrids: locating acceptor molecules through chiral doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudappagouda; Wakchaure, Vivek Chandrakant; Ranjeesh, Kayaramkodath Chandran; Abhai, Chalona Antony Ralph; Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh

    2017-06-27

    Light harvesting donor-acceptor assemblies are indispensable to efficiently tap photons. In an attempt to improve the light harvesting efficiency of an acceptor doped assembly, we design and synthesize a donor-acceptor-donor triad which exhibits an exceptional intramolecular energy transfer with excellent efficiency. Moreover, a facile cascade energy transfer (energy funnelling) is observed in the presence of a series of second acceptors (63-91% efficiency) with tunable emission colours. Self-assembled nanosheets formed by the triad in the presence of acceptors exhibit cascade energy transfer assisted tunable emission. In addition, use of chiral acceptors induces chirality to the triad and results in the formation of chiral nanosheets along with cascade energy transfer. Here chiral induction, nanosheet formation and cascade energy transfer in the presence of chiral acceptors are used as tools to probe the intercalation of acceptor molecules in the donor scaffold.

  4. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin

    2017-11-28

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  5. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang; Chen, Shiji

    2017-07-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ˜0.128 and 0.47 m, and ˜0.223 and 0.01 m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47 × 10-2 and 7.13 × 10-3, and 2.91 × 10-3 and 1.96 × 10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively.

  6. Development of surface wettability characteristics for enhancing pool boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moo Hwan; Jo, Hang Jin

    2010-05-01

    For several centuries, many boiling experiments have been conducted. Based on literature survey, the characteristic of heating surface in boiling condition played as an important role which mainly influenced to boiling performance. Among many surface factor, the fact that wettability effect is significant to not only the enhancement of critical heat flux(CHF) but also the nucleate boiling heat transfer is also supported by other kinds of boiling experiments. In this regard, the excellent boiling performance (a high CHF and heat transfer performance) in pool boiling could be achieved through some favorable surface modification which satisfies the optimized wettability condition. To find the optimized boiling condition, we design the special heaters to examine how two materials, which have different wettability (e.g. hydrophilic and hydrophobic), affect the boiling phenomena. The special heaters have hydrophobic dots on hydrophilic surface. The contact angle of hydrophobic surface is 120 .deg. to water at the room temperature. The contact angle of hydrophilic surface is 60 .deg. at same conditions. To conduct the experiment with new surface condition, we developed new fabrication method and design the pool boiling experimental apparatus. Through this facility, we can the higher CHF on pattern surface than that on hydrophobic surface, and the higher boiling heat transfer performance on pattern surface than that on hydrophilic surface. Based on this experimental results, we concluded that we proposed new heating surface condition and surface fabrication method to realize the best boiling condition by modified heating surface condition

  7. Experimental study of curvature effects on jet impingement heat transfer on concave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the local and average heat transfer characteristics of a single round jet impinging on the concave surfaces was conducted in this work to gain in-depth knowledge of the curvature effects. The experiments were conducted by employing a piccolo tube with one single jet hole over a wide range of parameters: jet Reynolds number from 27000 to 130000, relative nozzle to surface distance from 3.3 to 30, and relative surface curvature from 0.005 to 0.030. Experimental results indicate that the surface curvature has opposite effects on heat transfer characteristics. On one hand, an increase of relative nozzle to surface distance (increasing jet diameter in fact enhances the average heat transfer around the surface for the same curved surface. On the other hand, the average Nusselt number decreases as relative nozzle to surface distance increases for a fixed jet diameter. Finally, experimental data-based correlations of the average Nusselt number over the curved surface were obtained with consideration of surface curvature effect. This work contributes to a better understanding of the curvature effects on heat transfer of a round jet impingement on concave surfaces, which is of high importance to the design of the aircraft anti-icing system.

  8. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L.D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  9. The heat transfer coefficients of the heating surface of 300 MWe CFB boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Man; Lu, Qinggang; Sun, Yunkai

    2012-08-01

    A study of the heat transfer about the heating surface of three commercial 300 MWe CFB boilers was conducted in this work. The heat transfer coefficients of the platen heating surface, the external heat exchanger (EHE) and cyclone separator were calculated according to the relative operation data at different boiler loads. Moreover, the heat transfer coefficient of the waterwall was calculated by heat balance of the hot circuit of the CFB boiler. With the boiler capacity increasing, the heat transfer coefficients of these heating surface increases, and the heat transfer coefficient of the water wall is higher than that of the platen heating surface. The heat transfer coefficient of the EHE is the highest in high boiler load, the heat transfer coefficient of the cyclone separator is the lowest. Because the fired coal is different from the design coal in No.1 boiler, the ash content of the fired coal is much lower than that of the design coal. The heat transfer coefficients which calculated with the operation data are lower than the previous design value and that is the reason why the bed temperature is rather high during the boiler operation in No.1 boiler.

  10. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  11. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  12. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-01-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron "breakup" reaction 2H(e,e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the

  13. Hybrid Systems Based on Layered Silicate and Organic Dyes for Cascade Energy Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belušáková, S.; Lang, Kamil; Bujdák, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 38 (2015), s. 21784-21794 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Cascade energy transfers * Multicomponent films * Resonance energy transfer * Spectral properties * Steady state fluorescence * Time -resolved fluorescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.509, year: 2015

  14. Energy transfer in triton-X 100 micelles: a fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D. C.; Ray, K.; Misra, T. N.

    2000-03-01

    The study of fluorescence energy transfer from the phenyl groups of the micellar triton X-100 (TX-100) to solubilised 1-pyrene butyric acid (PBA) has been carried out. Through the analysis of the donor fluorescence quenching energy transfer efficiency has been determined. The observed donor-acceptor separation suggests that pyrene molecules are distributed uniformly in the micellar core.

  15. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-21

    suspected. Published by Elsevier Inc.1. Introduction Several features about the surface geology on the moons of Mars remain poorly understood. The grooves on...Deimos may have an effect on Phobos’ geology ; we shall attempt to estimate the magnitude of that effect in Section 4. For impacts with Mars, Phobos or...global surface geology , particularly in the 100+ Ma since the last Voltaire-sized impact. Therefore we believe it unlikely that the red veneer of

  16. Analysis of surface with low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear techniques applied to element analysis presents different characteristics depending on projectile energy. It can seen observed than an energy (E ≅ 1 MeV) exists which separate two regions for which sensitivity, information analysis and resolution in detection are different. For this work, we describe for the energy region E ≤ 1 MeV, the advantage of the three most used techniques which are PIXE, RBS y RNR. (Author)

  17. Momentum and Energy Transfer in an Ionospheric Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolin, O.; Brenning, N.; Swenson, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present new data from the subpayload of the GRIT II ionospheric active injection experiment. The analysis made possible by these data provides a good understanding of the momentum transfer between the injected ions and the ambient ionosphere. It resolves the conflict between the two competing...... models for the energy transfer from the newly created ions to hot electrons, while also giving a natural coupling between the energy and momentum transfer processes....

  18. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  19. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  20. Rapid Energy Transfer Enabling Control of Emission Polarization in Perylene Bisimide Donor-Acceptor Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menelaou, Christopher; ter Schiphorst, Jeroen; Kendhale, Amol M; Parkinson, Patrick; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Herz, Laura M

    2015-04-02

    Materials showing rapid intramolecular energy transfer and polarization switching are of interest for both their fundamental photophysics and potential for use in real-world applications. Here, we report two donor-acceptor-donor triad dyes based on perylene-bisimide subunits, with the long axis of the donors arranged either parallel or perpendicular to that of the central acceptor. We observe rapid energy transfer (energy transfer rate for the linearly arranged triad but severely underestimates it for the orthogonal case. We show that the rapid energy transfer arises from a combination of through-bond coupling and through-space transfer between donor and acceptor units. As they allow energy cascading to an excited state with controllable polarization, these triad dyes show high potential for use in luminescent solar concentrator devices.

  1. Mutations to R. sphaeroides Reaction Center Perturb Energy Levels and Vibronic Coupling but Not Observed Energy Transfer Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Moira L; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Rolczynski, Brian S; Massey, Sara C; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-03-10

    The bacterial reaction center is capable of both efficiently collecting and quickly transferring energy within the complex; therefore, the reaction center serves as a convenient model for both energy transfer and charge separation. To spectroscopically probe the interactions between the electronic excited states on the chromophores and their intricate relationship with vibrational motions in their environment, we examine coherences between the excited states. Here, we investigate this question by introducing a series of point mutations within 12 Å of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center. Using two-dimensional spectroscopy, we find that the time scales of energy transfer dynamics remain unperturbed by these mutations. However, within these spectra, we detect changes in the mixed vibrational-electronic coherences in these reaction centers. Our results indicate that resonance between bacteriochlorophyll vibrational modes and excitonic energy gaps promote electronic coherences and support current vibronic models of photosynthetic energy transfer.

  2. Modeling of a nanoscale flexoelectric energy harvester with surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the modeling of a beam energy harvester scavenging energy from ambient vibration based on the phenomenon of flexoelectricity. By considering surface elasticity, residual surface stress, surface piezoelectricity and bulk flexoelectricity, a modified Euler-Bernoulli beam model for the energy harvester is developed. After deriving the requisite energy expressions, the extended Hamilton's principle and the assumed-modes method are employed to obtain the discrete electromechanical Euler-Lagrange's equations. Then, the expressions of the steady-state electromechanical responses are given for harmonic base excitation. Numerical simulations are conducted to show the output voltage and the output power of the flexoelectric energy harvesters with different materials and sizes. Particular emphasis is given to the surface effects on the performance of the energy harvesters. It is found that the surface effects are sensitive to the beam geometries and the surface material constants, and the effect of residual surface stress is more significant than that of the surface elasticity and the surface piezoelectricity. The axial deformation of the beam is also considered in the model to account for the electromechanical coupling due to piezoelectricity, and results indicate that piezoelectricity will diminish the output electrical quantities for the case investigated. This work could lead to the development of flexoelectric energy harvesters that can make the micro- and nanoscale sensor systems autonomous.

  3. Surface energy and work function of elemental metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Rosengaard, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed an ab initio study of the surface energy and the work function for six close-packed surfaces of 40 elemental metals by means of a Green’s-function technique, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding and atomic-sphere approximations. The results...... are in excellent agreement with a recent full-potential, all-electron, slab-supercell calculation of surface energies and work functions for the 4d metals. The present calculations explain the trend exhibited by the surface energies of the alkali, alkaline earth, divalent rare-earth, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition...

  4. Efficient energy transfer and increase of energy density of magnetically charged flywheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterdorfer, T.

    2014-01-01

    Flywheel Energy Storage Systems represent an ecologically and economically sustainable technology for decentralized energy storage. Compared to other storage technologies such as e.g. chemical accumulators, they offer longer life cycles without performance degradation over time and usage and need almost no systematic maintenance. Further, they are made of environmentally friendly materials. By means of the driving torque of an electric motor, the flywheel is accelerated and thus electrical energy is transformed to kinetic energy. The stored energy can be transfered back by the load torque of a generator when needed. Modern flywheel energy storage applications use magnetic bearings to minimize selfdischarge. To avoid bearing forces due to rotor eccentricity an unbalance control strategy is used. However, this leads to an off-centered run of the electric machines rotor which in turn generates undesirable forces. A force-compensating operation of the electric machine will minimize the influence on the magnetic bearings in the planned control scheme, thus increasing their efficiency. Different concepts will be developed and compared to each other by means of simulations. Validation of the simulation models is carried out on a specially constructed test setup under defined conditions. In addition, the electrical machine will be integrated into the concept of redundancy of the flywheel. A bearingless operation increases the reliability and enables a safe shutdown of the application in case of malfunction of the magnetic bearings. High strength composite materials are used to achieve high speeds. Based on existing results from past research activities, a disc-shaped rotor is optimized first. To increase material utilization and to maximize energy density a topology optimization is performed. Evolutionary and gradient based optimization algorithms are used. Thereby the unused strength potential of the material is exploited in order to increase the economic efficiency of

  5. Energy and Information Transfer Via Coherent Exciton Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning

    associated excitations were dubbed twisted excitons. Twisted exciton packets can be manipulated as they travel down molecular chains, and this has applications in quantum information science as well. In each setting considered, exciton dynamics were initially studied using a simple tight-binding formalism. This misses the actual many-body interactions and multiple energy levels associated real systems. To remedy this, I adapted an existing time-domain Density Functional Theory code and applied it to study the dynamics of exciton wave packets on quasi-one-dimensional systems. This required the use of high-performance computing and the construction of a number of key auxiliary codes. Establishing the requisite methodology constituted a substantial part of the entire thesis. Surprisingly, this effort uncovered a computational issue associated with Rabi oscillations that had been incorrectly characterized in the literature. My research elucidated the actual problem and a solution was found. This new methodology was an integral part of the overall computational analysis. The thesis then takes up the a detailed consideration of the prospect for creating systems that support a strong measure of transport coherence. While physical implementations include molecular assemblies, solid-state superlattices, and even optical lattices, I decided to focus on assemblies of nanometer-sized silicon quantum dots. First principles computational analysis was used to quantify reorganization within individual dots and excitonic coupling between dots. Quantum dot functionalizations were identified that make it plausible to maintain a measure of excitonic coherence even at room temperatures. Attention was then turned to the use of covalently bonded bridge material to join quantum dots in a way that facilitates efficient exciton transfer. Both carbon and silicon structures were considered by considering the way in which subunits might be best brought together. This resulted in a set of design criteria

  6. The medium reorganization energy for the charge transfer reactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtalik, Lev I

    2011-11-01

    A low static dielectric permittivity of proteins causes the low reorganization energies for the charge transfer reactions inside them. This reorganization energy does not depend on the pre-existing intraprotein electric field. The charge transferred inside the protein interacts with its aqueous surroundings; for many globular proteins, the effect of this surroundings on the reorganization energy is comparable with the effect of reorganization of the protein itself while for the charge transfer in the middle of membrane the aqueous phase plays a minor role. Reorganization energy depends strongly on the system considered, and hence there is no sense to speak on the "protein reorganization energy" as some permanent characteristic parameter. We employed a simple algorithm for calculation of the medium reorganization energy using the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Namely, the reaction field energy was computed in two versions - all media having optical dielectric permittivity, and all the media with the static one; the difference of these two quantities gives the reorganization energy. We have calculated reorganization energies for electron transfer in cytochrome c, various ammine-ruthenated cytochromes c, azurin, ferredoxin, cytochrome c oxidase, complex of methylamine dehydrogenase with amicyanin, and for proton transfer in α-chymotrypsin. It is shown that calculation of the medium reorganization energy can be a useful tool in analysis of the mechanisms of the charge transfer reactions in proteins. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Griep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies.

  8. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  9. The Importance of Insects in Energy Transfers Across Riparian Ecotones Along Hong Kong Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, E. K.; Dudgeon, D.

    2005-05-01

    Energy and materials in the form of insects transfer reciprocally between land and water through stream riparian ecotones, and may provide important energy subsidies to aquatic and terrestrial consumers. Variation in the magnitude and extent of this transfer was investigated in 2004-05 in six Hong Kong streams: four shaded and two unshaded. A combination of pan traps and light traps were used to investigate seasonal activity of aquatic and terrestrial insects. Both were more abundant during the wet season (April to September). Over 80% of emerging aquatic insects stayed within 20 m of the stream bank at all sites, suggesting that the water to land subsidy was spatially restricted. Inputs of terrestrial insects into shaded streams were 30% greater than at open sites, and drift-feeding Parazacco spilurus (Cyprinidae) ate more terrestrial insects in shaded (>40% of prey) than unshaded streams (25% of prey). Stable isotope analysis (SIA; C & N) of potential prey and fish tissues confirmed the dietary importance of terrestrial insects. The spider Leucauge celebesiana (Tetragnathidae) builds orb web parallel to the water surface during the main period of aquatic insect emergence, and SIA indicated that aquatic insects were the primary prey of this terrestrial consumer.

  10. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of energy transfer parameters in Er3+-doped and Er3+, Pr3+-codoped ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Christopher; Golding, Paul S.; Jackson, Stuart D.; King, Terence A.; Pollnau, Markus

    A detailed characterization of energy level lifetimes and energy-transfer processes in Er3+-doped and Er3+, Pr3+-codoped ZBLAN bulk glasses is presented. Energy transfer upconversion parameters from the Er3+ 4I13/2 and 4I11/2 levels have been measured and are compared to energy transfer from Er3+ to

  12. Experimental study on soluble chemical transfer to surface runoff from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juxiu; Yang, Jinzhong; Hu, Bill X; Sun, Huaiwei

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff, under condition of irrigation and subsurface drainage, would improve surface water quality. In this paper, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of various soil and hydraulic factors on chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff. The factors include maximum depth of ponding water on soil surface, initial volumetric water content of soil, depth of soil with low porosity, type or texture of soil and condition of drainage. In the experiments, two soils, sand and loam, mixed with different quantities of soluble KCl were filled in the sandboxes and prepared under different initial saturated conditions. Simulated rainfall induced surface runoff are operated in the soils, and various ponding water depths on soil surface are simulated. Flow rates and KCl concentration of surface runoff are measured during the experiments. The following conclusions are made from the study results: (1) KCl concentration in surface runoff water would decrease with the increase of the maximum depth of ponding water on soil surface; (2) KCl concentration in surface runoff water would increase with the increase of initial volumetric water content in the soil; (3) smaller depth of soil with less porosity or deeper depth of soil with larger porosity leads to less KCl transfer to surface runoff; (4) the soil with finer texture, such as loam, could keep more fertilizer in soil, which will result in more KCl concentration in surface runoff; and (5) good subsurface drainage condition will increase the infiltration and drainage rates during rainfall event and will decrease KCl concentration in surface runoff. Therefore, it is necessary to reuse drained fertile water effectively during rainfall, without polluting groundwater. These study results should be considered in agriculture management to reduce soluble chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff for reducing non-point sources pollution.

  13. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  14. Linear energy transfer incorporated intensity modulated proton therapy optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Khabazian, Azin; Yepes, Pablo P.; Lim, Gino; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating linear energy transfer (LET) into the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. Because increased LET correlates with increased biological effectiveness of protons, high LETs in target volumes and low LETs in critical structures and normal tissues are preferred in an IMPT plan. However, if not explicitly incorporated into the optimization criteria, different IMPT plans may yield similar physical dose distributions but greatly different LET, specifically dose-averaged LET, distributions. Conventionally, the IMPT optimization criteria (or cost function) only includes dose-based objectives in which the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is assumed to have a constant value of 1.1. In this study, we added LET-based objectives for maximizing LET in target volumes and minimizing LET in critical structures and normal tissues. Due to the fractional programming nature of the resulting model, we used a variable reformulation approach so that the optimization process is computationally equivalent to conventional IMPT optimization. In this study, five brain tumor patients who had been treated with proton therapy at our institution were selected. Two plans were created for each patient based on the proposed LET-incorporated optimization (LETOpt) and the conventional dose-based optimization (DoseOpt). The optimized plans were compared in terms of both dose (assuming a constant RBE of 1.1 as adopted in clinical practice) and LET. Both optimization approaches were able to generate comparable dose distributions. The LET-incorporated optimization achieved not only pronounced reduction of LET values in critical organs, such as brainstem and optic chiasm, but also increased LET in target volumes, compared to the conventional dose-based optimization. However, on occasion, there was a need to tradeoff the acceptability of dose and LET distributions. Our conclusion is that the

  15. Linear energy transfer incorporated intensity modulated proton therapy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Khabazian, Azin; Yepes, Pablo P; Lim, Gino; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David R; Mohan, Radhe

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating linear energy transfer (LET) into the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. Because increased LET correlates with increased biological effectiveness of protons, high LETs in target volumes and low LETs in critical structures and normal tissues are preferred in an IMPT plan. However, if not explicitly incorporated into the optimization criteria, different IMPT plans may yield similar physical dose distributions but greatly different LET, specifically dose-averaged LET, distributions. Conventionally, the IMPT optimization criteria (or cost function) only includes dose-based objectives in which the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is assumed to have a constant value of 1.1. In this study, we added LET-based objectives for maximizing LET in target volumes and minimizing LET in critical structures and normal tissues. Due to the fractional programming nature of the resulting model, we used a variable reformulation approach so that the optimization process is computationally equivalent to conventional IMPT optimization. In this study, five brain tumor patients who had been treated with proton therapy at our institution were selected. Two plans were created for each patient based on the proposed LET-incorporated optimization (LETOpt) and the conventional dose-based optimization (DoseOpt). The optimized plans were compared in terms of both dose (assuming a constant RBE of 1.1 as adopted in clinical practice) and LET. Both optimization approaches were able to generate comparable dose distributions. The LET-incorporated optimization achieved not only pronounced reduction of LET values in critical organs, such as brainstem and optic chiasm, but also increased LET in target volumes, compared to the conventional dose-based optimization. However, on occasion, there was a need to tradeoff the acceptability of dose and LET distributions. Our conclusion is that the

  16. Critical assessment of Pt surface energy - An atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Seol, Donghyuk; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2018-04-01

    Despite the fact that surface energy is a fundamental quantity in understanding surface structure of nanoparticle, the results of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for the surface energy of pure Pt show a wide range of scattering. It is necessary to further ensure the surface energy of Pt to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration in Pt bimetallic nanoparticles accurately. In this article, we critically assess and optimize the Pt surface energy using a semi-empirical atomistic approach based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential. That is, the interatomic potential of pure Pt was adjusted in a way that the surface segregation tendency in a wide range of Pt binary alloys is reproduced in accordance with experimental information. The final optimized Pt surface energy (mJ/m2) is 2036 for (100) surface, 2106 for (110) surface, and 1502 for (111) surface. The potential can be utilized to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration of Pt bimetallic nanoparticles more accurately.

  17. Suppression of material transfer at contacting surfaces: the effect of adsorbates on Al/TiN and Cu/diamond interfaces from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbauer, Gregor; Wolloch, Michael; Bedolla, Pedro O.; Redinger, Josef; Vernes, András; Mohn, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The effect of monolayers of oxygen (O) and hydrogen (H) on the possibility of material transfer at aluminium/titanium nitride (Al/TiN) and copper/diamond (Cu/Cdia) interfaces, respectively, were investigated within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). To this end the approach, contact, and subsequent separation of two atomically flat surfaces consisting of the aforementioned pairs of materials were simulated. These calculations were performed for the clean as well as oxygenated and hydrogenated Al and Cdia surfaces, respectively. Various contact configurations were considered by studying several lateral arrangements of the involved surfaces at the interface. Material transfer is typically possible at interfaces between the investigated clean surfaces; however, the addition of O to the Al and H to the Cdia surfaces was found to hinder material transfer. This passivation occurs because of a significant reduction of the adhesion energy at the examined interfaces, which can be explained by the distinct bonding situations.

  18. Mesoscale atmosphere ocean coupling enhances the transfer of wind energy into the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D.; Münnich, M.; Frenger, I.; Gruber, N.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the large-scale wind drives much of the world's ocean circulation, the contribution of the wind energy input at mesoscales (10–200 km) remains poorly known. Here we use regional simulations with a coupled high-resolution atmosphere–ocean model of the South Atlantic, to show that mesoscale ocean features and, in particular, eddies can be energized by their thermodynamic interactions with the atmosphere. Owing to their sea-surface temperature anomalies affecting the wind field above them, the oceanic eddies in the presence of a large-scale wind gradient provide a mesoscale conduit for the transfer of energy into the ocean. Our simulations show that this pathway is responsible for up to 10% of the kinetic energy of the oceanic mesoscale eddy field in the South Atlantic. The conditions for this pathway to inject energy directly into the mesoscale prevail over much of the Southern Ocean north of the Polar Front. PMID:27292447

  19. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  20. Surface technologies 2006-Alternative energies and policy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Surfaces are the immediate contact between anything in our world. Literally, every industry utilizes coatings and surface modifications in order to create surfaces tailored to specific needs, protect underlying substrates, or modify their behavior. Surface and coating technologies are essential to a large variety of different industrial sectors, including transportation, manufacturing, food and biomedical engineering, energy, resources, and materials science and technology. The present paper explains the limitations for alternative energy technologies, with a focus on fuel cell technology development and the alternative energy sector, based on the outcomes of presentations and facilitated discussion groups during a Canadian national workshop series. Options for technological improvements of alternative energy systems are presented in combination with national and international policy choices, which could positively influence research and development in the alternative energy sector

  1. Real-space investigation of energy transfer in heterogeneous molecular dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-10-20

    Given its central role in photosynthesis and artificial energy-harvesting devices, energy transfer has been widely studied using optical spectroscopy to monitor excitation dynamics and probe the molecular-level control of energy transfer between coupled molecules. However, the spatial resolution of conventional optical spectroscopy is limited to a few hundred nanometres and thus cannot reveal the nanoscale spatial features associated with such processes. In contrast, scanning tunnelling luminescence spectroscopy has revealed the energy dynamics associated with phenomena ranging from single-molecule electroluminescence, absorption of localized plasmons and quantum interference effects to energy delocalization and intervalley electron scattering with submolecular spatial resolution in real space. Here we apply this technique to individual molecular dimers that comprise a magnesium phthalocyanine and a free-base phthalocyanine (MgPc and H 2 Pc) and find that locally exciting MgPc with the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope generates a luminescence signal from a nearby H 2 Pc molecule as a result of resonance energy transfer from the former to the latter. A reciprocating resonance energy transfer is observed when exciting the second singlet state (S 2 ) of H 2 Pc, which results in energy transfer to the first singlet state (S 1 ) of MgPc and final funnelling to the S 1 state of H 2 Pc. We also show that tautomerization of H 2 Pc changes the energy transfer characteristics within the dimer system, which essentially makes H 2 Pc a single-molecule energy transfer valve device that manifests itself by blinking resonance energy transfer behaviour.

  2. Influence of polar medium on the reorganization energy of charge transfer between dyes in a dye sensitized film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaissier, Valérie; Barnes, Piers; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2013-04-07

    We study the kinetics of the lateral hole transfer occurring between dye molecules anchored at the surface of the metal oxide in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC). We use Marcus' charge transfer rate equation for which we need the electronic coupling between two molecules (J) and the reorganization energy (λtot). In DSSC the medium surrounding the dyes is highly polar. This means that the contribution of the solvent to the reorganization energy cannot be neglected. Here we elaborate a method to calculate, from first principles, the total (i.e., inner- and outer-sphere) reorganization energy of hole exchange between ruthenium dyes. The influence of the solvent and of the ions in the solvent is incorporated. The inner-sphere reorganization energy depends on the nature of the dye, 0.1 eV for ruthenium dyes with CN ligands, 0.2 eV for ruthenium dyes with NCS ligands. In acetonitrile, the solvent reorganization energy contributes for at least 80% of the total giving a total reorganization energy of around 0.86 eV for ruthenium dyes with CN ligands and 0.95 eV for ruthenium dyes with NCS ligands. We use these results to estimate the rate of hole transfer within Marcus theory. We suggest that low diffusion coefficients observed experimentally may arise from the high polarity of the medium rather than by the chemical structure of the dye.

  3. Vibration excitation and energy transfer during ultrasonically assisted drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitsky, V. I.; Astashev, V. K.; Meadows, A.

    2007-12-01

    Successful application of ultrasonically assisted drilling needs dynamic matching of the transducer with the drill bit considered as a continuous system loaded by the nonlinear processing load. When using standard tools this leads to the compatible choice of the transducer and accurate matching of the transducer and tool. The principal dynamical features of this matching are considered. Optimal position of excitation cross section of the drill bit, which depends on the relationship between elasto-dissipative characteristics of the transducer, the drill bit and the work load, is found in general analytical form. The optimal matching preserves the resonant tuning of the transducer and compensates the additional energy losses in the drill bit and processing. This produces also an amplification of vibration amplitude. The effect is achieved through the generation and maintenance of a nonlinear resonant mode of vibration and by active matching of the oscillating system with the dynamic loads imposed by the cutting process with the help of the intelligent electronic feedback circuitry. A prototype of an ultrasonic drilling system has been designed, manufactured. and tested. Improvements of machining characteristics due to superposition of ultrasonic vibration are demonstrated. Substantial improvements in the cutting performance of drill bits lead to benefits in drilling performance, which include faster penetration rates, reduction of tool wear, improvements in the surface finish, roundness and straightness of holes and, in ductile materials, the reduction or even complete elimination of burrs on both the entrance and exit faces of plates. The reduction in the reactive force experienced also causes greatly reduced deformation when drilling through thin, flexible plates and helps to alleviate delamination hazard.

  4. Quantum transfer energy in the framework of time-dependent dipole-dipole interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; Haddon, Robert C.; Al-Heniti, Saleh H.; Raffah, Bahaaudin M.; Berrada, K.; Abdel-Khalek, S.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we examine the process of the quantum transfer of energy considering time-dependent dipole-dipole interaction in a dimer system characterized by two-level atom systems. By taking into account the effect of the acceleration and speed of the atoms in the dimer coupling, we demonstrate that the improvement of the probability for a single-excitation transfer energy extremely benefits from the incorporation of atomic motion effectiveness and the energy detuning. We explore the relevance between the population and entanglement during the time-evolution and show that this kind of nonlocal correlation may be generated during the process of the transfer of energy. Our work may provide optimal conditions to implement realistic experimental scenario in the transfer of the quantum energy.

  5. Product distributions for some thermal energy charge transfer reactions of rare gas ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anicich, V. G.; Laudenslager, J. B.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Futrell, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance methods were used to measure the product distributions for thermal-energy charge-transfer reactions of He(+), Ne(+), and Ar(+) ions with N2, O2, CO, NO, CO2, and N2O. Except for the He(+)-N2 reaction, no molecular ions were formed by thermal-energy charge transfer from He(+) and Ne(+) with these target molecules. The propensity for dissociative ionization channels in these highly exothermic charge-transfer reactions at thermal energies contrasts with the propensity for formation of parent molecular ions observed in photoionization experiments and in high-energy charge-transfer processes. This difference is explained in terms of more stringent requirements for energy resonance and favorable Franck-Condon factors at thermal ion velocities.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation on the energy transfer process in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Wang, Bei; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Xing-Kang; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Jiang, Li-Jin

    2004-06-01

    In this work, we employ cyanobacteria, Spirulina platensis, and separate their photosynthetic apparatus, phycobilisome (PBS), thylakoid membrane and phycobilisome-thylakoid membrane complex. The steady state absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and corresponding deconvoluted spectra and picosecond time-resolved spectra are used to investigate the energy transfer process in phycobilisome-thylakoid membrane complex. The results on steady state spectra show chlorophylls of the photosystem II are able to transfer excitation energy to phycobilisome with Chl a molecules selectively excited. The decomposition of the steady state spectra further suggest the uphill energy transfer originate from chlorophylls of photosystem II to cores of phycobilisome, while rods and cores of phycobilisome cannot receive energy from the chlorophylls of photosystem I. The time constant for the back energy transfer process is 18 ps.

  7. Changes in surface energy partitioning in China over the past three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yitian; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Cheng, Chi-Han

    2017-05-01

    Surface energy balance and the partitioning of sensible heat flux (SHF) and latent heat flux (LHF) play key roles in land-atmosphere feedback. However, the lack of long-term observations of surface energy fluxes, not to mention spatially extensive ones, limits our understanding of how the surface energy distribution has responded to a warming climate over recent decades (1979-2009) at the national scale in China. Using four state-of-the-art reanalysis products with long-term surface energy outputs, we identified robust changes in surface energy partitioning, defined by the Bowen ratio (BR = SHF/LHF), over different climate regimes in China. Over the past three decades, the net radiation showed an increasing trend over almost the whole of China. The increase in available radiative energy flux, however, was balanced by differential partitioning of surface turbulent fluxes, determined by local hydrological conditions. In semi-arid areas, such as Northeast China, the radiative energy was transferred largely into SHF. A severe deficiency in near-surface and soil moistures led to a significant decreasing trend in LHF. The combined effect of increased SHF and decreased LHF resulted in significant upward trends in the BR and surface warming over Northeast China. In contrast, in the wet monsoon regions, such as southern China, increased downward net radiation favored a rise in LHF rather than in SHF, leading to a significant decreasing trend in the BR. Meanwhile, the increased LHF partly cancelled out the surface warming. The warming trend in southern China was smaller than that in Northeast China. In addition to impacts on heat-related events, the changes in the BR also reflected recent cases of extreme drought in China. Our results indicate that information regarding the BR may be valuable for drought monitoring, especially in regions prone to such conditions.

  8. Dual hierarchical biomimic superhydrophobic surface with three energy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Chuang, Yun-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2009-07-01

    A low hysteresis surface prepared by two-length-scaled hierarchical textures to mimic the Lotus effect is proposed. The fabricated textures incorporate self-masked nanorods on microextrusions. A high static contact angle (160°) and low hysteresis (˜2.7°) are obtained and comparable to the surface properties of a natural lotus leaf. The stability of hydrophobicity is described with respect to three energy states (nonwetting, microwetting, and nanowetting) based on dynamic contact angle analysis by droplet impinging onto the surface. The estimated texture-induced energy barrier based on the principle of energy conservation is in good agreement to those estimated from Laplace's law.

  9. Spectroscopic evidence of resonance energy transfer mechanism from PbS QDs to bulk silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernechea M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the efficiency of the resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon. We present spectroscopic evidence that resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon can be an efficient process for separation distances below 12 nm. Temperature measurements are also presented for PbS quantum dots deposited on glass and silicon with 5 nm and 20nm spacer thicknesses substrates. Our findings show that the resonance energy transfer efficiency remains constant over the 50K to 300K temperature range.

  10. Nanophotonic Control of the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS...... is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply...

  11. Heat Transfer in Bubble Columns with High Viscous and Low Surface Tension Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Tae; Lim, Dae Ho; Kang, Yong [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Axial and overall heat transfer coefficients were investigated in a bubble column with relatively high viscous and low surface tension media. Effects of superficial gas velocity (0.02-0.1 m/s), liquid viscosity (0.1-3 Pa·s) and surface tension (66.1-72.9x10{sup -3} N/m) on the local and overall heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer field was composed of the immersed heater and the bubble column; a vertical heater was installed at the center of the column coaxially. The heat transfer coefficient was determined by measuring the temperature differences continuously between the heater surface and the column which was bubbling in a given operating condition, with the knowledge of heat supply to the heater. The local heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing axial distance from the gas distributor and liquid surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing liquid viscosity or surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient was well correlated in terms of operating variables such as superficial gas velocity, liquid surface tension and liquid viscosity with a correlation coefficient of 0.91, and in terms of dimensionless groups such as Nusselt, Reynolds, Prandtl and Weber numbers with a correlation of 0.92; h=2502U{sub G}{sup 0.236}{sub L}{sup -0.250}{sub L}{sup -}0{sup .028} Nu=3.25Re{sup 0.180}Pr{sup -0.067}We{sup 0.028}.

  12. Heat transfer control in a plane magnetic fluid layer with a free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashtovoi, V.G.; Pogirnitskaya, S.G.; Reks, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The heat transfer mechanisms that are specific to a magnetic liquid have been already investigated extensively. The high sensitivity of the free magnetic liquid surface to the external magnetic field introduces a new feature into the heat transfer process. In the present work, the authors have investigated the possibility of controlling the heat transfer through the phenomenon of magnetic liquid surface instability in a uniform magnetic field. The conditions for heat transfer through a chamber, partially filled with a magnetic liquid, are governed by the characteristics of the free liquid surface and by its stability and development in the supercritical magnetic fields. The authors consider a model two-dimensional problem of heat transfer through a two-layer medium consisting of horizontally situated immiscible layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic liquids with given thermal conductivities. In the absence of an external magnetic field, the interface of the liquids represents a plane surface. In fields which exceed the critical magnitude, the interface is deformed along the wave. As the field intensity is increased, the amplitude of interface distortion becomes larger. The two-dimensional shape of the free magnetic liquid surface may be realized experimentally using two plane layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic liquids in a uniform magnetic field tangent to the interface of the component layers. 7 refs., 9 figs

  13. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  14. Energy transfer of excitons between quantum wells separated by a wide barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyo, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the excitonic Stokes and anti-Stokes energy-transfer mechanisms between two widely separated unequal quantum wells with a large energy mismatch (Δ) at low temperatures (T). Several important intrinsic energy-transfer mechanisms have been examined, including dipolar coupling, real and virtual photon-exchange coupling, and over-barrier ionization of the excitons via exciton-exciton Auger processes. The transfer rate is calculated as a function of T and the center-to-center distance d between the wells. The rates depend sensitively on T for plane-wave excitons. For localized excitons, the rates depend on T only through the T dependence of the exciton localization radius. For Stokes energy transfer, the dominant energy transfer occurs through a photon-exchange interaction, which enables the excitons from the higher-energy wells to decay into free electrons and holes in the lower-energy wells. The rate has a slow dependence on d, yielding reasonable agreement with recent data from GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As quantum wells. The dipolar rate is about an order of magnitude smaller for large d (e.g., d=175Aa) with a stronger range dependence proportional to d -4 . However, the latter can be comparable to the radiative rate for small d (e.g., d≤80Aa). For anti-Stokes transfer through exchange-type (e.g., dipolar and photon-exchange) interactions, we show that thermal activation proportional to exp(-Δ/k B T) is essential for the transfer, contradicting a recent nonactivated result based on the Fo''rster-Dexter's spectral-overlap theory. Phonon-assisted transfer yields a negligibly small rate. On the other hand, energy transfer through over-barrier ionization of excitons via Auger processes yields a significantly larger nonactivated rate which is independent of d. The result is compared with recent data

  15. Energy transfer and thermal studies of Pr 3+ doped cerium oxalate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The analysis of energy level diagrams of cerium and praseodymium ions indicates that the energy gap between the sensitizer and the activator ions varies in a small range suggesting a possible energy transfer from the Ce3+ to Pr3+. The emission and absorption spectra of these crystals were recorded. The overlapping of ...

  16. 78 FR 2985 - Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 25, 2012...

  17. Energy transfer networks: Quasicontinuum photoluminescence linked to high densities of defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bude, Jeff D.; Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Lepró, Xavier; Ehrmann, Paul

    2017-11-01

    In a series of studies related to laser-induced damage of optical materials and deposition of plastics, we discovered a broadly emitting photoluminescence with fast lifetimes that we termed quasicontinuum photoluminescence (QC-PL). Here, we suggest that a high density of optically active defects leads to QC-PL, where interactions between defects affect the temporal and spectral characteristics of both excitation and emission. We develop a model that predicts the temporal characteristics of QC-PL, based on energy transfer interactions between high densities of defects. Our model does not explain all spectral broadening and redshifts found in QC-PL, since we do not model spectral changes in defects due to proximity to other defects. However, we do provide an example of a well-defined system that exhibits the QC-PL characteristics of a distribution in shortened lifetimes and broadened, redshifted energy levels: an organic chromophore (fluorescein) that has been dried rapidly on a fused silica surface. Recently, we showed that regions of fused silica exposed to up to 1 billion high-fluence laser shots at 351 rm nm at subdamage fluences exhibit significant transmission losses at the surface. Here, we find that these laser-exposed regions also exhibit QC-PL. Increases in the density of induced defects on these laser-exposed surfaces, as measured by the local transmission loss, lead to decreases in the observed lifetime and redshifts in the spectrum of the QC-PL, consistent with our explanation for QC-PL. We have found QC-PL in an increasing variety of situations and materials, and we believe it is a phenomenon commonly found on surfaces and nanostructured materials.

  18. A Simple Ligand for Lanthanide Energy Transfer Luminescence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    induced electron transfer (P.E.T.) fluorescent-based sensor that responds to the presence of Mg2+ ions by ... phenol tetraacetic acid (bapta).12,13 Owing to the similarity of the structures of bapta and apta, we decided to .... The protonation state can have a profound effect on the ability of the ligand to facilitate the formation of ...

  19. Energy transfer and thermal studies of Pr doped cerium oxalate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    transfer probabilities and thermal properties have been studied. Keywords. Optical materials; crystal growth; optical spectroscopy; thermal analysis. 1. Introduction. High quality, defect free crystals doped with trivalent lanthanides always attract attention of researchers because of their smart optical and spectroscopic proper-.

  20. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    –310 fs were found for all samples. Comparison between TA dynamics on uncoated and dye-sensitized hematite nanoparticles revealed the dye de-excitation pathway to consist of a competition between electron and energy transfer to the nanoparticles. We analyzed the TA data for hematite nanoparticles using...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported...

  1. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  2. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  3. On Averaging Timescales for the Surface Energy Budget Closure Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. A.; Fairall, C. W.; Persson, O. P. G.; Uttal, T.; Blomquist, B.; McCaffrey, K.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate determination of the surface energy budget (SEB) and all SEB components at the air-surface interface is of obvious relevance for the numerical modelling of the coupled atmosphere-land/ocean/snow system over different spatial and temporal scales, including climate modelling, weather forecasting, environmental impact studies, and many other applications. This study analyzes and discusses comprehensive measurements of the SEB and the surface energy fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and ground heat) made over different underlying surfaces based on the data collected during several field campaigns. Hourly-averaged, multiyear data sets collected at two terrestrial long-term research observatories located near the coast of the Arctic Ocean at Eureka (Canadian Archipelago) and Tiksi (East Siberia) and half-hourly averaged fluxes collected during a year-long field campaign (Wind Forecast Improvement Project 2, WFIP 2) at the Columbia River Gorge (Oregon) in areas of complex terrain. Our direct measurements of energy balance show that the sum of the turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes systematically underestimate the available energy at half-hourly and hourly time scales by around 20-30% at these sites. This imbalance of the surface energy budget is comparable to other terrestrial sites. Surface energy balance closure is a formulation of the conservation of energy principle (the first law of thermodynamics). The lack of energy balance closure at hourly time scales is a fundamental and pervasive problem in micrometeorology and may be caused by inaccurate estimates of the energy storage terms in soils, air and biomass in the layer below the measurement height and above the heat flux plates. However, the residual energy imbalance is significantly reduced at daily and monthly timescales. Increasing the averaging time to daily scales substantially reduces the storage terms because energy locally entering the soil, air column, and vegetation in the morning is

  4. Enhanced energy transfer by near-field coupling of a nanostructured metamaterial with a graphene-covered plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Yung; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2016-11-01

    Coupled surface plasmon/phonon polaritons and hyperbolic modes are known to enhance radiative transfer across nanometer vacuum gaps but usually require identical materials. It becomes crucial to achieve strong near-field energy transfer between dissimilar materials for applications like near-field thermophotovoltaic and thermal rectification. In this work, we theoretically demonstrate enhanced near-field radiative transfer between a nanostructured metamaterial emitter and a graphene-covered planar receiver. Strong near-field coupling with two orders of magnitude enhancement in the spectral heat flux is achieved at the gap distance of 20 nm. By carefully selecting the graphene chemical potential and doping levels of silicon nanohole emitter and silicon plate receiver, the total near-field radiative heat flux can reach about 500 times higher than the far-field blackbody limit between 400 K and 300 K. The physical mechanism is elucidated by the near-field surface plasmon coupling with fluctuational electrodynamics and dispersion relations. The effects of graphene chemical potential, emitter and receiver doping levels, and vacuum gap distance on the near-field coupling and radiative energy transfer are analyzed in detail.

  5. Investigation of energy transfer between PM567:Rh610 dye mixture in modified poly (methyl methacrylate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohui, E-mail: lixiaohuihit@163.com [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Institute of Opto-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Fan, Rongwei; Yu, Xin [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Institute of Opto-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Chen, Deying, E-mail: dychen@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Institute of Opto-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, solid dye samples were prepared by codoping laser dyes Pyrromethene 567 (PM567) as the energy donor and Rhodamine 610 (Rh610) as the energy acceptor into the ethanol modified poly (methyl methacrylate) matrix (MPMMA) to enhance the properties of the solid dye lasers. The fluorescence intensity of the acceptor was enhanced by up to 9 fold with the introduction of the donor molecules. The laser efficiency of the dye mixture doped samples was improved by up to 8 times relative to that of the samples solely doped with the acceptor, and the highest slope efficiency was obtained as 70.4%. The radiative and nonradiative energy transfer rate constants (K{sub R} and K{sub NR}) were calculated using the Stern–Volmer plots and the acceptor concentration dependence of the radiative and nonradiative transfer efficiencies were also obtained. The K{sub R} was three orders of magnitude higher than the K{sub NR}, indicating the dominance of the radiative energy transfer mechanism in the present system. The deviation of the Stern–Volmer plot from the linearity demonstrated that both the dynamic and transient quenching mechanism exist in the present energy transfer system. -- Highlights: • Energy transfer between PM567:Rh610 dye-mixture in MPMMA matrices studied. • Fluorescence intensity of acceptor was improved 9 fold due to the energy transfer. • Highest slope efficiency was 70.4%, 8 times of that of acceptor doped sample. • Energy transfer rate constants and efficiencies were investigated. • Dominant mechanism responsible for the energy transfer is radiative type.

  6. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Intermolecular Energy Transfer: Azulene + N2 Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsik; Paul, Amit K; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2016-07-14

    Chemical dynamics simulations were performed to investigate collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited azulene (Az*) in a N2 bath. The intermolecular potential between Az and N2, used for the simulations, was determined from MP2/6-31+G* ab initio calculations. Az* is prepared with an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy by using quantum microcanonical sampling, including its 95.7 kcal/mol zero-point energy. The average energy of Az* versus time, obtained from the simulations, shows different rates of Az* deactivation depending on the N2 bath density. Using the N2 bath density and Lennard-Jones collision number, the average energy transfer per collision ⟨ΔEc⟩ was obtained for Az* as it is collisionally relaxed. By comparing ⟨ΔEc⟩ versus the bath density, the single collision limiting density was found for energy transfer. The resulting ⟨ΔEc⟩, for an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy, is 0.30 ± 0.01 and 0.32 ± 0.01 kcal/mol for harmonic and anharmonic Az potentials, respectively. For comparison, the experimental value is 0.57 ± 0.11 kcal/mol. During Az* relaxation there is no appreciable energy transfer to Az translation and rotation, and the energy transfer is to the N2 bath.

  7. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  8. Representing Global Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces Using Gaussian Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Brian; Marshall, Paul; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2017-04-06

    Representation of multidimensional global potential energy surfaces suitable for spectral and dynamical calculations from high-level ab initio calculations remains a challenge. Here, we present a detailed study on constructing potential energy surfaces using a machine learning method, namely, Gaussian process regression. Tests for the 3 A″ state of SH 2 , which facilitates the SH + H ↔ S( 3 P) + H 2 abstraction reaction and the SH + H' ↔ SH' + H exchange reaction, suggest that the Gaussian process is capable of providing a reasonable potential energy surface with a small number (∼1 × 10 2 ) of ab initio points, but it needs substantially more points (∼1 × 10 3 ) to converge reaction probabilities. The implications of these observations for construction of potential energy surfaces are discussed.

  9. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    s12039-015-1022-8. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H. ++. CN system. BHARGAVA ANUSURI and SANJAY KUMAR. ∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

  10. Comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of circular cooling fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityakov, V. Yu; Grekov, M. A.; Gusakov, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, S. Z.; Seroshtanov, V. V.; Bashkatov, A. V.; Dymkin, A. N.; Pavlov, A. V.; Milto, O. A.; Kalmykov, K. S.

    2017-11-01

    For the first time is proposed to combine heat flux measurements with thermal imaging and PIV (particle image velocimetry) for a comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of the circular cooling fin. The investigated hollow fin is heated from within with saturated water steam; meanwhile the isothermal external surface simulates one of the perfect fin. Flow and heat transfer at the surface of the solid fin of the same size and shape, made of titanium alloy is investigated in the same regimes. Gradient Heat Flux Sensors (GHFS) were installed at different places of the fin surface. Velocity field around a cylinder, temperature field at the surface of the fin and heat flux for each rated time were obtained. Comprehensive method including heat flux measurement, PIV and thermal imaging allow to study flow and heat transfer at the surface of the fin in real time regime. The possibility to study flow and heat transfer for non-isothermal fins is shown; it is allow to improve traditional calculation of the cooling fins.

  11. Simultaneous and long-lasting hydrophilization of inner and outer wall surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes by transferring atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Faze; Song, Jinlong; Huang, Shuai; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin; Xu, Sihao; Xia, Guangqing; Yang, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Plasma hydrophilization is a general method to increase the surface free energy of materials. However, only a few works about plasma modification focus on the hydrophilization of tube inner and outer walls. In this paper, we realize simultaneous and long-lasting plasma hydrophilization on the inner and outer walls of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes by atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs). Specifically, an Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to modify the PTFE tube’s outer wall and meanwhile to induce transferred He APP inside the PTFE tube to modify its inner wall surface. The optical emission spectrum (OES) shows that the plasmas contain many chemically active species, which are known as enablers for various applications. Water contact angle (WCA) measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the plasma hydrophilization. Results demonstrate that the wettability of the tube walls are well improved due to the replacement of the surface fluorine by oxygen and the change of surface roughness. The obtained hydrophilicity decreases slowly during more than 180 d aging, indicating a long-lasting hydrophilization. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of transferring APPs for surface modification of the tube’s inner and outer walls simultaneously. (paper)

  12. Bispectral experimental estimation of the nonlinear energy transfer in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2008-01-01

    -wave turbulence. The density fluctuations, which at the realistic collisionality are advected as a passive scalar with the vorticity, show power transfer from large to small scales, while the spectral power in potential fluctuations, which represents the energy, is transferred as an inverse cascade to larger...

  13. Heat transfer tests under forced convection conditions with high wettable heater surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsutake, Toru; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Miura, Shigeru; Akiba, Miyuki; Sato, Hisaki; Shirakawa, Ken-etsu; Oosato, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Seiji [Toshiba Co., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Under forced convection and atmospheric pressure conditions, heat transfer tests were performed using the annulus channel of a heater rod with highly wettable surface. Improvement of boiling heat transfer requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. >From this point of view, high-wettable heating surface was studied. As oxide semiconductor-coated materials are highly-wettable, we made a TiO{sub 2} coated heater rod. TiO{sub 2} coated surface has a high-wettability, in terms of contact angle and Leidenfrost temperature. The boiling curve was measured with and without TiO coated surface. The results showed difference between with and without TiO{sub 2} coating. TiO{sub 2} coating rod showed lower boiling onset heat flux, wider nucleate boiling region and higher critical heat flux than without coating. In summary, high wettablity heater surface produced higher boiling heat transfer characteristics under forced convection conditions. (author)

  14. An energy dispersive time resolved liquid surface reflectometer

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, R F; King, D J; Dowling, T L; Fullagar, W

    2001-01-01

    Two designs are presented for an energy dispersive liquid surface reflectometer with time resolution in the milli-second domain. The designs utilise rotating crystal and Laue analyser optics respectively to energy analyse a pink synchrotron X-ray beam after reflection from a liquid surface. Some performance estimates are presented, along with results of a test experiment using a laboratory source and solid state detector.

  15. Calculation of the surface free energy of fcc copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Ming; Lai Yanqing; Tian Zhongliang; Liu Yexiang

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with the modified analytic embedded-atom method we calculate the Gibbs free energy and surface free energy for fcc Cu bulk, and further obtain the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles. Based on the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles, we have investigated the heat capacity of copper nanoparticles. Calculation results indicate that the Gibbs free energy and the heat capacity of nanoparticles can be divided into two parts: bulk quantity and surface quantity. The molar heat capacity of the bulk sample is lower compared with the molar heat capacity of nanoparticles, and this difference increases with the decrease in the particle size. It is also observed that the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of Cu nanoparticles is not really significant until the particle is less than about 20 nm. It is the surface atoms that decide the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles

  16. Energy transfer in the major intrinsic light-harvesting complex from Amphidinium carterae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Zigmantas, D.; van Grondelle, R.; Sundström, V.; Hiller, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2006), s. 8516-8526 ISSN 0006-2960 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Energy transfer * Amphidinium carterae Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.633, year: 2006

  17. Energy transfer in the major intrinsic light-harvesting complex from Amphidinium carterae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Zigmantas, D.; van Grondelle, R.; Sundström, V.; Hiller, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 28 (2006), s. 8516-8526 ISSN 0006-2960 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * Energy transfer Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.633, year: 2006

  18. Nonlocal interaction of inverse magnetic energy transfer in hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Keisuke; Miura, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    A detailed analysis of forward and inverse energy transfer processes due to the Hall term effect in freely decaying, homogeneous, isotropic Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) turbulence is performed through Fourier and wavelet analyses. We analyzed three snapshot datasets that were taken from such a period to allow the turbulence to develop sufficiently with a nearly constant magnetic Reynolds number. Because the Fourier energy spectra in these snapshots show remarkable agreement after the normalization in terms of the dissipation rates and the diffusion coefficients, they are considered as a universal equilibrium state. By analyzing the numerical solutions that are generated without any external forcing, it is confirmed that the inverse energy transfer due to the Hall term effect is intrinsic to HMHD dynamics. Orthonormal divergence-free wavelet analysis reveals that nonlinear mode interactions contributing to the inverse energy transfer exhibit a nonlocal feature, while those for the forward transfer are dominated by a local feature. (author)

  19. Optogalvanic monitoring of collisional transfer of laser excitation energy in a neon RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The optogalvanic signals produced by pulsed laser excitation of 1s5--2p8 and 1s5-2p9 (Paschen notation) transition by a ∼29 MHz radiofrequency (rf) discharge at ∼5 torr have been investigated. The optogalvanic signal produced by 1s5-2p9 excitations indicates that there is transfer of energy from the 2p9 state to some other state. The state to which this energy is transferred is believed to be mainly the 2p8 state because of the very small energy gap between the 2p9 and 2p8 states. To verify this transfer, the 1s5-2p8 transition was investigated. The similarity of the temporal profiles of the optogalvanic signals in both excitations confirms the collisional transfer of laser excitation energy from 2p9 to 2p8

  20. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  1. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  2. Determination of the transfer function for optical surface topography measuring instruments—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Török, Peter; Leach, Richard K.

    2013-05-01

    A significant number of areal surface topography measuring instruments, largely based on optical techniques, are commercially available. However, implementation of optical instrumentation into production is currently difficult due to the lack of understanding of the complex interaction between the light and the component surface. Studying the optical transfer function of the instrument can help address this issue. Here a review is given of techniques for the measurement of optical transfer functions. Starting from the basis of a spatially coherent, monochromatic confocal scanning imaging system, the theory of optical transfer functions in three-dimensional (3D) imaging is presented. Further generalizations are reviewed allowing the extension of the theory to the description of conventional and interferometric 3D imaging systems. Polychromatic transfer functions and surface topography measurements are also discussed. Following presentation of theoretical results, experimental methods to measure the optical transfer function of each class of system are presented, with a focus on suitable methods for the establishment of calibration standards in 3D imaging and surface topography measurements.

  3. Determination of the transfer function for optical surface topography measuring instruments—a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, Matthew R; Török, Peter; Giusca, Claudiu L; Leach, Richard K; Coupland, Jeremy M

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of areal surface topography measuring instruments, largely based on optical techniques, are commercially available. However, implementation of optical instrumentation into production is currently difficult due to the lack of understanding of the complex interaction between the light and the component surface. Studying the optical transfer function of the instrument can help address this issue. Here a review is given of techniques for the measurement of optical transfer functions. Starting from the basis of a spatially coherent, monochromatic confocal scanning imaging system, the theory of optical transfer functions in three-dimensional (3D) imaging is presented. Further generalizations are reviewed allowing the extension of the theory to the description of conventional and interferometric 3D imaging systems. Polychromatic transfer functions and surface topography measurements are also discussed. Following presentation of theoretical results, experimental methods to measure the optical transfer function of each class of system are presented, with a focus on suitable methods for the establishment of calibration standards in 3D imaging and surface topography measurements. (topical review)

  4. Intermolecular potential energy surface for CS2 dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-04-15

    A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction energies for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated energy points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of potential energy surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular potential energy surface, overestimating the total energy by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 potential energy surface. The MP2 extrapolated energy points were fitted to well-known analytical potential functions using two different methods to represent the potential energy surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented potential energy surface. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2: determination of molecular vibrational energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Ekadashi; Carreón-Macedo, José-Luis; Cuervo, Javier E; Schröder, Markus; Brown, Alex

    2013-08-15

    The ground state potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2 have been determined at the CASPT2/C:cc-pVTZ,S:aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z level of theory. The potential energy surface has been fit to a sum-of-products form using the neural network method with exponential neurons. A generic interface between neural network potential energy surface fitting and the Heidelberg MCTDH software package is demonstrated. The potential energy surface has also been fit using the potfit procedure in MCTDH. For fits to the low-energy regions of the potential, the neural network method requires fewer parameters than potfit to achieve high accuracy; global fits are comparable between the two methods. Using these potential energy surfaces, the vibrational energies have been computed for the four most abundant CS2 isotopomers. These results are compared to experimental and previous theoretical data. The current potential energy surfaces are shown to accurately reproduce the low-lying vibrational energies within a few wavenumbers. Hence, the potential energy and dipole moments surfaces will be useful for future study on the control of quantum dynamics in CS2.

  6. Surface Relaxations, Surface Energies and Electronic Structures of BaSnO3 (001) Surfaces: Ab Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slassi, A.; Hammi, M.; El Rhazouani, O.

    2017-07-01

    The surface relaxations, surface energies and electronic structures of BaO- and SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surfaces have been studied by employing the first-principles density functional theory. For both terminations, we find that the upper-layer Ba and Sn atoms move inward, whereas upper-layer O atoms move outward from the surface. Moreover, the largest relaxations are occurred on the first-layer atoms of both terminations. The surface rumpling of BaO-terminated BaSnO3 (001) is slightly less than that of the SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surface. The surface energies show that both terminated surfaces are energetically stable and favorable. Finally, the surface band gap is slightly decreased for the BaO termination, while it is dramatically decreased for the SnO2 termination.

  7. Surface morphology effects in a vibration based triboelectric energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, A.; Sodano, H. A.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the abundance of ambient mechanical energy in our environment, it is often neglected and left unused. However, recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical vibrations can be harvested and used to power small wireless electronic devices, such as micro electromechanical sensors (MEMS) and actuators. Most commonly, these energy harvesters convert vibration into electrical energy by utilizing piezoelectric, electromagnetic or electrostatic effects. Recently, triboelectric based energy harvesters have shown to be among the simplest and most cost-effective techniques for scavenging mechanical energy. The basis of triboelectric energy harvesters is the periodic contact and separation of two surfaces with opposite triboelectric properties which results in induced charge flow through an external load. Here, a vibration driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is fabricated and the effect of micro/nano scale surface modification is studied. The TENG produces electrical energy on the basis of periodic out-of-plane charge separation between gold and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with opposite triboelectric charge polarities. By introducing micro/nano scale surface modifications to the PDMS and gold, the TENG’s power output is further enhanced. This work demonstrates that the morphology of the surfaces in a TENG device is important and by increasing the effective surface area through micro/nano scale modification, the power output of the device can increase by 118%. Moreover, it is shown that unlike many TENGs proposed in the literature, the fabricated device has a high RMS open circuit voltage and short circuit current and can perform for an extended period of time.

  8. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) system: Application to interacting circadian clock proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yao; Piston, David W.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    1999-01-01

    We describe a method for assaying protein interactions that offers some attractive advantages over previous assays. This method, called bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), uses a bioluminescent luciferase that is genetically fused to one candidate protein, and a green fluorescent protein mutant fused to another protein of interest. Interactions between the two fusion proteins can bring the luciferase and green fluorescent protein close enough for resonance energy transfer to occ...

  9. Argonne National Laboratory energy storage and transfer experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.; Wehrle, R.B.; Smith, R.P.; Fuja, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic fusion reactor, equilibrium field, and ohmic heating (OH) coils require the coil energy to be cycled in relatively short periods of time. For large fusion reactor systems, the energy can be in the thousands of MJ range. These large amounts of energy cannot be removed from or returned to the power grid without having an adverse effect on the grid. Several schemes have been proposed which can minimize the amount of energy required from the power grid over a fusion-reactor cycle. They include the flying capacitor, the inductor-convertor bridge, the homopolar generator, and the motor-generator flywheel (MGF). The MGF is best understood and has been in use for this purpose for many years. It requires the least amount of development. The other schemes have not been applied to the energy buffering problem and require considerable development. Of the three remaining schemes, the homopolar generator and the inductor-convertor bridge seem to be the most desirable

  10. Modulation of defect-mediated energy transfer from ZnO nanoparticles for the photocatalytic degradation of bilirubin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanujjal Bora

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nanotechnology has gained significant interest for applications in the medical field. In this regard, a utilization of the ZnO nanoparticles for the efficient degradation of bilirubin (BR through photocatalysis was explored. BR is a water insoluble byproduct of the heme catabolism that can cause jaundice when its excretion is impaired. The photocatalytic degradation of BR activated by ZnO nanoparticles through a non-radiative energy transfer pathway can be influenced by the surface defect-states (mainly the oxygen vacancies of the catalyst nanoparticles. These were modulated by applying a simple annealing in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. The mechanism of the energy transfer process between the ZnO nanoparticles and the BR molecules adsorbed at the surface was studied by using steady-state and picosecond-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. A correlation of photocatalytic degradation and time-correlated single photon counting studies revealed that the defect-engineered ZnO nanoparticles that were obtained through post-annealing treatments led to an efficient decomposition of BR molecules that was enabled by Förster resonance energy transfer.

  11. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  12. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation

  13. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which...

  14. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  15. Meso-scale wrinkled coatings to improve heat transfers of surfaces facing ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Koji; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Shimono, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Yukio; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Keisuke; Myoko, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Meso-scale (micrometer-to submillimeter-scale) wrinkled surfaces coated on steel sheets used in outdoor storage and transport facilities for industrial low-temperature liquids were discovered to efficiently increase convective heat transfer between ambient air and the surface. The radiative and convective heat transfer coefficients of various wrinkled surfaces, which were formed by coating steel sheets with several types of shrinkable paints, were examined. The convective heat transfer coefficient of a surface colder than ambient air monotonically changed with average height difference and interval distance of the wrinkle undulation, where the proportions were 0.0254 and 0.0054 W/m 2 /K/μm, respectively. With this wrinkled coating, users can lower the possibility of condensation and reduce rust and maintenance cost of facilities for industrial low-temperature liquids. From the point of view of manufacturers, this coating method can be easily adapted to conventional manufacturing processes. - Highlights: • Various wrinkled surfaces were fabricated by a practical process. • Topographical effect on convection was parameterized separately from radiation. • Meso-scale wrinkled coatings increased convective heat transfer with ambient air. • Maintenance cost of outdoor steel sheets due to condensation can be reduced

  16. Dynamical energy transfer in ac-driven quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Lim, Jong Soo; Moskalets, Michael; Arrachea, Liliana; Sánchez, David

    2014-04-01

    We analyze the time-dependent energy and heat flows in a resonant level coupled to a fermionic continuum. The level is periodically forced with an external power source that supplies energy into the system. Based on the tunneling Hamiltonian approach and scattering theory, we discuss the different contributions to the total energy flux. We then derive the appropriate expression for the dynamical dissipation, in accordance with the fundamental principles of thermodynamics. Remarkably, we find that the dissipated heat can be expressed as a Joule law with a universal resistance that is constant at all times.

  17. Energy loss in grazing proton-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaristi, J.I.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy loss of fast protons, with energy E > 100 keV, specularly reflected on a solid surface with glancing angle of incidence of the order of a mrad is analysed on theoretical grounds. Two different contributions can be distinguished: i) energy losses originating from the interaction with the valence band, accounted for through an induced force, and ii) the excitation of electron bound states of the target atoms. The results are compared with available experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Solvent effect on bell-shaped energy gap dependence for charge transfer triplet exciplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, P. P.; Raghavan, P. K. N.

    1991-08-01

    The decay kinetics of charge transfer triplet exciplexes—radical ion pairs formed by electron transfer from aromatic amines to the quinones in the triplet excited states in benzene, ethyl acetate and tert-amyl alcohol was studied by laser photolysis. The bell-shaped dependence for the intersystem electron transfer becomes more pronounced and narrow with the increasing polarity of the medium, which may be explained in terms of the single quantum mode approximation within the non-adiabatic multiphonon electron transfer theory by means of the decrease in the vibrational frequency of the quantum mode and in the quantum reorganization energy.

  19. Radiative Heat Transfer with Nanowire/Nanohole Metamaterials for Thermal Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Yung

    Recently, nanostructured metamaterials have attracted lots of attentions due to its tunable artificial properties. In particular, nanowire/nanohole based metamaterials which are known of the capability of large area fabrication were intensively studied. Most of the studies are only based on the electrical responses of the metamaterials; however, magnetic response, is usually neglected since magnetic material does not exist naturally within the visible or infrared range. For the past few years, artificial magnetic response from nanostructure based metamaterials has been proposed. This reveals the possibility of exciting resonance modes based on magnetic responses in nanowire/nanohole metamaterials which can potentially provide additional enhancement on radiative transport. On the other hand, beyond classical far-field radiative heat transfer, near-field radiation which is known of exceeding the Planck's blackbody limit has also become a hot topic in the field. This PhD dissertation aims to obtain a deep fundamental understanding of nanowire/nanohole based metamaterials in both far-field and near-field in terms of both electrical and magnetic responses. The underlying mechanisms that can be excited by nanowire/nanohole metamaterials such as electrical surface plasmon polariton, magnetic hyperbolic mode, magnetic polariton, etc., will be theoretically studied in both far-field and near-field. Furthermore, other than conventional effective medium theory which only considers the electrical response of metamaterials, the artificial magnetic response of metamaterials will also be studied through parameter retrieval of far-field optical and radiative properties for studying near-field radiative transport. Moreover, a custom-made AFM tip based metrology will be employed to experimentally study near-field radiative transfer between a plate and a sphere separated by nanometer vacuum gaps in vacuum. This transformative research will break new ground in nanoscale radiative heat

  20. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  1. Time Resolved Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Vibrationally Excited Molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crim, F. F

    2007-01-01

    ...) in solution and in the gas phase. This second experiment is one of the few direct comparisons of intramolecular vibrational energy flow in a solvated molecule with that in the same molecule isolated in a gas...

  2. Numerical simulations of energy transfer in two collisionless interpenetrating plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion stream instabilities are essential for collisionless shock formation as seen in astrophysics. Weakly relativistic shocks are considered as candidates for sources of high energy cosmic rays. Laboratory experiments may provide a better understanding of this phenomenon. High intensity short pulse laser systems are opening possibilities for efficient ion acceleration to high energies. Their collision with a secondary target could be used for collisionless shock formation. In this paper, using particle-in-cell simulations we are studying interaction of a sub-relativistic, laser created proton beam with a secondary gas target. We show that the ion bunch initiates strong electron heating accompanied by the Weibel-like filamentation and ion energy losses. The energy repartition between ions, electrons and magnetic fields are investigated. This yields insight on the processes occurring in the interstellar medium (ISM and gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  3. Charge transfer effects on the Fermi surface of Ba0.5K 0.5Fe2As2

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-01-31

    Ab-initio calculations within density functional theory are performed to obtain a more systematic understanding of the electronic structure of iron pnictides. As a prototypical compound we study Ba0.5K 0.5Fe2As2 and analyze the changes of its electronic structure when the interaction between the Fe2As 2 layers and their surrounding is modified. We find strong effects on the density of states near the Fermi energy as well as the Fermi surface. The role of the electron donor atoms in iron pnictides thus cannot be understood in a rigid band picture. Instead, the bonding within the Fe2As 2 layers reacts to a modified charge transfer from the donor atoms by adapting the intra-layer Fe-As hybridization and charge transfer in order to maintain an As3- valence state. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Quantum coherent energy transfer over varying pathways in single light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildner, Richard; Brinks, Daan; Nieder, Jana B; Cogdell, Richard J; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-06-21

    The initial steps of photosynthesis comprise the absorption of sunlight by pigment-protein antenna complexes followed by rapid and highly efficient funneling of excitation energy to a reaction center. In these transport processes, signatures of unexpectedly long-lived coherences have emerged in two-dimensional ensemble spectra of various light-harvesting complexes. Here, we demonstrate ultrafast quantum coherent energy transfer within individual antenna complexes of a purple bacterium under physiological conditions. We find that quantum coherences between electronically coupled energy eigenstates persist at least 400 femtoseconds and that distinct energy-transfer pathways that change with time can be identified in each complex. Our data suggest that long-lived quantum coherence renders energy transfer in photosynthetic systems robust in the presence of disorder, which is a prerequisite for efficient light harvesting.

  5. Carrier multiplication in semiconductor nanocrystals detected by energy transfer to organic dye molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun; Wang, Ying; Hua, Zheng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Chunfeng; Xiao, Min

    2012-01-01

    Carrier multiplication describes an interesting optical phenomenon in semiconductors whereby more than one electron-hole pair, or exciton, can be simultaneously generated upon absorption of a single high-energy photon. So far, it has been highly debated whether the carrier multiplication efficiency is enhanced in semiconductor nanocrystals as compared with their bulk counterpart. The controversy arises from the fact that the ultrafast optical methods currently used need to correctly account for the false contribution of charged excitons to the carrier multiplication signals. Here we show that this charged exciton issue can be resolved in an energy transfer system, where biexcitons generated in the donor nanocrystals are transferred to the acceptor dyes, leading to an enhanced fluorescence from the latter. With the biexciton Auger and energy transfer lifetime measurements, an average carrier multiplication efficiency of ~17.1% can be roughly estimated in CdSe nanocrystals when the excitation photon energy is ~2.46 times of their energy gap.

  6. Calculated distance distributions of energy transfer events in irradiated liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Wright, H.A.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Histories from a Monte Carlo electron transport calculation in liquid water are analyzed to obtain the distance distribution functions, t(x) and T(x), of energy transfer events. These functions, which give the average energy transferred within a distance x from an arbitrary transfer event, are presented for irradiation by monoenergetic electrons of several energies between 500 eV and 1 MeV, for monoenergetic photons of 10, 50, and 200 keV energy and for 65 kVp and 200 kVp x rays and 60 Coγ rays. The dose average lineal energy in spherical sites as a function of site radius is also presented for these same photon spectra

  7. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  8. The role of the concentration scale in the definition of transfer free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeser, Beate; Horinek, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy of transferring a solute at infinite dilution between two solvents quantifies differences in solute-solvent interactions - if the transfer takes place at constant molarity of the solute. Yet, many calculation formulae and measuring instructions that are commonly used to quantify solute-solvent interactions correspond to transfer processes in which not the molarity of the solute but its concentration measured in another concentration scale is constant. Here, we demonstrate that in this case, not only the change in solute-solvent interactions is quantified but also the entropic effect of a volume change during the transfer. Consequently, the "phenomenon" which is known as "concentration-scale dependence" of transfer free energies is simply explained by a volume-entropy effect. Our explanations are of high importance for the study of cosolvent effects on protein stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A simulation of laser energy absorption by nanowired surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Miguel F.S.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances on research about laser inertial fusion energy, to increase the portion of energy absorbed by the target's surface from lasers remains as an important challenge. The plasma formed during the initial instants of laser arrival shields the target and prevents the absorption of laser energy by the deeper layers of the material. One strategy to circumvent that effect is the construction of targets whose surfaces are populated with nanowires. The nanowired surfaces have increased absorption of laser energy and constitutes a promising pathway for enhancing laser-matter coupling. In our work we present the results of simulations aiming to investigate how target's geometrical properties might contribute for maximizing laser energy absorption by material. Simulations have been carried out using the software FLASH, a multi-physics platform developed by researchers from the University of Chicago, written in FORTRAN 90 and Python. Different tools for generating target's geometry and analysis of results were developed using Python. Our results show that a nanowired surfaces has an increased energy absorption when compared with non wired surface. The software for visualization developed in this work also allowed an analysis of the spatial dynamics of the target's temperature, electron density, ionization levels and temperature of the radiation emitted by it. (author)

  10. Heat transfer efficient thermal energy storage for steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinberg, R.; Zvegilsky, D.; Epstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    A novel reflux heat transfer storage (RHTS) concept for producing high-temperature superheated steam in the temperature range 350-400 deg. C was developed and tested. The thermal storage medium is a metallic substance, Zinc-Tin alloy, which serves as the phase change material (PCM). A high-temperature heat transfer fluid (HTF) is added to the storage medium in order to enhance heat exchange within the storage system, which comprises PCM units and the associated heat exchangers serving for charging and discharging the storage. The applied heat transfer mechanism is based on the HTF reflux created by a combined evaporation-condensation process. It was shown that a PCM with a fraction of 70 wt.% Zn in the alloy (Zn70Sn30) is optimal to attain a storage temperature of 370 deg. C, provided the heat source such as solar-produced steam or solar-heated synthetic oil has a temperature of about 400 deg. C (typical for the parabolic troughs technology). This PCM melts gradually between temperatures 200 and 370 deg. C preserving the latent heat of fusion, mainly of the Zn-component, that later, at the stage of heat discharge, will be available for producing steam. The thermal storage concept was experimentally studied using a lab scale apparatus that enabled investigating of storage materials (the PCM-HTF system) simultaneously with carrying out thermal performance measurements and observing heat transfer effects occurring in the system. The tests produced satisfactory results in terms of thermal stability and compatibility of the utilized storage materials, alloy Zn70Sn30 and the eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, up to a working temperature of 400 deg. C. Optional schemes for integrating the developed thermal storage into a solar thermal electric plant are discussed and evaluated considering a pilot scale solar plant with thermal power output of 12 MW. The storage should enable uninterrupted operation of solar thermal electric systems during additional hours

  11. Ab initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  12. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, A.A.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies, three resonances are created: emitter–mediator (EM), mediator–receiver (MR) and emitter–receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the EM resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter–mediator–receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the EM resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust against noise, resonant constraints and external interferences. - Highlights: ► Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil. ► The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. ► Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils.

  13. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  14. Empirical mapping of the convective heat transfer coefficients with local hot spots on highly conductive surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekelioğlu Murat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental method was proposed to assess the natural and forced convective heat transfer coefficients on highly conductive bodies. Experiments were performed at air velocities of 0m/s, 4.0m/s, and 5.4m/s, and comparisons were made between the current results and available literature. These experiments were extended to arbitrary-shape bodies. External flow conditions were maintained throughout. In the proposed method, in determination of the surface convective heat transfer coefficients, flow condition is immaterial, i.e., either laminar or turbulent. With the present method, it was aimed to acquire the local heat transfer coefficients on any arbitrary conductive shape. This method was intended to be implemented by the heat transfer engineer to identify the local heat transfer rates with local hot spots. Finally, after analyzing the proposed experimental results, appropriate decisions can be made to control the amount of the convective heat transfer off the surface. Limited mass transport was quantified on the cooled plate.

  15. Effective Energy Transfer via Plasmon-Activated High-Energy Water Promotes Its Fundamental Activities of Solubility, Ionic Conductivity, and Extraction at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Water is a ubiquitous solvent in biological, physical, and chemical processes. Unique properties of water result from water’s tetrahedral hydrogen-bonded (HB) network (THBN). The original THBN is destroyed when water is confined in a nanosized environment or localized at interfaces, resulting in corresponding changes in HB-dependent properties. In this work, we present an innovative idea to validate the reserve energy of high-energy water and applications of high-energy water to promote water’s fundamental activities of solubility, ionic conductivity, and extraction at room temperature. High-energy water with reduced HBs was created by utilizing hot electrons with energies from the decay of surface plasmon excited at gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Compared to conventional deionized (DI) water, solubilities of alkali metal-chloride salts in high-energy water were significantly increased, especially for salts that release heat when dissolved. The ionic conductivity of NaCl in high-energy water was also markedly higher, especially when the electrolyte’s concentration was extremely low. In addition, antioxidative components, such as polyphenols and 2,3,5,4’-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-d-glucoside (THSG) from teas, and Polygonum multiflorum (PM), could more effectively be extracted using high-energy water. These results demonstrate that high-energy water has emerged as a promising innovative solvent for promoting water’s fundamental activities via effective energy transfer.

  16. Energy transfer from excited cyclobutane-t chemically activated by nuclear recoil reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogar, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    Relative energy transfer efficiencies were determined for collisions between highly excited cyclobutane-t and a number of thermal bath gases, including nitrogen, tetrafluoromethane, the noble gases, and cyclobutane. The excited cyclobutane-t was produced with a broad spectrum of energies about a mean energy of 5 eV by replacement of hydrogen with nuclear recoil tritium. The distribution of cyclobutane-t included a fraction produced at such low energies that it was not subjected to unimolecular decomposition, a fraction always found as the decomposition product, ethylene-t, and a fraction subject to competitive stabilization-decomposition reactions. The fraction of cyclobutane-t produced at such extreme energies that it was not subject to competitive unimolecular reaction was determined by curve-fitting the pressure dependence of ratio of cyclobutane-t to ethylene-t. Subsequent examination of the composition dependence of the ratio of competitive cyclobutane-t and ethylene-t yields gave energy transfer efficiencies for C 4 H 8 , CF 4 , N 2 , He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe of 1.00:1.05:0.40, 0.12, 0.23, 0.24, 0.31, 0.39. The relative efficiencies found in this system are similar to those found in high energy conventional chemical activation systems, supporting this method for determination of energy transfer efficiencies following nuclear recoil activation. Cascade deactivation is demonstrated for this system and discussed with respect to energy transfer in hot atom activated systems

  17. Graphical surface-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model as a pedagogical and research tool

    OpenAIRE

    Gillies, Robert R.; Carlson, Toby N.; Ripley, David A.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers, by example, the use of a Surface-Atmosphere-Vegetation-Transfer (SVAT), Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) model designed as a pedagogical tool. The goal of the computer software and the approach is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of communicating often complex and mathematical based disciplines (e.g., micrometeorology, land surface processes) to the non-specialist interested in studying problems involving interactions between vegetation and the atmosphere and,...

  18. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  19. Reaction Coordinate, Free Energy, and Rate of Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjib; Paul, Tanmoy Kumar; Taraphder, Srabani

    2018-03-22

    The role of structure and dynamics of an enzyme has been investigated at three different stages of its function including the chemical event it catalyzes. A one-pot computational method has been designed for each of these stages on the basis of classical and/or quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and transition path sampling simulations. For a pair of initial and final states A and B separated by a high free-energy barrier, using a two-stage selection process, several collective variables (CVs) are identified that can delineate A and B. However, these CVs are found to exhibit strong cross-coupling over the transition paths. A set of mutually orthogonal order parameters is then derived from these CVs and an optimal reaction coordinate, r, determined applying half-trajectory likelihood maximization along with a Bayesian information criterion. The transition paths are also used to project the multidimensional free energy surface and barrier crossing dynamics along r. The proposed scheme has been applied to the rate-determining intramolecular proton transfer reaction of the well-known enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. The potential of mean force, F( r), in the absence of the chemical step is found to reproduce earlier results on the equilibrium population of two side-chain orientations of key residue His-64. Estimation of rate constants, k, from mean first passage times for the three different stages of catalysis shows that the rate-determining step of intramolecular proton transfer occurs with k ≃ 1.0 × 10 6 s -1 , in close agreement with known experimental results.

  20. Manipulating Energy Transfer in Conjugated Polymers using Radical Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Daniel; Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Boudouris, Bryan

    Previous efforts have demonstrated that polymers containing open-shell moieties can be used to improve the performance of organic electronic devices (e.g., organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and photovoltaic devices). However, the exact mechanism of how these redox-active radical polymers improve the performance of these next-generation devices has yet to be described in full. Here, we take the first steps towards elucidating this full picture by demonstrating that the galvinoxyl radical can be used as an electron acceptor for a common electron-donating macromolecule. First, galvinoxyl was used as a fluorescence quencher for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with quenching performance on par with that of oft-used fullerene derivatives. This effect was caused by photoinduced electron transfer between the two materials. Additionally, the galvinoxyl radical was used as an active layer dopant for P3HT OFETs. By increasing the P3HT carrier density through spontaneous electron transfer, the behavior of the device was changed from that of an intrinsic semiconductor to that of a highly-doped semiconductor. Thus, these initial studies lay the foundation for a paradigm where open-shell entities are used to dope conjugated polymer semiconductors for high-performance device applications.