WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface electron density

  1. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modeled...... at two levels of approximation, first as a simple external potential and later as a 20-atom cluster. We perform a number of calculations on an electron hitting the adsorbed molecule from inside the surface and establish a picture, where the resonance is being probed by the hot electron. This enables us...

  2. Diffuse Surface Scattering in the Plasmonic Resonances of Ultralow Electron Density Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, R Carmina; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Apell, S Peter

    2015-05-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) have recently been identified in extremely diluted electron systems obtained by doping semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we investigate the role that different surface effects, namely, electronic spill-out and diffuse surface scattering, play in the optical properties of these ultralow electron density nanosystems. Diffuse scattering originates from imperfections or roughness at a microscopic scale on the surface. Using an electromagnetic theory that describes this mechanism in conjunction with a dielectric function including the quantum size effect, we find that the LSPRs show an oscillatory behavior in both position and width for large particles and a strong blue shift in energy and an increased width for smaller radii, consistent with recent experimental results for photodoped ZnO nanocrystals. We thus show that the commonly ignored process of diffuse surface scattering is a more important mechanism affecting the plasmonic properties of ultralow electron density nanoparticles than the spill-out effect.

  3. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  5. Positron study of electron momentum density and Fermi surface in titanium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Osawa, Makoto; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Matsumoto, Makoto; Shiotani, Nobuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum densities have been obtained on Ti and Zr from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation followed by an image reconstruction technique based on direct Fourier transformation. Augmented-plane wave band structure calculations have been carried out and the results are compared with the experiments. Agreement between the experiment and the theory leads to a conclusion that both Ti and Zr have electron surface sheets which are centered at H and hole surface sheets which are running along the Γ-A axis. (author)

  6. Advances in electric field and atomic surface derived properties from experimental electron densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmaida, Nouzha; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2008-07-14

    The present study is devoted to a general use of the Gauss law. This is applied to the atomic surfaces derived from the topological analysis of the electron density. The method proposed here is entirely numerical, robust and does not necessitate any specific parametrization of the atomic surfaces. We focus on two fundamental properties: the atomic charges and the electrostatic forces acting on atoms in molecules. Application is made on experimental electron densities modelized by the Hansen-Coppens model from which the electric field is derived for a heterogenic set of compounds: water molecule, NO(3) anion, bis-triazine molecule and MgO cluster. Charges and electrostatic forces are estimated by the atomic surface flux of the electric field and the Maxwell stress tensor, respectively. The charges obtained from the present method are in good agreement with those issued from the conventional volume integration. Both Feynman and Ehrenfest forces as well as the electrostatic potential at the nuclei (EPN) are here estimated from the experimental electron densities. The values found for the molecular compounds are presented and discussed in the scope of the mechanics of atomic interactions.

  7. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N.

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  8. Density-functional calculation of van der Waals forces for free-electron-like surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hult, E.; Hyldgaard, P.; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2001-01-01

    A recently proposed general density functional for asymptotic van der Waals forces is used to calculate van der Waals coefficients and reference-plane positions for realistic low-indexed Al surfaces. Results are given for a number of atoms and molecules outside the surfaces, as well as for the in......A recently proposed general density functional for asymptotic van der Waals forces is used to calculate van der Waals coefficients and reference-plane positions for realistic low-indexed Al surfaces. Results are given for a number of atoms and molecules outside the surfaces, as well...... as for the interaction between the surfaces themselves. The densities and static image-plane positions that are needed as input in the van der Waals functional are calculated self-consistently within density-functional theory using the generalized-gradient approximation, pseudopotentials, and plane waves. This study...

  9. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  10. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO3 by high-density electronic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, A.S.; Wilhelm, R.A.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions

  11. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO{sub 3} by high-density electronic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Said, A.S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Lab, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Wilhelm, R.A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Facsko, S. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions.

  12. Structure and electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface: ab initio density functional theory cluster studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, I.; Witko, M.; Hermann, K.

    2003-02-01

    Electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface are studied using ab initio density functional theory method. In addition, the nature of surface V-O bonding as well as the electronic states of the structurally different surface oxygen and vanadium sites are discussed and compared with bulk oxygen/vanadium centers. The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide is modeled using clusters of different size where the three ideal bulk-terminated surfaces, denoted as VV 'O (terminated by a double layer of vanadium atoms), V 'OV (terminated by one layer of V atoms), and OVV ' (terminated by one layer of oxygen atoms), are considered. For these surface terminations electronic properties of various surface and bulk centers are discussed. The results confirm bonding in vanadium sesquioxide as a mixture of ionic and covalent characters. Further, charging of structurally non-equivalent surface vanadium and oxygen sites is found to increase with the corresponding coordination number. Large differences in charging between surface and bulk vanadium atoms are found. In addition, the strong interaction between neighboring vanadium ions are observed.

  13. Electron density in surface barrier discharge emerging at argon/water interface: quantification for streamers and leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanović, Nikola; Galmiz, Oleksandr; Synek, Petr; Zemánek, Miroslav; Brablec, Antonín; Hoder, Tomáš

    2018-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy, fast intensified CCD imaging and electrical measurements were applied to investigate the basic plasma parameters of surface barrier discharge emerging from a conductive water electrode. The discharge was generated at the triple-line interface of atmospheric pressure argon gas and conductive water solution at the fused silica dielectrics using a sinusoidal high-voltage waveform. The spectroscopic methods of atomic line broadening and molecular spectroscopy were used to determine the electron densities and the gas temperature in the active plasma. These parameters were obtained for both applied voltage polarities and resolved spatially. Two different spectral signatures were identified in the spatially resolved spectra resulting in electron densities differing by two orders of magnitude. It is shown that two discharge mechanisms take a place: the streamer and the leader one, with electron densities of 1014 and 1016 cm‑3, respectively. This spectroscopic evidence is supported by the combined diagnostics of electrical current measurements and phase-resolved intensified CCD camera imaging.

  14. Carrier-Density Control of the SrTiO3 (001) Surface 2D Electron Gas studied by ARPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Siobhan McKeown; Bruno, Flavio Yair; Wang, Zhiming; de la Torre, Alberto; Riccó, Sara; Tamai, Anna; Kim, Timur K; Hoesch, Moritz; Shi, Ming; Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; King, Phil D C; Baumberger, Felix

    2015-07-08

    The origin of the 2D electron gas (2DEG)stabilized at the bare surface of SrTiO3 (001) is investigated. Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission and core-level spectroscopy, it is shown conclusively that this 2DEG arises from light-induced oxygen vacancies. The dominant mechanism driving vacancy formation is identified, allowing unprecedented control over the 2DEG carrier density. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Influence of surface composition and density on electron inelastic mean free paths in Ge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Jablonski, A.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Pavluch, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2002), s. 381-393 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : EPES * IMFP * Ge * composition * density * chemical bonding state Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.071, year: 2002

  16. Density Determination and Metallographic Surface Preparation of Electron Beam Melted Ti6Al4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-02

    Dossett and LtCol. Todd Lincoln of the United States Air Force – Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service for performing X-ray micro computed tomography...reconstruction surgeries due to loss of skull tissue. Infections can occur in the surgical site, which may be due to the surface topography of the...particles and pores are indicated by boxes and arrows, respectively. (C) X-ray micro computed tomography cross section image showing pores

  17. Atomic and molecular adsorption on transition-metal carbide (111) surfaces from density-functional theory: a trend study of surface electronic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Ruberto, C.; Lundqvist, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    This study explores atomic and molecular adsorption on a number of early transition-metal carbides (TMCs) in NaCl structure by means of density-functional theory calculations. The investigated substrates are the TM-terminated TMC(111) surfaces, of interest because of the presence of different types......, surface relaxations, Bader charges, and surface-localized densities of states (DOSs). Detailed comparisons between surface and bulk DOSs reveal the existence of transition-metal localized SRs (TMSRs) in the pseudogap and of several C-localized SRs (CSRs) in the upper valence band on all considered TMC(111......) surfaces. The spatial extent and the dangling bond nature of these SRs are supported by real-space analyses of the calculated Kohn-Sham wavefunctions. Then, atomic and molecular adsorption energies, geometries, and charge transfers are presented. An analysis of the adsorbate-induced changes in surface DOSs...

  18. Solar corona electron density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, P.B.; Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.

    1980-01-01

    Three and one-half months of single-frequency (f= 0 2.2 x 10 9 Hz) time delay data (earth-to-spacecraft and return signal travel time) were acquired from the Helios 2 spacecraft around the time of its solar occupation (May 16, 1976). Following the determination of the spacecraft trajectory the excess time delay due to the integrated effect of free electrons along the signal's ray path could be separated and modeled. An average solar corona, equatorial, electron density profile, during solar minimum, was deduced from time delay measurements acquired within 5--60 solar radii (R/sub S/) of the sun. As a point of reference, at 10 R/sub S/ from the sun we find an average electron density of 4500 el cm -3 . However, there appears to be an asymmtry in the electron density as the ray path moved from the west (preoccultation) to east (post-occulation) solar limb. This may be related to the fact that during entry into occulation the heliographic latitude of the ray path (at closes approach to the sun) was about 6 0 , whereas during exit it became -7 0 . The Helios electron density model is compared with similar models deduced from a variety of different experimental techniques. Within 5--20 R/sub S/ of the sun the models separate according to solar minimum or maximum conditions; however, anomalies are evident

  19. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Packing Density on Electronic Polarization in the Bulk and at Surfaces of Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-16

    The polarizable environment surrounding charge carriers in organic semiconductors impacts the efficiency of the charge transport process. Here, we consider two representative organic semiconductors, tetracene and rubrene, and evaluate their polarization energies in the bulk and at the organic-vacuum interface using a polarizable force field that accounts for induced-dipole and quadrupole interactions. Though both oligoacenes pack in a herringbone motif, the tetraphenyl substituents on the tetracene backbone of rubrene alter greatly the nature of the packing. The resulting change in relative orientations of neighboring molecules is found to reduce the bulk polarization energy of holes in rubrene by some 0.3 eV when compared to tetracene. The consideration of model organic-vacuum interfaces highlights the significant variation in the electrostatic environment for a charge carrier at a surface although the net change in polarization energy is small; interestingly, the environment of a charge even just one layer removed from the surface can be viewed already as representative of the bulk. Overall, it is found that in these herringbone-type layered crystals the polarization energy has a much stronger dependence on the intralayer packing density than interlayer packing density.

  20. Statistical theory of electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Hoffman, G.G.; Harris, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An optimized Thomas--Fermi theory is proposed which retains the simplicity of the original theory and is a suitable reference theory for Monte Carlo density functional treatments of condensed materials. The key ingredient of the optimized theory is a neighborhood sampled potential which contains effects of the inhomogeneities in the one-electron potential. In contrast to the traditional Thomas--Fermi approach, the optimized theory predicts a finite electron density in the vicinity of a nucleus. Consideration of the example of an ideal electron gas subject to a central Coulomb field indicates that implementation of the approach is straightforward. The optimized theory is found to fail completely when a classically forbidden region is approached. However, these circumstances are not of primary interest for calculations of interatomic forces. It is shown how the energy functional of the density may be constructed by integration of a generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation. This generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation proves to be equivalent to the variational principle of density functional quantum mechanics, and, therefore, the present density theory can be viewed as a variational consequence of the constructed energy functional

  1. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  2. Electron densities in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanghellini, L.; Kaler, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Electron densities for 146 planetary nebulae have been obtained for analyzing a large sample of forbidden lines by interpolating theoretical curves obtained from solutions of the five-level atoms using up-to-date collision strengths and transition probabilities. Electron temperatures were derived from forbidden N II and/or forbidden O III lines or were estimated from the He II 4686 A line strengths. The forbidden O II densities are generally lower than those from forbidden Cl III by an average factor of 0.65. For data sets in which forbidden O II and forbidden S II were observed in common, the forbidden O II values drop to 0.84 that of the forbidden S II, implying that the outermost parts of the nebulae might have elevated densities. The forbidden Cl II and forbidden Ar IV densities show the best correlation, especially where they have been obtained from common data sets. The data give results within 30 percent of one another, assuming homogeneous nebulae. 106 refs

  3. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  4. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, A.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq); Mohammad, F.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Tikreet, Tikreet (Iraq); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Mukesh [Physics Division, Forensic Science Laboratory, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  5. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaleb, A.M.; Mohammad, F.M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241 Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi

  6. Universal solvation model based on solute electron density and on a continuum model of the solvent defined by the bulk dielectric constant and atomic surface tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-07

    We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the "D" stands for "density" to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. "Continuum" denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute-solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where "universal" denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for electrostatics in terms of the integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). The cavities for the bulk electrostatic calculation are defined by superpositions of nuclear-centered spheres. The second component is called the cavity-dispersion-solvent-structure term and is the contribution arising from short-range interactions between the solute and solvent molecules in the first solvation shell. This contribution is a sum of terms that are proportional (with geometry-dependent proportionality constants called atomic surface tensions) to the solvent-accessible surface areas of the individual atoms of the solute. The SMD model has been parametrized with a training set of 2821 solvation data including 112 aqueous ionic solvation free energies, 220 solvation free energies for 166 ions in acetonitrile, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide, 2346 solvation free energies for 318 neutral solutes in 91 solvents (90 nonaqueous

  7. Applications of high order harmonic radiation to UVX-solids interaction: high excitation density in electronic relaxation dynamics and surface damaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grazia, M.

    2007-12-01

    The new sources of radiation in the extreme-UV (X-UV: 10-100 nm), which deliver spatially coherent, ultra-short and intense pulses, allow studying high flux processes and ultra-fast dynamics in various domains. The thesis work presents two applications of the high-order laser harmonics (HH) to solid state physics. In Part I, we describe the optimization of the harmonic for studies of X-UV/solids interaction. In Part II, we investigate effects of high excitation density in the dynamics of electron relaxation in dielectric scintillator crystals - tungstates and fluorides, using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Quenching of luminescence at short time gives evidence of the competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). The non-radiative channel is identified to mutual interaction of STE at high excitation density. In Part III, we study the X-UV induced damage mechanism in various materials, either conductor (amorphous carbon) or insulators (organic polymers, e.g., PMMA). In PMMA-Plexiglas, in the desorption regime (0.2 mJ/cm 2 , i.e., below damage threshold), the surface modifications reflect X-UV induced photochemical processes that are tentatively identified, as a function of dose: at low dose, polymer chain scission followed by the blow-up of the volatile, low-molecular fragments leads to crater formation; at high dose, cross-linking in the near-surface layer of remaining material leads to surface hardening. These promising results have great perspectives considering the performances already attained and planned in the next future in the development of the harmonic sources. (author)

  8. First principle study of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals are studied. The calculations are based on the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), in addition the Engel–Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The DFT calculations show that these compounds have metallic origin. The contribution of different bands was analyzed from total and partial density of states curves. The values of the density of states at Fermi energy (N(E{sub F})) for ThCu{sub 5}In (ThCu{sub 5}Sn) is 1.75 (1.63) states/eV unit cell. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be equal to 0.30 and 0.28 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn, respectively. The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. - Highlights: • The DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn compounds. • This study shows that the nature of the two compounds is metallic. • Crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction.

  9. Analyticity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Østergaard; Fournais, S.; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M.

    2004-01-01

    We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei.......We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei....

  10. The 7 × 1 Fermi Surface Reconstruction in a Two-dimensional f -electron Charge Density Wave System: PrTe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Hyun Woo; Denlinger, J. D.; Kim, Heejung; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Min, B. H.; Kwon, Y. S.; Kang, J.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure of a charge density wave (CDW) system PrTe3 and its modulated structure in the CDW phase have been investigated by employing ARPES, XAS, Pr 4 f RPES, and first-principles band structure calculation. Pr ions are found to be nearly trivalent, supporting the CDW instability in the metallic Te sheets through partial filling. Finite Pr 4 f spectral weight is observed near the Fermi level, suggesting the non-negligible Pr 4 f contribution to the CDW formation through the Pr 4 f -Te 5p hybridization. The two-fold symmetric features in the measured Fermi surface (FS) of PrTe3 are explained by the calculated FS for the assumed 7 × 1 CDW supercell formation in Te sheets. The shadow bands and the corresponding very weak FSs are observed, which originate from both the band folding due to the 3D interaction of Te sheets with neighboring Pr-Te layers and that due to the CDW-induced FS reconstruction. The straight vertical FSs are observed along kz, demonstrating the nearly 2D character for the near-EF states. The observed linear dichroism reveals the in-plane orbital character of the near-EF Te 5p states. PMID:27453329

  11. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  12. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere.

  13. Electron density measurements in STPX plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jerry; Williams, R.; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Akpovo, C.; Thomas, E.

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostics have been installed to measure the electron density of Spheromak Turbulent Physics Experiment (STPX) plasmas at Florida A. & M. University. An insertable probe, provided by Auburn University, consisting of a combination of a triple-tipped Langmuir probe and a radial array consisting of three ion saturation current / floating potential rings has been installed to measure instantaneous plasma density, temperature and plasma potential. As the ramp-up of the experimental program commences, initial electron density measurements from the triple-probe show that the electron density is on the order of 1019 particles/m3. For a passive measurement, a CO2 interferometer system has been designed and installed for measuring line-averaged densities and to corroborate the Langmuir measurements. We describe the design, calibration, and performance of these diagnostic systems on large volume STPX plasmas.

  14. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  15. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...

  16. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    dissociation of these groups, result into a pH dependent surface charge whose density can be measured by acid-base titration. The surface charge density determined by such method is essentially measured relative to the unknown condition of the oxide/liquid interface prior to reagent addition (i.e. at the point of zero ...

  17. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned

  18. Oxides Surfaces and Novel Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Pratik

    The scope of this thesis extends to the study of surface structures and electronic properties in a number of complex oxides. The c(6x2) surface reconstruction on SrTiO3 (001) was solved using a combination of plan view transmission electron microscopy imaging, atomic resolution secondary electron imaging, and density functional theory calculations. This work provided fundamental insights on the effects of dielectric screening in secondary electron generation. A thorough analysis on the limitation and functionality of transmission plan view imaging showed that the kinematical approximations used in the separation of top and bottom surfaces is only valid in thin samples (˜5 nm or less for SrTiO3). The presence of an inversion center in the surface structure also made separation of the top and bottom surfaces more robust. Surface studies of two other oxides, KTaO3 and NdGaO3, provided understanding on the mechanism of surface heterogeneity and segregation. In the case of KTaO3, selective ion sputtering and the loss of K resulted in large stoichiometric variations at the surface. Annealing of such samples led to the formation of a potassium deficient tetragonal phase (K 6Ta10.8O30) on the surface. A similar phenomenon was also observed in NdGaO3. Exploratory surface studies of the rare earth scandates (ReScO3 , Re = Gd, Tb, Dy) led to the observation of large flexoelectric bending inside an electron microscope. Thin rods of these scandates bent by up to 90 degree under a focused electron beam; the bending was fully reversible. Ex-situ measurements of flexoelectric coe cient performed by an- other graduate student, Christopher Mizzi, confirmed that the scandates have a large flexocoupling voltage (˜42 V). Electronic structure of the lanthanide scandates was studied using temperature depen- dent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The amount of charging under X-ray illumination was greatly reduced with increasing

  19. Does low surface brightness mean low density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1996-01-01

    We compare the dynamical properties of two galaxies at identical positions on the Tully-Fisher relation, but with different surface brightnesses. We find that the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 128 has a higher mass-to-light ratio, and yet has lower mass densities than the high surface brightness

  20. Density and surface tension of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeck, C; Lehmann, J; Lovelock, K R J; Cremer, T; Paape, N; Wasserscheid, P; Fröba, A P; Maier, F; Steinrück, H-P

    2010-12-30

    We measured the density and surface tension of 9 bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Tf(2)N](-))-based and 12 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium ([C(8)C(1)Im](+))-based ionic liquids (ILs) with the vibrating tube and the pendant drop method, respectively. This comprehensive set of ILs was chosen to probe the influence of the cations and anions on density and surface tension. When the alkyl chain length in the [C(n)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N] series (n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12) is increased, a decrease in density is observed. The surface tension initially also decreases but reaches a plateau for alkyl chain lengths greater than n = 8. Functionalizing the alkyl chains with ethylene glycol groups results in a higher density as well as a higher surface tension. For the dependence of density and surface tension on the chemical nature of the anion, relations are only found for subgroups of the studied ILs. Density and surface tension values are discussed with respect to intermolecular interactions and surface composition as determined by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). The absence of nonvolatile surface-active contaminants was proven by ARXPS.

  1. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  2. Determination of electron temperature and electron density in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is seen that the electron temperature increases from 5.8 × 102 oK to 7.83 × 104 oK as the pd is reduced from 130mm Hg × mm to 60 mm Hg × mm for argon. The electron densities increases from 2.8 × 1011/cm3 to 3.2 × 1011 /cm3 for the same variation of pds. For air the electron temperature increases from 3.6 × 104 oK to ...

  3. Topside electron density at low latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezquer, R.G.; Cabrera, M.A.; Flores, R.F.; Mosert, M.

    2002-01-01

    The validity of IRI to predict the electron density at the topside electron density profile over the low latitude region is checked. The comparison with measurements obtained with the Taiyo satellite during low solar activity shows that, the disagreement between prediction and measurement is lower than 40% for 70% of considered cases. These IRI predictions are better than those obtained in a previous work at the southern peak of the equatorial anomaly for high solar activity. Additional studies for low solar activity, using ionosonde data as input parameters in the model, are needed in order to check if the observed deviations are due to the predicted peak characteristics or to the predicted shape of the topside profile. (author)

  4. Electron density measurement for steady state plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Chiba, Shinichi; Inoue, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Electron density of a large tokamak has been measured successfully by the tangential CO 2 laser polarimeter developed in JT-60U. The tangential Faraday rotation angles of two different wavelength of 9.27 and 10.6 μm provided the electron density independently. Two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of Faraday rotation at vacuum windows is verified for the first time. A system stability for long time operation up to ∼10 hours is confirmed. A fluctuation of a signal baseline is observed with a period of ∼3 hours and an amplitude of 0.4 - 0.7deg. In order to improve the polarimeter, an application of diamond window for reduction of the Faraday rotation at vacuum windows and another two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of mechanical rotation component are proposed. (author)

  5. Electron emission at the rail surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, L.; Battech, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the processes by which current is transferred from the cathode rail to the plasma armature in an arc-driven railgun. Three electron emission mechanisms are considered, namely thermionic emission, field-enhanced thermionic emission (or Schottky emission), and photoemission. The author's calculations show that the dominant electron emission mechanism depends, to a great extent, on the work function of the rail surface, the rail surface temperature, the electric field at the rail surface, and the effective radiation temperature of the plasma. For conditions that are considered to be typical of a railgun armature, Schottky emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism, providing current densities on the order of 10 9 A/m 2

  6. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O.

    1999-01-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index. (Author)

  7. New description of the electron density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawer, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are described by which the entire electron density profile of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) could be respresented analytically while emphasizing the most important physical features. Consideration is given to the use of absolute values as a sum of individual Ne (height) functions in order to eliminate conventional time-consuming fitting procedures. It is recommended that three Epstein steps be integrated in the skeleton function, thereby providing a total of eleven parameters for the profile. Some of the parameters might be only slowly variable (HX2, HX3, SC2, SC3). 9 references

  8. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density (ρe) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of ρe to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head

  9. Electron and current density measurements on tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammeren, A.C.A.P. van.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes the Thomson-scattering diagnostic as it was present at the TORTUR tokamak. For the first time with this diagnostic a complete tangential scattering spectrum was recorded during one single laser pulse. From this scattering spectrum the local current density was derived. Small deviations from the expected gaussian scattering spectrum were observed indicating the non-Maxwellian character of the electron-velocity distribution. The second part of this thesis describes the multi-channel interferometer/ polarimeter diagnostic which was constructed, build and operated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) tokamak. The diagnostic was operated routinely, yielding the development of the density profiles for every discharge. When ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) is switched on the density profile broadens, the central density decreases and the total density increases, the opposite takes place when ECRH is switched off. The influence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) activity on the density was clearly observable. In the central region of the plasma it was measured that in hydrogen discharges the so-called sawtooth collapse is preceded by an m=1 instability which grows rapidly. An increase in radius of this m=1 mode of 1.5 cm just before the crash is observed. In hydrogen discharges the sawtooth induced density pulse shows an asymmetry for the high- and low-field side propagation. This asymmetry disappeared for helium discharges. From the location of the maximum density variations during an m=2 mode the position of the q=2 surface is derived. The density profiles are measured during the energy quench phase of a plasma disruption. A fast flattening and broadening of the density profile is observed. (author). 95 refs.; 66 figs.; 7 tabs

  10. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  11. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D'’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    —In a series of systematic optical pump - terahertz probe experiments we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in a large range of carrier densities. The electron scattering time decreases by as much as a factor of 4, from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density...

  12. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things

  13. Theoretical model of fast electron emission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, C.; Burgdoerfer, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Electron emission in glancing-angle ion-surface collisions has become a focus of ion-surface interactions. Electron spectra can provide detailed information on the above surface neutralization dynamics of multiply charged ions, the electronic structure of the surface (surface density of states), and the long-ranged image interactions near the surface. Recent experiments have found that the convoy peak, well known from ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is dramatically altered. The peak is broadened and shifted in energy which has been attributed to dynamical image interactions. We present a microscopic model for the emission of fast electrons in glancing-angle surface collisions. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach is utilized to calculate the evolution of electrons in the presence of their self image, the projectile Coulomb field and the image potential induced by the projectile. The excitation of collective surface modes is also incorporated.

  14. Interaction effects in liquids with low electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses two complementary classes of systems in which strong electron-electron or electron-ion interactions appear at low electron densities. The first are the expanded liquid alkali metals (cesium) in which electron correlation effects have a profound effect on the magnetic properties on the metallic side of the metal-nonmetal transition. The second group are molten alkali halides containing low densities of localized electrons introduced, say, by dissolution of small amounts of excess metal. (Auth.)

  15. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  16. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  17. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  18. NEW CONCEPTS AND TEST METHODS OF CURVE PROFILE AREA DENSITY IN SURFACE: ESTIMATION OF AREAL DENSITY ON CURVED SPATIAL SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Shen

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of curve profile, curve intercept, curve intercept density, curve profile area density, intersection density in containing intersection (or intersection density relied on intersection reference), curve profile intersection density in surface (or curve intercept intersection density relied on intersection of containing curve), and curve profile area density in surface (AS) were defined. AS expressed the amount of curve profile area of Y phase in the unit containing surface area, S...

  19. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  20. Analytical Schwartz density applied to heavy two-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Universidad de Granada (Spain); Koga, Toshikatsu [Muroran Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1997-01-20

    An analytical expression of the electron density function p(r) due to Schwartz for two-electron atomic systems is applied to a detailed study of density-dependent properties of relatively heavy two-electron ions. Comparison of the Schwartz results with those from accurate Hartree-Fock and Hylleraas wave functions shows that despite its simple yet analytical form, the Schwartz density has a quantitative applicability in the density study of two-electron atoms within the nonrelativistic framework. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J. [Middle Tennessee State University; Levit, M. Creon [Nasa Ames Research Center

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  2. Continuous localization-delocalization transition at intermediate electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, D.; Thakur, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    We find in 2D electron layers in quantum transistors that the interplay between the electron correlations and their interactions with defects in the semiconductor substrate generates a continuous localisation-delocalisation transition for intermediate electron densities (5 ≤ r s≤ 9). We distinguish this transition from the discontinuous metal-insulator transition which is observed at lower electron densities (r s≥ 10). The approach we use is based on the behaviour of electrons at low densities. We take into account the interactions between electrons and also their interactions with disorder. We determine a zero temperature phase diagram of localised and delocalised states as a function of electron and impurity densities. The phase boundary of the continuous transition is determined by the localisation length of the electrons. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Australia

  3. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  4. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  5. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha–. Boltzmann equation method ... Laser-induced plasma; spectroscopy; plasma temperature; electron density. PACS Nos 52.50.Jm; 52.70. ... trace sample in any phase (solid, liquid and gas) with no or minimal sample prepa- ration [2–4].

  6. On the regularity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, S.; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M.; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, T.

      We prove that the electronic density of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions is smooth away from the nuclei. The result is proved without decay assumptions on the eighenfunctions.......  We prove that the electronic density of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions is smooth away from the nuclei. The result is proved without decay assumptions on the eighenfunctions....

  7. Solvent/co-solvent effects on the electronic properties and adsorption mechanism of anticancer drug Thioguanine on Graphene oxide surface as a nanocarrier: Density functional theory investigation and a molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzade, Zohre; Raissi, Heidar

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the adsorption of Thioguanine (TG) anticancer drug on the surface of Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet has investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDs). Quantum mechanics calculations by two methods including M06-2X/6-31G**and ωB97X-D/6-31G** have been employed to calculate the details of energetic, geometric, and electronic properties of the TG molecule interacting with Graphene oxide nanosheet (GONS). DFT calculations confirmed that the strongest adsorption is observed when hydrogen bond interactions between TG molecule and the functional groups of Graphene oxide nanosheet are predominate. In all calculations, solvent effects have been considered in water using the PCM method. It is found that TG molecule can be adsorbed on Graphene oxide with negative solvation energy, indicating the TG adsorption on Graphene oxide surfaces is thermodynamically favored. Moreover, MD simulations are examined to understand the solvent/co-solvent effect (water, ethanol, nicotine) on the Thioguanine drug delivery through Graphene oxide. The results of RDF patterns and the van der Waals energy calculations show that interaction between TG drugs and the Graphene oxide surface is stronger in water solvent compared to the other co-solvent. The obtained MD results illustrate that when nicotine and ethanol exist in the system, the drug takes longer time to bind with GO nanosheet and the system becomes unstable. It can be concluded that Graphene oxide can be a promising candidate in water media for delivery the TG molecule.

  8. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  9. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  10. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  11. Method for surface treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Doehler, H.; Bartel, R.; Ardenne, T. von.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at simplifying the technology and saving energy in modifying surfaces with the aid of electron beams. The described beam-object geometry allows to abandon additional heat treatments. It can be used for surface hardening

  12. Electronic collective modes and instabilities on semiconductor surfaces. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1984-01-01

    A Green's-function theory of electronic collective modes is presented which leads to a practical scheme for a microscopic determination of surface elementary excitations in conducting as well as nonconducting solids. Particular emphasis is placed on semiconductor surfaces where the jellium approximation is not valid, due to the importance of density fluctuations on a microscopic scale (reflected in the local-field effects). Starting from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green's function of the surface system, an equation of motion for the electron-hole pair is obtained. Its solutions determine the energy spectra, lifetimes, and amplitudes of the surface elementary excitations, i.e., surface plasmons, excitons, polaritons, and magnons. Exchange and correlation effects are taken into account through the random-phase and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (screened electron-hole attraction) approximations. The formalism is applied to the study of electronic (charge- and spin-density) instabilities at covalent semiconductor surfaces. Quantitative calculations for an eight-layer Si(111) slab display an instability of the ideal paramagnetic surface with respect to spin-density waves with wavelength nearly corresponding to (2 x 1) and (7 x 7) superstructures

  13. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  14. Clinical impact of electron density calibration on dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S. T.; Bromley, R.; Oliver, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: 3D calculation of dose for radiotherapy planning requires accurate density data in the form of Hounsfield Units (HU) obtained from CT scans. This investigation aims to establish the clinical impact that inaccuracies in the definition of the relationship between HU and electron density may have on the dose distribution for a range of treatment sites. HU versus electron density calibration relationships were derived from RMI 465, Catphan and CTRS phantoms scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT CT. Dose calculations were performed using Eclipse AAA 8.6.14. A range of patient case studies were assessed in terms of reference point doses, off axis dose points, dose subtraction plots and dose volume histograms. The RMI electron density calibration was regarded as the gold standard. All plans used identical field parameters, monitor units and optimal fluence maps derived from the RMI reference plan to enable direct dosimetric comparison. Plans calculated with the CIRS and RMI electron density calibrations were comparable. In contrast, the electron density calibration derived from Catphan produced dose differences in the order of 8% for head and neck, 6% for pelvis and 2% for a simple spine case. Incorrect electron density calibration data can result in significant dosimetric error and should be validated against a gold standard prior to implementation in a TPS.

  15. Secondary electron emission from textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Patino, M. I.; Wirz, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo model is used to investigate electron induced secondary electron emission for varying effects of complex surfaces by using simple geometric constructs. Geometries used in the model include: vertical fibers for velvet-like surfaces, tapered pillars for carpet-like surfaces, and a cage-like configuration of interlaced horizontal and vertical fibers for nano-structured fuzz. The model accurately captures the secondary electron emission yield dependence on incidence angle. The model shows that unlike other structured surfaces previously studied, tungsten fuzz exhibits secondary electron emission yield that is independent of primary electron incidence angle, due to the prevalence of horizontally-oriented fibers in the fuzz geometry. This is confirmed with new data presented herein of the secondary electron emission yield of tungsten fuzz at incidence angles from 0-60°.

  16. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  17. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  18. QTAIM electron density study of natural chalcones

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Moa, María J.; Mandado, Marcos; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2007-09-01

    QTAIM atomic and bond properties, ionization potential, and O-H bond dissociation energies calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level indicate the natural chalcones bear a significant radical scavenging activity. However, their ionization potentials indicate they decrease the electron-transfer rate between antioxidant and oxygen that yields the pro-oxidative cations less than other natural antioxidants. Rings A and B display slight and similar positive charges, whereas ring B is involved in exocycle delocalization at a larger extension.

  19. Determination of electron density, mass density and calcium fraction by mass of soft and osseous tissues by dual energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henson, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of CT analysis of trabecular regions are concerned with bone mineral assessment, with considerable attention being paid to the effect of unknown fat content. Information concerning mass density and electron density might provide a more complete picture but is not normally obtained. A method for the calculation of mass and electron density, as well as the fraction of calcium by mass, is described and requires only a measurement of effective beam energy on the skin in addition to the CT numbers from a dual energy scan. The method uses the six major elements, H, C, N, O, P and Ca as compartments for the analysis and can also be applied to soft tissue by using only the first four. The calculated mass fraction of Ca is found to be sensitive to fat content and difference between surface and internal energies which can lead to serious underestimates below a fraction of about 0.04. Mass and electron density results are independent of fat content and only marginally affected by energy differences. Results were obtained with simple materials confirming mass density can be calculated to the order of 3% and electron density to considerably better than 1%. 23 refs., 8 tabs

  20. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    CERN Document Server

    Slutskin, A A; Pepper, M

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the res...

  1. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  2. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  3. Simulation of electron beam from two strip electron guns and control of power density by rotation of gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, G K; Baruah, S; Thakur, K B

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam is preferably used for large scale evaporation of refractory materials. Material evaporation from a long and narrow source providing a well collimated wedge shaped atomic beam has applications in isotopic purification of metals relevant to nuclear industry. The electron beam from an electron gun with strip type filament provides a linear heating source. However, the high power density of the electron beam can lead to turbulence of the melt pool and undesirable splashing of molten metal. For obtaining quiet surface evaporation, the linear electron beam is generally scanned along its length. To further reduce the power density to maintain quiet evaporation the width of the vapour source can be controlled by rotating the electron gun on its plane, thereby scanning an inclined beam over the molten pool. The rotation of gun has further advantages. When multiple strip type electron guns are used for scaling up evaporation length, a dark zone appears between two beams due to physical separation of adjacent guns. This dark zone can be reduced by rotating the gun and thereby bringing two adjacent beams closer. The paper presented here provides the simulation results of the electron beam trajectory and incident power density originating from two strip electron guns by using in-house developed code. The effect of electron gun rotation on the electron beam trajectory and power density is studied. The simulation result is experimentally verified with the image of molten pool and heat affected zone taken after experiment. This technique can be gainfully utilized in controlling the time averaged power density of the electron beam and obtaining quiet evaporation from the metal molten pool.

  4. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  5. Regional 4-D modeling of the ionospheric electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Bilitza, D.; Shum, C. K.; Zeilhofer, C.

    2008-08-01

    The knowledge of the electron density is the key point in correcting ionospheric delays of electromagnetic measurements and in studying the ionosphere. During the last decade GNSS, in particular GPS, has become a promising tool for monitoring the total electron content (TEC), i.e., the integral of the electron density along the ray-path between the transmitting satellite and the receiver. Hence, geometry-free GNSS measurements provide informations on the electron density, which is basically a four-dimensional function depending on spatial position and time. In addition, these GNSS measurements can be combined with other available data including nadir, over-ocean TEC observations from dual-frequency radar altimetry (T/P, JASON, ENVISAT), and TECs from GPS-LEO occultation systems (e.g., FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, CHAMP) with heterogeneous sampling and accuracy. In this paper, we present different multi-dimensional approaches for modeling spatio-temporal variations of the ionospheric electron density. To be more specific, we split the target function into a reference part, computed from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), and an unknown correction term. Due to the localizing feature of B-spline functions we apply tensor-product spline expansions to model the correction term in a certain multi-dimensional region either completely or partly. Furthermore, the multi-resolution representation derived from wavelet analysis allows monitoring the ionosphere at different resolutions levels. For demonstration we apply three approaches to electron density data over South America.

  6. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  7. Tomography of the ionospheric electron density with geostatistical inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Minkwitz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In relation to satellite applications like global navigation satellite systems (GNSS and remote sensing, the electron density distribution of the ionosphere has significant influence on trans-ionospheric radio signal propagation. In this paper, we develop a novel ionospheric tomography approach providing the estimation of the electron density's spatial covariance and based on a best linear unbiased estimator of the 3-D electron density. Therefore a non-stationary and anisotropic covariance model is set up and its parameters are determined within a maximum-likelihood approach incorporating GNSS total electron content measurements and the NeQuick model as background. As a first assessment this 3-D simple kriging approach is applied to a part of Europe. We illustrate the estimated covariance model revealing the different correlation lengths in latitude and longitude direction and its non-stationarity. Furthermore, we show promising improvements of the reconstructed electron densities compared to the background model through the validation of the ionosondes Rome, Italy (RO041, and Dourbes, Belgium (DB049, with electron density profiles for 1 day.

  8. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  9. Idempotent Dirac density matrix for ten-electron central field inhomogeneous electron liquids in terms of electron- and kinetic energy-densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2006-08-01

    A differential equation for the Dirac density matrix γ(r, r'), given ground-state electron- and kinetic energy-densities, has been derived by March and Suhai for one- and two-level occupancy. For ten-electron spin-compensated spherical systems, it is shown here that γ ≡ γ[ρ, t g ] where ρ and t g are electron- and kinetic energy-densities. The philosophy of March and Suhai is confirmed beyond two-level filling. An important byproduct of the present approach is an explicit expression for the one-body potential of DFT in terms of the p-shell electron density. (author)

  10. Electronic structure of bulk AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np, Pu) and water adsorption on the (111) and (110) surfaces of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} from hybrid density functional theory within the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Joseph P.W. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Kerridge, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YP (United Kingdom); Austin, Jonathan [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas, E-mail: nikolas.kaltsoyannis@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Generalised gradient approximation (PBE) and hybrid (PBE0) density functional theory (DFT) within the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method have been used to study AnO{sub 2} bulk and surfaces (An = U, Np, Pu). The electronic structure has been investigated by examining the projected density of states (PDOS). While PBE incorrectly predicts these systems to be metallic, PBE0 finds them to be insulators, with the composition of the valence and conduction levels agreeing well with experiment. Molecular and dissociative water adsorption on the (111) and (110) surfaces of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} has been investigated, with that on the (110) surface being stronger than on the (111). Similar energies are found for molecular and dissociative adsorption on the (111) surfaces, while on the (110) there is a clear preference for dissociative adsorption. Adsorption energies and geometries on the (111) surface of UO{sub 2} are in good agreement with recent periodic DFT studies using the GGA+U approach, and our data for dissociative adsorption on the (110) surface of PuO{sub 2} match experiment rather well, especially when dispersion corrections are included. - Graphical abstract: The electronic structures of AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np, Pu) are studied computationally with hybrid density functional theory, and the geometries and energetics of water adsorption on the low index surfaces are presented.

  11. Proton cooling in ultracold low-density electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Bronin, S. Y.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.; Khikhlukha, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A sole proton energy loss processes in an electron gas and the dependence of these processes on temperature and magnetic field are studied using molecular dynamics techniques in present work. It appears that for electron temperatures less than 100 K many body collisions affect the proton energy loss and these collisions must be taken into account. The influence of a strong magnetic field on the relaxation processes is also considered in this work. Calculations were performed for electron densities 10 cm-3, magnetic field 1-3 Tesla, electron temperatures 10-50 K, initial proton energies 100-10000 K.

  12. Possible correlation effects of surface state electrons on a solid hydrogen film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Albrecht, Uwe; Leiderer, Paul; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of surface state electrons on thin quench-condensed hydrogen films for various electron densities. The surface state electron mobility showed a continuous dependence on the plasma parameter Gamma in the range from 20 to 130, indicating a strong influence

  13. Density functional theory and an experimentally-designed energy functional of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, David A; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-09-21

    We herein demonstrate that capacitance spectroscopy (CS) experimentally allows access to the energy associated with the quantum mechanical ground state of many-electron systems. Priorly, electrochemical capacitance, C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], was previously understood from conceptual and computational density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thus, we herein propose a quantum mechanical experiment-based variational method for electron charging processes based on an experimentally-designed functional of the ground state electron density. In this methodology, the electron state density, ρ, and an energy functional of the electron density, E [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], can be obtained from CS data. CS allows the derivative of the electrochemical potential with respect to the electron density, (δ[small mu, Greek, macron][ρ]/δρ), to be obtained as a unique functional of the energetically minimised system, i.e., β/C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], where β is a constant (associated with the size of the system) and C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ] is an experimentally observable quantity. Thus the ground state energy (at a given fixed external potential) can be obtained simply as E [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], from the experimental measurement of C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ]. An experimental data-set was interpreted to demonstrate the potential of this quantum mechanical experiment-based variational principle.

  14. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  15. Electron temperature and density relationships in coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, C. M.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    We examine 10 coronal mass ejections from the in-ecliptic portion of the Ulysses mission. Five of these CMEs are magnetic clouds. In each case we observe an inverse relationship between electron temperature and density. For protons this relationship is less clear. Earlier work has shown a similar inverse relationship for electrons inside magnetic clouds and interpreted it to mean that the polytropic index governing the expansion of electrons is less than unity. This requires electrons to be heated as the CME expands. We offer an alternative view that the inverse relationship between electron temperature and density is caused by more rapid cooling of the denser plasma through collisions. More rapid cooling of denser plasma has been shown for 1 AU measurements in the solar wind. As evidence for this hypothesis we show that the denser plasma inside the CMEs tends to be more isotropic indicating a different history of collisions for the dense plasma. Thus, although the electron temperature inside CMEs consistently shows an inverse correlation with the density, this is not an indication of the polytropic index of the plasma but instead supports the idea of collisional modification of the electrons during their transit from the sun.

  16. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    . ... include manufacture of aerospace housing, automotive and jet engines and lead acid batteries. [2]. In specialised ... diameter of one hydrated ion) from the surface of the oxide (ψd) are normally measured through methods such as ...

  17. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  18. Versatile Density Functionals for Computational Surface Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess

    resampling techniques, thereby systematically avoiding problems with overfitting. The first ever density functional presenting both reliable accuracy and convincing error estimation is generated. The methodology is general enough to be applied to more complex functional forms with higher-dimensional fitting...... and resampling. This is illustrated by searching for meta-GGA type functionals that outperform current meta-GGAs while allowing for error estimation....

  19. Unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Dowben, P.A.; Ortega, J.E.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) was investigated with high-resolution inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. An empty surface state near E F is observed at bar Γ. Two other surface-sensitive features are also revealed at 1.2 and 3.1 eV above the Fermi level. Hydrogen adsorption on Gd surfaces was used to distinguish the surface-sensitive features from the bulk features. The unoccupied bulk-band critical points are determined to be Γ 3 + at 1.9 eV and A 1 at 0.8 eV

  20. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  1. Reflection of Slow Electrons from Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Ainov, Matsak; Kaganovich, Igor; Demidov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    Given that progress of future plasma technologies depends on control of electron coefficient reflection r0, the development of methods of measurement and control of r0 is of great importance. Published experimental data on r0 for slow electrons are inconsistent and sometime give large values up to r0 ~ 0 , 8 and even higher. This talk presents a technique for r0 measurements in low pressure plasmas in the presence of transverse magnetic field. It is found that for poly-crystal surface, effective reflection coefficient can really reach value of 0.8. It is demonstrated that it is connected to additional reflection from potential barrier near the surfaces. The contribution of electron reflection from the barrier and the surface has been divided and studied. The data have been confirmed at different mono-crystal surfaces. This work was supported by DoE Fusion Energy Sciences contract DE-SC0001939 and Education Ministry of the RF.

  2. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  3. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  4. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  5. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  6. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of ... The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology.

  7. The electron-propagator approach to conceptual density-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Both electron propagator theory and density-functional theory provide conceptually useful information about chemical reactivity and, most especially, charge transfer. This paper elucidates the qualitative and quantitative links between the two theories, with emphasis on how the reactivity indica- tors of conceptual ...

  8. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  9. Behavior of the bottomside electron density profile over Pruhonice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mosert, M.; Burešová, Dalia; Ezquer, R.; Mansilla, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2004), s. 1982-1989 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : Electron density profiles * Variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2004

  10. The electron-propagator approach to conceptual density-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Both electron propagator theory and density-functional theory provide conceptually useful information about chemical reactivity and, most especially, charge transfer. This paper elucidates thequalitative and quantitative links between the two theories, with emphasis on how the reactivity indicators of conceptual ...

  11. Reactivity descriptors and electron density analysis for ligand ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss evaluation of local descriptors using relaxed as well as frozen approximation and characterize the / acceptance/donor characteristics of the above ligands. The intermolecular reactivity sequence for the same systems is examined by the global and local philicity index. In addition, electron density analysis has ...

  12. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 6. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions. V K Unnikrishnan Kamlesh Alti V B Kartha C Santhosh G P Gupta B M Suri. Research Articles ...

  13. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density. (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coef- ficient from Hubbell and Seltzer.

  14. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  15. Analysis of Total Electron Content and Electron Density Profile during Different Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, N. P.; Rana, B.; Adhikari, B.

    2017-12-01

    Total Electron content (TEC) and electron density are the key parameters in the mitigation of ionospheric effects on radio communication system. Detail study of the TEC and electron density variations has been carried out during geomagnetic storms, with longitude and latitude, for four different locations: (13˚N -17˚N, 88˚E -98˚E), (30˚N-50˚N, 120˚W -95˚W), (29˚S-26˚S, 167˚W-163˚W,) and (60˚S-45˚S, 120˚W-105˚W) using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations. In order to find the geomagnetic activity, the solar wind parameters such as north-south component of inter planetary magnetic field (Bz), plasma drift velocity (Vsw), flow pressure (nPa), AE, Dst and Kp indices were obtained from Operating Mission as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) web system. The data for geomagnetic indices have been correlated with the TEC and electron density for four different events of geomagnetic storms on 6 April 2008, 27 March 2008, 4 September 2008, and 11 October 2008. The result illustrates that the observed TEC and electron density profile significantly vary with longitudes and latitudes. This study illustrates that the values of TEC and the vertical electron density profile are influenced by the solar wind parameters associated with solar activities. The peak values of electron density and TEC increase as the geomagnetic storms become stronger. Similarly, the electron density profile varies with altitudes, which peaks around the altitude range of about 250- 350 km, depending on the strength of geomagnetic storms. The results clearly show that the peak electron density shifted to higher altitude (from about 250 km to 350 km) as the geomagnetic disturbances becomes stronger.

  16. Sorting carbon nanotubes by electronic structure using density differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michael S; Green, Alexander A; Hulvat, James F; Stupp, Samuel I; Hersam, Mark C

    2006-10-01

    The heterogeneity of as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) precludes their widespread application in electronics, optics and sensing. We report on the sorting of carbon nanotubes by diameter, bandgap and electronic type using structure-discriminating surfactants to engineer subtle differences in their buoyant densities. Using the scalable technique of density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we have isolated narrow distributions of SWNTs in which >97% are within a 0.02-nm-diameter range. Furthermore, using competing mixtures of surfactants, we have produced bulk quantities of SWNTs of predominantly a single electronic type. These materials were used to fabricate thin-film electrical devices of networked SWNTs characterized by either metallic or semiconducting behaviour.

  17. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  18. Comparison of Satellite based Ion Density Measurements with Digisonde electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G.; Balthazor, R. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; McHarg, M.; Maldonado, C.

    2017-12-01

    The integrated Miniaturized Electrostatic Analyzer (IMESA) flying on the STPSat-3 satellite has collected more than 3 years of ion density data. This instrument is the first in a constellation of up to 6 instruments. We plan on integrating the data from all IMESAs into an approiate ionospheric model. OUr first step is to validate the IMESA data and calibrate the instrument. In this presentation we discuss our process for preparing IMESA data and comparing it to ground based measurements. Lastly, we present a number of comparisons between IMESA ion density measurements and digisonde electron density measurements.

  19. Electron Density Determination, Bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiezorek, Jorg [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The project developed quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) methods by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and used them in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electron density distribution in metallic and intermetallic phases with different cubic and non-cubic crystal structures that comprise elements with d-electron shells. The experimental methods developed here focus on the bonding charge distribution as one of the quantum mechanical characteristics central for understanding of intrinsic properties and validation of DFT calculations. Multiple structure and temperature factors have been measured simultaneously from nano-scale volumes of high-quality crystal with sufficient accuracy and precision for comparison with electron density distribution calculations by DFT. The often anisotropic temperature factors for the different atoms and atom sites in chemically ordered phases can differ significantly from those known for relevant pure element crystals due to bonding effects. Thus they have been measured from the same crystal volumes from which the structure factors have been determined. The ferromagnetic ordered intermetallic phases FePd and FePt are selected as model systems for 3d-4d and 3d-5d electron interactions, while the intermetallic phases NiAl and TiAl are used to probe 3d-3p electron interactions. Additionally, pure transition metal elements with d-electrons have been studied. FCC metals exhibit well defined delocalized bonding charge in tetrahedral sites, while less directional, more distributed bonding charge attains in BCC metals. Agreement between DFT calculated and QCBED results degrades as d-electron levels fill in the elements, and for intermetallics as d-d interactions become prominent over p-d interactions. Utilizing the LDA+U approach enabled inclusion of onsite Coulomb-repulsion effects in DFT calculations, which can afford improved agreements with QCBED results

  20. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  1. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demma

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.024403] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to within ∼15% for general LHC bunch filling patterns. We also illustrate the dependence of the polynomial map coefficients on the physical parameters affecting the electron cloud (secondary emission yield, bunch charge, bunch spacing, etc..

  2. Surface Relaxations, Surface Energies and Electronic Structures of BaSnO3 (001) Surfaces: Ab Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slassi, A.; Hammi, M.; El Rhazouani, O.

    2017-07-01

    The surface relaxations, surface energies and electronic structures of BaO- and SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surfaces have been studied by employing the first-principles density functional theory. For both terminations, we find that the upper-layer Ba and Sn atoms move inward, whereas upper-layer O atoms move outward from the surface. Moreover, the largest relaxations are occurred on the first-layer atoms of both terminations. The surface rumpling of BaO-terminated BaSnO3 (001) is slightly less than that of the SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surface. The surface energies show that both terminated surfaces are energetically stable and favorable. Finally, the surface band gap is slightly decreased for the BaO termination, while it is dramatically decreased for the SnO2 termination.

  3. Electron charge densities at conduction-band edges of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, S.L.; Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G.; Chelikowsky, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that both the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) and the linear combination of atomiclike orbitals (LCAO) approach are capable of producing consistent electronic charge distributions in a compound semiconductor. Since the EPM approach is known to produce total valence electron charge densities which compare well with experimental x-ray data (e.g., Si), this work serves as a further test for the LCAO method. In particular, the EPM scheme, which uses an extended plane-wave basis, and the LCAO scheme, which employs a localized Gaussian basis, are used, with the same empirical potential as input, to analyze both the total valence electron charge density and the charge density of the first conduction band at the GAMMA, L, and X k points of the Brillouin zone. These charge densities are decomposed into their s-, p-, and d-orbital contributions, and this information is used to interpret the differences in the topologies of the conduction bands at GAMMA, L, and X. Such differences are crucial for a comprehensive understanding of interstitial impurities and the response of specific band states to perturbations in compound semiconductors

  4. Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE) insulation ... ammonium chloride as the contaminant, in high density polyethylene ..... liquid in the material. When diffusion is driven by the concentration gradient and if there is no chemical change between liquid and material, this would result in mass.

  5. The electron density of Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Morooka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated statistically the electron density below 5 cm−3 in the magnetosphere of Saturn (7–80 RS, Saturn radii using 44 orbits of the floating potential data from the RPWS Langmuir probe (LP onboard Cassini. The density distribution shows a clear dependence on the distance from the Saturnian rotation axis (√X2+Y2 as well as on the distance from the equatorial plane (|Z|, indicating a disc-like structure. From the characteristics of the density distribution, we have identified three regions: the extension of the plasma disc, the magnetodisc region, and the lobe regions. The plasma disc region is at L<15, where L is the radial distance to the equatorial crossing of the dipole magnetic field line, and confined to |Z|<5 RS. The magnetodisc is located beyond L=15, and its density has a large variability. The variability has quasi-periodic characteristics with a periodicity corresponding to the planetary rotation. For Z>15 RS, the magnetospheric density distribution becomes constant in Z. However, the density still varies quasi-periodically with the planetary rotation also in this region. In fact, the quasi-periodic variation has been observed all over the magnetosphere beyond L=15. The region above Z=15 RS is identified as the lobe region. We also found that the magnetosphere can occasionally move latitudinally under the control of the density in the magnetosphere and the solar wind. From the empirical distributions of the electron densities obtained in this study, we have constructed an electron density model of the Saturnian nightside magnetosphere beyond 7 RS. The obtained model can well reproduce the observed density distribution, and can thus be useful for magnetospheric modelling studies.

  6. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  7. Electron correlation effects in third-order densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mayorga, Mauricio; Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Feixas, Ferran; Matito, Eduard

    2017-02-08

    The electronic energy of a system of fermions can be obtained from the second-order reduced density matrix through the contracted Schrödinger equation or its anti-Hermitian counterpart. Both energy expressions depend on the third-order reduced density matrix (3-RDM) which is usually approximated from lower-order densities. The accuracy of these methods depends critically on the set of N-representability conditions enforced in the calculation and the quality of the approximate 3-RDM. There are no benchmark studies including most 3-RDM approximations and, thus far, no assessment of the deterioration of the approximations with correlation effects has been performed. In this paper we introduce a series of tests to assess the performance of 3-RDM approximations in a model system with varying electron correlation effects, the three-electron harmonium atom. The results of this work put forward several limitations of the currently most used 3-RDM approximations for systems with important electron correlation effects.

  8. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  9. A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

  10. Density effects on electronic configurations in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    We present a quantum mechanical model to describe the density effects on electronic configurations inside a plasma environment. Two different approaches are given by starting from a quantum average-atom model. Illustrations are shown for an aluminum plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium at solid density and at a temperature of 100 eV and in the thermodynamic conditions of a recent experiment designed to characterize the effects of the ionization potential depression treatment. Our approach compares well with experiment and is consistent in that case with the approach of Stewart and Pyatt to describe the ionization potential depression rather than with the method of Ecker and Kröll.

  11. Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-06-01

    Reduced surface area targets were studied using an ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser in order to determine the effect of electron sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a {K}α imaging crystal. Electrons were observed to travel along the surface of wire targets, and were slowed mainly by the induced fields. Targets with reduced surface areas were correlated with increased hot electron densities and proton energies. Hybrid Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations demonstrated increased electric sheath field strength in reduced surface area targets.

  12. An electron density measurement using an analyzer based imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewer, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Using a monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source the electron density of a homogeneous target was determined by measuring the refraction that occurs at the air-target interface for a known angle of incidence. The angle of deviation that these X-rays undergo at the transition between materials is micro-radian to submicro-radian in scale. Existing analyzer based imaging systems are designed to measure submicro-radian angle changes and commonly use monochromatic hard X-ray beams generated from synchrotron sources. A preliminary experiment using the analyzer based imaging apparatus at the Canadian Light Source Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline and a half cylinder shaped plastic target will be presented. By measuring the angle of deviation of the photon beam at several discrete angular positions of the target the electron density of the target material was determined.

  13. Device for radiometric measurement, e.g. of surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Kopl, F.

    1973-01-01

    A design is described of a device for radiometric measurements, such as of material surface density, thickness of coating layers, surface moisture, and for the analysis of chemical composition. The device uses backscattered radiation indicated by two ionization chambers with gas filling; the radiation source is placed in between the chambers. (J.K.)

  14. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  15. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  16. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, the effective atomic num- bers and electron densities have been computed for 14 oxides of lanthanides which are shown in table 1 in the energy region of 0.001 MeV to 105 MeV using mass attenuation coefficient values from WinXCom. The kerma relative to air has also been computed and reported in ...

  17. Stopping power of degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the stopping power of the degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities in the dielectric formalism. The strong Coulomb-coupling effects beyond the random-phase approximation are taken into account through the static and dynamic local-field corrections. It is shown that those strong-coupling and dynamic effects act to enhance the stopping power substantially in the low-velocity regime, leading to an improved agreement with experimental data. (author)

  18. The electronic density of states of disordered compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geertsma, W.; Dijkstra, J.

    1984-11-01

    Recently, the electronic properties of liquid alkali (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs)-group IV (Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) alloys have been discussed by the present authors using a tight-binding model. Only anion orbitals (= group IV) are taken into account. Disorder is described by a pseudo lattice, which takes into account local coordination in one of the sublattices (cation or anion) only. In the first part of this paper it is shown that this approximation is consistent with the usual valence rules used by structural chemists for crystalline structures. In the second part of the paper the solutions for the density of states of the tight-binding Hamiltonian are studied for a number of pseudolattices. The infinite set of Green function equations is solved by using the effective transfer method, which replaces the famous Block condition. It is shown that such a model can explain the formation of bandgaps in disordered systems. By choosing the proper smallest cluster(s) of transfer loops to model the real structure by a pseudolattice, a density of states is obtained which represents properly that of the corresponding crystalline structure. Structures reminiscent to those caused by van Hove singularities already appear in the electronic density of states when relatively small cluster(s) of transfer loops are used. The approach outlined in this paper is capable of describing the electronic density of states due to various degrees of local order in a sublattice. Some of the peculiarities occurring in the solution of the density of states of certain pseudolattices, such as poles outside the band, are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  19. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  20. Zinc surface complexes on birnessite: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison

    2009-01-05

    Biogeochemical cycling of zinc is strongly influenced by sorption on birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which are found in diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Zinc has been observed to form both tetrahedral (Zn{sup IV}) and octahedral (Zn{sup VI}) triple-corner-sharing surface complexes (TCS) at Mn(IV) vacancy sites in hexagonal birnessite. The octahedral complex is expected to be similar to that of Zn in the Mn oxide mineral, chalcophanite (ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O), but the reason for the occurrence of the four-coordinate Zn surface species remains unclear. We address this issue computationally using spin-polarized Density Functional Theory (DFT) to examine the Zn{sub IV}-TCS and Zn{sup VI}-TCS species. Structural parameters obtained by DFT geometry optimization were in excellent agreement with available experimental data on Zn-birnessites. Total energy, magnetic moments, and electron-overlap populations obtained by DFT for isolated Zn{sup IV}-TCS revealed that this species is stable in birnessite without a need for Mn(III) substitution in the octahedral sheet and that it is more effective in reducing undersaturation of surface O at a Mn vacancy than is Zn{sub VI}-TCS. Comparison between geometry-optimized ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O (chalcophanite) and the hypothetical monohydrate mineral, ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, which contains only tetrahedral Zn, showed that the hydration state of Zn significantly affects birnessite structural stability. Finally, our study also revealed that, relative to their positions in an ideal vacancy-free MnO{sub 2}, Mn nearest to Zn in a TCS surface complex move toward the vacancy by 0.08-0.11 {angstrom}, while surface O bordering the vacancy move away from it by 0.16-0.21 {angstrom}, in agreement with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

  1. Electronically controllable spoof localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liu; Xun Xiao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Electronically controllable multipolar spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are experimentally demonstrated in the microwave frequencies. It has been shown that half integer order LSPs modes exist on the corrugated ring loaded with a slit, which actually arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances. By mounting active components across the slit in the corrugated rings, electronic switchability and tunability of spoof LSPs modes have been accomplished. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate efficient dynamic control of the spoof LSPs. These elements may form the basis of highly integrated programmable plasmonic circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  2. Density-functional method for nonequilibrium electron transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.

    2002-01-01

    We describe an ab initio method for calculating the electronic structure, electronic transport, and forces acting on the atoms, for atomic scale systems connected to semi-infinite electrodes and with an applied voltage bias. Our method is based on the density-functional theory (DFT) as implemented...... in the well tested SIESTA approach (which uses nonlocal norm-conserving pseudopotentials to describe the effect of the core electrons, and linear combination of finite-range numerical atomic orbitals to describe the valence states). We fully deal with the atomistic structure of the whole system, treating both...... the contact and the electrodes on the same footing. The effect of the finite bias (including self-consistency and the solution of the electrostatic problem) is taken into account using nonequilibrium Green's functions. We relate the nonequilibrium Green's function expressions to the more transparent scheme...

  3. Equations of electron hydrodynamics in low-density pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrova, N.A.; Sasarov, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    The equations of electron hydrodynamics that describe axisymmetric configurations with a purely toroidal magnetic field in the case when ρ He /α ei /α He , where ρ He is the gyroradius of the electrons and α is the inverse density gradient, are derived. These equations generalize the electron part of the well-known Braginskii system of equations and contain additional dissipative terms, proportional to v ei -1 , which for l ei > α are ∼(l ei /α) 2 times greater than the well-known dissipative effects. The derived system of equations can be employed to describe the later stages of the development of sausages in not very dense z-pinches and to describe the phenomena occurring in plasma switches

  4. 'Anomalous electron transport' with 'Giant Current Density' at room temperature observed with nanogranular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, Hans W.P.

    2013-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition is a novel bottom up nano-structurization technology. An electron beam of high power density is used to generate nano- structures with dimensions > 20 nm, but being composed from amorphous or nanogranular materials with crystals of 2 to 5 nm diameter embedded in a Fullerene matrix. Those compounds are generated in general by secondary or low energy electrons in layers of inorganic, organic, organometallic compounds absorbed to the sample. Those are converted into nanogranular materials by the electron beam following chemical and physical laws, as given by 'Mother Nature'. Metals and amorphous mixtures of chemical compounds from metals are normal resistors, which can carry a current density J 2 . Nanogranular composites like Au/C or Pt/C with metal nanocrystals embedded in a Fullerene matrix have hopping conduction with 0-dimensional Eigen-value characteristics and show 'anomalous electron transport' and can carry 'Giant Current Densities' with values from > 1 MA/cm 2 to 0.1 GA/cm 2 without destruction of the materials. However the area connecting the nanogranular material with a metal with a 3-dimensional electron gas needs to be designed, that the flowing current is reduced to the current density values which the 3-D metal can support without segregation. The basis for a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon can be geometry quantization for Coulomb blockade, of electron surface orbitals around the nanocrystals, hopping conduction, and the limitation of the density of states for phonons in geometry confined non percolated granular materials with strong difference in mass and orientation. Several applications in electronics, signal generators, light sources, detectors, and solar energy harvesting are suggested. (author)

  5. Trends in the chemical properties in early transition metal carbide surfaces: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitchin, J.R.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Barteau, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present density functional theory (DFT) investigations of the physical, chemical and electronic structure properties of several close-packed surfaces of early transition metal carbides, including beta-Mo2C(0 0 0 1), and the (1 1 1) surfaces of TiC, VC, NbC, and TaC. The results...... are in excellent agreement with experimental values of lattice constants and bulk moduli. The adsorption of atomic hydrogen is used as a probe to compare the chemical properties of various carbide surfaces. Hydrogen adsorbs more strongly to the metal-terminated carbide surfaces than to the corresponding closest......-packed pure metal surfaces, due to the tensile strain induced in the carbide surfaces upon incorporation of carbon into the lattice. Hydrogen atoms were found to adsorb more weakly on carbide surfaces than on the corresponding closest-packed pure metal surfaces only when there were surface carbon atoms...

  6. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  7. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  8. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  9. Measuring charge density of electron beam single nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.I.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Fazkullin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of a probe design and electrometric repeater circuit and technique for measuring the charge (current) density of electron beam single pulses by integrating current at a reference capacitor with a subsequent registering of voltage across the capacitor. The probe consists of a band-type signal electrodes and two oval cross-section sleeves: external and internal with larger and smaller rectangular openings, respectively. The external sleeve has antidynatron grid located over the hole. The design employs integer nickel sleever - the cores of electron tube cathodes. The signal electrode is made of nickel band 0.15 mm thick. The probe elements are insulated from each other along the whole length with a layer of teflon band (30 μm), with rectangular openings cut in compliance with the sleeve openings. The measurement range is from 0.4x10 - 9 to 1x10 - 7 C/cm 2 . The rated accuracy of measurements is no worse than +-5% for the beam energy of 0.2 to 3 KeV. The ultimate parameters the charge density - 6 C/cm 2 and direct current density 3 mA/cm 2 - are specified by the breakdown voltage (200 V) of the input capacitor and probe insulation

  10. Current density monitor for intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, R.B.; Raleigh, M.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new type of electric probe which is capable of measuring the time-resolved current density profile of a stable, reproducible, high-energy (>4-MeV) high-current (>1-kA) electron beam. The sensing element of this probe is an open-ended but capped-off 50-Ω coaxial line constructed of graphite. The graphite sensor is 4.3 mm in diameter, 6 cm long, and is range thin to the primary beam electrons. The probe produces a signal proportional to the intercepted beam current. When the sensor is scanned radially through the beam during repeated pulses, a curve of signal versus depth of insertion is produced from which the radial current density profile can be determined. Measurements are presented of the profile of the electron beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (4.5 MeV, 10 kA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement is shown between measurements made with this probe and the beam radius as predicted by transport codes. The advantage of the electric probe lies in its ruggedness, simplicity, inherent fast rise time, and low cost. In contrast to other systems it requires no radiation shielding, water cooling, or auxiliary support equipment to operate in an intense beam environment

  11. Density functional theory in surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Scheffler, M.; Toulhoat, H.

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces are used extensively as catalysts throughout the chemical industry, in the energy sector, and in environmental protection. Recently, density functional theory has started providing new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, helping to interpret the large...... amount of experimental data gathered during the last decades. This article shows how density functional theory can be used to describe the state of the surface during reactions and the rate of catalytic reactions. It will also show how we are beginning to understand the variation in catalytic activity...

  12. Automated Processing of ISIS Topside Ionograms into Electron Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter; Hills, H. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of the topside ionosphere has for the most part relied on just a few years of data from topside sounder satellites. The widely used Bent et al. (1972) model, for example, is based on only 50,000 Alouette 1 profiles. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza, 1990, 2001) uses an analytical description of the graphs and tables provided by Bent et al. (1972). The Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder satellites of the sixties and seventies were ahead of their times in terms of the sheer volume of data obtained and in terms of the computer and software requirements for data analysis. As a result, only a small percentage of the collected topside ionograms was converted into electron density profiles. Recently, a NASA-funded data restoration project has undertaken and is continuing the process of digitizing the Alouette/ISIS ionograms from the analog 7-track tapes. Our project involves the automated processing of these digital ionograms into electron density profiles. The project accomplished a set of important goals that will have a major impact on understanding and modeling of the topside ionosphere: (1) The TOPside Ionogram Scaling and True height inversion (TOPIST) software was developed for the automated scaling and inversion of topside ionograms. (2) The TOPIST software was applied to the over 300,000 ISIS-2 topside ionograms that had been digitized in the fkamework of a separate AISRP project (PI: R.F. Benson). (3) The new TOPIST-produced database of global electron density profiles for the topside ionosphere were made publicly available through NASA s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) ftp archive at . (4) Earlier Alouette 1,2 and ISIS 1, 2 data sets of electron density profiles from manual scaling of selected sets of ionograms were converted fiom a highly-compressed binary format into a user-friendly ASCII format and made publicly available through nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov. The new database for the topside ionosphere established

  13. Experimental electron density in crystalline H3PO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhassou, M; Espinosa, E; Lecomte, C; Blessing, R H

    1995-10-01

    X-ray diffraction data for H3PO4 crystals have been measured to dmin = 0.46 A resolution, and used to model the electron-density distribution with the hydrogen structure of the crystals adopted from an earlier neutron diffraction analysis. The molecule is asymmetric in the crystal with site symmetry 1 (C1), but the local symmetries of the pseudoatomic densities are, within experimental error, equivalent as they would be under idealized 3m (C3v) molecular symmetry. Although the experimental analysis entailed substantial problems with absorption and extinction corrections, the static deformation density from the experiment agrees very well with that from a polarized split-valence molecular orbital wavefunction for an isolated molecule with the crystallographic molecular geometry. Hydrogen bonding in the crystal polarizes the molecule's P==O acceptor group towards P(+)--O-, and appears to relocalize the lone-pair density of the P--OH donor groups. Crystal data: anhydrous orthophosphoric acid, H3PO4, M(r) = 98.00, room temperature, P2(1)/c, a = 5.7572 (13), b = 4.8310 (17), c = 11.5743 (21) A, beta = 95.274 (12) degrees, V = 320.55 (25) A3, Z = 4, dx = 2.030 mg mm-3, mu = 0.660 mm-1 for lambda(Mo K alpha) = 0.7107 A, F(000) = 200 e-, R(parallel F) = 0.026 for 3512 unique reflections.

  14. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng, E-mail: dssu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  15. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  16. Pre-storm electron density enhancements at middle latitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Laštovička, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 15 (2008), s. 1848-1855 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 091; GA MŠk 1P05OC030; GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/08/1356 Grant - others:European Union(XE) COST 296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ionosphere * Electron density * Pre-stormenhancement Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2008

  17. Evidence for a continuous, power law, electron density irregularity spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronyn, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral form of the irregularities in electron density that cause interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of small angular diameter radio sources is discussed. The intensity scintillation technique always yields an irregularity scale size, which is of the order of the first Fresnel zone for the wavelength at which the observations are taken. This includes not only the radio wavelength measurements of the structure of the interplanetary medium, but also radio wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the ionosphere and interstellar medium, and optical wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the atmosphere.

  18. Surface dynamics using pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ally S. Y.; Jones, Robert G.

    2000-04-01

    Line of sight time of flight has been used to measure the translational energy of ethene formed by dissociative electron attachment of adsorbed dihalocarbons (XCH 2CH 2Y) on Cu(111) at 100 K. A pulsed electron beam was used to generate low energy secondary electrons at the surface, which were the active agents in initiating the decomposition, XCH 2CH 2Y(ads)+e -→XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)+Y(chem)+e -, XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)→C 2H 4(g)+X(chem). For 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) adsorbed with a spacer layer of chemisorbed chlorine between it and the Cu(111)surface, the TOF data could be fitted using three Maxwell distributions with fast (960 K), slow (180 K) and diffusion ('20 K') components. For a single monolayer of DCE adsorbed directly on the clean Cu(111) surface the fast (1230 K) and slow (225 K) components increased in temperature, indicating that the copper surface was affecting the reaction. For 1-bromo-2-chloroethane the results were the same, consistent with both molecules dissociating via a common intermediate, ClC 2H 4rad (ads). For 1,2-dibromoethane the intermediate is different, BrC 2H 4rad , and decomposition of a monolayer of this molecule on clean Cu(111) exhibited fast (1850 K) and slow (270 K) components, both higher than the corresponding temperatures for DCE. The dynamics of these reactions and the origin of the two Maxwell distributions are discussed in terms of the energy available within the radical, and from the formation of the chemisorbed halogen when the radical dissociates.

  19. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Fan, Xue; Diao, Dongfeng

    2016-10-01

    We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp2 nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp2 nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp2 nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  20. Recent measurements of electron density profiles of plasmas in PLADIS I, a plasma disruption simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J. III; Sharp, G.; Gahl, J.M. Kuznetsov, V.; Rockett, P.; Hunter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tokamak disruption simulation experiments are being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) using the PLADIS I plasma gun system. PLADIS I is a high power, high energy coaxial plasma gun configured to produce an intense plasma beam. First wall candidate materials are placed in the beam path to determine their response under disruption relevant energy densities. An optically thick vapor shield plasma has been observed to form above the target surface in PLADIS I. Various diagnostics have been used to determine the characteristics of the incident plasma and the vapor shielding plasma. The cross sectional area of the incident plasma beam is a critical characteristic, as it is used in the calculation of the incident plasma energy density. Recently, a HeNe interferometer in the Mach-Zehnder configuration has been constructed and used to probe the electron density of the incident plasma beam and vapor shield plasma. The object beam of the interferometer is scanned across the plasma beam on successive shots, yielding line integrals of beam density on different chords through the plasma. Data from the interferometer is used to determine the electron density profile of the incident plasma beam as a function of beam radius. This data is then used to calculate the effective beam area. Estimates. of beam area, obtained from other diagnostics such as damage targets, calorimeter arrays and off-axis measurements of surface pressure, will be compared with data from the interferometer to obtain a better estimate of the beam cross sectional area

  1. Power Spectral Density Evaluation of Laser Milled Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul-Amadeus Lorbeer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ablating surfaces with a pulsed laser system in milling processes often leads to surface changes depending on the milling depth. Especially if a constant surface roughness and evenness is essential to the process, structural degradation may advance until the process fails. The process investigated is the generation of precise thrust by laser ablation. Here, it is essential to predict or rather control the evolution of the surfaces roughness. Laser ablative milling with a short pulse laser system in vacuum (≈1 Pa were performed over depths of several 10 µm documenting the evolution of surface roughness and unevenness with a white light interference microscope. Power spectral density analysis of the generated surface data reveals a strong influence of the crystalline structure of the solid. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate that this effect could be suppressed for gold.

  2. Inverse calculation of power density for laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Laser beam surface treatment requires a well-defined temperature profile. In this paper an analytic method is presented to solve the inverse problem of heat conduction in solids, based on the 2-dimensional Fourier transform. As a result, the required power density profile of the laser beam can be

  3. Variation In Surface Water Vapour Density Over Four Nigerian Stations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surface water vapour density ρ has been studied using monthly averages of temperature and relative humidity at four selected weather stations in Nigeria for the years 1987 to 1991. It is found that during the dry season months of November to March, ρ is higher at night by an average of about 9.9% than during the day ...

  4. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  5. Structure of the electron momentum density of atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna; Koga, T. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050 (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    The present paper addresses the controversial problem on the nonmonotonic behavior of the spherically-averaged momentum density {gamma}(p) observed previously for some ground-state atoms based on the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave functions of Clementi and Roetti. Highly accurate RHF wave functions of Koga et al. are used to study the existence of extrema in the momentum density {gamma}(p) of all the neutral atoms from hydrogen to xenon. Three groups of atoms are clearly identified according to the nonmonotonicity parameter {mu}, whose value is either equal to, larger, or smaller than unity. Additionally, it is found that the function p{sup -{alpha}} {gamma}(p) is (i) monotonically decreasing from the origin for {alpha}{>=}0.75, (ii) convex for {alpha}{>=}1.35, and (iii) logarithmically convex for {alpha}{>=}3.64 for all the neutral atoms with nuclear charges Z = 1-54. Finally, these monotonicity properties are applied to derive simple yet general inequalities which involve three momentum moments left angle p{sup t} right angle. These inequalities not only generalize similar inequalities reported so far but also allow us to correlate some fundamental atomic quantities, such as the electron-electron repulsion energy and the peak height of Compton profile, in a simple manner. (orig.) 40 refs.

  6. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density Σ of Σ c ∼ 120 M ☉ pc –2 (A K ∼ 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area Σ SFR with increasing Σ, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of Σ SFR , approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of Σ SFR versus Σ in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A ∼ Σ –3 for low-mass regions and A ∼ Σ –1 for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse

  7. Improved DFT Potential Energy Surfaces via Improved Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Park, Hansol; Son, Suyeon; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2015-10-01

    Density-corrected DFT is a method that cures several failures of self-consistent semilocal DFT calculations by using a more accurate density instead. A novel procedure employs the Hartree-Fock density to bonds that are more severely stretched than ever before. This substantially increases the range of accurate potential energy surfaces obtainable from semilocal DFT for many heteronuclear molecules. We show that this works for both neutral and charged molecules. We explain why and explore more difficult cases, for example, CH(+), where density-corrected DFT results are even better than sophisticated methods like CCSD. We give a simple criterion for when DC-DFT should be more accurate than self-consistent DFT that can be applied for most cases.

  8. Analysis of flame surface density measurements in turbulent premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halter, Fabien [Institut PRISME, Universite d' Orleans, 45072 Orleans (France); Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender [Institut de Combustion, Aerothermique, Reactivite et Environnement, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans (France); Veynante, Denis [Laboratoire E.M2.C, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2009-03-15

    In premixed turbulent combustion, reaction rates can be estimated from the flame surface density. This parameter, which measures the mean flame surface area available per unit volume, may be obtained from algebraic expressions or by solving a transport equation. In this study, detailed measurements were performed on a Bunsen-type burner fed with methane/air mixtures in order to determine the local flame surface density experimentally. This burner, located in a high-pressure combustion chamber, allows investigation of turbulent premixed flames under various flow, mixture, and pressure conditions. In the present work, equivalence ratio was varied from 0.6 to 0.8 and pressure from 0.1 to 0.9 MPa. Flame front visualizations by Mie scattering laser tomography are used to obtain experimental data on the instantaneous flame front dynamics. The exact equation given by Pope is used to obtain flame surface density maps for different flame conditions. Some assumptions are made in order to access three-dimensional information from our two-dimensional experiments. Two different methodologies are proposed and tested in term of global mass balance (what enters compared to what is burned). The detailed experimental flame surface data provided for the first time in this work should progressively allow improvement of turbulent premixed flame modeling approaches. (author)

  9. Electron density fluctuation measurements in the TORTUR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remkes, G.J.J.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with measurements of electron-density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak. These measurements are carried out by making use of collective scattering of electromagnetic beams. The choice of the wavelength of the probing beam used in collective scattering experiments has important consequences. in this thesis it is argued that the best choice for a wavelength lies in the region 0.1 - 1 mm. Because sources in this region were not disposable a 2 mm collective scattering apparatus has been used as a fair compromise. The scattering theory, somewhat adapted to the specific TORTUR situation, is discussed in Ch. 2. Large scattering angles are admitted in scattering experiments with 2 mm probing beams. This had consequences for the spatial response functions. Special attention has been paid to the wave number resolution. Expressions for the minimum source power have been determined for two detection techniques. The design and implementation of the scattering apparatus has been described in Ch. 3. The available location of the scattering volume and values of the scattering angle have been determined. The effect of beam deflection due to refraction effects is evaluated. The electronic system is introduced. Ch. 4 presents the results of measurements of density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak in the frequency range 1 kHz to 100 MHz end the wave number region 400 - 4000 m -1 in different regions of the plasma. Correlation between density and magnetic fluctuations has been found in a number of cases. During the current decay at the termination of several plasma discharges minor disruptions occurred. The fluctuations during these disruptions have been monitored. Measurements have been performed in hydrogen as well as deuterium. A possible dependence of the wave number on the ion gyroradius has been investigated. The isotropy of the fluctuations in the poloidal plane was investigated. A theoretical discussion of the measured results is given in ch. 5. ( H.W.). 63

  10. Gravitational lensing by a smoothly variable surface mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczynski, Bohdan; Wambsganss, Joachim

    1989-01-01

    The statistical properties of gravitational lensing due to smooth but nonuniform distributions of matter are considered. It is found that a majority of triple images had a parity characteristic for 'shear-induced' lensing. Almost all cases of triple or multiple imaging were associated with large surface density enhancements, and lensing objects were present between the images. Thus, the observed gravitational lens candidates for which no lensing object has been detected between the images are unlikely to be a result of asymmetric distribution of mass external to the image circle. In a model with smoothly variable surface mass density, moderately and highly amplified images tended to be single rather than multiple. An opposite trend was found in models which had singularities in the surface mass distribution.

  11. First-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from first principles.

  12. first-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A computational study of the total electrons charge density in the diamond-structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from.

  13. Accuracy of ab initio electron correlation and electron densities in vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylänpää, Ilkka; Balachandran, Janakiraman; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Heinonen, Olle; Kent, Paul R. C.; Krogel, Jaron T.

    2017-11-01

    Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo results are used as a reference to analyze properties related to phase stability and magnetism in vanadium dioxide computed with various formulations of density functional theory. We introduce metrics related to energetics, electron densities and spin densities that give us insight on both local and global variations in the antiferromagnetic M1 and R phases. Importantly, these metrics can address contributions arising from the challenging description of the 3 d orbital physics in this material. We observe that the best description of energetics between the structural phases does not correspond to the best accuracy in the charge density, which is consistent with observations made recently by Medvedev et al. [Science 355, 371 (2017), 10.1126/science.aag0410] in the context of isolated atoms. However, we do find evidence that an accurate spin density connects to correct energetic ordering of different magnetic states in VO2, although local, semilocal, and meta-GGA functionals tend to erroneously favor demagnetization of the vanadium sites. The recently developed SCAN functional stands out as remaining nearly balanced in terms of magnetization across the M1-R transition and correctly predicting the ground state crystal structure. In addition to ranking current density functionals, our reference energies and densities serve as important benchmarks for future functional development. With our reference data, the accuracy of both the energy and the electron density can be monitored simultaneously, which is useful for functional development. So far, this kind of detailed high accuracy reference data for correlated materials has been absent from the literature.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  15. Surface determinants of low density lipoprotein uptake by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeroeg, P.; Pearson, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The surface sialic acid content of aortic endothelial cells in vitro was substantially lower in sparse cultures than at confluence. Binding of LDL to endothelial cells did not change at different culture densities and was unaffected by brief pretreatment with neuraminidase to partially remove surface sialic acid residues. In contrast, internalisation of LDL declined by a factor of 3 between low density cell cultures and confluent monolayers; neuraminidase pretreatment increased LDL uptake and the effect was most marked (>10-fold) at confluence. Pretreatment with cationised ferritin, which removed most of the surface sialic acid residues as well as glycosaminoglycans, increased LDL internalisation by up to 20-fold, again with most effect on confluent monolayers. Thus LDL uptake is inversely correlated with sialic acid content. We conclude that changes in the surface density of sialic acid (and possibly other charged) residues significantly modulate endothelial LDL uptake, and suggest that focal increases in LDL accumulation during atherogenesis may be related to alterations in endothelial endocytic properties at sites of increased cell turnover or damage. (author)

  16. Effects of rational surface density on resistive g turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    The Beklemishev-Horton theory states that the anomalous transport coefficient is proportional to the density of rational surfaces provided that the interaction between the modes localized around different rational surfaces is weak compared with modes of the same helicity. The authors examine the effects of the density of states ρ using resistive g turbulence in 2D (single-helicity) and 3D (multi-helicity) simulations. They find that the modes with different helicities do not equipartition the available energy, but rather the coalescence or inverse cascade effect is strong so that a few low order mode rational surfaces receive most of the energy. The quasilinear flattening at the surfaces is a strong effect and they use bifurcation theory to derive that the effective diffusivity increases as χ eff = χ 0 ρ/(1 - Cρ) where C is a constant determined by interaction integrals. For a sufficiently high density of states Cρ ≤ 1, the higher order nonlinear interaction must be taken into account

  17. Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the laser-irradiated target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Liu, B C; Du, F; Wang, S J; Li, C; Zhou, M L; Zhang, L; Liu, X; Wang, J; Liu, X L; Chen, L M; Wang, Z H; Ma, J L; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J; Liu, F; Liu, F

    2010-01-01

    Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the target surfaces irradiated by femtosecond intense laser pulses is measured by k α x-ray imaging technique when a preplasma is presented. An annular halo surrounding a bright spot is observed in the x-ray images when the scale length of the electron density is large. For an incidence angle of 70 0 the x-ray images show a non-symmetrical distribution peaked to the laser propagation direction. The x-ray photons in the halo are mainly excited by the fast electrons that flow in the preplasma when their paths intersect the high density regions near the target surface.

  18. Influence of electropolishing current densities on sulfur generation at niobium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, P.V., E-mail: tyagipv@ornl.gov [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishiwaki, M.; Noguchi, T.; Sawabe, M.; Saeki, T.; Hayano, H.; Kato, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    We report the effect of different current densities on sulfur generation at Nb surface in the electropolishing (EP) with aged electrolyte. In this regard, we conducted a series of electropolishing (EP) experiments in aged EP electrolyte with high (≈50 mA/cm{sup 2}) and low (≈30 mA/cm{sup 2}) current densities on Nb surfaces. The experiments were carried out both for laboratory coupons and a real Nb single cell cavity with six witness samples located at three typical positions (equator, iris and beam pipe). Sample's surfaces were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). The surface analysis showed that the EP with a high current density produced a huge amount of sulfate/sulfite particles at Nb surface whereas the EP with a low current density was very helpful to mitigate sulfate/sulfite at Nb surface in both the experiments.

  19. Electronic structure and momentum density distribution of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, K.B.; Sharma, B.K.

    2007-01-01

    LCAO calculations have been performed for the electronic and structural properties of the rutile TiO 2 under the periodic HF and DFT schemes. The methods have been applied to study Compton profiles and the structure factors. The experimental Compton profile based on Am 241 Compton spectrometer for polycrystalline TiO 2 has been compared with the calculations. The calculated Compton profile from HF-LCAO has been found to be in good agreement with the measurement compared to the ionic model and DFT-LCAO method. The published experimental X-ray structure factors support the FLAPW method more than the periodic HF-LCAO method. Signatures of charge transfer on compound formation are observed. Partial ionic as well as covalent character of bonding is observed on the basis of structure factor as well as momentum density analysis. The present work enables to examine the DFT and HF approaches in terms of structure factor and the Compton profile studies

  20. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons: A density functional investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on graphene nano ribbons (GNRs) to investigate the electronic properties as a function of chirality, size and hydrogenation on the edges. The calculations were performed on GNRs with armchair and zigzag configurations with 28, 34, 36, 40, 50, 56, 62, 66 carbon atoms. The structural stability of AGNR and ZGNR increases with the size of nanoribbon where as hydrogenation of GNR tends to lowers their structural stability. All GNRs considered have shown semiconducting behavior with HOMO-LUMO gap decreasing with the increase in the GNR size. The hydrogenation of GNR decreases its HOMO-LUMO gap significantly. The results are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results

  1. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  2. Deposition of thin films and surface modification by pulsed high energy density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Pengxun; Yang Size

    2002-01-01

    The use of pulsed high energy density plasma is a new low temperature plasma technology for material surface treatment and thin film deposition. The authors present detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the production mechanism and physical properties of the pulsed plasma. The basic physics of the pulsed plasma-material interaction has been investigated. Diagnostic measurements show that the pulsed plasma has a high electron temperature of 10-100 eV, density of 10 14 -10 16 cm -3 , translation velocity of ∼10 -7 cm/s and power density of ∼10 4 W/cm 2 . Its use in material surface treatment combines the effects of laser surface treatment, electron beam treatment, shock wave bombardment, ion implantation, sputtering deposition and chemical vapor deposition. The metastable phase and other kinds of compounds can be produced on low temperature substrates. For thin film deposition, a high deposition ratio and strong film to substrate adhesion can be achieved. The thin film deposition and material surface modification by the pulsed plasma and related physical mechanism have been investigated. Thin film c-BN, Ti(CN), TiN, DLC and AlN materials have been produced successfully on various substrates at room temperature. A wide interface layer exists between film and substrate, resulting in strong adhesion. Metal surface properties can be improved greatly by using this kind of treatment

  3. Ultra-Stretchable Interconnects for High-Density Stretchable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Shafqat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for proven standardized (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-type process recipes using bulk integrated circuit (IC microfabrication tools and fine-pitch photolithography patterning. Here, we address this combined challenge of microfabrication with extreme stretchability for high-density SE devices by introducing CMOS-enabled, free-standing, miniaturized interconnect structures that fully exploit their 3D kinematic freedom through an interplay of buckling, torsion, and bending to maximize stretchability. Integration with standard CMOS-type batch processing is assured by utilizing the Flex-to-Rigid (F2R post-processing technology to make the back-end-of-line interconnect structures free-standing, thus enabling the routine microfabrication of highly-stretchable interconnects. The performance and reproducibility of these free-standing structures is promising: an elastic stretch beyond 2000% and ultimate (plastic stretch beyond 3000%, with <0.3% resistance change, and >10 million cycles at 1000% stretch with <1% resistance change. This generic technology provides a new route to exciting highly-stretchable miniature devices.

  4. One-electron densities of freely rotating Wigner molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    A formalism enabling computation of the one-particle density of a freely rotating assembly of identical particles that vibrate about their equilibrium positions with amplitudes much smaller than their average distances is presented. It produces densities as finite sums of products of angular and radial functions, the length of the expansion being determined by the interplay between the point-group and permutational symmetries of the system in question. Obtaining from a convolution of the rotational and bosonic components of the parent wavefunction, the angular functions are state-dependent. On the other hand, the radial functions are Gaussians with maxima located at the equilibrium lengths of the position vectors of individual particles and exponents depending on the scalar products of these vectors and the eigenvectors of the corresponding Hessian as well as the respective eigenvalues. Although the new formalism is particularly useful for studies of the Wigner molecules formed by electrons subject to weak confining potentials, it is readily adaptable to species (such as ´balliums’ and Coulomb crystals) composed of identical particles with arbitrary spin statistics and permutational symmetry. Several examples of applications of the present approach to the harmonium atoms within the strong-correlation regime are given.

  5. Nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface: Density functional theory considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berim, Gersh O.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2008-07-01

    The density distributions and contact angles of liquid nanodrops on nanorough solid surfaces are determined on the basis of a nonlocal density functional theory. Two kinds of roughness, chemical and physical, are examined. The former considers the substrate as a sequence of two kinds of semi-infinite vertical plates of equal thicknesses but of different natures with different strengths for the liquid-solid interactions. The physical roughness involves an ordered set of pillars on a flat homogeneous surface. Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were considered. For the chemical roughness, the contact angle which the drop makes with the flat surface increases when the strength of the liquid-solid interaction for one kind of plates decreases with respect to the fixed value of the other kind of plates. Such a behavior is in agreement with the Cassie-Baxter expression derived from macroscopic considerations. For the physical roughness on a hydrophobic surface, the contact angle which a drop makes with the plane containing the tops of the pillars increases with increasing roughness. Such a behavior is consistent with the Wenzel formula developed for macroscopic drops. For hydrophilic surfaces, as the roughness increases the contact angle first increases, in contradiction with the Wenzel formula, which predicts for hydrophilic surfaces a decrease of the contact angle with increasing roughness. However, a further increase in roughness changes nonmonotonously the contact angle, and at some roughness, the drop disappears and only a liquid film is present on the surface. It was also found that the contact angle has a periodic dependence on the volume of the drop.

  6. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Man-Hong

    2016-01-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. (paper)

  7. Electronic structure and band alignment of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the room-temperature deposition of the organic molecule 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) reduces the surface defect density of the silicon (100) surface by chemically bonding to the surface dangling bonds. Using various spectroscopic measurements we have investigated the electronic structure and band alignment properties of the PQ/Si interface. The band-bending at the PQ-passivated silicon surface is negligible for both n- and p-type substrates, demonstrating a low density of surface defects. Finally we show that PQ forms a semiconducting wide-bandgap type-I heterojunction with silicon.

  8. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  9. Diurnal and seasonal variations of surface water vapour density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diurnal and seasonal variations of surface water vapour density over some meteorological stations in Nigeria. ... Ife Journal of Science ... the three Sahelian stations, was 5.29±0.39; while during the rainy season, they were 21.72±1.22, 19.60±0.12 and 19.47±0.07 for the Southern, Midland and Northern regions respectively.

  10. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm 2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  11. Electron density enhancement in a quasi isochronous storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.

    1991-01-01

    The six dimensional phase-space density of an electron beam in a storage ring is determined by the emission of synchrotron radiation, and by the transverse and longitudinal focusing forces determining the particle trajectories. In the simplest case of uncoupled horizontal, vertical and longitudinal motion, the phase space volume occupied by the beam can be characterized by the product of its three projections on the single degree of freedom planes, the horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal emittances. To minimize the beam phase space volume the authors can minimize the transverse and longitudinal emittances. In the case of transverse emittances this problem is very important for synchrotron radiation sources, and has been studied by several authors. A method to minimize the longitudinal emittance, and produce electron bunches with a short pulse length, small energy spread and large peak current has been proposed and discussed recently by C. Pellegrini and D. Robin. This method uses a ring in which the revolution period is weakly dependent on the particle energy, Quasi Isochronous Ring (QIR), in other words a ring with a momentum compaction nearly zero. In this paper they will extend the previous analysis of the conditions for stable single particle motion in such a ring, and give simple criteria for the estimate of the energy spread and phase acceptance of a QIR

  12. A thermodynamic perturbation theory for the surface tension and ion density profile of a liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.; Kumaravadivel, R.

    1976-01-01

    A simple scheme for determining the ion density profile and the surface tension of a liquid metal is described. Assuming that the interaction between metallic pseudo-ions is of the form introduced by Evans, an approximate expression for the excess free energy of the system is derived using the thermodynamic perturbation theory of Weeks, Chandler and Anderson. This excess free energy is then minimized with respect to a parameter which specifies the ion density profile, and the surface tension is given directly. From a consideration of the dependence of the interionic forces on the electron density it is predicted that the ions should take up a very steep density profile at the liquid metal surface. This behaviour is contrasted with that to be expected for rare-gas fluids in which the interatomic forces are density-independent. The values of the surface tension calculated for liquid Na, K and Al from a simplified version of the theory are in reasonable agreement with experiment. (author)

  13. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-01-01

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through ...

  14. Analysis of the surface density and reactivity of perfluorophenylazide and the impact on ligand immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, Gilad, E-mail: zorn@ge.com; Castner, David G. [National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical Problems, Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Box 351653, Seattle, Washington 98195-1653 (United States); Tyagi, Anuradha; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hui; Yan, Mingdi, E-mail: Mingdi-Yan@uml.edu [Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207-0751 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry is a novel method for tailoring the surface properties of solid surfaces and nanoparticles. It is general and versatile, and has proven to be an efficient way to immobilize graphene, proteins, carbohydrates, and synthetic polymers. The main thrust of this work is to provide a detailed investigation on the chemical composition and surface density of the PFPA tailored surface. Specifically, gold surfaces were treated with PFPA-derivatized (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol) (PFPA-MUTEG) mixed with 2-[2-(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethoxy]ethanol (MDEG) at varying solution mole ratios. Complementary analytical techniques were employed to characterize the resulting films including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to detect fingerprints of the PFPA group, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry to study the homogeneity and uniformity of the films, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structures to study the electronic and chemical structure of the PFPA groups. Results from these studies show that the films prepared from 90:10 and 80:20 PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG mixed solutions exhibited the highest surface density of PFPA and the most homogeneous coverage on the surface. A functional assay using surface plasmon resonance with carbohydrates covalently immobilized onto the PFPA-modified surfaces showed the highest binding affinity for lectin on the PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG film prepared from a 90:10 solution.

  15. Analysis of the surface density and reactivity of perfluorophenylazide and the impact on ligand immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorn, Gilad; Castner, David G.; Tyagi, Anuradha; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hui; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry is a novel method for tailoring the surface properties of solid surfaces and nanoparticles. It is general and versatile, and has proven to be an efficient way to immobilize graphene, proteins, carbohydrates, and synthetic polymers. The main thrust of this work is to provide a detailed investigation on the chemical composition and surface density of the PFPA tailored surface. Specifically, gold surfaces were treated with PFPA-derivatized (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol) (PFPA-MUTEG) mixed with 2-[2-(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethoxy]ethanol (MDEG) at varying solution mole ratios. Complementary analytical techniques were employed to characterize the resulting films including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to detect fingerprints of the PFPA group, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry to study the homogeneity and uniformity of the films, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structures to study the electronic and chemical structure of the PFPA groups. Results from these studies show that the films prepared from 90:10 and 80:20 PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG mixed solutions exhibited the highest surface density of PFPA and the most homogeneous coverage on the surface. A functional assay using surface plasmon resonance with carbohydrates covalently immobilized onto the PFPA-modified surfaces showed the highest binding affinity for lectin on the PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG film prepared from a 90:10 solution

  16. Accuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations for electron densities: a study for light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almbladh, C.-O.; Ekenberg, U.; Pedroza, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors compare the electron densities and Hartree potentials in the local density and the Hartree-Fock approximations to the corresponding quantities obtained from more accurate correlated wavefunctions. The comparison is made for a number of two-electron atoms, Li, and for Be. The Hartree-Fock approximation is more accurate than the local density approximation within the 1s shell and for the spin polarization in Li, while the local density approximation is slightly better than the Hartree-Fock approximation for charge densities in the 2s shell. The inaccuracy of the Hartree-Fock and local density approximations to the Hartree potential is substantially smaller than the inaccuracy of the local density approximation to the ground-state exchange-correlation potential. (Auth.)

  17. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    electron states was observed, which can be understood as a higher localization of electronic states and lower crystal quality. In addition, a strong rearrangement of the copper partial density of states was shown. The intimate knowledge of the electric structure was then exploited to demonstrate the valence band discontinuity between CuInSe 2 and CuIn 3 Se 5 . The analysis by photoemission yielded a valence band offset of 0.28 eV, again in reasonable agreement with theoretical results. The p-n-junction in chalcopyrite solar cells is situated near the absorber-buffer interface, which is therefore crucial for the device performance. In this thesis, ZnO deposited from metal-organic precursors on epitaxial CuInSe 2 was investigated as cadmium-free buffer material. In the course of contact formation, the interfacial region of the absorber becomes depleted of copper. Additionally, a thin intrinsic ZnSe layer is formed, prior to the growth of ZnO. The derived band alignments show no dependence on the surface orientation of the chalcopyrite substrate and are consistent with theoretical results. The conduction band lineup is favorable for the application in solar cells.

  18. Surface regulated arsenenes as Dirac materials: From density functional calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Junhui; Xie, Qingxing; Yu, Niannian, E-mail: niannianyu@whut.edu.cn; Wang, Jiafu, E-mail: jasper@whut.edu.cn

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The presence of Dirac cones in chemically decorated buckled arsenene AsX (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS, and NCSe) has been revealed. • First-principles calculations show that all these chemically decorated arsenenes are kinetically stable in defending thermal fluctuations in room temperature. - Abstract: Using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we have systematically investigated the structure stability and electronic properties of chemically decorated arsenenes, AsX (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS and NCSe). Phonon dispersion and formation energy analysis reveal that all the five chemically decorated buckled arsenenes are energetically favorable and could be synthesized. Our study shows that wide-bandgap arsenene would turn into Dirac materials when functionalized by -X (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS and NCSe) groups, rendering new promises in next generation high-performance electronic devices.

  19. The Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer: a refraction-based electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begishev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Sallee; Vescovi, Milenko; Munoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Villanueva, Francisca; Veloso, Felipe

    2017-10-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The diagnostic delivers refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single-shot Moiré image. A Talbot-Lau interferometer was benchmarked using laser-target and X-pinch x-ray backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for: a) 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu targets and b) a 4 x 25 µm copper X-pinch driven by a 400kA/350ns generator. X-ray backlighter quality was assessed in order to optimize areal electron density gradient retrieval and electron density mapping. TXD enabled accurate areal electron density detection with high contrast (>25%) and spatial resolution of 50 µm in the high-power laser experiments, while a higher spatial resolution <27 µm and lower contrast (<15%) were found in pulsed power experiments, thus demonstrating the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas. DENA0002955; FONDECYT N1171412.

  20. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  1. High-Density Infrared Surface Treatments of Refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    2005-03-31

    Refractory materials play a crucial role in all energy-intensive industries and are truly a crosscutting technology for the Industries of the Future (IOF). One of the major mechanisms for the degradation of refractories and a general decrease in their performance has been the penetration and corrosion by molten metals or glass. Methods and materials that would reduce the penetration, wetting, and corrosive chemistry would significantly improve refractory performance and also maintain the quality of the processed liquid, be it metal or glass. This report presents the results of an R&D project aimed at investigating the use of high-density infrared (HDI) heating to surface treat refractories to improve their performance. The project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). HDI is capable of heating the near-surface region of materials to very high temperatures where sintering, diffusion, and melting can occur. The intended benefits of HDI processing of refractories were to (1) reduce surface porosity (by essentially sealing the surface to prevent liquid penetration), (2) allow surface chemistry changes to be performed by bonding an adherent coating onto the underlying refractory (in order to inhibit wetting and/or improve corrosion resistance), and (3) produce noncontact refractories with high-emissivity surface coatings.

  2. Simultaneous solution of the geoid and the surface density anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, A. A.; Safari, A.; Karimi, R.; AllahTavakoli, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The main application of the land gravity data in geodesy is "local geoid" or "local gravity field" modeling, whereas the same data could play a vital role for the anomalous mass-density modeling in geophysical explorations. In the realm of local geoid computations based on Geodetic Boundary Value Problems (GBVP), it is needed that the effect of the topographic (or residual terrain) masses be removed via application of the Newton integral in order to perform the downward continuation in a harmonic space. However, harmonization of the downward continuation domain may not be perfectly possible unless accurate information about the mass-density of the topographic masses be available. On the other hand, from the exploration point of view the unwanted topographical masses within the aforementioned procedure could be regarded as the signal. In order to overcome the effect of the remaining masses within the remove step of the GBVP, which cause uncertainties in mathematical modeling of the problem, here we are proposing a methodology for simultaneous solution of the geoid and residual surface density modeling In other words, a new mathematical model will be offered which both provides the needed harmonic space for downward continuation and at the same time accounts for the non-harmonic terms of gravitational field and makes use of it for residual mass density modeling within the topographic region. The presented new model enjoys from uniqueness of the solution, opposite to the inverse application of the Newton integral for mass density modeling which is non-unique, and only needs regularization to remove its instability problem. In this way, the solution of the model provides both the incremental harmonic gravitational potential on surface of the reference ellipsoid as the gravity field model and the lateral surface mass-density variations via the second derivatives of the non harmonic terms of gravitational field. As the case study and accuracy verification, the proposed

  3. Calculating the SnS(010) surface electronic structure using the green function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirli, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure of the (010) surface in a layered SnS semiconductor terminating with Sn and S atomic planes is calculated by the Green function method. The electronic structure of a perfect crystal is calculated according to the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) using Slater s-, p-, and d-orbitals. Defect-induced changes in the density of states and the origin and orbital composition of electronic states in the band gap are discussed.

  4. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    , manifested by the observation of quantum well states and a surface state. The resulting shift in binding energy of both quantum well states and surface state has been interpreted in terms of the virtual crystal approximation model where the main effect of the alloying process is attributed to the change of electron density of the system. For this system, the variation of photoemission intensity as a function of photon energy has been also investigated and explained in terms of collective excitations. (orig.)

  5. Surface-plasmon dispersion relation for the inhomogeneous charge-density medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, O.K.; Agarwal, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-plasmon dispersion relation is derived for the plane-bounded electron gas when there is an inhomogeneous charge-density distribution in the plasma. The hydrodynamical model is used. Both cphi and dcphi/dx are taken to be continuous at the surface of the slab, where cphi is the scalar potential. The dispersion relation is compared with the theoretical works of Stern and Ferrell and of Harsh and Agarwal. It is also compared with the observations of Kunz. A dispersion relation for the volume-plasmon oscillations is derived which resembles the well-known relation of Bohm and Pines

  6. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  7. Measurement of electron density in the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet by using a dielectric probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Bing; Zhou Qiujiao; Pan Lizhu; Zhang Mengdie; Huang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The electron densities in the atmospheric pressure helium plasma were calculated by means of electron drift velocity and the jet velocity respectively. The electron velocity and jet velocity can be calculated by means of helium plasma jet current measured by a dielectric probe and plasma discharge current signal measured by voltage probes. The results show that the estimated electron densities of the helium plasma jet calculated from electron drift velocity and the jet velocity are in the order of 10 11 cm -3 and they increase with applied voltage. There is a little fluctuation in the value of the electron density along the jet axis of the plasma. This result is the same as the measured electron density in atmospheric pressure helium non-thermal plasma jet by using a Rogowski coil and a Langmuir probe. This is in one order lower than the electron density measured by microwave antenna. (authors)

  8. Surface electron states on the quasi-two-dimensional excess-electron compounds Ca2N and Y2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Takeshi; Takemoto, Seiji; Tada, Tomofumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Compounds having excess electrons from the formal valence viewpoint (electrides) are a new class of materials, which often take low-dimensional structures. We studied the (001) surface electronic structures of quasi-two-dimensional electrides Ca2N and Y2C by density functional theory using a slab model. Both materials were found to have a clean surface state well separated in energy from the bulk states. Furthermore, this state virtually floats above the surface and may be considered to be a hallmark of two-dimensional electrides. For Ca2N , a tight-binding model in the Wannier representation was derived and analyzed, from which we concluded that the surface state, described by extra-surface s -like orbitals, is a Tamm state originating from an abrupt increase in potential energy at the surface.

  9. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L.; Gill, Peter M. W.; Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids — the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) — and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy

  10. Calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density by measurement of the three-phase contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H; Nikolov, A; Wasan, D T

    2012-11-01

    The silica/silicon wafer is widely used in the semiconductor industry in the manufacture of electronic devices, so it is essential to understand its physical chemistry and determine the surface potential at the silica wafer/water interface. However, it is difficult to measure the surface potential of a silica/silicon wafer directly due to its high electric resistance. In the present study, the three-phase contact angle (TPCA) on silica is measured as a function of the pH. The surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/water surface are calculated by a model based on the Young-Lippmann equation in conjunction with the Gouy-Chapman model for the electric double layer. In measurements of the TPCA on silica, two distinct regions were identified with a boundary at pH 9.5-showing a dominance of the surface ionization of silanol groups below pH 9.5 and a dominance of the dissolution of silica into the aqueous solution above pH 9.5. Since the surface chemistry changes above pH 9.5, the model is applied to solutions below pH 9.5 (ionization dominant) for the calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/aqueous interface. In order to evaluate the model, a galvanic mica cell was made of a mica sheet and the surface potential was measured directly at the mica/water interface. The model results are also validated by experimental data from the literature, as well as the results obtained by the potentiometric titration method and the electro-kinetic measurements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The determination of electron momentum densities by inelastic scattering gamma-ray-electron coincidence measurements: The (γ,eγ)-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollason, A.J.; Bell, F.; Schneider, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the recoiling electron in 320 keV gamma ray inelastic scattering collisions in thin aluminium targets. The angular correlation of these electrons detected in coincidence with the scattered photon is in agreement with the kinematic requirements of the Compton effect and is correctly predicted by Monte Carlo simulations based on the impulse approximation. Further simulations of ideal-geometry experiments indicate that information about the initial electron momenta is available from an examination of those electron-photon events originating in a surface layer of one electronic mean free path depth and that elastic scattering of the recoil electrons from greater depths produces a nearly flat background to this signal. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the (γ,eγ) experiment for studying electron momentum densities with synchrotron radiation. (orig.) With 23 refs., 17 figs

  12. Simulation of secondary electron emission from rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, J.; Ohya, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the secondary electron emission from a beryllium surface under low-energy (≤1 keV) electron bombardment is investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation combined with the model of bowl-structured surface. With increasing aspect ratio H/W of the bowl structure, the secondary electron yield becomes greater than that for a flat surface, whereas for large H/W the yield is smaller; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The former is due to emission of electrons, which cannot escape from the flat surface, from an inclined plane; it increases the low-energy component in the energy distribution. The latter is due to re-entrance of once-emitted electrons into the next part of the topographic surface; it decreases the number of electrons emitted with oblique angles. ((orig.))

  13. Morphology and electronic properties of silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shu

    2007-12-01

    Several issues related to SiC surfaces are studied in the thesis using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Specific surfaces examined include electropolished SiC, epitaxial graphene on SiC, and vicinal (i.e. slightly miscut from a low-index direction) SiC that have been subjected to high temperature hydrogen-etching. The electropolished surfaces are meant to mimic electrochemically etched SiC, which forms a porous network. The chemical treatment of the surface is similar between electropolishing and electrochemical etching, but the etching conditions are slightly different such that the former produces a flat surface (that is amenable to STM study) whereas the latter produces a complex 3-dimensional porous network. We have used these porous SiC layers as semi-permeable membranes in a biosensor, and we find that the material is quite biocompatible. The purpose of the STM/STS study is to investigate the surface properties of the SiC on the atomic scale in an effort to explain this biocompatibility. The observed tunneling spectra are found to be very asymmetric, with a usual amount of current at positive voltages but no observable current at negative voltages. We propose that this behavior is due to surface charge accumulating on an incompletely passivated surface. Measurements on SiC surfaces prepared by various amounts of hydrogen-etching are used to support this interpretation. Comparison with tunneling computations reveals a density of about 10 13 cm-2 fixed charges on both the electro-polished and the H-etched surfaces. The relatively insulating nature observed on the electro-polished SiC surface may provide an explanation for the biocompatibility of the surface. Graphene, a monolayer of carbon, is a new material for electronic devices. Epitaxial graphene on SiC is fabricated by the Si sublimation method in which a substrate is heated up to about 1350°C in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of the graphene is

  14. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  15. Surface excitations in electron backscattering from silicon surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Lesiak, B.; Jablonski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 562, - (2004), s. 92-100 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron-solid interactions * electron-solid scattering and transmission-elastic * electron-solid scattering and transmission-inelastic * Monte Carlo simulation * electron bombardment * silicon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  16. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge density wave transformations in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions. In the classical regime strong enough coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima, so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Intersite interactions order spins at lower temperatures. Extension to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the charge density wave (CDW) transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains metallic because the structural vector Q and the Fermi surface sizes are not related. Large values of the CDW gap seen in the tunneling experiments correspond to the energy of the minima in the electron-ion two-well complex. The gap is defined through the density of states inside the electronic bands below the CDW transition. We focus mainly on electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  17. Self-consistent electronic structure of the contracted tungsten (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posternak, M.; Krakauer, H.; Freeman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave energy-band studies using the warped muffin-tin approximation for a seven-layer W(001) single slab with the surface-layer separation contracted by 6% of the bulk interlayer spacing are reported. Surface electronic structure, local densities of states, generalized susceptibility for the surface, work function, and core-level shifts are found to have insignificant differences with corresponding results for the unrelaxed surface. Several differences in surface states between theory and recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments are discussed in the light of new proposed models of the actual unreconstructed surface structure at high temperatures

  18. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively....... Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence...

  19. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin; Li, Shengtao; Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri; Wang, Xuan; Lin, Shengjun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  20. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: stli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Lin, Shengjun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pinggao Group Company Ltd., State Grid High Voltage Switchgear Insulation Materials Laboratory, Pingdingshan 467001 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  1. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm-3 in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  2. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  3. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  4. Surface and volume photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions....

  5. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Fan, Xue, E-mail: fanx@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Low-energy electron irradiation was proposed to nanocrystallize the top-surface of the as-deposited amorphous carbon film, and sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites formed in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. Display Omitted - Abstract: We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp{sup 2} nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  6. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics of porphyrin on TiO2 nanoparticles: dissecting the interfacial electric field and electron accepting state density dependent dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vishal Govind; Dhital, Bharat; Lu, H Peter

    2015-12-07

    Single-molecule photon-stamping spectroscopy correlated with electrochemical techniques was used to dissect complex interfacial electron transfer (ET) dynamics by probing an m-ZnTCPP molecule anchored to a TiO2 NP surface while electrochemically controlling the energetically-accessible surface states of TiO2 NPs. Application of negative potential increases the electron density in TiO2 NPs, resulting in hindered forward ET and enhanced backward ET due to the changes in the interfacial electric field and the occupancy of acceptor states.

  7. Electronic structures and large spectrum shifts in hydrogenated fullerenes: Density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    Electronic structures and band gaps of hydrogenated fullerenes have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. The mechanism of hydrogen addition reaction to the fullerene (C 60 ) surface was also investigated. Addition of one and two hydrogen atoms was examined in the calculations. The binding energies of the second hydrogen atom to C 60 H were widely distributed in the range 1.5–3.6 eV. It was found that the bonding energy is strongly dependent on the spin density of carbon atom of C 60 H. The second hydrogen atom preferentially binds to the neighbor site of the first addition site. The electronic states and excitation energies of C 60 -H were discussed on the basis of theoretical results. - Highlights: • Hydrogen atom addition to C60 was investigated. • First hydrogen atom addition proceeded with very low activation barrier. • Second hydrogen addition was dependent on the binding site. • Addition site of second atom was correlated with spin density

  8. Magnetite Fe3O4 (111) Surfaces: Impact of Defects on Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-04

    We present a comprehensive investigation, via first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, of various surface terminations of magnetite, Fe3O4 (111), a major iron oxide which has also a number of applications in electronics and spintronics. We compare the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure among the different surfaces terminations. Interestingly, we find that surfaces modified with point defects and adatoms can be more stable than bulk-like terminations. These surfaces show different surface chemistry, electronic structures and distinctive spin polarization features near the Fermi level from those previously considered in the literature. Our studies provide an atomic level insight for magnetite surfaces, which is a necessary step to understanding their interfaces with organic layers in OLED and spintronic devices.

  9. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    and without thin epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layers and are studied for structure, crystalline quality, surface morphology, density and composition by a combination of x-ray diffraction theta-2theta scans, o-rocking curves, pole figures, reciprocal space mapping, Rutherford backscattering, x-ray reflectometry and transmission electron microscopy. The TiN(001) surface suppresses Cu and Ag dewetting, yielding lower defect density, no twinning, and smaller surface roughness than if grown on MgO(001). Textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers 25-50-nm-thick are deposited on a stack of 7.5-nm-Ta on SiO2/Si(001), and subsequent in situ annealing at 350°C followed by sputter etching in Ar plasma yields Cu layers with independently variable thickness and grain size. Cu nanowires, 75 to 350 nm wide, are fabricated from Cu layers with different average grain size using a subtractive patterning process. In situ electron transport measurements at room temperature in vacuum and at 77 K in liquid nitrogen for single-crystal Cu and Ag layers is consistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer (FS) model and indicates specular scattering at the metal-vacuum boundary with an average specularity parameter p = 0.8 and 0.6, respectively. In contrast, layers measured ex situ show diffuse surface scattering due to sub-monolayer oxidation. Also, addition of Ta atoms on Cu(001) surface perturbs the smooth interface potential and results in completely diffuse scattering at the Cu-Ta interface, and in turn, a higher resistivity of single-crystal Cu layers. In situ exposure of Cu(001) layers to O2 between 10 -3 and 105 Pa-s results in a sequential increase, decrease and increase of the electrical resistance which is attributed to specular surface scattering for clean Cu(001) and for surfaces with a complete adsorbed monolayer, but diffuse scattering at partial coverage and after chemical oxidation. Electron transport measurements for polycrystalline Cu layers and wires show a 10-15% and 7-9% decrease in

  10. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...

  11. Stopping powers for channeled helium ions in silicon using electron densities from bandstructure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, P. W. L.; van Ijzendoorn, L. J.; de Koning, M.; Bobbert, P.; van Haeringen, W.; de Voigt, M. J. A.

    1994-03-01

    Stopping powers for channeled He ions have been calculated with a modified version of the Monte Carlo code LAROSE [J.H. Barrett, Phys. Rev. B 3 (1971) 1527]. The spatial distribution of the valence electron density in Si was obtained from bandstructure calculations. The stopping power was calculated using Lindhard's free-electron gas approach within the framework of the local density approximation. Spatial variations of the electron density along individual trajectories produce a significant contribution to the energy loss distribution. The average energy loss of 4 MeV He ions channeled in the axial , and directions have been calculated and compared with measured values. The contribution of the core electrons to the energy loss is investigated by adding the spherically symmetric Hartree-Fock-Slater electron densities of the closed shells to the valence electron density. Calculations show a high energy loss tail in the spectrum qualitatively in agreement with published experimental results.

  12. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F o − F c )exp(iϕ c ) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule

  13. One-electron properties of several small molecules calculated using the local density approximation within density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Patrick; Chong, Delano P.; Dupuis, Michel

    1995-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a field enjoying a tremendous recent surge in popularity among theoretical and practical chemists alike because of its ability to more easily handle larger molecular systems than conventional ab initio methods. Until recently, however, assessment of the quality of the properties predicted (and therefore the charge density) from DFT had been limited mainly to dipole moments and their nuclear coordinate and electric field derivatives. This paper presents the calculated results for some of the one-electron properties of the eight small molecules (NH3, PH3, H2O, H2S, HF, HCl, CO, and N2). The properties chosen weight different regions of the charge density, from either very close in or at the nucleus (e.g., δ, the electron density at the nucleus) to regions farther out from the nucleus (e.g., the diamagnetic susceptibility ). It is found that properties which depend on an accurate knowledge of the electron density near to the nucleus are predicted poorly by the local density approximation (LDA), while others more dependent on the charge density farther out from the nucleus are predicted much more accurately, possibly due to cancellation of errors. Use of the LDA is therefore not recommended for ``tight'' properties; use of a functional employing gradient corrections would be more suitable for this purpose.

  14. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    and an extended multipolar model an experimental modeling of the core density is possible.4 The thermal motion is a problem since it is strongly correlated to the changes of the core density, but by combining the average displacement from a Wilson plot and a constrained refinement, a reasonable result has been...

  15. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...... model, directly yielding the electron scattering rates. A diffusion model is applied to determine the spatial extent of the photoexcited electron-hole gas at each moment after photoexcitation, yielding the time-dependent electron density, and hence the density-dependent electron scattering time. We find...... that the electron scattering time decreases from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density changes from 1015 to 1019 cm−3....

  16. EISCAT observations of large scale electron temperture and electron density perturbations caused by high power HF radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, A. J.; Honary, F.; Robinson, T. R.; Jones, T. B.; Stubbe, P.; Kopka, H.

    In this paper EISCAT observations of the effect of artificial modification on the F-region electron temperature and electron density during several heating experiments at Tromsø are reported. During O-mode heating at full power ( ERP = 240 MW) the electron temperature is increased by up to 55% of its ambient value at altitudes close to the heater interaction height. Measurements of the electron density have revealed both enhancements and depletions in the vicinity of the heater reflection height. These differences are indicative of variations in the balance between the transport and chemical effects. These results are compared with a time dependent numerical model developed from the perturbation equations of VAS'KOV and GUREVICH [(1975) Geomagn. Aeron.15, 51]. The results of numerical modelling of the electron temperature are in good agreement with the EISCAT observations, whereas there is less good agreement with regard to electron density.

  17. Surface influence on convoy electron emission at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the dependence of the production of convoy electrons induced by H + - 60 KeV with surface conditions of Al targets by in situ deposition of Na and O. The conclusion is that convoy electron production increases with the work function of the surface. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  18. Density functional theory of electron transfer beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: Case study of LiF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Requist, Ryan; Gross, E K U

    2018-02-28

    We perform model calculations for a stretched LiF molecule, demonstrating that nonadiabatic charge transfer effects can be accurately and seamlessly described within a density functional framework. In alkali halides like LiF, there is an abrupt change in the ground state electronic distribution due to an electron transfer at a critical bond length R = R c , where an avoided crossing of the lowest adiabatic potential energy surfaces calls the validity of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation into doubt. Modeling the R-dependent electronic structure of LiF within a two-site Hubbard model, we find that nonadiabatic electron-nuclear coupling produces a sizable elongation of the critical R c by 0.5 bohr. This effect is very accurately captured by a simple and rigorously derived correction, with an M -1 prefactor, to the exchange-correlation potential in density functional theory, M = reduced nuclear mass. Since this nonadiabatic term depends on gradients of the nuclear wave function and conditional electronic density, ∇ R χ(R) and ∇ R n(r, R), it couples the Kohn-Sham equations at neighboring R points. Motivated by an observed localization of nonadiabatic effects in nuclear configuration space, we propose a local conditional density approximation-an approximation that reduces the search for nonadiabatic density functionals to the search for a single function y(n).

  19. Commensurate and incommensurate spin-density waves in heavy electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schlottmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting of the Fermi surfaces of an electron and a hole pocket separated by a nesting vector Q and the interaction between electrons gives rise to itinerant antiferromagnetism. The order can gradually be suppressed by mismatching the nesting and a quantum critical point (QCP is obtained as the Néel temperature tends to zero. The transfer of pairs of electrons between the pockets can lead to a superconducting dome above the QCP (if Q is commensurate with the lattice, i.e. equal to G/2. If the vector Q is not commensurate with the lattice there are eight possible phases: commensurate and incommensurate spin and charge density waves and four superconductivity phases, two of them with modulated order parameter of the FFLO type. The renormalization group equations are studied and numerically integrated. A re-entrant SDW phase (either commensurate or incommensurate is obtained as a function of the mismatch of the Fermi surfaces and the magnitude of |Q − G/2|.

  20. Electron density distribution and bonding in ZnSe and PbSe using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    directions are relatively low in conformity with the loosely packed structure of ZnSe. (The interaction of atomic charges will be less and hence the electron densities along directions other than bonding are expected to be minimum). Figure 8(b) of PbSe shows unequal electron densities along the three directions. This is due ...

  1. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  2. Understanding the properties of inorganic benzenes based on π-electron densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjie; Li, Xiaoyan; Meng, Lingpeng; Zheng, Shijun; Zeng, Yanli

    2015-03-12

    The properties of inorganic benzenes have been investigated by means of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) studies. In this work, the σ- and π-electron densities were separated from the total electron densities, and it was therefore possible to evaluate the contributions of σ and π electrons to the chemical bonds and properties of inorganic benzenes. The following conclusions are given: (1) The π-attractors' positions correlate to their respective atomic radii. With increasing atomic number in the same period, the attractor of π-electron densities becomes closer to its respective nucleus. With increasing atomic number in the main group, the position of the π attractor becomes farther from its respective nucleus. (2) The strength of the chemical bonds of the inorganic benzene rings is determined by σ-electron densities, not π-electron densities; their bonding character is mainly determined by the σ-electron density; however, the role of the π-electron density cannot be neglected. (3) For the inorganic benzenes studied, the electron localization function for π (ELFπ) values are related to the differences of the electronegativity between the neighboring atoms of the inorganic benzene rings, Δχ(X,Y). The smaller the difference of Δχ(X,Y), the higher the value of ELFπ, resulting in more aromatic properties of the inorganic benzenes.

  3. Time-dependent density-functional and reduced density-matrix methods for few electrons: Exact versus adiabatic approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, N.; Fuks, J.I.; Tokatly, I.V.; Appel, H.; Gross, E.K.U.; Rubio, A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We solve a 1D N-electron system, with N small, by mapping it onto an N-dimensional one-electron problem. We compare the exact solutions to the results from adiabatic density and density matrix functionals for different physical situations. Highlights: ► Static and dynamical correlations. ► Memory dependence of exchange-correlation functionals in TDDFT. ► Linear and non-linear response. ► Laser-induced population control. - Abstract: To address the impact of electron correlations in the linear and non-linear response regimes of interacting many-electron systems exposed to time-dependent external fields, we study one-dimensional (1D) systems where the interacting problem is solved exactly by exploiting the mapping of the 1D N-electron problem onto an N-dimensional single electron problem. We analyze the performance of the recently derived 1D local density approximation as well as the exact-exchange orbital functional for those systems. We show that the interaction with an external resonant laser field shows Rabi oscillations which are detuned due to the lack of memory in adiabatic approximations. To investigate situations where static correlations play a role, we consider the time-evolution of the natural occupation numbers associated to the reduced one-body density matrix. Those studies shed light on the non-locality and time-dependence of the exchange and correlation functionals in time-dependent density and density-matrix functional theories.

  4. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  5. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Aun (n = 1-5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au3, Au4 and Au5 planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au+δ(basal)/Au-δ(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  6. All-electron density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory with high-order finite elements

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Havu, Ville; Puska, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We present for static density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations an all-electron method which employs high-order hierarchical finite-element bases. Our mesh generation scheme, in which structured atomic meshes are merged to an unstructured molecular mesh, allows a highly nonuniform discretization of the space. Thus it is possible to represent the core and valence states using the same discretization scheme, i.e., no pseudopotentials or similar treatmen...

  7. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský, Lukáš

    2014-06-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Profile shape parameterization of JET electron temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunke, B.

    1997-01-01

    The temperature and density profiles of the Joint European Torus (JET) are parametrized using log additive models in the control variables. Predictive error criteria are used to determine which terms in the log linear model to include. The density and temperature profiles are normalized to their line averages (n-bar and T-bar). The normalized ohmic density shape depends primarily on the parameter n-bar/B t , where B t is the toroidal magnetic field. Both the low mode (L mode) and the edge localized mode-free (ELM-free) high mode (H mode) temperature profiles shapes depend strongly on the type of heating power, with ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) producing a more peaked profile than neutral beam injection (NBI). Given the heating type dependence, the L mode temperature shape is nearly independent of the other control variables. The H mode temperature shape broadens as the effective charge, Z eff , increases. The line average L mode temperature scales as B 0.96 t (power per particle) 0.385 . The L mode normalized density shape depends primarily on the ratio of line average density, n-bar, to the edge safety factor, q 95 . As n-bar/q 95 increases, the profile shape broadens. The current, I p , is the most important control variable for the normalized H mode density. As the current increases, the profile broadens and the gradient at the edge sharpens. Increasing the heating power, especially ICRH, or decreasing the average density, peaks the H mode density profile slightly. (author). 15 refs, 12 figs, 10 tabs

  9. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  10. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma; Evaporacion de carbono usando los electrones de un plasma de alta densidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index). (Author)

  11. Improving energy conversion efficiency for triboelectric nanogenerator with capacitor structure by maximizing surface charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianming; Guo, Hengyu; Yue, Xule; Gao, Jun; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-02-07

    Nanogenerators with capacitor structures based on piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity, triboelectricity and electrostatic induction have been extensively investigated. Although the electron flow on electrodes is well understood, the maximum efficiency-dependent structure design is not clearly known. In this paper, a clear understanding of triboelectric generators with capacitor structures is presented by the investigation of polydimethylsiloxane-based composite film nanogenerators, indicating that the generator, in fact, acts as both an energy storage and output device. Maximum energy storage and output depend on the maximum charge density on the dielectric polymer surface, which is determined by the capacitance of the device. The effective thickness of polydimethylsiloxane can be greatly reduced by mixing a suitable amount of conductive nanoparticles into the polymer, through which the charge density on the polymer surface can be greatly increased. This finding can be applied to all the triboelectric nanogenerators with capacitor structures, and it provides an important guide to the structural design for nanogenerators. It is demonstrated that graphite particles with sizes of 20-40 nm and 3.0% mass mixed into the polydimethylsiloxane can reduce 34.68% of the effective thickness of the dielectric film and increase the surface charges by 111.27% on the dielectric film. The output power density of the triboelectric nanogenerator with the composite polydimethylsiloxane film is 3.7 W m(-2), which is 2.6 times as much as that of the pure polydimethylsiloxane film.

  12. Electron density dynamics in the electronic ground state: motion along the Kekulé mode of benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Axel; Choudhary, Deepanshu; Sambre, Vaibhav D; Paulus, Beate

    2012-11-26

    If the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is invoked for the description of chemical reactions, the electron density rearranges following the motion of the nuclei. Even though this approach is central to theoretical chemistry, the explicit time dependence of the electron density is rarely studied, especially if the nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. In this article, we model the motion of benzene along the Kekulé vibrational coordinate to simulate the nuclear dynamics and electron density dynamics in the electronic ground state. Details of the change of core, valence, and π electrons are determined and analyzed. We show how the pictures anticipated by drawing Lewis structures of the rearrangement correlate with the time-dependent quantum description of the process.

  13. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental......-relativistic plasma. Radial profiles for the power deposition and the non-inductive wave-driven current due to the Bernstein waves are calculated for realistic antenna radiation patterns with parameters corresponding to the Danish tokamak DANTE and to Princeton's PLT....

  14. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  15. Some unusual electronic patterns on graphite surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gives rise to one-dimensional fringe-like pattern as seen with the STM. We are also reporting here observation of such large-scale linear fringes near defects. 2. Experimental details. Experiments were done with a home-built compact STM similar to the one de- scribed in [10]. This STM uses commercial electronics and ...

  16. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  17. Extension of electron cyclotron heating at ASDEX Upgrade with respect to high density operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ASDEX Upgrade electron cyclotron resonance heating operates at 105 GHz and 140 GHz with flexible launching geometry and polarization. In 2016 four Gyrotrons with 10 sec pulse length and output power close to 1 MW per unit were available. The system is presently being extended to eight similar units in total. High heating power and high plasma density operation will be a part of the future ASDEX Upgrade experiment program. For the electron cyclotron resonance heating, an O-2 mode scheme is proposed, which is compatible with the expected high plasma densities. It may, however, suffer from incomplete single-pass absorption. The situation can be improved significantly by installing holographic mirrors on the inner column, which allow for a second pass of the unabsorbed fraction of the millimetre wave beam. Since the beam path in the plasma is subject to refraction, the beam position on the holographic mirror has to be controlled. Thermocouples built into the mirror surface are used for this purpose. As a protective measure, the tiles of the heat shield on the inner column were modified in order to increase the shielding against unabsorbed millimetre wave power.

  18. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-01-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75 Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6 eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as A 3 Σ u +

  19. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  20. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  1. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Kociak, Mathieu

    2017-10-01

    Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London) 514, 209 (2014), 10.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London) 543, 529 (2017), 10.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014), 10.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989), 10.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015), 10.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  2. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Dian; Tang, Guangze; Ma, Xinxin; Gu, Le; Sun, Mingren; Wang, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm 2 . Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm 2 ) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation

  3. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... the refractive index in zero frequency limits is 2.42. The absorption coefficient predicts the applicability of AgScO2 in solar cells and flat panel liquid crystal display as a transparent top window layer. Keywords. Density functional theory; band structure; optical properties. PACS Nos 71.15.Mb; 71.20.−b; 78.20.

  4. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids. For the......In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids....... For these VSCs, high power density is required due to limited turbine nacelle space. Also, high reliability is required since maintenance cost of these remotely located wind turbines is quite high and these turbines operate under harsh operating conditions. In order to select a high power density and reliability...... VSC solution for wind turbines, first, the VSC topology and the switch technology to be employed should be specified such that the highest possible power density and reliability are to be attained. Then, this qualitative approach should be complemented with the power density and reliability...

  5. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Nijdam, S; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 10 16  m −3 . This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 10 16  m −3 . After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds. (fast track communication)

  6. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  7. The study of dynamics of electrons in the presence of large current densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.

    2007-11-01

    The runaway electron effect is considered in different fields: nuclear fusion, or the heating of the solar corona. In this thesis, we are interested in runaway electrons in the ionosphere. We consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a parallel electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms. Then, a static electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction, parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density up to 20% of the total current density. Nevertheless, we note that the divergence free of the current density is not conserved. We introduce major changes in order to take into account the variation of the different moments of the ion distribution functions. We observe that the electron distribution functions are still non-Maxwellian. Runaway electrons are created and carry the current density. The core distribution stay at rest. As these electrons undergo less collisions, they increase the plasma conductivity. We make a parametric study. We fit the electron distribution function by two Maxwellian. We show that the time to reach the maximal current density is a key point. Thus, when we increase this time, we modify the temperatures. The current density plays a primary role. When the current density increases, all the moments of the distributions increase: electron density and mean velocity of the suprathermal distribution and the electron temperature of the core and

  8. Angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.

    2000-01-01

    The angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume has been studied for the first time. The electron temperature ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 eV and is only weakly dependent on the angle in the low-intensity range studied here. In contrast, the typical ion energy is ...... is about 2 orders of magnitude larger, and its angular distribution is mon peaked about the target normal. The derived Values of the electron density are in agreement with the measured values of ion density.......The angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume has been studied for the first time. The electron temperature ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 eV and is only weakly dependent on the angle in the low-intensity range studied here. In contrast, the typical ion energy...

  9. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shume, E. B.; Vergados, P.; Komjathy, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents electron number density profiles derived from high resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations performed using the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) payload on the high inclination CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE......) spacecraft. We have developed and applied a novel inverse Abel transform algorithm on high rate RO total electron content (TEC) measurements performed along GPS to CASSIOPE radio links to recover electron density profiles. The high resolution density profiles inferred from the CASSIOPE RO are: (1) in very...... number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit wide-spread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating...

  10. The role of electron scattering in electron-induced surface chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Electron-induced chemistry on surfaces plays a key role in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), a single-step lithography technique that has increasingly gained interest in the past decade. It is crucial for the understanding and modelling of this process to know the role of the surface

  11. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E. [INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G. [IFISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ferullo, Ricardo M., E-mail: caferull@criba.edu.ar [INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • On the hydroxylated surface, the adsorption of Au clusters is relatively weak. • Au-oxide interaction induces a polarization of the Au particles on the bare surface. • A predominance of planar (111) arrangements was obtained on both surfaces. • Comparing both surfaces, atom-by-atom nucleation energies show opposite behaviors. - Abstract: We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Au{sub n} (n = 1–5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au{sub 3}, Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 5} planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au{sup +δ}(basal)/Au{sup −δ}(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  12. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  13. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  14. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  15. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  16. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  17. Catalytic water dissociation by greigite Fe3S4 surfaces: density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, A.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The iron sulfide mineral greigite, Fe3S4, has shown promising capability as a hydrogenating catalyst, in particular in the reduction of carbon dioxide to produce small organic molecules under mild conditions. We employed density functional theory calculations to investigate the {001},{011} and {111} surfaces of this iron thiospinel material, as well as the production of hydrogen ad-atoms from the dissociation of water molecules on the surfaces. We systematically analysed the adsorption geometries and the electronic structure of both bare and hydroxylated surfaces. The sulfide surfaces presented a higher flexibility than the isomorphic oxide magnetite, Fe3O4, allowing perpendicular movement of the cations above or below the top atomic sulfur layer. We considered both molecular and dissociative water adsorption processes, and have shown that molecular adsorption is the predominant state on these surfaces from both a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We considered a second molecule of water which stabilizes the system mainly by H-bonds, although the dissociation process remains thermodynamically unfavourable. We noted, however, synergistic adsorption effects on the Fe3S4{001} owing to the presence of hydroxyl groups. We concluded that, in contrast to Fe3O4, molecular adsorption of water is clearly preferred on greigite surfaces. PMID:27274698

  18. Origin of synergistic effect over Ni-based bimetallic surfaces: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen; Zhu, Yi-An; Xu, Yue; Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Chen, De

    2012-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been conducted to explore the physical origin of the synergistic effect over Ni-based surface alloys using methane dissociation as a probe reaction. Some late transition metal atoms (M = Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au) are substituted for surface Ni atoms to examine the variation in electronic structure and adsorption property of Ni(111). Two types of threefold hollow sites, namely, the Ni2M and Ni3 sites, are taken into account. The calculated results indicate that the variation in the CHx adsorption energy at the Ni2M and Ni3 sites is dominated by the ensemble and ligand effect, respectively, and the other factors such as surface and adsorbate distortion and electrostatic interaction affect the catalytic properties of the bimetallic surfaces to a smaller extent. Both the Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship and the scaling correlation hold true on the Ni-based bimetallic surfaces. With the combination of these two linear energy relations, the corrected binding energy of atomic C is found to be a good descriptor for representing the catalytic activity of the alloyed surfaces. Considering the compromise between the catalytic activity and catalyst stability, we suggest that the Rh/Ni catalyst is a good candidate for methane dissociation.

  19. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Rhodium; boron; aluminium; gallium; methanol activation. Abstract. Rhodium clusters are very important finite size materials because of their unique electronic, magneticand catalytic properties. Tuning the physical and chemical properties of rhodium clusters by incorporatingdifferent metal and non-metal atoms ...

  20. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The local, average and electronic structure of the semiconducting materials Si and Ge has been studied using multipole, maximum entropy method (MEM) and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses, using X-ray powder data. The covalent nature of bonding and the interaction between the atoms are clearly revealed by the ...

  1. Electron-positron momentum density in TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, S.; Manuel, A.A.; Hoffmann, L.

    1997-01-01

    We present measurements of the positron two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) in TTF-TCNQ. We report also theoretical simulations of the 2D-ACAR in which the electron wave functions were expressed as TTF or TCNQ molecular orbitals obtained from self-consistent qu...

  2. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... used as an inner layer of solar cells for electricity gen- eration. This peculiar characteristic has established a benchmark in invisible electronics and opened a new era in solar cell technology [5–9]. Dietrich and Jansen [10] synthesized and reported the 3R phase of AgScO2. Shannon et al [11] reported.

  3. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHIJIT DUTTA

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Abstract. Rhodium clusters are very important finite size materials because of their unique electronic, magnetic and catalytic properties. Tuning the physical and chemical properties of rhodium clusters by incorporating different metal and non-metal atoms have found a great research interest in recent years.

  4. Surface sensitization mechanism on negative electron affinity p-GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Feng, Shu; Lu, Feifei

    2018-03-01

    The surface sensitization is the key to prepare negative electron affinity photocathode. The thesis emphasizes on the study of surface sensitization mechanism of p-type doping GaN nanowires utilizing first principles based on density function theory. The adsorption energy, work function, dipole moment, geometry structure, electronic structure and optical properties of Mg-doped GaN nanowires surfaces with various coverages of Cs atoms are investigated. The GaN nanowire with Mg doped in core position is taken as the sensitization base. At the initial stage of sensitization, the best adsorption site for Cs atom on GaN nanowire surface is BN, the bridge site of two adjacent N atoms. Surface sensitization generates a p-type internal surface with an n-type surface state, introducing a band bending region which can help reduce surface barrier and work function. With increasing Cs coverage, work functions decrease monotonously and the "Cs-kill" phenomenon disappears. For Cs coverage of 0.75 ML and 1 ML, the corresponding sensitization systems reach negative electron affinity state. Through surface sensitization, the absorption curves are red shifted and the absorption coefficient is cut down. All theoretical calculations can guide the design of negative electron affinity Mg doped GaN nanowires photocathode.

  5. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, S.; Balakrishnan, C.; Theetharappan, M.; Neelakantan, M. A.; Venkataraman, R.

    2017-03-01

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  6. Analytical thermal modelling of multilayered active embedded chips into high density electronic board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monier-Vinard Eric

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent Printed Wiring Board embedding technology is an attractive packaging alternative that allows a very high degree of miniaturization by stacking multiple layers of embedded chips. This disruptive technology will further increase the thermal management challenges by concentrating heat dissipation at the heart of the organic substrate structure. In order to allow the electronic designer to early analyze the limits of the power dissipation, depending on the embedded chip location inside the board, as well as the thermal interactions with other buried chips or surface mounted electronic components, an analytical thermal modelling approach was established. The presented work describes the comparison of the analytical model results with the numerical models of various embedded chips configurations. The thermal behaviour predictions of the analytical model, found to be within ±10% of relative error, demonstrate its relevance for modelling high density electronic board. Besides the approach promotes a practical solution to study the potential gain to conduct a part of heat flow from the components towards a set of localized cooled board pads.

  7. Experimental electron density profiles of the mid-latitude lower ionosphere and winter anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapoport, Z.Ts.; Sinel'nikov, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    Summarized measurements of high-latitude electron density profiles of N e lower ionosphere, obtained at M100B meteorological rockets by precision method of coherent frequencies during 1979-1990 at the Volgograd test site (φ = 48 deg 41' N; λ = 44 deg 21 E), are presented. The profiles obtained represent average values of electron density at various altitudes of lower ionosphere (h = 70-100 km) during night and day time hours in winter and non winter periods. Increased electron density values during daytime hours in winter are related to winter anomaly phenomenon. 36 refs.; 1 fig

  8. Basis set representation of the electron density at an atomic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Remigius; Widmark, Per-Olof; Roos, Björn Olof; Lindh, Roland; Reiher, Markus

    2010-10-14

    In this paper a detailed investigation of the basis set convergence for the calculation of relativistic electron densities at the position of finite-sized atomic nuclei is presented. The development of Gauss-type basis sets for such electron densities is reported and the effect of different contraction schemes is studied. Results are then presented for picture-change corrected calculations based on the Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Moreover, the role of electron correlation, the effect of the numerical integration accuracy in density functional calculations, and the convergence with respect to the order of the Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian and the picture-change-transformed property operator are studied.

  9. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, P. J.; Gerber, R. A.; Gerardo, J. B.

    1982-09-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2×1015 cm-2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift.

  10. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannon, P.J.; Gerber, R.A.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach--Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2 x 10 15 cm -2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift

  11. Theoretical calculation of electron density and temperature in the edge of tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Asif, Anila

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we use a method based on the concept of particle confinement time (τp) uniqueness to calculate the electron density and temperature in ohmically heated, edge plasma of the Hefei tokamak-7. Here, with the help of the data taken from Johnson and Hinnov’s table, we have done an extensive work to find electron densities and temperatures that satisfy the τp uniqueness to evaluate the temporal evolution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te). The results are in good agreement as measured from the Langmuir probe array in previous works.

  12. Electronic structure of (001) semiconducting MTe surfaces (M = Zn, Cd, Hg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Camacho, A.; Quiroga, L.; Baquero, R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the tight-binding scheme with ten orbitals per atom (SP 3 s * and two spin orientations) the electronic projected bulk band structure, surface band structure (both anion- and cation-terminated surfaces), and the wave-vector-resolved density of states for these II-VI semiconductors are calculated. A quickly convergent iterative technique is employed for calculating the Green function of the actual semi-infinite crystal. This calculational method allows to precise very accurately, the energy of localized surface states. All the materials considered in this work present surface states with energies lying in the fundamental gap as well as surface states in the lenses opened in the projected bulk valence-band continuum. The atomic weight of each surface state is determined. The states in the fundamental gap turn out to be 'bridge-bond'-type states for anion-terminated surfaces and 'dangling-bond'-type states for cation-terminated surfaces. (author)

  13. The surface electronic structure of Y(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, C.

    1998-12-01

    Yttrium has been grown epitaxially on W(110). The growth was monitored by using photoemission spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. The film thickness has been gauged by the attenuation of the W 4f 7/2 bulk component. The films have been grown reproducibly and show a prominent surface state which is indicative of good order and low contamination. Angle-Resolved Ultra-Violet Photoemission Spectroscopy has been used to examine the valence band of these ultra-thin films. The films show a very different structure to the valence band of a bulk crystal of yttrium. The differences have been investigated by a series of model calculations using the LMASA-46 tight-binding LMTO program. The calculations suggest that the ultra-thin film surface state may be hybridised with a tungsten orbital having (x 2 - y 2 ) character. (author)

  14. Effects of electronic correlation, physical structure, and surface termination on the electronic structure of V2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Li, Jing-bin; Sutter, Eli; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Fernández-Serra, M.-V.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a density functional theory (DFT) study of the electronic structure of vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) in both bulk and nanowire form. In particular, our study focuses on the role of spin polarization and electronic correlations, as computed within the local (spin) density approximation (L(S)DA) and the LDA+U formalism. As expected for a mean-field approach such as DFT, our optimized bulk V2O3 structure is shown to be metallic in nature, while an adequate choice of the Hubbard U parameter (U = 4 eV) is enough to open the band gap, making the system insulating. However, this formalism predicts a nonmagnetic insulator, as opposed to the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic structure, to be the ground state. The electronic structure of the V2O3 nanowire system is more complex, and it strongly depends on the surface termination of the structures. Our results show that non-spin-polarized LDA calculations of 001-grown nanowires are metallic in nature. However, LSDA predicts that some surface terminations are half-metals, with a large band gap opening for one of the spins. When LSDA+U was used to study the nanowire model with a closed-shell oxygen surface termination, we observe insulating behavior with no net magnetic moment, with a 104 meV band gap. This is consistent with the experimentally observed gap recently reported in the literature for similar wires. To experimentally address the surface structure of these nanowires, we perform surface specific nano-Auger electron spectroscopy on as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires. Our experimental results show a higher O:V peak ratio (1.93:1) than expected for pure V2O3, thereby suggesting higher oxygen content at the surface of the nanowires. From our results, we conclude that oxygen termination is likely the termination for our as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires.

  15. Mapping the Local Density of States by Very-Low-Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 214-218 ISSN 1345-9678 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : density of states * scanning low energy electron microscopy * aluminum * very-low-energy scanning electron microscopy * electron band structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010 http://www.jim.or.jp/journal/e/51/02/214.html

  16. Characterizing the geometric and electronic structure of defects in the "29" copper surface oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Andrew J.; Hensley, Alyssa J. R.; Zhang, Renqin; Pronschinske, Alex; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric and electronic structural characterization of thin film metal oxides is of fundamental importance to many fields such as catalysis, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry. Surface defects are also well known to impact a material's performance in any such applications. Here, we focus on the "29" oxide Cu2O/Cu(111) surface and we observe two common structural defects which we characterize using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and density functional theory. The defects are proposed to be O vacancies and Cu adatoms, which both show unique topographic and spectroscopic signatures. The spatially resolved electronic and charge state effects of the defects are investigated, and implications for their reactivity are given.

  17. EVOLUTION OF IONS AFTER MULTIPLE ELECTRON-CAPTURE FROM SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R; DAS, J

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the electronic processes which occur when a multiply charged ion is approaching an atomic target on the one hand or a metal surface on the other hand. In both caws three collision phases can be identified: those of attraction, of electron capture and of decay in the vacuum;

  18. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homoge- neously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with ...

  19. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with different ...

  20. Holographic electron density shape theorem and its role in drug design and toxicological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, P G

    1999-01-01

    Each complete, boundaryless molecular electron density is fully determined by any nonzero volume piece of the electron density cloud. This inherent feature of molecules, called the "holographic" property of molecular electron densities, provides a strong foundation for the local, quantum chemical shape analysis of various functional groups, pharmacophores, and other local molecular moieties. A proof is presented for the relevant molecular shape theorem, the "holographic electron density shape theorem", and the role of this theorem in quantum chemical, quantitative shape-activity relations (QShAR) is discussed. The quantum chemical methods of molecular shape analysis can be extended to ab initio quality electron densities of macromolecules, such as proteins, as well as to local molecular moieties, such as functional groups or pharmacophores, based on the transferability and additivity of local, fuzzy density fragments and the associated local density matrixes within the framework of the ADMA (Adjustable Density Matrix Assembler) approach. In addition to new results on chemical bonding and the development of macromolecular force methods, the new methodologies are also applicable to QShAR studies in computer-aided drug discovery and in toxicological risk assessment.

  1. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  2. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  3. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei; Perdew, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  4. CASSINI RSS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES EDP1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the complete collection of the published Cassini radio occultation electron density profiles of the Titan ionosphere as of September 2008.

  5. Two-dimensional electron density characterisation of arc interruption phenomenon in current-zero phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Kamiya, Tomoki; Matsuoka, Shigeyasu; Kumada, Akiko; Ikeda, Hisatoshi; Hidaka, Kunihiko

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron density imaging over free burning SF6 arcs and SF6 gas-blast arcs was conducted at current zero using highly sensitive Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensors in order to experimentally characterise electron density distributions for the success and failure of arc interruption in the thermal reignition phase. The experimental results under an interruption probability of 50% showed that free burning SF6 arcs with axially asymmetric electron density profiles were interrupted with a success rate of 88%. On the other hand, the current interruption of SF6 gas-blast arcs was reproducibly achieved under locally reduced electron densities and the interruption success rate was 100%.

  6. Generalized expressions for variations in critical frequencies, electron densities and altitudes of the ionospheric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njau, E.C.

    1990-12-01

    We develop generalized mathematical expressions for time and space variations of peak electron densities of the ionospheric D, E, F1 and F2 layers as well as corresponding variations in the altitudes of the electron density peaks in each of these layers. On the basis of the Chapman characteristics of the E and F1 layers and other techniques, a generalized expression is developed for the electron density height profile of each of the four ionospheric layers. Consequently a generalized mathematical expression is developed for the entire electron density height profile of the whole ionosphere as a function of time, latitude and longitude. The latter mathematical expression may be used to compute or predict ionospheric parameters associated with ratio and satellite communications. Finally we show that some well documented equations on ionospheric parameters are simplified (or approximated) versions of some of our mathematical expressions. (author). 29 refs

  7. Plasma sheath: An equivalent nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmitted electromagnetic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Li, Xiaoping; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yanming; Lei, Fan; Zhu, Congying

    2017-10-01

    An experiment on the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) signals in continuous time-varying plasma is designed to establish the nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmission coefficient. The nonlinearity is confirmed from the theoretical and experimental results. The amplitude and phase can be considered nonlinear functions of electron density when the complex interaction between plasma and EM waves is ignored. Results show that amplitude and phase distributions are asymmetrical when electron density follows symmetric distribution. The skewness of amplitude is positive, whereas the skewness of phase is negative. The nonlinear degree is closely related to the ratio of plasma frequency to the incident wave frequency and the range of electron density. The conclusions are crucial to the modeling of plasma sheath channels and understanding the blackout problem.

  8. Electron-density-sensitive Line Ratios of Fe XIII– XVI from Laboratory Sources Compared to CHIANTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, M. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Scotti, F.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2018-02-01

    We present electron-density-sensitive line ratios for Fe XIII– XVI measured in the spectral wavelength range of 200–440 Å and an electron density range of (1–4) × 1013 cm‑3. The results provide a test at the high-density limit of density-sensitive line ratios useful for astrophysical studies. The measurements were performed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade, where electron densities were measured independently by the laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Spectra were collected with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer, which provided a spectral resolution of up to 0.3 Å, i.e., high resolution across the broad wavelength range. The response of the instrument was relatively calibrated using spectroscopic techniques in order to improve accuracy. The line ratios are compared to other laboratory sources and the latest version of CHIANTI (8.0.2), and an agreement within 30% is found.

  9. Electron heating caused by parametrically driven turbulence near the critical density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    Microwave-driven experiments and particle simulation calculations are presented that model s-polarized laser light incident on a pellet. In the microwave experiments, the incident microwaves are observed to decay into ion and electron waves near the critical density if the microwave power is above a well-defined threshold. Significant absorption, thermal electron heating, and hot electron generation are observed for microwave powers above a few times threshold. Strong absorption, strong profile modification, strongly heated hot electrons with a Maxwellian distribution, a hot-electron temperature that increases slowly with power, and a hot-electron density that is almost constant, are all observed in both the microwave experiments and simulation calculations for high powers. In addition, the thermal electrons are strongly heated for high powers in the microwave experiments

  10. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  11. Spectroscopic measurements of the density and electronic temperature at the plasma edge in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lediankine, A.

    1996-01-01

    The profiles of temperature and electronic density at the plasma edge are important to study the wall-plasma interaction and the radiative layers in the Tokamak plasmas. The laser ablation technique of the lithium allows to measure the profile of electronic density. To measure the profile of temperature, it has been used for the first time, the injection of a fluorine neutral atoms beam. The experiments, the results are described in this work. (N.C.)

  12. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetto, D.; Musumeci, P.; Zolotorev, M.; Stupakov, G.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  13. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Filippetto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  14. Inertial electron instability of current-carrying low-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basova, S.V.; Varentsova, S.A.; Gordeev, A.V.; Gulin, A.V.; Shuvaev, V.Yu.

    1991-01-01

    Current-carrying low-density plasma instability is investigated taking into account electron inertia at stationary ions. By analytic and numeric methods it is shown that in a constant density plasma the instability occurs under condition that the value H-tilde=H+(m e c/e)dv/dr, where H is the magnetic field, v - electron current velocity, changes the sign as the function of coordinate. Numeric calculations allowed to derive the increments for specific current configurations

  15. Self-consistent calculation of electron density distribution in metals in HNC approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, H.; Boronski, E.; Banach, G. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    1997-12-01

    A nonlinear integro-differential equation is introduced for density amplitude of conduction electrons in simple metals as a consequence of the results obtained within the theory of liquids. The simplicity of this equation in comparison with the usual Kohn-Sham approach gives the possibility to determine the self- consistent density of conduction electrons without assuming a muffin-tin lattice potential. Calculations have been performed for lithium. Perspectives connected with this approach are discussed. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs.

  16. Fast-electron self-collimation in a plasma density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X. H.; Borghesi, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of fast electron transport in solid and compressed fast ignition relevant targets is presented. The principal aim of the study is to assess how localized increases in the target density (e.g., by engineering of the density profile) can enhance magnetic field generation and thus pinching of the fast electron beam through reducing the rate of temperature rise. The extent to which this might benefit fast ignition is discussed.

  17. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne and temperature (Te observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than −0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere, which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne–Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple

  18. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-12-19

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  19. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  20. An empirical topside electron density model for calculation of absolute ion densities in IRI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Třísková, Ludmila; Truhlík, Vladimír; Šmilauer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 5 (2006), s. 928-934 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/02/P037; GA AV ČR IAA3042201; GA MŠk ME 651 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) 0245457 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Plasma density * Topside ionosphere * Ion composition * Empirical models Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.706, year: 2005

  1. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  2. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving many-electronic systems.

  3. Role of substituents on the reactivity and electron density profile of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 5. Role of substituents on the reactivity and electron density profile of diimine ligands: A density functional theory based study. Bhakti S Kulkarni Deepti Mishra Sourav Pal. Volume 125 Issue 5 September 2013 pp 1247-1258 ...

  4. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Knecht, Stefan; Kielberg, Jesper Skau

    2015-01-01

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electroncorrelation...... effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems....

  6. Aromaticity in benzene-like rings-An experimental electron density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An experimental charge density study has been carried out on perylene based on X-ray diffraction measurements at 130 K. The electron density and its associated properties have been evaluated at the bond and the ring critical points for the naphthalene residues as well as for the central ring. The variation of the Laplacian ...

  7. Proton and neutron densities from elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1979-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering has now determined extremely fine details of the shape of the nuclear groound state. The combination of (e,e) and muonic X-rays data are giving informations that are among the most precise on nuclear structure. This enables to see all the limitations of existing theories. However, we begin to have a very coherent description of nuclei with the self consistent field theories to a few percent. A very significant progress has been achieved with the calculations of RPA correlations in the round state in a self consistent way. Only recent experiments (on medium and heavy nuclei) of some significance for the understanding of the structure of the nucleus are reviewed

  8. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  9. Membrane effects of Vitamin E deficiency: bioenergetic and surface-charge-density studies of skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintanilha, A.T.; Packer, L.; Szyszlo Davies, J.M.; Racanelli, T.L.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin E (dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol) deficiency in rats increased the sensitivity of liver and muscle mitochondria to damage during incubation at various temperatures, irradiation with visible light, or steady state respiration with substrates. In all cases, vitamin E deficient mitochondria exhibited increased lipid peroxidation, reduced transmembrane potential, decreased respiratory coupling, and lower rates of electron transport, compared to control mitochondria. Muscle mitochondria always showed greater negative inner membrane surface charge density, and were also more sensitive to damage than were liver mitochondria. Vitamin E deficient mitochondria also showed slightly more negative inner membrane surface charge density compared to controls. The relationship between greater negative surface potential and increased sensitivity to damage observed, provides for a new and sensitive method to further probe the role of surface charge in membrane structure and function. Implications of these new findings for the well known human muscle myopathies and those experimentally induced by Vitamin E deficiency in animals, are discussed.

  10. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, O.; Beigman, I. L.; Vainshtein, L. A.; Schweer, B.; Kantor, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Xu, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Lehnen, M.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T-e(r, t) and electron density ne(r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed

  11. Electron-nuclear coupling in time-dependent multicomponent density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butriy, Olena O.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we developed the time-dependent version of the multicomponent density functional approach to treat time-dependent electron-nuclear systems. The method enables to describe the electron-nuclear coupling fully quantum mechanically. No Born-Oppenheimer approximation is involved in the

  12. A density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and spin moments of magnetite

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Junghyun

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on magnetite, Fe3O4, which has been recently considered as electrode in the emerging field of organic spintronics. Given the nature of the potential applications, we evaluated the magnetite room-temperature cubic phase in terms of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. We considered GGA (PBE), GGA + U (PBE + U), and range-separated hybrid (HSE06 and HSE(15%)) functionals. Calculations using HSE06 and HSE(15%) functionals underline the impact that inclusion of exact exchange has on the electronic structure. While the modulation of the band gap with exact exchange has been seen in numerous situations, the dramatic change in the valence band nature and states near the Fermi level has major implications for even a qualitative interpretation of the DFT results. We find that HSE06 leads to highly localized states below the Fermi level while HSE(15%) and PBE + U result in delocalized states around the Fermi level. The significant differences in local magnetic moments and atomic charges indicate that describing room-temperature bulk materials, surfaces and interfaces may require different functionals than their low-temperature counterparts.

  13. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-01-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10 −4 ), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10 −6 ) and 282

  14. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  15. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of ∼ 4γ 2 and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to ∼ 10 10 photons, 60 nJ (1.4×10 12 photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  16. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Osaka University (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries (Japan); Ludwig-Maximilians-University (Germany); and others

    2012-07-11

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of {approx} 4{gamma}{sup 2} and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to {approx} 10{sup 10} photons, 60 nJ (1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  17. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  18. A surface diffuse scattering model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices is studied on the basis of the results previously obtained, considering a surface diffuse scattering; the importance of the results obtained for a better understanding of the influence of the fringing field in surface charge coupled devices is discussed. (author)

  19. Measurement of power density distribution and beam waist simulation for electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Chunlong; Peng, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to measure the power density distribution of the electron beam (EB) for further estimating its characteristics. A compact device combining deflection signal controller and current signal acquisition circuit of the EB was built. A software modelling framework was developed to investigate structural parameters of the electron beam. With an iterative algorithm, the functional relationship between the electron beam power and its power density was solved and the corresponding contour map of power density distribution was plotted through isoline tracking approach. The power density distribution of various layers of cross-section beam was reconstructed for beam volume by direct volume rendering technique. The further simulation of beam waist with all-known marching cubes algorithm reveals the evolution of spatial appearance and geometry measurement principle was explained in detail. The study provides an evaluation of promising to replace the traditional idea of EB spatial characteristics. - Highlights: ► We build a framework for measuring power density distribution for electron beam. ► We capture actual electron and build transient spatial power distribution for EB. ► Tracing algorithm of power density contour for cross-section was designed. ► The volume and waist of the beam are reconstructed in 4D mode. ► Geometry measurement is finished which is befit for designing of process welding.

  20. Adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on [Formula: see text] surface: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedon, M; Spencer, M J S; Yarovsky, I

    2009-04-08

    The adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on the ([Formula: see text]) crystal face of zinc oxide (ZnO) was studied. Binding energies, workfunction changes, vibrational frequencies, charge density differences and electron localization functions were calculated. It was elucidated that atomic oxygen binds more strongly than nitrogen, with the most stable [Formula: see text] structure exhibiting a binding energy of -2.47 eV, indicating chemisorption onto the surface. Surface reconstructions were observed for the most stable minima of both atomic species. Positive workfunction changes were calculated for both adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen if the adsorbate interacted with zinc atoms. Negative workfunction changes were calculated when the adsorbate interacted with both surface oxygen and zinc atoms. Interactions between the adsorbate and the surface zinc atoms resulted in ionic-type bonding, whereas interactions with oxygen atoms were more likely to result in the formation of covalent-type bonding. The positive workfunction changes correlate with an experimentally observed increase in resistance of ZnO conductometric sensor devices.

  1. Energy-momentum density of graphite by electron-momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1996-11-01

    The energy-resolved electron momentum density of graphite has been measured along a series of well-defined directions using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). This is the first measurement of this kind performed on a single-crystal target with a thoroughly controlled orientation which clearly demonstrates the different nature of the σ and π bands in graphite. Good agreement between the calculated density and the measured one is found, further establishing that fact that EMS yields more direct and complete information on the valence electronic structure that any other method. 12 refs., 2 figs

  2. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Falkenberg, Jesper Toft

    2016-01-01

    morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity....... Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic......ecent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline...

  3. The implementation of real-time plasma electron density calculations on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.C., E-mail: zzc@ipp.ac.cn; Xiao, B.J.; Wang, F.; Liu, H.Q.; Yuan, Q.P.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The real-time density calculation system (DCS) has been applied to the EAST 3-wave polarimeter-interferometer (POINT) system. • The new system based on Flex RIO acquires data at high speed and processes them in a short time. • Roll-over module is developed for density calculation. - Abstract: The plasma electron density is one of the most fundamental parameters in tokamak experiment. It is widely used in the plasma control system (PCS) real-time control, as well as plasma physics analysis. The 3-wave polarimeter-interferometer (POINT) system had been used to measure the plasma electron density on the EAST since last campaign. This paper will give the way to realize the real-time measurement of plasma electron density. All intermediate frequency (IF) signals after POINT system, in the 0.5–3 MHz range, stream to the real-time density calculation system (DCS) to extract the phase shift information. All the prototype hardware is based on NI Flex RIO device which contains a high speed Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The original signals are sampled at 10 M Samples/s, and the data after roll-over module are transmitted to PCS by reflective memory (RFM). With this method, real-time plasma electron density data with high accuracy and low noise had been obtained in the latest EAST tokamak experiment.

  4. A theoretical-electron-density databank using a model of real and virtual spherical atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Ayoub; Domagala, Slawomir; Guillot, Benoit; Leduc, Theo; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2017-08-01

    A database describing the electron density of common chemical groups using combinations of real and virtual spherical atoms is proposed, as an alternative to the multipolar atom modelling of the molecular charge density. Theoretical structure factors were computed from periodic density functional theory calculations on 38 crystal structures of small molecules and the charge density was subsequently refined using a density model based on real spherical atoms and additional dummy charges on the covalent bonds and on electron lone-pair sites. The electron-density parameters of real and dummy atoms present in a similar chemical environment were averaged on all the molecules studied to build a database of transferable spherical atoms. Compared with the now-popular databases of transferable multipolar parameters, the spherical charge modelling needs fewer parameters to describe the molecular electron density and can be more easily incorporated in molecular modelling software for the computation of electrostatic properties. The construction method of the database is described. In order to analyse to what extent this modelling method can be used to derive meaningful molecular properties, it has been applied to the urea molecule and to biotin/streptavidin, a protein/ligand complex.

  5. A Plasma Edge Electron Density Diagnostic Based on a Doppler-free Measurement of Stark Broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Abdullah; Martin, Elijah; Shannon, Steve

    2017-10-01

    Passive spectroscopic measurements of Stark broadening have been reliably used to determine electron density for decades. A low-density limit of 1e19 m-3 exists using these passive techniques due to Doppler and instrument broadening. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a novel diagnostic approach for measuring electron density using Stark broadening is currently under development and is capable of extending the low-density limit to 1e16 m-3 . The diagnostic is based on measuring the spectral line profile of a Balmer series transition using Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, a laser-based absorption technique. The spectrum is then fit to a quantum mechanical model using the Explicit Zeeman Stark Spectral Simulator (EZSSS) code to extract the electron density. The increased sensitivity to the electron density is realized because Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS) can greatly reduce the Doppler broadening and essentially eliminate the instrument broadening. DFSS has been successfully employed to measure spectral data in a magnetized (500-800 G), low temperature (5 eV), low density (1e17-1e18 m-3), He/H2 and He/CH4 plasma in the mTorr pressure range. Experimentally measured pi and sigma H-alpha spectra, fit using the EZSSS code, will be presented. A quantitative model to accurately predict crossover peaks and dips will also be given. This work was supported by the US. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  6. Topology of Electron Density of Cadmium Telluride Determined from Relief and Contour Plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.P.; Gopir, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The topology of the electron density yields a faithful and a reliable mapping of the concepts of atoms, molecular structure, bonds and structure, besides providing the basis for a theory of structural stability. In quantum mechanics, and in particular quantum chemistry, the electron density is a measure of the probability of an electron occupying an infinitesimal element of space surrounding any given point. Contour plots of electron density distribution of cadmium telluride (CdTe) were obtained using the density functional theory (DFT) method and were used as the basis to qualitatively study the bond, structure and stability of the molecule when it is in bulk. We looked at the way the electron density, ρ of CdTe defines the gradient field and hence the bonding type. We identified the bond paths that coincide with the contours of electron sharing. These bond paths indicated that the molecule was slightly covalent. Our topological analysis led us to conclude that CdTe was an n-type semiconductor with covalent bond and slight ionic character. (author)

  7. Surface hardening of 30CrMnSiA steel using continuous electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulei; Hu, Jing; Shen, Xianfeng; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Wansheng

    2017-11-01

    30CrMnSiA high strength low alloy (HSLA) carbon structural steel is typically applied in equipment manufacturing and aerospace industries. In this work, the effects of continuous electron beam treatment on the surface hardening and microstructure modifications of 30CrMnSiA are investigated experimentally via a multi-purpose electron beam machine Pro-beam system. Micro hardness value in the electron beam treated area shows a double to triple increase, from 208 HV0.2 on the base metal to 520 HV0.2 on the irradiated area, while the surface roughness is relatively unchanged. Surface hardening parameters and mechanisms are clarified by investigation of the microstructural modification and the phase transformation both pre and post irradiation. The base metal is composed of ferrite and troostite. After continuous electron beam irradiation, the micro structure of the electron beam hardened area is composed of acicular lower bainite, feathered upper bainite and part of lath martensite. The optimal input energy density for 30CrMnSiA steel in this study is of 2.5 kJ/cm2 to attain the proper hardened depth and peak hardness without the surface quality deterioration. When the input irradiation energy exceeds 2.5 kJ/cm2 the convective mixing of the melted zone will become dominant. In the area with convective mixing, the cooling rate is relatively lower, thus the micro hardness is lower. The surface quality will deteriorate. Chemical composition and surface roughness pre and post electron beam treatment are also compared. The technology discussed give a picture of the potential of electron beam surface treatment for improving service life and reliability of the 30CrMnSiA steel.

  8. Structural and electronic properties of low-index stoichiometric BiOI surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wen-Wu; Zhao, Zong-Yan, E-mail: zzy@kmust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    As promising photocatalyst driven by visible-light, BiOI has attracted more and more attention in the past years. However, the surface structure and properties of BiOI that is the most important place for the photocatalytic have not been investigated in details. To this end, density functional theory was performed to calculate the structural and electronic properties of four low-index stoichiometric surfaces of BiOI. It is found that the relaxation of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small, especially the (001) surface. Thus, the surface energies of BiOI are very relatively small. Moreover, there are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer except the (001) surface, which maybe capture the photo-excited carriers. In all of the most stable terminated planes, all the dangling bonds are cleaved from the broken Bi-O bonds. In the case of (001) surface, the dangling bond density of Bi atoms for the (001) surface is zero per square nano. Therefore, the (001) surface is thermodynamically lowest-energy surface of BiOI, and it is the predominant surface (51.4%). As a final remark, the dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. Finally, the equilibrium morphology of BiOI was also proposed and provided, which is determined through the Wulff construction. These results will help us to better understand the underlying photocatalytic mechanism that is related to BiOI surfaces, and provide theoretical support for some experimental studies about BiOI-based photocatalyst in future. - Highlights: • Four low-index BiOI surfaces have been calculated by DFT method. • The relaxations of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small. • There are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer. • The dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. • The thermodynamic

  9. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pseudoclassical approach to electron and ion density correlations in simple liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vericat, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Pastore, G.

    1986-04-01

    Electron-electron and electron-ion structural correlations in simple liquid metals are treated by using effective pair potentials to incorporate quantal effects into a pseudoclassical description of the electron fluid. An effective pair potential between simultaneous electron density fluctuations is first constructed from known properties of the degenerate jellium model, which are the plasmon sum rule, the Kimball-Niklasson relation and Yasuhara's values of the electron pair distribution function at contact. An analytic expression is thereby obtained in the Debye-Hueckel approximation for the electronic structure factor in jellium over a range of density appropriate to metals, with results which compare favourably with those of fully quantal evaluations. A simple pseudoclassical model is then set up for a liquid metal: this involves a model of charged hard spheres for the ion-ion potential and an empty core model for the electron-ion potential, the Coulombic tails being scaled as required by the relation between the long-wavelength partial structure factors and the isothermal compressibility of the metal. The model is solved analytically by a pseudoclassical linear response treatment of the electron-ion coupling and numerical results are reported for partial structure factors in liquid sodium and liquid beryllium. Contact is made for the latter system with data on the electron-electron structure factor in the crystal from inelastic X-ray scattering experiments of Eisenberger, Marra and Brown. (author)

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electron and Magnetization Densities in Molecules and Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The interest of describing the ground state properties of a system in terms of one electron density (or its two spin components) is obvious, in particular due to the simple physical significance of this function. Recent experimental progress in diffraction made the measurement of charge and magnetization densities in crystalline solids possible, with an accuracy at least as good as theoretical accuracy. Theoretical developments of the many-body problem have proved the extreme importance of the one electron density function and presently, accurate methods of band structure determination become available. Parallel to the diffraction techniques, other domains of research (inelastic scattering, resonance, molecular spectroscopy) deal with quantities directly related to the one particle density. But the two types of studies do not interfere enough and one should obviously gain more information by interpreting all experiments that are related to the density together. It became necessary to have an International Sch...

  12. Using Fe XXII to Determine the Electron Density of Stellar Coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepson, Jaan; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Clementson, J.; Gu, M. F.

    2010-03-01

    Lines from Fe XXII, both in the EUV and X-ray region, are known to be sensitive to the electron density and have in recent years been used as diagnostics of stellar coronae, such as AB Dor and Ex Hya. We have recently obtained spectral data from laboratory sources in which the electron density is known either from non-spectroscopic means or from K-shell density diagnostics. The densities of the laboratory sources range from 5x1011 cm-3 to 5x1014 cm-3. The measurements have been used to test the spectral models underlying the Fe XXII density diagnostic line ratios. This work was supported by the NASA APRA program and the DOE General Plasma Science program.

  13. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  14. Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The {\\it Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials} research program provided conceptual understanding of and theoretical methodologies for understanding the properties of surfaces and interfaces involving materials exhibiting strong electronic correlations. The issues addressed in this research program are important for basic science, because the behavior of correlated electron superlattices is a crucial challenge to and crucial test of our understanding of the grand-challenge problem of correlated electron physics and are important for our nation's energy future because correlated interfaces offer opportunities for the control of phenomena needed for energy and device applications. Results include new physics insights, development of new methods, and new predictions for materials properties.

  15. Characterization of lacunae density in pictorial surfaces using GIS software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Henriques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the application of simple image-processing techniques, in a geographic information system (GIS environment, on a detailed digital photography of a retabular painting. The aim is to register semi-automatically the lacunae density, through reclassification, and point density estimation. The digital photography image used on the exercise displays a detail of a 16th century panel painting named "Resurrection of Lazarus", from the Rotunda of Christ Convent, in Tomar, Portugal. The final result is a thematic pathology map of lacunae type.

  16. Electron mobility in supercritical pentanes as a function of density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kengo; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Nishikawa, Masaru

    1988-01-01

    The excess electron mobility in supercritical n-, iso- and neopentane was measured isothermally as a function of density. The density-normalized mobility μN in all three isomers goes through a minimum at a density below the respective critical densities, and the mobility is quite temperature-dependent in this region, then goes through a minimum. The μN behavior around the minimum in n-pentane is well accounted for by the Cohen-Lekner model with the structure factor S(K) estimated from the speed of sound, while that in iso- and neopentane is not. (author)

  17. Distribution of E/N and N/e/ in a cross-flow electric discharge laser. [electric field to neutral gas density and electron number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, J. W., Jr.; Lancashire, R. B.; Manista, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the effect of the convection of ions and electrons on the discharge characteristics in a large scale laser. The results are presented for one particular distribution of ballast resistance. Values of electric field, current density, input power density, ratio of electric field to neutral gas density (E/N), and electron number density were calculated on the basis of measurements of the discharge properties. In a number of graphs, the E/N ratio, current density, power density, and electron density are plotted as a function of row number (downstream position) with total discharge current and gas velocity as parameters. From the dependence of the current distribution on the total current, it appears that the electron production in the first two rows significantly affects the current flowing in the succeeding rows.

  18. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  19. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  20. ELECTRON AVALANCHE MODEL OF DIELECTRIC-VACUUM SURFACE BREAKDOWN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, E J

    2007-02-21

    The model assumes that an 'initiating event' results in positive ions on the surface near the anode and reverses the direction of the normal component of electric field so that electrons in vacuum are attracted to the dielectric locally. A sequence of surface electron avalanches progresses in steps from the anode to the cathode. For 200 kV across 1 cm, the spacing of avalanches is predicted to be about 13 microns. The time for avalanches to step from the anode to the cathode is predicted to be about a ns.

  1. The nematicity induced d-symmetry charge density wave in electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Chen, Hong-Yi; Ting, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    The interplay among the nematicity, the stripe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and superconductivity in iron-pnictides is studied in a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Our calculations have shown that the nematic-order breaks the degeneracy of dxz and dyz orbitals and causes the elliptic Fermi surface near the Γ point in the normal state. In addition, the appearance of the orthorhombic magnetic fluctuations generates two uneven pairs of peaks at ( ± π, 0) and (0, ± π) in its Fourier transformation. All these are comparing favorably with experimental measurements. In the nematic phase, our results indicate that the charge density and its spatial image in the local density of states exhibit a dx2 -y2-like symmetry. Finally, the complete phase diagram is obtained and the nematic phase is found to be in a narrow region close to the SDW transition in the electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors.

  2. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  3. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low-energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  4. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  5. Deduction of edge electron density with multiply charged ions in ORNL volume-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, H-J; Woo, H-J; Chung, K-S; Liu, Y; Meyer, F W; Lho, T; Lee, M-J

    2008-02-01

    The electron densities in the argon plasmas of the ORNL 6 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a flat central magnetic field have been deduced from the ion branches of the electric probe current-voltage curves measured in the edge region of the plasmas. To overcome the difficulties due to unknown velocities of multiply charged ions at the sheath edge, a modified generalized Bohm criterion for the ion sheath velocity is introduced and the mean velocity of all ionic charge states at the sheath edge is assumed to be equal to the sound velocity of the system of particles. The calculated electron densities and temperatures for different plasmas optimized for four charge state distributions are discussed.

  6. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  7. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  8. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  9. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  10. Diagnostics of microwave assisted electron cyclotron resonance plasma source for surface modification of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Supriya E.; Das, Partha Sarathi; Bansode, Avinash; Dhamale, Gayatri; Ghorui, S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Mathe, Vikas L.

    2018-01-01

    Looking at the increasing scope of plasma processing of materials surface, here we present the development and diagnostics of a microwave assisted Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma system suitable for surface modification of polymers. Prior to the surface-treatment, a detailed diagnostic mapping of the plasma parameters throughout the reactor chamber was carried out by using single and double Langmuir probe measurements in Ar plasma. Conventional analysis of I-V curves as well as the elucidation form of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) has become the source of calibration of plasma parameters in the reaction chamber. The high energy tail in the EEDF of electron temperature is seen to extend beyond 60 eV, at much larger distances from the ECR zone. This proves the suitability of the rector for plasma processing, since the electron energy is much beyond the threshold energy of bond breaking in most of the polymers. Nylon 6 is used as a representative candidate for surface processing in the presence of Ar, H2 + N2, and O2 plasma, treated at different locations inside the plasma chamber. In a typical case, the work of adhesion is seen to almost get doubled when treated with oxygen plasma. Morphology of the plasma treated surface and its hydrophilicity are discussed in view of the variation in electron density and electron temperature at these locations. Nano-protrusions arising from plasma treatment are set to be responsible for the hydrophobicity. Chemical sputtering and physical sputtering are seen to influence the surface morphology on account of sufficient electron energies and increased plasma potential.

  11. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck's law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author)

  12. The Electron Density in Explosive Transition Region Events Observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the intensity ratio of the O IV line at 1401.16 Å to the Si IV line at 1402.77 Å in Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectra. This intensity ratio is important if it can be used to measure high electron densities that cannot be measured using line intensity ratios of two different O IV lines from the multiplet within the IRIS wavelength range. Our discussion is in terms of considerably earlier observations made from the Skylab manned space station and other spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft. The earlier data on the O IV and Si IV ratio and other intersystem line ratios not available to IRIS are complementary to IRIS data. In this paper, we adopt a simple interpretation based on electron density. We adopt a set of assumptions and calculate the electron density as a function of velocity in the Si IV line profiles of two explosive events. At zero velocity the densities are about 2-3 × 1011 cm-3, and near 200 km s-1 outflow speed the densities are about 1012 cm-3. The densities increase with outflow speed up to about 150 km s-1 after which they level off. Because of the difference in the temperature of formation of the two lines and other possible effects such as non-ionization equilibrium, these density measurements do not have the precision that would be available if there were some additional lines near the formation temperature of O IV.

  13. Impact of Surface Treatment on the Structural and Electronic Properties of Polished CdZnTe Surfaces for Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Suleyman; Aqariden, F.; Chang, Y.; Grein, C.; Li, Jin; Kioussis, N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the effects of surface treatments on the structural and electronic properties of chemomechanically polished Cd0.9Zn0.1Te before contact deposition. Specifically, polished CdZnTe (CZT) samples were treated with four distinct chemical etchants: (1) bromine methanol (BM), (2) bromine in lactic acid, (3) bromine in methanol followed by bromine-20% lactic acid in ethylene glycol, and (4) hydrochloric acid (HCl). The surface structure and surface electronic properties were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images showed that three of the four etchants significantly altered the surface morphology and structure of CZT. All etchants created smoother surfaces; however, all except HCl also introduced high densities of defects. HCl was found to not affect the surface structure. XPS measurements indicated that a thick, ˜3 nm to 4 nm, TeO2 layer formed about 1 h after etching; hence, it is very important to process devices immediately after etching to prevent oxide formation.

  14. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  15. IrPd nanoalloys: simulations, from surface segregation to local electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamiharintsoa, T. H. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France); Rakotomahevitra, A. [Institut pour la Maîtrise de l’Énergie, Faculté des sciences d’Antananarivo (Madagascar); Piccolo, L. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon IRCELYON, UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1 (France); Goyhenex, C., E-mail: christine.goyhenex@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Using semi-empirical modeling, namely tight-binding at different levels of accuracy, the chemical, crystallographic, and electronic structures of bimetallic IrPd nanoparticles are characterized. For the purpose, model cuboctahedral particles containing 561 atoms are considered. Atomistic simulations show that core–shell nanoparticles are highly stable, with a strong surface segregation of Pd, at least for one atomic shell thickness. Within self-consistent tight-binding calculations founded on the density functional theory, an accurate insight is given into the electronic structure of these materials which have a high potential as catalysts.

  16. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  17. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...... moments are computed using the same geometries (MP2/6-31G*) and basis set (TZVP) as in our previous ab initio benchmark study on electronically excited states. The results from TD-DFT (with the functionals BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP) and from DFT/MRCI are compared against the previous high-level ab initio...

  18. Density-functional calculations of the surface tension of liquid Al and Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, D.; Grimson, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the surface tensions of liquid Al and Na are described using the full ionic density functional formalism of Wood and Stroud (1983). Surface tensions are in good agreement with experiment in both cases, with results substantially better for Al than those found previously in the gradient approximation. Preliminary minimization with respect to surface profile leads to an oscillatory profile superimposed on a nearly steplike ionic density disribution; the oscillations have a wavellength of about a hardsphere diameter.

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  20. Assembling phosphorene flexagons for 2D electron-density-guided nanopatterning and nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kisung; Jang, Woosun; Soon, Aloysius

    2017-07-27

    To build upon the rich structural diversity in the ever-increasing polymorphic phases of two-dimensional phosphorene, we propose different assembly methods (namely, the "bottom-up" and "top-down" approaches) that involve four commonly reported parent phases (i.e. the α-, β-, γ-, and δ-phosphorene) in combination with the lately reported remarkably low-energy one-dimensional defects in α-phosphorene. In doing so, we generate various periodically repeated phosphorene patterns in these so-called phosphorene flexagons and present their local electron density (via simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images). These interesting electron density patterns seen in the flexagons (mimicking symmetry patterns that one may typically see in a kaleidoscope) may assist as potential 2D templates where electron-density-guided nanopatterning and nanofabrication in complex organized nanoarchitectures are important.

  1. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... of electron density studies in connection with the UN declared International Year of Crystallography in 2014. In addition, a number of reviews on the method have very recently appeared showing that the time is ripe to look back on the achievements of the last 10 years and also to look ahead to see where...... the research in the area is directed. The method of electron density determination itself, as we shall see later, is strongly dependent on the access to very accurate X-ray structure factors collected to a high scattering angle. Data that fulfill these criteria are now becoming increasingly available due...

  2. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  3. Likelihood-based modification of experimental crystal structure electron density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Sante Fe, NM

    2005-04-16

    A maximum-likelihood method for improves an electron density map of an experimental crystal structure. A likelihood of a set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is formed for the experimental crystal structure as (1) the likelihood of having obtained an observed set of structure factors {F.sub.h.sup.OBS } if structure factor set {F.sub.h } was correct, and (2) the likelihood that an electron density map resulting from {F.sub.h } is consistent with selected prior knowledge about the experimental crystal structure. The set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is then adjusted to maximize the likelihood of {F.sub.h } for the experimental crystal structure. An improved electron density map is constructed with the maximized structure factors.

  4. Reassessment of the electron density in Cu2O using γ-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Wolfgang; Reehuis, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    The electron-density distribution in Cu2O has been critically reexamined to test controversial conclusions from earlier experimental and theoretical studies. The electron density is derived via multipole refinement of high-quality single-crystal diffraction data, collected at room temperature with 316.5 keV gamma radiation. Four γ-lines in the energy range 200-600 keV have been used to extrapolate extinction-free low-order structure factors. The remaining extinction corrections refine to a crystal mosaicity identical to the observed one. There is no support for anharmonic contributions to the thermal parameters. Important features of the derived electron density are (i) a partially filled d_{z^2} orbital, (ii) an incomplete ionization of Cu and O, and (iii) no interstitial Cu-Cu charge pileup, thereby refuting the covalent bonding hypothesis.

  5. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B. [Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bruhwiler, David L. [RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies LLC (United States); Smith, Jonathan [Tech-X UK Ltd, Daresbury, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom); Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G. [Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Hidding, Bernhard [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical “plasma torch” distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  6. Electron at the Surface of Water: Dehydrated or Not?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlig, Frank; Maršálek, Ondřej; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2013), s. 338-343 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrated electron * surface solvation * ab initio molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.687, year: 2013

  7. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental design: Thirty ...

  8. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  9. Diagnostics of electron density of laser-produced plasma from the XUV spectra of Ag XIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wenzhong; Zhang Tanxin; He Shaotang; Gu Yuqiu; You Yonglu; Jiang Wenmian

    1999-12-01

    The XUV spectra from Ag XIX of laser-produced plasma are measured. The density dependence of Δn = 0(4-4) transitions from Ag XIX has been studied in a density range 10 17 -10 22 cm -3 with the collisional radiative model. The theoretical model includes the effect of cascading from n = 5 states on the population of the n = 4 levels. In addition, optical depth effects on the line intensities were considered. The two transitions of 4d 2 D 5/2 -4f 2 F 7/2 and 4p 2 P 3/2 -4d 2 D 5/2 remain close to each other and are unblended with other lines. Calculations of their radiation intensity ratio vs the electron density are performed. Electron density of laser produced plasma has been deduced from the ratio

  10. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  11. Investigation of bulk electron densities for dose calculations on cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.; Parker, J.; Gupta, S.; Hatton, J.; Tang, C.; Capp, A.; Denham, J.W.; Wright, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: If cone-beam CT images are to be used for dose calculations, then the images must be able to provide accurate electron density information. Twelve patients underwent twice weekly cone-beam CT scans in addition to the planning CT scan. A standardised 5-field treatment plan was applied to 169 of the CBCT images. Doses were calculated using the original electron density values in the CBCT and with bulk electron densities applied. Bone was assigned a density of 288 HU, and all other tissue was assigned to be water equivalent (0 HU). The doses were compared to the dose calculated on the original planning CT image. Using the original HU values in the cone-beam images, the average dose del i vered by the plans from all 12 patients was I. I % lower than the intended 200 cOy delivered on the original CT plans (standard devia tion 0.7%, maximum difference -2.93%). When bulk electron densities were applied to the cone-beam images, the average dose was 0.3% lower than the original CT plans (standard deviation 0.8%, maximum difference -2.22%). Compared to using the original HU values, applying bulk electron densities to the CBCT images improved the dose calculations by almost I %. Some variation due to natural changes in anatomy should be expected. The application of bulk elec tron densities to cone beam CT images has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations due to inaccurate H U values. Acknowledgements This work was partially funded by Cancer Council NSW Grant Number RG 07-06.

  12. Effect of plasma density around Io on local electron heating in the Io plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kagitani, M.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Misawa, H.; Kasaba, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Sakanoi, T.; Koga, R.; Ryo, A.; Suzuki, F.; Hikida, R.

    2017-12-01

    HISAKI observation of Io plasma torus (IPT) with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength range is a useful probe to access plasma environment in inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. Emissions from sulfur and oxygen ions in EUV range are caused by electron impact excitation and their intensity is well correlated with the abundance of hot electron in IPT. Previous observation showed that the brightness was enhanced downstream of the satellite Io, indicating that efficient electron heating takes place at Io and/or just downstream of Io. Detailed analysis of the emission intensity shows that the brightness depends on the magnetic longitude at Io and primary and secondary peaks appear in the longitude ranges of 100-130 and 250-340 degrees, respectively. The peak position and amplitude are slightly different between dawn and dusk sides. Here, we introduce inhomogeneous IPT density model in order to investigate relation between the emission intensity and local plasma density around Io in detail. An empirical IPT model is used for spatial distribution of ion and electron densities in the meridional plane. To include longitude and local time asymmetry in IPT, we consider (1)dawnward shift of IPT due to global convection electric field, (2) offset of Jupiter's dipole magnetic field, and (3) tilt of IPT with respect to Io's orbital plane. The modeled electron density at the position of Io as a function of magnetic longitude at Io shows similar profile with the ion emission intensity derived from the observation. This result suggests that energy extracted around Io and/or efficiency of electron heating is closely related to the plasma density around Io and longitude and local time dependences is explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of plasma density in IPT. A part of the energy extracted around Io could be transferred to the Jovian ionosphere along the magnetic field line and cause bright aurora spots and strong radio emissions.

  13. Electronic structure at metal-smiconductor surfaces and interfaces: effects of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the study of the electronic structure at metal and semiconductor surfaces or interfaces, with special emphasis in the effects of disorder and local microstructure upon them. Various factors which determine this structure are presented and those of central importance are identified. A model that allows the efficient and exact calculation of the local density of states at disordered interfaces is described. This model is based on a tight-binding hamiltonian that has enough flexibility so as to allow an adequate description of real solids. The disorder is taken into account by including stochastic perturbations in the diagonal elements of the hamiltonian in a site orbital basis. These perturbations are taken at each layer from a lorentzian probability distribution. An exact expression for the calculation of the local density of states is derived and applied to a model surface built up from a type orbitals arranged in a simple cubic lattice. The effects of disorder on the local densities of states and on the existence of surface Tamm states are studied. The properties of the electronic states with this kind of model of disorder are considered. The self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of the Si(111) - (1x1) surface is presented. The effects of disorder on the electronic properties such as the work function or the position of surface states within the gap are evaluated. The surface of the metallic compound NiSi 2 is also treated. The first self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of its (111) surface is presented. The electronic structure of the Si/NiSi 2 (111) interfaces is calculated for the two types of junctions that can be grown experimentally. The origin of the difference between the Schottky barrier heights at both interfaces is discussed. The results are compared with available experimental data. The implications of this calculation on existing theories about the microscopic mechanism that causes

  14. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  15. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  16. Modelling the experimental electron density: only the synergy of various approaches can tackle the new challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Macchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron density is a fundamental quantity that enables understanding of the chemical bonding in a molecule or in a solid and the chemical/physical property of a material. Because electrons have a charge and a spin, two kinds of electron densities are available. Moreover, because electron distribution can be described in momentum or in position space, charge and spin density have two definitions and they can be observed through Bragg (for the position space or Compton (for the momentum space diffraction experiments, using X-rays (charge density or polarized neutrons (spin density. In recent years, we have witnessed many advances in this field, stimulated by the increased power of experimental techniques. However, an accurate modelling is still necessary to determine the desired functions from the acquired data. The improved accuracy of measurements and the possibility to combine information from different experimental techniques require even more flexibility of the models. In this short review, we analyse some of the most important topics that have emerged in the recent literature, especially the most thought-provoking at the recent IUCr general meeting in Montreal.

  17. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørskov, Jens K.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future challenges. PMID:21220337

  18. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future...

  19. Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norskov, Jens

    2011-05-19

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

  20. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... to the technical developments driven not least by the efforts from large commercial manufacturers such as Bruker AXS and Agilent Technologies. It is also not unwarranted to claim that the electron density community is a driving force in this technological improvement as it is essential to push these instruments...

  1. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    encountered in single-crystal studies of small-unit-cell inorganic structures can be overcome with synchrotron powder diffraction. It is shown that the standard Hansen-Coppens multipole model is not flexible enough to fit the static theoretical structure factors, whereas fitting of thermally smeared structure...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  2. Critical density for Landau damping in a two-electron-component plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, Constantin F.; López, Rodrigo A.; Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    The asymptotic evolution of an initial perturbation in a collisionless two-electron-component plasma with different temperatures is studied numerically. The transition between linear and nonlinear damping regimes is determined by slowly varying the density of the secondary electron-component using high-resolution Vlasov-Poisson simulations. It is shown that, for fixed amplitude perturbations, this transition behaves as a critical phenomenon with time scales and field amplitudes exhibiting power-law dependencies on the threshold density, similar to the critical amplitude behavior in a single-component plasma.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of line electron density and Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Ma, C.H.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new diagnostic system utilizing a submillimetre-wave, phase-modulated polarimeter/interferometer has been used to simultaneously measure the time evolution of the line-averaged electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The measurements, performed along four chords of the plasma column, have been correlated with poloidal field changes associated with a ramp in the Ohmic-heating current and by neutral-beam injection. These are the first simultaneous measurements of line electron density and Faraday rotation to be made along a chord of submillimetre laser beam in a tokamak plasma. (author)

  4. Surface hardening of AISI 4340 steel by electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chienchun; Hwang Jiunren

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of electron beam (EB) surface hardening on the abrasive wear property of AISI 4340 steel. The heat treatment conditions were varied so that the influence of microstructures on the wear resistance could be evaluated. A dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion test was selected to evaluate the high stress wear properties. The results show that the weight loss decreases with increasing hardness of surface layer or base material. The EB surface hardening can improve the abrasive wear resistance by about 10%. The best heat treatment process for AISI 4340 steel against abrasive wear is oil quenching from 840 C, tempering at 370 C, the EB surface hardening under heat input of 135-150 J mm -1 . The width and depth of the wear tracks are reduced after the EB surface hardening treatment. (orig.)

  5. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, J; Sonnad, K; Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Krasnykh, A; Pivi, M

    2009-01-01

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solen...

  6. Study of the density of electrons in momentum space in the Al-Li-Cu icosahedral phase by means of positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Nanao, Susumu [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo 106 (Japan); Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1997-12-15

    The three-dimensional momentum density of annihilating electron - positron pairs has been studied for a single Al-Li-Cu icosahedral quasicrystal. A direct Fourier transform method is employed to reconstruct the three-dimensional momentum density from measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2 D-ACAR). The crystallographic anisotropy in the momentum density is observed to be very small. The asphericity of the Fermi surface is not found explicitly within the experimental resolution in the momentum space. The features of the three-dimensional electron - positron momentum density agree with those obtained by means of Compton profile measurement. It is suggested that a strong lattice - electron interaction at the Fermi level occurs in this icosahedral phase. (author)

  7. Isochoric heating and strong blast wave formation driven by fast electrons in solid-density targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. J.; Vauzour, B.; Touati, M.; Gremillet, L.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Ceccotti, T.; Bouillaud, R.; Deneuville, F.; Floquet, V.; Fourment, C.; Hadj-Bachir, M.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, Ph; d'Oliveira, P.; Reau, F.; Samaké, A.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally investigate the fast (metallic foils and subsequent high-pressure hydrodynamics induced by energetic electrons driven by high-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses. The early-time temperature profile inside the target is measured from the streaked optical pyrometry of the target rear side. This is further characterized from benchmarked simulations of the laser-target interaction and the fast electron transport. Despite a modest laser energy (laser-based platform dedicated to high-energy-density physics studies.

  8. Inertial electron instability in low-density current-carrying plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basova, S.V.; Varentsova, S.A.; Gordeev, A.V.; Gulin, A.V.; Shuvaev, V.Yu.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of a low-density current-carrying plasma with finite electron inertia and motionless ions is studied. It is shown analytically and numerically that an instability exists when the quantity H = H + (m e c/e)dv/dr changes sign as a function of position, where H is the magnetic field and v is the current drift velocity of the electrons. The growth rates for specific current configurations are obtained by numerical calculation

  9. Cooling of high-density and power electronics by means of heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbeling, L.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes how heat pipes can be used for cooling modern electronic equipment, with numerous advantages over air-cooled systems. A brief review of heat-pipe properties is given, with a detailed description of a functioning prototype. This is a single-width CAMAC unit containing high-density electronic circuits cooled by three heat pipes, and allowing a dissipation of over 120 W instead of the normal maximum of 20 W. (orig.)

  10. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of

  11. Study of electron density and its fluctuations in tokamaks plasmas by fast infrared interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1982-10-01

    The electron density knowledge in tokamak plasma is fundamental for controlled fusion research. Its study can be made by interferometric measurement of plasma refraction index. Density and density fluctuation measurements are given for present and future tokamak, the wavelength used must be in the far infrared. The interferometer used type employs two identical lasers. Waveguide type submillimetric lasers, optically pumped by a CO 2 laser, have been developed and optimized. Detectors used are Schottky diodes. The interferometer allows a radial study of the plasma and presents a great stability during the measurement [fr

  12. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  13. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis resu...

  14. Insertion torques influenced by bone density and surface roughness of HA–TiO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, T.; Chen, Y.; Nie, X., E-mail: xnie@uwindsor.ca

    2013-12-31

    Bio-ceramic TiO{sub 2} coatings containing calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were deposited onto Ti–6Al–4V alloy screws using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) processes in an alkaline electrolyte with hydroxyapatite (HA) suspension. Coating on each screw had different surface roughness and morphology. Insertion torque (IT) of the coated screws in low (10 pcf, pounds per cubic feet), medium–high (20 pcf), and high (40 pcf) density of artificial bones was measured in comparison with that of the uncoated and sandblasted screws having similar surface roughness. Higher insertion torques and final seating torques were obtained in the coated screws which may result in less micro-movement during the primary implantation stage and thus lower the risk of implant failure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that all coatings still adhesively remained on the screw surfaces after inserted into the bones with different densities. The relationship between coefficient of friction and surface roughness was also addressed to better understand the results of insertion torque. It was found that a lower density bone (similar to aged bone) would need a surface-rougher coated screw to achieve a high torque while a high density bone can have a wide range of selections for surface roughness of the screw. - Highlights: • The insertion torque of PEO-coated screws is higher than machined and sandblasting implants. • Lower density bone needs a rougher coated implant to increase the insertion torque. • The composite HA–TiO{sub 2} coating could benefit dental implants in both primary and secondary stability stages.

  15. An approximate geostrophic streamfunction for use in density surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Trevor J.; Klocker, Andreas

    An approximate expression is derived for the geostrophic streamfunction in approximately neutral surfaces, φn, namely φ={1}/{2}Δpδ˜˜-{1}/{12}{T}/{bΘρ}ΔΘΔ-∫0pδ˜˜ dp'. This expression involves the specific volume anomaly δ˜˜ defined with respect to a reference point (S,Θ˜˜,p˜˜) on the surface, Δ p and ΔΘ are the differences in pressure and Conservative Temperature with respect to p˜˜ and Θ˜˜, respectively, and TbΘ is the thermobaric coefficient. This geostrophic streamfunction is shown to be more accurate than previously available choices of geostrophic streamfunction such as the Montgomery streamfunction. Also, by writing expressions for the horizontal differences on a regular horizontal grid of a localized form of the above geostrophic streamfunction, an over-determined set of equations is developed and solved to numerically obtain a very accurate geostrophic streamfunction on an approximately neutral surface; the remaining error in this streamfunction is caused only by neutral helicity.

  16. Microwave Transmission Measurement of the Electron Cloud Density in the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T F; Byrd, J; De Santis, S; Sonnad, K G; Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Roncarolo, F

    2008-01-01

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic...

  17. The influence of the edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beam propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelli, N.; Balakin, A.A.; Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation...... are estimated in a vacuum beam propagation between the edge density layer and the EC resonance absorption layer. Consequences on the EC beam propagation are investigated by using a simplified model in which the density fluctuations are described by a single harmonic oscillation. In addition, quasi......-optical calculations are shown by using edge density fluctuations as calculated by two-dimensional interchange turbulence simulations and validated with the experimental data [O. E. Garcia et al, Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 667]...

  18. Electron momentum density and band structure calculations of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadkhiya, Laxman [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Arora, Gunjan [Department of Physics, Techno India NJR Institute of Technology, Udaipur 313002, Rajasthan (India); Rathor, Ashish [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2011-12-15

    We have measured isotropic experimental Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe by employing high energy (662 keV) {gamma}-radiation from a {sup 137}Cs isotope. To compare our experiment, we have also computed energy bands, density of states, electron momentum densities and Compton profiles of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases of GeTe using the linear combination of atomic orbitals method. The electron momentum density is found to play a major role in understanding the topology of bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level. It is seen that the density functional theory (DFT) with generalised gradient approximation is relatively in better agreement with the experiment than the local density approximation and hybrid Hartree-Fock/DFT. - Highlights: > Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe using a 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer. > Compared experimental Compton data with density functional theory. > Reported energy bands and density of states of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe. > EVED profiles analysed to check the covalent character.

  19. Synthesis and electronic structure of low-density monoliths of nanoporous nanocrystalline anatase TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S O; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y M; van Buuren, T; Satcher, J H

    2004-08-13

    Monolithic nanocrystalline anatase titania aerogels are synthesized by the epoxide sol-gel method followed by thermal annealing at 550 C. These aerogels are formed by {approx}10-20 nm size anatase nanoparticles which are randomly oriented and interconnected into an open-cell solid network. Aerogel monoliths have an apparent density of {approx}6% and a surface area of {approx} 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and soft x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy reveal good crystallinity of the anatase nanoparticles forming the aerogel skeleton.

  20. Dissociative electron attachment on surfaces and in bulk media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-01-01

    A theory of dissociative electron attachment to molecules condensed at surfaces and embedded within bulk media is developed. The theory of low-energy electron diffraction is used to obtain the width for electron-molecule resonance scattering in the condensed phase from the width for the gas phase. It is then employed for the calculation of dissociative attachment in the framework of the nonlocal complex potential theory. Specific calculations using the effective mass approximation are carried out for electron attachment to CH 3 Cl and CF 3 Cl molecules physisorbed on the surface of a Kr film. The role of image states and image-potential resonances is analyzed. The results show an increase by several orders of magnitude in the cross section for physisorbed molecules as compared with gas-phase molecules. This is in general agreement with the measured cross sections. However, the position of the peak in the cross section for CH 3 Cl is significantly shifted towards higher energies as compared to experiment [K. Nagesha et al., J. Chem. Phys. 114, 4934 (2001)], and the magnitude of the calculated cross section for CF 3 Cl at the surface is significantly higher than the measured value. Possible reasons for disagreements are analyzed

  1. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations of the adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wu; Li, Xin; Bian, Wen-Wen; Fan, Xiu-Juan; Qi, Jing-Yao

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing attention in the unique biological and medical properties of graphene, and it is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. Despite the importance of biomolecules-graphene interactions, a detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanism and features of biomolecules onto the surfaces of graphene is lacking. To address this, we have performed density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods exploring the adsorption geometries, adsorption energies, electronic band structures, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption dynamics of l-leucine (model biomolecule)/graphene composite system. DFT calculations confirmed the energetic stability of adsorption model and revealed that electronic structure of graphene can be controlled by the adsorption direction of l-leucine. MD simulations further investigate the potential energy and van der Waals energy for the interaction processes of l-leucine/graphene system at different temperatures and pressures. We find that the van der Waals interaction between the l-leucine and the graphene play a dominant role in the adsorption process under a certain range of temperature and pressure, and the l-leucine molecule could be adsorbed onto graphene spontaneously in aqueous solution.

  2. Relationships between electron density, height and sub-peak ionospheric thickness in the night equatorial ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, K. J. W.; Harris, T. J.; Sjarifudin, M.

    2006-07-01

    The development and decay of the southern equatorial anomaly night-time peak in electron density as seen at a number of ionosonde reflection points extending from New Guinea and Indonesia into northern Australia was examined in terms of the characteristic rise and fall in height associated with the sunset ionisation-drift vortex at the magnetic equator. The observations relate to measurements made in November 1997. Following sunset, the ionospheric profile was observed to narrow as the maximum electron density increased during a fall in height that took the peak of the layer at Vanimo and Sumedang down to some 240 km. The fall was followed by a strong rise in which the electron density sub-peak profile expanded from a slab width (as given by POLAN) of 20 km to over 100km with no corresponding change in peak electron density. The post-sunset equatorial fall in height and associated changes in profile density and thickness continued to be seen with diminishing amplitude and increasing local time delay in moving from the anomaly peak at Vanimo to the southernmost site of observation at Townsville. Secondary events on a lesser scale sometimes occurred later in the night and may provide evidence of the multiple vortices suggested by Kudeki and Bhattacharyya (1999). Doppler measurements of vertical velocity as seen at Sumedang in Java are compared with the observed changes in electron density profile in the post-sunset period. The normal post-sunset variation in ionospheric parameters was disrupted on the night of 7 November, the night before a negative ionospheric storm was observed.

  3. Conventional and acoustic surface plasmons on noble metal surfaces: a time-dependent density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jun; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    First-principles calculations of the conventional and acoustic surface plasmons (CSPs and ASPs) on the (111) surfaces of Cu, Ag, and Au are presented. The effect of s-d interband transitions on both types of plasmons is investigated by comparing results from the local density approximation...

  4. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields

  5. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth\\'s ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields. Within this model framework the effect of the

  6. Investigation of the Electron Density Variation During the 21 August 2017 Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Dandenault, P. B.; Galkin, I. A.; Hamel, R.; Richards, P. G.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a comparison of modeled and measured electron densities for the 21 August 2017 solar eclipse across the USA. The location of the instrument was (43.81°N, 247.32°E) where the maximum obscuration of 99.6% occurred at 17.53 hr UT on 21 August. The solar apparent time was 9.96 hr, and the duration of the eclipse was 2.7 hr. It was found that if it is assumed that there are no chromosphere emissions at totality, 30% coronal emission remaining at totality gave the best fit to the electron density variation at 150 km. The 30% coronal emission estimate has uncertainties associated with respect to uncertainties in the solar spectrum, the measured electron density, and the amount of chromosphere emissions remaining at totality. The agreement between the modeled and measured electron densities is excellent at 150 km with the assumed 30% coronal emission at totality. At other altitudes, the agreement is very good, but the altitude profile would be improved if the model peak electron density (NmF2) decayed more slowly to better match the data. The minimum NmF2 in the model occurs 10 min after totality when it decreases to 0.55 from its noneclipse value. The minimum of the NmF2 data occurs between 6 and 10 min after totality but is 15% larger. The total electron content decreases to 0.65 of its preeclipse value. These relative changes agree well with those predicted by others prior to the eclipse.

  7. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  8. Atomic configuration of hydrogenated and clean tantalum(111) surfaces: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment and electron polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Maolin; Li, Lei; Guo, Yongling; Yao, Chuang; Peng, Cheng; Sun, Chang Q.

    2018-01-01

    By studying the tantalum (Ta)(111) surface with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, we determined binding energy values for the clean Ta(111) (+3.068 eV) and hydrogenated Ta(111) (+3.421 eV) surfaces with an isolated atom level of 18.977 eV. Using the bond-band barrier and zone-selective electron spectroscopy correlation, we investigated the mechanism of hydrogenation adsorption on the Ta(111) surface. We found the local densities of states of the first layer of Ta atoms in the reconstructed structure, which formed on the adsorbent hydrogen of the surface chemical bond contracts and dipole polarization. Moreover, we showed that on the Ta(111) surface, the hydrogen-induced surface core level shifts are dominated by quantum entrapment and are proportional to the calculated hybridized orbitals of the valence band. The latter is therefore correlated to the local surface chemical reactivity and is useful for other adsorbate systems on transition metals.

  9. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  10. A new method of electron density measurement by Fabry-Perot interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    A new method for determining the electron density of a thin plasma by means of Fabry-Perot interferometry is proposed. The interferometer consists of two plasma layers and dielectric material surrounded by two plasma layers. The transmittance of electromagnetic waves across the interferometer is calculated, and Fabry-Perot resonances are frequency when the width of a plasma layer is known. (author)

  11. Influence of the curve density relative electron in dosimetry clinic in treatments stereo tactics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno Saiz, C.; Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Casado Villalon, F. J.; Parra Osorio, V.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Garcia Pareja, S.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the difference between clinical dosimetry in the treatments with radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy fractional obtained from the relative Electron density curve (Schneider 1996) tabulated and provided with the scanner's radiation therapy. (Author)

  12. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Abbema, Joanne K.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides

  13. Density functional study of AgScO 2: Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... The density functional theory (DFT) in the framework of full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) scheme has been used for the present calculations with local densityapproximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Electronic properties deal with energy bands and ...

  14. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomerz, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthermore, we have included a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (Author) 13 refs

  15. Density functional theory for strongly-interacting electrons: Perspectives for Physics and Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori Giorgi, P.; Seidl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improving the accuracy and thus broadening the applicability of electronic density functional theory (DFT) is crucial to many research areas, from material science, to theoretical chemistry, biophysics and biochemistry. In the last three years, the mathematical structure of the strong-interaction

  16. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthemore, a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, is included in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (author) [es

  17. EDMA: a computer program for topological analysis of discrete electron densities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Prathapa, S.J.; van Smaalen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, Part 3 (2012), 575-580 ISSN 0021-8898 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : discrete electron density * maximum entropy method * atoms in molecules Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2012

  18. Electron density measurement with dual-energy x-ray CT using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikoshi, Masami; Tsunoo, Takanori; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Masahiro; Noda, Yutaka; Ohno, Yumiko; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2003-01-01

    Monochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) at two different energies provides information about electron density of human tissue without ambiguity due to the beam hardening effect. This information makes the treatment planning for proton and heavy-ion radiotherapy more precise. We have started a feasibility study on dual energy x-ray CT by using synchrotron radiation. A translation-rotation scanning CT system was developed for quantitative measurement in order to clarify what precision in the measurement was achieved. Liquid samples of solutions of K 2 HPO 4 and solid samples of tissue equivalent materials were used to simulate human tissue. The experiments were carried out using monochromatic x-rays with energies of 40, 70 and 80 keV produced by monochromatizing synchrotron radiation. The solid samples were also measured in a complementary method using high-energy carbon beams to evaluate the electron densities. The measured electron densities were compared with the theoretical values or the values measured in the complementary method. It was found that these values were in agreement in 0.9% on average. Effective atomic numbers were obtained as well from dual-energy x-ray CT. The tomographic image based on each of the electron densities and the effective atomic number presents a different feature of the material, and its contrast drastically differs from that in a conventional CT image

  19. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1− xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    II–VI semiconductor alloys; band structure; charge density; empirical pseudopotential method. Abstract. Electronic band structure calculations are performed for the BeZn1−Te (0 ≤ ≤ 1 in steps of 0.2) alloys following the empirical pseudopotential method. The alloying effects are modelled through the modified virtual ...

  20. Efficient k⋅p method for the calculation of total energy and electronic density of states

    OpenAIRE

    Iannuzzi, Marcella; Parrinello, Michele

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating the electronic structure in large systems with a fully converged BZ sampling is presented. The method is based on a k.p-like approximation developed in the framework of the density functional perturbation theory. The reliability and efficiency of the method are demostrated in test calculations on Ar and Si supercells

  1. YUP.SCX: coaxing atomic models into medium resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert K-Z; Devkota, Batsal; Harvey, Stephen C

    2008-08-01

    The structures of large macromolecular complexes in different functional states can be determined by cryo-electron microscopy, which yields electron density maps of low to intermediate resolutions. The maps can be combined with high-resolution atomic structures of components of the complex, to produce a model for the complex that is more accurate than the formal resolution of the map. To this end, methods have been developed to dock atomic models into density maps rigidly or flexibly, and to refine a docked model so as to optimize the fit of the atomic model into the map. We have developed a new refinement method called YUP.SCX. The electron density map is converted into a component of the potential energy function to which terms for stereochemical restraints and volume exclusion are added. The potential energy function is then minimized (using simulated annealing) to yield a stereochemically-restrained atomic structure that fits into the electron density map optimally. We used this procedure to construct an atomic model of the 70S ribosome in the pre-accommodation state. Although some atoms are displaced by as much as 33A, they divide themselves into nearly rigid fragments along natural boundaries with smooth transitions between the fragments.

  2. Pressure dependence of electron density distribution and d-p-π hybridization in titanate perovskite ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu; Nakamoto, Yuki; Ahart, Muhtar; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2018-04-01

    Electron density distributions of PbTi O3 , BaTi O3 , and SrTi O3 were determined by synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction up to 55 GPa at 300 K and ab initio quantum chemical molecular orbital (MO) calculations, together with a combination of maximum entropy method calculations. The intensity profiles of Bragg peaks reveal split atoms in both ferroelectric PbTi O3 and BaTi O3 , reflecting the two possible positions occupied by the Ti atom. The experimentally obtained atomic structure factor was used for the determination of the deformation in electron density and the d-p-π hybridization between dx z (and dy z) of Ti and px (and py) of O in the Ti-O bond. Ab initio MO calculations proved the change of the molecular orbital coupling and of Mulliken charges with a structure transformation. The Mulliken charge of Ti in the Ti O6 octahedron increased in the ionicity with increasing pressure in the cubic phase. The bonding nature is changed with a decrease in the hybridization of the Ti-O bond and the localization of the electron density with increasing pressure. The hybridization decreases with pressure and disappears in the cubic paraelectric phase, which has a much more localized electron density distribution.

  3. Wormholes in chemical space connecting torus knot and torus link pi-electron density topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepa, Henry S

    2009-03-07

    Möbius aromaticities can be considered as deriving from cyclic delocalized pi-electron densities rho(r)(pi) which have the topological form of either a two-component torus link or a single-component torus knot. These two topological forms are distinguished by their (non-zero) linking number L(k), which describes how many times the two components of a torus link cross each other or the single component of a torus knot crosses with itself. The special case of Hückel or benzenoid aromaticity is associated with a pi-electron density that takes the form of a two-component torus link for which the linking number is zero. A class of molecule has been identified which here is termed a Janus aromatic, and which bears the characteristics of both a two-component torus link and a single-component torus knot in the topology of the pi-electron density. This is achieved by the formation of one (or more) wormholes or throats in the pi-electron density connecting the two torus forms, which can impart a Janus-like dual personality to the aromaticity of the system. The impact of such wormholes on the overall pi-delocalized aromaticity of such molecules is approximately estimated using a NICS(rcp) index, and subdivides into two types; those where the forms of aromaticity associated with a torus link and a torus knot cooperate and those where they oppose.

  4. Construction of New Electronic Density Functionals with Error Estimation Through Fitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petzold, V.; Bligaard, T.; Jacobsen, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possibilities and limitations for the development of new electronic density functionals through large-scale fitting to databases of binding energies obtained experimentally or through high-quality calculations. We show that databases with up to a few hundred entries allow for up...

  5. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  6. Low-latitude Model Electron Density Profiles using the IRI and CCIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    empirical basis with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90) and the CCIR models. Electron density profiles are computed using the median values of ionospheric data routinely scaled from ionograms at Ibadan (7.40N, 3.90E) and ...

  7. Electron density distribution and bonding in ZnSe and PbSe using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    structural refinement using JANA 2000, and then the re- fined structure factors have been utilized for MEM re- finements to elucidate the ... the appropriate methods in which the concept of entropy is introduced to handle the uncertainty properly. The principle of MEM is to obtain an electron density distri- bution, which is ...

  8. Measuring Density Profiles of Electrons and Heavy Particles in a Stable Axially Blown Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, J.; Stoller, P.; Galletti, B.; Doiron, C. B.; Sokolov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Two-color spatial carrier wave interferometry employing pulsed 532- and 671-nm lasers is used to measure the electron-density and heavy-particle-density profiles in the stagnation point of a stable, axially blown arc in argon for currents of 50 to 200 A and stagnation point pressures of 0.2 to 16 bar. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the free-electron contribution to the refractive index depends strongly on the wavelength, while that of the heavy particles does not. The high spatial resolution achieved allows the hot core of the arc to be readily distinguished from the surrounding boundary layer. A custom-built test device is used to ensure flow conditions that lead to a stable, axisymmetric arc; this permits the reconstruction of the density and temperature profiles using a single projection (interferometric image) of the refractive-index distribution through the arc (at two wavelengths). The arc radius determined from the heavy-particle density decreases with increasing stagnation pressure and increases with the current. These measurements are in good agreement with a simple axially blown arc model taking into account Ohmic heating, radiation losses, and enthalpy flow for core temperatures of approximately 16 500 K. The measured electron density at the center of the arc agrees well with a prediction based on local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  9. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  10. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. - Highlights: ► Electron density of normal and neoplastic breast tissues was measured using Compton scattering. ► Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to obtain the Compton scattering data. ► The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of samples. ► Adipose tissue shows the lowest electron density values whereas the malignant tissue the highest. ► Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%.

  11. Surface density profile and surface tension of the one-component classical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Senatore, G.; Trieste Univ.; Tosi, M.P.; Oxford Univ.

    1982-08-01

    The density profile and the interfacial tension of two classical plasmas in equilibrium at different densities are evaluated in the square-density-gradient approximation. For equilibrium in the absence of applied external voltage, the profile is oscillatory in the higher-density plasma and the interfacial tension is positive. The amplitude and phase of these oscillations and the magnitude of the interfacial tension are related to the width of the background profile. Approximate representations of the equilibrium profile by matching of its asymptotic forms are analyzed. A comparison with computer simulation data and a critical discussion of a local-density theory are also presented. (author)

  12. Recent activities on nuclear and electron density study by diffraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Advanced structure analysis is to know the detail structures in a crystal as atomic and electronic level and also to know the relation between the crystal structure and physical properties of the material. In this talk, I will emphasize the importance of the role of neutron single crystal experiments. As one of the examples, the comparison of electron density observed by x-ray crystal structure analysis and nuclear distribution observed by neutron structure analysis, especially in the hydrogen bond system, will be given. As a result, we found a large electronic polarization in a hydrogen atom, which plays an important role for the antiferroelectric phase transition. Other examples are the direct measurements of d-electron orbital using neutron magnetic structure analyses. MnF 2 (d 5 ) and Nd 2 CuO 4 (d 1 ) are examples. Finally, a π-electron distribution in an organic crystal using the similar technique will be shown

  13. International Workshop on Electronic Density Functional Theory : Recent Progress and New Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Vignale, Giovanni; Das, Mukunda

    1998-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the International Workshop on Electronic Density Functional Theory, held at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, in July 1996. Density functional theory, standing as it does at the boundary between the disciplines of physics, chemistry, and materials science, is a great mixer. Invited experts from North America, Europe, and Australia mingled with students from several disciplines, rapidly taking up the informal style for which Australia is famous. A list of participants is given at the end of the book. Density functional theory (DFT) is a subtle approach to the very difficult problem of predicting the behavior of many interacting particles. A major application is the study of many-electron systems. This was the workshop theme, embracing inter alia computational chemistry and condensed matter physics. DFT circumvents the more conceptually straightforward (but more computationally intensive) approach in which one solves the many-body Schrodinger equation. It relies instead on r...

  14. Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts as Tracers for Electron Density Fluctuations in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, V.; Hariharan, K.; Ramesh, R.

    2017-11-01

    We present an estimation of the electron density modulation index (δ{Ne}/Ne) for the first time using solar type IIIb radio burst observations. The mean value of δ{Ne}/Ne is calculated to be ≈ 0.006±0.002 over the heliocentric distance range r ≈1.6 - 2.2 R_{⊙}. The estimated {δ{Ne}}/{Ne} shows a power law dependence on r with a power law index ≈ 0.31±0.10. The wavenumber (k) spectrum for the electron density fluctuation ({δ{Ne}/Ne})2 values shows a Kolmogorov-like behavior. Using δ{Ne}/Ne and the Kolmogorov turbulence index, we estimated the amplitude of density turbulence [Cn2{(r)}] in the aforementioned range of r.

  15. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  16. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  17. Characteristics of temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature in helicon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiong; Cheng, Mousen; Guo, Dawei; Wang, Moge; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of considering electrochemical reactions and collision relations in detail, a direct numerical simulation model of a helicon plasma discharge with three-dimensional two-fluid equations was employed to study the characteristics of the temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature. With the assumption of weak ionization, the Maxwell equations coupled with the plasma parameters were directly solved in the whole computational domain. All of the partial differential equations were solved by the finite element solver in COMSOL MultiphysicsTM with a fully coupled method. In this work, the numerical cases were calculated with an Ar working medium and a Shoji-type antenna. The numerical results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of temporal evolution of the electron and ground atom density, which can be explained by the ion pumping effect. The evolution of the electron temperature is controlled by two schemes: electromagnetic wave heating and particle collision cooling. The high RF power results in a high peak electron temperature while the high gas pressure leads to a low steady temperature. In addition, an OES experiment using nine Ar I lines was conducted using a modified CR model to verify the validity of the results by simulation, showing that the trends of temporal evolution of electron density and temperature are well consistent with the numerically simulated ones.

  18. Bayesian modeling of JET Li-BES for edge electron density profiles using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, Jakob; Brix, Mathias; Ghim, Young-Chul; JET Contributors Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A Bayesian model for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system has been developed to infer edge electron density profiles. The 26 spatial channels measure emission profiles with ~15 ms temporal resolution and ~1 cm spatial resolution. The lithium I (2p-2s) line radiation in an emission spectrum is calculated using a multi-state model, which expresses collisions between the neutral lithium beam atoms and the plasma particles as a set of differential equations. The emission spectrum is described in the model including photon and electronic noise, spectral line shapes, interference filter curves, and relative calibrations. This spectral modeling gets rid of the need of separate background measurements for calculating the intensity of the line radiation. Gaussian processes are applied to model both emission spectrum and edge electron density profile, and the electron temperature to calculate all the rate coefficients is obtained from the JET high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system. The posterior distributions of the edge electron density profile are explored via the numerical technique and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplings. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., Proceedings of the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

  19. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjorchmar; Johansson, Martin; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO 2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm 2 have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and work function measurements. Energy spectra of electron emission from the devices under an applied bias voltage have been recorded for the clean Au surface and for two Cs coverages and simultaneous work function curves have been obtained. The electron emission onset is seen to appear at the surface work function. A method for cleaning the ex situ deposited Au top electrodes to a degree satisfactory to surface science studies has been developed, and a threshold for oxide damage by low-energy ion exposure between 0.5 and 1 keV has been determined.

  20. Simulating measures of wood density through the surface by Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penna, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Arno H.; Braga, Mario R.M.S.S.; Vasconcelos, Danilo C.; Carneiro, Clemente J.G.; Penna, Ariane G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo code (MCNP-4C) was used to simulate a nuclear densimeter for measuring wood densities nondestructively. An Americium source (E = 60 keV) and a NaI (Tl) detector were placed on a wood block surface. Results from MCNP shown that scattered photon fluxes may be used to determining wood densities. Linear regressions between scattered photons fluxes and wood density were calculated and shown correlation coefficients near unity. (author)

  1. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudikov, D.A.; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  2. Reduction of electron density in a plasma by injection of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, M. S.; Evans, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper, the authors have investigated the physics of various processes relevant to the reduction of electron density in a plasma by addition of water droplets; two processes have in particular been analyzed in some detail, viz, the electron attachment to charged dielectric droplets and the emission of negative ions by vaporization from these droplets. The results of these analyses have been applied to a study of the kinetics of reduction of electron density and charging of droplets in an initially overionized plasma, after addition of water droplets. A number of simplifying assumptions including uniform size and charge on droplets and negligible change in the radius of the droplet due to evaporation have been made.

  3. Density functional theory description of electronic properties of wurtzite zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, L.; Ekuma, C. E.; Zhao, G. L.; Bagayoko, D.

    2013-05-01

    We report calculated, electronic properties of wurtzite zinc oxide (w-ZnO). We solved self-consistently the two inherently coupled equations of density functional theory (DFT), following the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW) method as enhanced by the work of Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). We employed a local density approximation (LDA) potential and the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). Most of the calculated, electronic properties of w-ZnO are in excellent agreement with experiment, including our zero temperature band gap of 3.39 eV and the electron effective mass. The doubly self-consistent approach utilized in this work points to the ability of theory to predict accurately key properties of semiconductors and hence to inform and to guide the design and fabrication of semiconductor-based devices.

  4. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2014-01-01

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  5. First principles predictions of electron tunneling rates between atoms and crystalline surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidfeldt, Keith

    Charge transfer is a critical process that controls many important reactions such as photosynthesis, corrosion, and catalysis. We developed a quantitative method for calculating charge transfer rates using periodic density functional theory (DFT). This approach allows us to model from first principles the interaction between an adsorbate and arbitrary material surfaces. By deconvoluting the projected density of states of the ionization level of the atom, we can determine its width, which is proportional to the charge transfer rate. These rates can be used to predict important properties such as adsorbate excited state lifetimes and neutralization fractions for scattered ions. By comparing neutralization fractions for Li scattering off of Al(001) to experimental data, we validated our first principles method of predicting charge transfer rates. While our results are consistent with the classic Langmuir-Gurney (LG) model of adsorption for nearly-free-electron-like metal surfaces, we find several important deviations caused by the actual electronic structure of more complicated material surfaces. For example, we find that the d-band of transition metal surfaces mediates an intra-atomic hybridization of the Li ionization level. Secondly, we find that surface-projected band gaps (e.g., in Cu(111)) enhance the lifetimes of alkali atoms above surfaces containing such band gaps. In addition, our method allows us to also study atoms interacting with non-metallic surfaces where the LG model does not apply. For example, we find that alkali charge transfer rates are controlled by dangling bonds on covalently-bonded surfaces (e.g., Si(001)-(2xl)) instead of by the traditional image potential.

  6. A density functional theory study of the electronic properties of Os(II) and Os(III) complexes immobilized on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Boyle, N.M.; Albrecht, Tim; Murgida, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) study of an osmium polypyridyl complex adsorbed on Au(111). The osmium polypyridyl complex [Os(bpy)(2)(P0P)Cl](n+) [bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, P0P is 4,4'-bipyridine, n = 1 for osmium(II), and n = 2 for osmium(III)] is bound to the surface through the free...... with crystallographic structures reported in the literature. Oxidation of the complex has little effect on these structural features, but there is a substantial reordering of the electronic energy levels with corresponding changes in the electron density. Significantly, the highest occupied molecular orbital shifts...

  7. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn3N2(0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Wang, Kangkang; Takeuchi, Noboru; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Smith, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Spin-polarized first-principles total energy calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn 3 N 2 (0 0 1) surfaces. It is found that three surface terminations are energetically stable, in agreement with previous scanning tunneling microscopy experiments that have found three different electronic contrasts in their images. It is also found that in all three cases, the topmost layer has a MnN stoichiometry. Density of states calculations show a metallic behavior for all the stable structures with the most important contribution close to the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. Our Tersoff–Hamann scanning tunneling microscopy simulations are in good agreement with previous experimental results.

  8. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Johansson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm(2) have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission...... characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS...

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  11. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Is as Accurate as CASPT2 for Electronic Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Chad E; Ghosh, Soumen; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-02-04

    A correct description of electronically excited states is critical to the interpretation of visible-ultraviolet spectra, photochemical reactions, and excited-state charge-transfer processes in chemical systems. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory and a new kind of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here, we show that MC-PDFT with a first-generation on-top density functional performs as well as CASPT2 for an organic chemistry database including valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. The results are very encouraging for practical applications.

  12. Surface Electronic Structure of Hybrid Organo Lead Bromide Perovskite Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Komesu, Takashi

    2016-08-24

    The electronic structure and band dispersion of methylammonium lead bromide, CH3NH3PbBr3, has been investigated through a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES), as well as theoretical modeling based on density functional theory. The experimental band structures are consistent with the density functional calculations. The results demonstrate the presence of a dispersive valence band in MAPbBr3 that peaks at the M point of the surface Brillouin zone. The results also indicate that the surface termination of the CH3NH3PbBr3 is the methylammonium bromide (CH3NH3Br) layer. We find our results support models that predict a heavier hole effective mass in the region of -0.23 to -0.26 me, along the Γ (surface Brillouin center) to M point of the surface Brillouin zone. The surface appears to be n-type as a result of an excess of lead in the surface region. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  13. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  14. Energy densities of magnetic field and relativistic electrons at the innermost region of the M87 jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kino M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore energy densities of magnetic fields and relativistic electrons in M87 jet. Since the radio core at the base of the M87 jet is the optically thick surface against synchrotron self absorption (SSA, observations directly give the size and turnover frequency for SSA. Using the observed angular diameter 0.11 mas, which corresponds to 16 Schwarzschild radii of the central black hole with 6 × 109 solar mass, and the flux density of the radio core at 43 GHz, we estimate the energy densities of magnetic field (UB and relativistic electrons (Ue by comparing the standard SSA formula to the observed radio core. Together with the allowed total kinetic power of the M87 jet, we find that (i the allowed B is limited in the range 2 G ≤ B ≤ 13 G, and that (ii 0:18 ≤ Ue/UB ≤ 66 holds. Our results significantly constrain formation mechanism of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  15. Density-functional theory based on the electron distribution on the energy coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    2018-03-01

    We developed an electronic density functional theory utilizing a novel electron distribution n(ɛ) as a basic variable to compute ground state energy of a system. n(ɛ) is obtained by projecting the electron density n({\\boldsymbol{r}}) defined on the space coordinate {\\boldsymbol{r}} onto the energy coordinate ɛ specified with the external potential {\\upsilon }ext}({\\boldsymbol{r}}) of interest. It was demonstrated that the Kohn–Sham equation can also be formulated with the exchange-correlation functional E xc[n(ɛ)] that employs the density n(ɛ) as an argument. It turned out an exchange functional proposed in our preliminary development suffices to describe properly the potential energies of several types of chemical bonds with comparable accuracies to the corresponding functional based on local density approximation. As a remarkable feature of the distribution n(ɛ) it inherently involves the spatially non-local information of the exchange hole at the bond dissociation limit in contrast to conventional approximate functionals. By taking advantage of this property we also developed a prototype of the static correlation functional E sc including no empirical parameters, which showed marked improvements in describing the dissociations of covalent bonds in {{{H}}}2,{{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4 and {CH}}4 molecules.

  16. Analysis of the Effect of Electron Density Perturbations Generated by Gravity Waves on HF Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, M.; Elias, A. G.; Chum, J.; Cabrera, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, ray tracing of high frequency (HF) signals in ionospheric disturbed conditions is analyzed, particularly in the presence of electron density perturbations generated by gravity waves (GWs). The three-dimensional numerical ray tracing code by Jones and Stephenson, based on Hamilton's equations, which is commonly used to study radio propagation through the ionosphere, is used. An electron density perturbation model is implemented to this code based upon the consideration of atmospheric GWs generated at a height of 150 km in the thermosphere and propagating up into the ionosphere. The motion of the neutral gas at these altitudes induces disturbances in the background plasma which affects HF signals propagation. To obtain a realistic model of GWs in order to analyze the propagation and dispersion characteristics, a GW ray tracing method with kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity was applied. The IRI-2012, HWM14 and NRLMSISE-00 models were incorporated to assess electron density, wind velocities, neutral temperature and total mass density needed for the ray tracing codes. Preliminary results of gravity wave effects on ground range and reflection height are presented for low-mid latitude ionosphere.

  17. Electron density measurement of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using dispersion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Medical applications of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasmas have recently been attracting a great deal of attention, where many types of plasma sources have been developed to meet the purposes. For example, plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is now being studied for cancer treatment, has been produced by irradiating non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density to a culture medium. Meanwhile, in order to measure electron density in magnetic confinement plasmas, a CO2 laser dispersion interferometer has been developed and installed on the Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. The dispersion interferometer has advantages that the measurement is insensitive to mechanical vibrations and changes in neutral gas density. Taking advantage of these properties, we applied the dispersion interferometer to electron density diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas produced by the NU-Global HUMAP-WSAP-50 device, which is used for producing PAM. This study was supported by the Grant of Joint Research by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS).

  18. High frequency electric field spikes formed by electron beam-plasma interaction in plasma density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunell, H.; Loefgren, T.

    1997-02-01

    In the electron beam-plasma interaction at an electric double layer the beam density is much higher than in the classical beam-plasma experiments. The wave propagation takes place along the density gradient, that is present at the high potential side of the double layer. Such a case is studied experimentally by injecting the electron beam from a plane cathode, without any grids suppressing the gradient, and by particle simulations. The high frequency field concentrates in a sharp 'spike' with a half width of the order of one wavelength. The spike is found to be a standing wave surrounded by regions dominated by propagating waves. It forms at a position where its frequency is close to the local plasma frequency. The spike forms also when the electric field is well below the threshold for modulational instability, and long before a density cavity is formed in the simulations. Particle simulations reveal that, at the spike, there is a backward travelling wave that, when it is strongly damped, accelerates electrons back towards the cathode. In a simulation of a homogeneous plasma without the density gradient no spike is seen, and the wave is purely travelling instead of standing. 9 refs

  19. Electric field spikes formed by electron beam endash plasma interaction in plasma density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunell, H.; Loefgren, T.

    1997-01-01

    In the electron beam endash plasma interaction at an electric double layer the beam density is much higher than in the classical beam endash plasma experiments. The wave propagation takes place along the density gradient that is present at the high potential side of the double layer. Such a case is studied experimentally by injecting the electron beam from a plane cathode, without any grids suppressing the gradient, and by particle simulations. The high frequency field concentrates in a sharp open-quotes spikeclose quotes with a half width of the order of one wavelength. The spike is found to be a standing wave surrounded by regions dominated by propagating waves. It forms at a position where its frequency is close to the local plasma frequency. The spike forms also when the electric field is well below the threshold for modulational instability, and long before a density cavity is formed in the simulations. Particle simulations reveal that, at the spike, there is a backward traveling wave that, when it is strongly damped, accelerates electrons back towards the cathode. In a simulation of a homogeneous plasma without the density gradient no spike is seen, and the wave is purely travelling instead of standing. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  1. Adsorption of a metalorganic complex at a metal surface: A density functional theory study vs. model description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyrko, T., E-mail: tkos@amu.edu.pl; Ślusarski, T. [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-01-21

    A modification of the electronic and magnetic structure of a metalorganic complex by chemisorption at a metallic surface is addressed. The density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate a simplified form of a copper-dioxolene complex in a free state and connected to Au(111) surface with alkanethiol linkers. A systematic study of the dependence of the system electronic structure on the linker length is performed. It is found that the electronic structure of the complex is well preserved during the adsorption process. The magnetic moment of the Cu-dioxolene functional group is shown to be strictly correlated with the amount of the charge residing at the complex. On the basis of the DFT results, a model Hamiltonian of the adsorbed metalorganic system is proposed. The model is an extension of the Sandorfy's model of the alkanes and includes explicitly Coulomb interaction between electrons both within the alkane's backbone and the end group. We show that the latter feature is necessary to understand the evolution of the system's properties with the length of the linkers. The advantage of this approach is that it not only reproduces the main results of our DFT analysis but also provides a simple common basis to analyse a wide class of metal complexes bound to metal surfaces with alkanethiol linkers.

  2. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brombin, M.; Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.; Murari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  3. Experimental Investigation of m=1 Diocotron Mode Growth at Low Electron Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Stephen F.; Morrison, Kyle; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Previous experiments on the Electron Diffusion Gauge showed that the diocotron mode damping increases with higher neutral gas filling pressure. Yet the energy dissipated from a rotating plasma by collisions with neutrals is predicted to excite the mode. To resolve this, experiments have been conducted to examine the coupling between expansion and the m=1 diocotron mode. Results from recent experiments have shown interesting phenomena: (1) The degree and sensitivity of mode growth is observed to be strongly dependent on filament conditions. Mode growth rates of nearly 20 sec -1 have been observed even with negligible resistive drive. Specifically, at low filament bias voltages (and correspondingly low electron densities ∼1-2 x 10 7 electrons/cm), the mode growth is very sensitive to the heating voltage across the filament, even though changes in filament heating voltage barely affect the plasma expansion, the plasma density profile, the filament emission, or the resulting electron density. (2) At low neutral gas pressure ( -9 Torr), the diocotron mode growth rate increases with neutral pressure. However, the growth rate is several orders of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions

  4. Variations of the ionospheric electron density during the Bhuj seismic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trigunait

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations by natural geophysical activity, such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, have been studied since the great Alaskan earthquake in 1964. Measurements made from the ground show a variation of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layers before and after the shock. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the electron density variations around the time of the Bhuj earthquake in Gujarat, India. Several experiments have been used to survey the ionosphere. Measurements of fluctuations in the integrated electron density or TEC (Total Electron Content between three satellites (TOPEX-POSEIDON, SPOT2, SPOT4 and the ground have been done using the DORIS beacons. TEC has been also evaluated from a ground-based station using GPS satellites, and finally, ionospheric data from a classical ionospheric sounder located close to the earthquake epicenter are utilized. Anomalous electron density variations are detected both in day and night times before the quake. The generation mechanism of these perturbations is explained by a modification of the electric field in the global electric circuit induced during the earthquake preparation. Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances – Radio Science (ionospheric physics – History of geophysics (seismology

  5. DAMQT: A package for the analysis of electron density in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rafael; Rico, Jaime Fernández; Ramírez, Guillermo; Ema, Ignacio; Zorrilla, David

    2009-09-01

    DAMQT is a package for the analysis of the electron density in molecules and the fast computation of the density, density deformations, electrostatic potential and field, and Hellmann-Feynman forces. The method is based on the partition of the electron density into atomic fragments by means of a least deformation criterion. Each atomic fragment of the density is expanded in regular spherical harmonics times radial factors, which are piecewise represented in terms of analytical functions. This representation is used for the fast evaluation of the electrostatic potential and field generated by the electron density and nuclei, as well as for the computation of the Hellmann-Feynman forces on the nuclei. An analysis of the atomic and molecular deformations of the density can be also carried out, yielding a picture that connects with several concepts of the empirical structural chemistry. Program summaryProgram title: DAMQT1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEDL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 278 356 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 065 317 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 and C++ Computer: Any Operating system: Linux, Windows (Xp, Vista) RAM: 190 Mbytes Classification: 16.1 External routines: Trolltech's Qt (4.3 or higher) ( http://www.qtsoftware.com/products), OpenGL (1.1 or higher) ( http://www.opengl.org/), GLUT 3.7 ( http://www.opengl.org/resources/libraries/glut/). Nature of problem: Analysis of the molecular electron density and density deformations, including fast evaluation of electrostatic potential, electric field and Hellmann-Feynman forces on nuclei. Solution method: The method of Deformed Atoms in Molecules, reported elsewhere [1], is used for partitioning the molecular electron density

  6. First principle local density approximation description of the electronic properties of ferroelectric sodium nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekuma, C.E., E-mail: panaceamee@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University (LSU) Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Jarrell, M.; Moreno, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University (LSU) Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Franklin, L.; Zhao, G.L.; Wang, J.T.; Bagayoko, D. [Department of Physics, Southern University and A and M College in Baton Rouge (SUBR) Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70813 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The electronic structure of the ferroelectric crystal, NaNO{sub 2}, is studied by means of first-principles, local density calculations. Our ab-initio, non-relativistic calculations employed a local density functional approximation (LDA) potential and the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). Following the Bagayoko, Zhao, Williams, method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF), we solved self-consistently both the Kohn-Sham equation and the equation giving the ground state charge density in terms of the wave functions of the occupied states. We found an indirect band gap of 2.83 eV, from W to R. Our calculated direct gaps are 2.90, 2.98, 3.02, 3.22, and 3.51 eV at R, W, X, {Gamma}, and T, respectively. The band structure and density of states show high localization, typical of a molecular solid. The partial density of states shows that the valence bands are formed only by complex anionic states. These results are in excellent agreement with experiment. So are the calculated densities of states. Our calculated electron effective masses of 1.18, 0.63, and 0.73 m{sub o} in the {Gamma}-X, {Gamma}-R, and {Gamma}-W directions, respectively, show the highly anisotropic nature of this material. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferro-NaNO{sub 2} has been studied using the BZW-EF method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the valence states, polarization has primacy over spherical symmetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimal basis set is verified to be complete for the ground state of NaNO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computed electronic and related properties are in agreement with experiment.

  7. Characterization of grafting density and binding efficiency of DNA and proteins on gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelino, Kenneth; Kannan, Balaji; Majumdar, Arun

    2005-03-01

    The surface grafting density of biomolecules is an important factor for quantitative assays using a wide range of biological sensors. We use a fluorescent measurement technique to characterize the immobilization density of thiolated probe DNA on gold and hybridization efficiency of target DNA as a function of oligonucleotide length and salt concentration. The results indicate the dominance of osmotic and hydration forces in different regimes of salt concentration, which was used to validate previous simulations and to optimize the performance of surface-stress based microcantilever biosensors. The difference in hybridization density between complementary and mismatched target sequences was also measured to understand the response of these sensors in base-pair mismatch detection experiments. Finally, two different techniques for immobilizing proteins on gold were considered and the surface densities obtained in both cases were compared.

  8. The role of electron induced secondary electron emission from SiO2 surfaces in capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated at low pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, B.; Daksha, M.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Schulze, J.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of electron induced secondary electron (SE) emission from SiO2 electrodes in single-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) are studied by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) simulations in argon gas at 0.5 Pa for different voltage amplitudes. Unlike conventional simulations, we use a realistic model for the description of electron-surface interactions, which takes into account the elastic reflection and the inelastic backscattering of electrons, as well as the emission of electron induced SEs (δ-electrons). The emission coefficients corresponding to these elementary processes are determined as a function of the electron energy and angle of incidence, taking the properties of the surface into account. Compared to the results obtained by using a simplified model for the electron-surface interaction, widely used in PIC/MCC simulations of CCPs, which includes only elastic electron reflection at a constant probability of 0.2, strongly different electron power absorption and ionization dynamics are observed. We find that ion induced SEs (γ-electrons) emitted at one electrode and accelerated to high energies by the local sheath electric field propagate through the plasma almost collisionlessly and impinge on the opposing sheath within a few nanoseconds. Depending on the instantaneous local sheath voltage these energetic electrons are either reflected by the sheath electric field or they hit the electrode surface, where each γ-electron can generate multiple δ-electrons upon impact. These electron induced SEs are accelerated back into the plasma by the momentary sheath electric field and can again generate δ-electrons at the opposite electrode after propagating through the plasma bulk. Overall, a complex dynamics of γ- and δ-electrons is observed including multiple reflections between the boundary sheaths. At high voltages, the electron induced SE emission is found to strongly affect the plasma density and the ionization dynamics and

  9. Flame Treatment of Low-Density Polyethylene: Surface Chemistry Across the Length Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jing; Gunst, Ullrich; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between surface chemistry and morphology of flame treated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was studied by various characterization techniques across different length scales. The chemical composition of the surface was determined on the micrometer scale by X-ray photoelectron

  10. Structural stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Mn4N(0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface formation energy calculations demonstrate a N-dependent stability. • The magnetic alignment of these surfaces remains bulk-like, in a ferrimagnetic fashion. • A ferrimagnetic behavior in both structures is confirmed by density of states calculations. - Abstract: We have carried out spin-polarized first principles calculations to describe the surface stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn 4 N(0 0 1) surfaces. Results show two different surface terminations with different N content. The surface formation energies indicate that for manganese rich conditions the most stable structure is a MnN terminated surface. Whereas, from intermediate to nitrogen rich conditions, a MnN terminated surface with excess of nitrogen atoms is the most favorable. The stability of these surfaces can be traced to the formation of Mn–N bonds at the surface. The stable surfaces are Ferrimagnetic along the direction perpendicular to the surface, retaining a bulk-like behavior. However, there is a decrease in the Mn magnetic moments due to the presence of the surface. Density of states shows an asymmetric behavior, inherent of a Ferrimagnetic state. Finally, the surfaces are metallic with the main contributions around the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. The knowledge about the atomic arrangements of the Mn 4 N surfaces may serve to explain and understand the formation of more complex and technologically applicable ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic heterostructures.

  11. RENNSH: a novel α-helix identification approach for intermediate resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingyu; Reisert, Marco; Burkhardt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein secondary structures is beneficial to understand three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. In this paper, a novel refined classification framework is proposed, which treats alpha-helix identification as a machine learning problem by representing each voxel in the density map with its Spherical Harmonic Descriptors (SHD). An energy function is defined to provide statistical analysis of its identification performance, which can be applied to all the α-helix identification approaches. Comparing with other existing α-helix identification methods for intermediate resolution electron density maps, the experimental results demonstrate that our approach gives the best identification accuracy and is more robust to the noise.

  12. Application of modern electronic balances to measure densities of solids and liquids by a hydrostatic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, D.

    1983-01-01

    Modern balances (analytical and microanalytical) operate on the electromagnetic principle, i.e. without arms and without the use of weights. Accordingly, this paper presents a method dealing with the application of modern electronic single-plan balances of the accuracy class I to measurements of the density of solids and liquids by a hydrostatic method. The proposed method has some advantages compared with conventional ones for density measurements with corresponding mechanical balances, such as for instance: improved measurement accuracy, automatic establishment of balance equilibrium, ready read-out of measurement results, and the possibility of computer processing and printing thereof. (orig.) [de

  13. Line Shape Modeling for the Diagnostic of the Electron Density in a Corona Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Rosato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of spectra observed in a corona discharge designed for the study of dielectrics in electrical engineering. The medium is a gas of helium and the discharge was performed at the vicinity of a tip electrode under high voltage. The shape of helium lines is dominated by the Stark broadening due to the plasma microfield. Using a computer simulation method, we examine the sensitivity of the He 492 nm line shape to the electron density. Our results indicate the possibility of a density diagnostic based on passive spectroscopy. The influence of collisional broadening due to interactions between the emitters and neutrals is discussed.

  14. Self-consistent modeling of plasma density control using self-excited electron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, R.P. [Siemens AG, Munich (Germany); Klick, M.; Rehak, W. [Adolf-Slaby Inst., Berlin (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Plasma processing, such as the structuring of wafer surfaces or the deposition of thin films, plays a pivotal role in the manufacturing of VLSI microelectronics and other semiconductors. Increasing wafer diameters and decreasing device dimensions put an ever-growing demand on the stability of the process conditions. Closed loop feed-back control is thought to ensure this stability, even in the presence of run-to-run variations in the chamber state, or similar drifts in the external process parameters. Traditional plasma diagnostics either provides very indirect plasma information, or causes intolerable disturbances of the process itself. Recently, however, a novel method was proposed which allows to characterize an RF plasma in a strictly passive way. This method, termed Self-Excited Electron Resonance Spectroscopy or SEERS, is based on the excitation of global oscillations in the plasma body due to nonlinearities in the sheath. In this work, the authors study the behavior of an inductively coupled, high density plasma reactor (ICP/HDP) under the action of a SEERS-based closed loop control. The approach employs a period-averaged plasma simulator which allows to predict, for any input power P, the secular evolution of the charge distribution in the plasma bulk, and the spatially resolved capacitance of the boundary sheath. Note that the control scheme is realizable, in the sense that it makes use only of that plasma information which is physically available. The results show that already a simple--even only proportional--SEERS-based feedback control can considerably increase the long time stability of industrial plasma processes.

  15. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  16. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  17. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    origins of this phenomenon is therefore needed for designing cathode materials with optimal surface chemistry. We quantitatively assessed the elastic and electrostatic interactions of the dopant with the surrounding lattice as the key driving forces for segregation on model perovskite compounds, LnMnO3 (host cation Ln=La, Sm). Our approach combines surface chemical analysis with X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy on model dense thin films, and computational analysis with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and analytical models. Elastic energy differences were systematically induced in the system by varying the radius of the selected dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba) with respect to the host cations (La, Sm) while retaining the same charge state. Electrostatic energy differences were introduced by varying the distribution of charged oxygen and cation vacancies in our models. Varying the oxygen chemical potential in our experiments induced changes in both the elastic energy and electrostatic interactions. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that the mechanism of dopant segregation on perovskite oxides includes both the elastic and electrostatic energy contributions. A smaller size mismatch between the host and dopant cations and a chemically expanded lattice were found to reduce the segregation level of the dopant and to enable more stable cathode surfaces. Ca-doped LaMnO3 was found to have the most stable surface composition with the least cation segregation among the compositions surveyed. The diffusion kinetics of the larger dopants, Ba and Sr, was found to be slower, and can kinetically trap the segregation at reduced temperatures despite the larger elastic energy driving force. Lastly, scanning probe image-contrast showed that the surface chemical heterogeneities made of dopant oxides upon segregation were electronically insulating. The consistency between the results obtained from experiments, DFT calculations and analytical theory in this work

  18. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Rimini, F. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  19. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  20. The effect of energetic electron precipitation on the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetre, Camilla

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this thesis has been the study of the chemical effects of the electron precipitation in the upper atmosphere, and mainly the increase of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO). NO plays an important role in the temperature balance for the mesosphere and thermosphere.In this project auroral electron precipitation data, derived from the Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) and the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite, have been used together with NO density measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE)