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Sample records for surface dose reduction

  1. Dose Reduction Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program

  2. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  3. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  4. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated surface dose reduction for superficial X-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, John; Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Markwell, Tim; Chan, Millicent

    2018-02-01

    Measurement of surface dose reduction effects for superficial x-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations of such effects. Further to investigate the correlation between surface dose reduction and changes in Compton backscatter spectra with tissue-bone separation. An Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream on the surface of a solid water phantom was used to investigate changes in surface dose with an underlying air or bone interface located at various depths below the surface. Chamber readings were obtained for interface depths ranging from 1 to 100 mm using the 50 kV, 100 kV and 150 kV beams of an Xstrahl 150 x-ray unit, with field diameters (ϕ) = 2.5 cm and 5 cm. For each beam quality and field size the dose correction factor, DCF(t), namely the ratio of measured dose (t) to dose (t = 100 mm) was determined. Monte Carlo simulations of DCF(t) for air and bone interfaces in tissue are used to validate corresponding measured data. For a given beam and field size, the difference between simulated spectra with an air or bone interface at t = 3 mm was used to determine the Compton backscatter from bone at the surface. For air, DCF(t tube potentials corresponding factors, ϕ = 2.5 cm, for air(bone) are 0.94(0.96) and 0.92(0.99). Calculated DCF(t) based on Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with experimental observations to within 2%. Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray spectra demonstrate the presence of Compton backscatter from underlying bone in tissue. With bone at 3 mm depth calculated backscatter spectra at the tissue surface suggest that surface dose is influenced by the proximity of bone and that this effect depends on beam quality. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using an Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream to investigate surface dose reduction with underlying air or bone in tissue. As the field size decreases and beam quality increases surface

  5. Dose reduction - the radiologist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the exposure to ionising radiation dominates radiological practice in only three fields, i.e. foetal radiography, mammography and computed tomography. The balance between risk and benefit are briefly examined. The types of hazard considered are carcinogenesis, genetic injury and organogenesis. Ways of achieving a reduction of the dose to the patient are also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  6. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm 2 ) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm 2 ) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  7. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook

  8. Variation of surface dose in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviles Lucas, P.; Castellano, I. A.; Dance, D. R.; Vano Carruana, E.; Prieto Martin, C.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of the variations of the air kerma-length product at the surface of a phantom exposed in a CT scanner using clinical parameters. the effect of patient size, position within the gantry plane and beam-shaping filter type was studied using three different elliptical phantoms. A dose reduction technique based on a sinusoidal tube current modulation system was also investigated. the result of the variation of the surface dose was analysed for the case of CT fluoroscopy procedures. The surface air kerma-length product was shown to be independent of phantom size (within experimental error) but decreases as the surface moves vertically away from the iso centre. The major contributor to this variation the beam-shaping filter. The possibility of underestimating the surface dose if an AAPM body phantom is used (a 36% increase for the head phantom) is an indirect result of the previous conclusion when applied to CT fluoroscopy. This highlights the importance of considering the size and position of the patient when measuring the does. Finally, when the tube current modulation system was used, the maximum surface dose reduction was 18%. (Author) 23 refs

  9. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Full system decontamination (FSD) for sustainable dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph; Sempere-Belda, Luis; Topf, Christian; Basu, Ashim

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. In the past dose reduction plans were performed, based on - Modification in coolant water chemistry - Substitution of Cobalt containing materials - Outage optimization program - Installation of permanent shielding - Decontamination The dose rate reduction took several years and today a stagnation of further dose rate reduction can be seen. Therefore AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels rapidly and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is based fully on the application of proven technologies, including: - Full System Decontamination with AREVA's decontamination process HP/CORD UV to minimize the activity inventory - The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc - Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. The latest application was performed successfully at the German PWR Grafenrheinfeld in 2010. In this paper the concept for sustainable dose reduction will be outlined and the site application detailed and the achieved results at PWR Grafenrheinfeld will be described. The recontamination after one cycle will be outlined in a second paper. (authors)

  11. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  12. Dose reduction factors from a radioactive cloud for large buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, J. le; Roux, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A set of complex and accurate computer codes has been established to determine the transport of photons emitted from a radioactive cloud through various media. The geometrical and physical description of large buildings with various numbers of floors and rooms can be done by the user. The codes can calculate, in any room or apartment, the characteristics of the photon fields (photon flux, energy flux and distribution, direction distribution) and whole-body absorbed dose rates in a phantom standing or lying on the floor. The dose reduction factor is then the quotient of the mean absorbed dose rate in the apartment to the absorbed dose rate in the phantom standing on the ground outdoors. Applications to several modern multistorey buildings are presented. The results show the influence of various parameters such as density and composition of building materials, the fraction of the external building surface containing apertures and initial photon energy. (author)

  13. Dose reduction factors from a radioactive cloud for large buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, J. le; Roux, Y.; Patau, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    A set of complex and accurate computer codes has been established to determine the transport of photons emitted from a radioactive cloud through various media. The geometrical and physical description of large buildings with various numbers of floors and rooms can be done by the user. The codes can calculate, in any room or apartment, the characteristics of the photon fields (photon flux, energy flux and distribution, direction distribution) and whole-body absorbed dose rates in a phantom standing or lying on the floor. The dose reduction factor is then the quotient of the mean absorbed dose rate in the apartment to the absorbed dose rate in the phantom standing on the ground outdoors. Applications to several modern multistorey buildings are presented. The results show the influence of various parameters such as density and composition of building materials, the fraction of the external building surface containing apertures and initial photon energy.

  14. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  15. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric cranial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Choyin; Wong Yiuchung; Chau Luenfai; Yu Siuki; Lau Pochung

    1999-01-01

    Background. There is no consensus about the optimal milliamperage-second (mAs) settings for computed tomography (CT). Most operators follow the recommended settings of the manufacturers, but these may not be the most appropriate settings. Objective. To determine whether a lower radiation dose technique could be used in CT of the paediatric brain without jeopardising the diagnostic accuracy of the images. Materials and methods. A randomised prospective trial. A group of 53 children underwent CT using manufacturer's default levels of 200 or 250 mAs; 47 underwent scanning at 125 or 150 mAs. Anatomical details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. Results. For both readers there was no statistically significant difference in the confidence level for reaching a diagnosis between the two groups. The 95 % confidence intervals and P values were -0.9-1.1 and 0.13 (reader 1) and -1.29-1.37 and 0.70 (reader 2), respectively. Reliability tests showed the results were consistent. Conclusions. The recommended level may not be the optimum setting. Dose reduction of 40 % is possible on our system in paediatric brain CT without affecting the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  16. Dose reduction and optimization studies (ALARA) at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been commissioned by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at LWR plants. These studies have the following objectives: identify high-dose maintenance tasks; identify dose-reduction techniques; examine incentives for dose reduction; evaluate cost-effectiveness and optimization of dose-reduction techniques; and compile an ALARA handbook on data, engineering modifications, cost-effectiveness calculations, and other information of interest to ALARA practioners

  17. Six steps to a successful dose-reduction strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. [Rolls-Royce & Associates Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    The increased importance of demonstrating achievement of the ALARA principle has helped produce a proliferation of dose-reduction ideas. Across a company there may be many dose-reduction items being pursued in a variety of areas. However, companies have a limited amount of resource and, therefore, to ensure funding is directed to those items which will produce the most benefit and that all areas apply a common policy, requires the presence of a dose-reduction strategy. Six steps were identified in formulating the dose-reduction strategy for Rolls-Royce and Associates (RRA): (1) collating the ideas; (2) quantitatively evaluating them on a common basis; (3) prioritizing the ideas in terms of cost benefit, (4) implementation of the highest priority items; (5) monitoring their success; (6) periodically reviewing the strategy. Inherent in producing the dose-reduction strategy has been a comprehensive dose database and the RRA-developed dose management computer code DOMAIN, which allows prediction of dose rates and dose. The database enabled high task dose items to be identified, assisted in evaluating dose benefits, and monitored dose trends once items had been implemented. The DOMAIN code was used both in quantifying some of the project dose benefits and its results, such as dose contours, used in some of the dose-reduction items themselves. In all, over fifty dose-reduction items were evaluated in the strategy process and the items which will give greatest benefit are being implemented. The strategy has been successful in giving renewed impetus and direction to dose-reduction management.

  18. Six steps to a successful dose-reduction strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.

    1995-01-01

    The increased importance of demonstrating achievement of the ALARA principle has helped produce a proliferation of dose-reduction ideas. Across a company there may be many dose-reduction items being pursued in a variety of areas. However, companies have a limited amount of resource and, therefore, to ensure funding is directed to those items which will produce the most benefit and that all areas apply a common policy, requires the presence of a dose-reduction strategy. Six steps were identified in formulating the dose-reduction strategy for Rolls-Royce and Associates (RRA): (1) collating the ideas; (2) quantitatively evaluating them on a common basis; (3) prioritizing the ideas in terms of cost benefit, (4) implementation of the highest priority items; (5) monitoring their success; (6) periodically reviewing the strategy. Inherent in producing the dose-reduction strategy has been a comprehensive dose database and the RRA-developed dose management computer code DOMAIN, which allows prediction of dose rates and dose. The database enabled high task dose items to be identified, assisted in evaluating dose benefits, and monitored dose trends once items had been implemented. The DOMAIN code was used both in quantifying some of the project dose benefits and its results, such as dose contours, used in some of the dose-reduction items themselves. In all, over fifty dose-reduction items were evaluated in the strategy process and the items which will give greatest benefit are being implemented. The strategy has been successful in giving renewed impetus and direction to dose-reduction management

  19. Surface dose in intracavitary orthovoltage radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorsak, M.B.; Schreiner, L.J.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    Radiotherapy with orthovoltage techniques is often the prime treatment for localized superficial malignancies. Surface doses and depth doses measured with cylindrical and end-window Farmer chambers are presented for various orthovoltage x-ray beams in the range from 80 to 300 kVp, both for open beams and beams collimated with commercial intracavitary leaded-glass cones. For radiation fields collimated by a diaphragm positioned at a distance from the patient surface (open beams) there is a small skin-sparing effect. On the other hand, the surface doses with commercial leaded-glass intracavitary cones can exhibit a fivefold increase compared to the open-beam dose maxima. Beyond a depth of ∼0.2 mm in a tissue-equivalent phantom, the doses measured for open beams and beams collimated with intracavitary cones are essentially identical. The increase in the surface dose observed with intracavitary cones is attributed to photoelectrons and recoil electrons produced in the cones. The high surface doses are measured by thin-wall parallel-plate ionization chambers but cannot be measured with cylindrical Farmer chambers since these chambers have wall thicknesses too large for the transmission of electrons produced in the cone. Since cylindrical Farmer chambers are typically used for calibration of radiation output, the high surface doses produced by the intracavitary cones may be overlooked; they can, however, be reduced to open-beam values by simple modifications to the cones

  20. Dose rate reduction method for NMCA applied BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Varela, Juan; Caine, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    BRAC (BWR Radiation Assessment and Control) dose rate is used as an indicator of the incorporation of activated corrosion by products into BWR recirculation piping, which is known to be a significant contributor to dose rate received by workers during refueling outages. In order to reduce radiation exposure of the workers during the outage, it is desirable to keep BRAC dose rates as low as possible. After HWC was adopted to reduce IGSCC, a BRAC dose rate increase was observed in many plants. As a countermeasure to these rapid dose rate increases under HWC conditions, Zn injection was widely adopted in United States and Europe resulting in a reduction of BRAC dose rates. However, BRAC dose rates in several plants remain high, prompting the industry to continue to investigate methods to achieve further reductions. In recent years a large portion of the BWR fleet has adopted NMCA (NobleChem TM ) to enhance the hydrogen injection effect to suppress SCC. After NMCA, especially OLNC (On-Line NobleChem TM ), BRAC dose rates were observed to decrease. In some OLNC applied BWR plants this reduction was observed year after year to reach a new reduced equilibrium level. This dose rate reduction trends suggest the potential dose reduction might be obtained by the combination of Pt and Zn injection. So, laboratory experiments and in-plant tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of Pt and Zn on Co-60 deposition behaviour. Firstly, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of noble metal deposition on Co deposition on stainless steel surfaces. Polished type 316 stainless steel coupons were prepared and some of them were OLNC treated in the test loop before the Co deposition test. Water chemistry conditions to simulate HWC were as follows: Dissolved oxygen, hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide were below 5 ppb, 100 ppb and 0 ppb (no addition), respectively. Zn was injected to target a concentration of 5 ppb. The test was conducted up to 1500 hours at 553 K. Test

  1. Employee dose reduction at British Nuclear Fuels plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishwick, A.H.; Finlayson, J.L.; James, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Average work force doses in uranium fuel fabrication plants are a small percentage (about 6 % or 3 mSv pa) of UK regulatory limits. In uranium metal casting, and uranium oxide production plants, doses are somewhat higher than the average. Dose reduction methods have, however, resulted in these being reduced to 20 %, or less, of the same limit. Major future investment should reduce doses in oxide production plants to about the current average level. (author)

  2. Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Currie, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. (note)

  3. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  4. Patient dose reduction during voiding cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Valerie L.

    2006-01-01

    Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is a commonly performed examination in a pediatric uroradiology practice. This article contains suggestions on how the radiation dose to a child from VCUG can be made ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA). The pediatric radiologist should consider the appropriateness of the clinical indication before performing VCUG and utilize radiation exposure techniques and parameters during VCUG to reduce radiation exposure to a child. The medical physicist and fluoroscope manufacturer can also work together to optimize a pulsed-fluoroscopy unit and further reduce the radiation exposure. Laboratory and clinical research is necessary to investigate methods that reduce radiation exposures during VCUG, and current research is presented here. (orig.)

  5. Review of surface dose detectors in radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, E.

    2006-11-20

    Several instruments have been used to measure absorbed radiation dose under non-electronic equilibrium conditions, such as in the build-up region or near the interface between two different media, including the surface. Many of these detectors are discussed in this paper. A common method of measuring the absorbed dose distribution and electron contamination in the build-up region of high-energy beams for radiation therapy is by means of parallel-plate ionisation chambers. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), diodes and radiographic film have also been used to obtain surface dose measurements. The diamond detector was used recently by the author in an investigation on the effects of beam-modifying devices on skin dose and it is also described in this report

  6. Dose Reduction to the Thyroid Gland in Pediatric Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  It is remain a main concern that pediatric chest radiographies contribute to the significant radiation exposure to the thyroid gland as a more susceptible organ to radiation induced cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface dose (ESD of pediatric chest radiography compared to the diagnostic reference levels (DRL and evaluation the efficacy of the lead (Pb shield in radiation dose reduction to the thyroid gland.Materials and Methods After assessing each patient against specific inclusion-exclusion criteria, 40 pediatric patients who were undergoing anterior-posterior (AP projection of the chest x-ray were considered eligible for this study. The ESD of the chest and also ESD of thyroid gland with and without a 1 mm butterfly-shaped lead shield which placed on the thyroid gland were measured using high sensitive thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD-GR 200.Results The average of ESD for chest radiography was 0.068+ 0.006 mGy (0.021 - 0.232 mGy. The unshielded average thyroid ESD was 0.065 + 0.003 mGy compared to the shielded average thyroid ESD of 0.001 + 0.0005 mGy. The use of Pb-shield produced a statistically significant decrease in the average thyroid dose by about 97% (P< 0.001. Conclusion The use of Pb-thyroid shield in the AP projection of pediatric chest radiography has potential to reduced radiation dose without compromising image quality.

  7. Device for the reduction of population dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, T.; Uchinoumi, K.; Akagi, F.; Antoku, S.

    1982-01-01

    Conventional dental radiographic procedures do not permit direct visualization of the radiation field or the central ray. As a result, it is necessary to use a beam diameter larger than the film in order to prevent an unnecessarily high number of cone cuts or other errors during visual alignment of the cone and film. The modification of a conventional dental x-ray cone which permits the central ray to be depicted by a beam of light is described. The use of the device significantly reduced the number of cone cuts, even when small beam diameters were used. Visualization of the central ray improved radiographic accuracy and has the potential to significantly reduce the over-all dose to the population by reducing the size of the field used for dental radiography

  8. Dose reduction potential with photon counting computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zamyatin, Alexander; Shi, Daxin

    2012-03-01

    Electronic noise becomes a major source of signal degradation in low-dose clinical computed tomography (CT). In current clinical scanners based on energy integrating x-ray detectors, electronic noise from the readout circuits adds a noise of constant variance, which is negligible at high counts but can be significant at low count levels. On the other hand, in a photon counting detector (PCD) with pulse height discrimination capability, electronic noise has little to no impact on the measured signal. PCDs are known for their abilities to provide useful spectral information. In this work, we investigate this dose reduction to improve low-dose single-energy CT. We perform low-dose single-energy CT simulations using both energy integrating and photon counting detectors, and compare results with both analytical and iterative reconstructions (IR). The results demonstrate the dose reduction potential of PCDs in conventional low-dose single-energy CT examinations, when spectral information is not required.

  9. Regulatory actions towards dose reduction at Atucha 1 NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spano, F.; Curti, A.R.; Telleria, D.M.; Rudelli, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Atucha 1, a nuclear power plant designed in the late sixties, is in commercial operation since June 1974. In some internal components such as the coolant channels, the station has Stellite-6, a high cobalt content alloy (up to 60%) for hard-facing application. The erosion and corrosion processes on the surfaces of the piping components of the primary coolant and moderator systems generate a varied type of particles oxides called 'crud'. The crud and cobalt 60 produced by neutron activation of cobalt are transferred by the water along the circuit of the coolant and moderator systems, producing deposits on internal surfaces. The cobalt deposits are dominant in radiation fields at working locations. For years, the Authority allowed a considerable number of station workers incurring doses near the limit since that installation had been built previously to introduction of the optimisation concept by ICRP publication 26. The recommendations included in ICRP publication 60 made more than difficult the radiological situation at the Atucha 1. For the facility, to comply with the new limit established by the Authority in January 1995, meant to carry out a substantial modification of the radiological conditions, specially the radiation fields due to cobalt 60. Some options to reduce individual and collective doses were analysed by the Authority. To carry out the evaluation of the deposit mechanisms and the real activity level of cobalt 60, a model of compartments connected by means of constant transfer coefficients was designed. It was concluded that there was a necessity to the change of coolant channels by new ones free of cobalt. It has been shown experimentally that radiation fields and occupational doses were reduced, due to the replacement programme carried out by the utility, in a similar way to the model predictions. At present after more than three years from the beginning of the application of the new limits, and after carrying out partially the tasks for the

  10. SU-E-I-33: Advances in Dose Metrics and Dose Reduction Strategies for Interventional Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A

    2012-06-01

    To explore recent advances in available dose metrics and dose reduction features and their impacts during various fluoroscopy procedures. Besides traditional dose metrics (cumulative dose, DAP, etc), recent methods such as real time dose mapping and dose calculation from DICOM information and their relevance to entrance skin exposure (ESE) are demonstrated. Dose reduction features and their potential effects on ESE are explored for different interventional procedures, including dose setting options, frame rate settings, wedges, software options and how these help reduce patient dose, etc. Real time dose monitoring techniques such as DoseAware are investigated. Dose alert such as flagging higher doses at about half of the Joint Commission sentinel event limit, Dose Index Registry and their impacts are discussed. Habit related practices, such as a physician leaning over patients, are highlighted, also taking foot off the fluoroscopy pedal when not needed, and best places to stand are illustrated. A practice improvement procedure involving measurement, analysis and improvement actions is instituted. We also discuss the impact of physician follow up letters to patients who might not have reached the JC Sentinel Event limits but may still have skin issues. In our institutes, these efforts have led to reduction of both patient dose and personnel exposure for interventional procedures. The recording of technical parameters and fluoroscopy dose by the staff has led to a better understanding of appropriate dose levels and technique settings for each procedure. This article can serve as a refresher for radiological staff on how to protect patients and themselves from high doses, while providing the best care possible. It can also serve as criteria for health care providers to institute changes and make quality improvement in interventional practices. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Reduction of radiation doses on patients. Practice cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Perez de Villar, M.J.; Llorca Diaz, A.L.; Vano Carruana, E.

    1993-01-01

    The percentages of patient dose reduction achieved in chest, abdomen, lumbar spine and pelvis imaging as a result of the quality controls applied to X-ray generators and tubes are presented. Dosimetry was done with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent crystals. The absorbed doses were measured before and after the quality controls and were compared with reference doses provided by the European Community and by the Medical Physics department of the Universidad Complutense in Madrid. The procedures applied in the quality controls of generators and tubes were noninvasive. In chest studies, the reductions in dose ranged between 60 and 80%. In studies of abdomen, lumbar column and pelvis, it was possible to reduce the absorbed dose by 35%. (Author)

  12. Dose Reduction and Dose Management in Computed Tomography - State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsser, Dominik; Marcus, Roy; Othman, Ahmed E; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Flohr, Thomas; Notohamiprodjo, Mike

    2018-03-13

     For years, the number of performed CT examinations has been rising. At the same time, computed tomography became more dose efficient. The aim of this article is to give an overview about the state of the art in dose reduction in CT and to highlight currently available tools in dose management.  By performing a literature research on Pubmed regarding dose reduction in CT, relevant articles were identified and analyzed.  Technical innovations with individual adaptation of tube current and voltage as well as iterative image reconstruction enable a considerable dose reduction with preserved image quality. At the same time, dedicated software tools are able to handle huge amounts of data and allow to optimize existing examination protocols.   · CT examinations are increasingly performed and contribute considerably to non-natural radiation exposure.. · A correct indication is crucial for each CT examination.. · The examination protocol has to be tailored to the medical question and patient.. · Multiple technical innovations enable considerable dose reduction with constant image quality.. · Dose management with dedicated software tools gains importance.. · Zinsser D, Marcus R, Othman AE et al. Dose reduction and dose management in computed tomography - State of the art. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2018; DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-101261. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  14. Patient surface doses in computerized tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vekic, B; Kovacevic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Duvnjak, N.; Marusic, P.; Anic, P.; Dolencic, P.

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic value of computerized tomography has increased due to very rapid technical advances in both equipment and techniques. When the CT scanners were introduced, a significant problem for the specification of the radiation dose imparted to the patient undergoing CT examination has been created. In CT, the conditions of exposure are quite different from those in conventional X-ray imaging. CT procedure involves the continuous tomography of thin layers. Some of these layers touch each other while others overlap. The radiation doses received by patients can vary considerably. In addition to the radiation from the collimated primary beam, patients are exposed to significant scattered doses in unpredictable amounts. Every effort should be made to keep these doses to a reasonable minimum, without sacrificing the image quality. The aims of this work were to determine the surface doses delivered to various organs of patients during various computerized tomography examinations (head, thorax, kidney, abdomen and pelvis). Particular attention was directed to the precise determination of doses received by the eyes (during CT of head) and gonads (during CT of pelvis and lower abdomen) since these organs can be near or even in the primary X-ray beam

  15. Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    This monography is about the Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest CT. The radiation protection of specific areas is necessary when the tissues or radiosensitive organs are near the path of light beam. The correct use of protection represents a challenge for the radiologist because of the time and materials required. The method used was a prospective investigatio in CHPR (TC service) and the doses was measured with TLD dosimeters. It is important to use these protectors in children hospitals.

  16. Final design review report for K basin dose reduction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the K East Basin concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. This report documents a final design review for cleaning/coating basin walls and modifying other basin components where appropriate. The conclusion of this review was that the documents developed constitute an acceptable design for the Dose Reduction Project

  17. Reduction of the dose of ionizing radiation: progressions in TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlacchio, A.; Costanzo, E.; Chegai, F.; Simonetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of the dose of ionizing radiation in CT, it is a very important matter that can be reach avoiding unnecessary examinations, using un appropriate report KV / mAs reducing the rotation time, determining the field of study, using a high pitch using equipment that provide systems with dose reduction, through proper education of the staff that interacts with machinery and using radioprotective compounds.

  18. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  19. Dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study of the extent of radiation dose received by special work groups in the nuclear power industry. Work groups which chronically get large doses were investigated, using information provided by the industry. The tasks that give high doses to these work groups were examined and techniques described that were found to be particularly successful in reducing dose. Quantitative information on the extent of radiation doses to various work groups shows that significant numbers of workers in several critical groups receive doses greater than 1 and even 2 rem per year, particularly contract personnel and workers at BWR-type plants. The number of radiation workers whose lifetime dose is greater than their age is much less. Although the techniques presented would go some way in reducing dose, it is likely that a sizeable reduction to the high-dose work groups may require development of new dose-reduction techniques as well as major changes in procedures. 10 refs., 26 tabs

  20. Towards tracer dose reduction in PET studies: Simulation of dose reduction by retrospective randomized undersampling of list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Würslin, Christian; Seith, Ferdinand; Schäfer, Jürgen F; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of tracer dose regimes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a trade-off between diagnostic image quality and radiation exposure. The challenge lies in defining minimal tracer doses that still result in sufficient diagnostic image quality. In order to find such minimal doses, it would be useful to simulate tracer dose reduction as this would enable to study the effects of tracer dose reduction on image quality in single patients without repeated injections of different amounts of tracer. The aim of our study was to introduce and validate a method for simulation of low-dose PET images enabling direct comparison of different tracer doses in single patients and under constant influencing factors. (18)F-fluoride PET data were acquired on a combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. PET data were stored together with the temporal information of the occurrence of single events (list-mode format). A predefined proportion of PET events were then randomly deleted resulting in undersampled PET data. These data sets were subsequently reconstructed resulting in simulated low-dose PET images (retrospective undersampling of list-mode data). This approach was validated in phantom experiments by visual inspection and by comparison of PET quality metrics contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), background-variability (BV) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured and simulated PET images for different activity concentrations. In addition, reduced-dose PET images of a clinical (18)F-FDG PET dataset were simulated using the proposed approach. (18)F-PET image quality degraded with decreasing activity concentrations with comparable visual image characteristics in measured and in corresponding simulated PET images. This result was confirmed by quantification of image quality metrics. CRC, SNR and BV showed concordant behavior with decreasing activity concentrations for measured and for corresponding simulated PET images. Simulation of dose

  1. Determinants to dose reduction in EMCCR - in regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, V.; Venkataraman, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Sajeev, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Indian PHWRs had experienced three en masse coolant channel replacement campaigns, (EMCCR) first in RAPS-2, next in MAPS-2 and the last in MAPS-1. The campaign is already in full swing at NAPS-1. At MAPS, two EMCCR campaigns were done in a span of four years. The collective dose consumption in the MAPS-1 campaign was only about 25 % that of MAPS-2, a commendable achievement. Based on the experience of RAPS-2 and MAPS-2 campaigns, AERB - through several regulatory means- had given directives for reduction in collective dose in MAPS-1 campaign which was successfully implemented. This paper analyses and quantifies the key factors that contributed to collective dose reduction in MAPS-1 EMCCR. These factors could be put to use in the on going NAPS and forthcoming KAPS campaigns. (author)

  2. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    Staff at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory have established a data base of information about current research that is likely to result in lower radiation doses to workers. The data base, concerned primarily with nuclear power generation, is part of a project that the ALARA Center is carrying out for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes its current status. A substantial amount of research on reducing occupational exposure is being done in the US and abroad. This research is beginning to have an impact on the collective dose expenditures at nuclear power plants. The collective radiation doses in Europe, Japan, and North America all show downward trends. A large part of the research in the US is either sponsored by the nuclear industry through joint industry organizations such as EPRI and ESEERCO or is done by individual corporations. There is also significant participation by smaller companies. The main emphasis of the research on dose reduction is on engineering approaches aimed at reducing radiation fields or keeping people out of high-exposure areas by using robotics. Effective ALARA programs are also underway at a large number of nuclear plants. Additional attention should be given to non-engineering approaches to dose reduction, which are potentially very useful and cost effective but require quantitative study and analysis based on data from nuclear power plants. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Analysis on the entrance surface dose and contrast medium dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Hyun [Dept. of Cardiovascular Center, Yeocheon Jeonnam Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Choi, Nam Gil; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to identify dose reduction measures by retrospectively analyzing the entrance surface dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination and to contribute the patients with renal impairmend and a high probability of side effects to determine the inspection's direction by measuring the contrast usages actually to active actions for the dose by actually measuring the contrast medium dose. The CTDIvol value and air kerma value, which are the entrance surface doses of the two examinations, and the contrast medium dose depending on the number of slides were compared and analyzed. This study was conducted in 21 subjects (11 males; 10 females) who underwent Cardiac Computed Tomographic Angiography (CCTA) and Coronary Angiography (CAG) in this hospital during the period from May 2014 to May 2016. The subject's age was 48-85 years old (mean 65±10 years old), and the weight was 37.6~83.3 kg (mean 63±6 kg). Dose reduction could be expected in the cardiovascular examination using CCTA rather than in the examination using CAG. In terms of contrast medium dose, CAG used a smaller dose than CCTA. In particular, as the number of slides increases at CAG, the contrast medium dose increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the contrast medium dose, the number of slides suitable for the scan range must be selected.

  4. Leidenfrost point reduction on micropatterned metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Cerro, Daniel Arnaldo; Marín, Alvaro G; Römer, Gertwillem R B E; Pathiraj, B; Lohse, Detlef; Huis in 't Veld, Albertus J

    2012-10-23

    Droplets are able to levitate when deposited over a hot surface exceeding a critical temperature. This is known as the Leidenfrost effect. This phenomenon occurs when the surface is heated above the so-called Leidenfrost point (LFP), above which the vapor film between the droplet and hot surface is able to levitate the droplet. Such a critical temperature depends on several factors. One of the most studied parameters has been the surface roughness. Almost all of the experimental studies in the literature have concluded that the LFP increases with the roughness. According to these results, it seems that the roughness is detrimental for the stability of the vapor film. In contrast with these results, we present here a micropatterned surface that significantly reduces the LFP. The temperature increase, relative to the boiling point, required to reach the LFP is 70% lower than that on the flat surface. The reasons for such an effect are qualitatively and quantitatively discussed with a simple semiempirical model. This result can be relevant to save energy in applications that take advantage of the Leidenfrost effect for drop control or drag reduction.

  5. Radiation dose reduction in direct digital panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavala, Sophia; Donta, Catherine; Tsiklakis, Kostas; Boziari, Argyro; Kamenopoulou, Vasiliki; Stamatakis, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: (a) To measure the absorbed radiation doses at 16 anatomical sites of a Rando phantom and (b) to calculate the effective doses including and excluding the salivary gland doses in panoramic radiography using a conventional and a digital panoramic device. Study design: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were placed at 16 sites in a Rando phantom, using a conventional, Planmeca Promax and a digital, Planmeca PM2002CC Proline 2000 (Planmeca Oy, 00880 Helsinki, Finland) panoramic device for panoramic radiography. During conventional radiography the selected exposure settings were 66 kVp, 6 mA and 16 s, while during digital radiography two combinations were selected 60 kVp, 4 mA, 18 s and 66 kVp, 8 mA, 18 s with and without image processing function. The dosimeters were annealed in a PTW-TLDO Harshaw oven. TLD energy response was studied using RQN beam narrow series at GAEC's Secondary Standard Calibration Laboratory. The reader used was a Harshaw, 4500. Effective dose was estimated according to ICRP 60 report (E ICRP60 ). An additional estimation of the effective dose was accomplished including the doses of the salivary glands (E SAL ). A Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The effective dose, according to ICRP report (E ICRP60 ) in conventional panoramic radiography was 17 μSv and E SAL was 26 μSv. The respective values in digital panoramic radiography were E ICRP60 = 23 μSv and E SAL = 38 μSv; while using the lowest possible radiographic settings E ICRP60 was 8 μSv and E SAL was 12 μSv. Conclusions: The effective dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography can be achieved, if the lowest possible radiographic settings are used.

  6. Radiation dose reduction in direct digital panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavala, Sophia; Donta, Catherine [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of Athens, 2 Thivon Street Goudi, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Tsiklakis, Kostas [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of Athens, 2 Thivon Street Goudi, 115 27 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: ktsiklak@dent.uoa.gr; Boziari, Argyro; Kamenopoulou, Vasiliki [Greek Atomic Energy Commission (Greece); Stamatakis, Harry C. [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of Athens, 2 Thivon Street Goudi, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2009-07-15

    Objectives: (a) To measure the absorbed radiation doses at 16 anatomical sites of a Rando phantom and (b) to calculate the effective doses including and excluding the salivary gland doses in panoramic radiography using a conventional and a digital panoramic device. Study design: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were placed at 16 sites in a Rando phantom, using a conventional, Planmeca Promax and a digital, Planmeca PM2002CC Proline 2000 (Planmeca Oy, 00880 Helsinki, Finland) panoramic device for panoramic radiography. During conventional radiography the selected exposure settings were 66 kVp, 6 mA and 16 s, while during digital radiography two combinations were selected 60 kVp, 4 mA, 18 s and 66 kVp, 8 mA, 18 s with and without image processing function. The dosimeters were annealed in a PTW-TLDO Harshaw oven. TLD energy response was studied using RQN beam narrow series at GAEC's Secondary Standard Calibration Laboratory. The reader used was a Harshaw, 4500. Effective dose was estimated according to ICRP{sub 60} report (E{sub ICRP60}). An additional estimation of the effective dose was accomplished including the doses of the salivary glands (E{sub SAL}). A Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The effective dose, according to ICRP report (E{sub ICRP60}) in conventional panoramic radiography was 17 {mu}Sv and E{sub SAL} was 26 {mu}Sv. The respective values in digital panoramic radiography were E{sub ICRP60} = 23 {mu}Sv and E{sub SAL} = 38 {mu}Sv; while using the lowest possible radiographic settings E{sub ICRP60} was 8 {mu}Sv and E{sub SAL} was 12 {mu}Sv. Conclusions: The effective dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography can be achieved, if the lowest possible radiographic settings are used.

  7. Radiation dose reduction in direct digital panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavala, Sophia; Donta, Catherine; Tsiklakis, Kostas; Boziari, Argyro; Kamenopoulou, Vasiliki; Stamatakis, Harry C

    2009-07-01

    (a) To measure the absorbed radiation doses at 16 anatomical sites of a Rando phantom and (b) to calculate the effective doses including and excluding the salivary gland doses in panoramic radiography using a conventional and a digital panoramic device. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were placed at 16 sites in a Rando phantom, using a conventional, Planmeca Promax and a digital, Planmeca PM2002CC Proline 2000 (Planmeca Oy, 00880 Helsinki, Finland) panoramic device for panoramic radiography. During conventional radiography the selected exposure settings were 66 kVp, 6 mA and 16s, while during digital radiography two combinations were selected 60 kVp, 4 mA, 18 s and 66 kVp, 8 mA, 18s with and without image processing function. The dosimeters were annealed in a PTW-TLDO Harshaw oven. TLD energy response was studied using RQN beam narrow series at GAEC's Secondary Standard Calibration Laboratory. The reader used was a Harshaw, 4500. Effective dose was estimated according to ICRP(60) report (E(ICRP60)). An additional estimation of the effective dose was accomplished including the doses of the salivary glands (E(SAL)). A Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for statistical analysis. The effective dose, according to ICRP report (E(ICRP60)) in conventional panoramic radiography was 17 microSv and E(SAL) was 26 microSv. The respective values in digital panoramic radiography were E(ICRP60)=23 microSv and E(SAL)=38 microSv; while using the lowest possible radiographic settings E(ICRP60) was 8 microSv and E(SAL) was 12 microSv. The effective dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography can be achieved, if the lowest possible radiographic settings are used.

  8. Organ and effective dose reduction for region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT and fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    In some medical-imaging procedures using CBCT and fluoroscopy, it may be needed to visualize only the center of the field-of-view with optimal quality. To reduce the dose to the patient as well as enable increased contrast in the region of interest (ROI) during CBCT and fluoroscopy procedures, a 0.7 mm thick Cu ROI attenuator with a circular aperture 12% of the FOV was used. The aim of this study was to quantify the dose-reduction benefit of ROI imaging during a typical CBCT and interventional fluoroscopy procedures in the head and torso. The Toshiba Infinix C-Arm System was modeled in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc with and without the ROI attenuator. Patient organ and effective doses were calculated in DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc Monte-Carlo software for CBCT and interventional procedures. We first compared the entrance dose with and without the ROI attenuator on a 20 cm thick solid-water block. Then we simulated a CBCT scan and an interventional fluoroscopy procedure on the head and torso with and without an ROI attenuator. The results showed that the entrance-surface dose reduction in the solid water is about 85.7% outside the ROI opening and 10.5% in the ROI opening. The results showed a reduction in most organ doses of 45%-70% and in effective dose of 46%-66% compared to the dose in a CBCT scan and in an interventional procedure without the ROI attenuator. This work provides evidence of substantial reduction of organ and effective doses when using an ROI attenuator during CBCT and fluoroscopic procedures.

  9. Radiation dose reduction in parasinus CT by spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin; Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Spectral shaping aims to narrow the X-ray spectrum of clinical CT. The aim of this study was to determine the image quality and the extent of radiation dose reduction that can be achieved by tin prefiltration for parasinus CT. All scans were performed with a third generation dual-source CT scanner. A study protocol was designed using 100 kV tube voltage with tin prefiltration (200 mAs) that provides image noise levels comparable to a low-dose reference protocol using 100 kV without spectral shaping (25 mAs). One hundred consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to the study or control group. All patients signed written informed consent. The study protocol was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and applies to the HIPAA. Subjective and objective image quality (attenuation values, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) were assessed. Radiation exposure was assessed as volumetric CT dose index, and effective dose was estimated. Mann-Whitney U test was performed for radiation exposure and for image noise comparison. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Image noise in air, in the retrobulbar fat, and in the eye globe was comparable between both groups (all p > 0.05). CNR{sub eye} {sub globe/air} did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.7). Radiation exposure (1.7 vs. 2.1 mGy, p < 0.01) and effective dose (0.055 vs. 0.066 mSv, p < 0.01) were significantly reduced in the study group. Radiation dose can be further reduced by 17% for low-dose parasinus CT by tin prefiltration maintaining diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  10. Effective dose at pneumatic reduction of paediatric intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heenan, S.D.; Kyriou, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Adam, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to assess screening times and resulting dose implication at pneumatic reduction of intussusception in the paediatric age group and to examine the relationship with the outcome of the procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and departmental records of 143 children who had undergone a total of 153 pneumatic reductions in our department over a 4-year period. Success rates, screening times and available dose-area products (DAP) were recorded. The DAPs were converted to effective dose (ED) for 77 procedures. RESULTS: A 76.5% (117/153) success rate was achieved with a recurrence rate of 6.5% and only one complication: a perforation. Screening times were recorded in 137 reductions and ranged from 15 s to 22.6 min. Although the longest screening time was associated with an unsuccessful outcome, the second longest time of 21 min was successful. This gave a DAP of 1278 cGy cm 2 and an ED of 12.73 mSv, which is equivalent to approximately 400 abdominal films for a 1-year-old. A lifetime risk of fatal cancer of one in 1000 was achieved, assuming the worst case, after a screening time of 30 min on our conventional fluoroscopy unit. CONCLUSION: Our success rate compares well with other centres. Our institution is a tertiary referral centre and the occasional long screening time may reflect the delay and complex nature of the patients referred. Persistence at air reduction may be successful and the success rate increases with delayed attempts but the risks of the increasing radiation burden must be weighed against the risks of emergency surgery and anaesthesia. Heenan, S.D. (2000)

  11. Dose and dose reduction in computed tomography; Dosis und Dosisreduktion in der Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, Michael [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Paracelsus Medical Univ. Nuernberg (Germany); Wucherer, Michael [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Kachelriess, Marc [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    CT is widely used in medical imaging due to high availability, relatively low cost, and excellent diagnostic yield. Newer applications like coronary CTA, CT colonography, and CT perfusion imaging are integrated in clinical pathways. Although there is a high level of consensus that the benefits of CT exceeds the risks of radiation exposure for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential of cancer induction. Keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable remains the most important task. Dose reduction strategies are presented and discussed.

  12. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in the development and coordination of the nuclear station ALARA programs

  13. Contralateral breast dose reduction using a virtual wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, In Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Chie, Eui Kyu; Park, Won; Lim, Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2005-01-01

    in a Siemens linear accelerator was found to be useful in reducing dose to the contralateral breast. Our additional finding was that the surface dose distribution from the Siemens accelerator was different from a Varian accelerator

  14. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications.

  15. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhili; Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications

  16. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  17. Securing safe and informative thoracic CT examinations—Progress of radiation dose reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takeshi, E-mail: tkubo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishinara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Kalender, Willi A. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Henkestr. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Lee, Chang Hyun [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David A. [Department of Radiology, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson St, A330 Denver, Colorado 80206 (United States); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Various techniques have led to substantial radiation dose reduction of chest CT. • Automatic modulation of tube current has been shown to reduce radiation dose. • Iterative reconstruction makes significant radiation dose reduction possible. • Processing time is a limitation for full iterative reconstruction, currently. • Validation of diagnostic accuracy is desirable for routine use of low dose protocols. - Abstract: The increase in the radiation exposure from CT examinations prompted the investigation on the various dose-reduction techniques. Significant dose reduction has been achieved and the level of radiation exposure of thoracic CT is expected to reach the level equivalent to several chest X-ray examinations. With more scanners with advanced dose reduction capability deployed, knowledge on the radiation dose reduction methods has become essential to clinical practice as well as academic research. This article reviews the history of dose reduction techniques, ongoing changes brought by newer technologies and areas of further investigation.

  18. SU-F-T-325: On the Use of Bolus in Dosimetry and Dose Reduction for Pacemaker and Defibrillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Kenneth, R; Higgins, S; Nath, R [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, D [Saint Thomas Hospital, Murfreesboro, TN (United States); Trumpore, S [Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen, Z [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Special attention is required in planning and administering radiation therapy to patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), such as pacemaker and defibrillator. The range of dose to CIEDs that can induce malfunction is very large among CIEDs. Significant defects have been reported at dose as low as 0.15Gy. Failures causing discomfort have been reported at dose as low as 0.05Gy. Therefore, accurate estimation of dose to CIED and dose reduction are both important even if the dose is expected to be less than the often-used 2Gy limit. We investigate the use of bolus in in vivo dosimetry for CIEDs. Methods: In our clinic, high-energy beams (>10MV) are not used for patients with CIED due to neutron production. Solid water phantom measurements of out-of-field dose for a 6MV beam were performed using parallel plate chamber at different depth with and without 2cm bolus covering the chamber. In vivo dosimetry at skin surface above the pacemaker was performed with and without bolus for 3 patients with pacemaker <5cm from the field edge. Results: Chamber measured dose at depth ∼1 to 1.5cm below the skin surface, where the CIED is normally located, was reduced by ∼6% – 20% with bolus. The dose reduction became smaller at deeper depth. In vivo dosimetry at skin surface also yielded ∼20% – 60% lower dose when using bolus for the 3 patients. In general, TPS calculation underestimated the dose. The dose measured with bolus is closer to the dose at the depth of the pacemaker and less affected by contaminant electrons and linac head leakage. Conclusion: In vivo CIED dose measurements should be performed with 1 to 2cm bolus covering the dosimeter on the skin above the CIED for more accurate CIED dose estimation. The use of bolus also reduces the dose delivered to CIED.

  19. Determination of skin dose reduction by lead equivalent gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli

    2006-01-01

    Radiation protective gloves are always used in medical facilities to protect radiation workers from unnecessary radiation exposure. A study on radiation protection gloves which are produced by local company had been performed by the Medical Physics Group, MINT. The gloves were made of lead equivalent material, as the attenuating element. The gloves were evaluated in term of the percentage of skin dose reduction by using a newly developed procedure and facilities in MINT. Attenuation measurements of the gloves had been carried out using direct beams and scattered radiations of different qualities. TLD rings were fitted on finger phantom; and water phantom were used in the measurement. The result were obtained and analysed based on data supplied by manufacturer. (Author)

  20. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains project information on the research and development activities of the nuclear power industry in the area of dose reduction. It is based on a data base of information set up at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory. One purpose of this report is to draw attention to work in progress and to enable researchers and subscribers to obtain further information from the investigators and project managers. Information is provided on 180 projects, divided according to whether they are oriented to Engineering Research or to Health Physics Technology. The report contains indices on main category, project manager, principal investigator, sponsoring organization, contracting organization, and subject. This is an initial report. It is intended that periodic updates be issued whenever sufficient material has been accumulated.

  1. Entrance surface dose of the common radiological investigations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The entrance surface Dose (ESD) was determined among patients who presented for routine radiological examinations using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips placed on averagely built adult [ (30cm) chest width, 60 - 90kg weight and 20-40years)] by multiplying the incident dose/entrances dose by the back ...

  2. Investigation of reduction of exposure dose in digital mammography. Relationship between exposure dose and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Yoshio; Nishiyama, Hikaru; Masumoto, Toshinori; Kono, Shingo; Kitagawa, Yasuko; Ikeda, Toshiki; Furukawa, Takashi; Ishida, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    In digital mammograms, granularity is an important image property for the detection of microcalcifications and masses. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the conditions of various exposure doses and the detectability of RMI156 phantom images with and without image processing for the reduction of exposure dose. The images are processed with Gaussian filter and unsharp-masking filters to evaluate the effects on image properties by using the digital Wiener spectrum (WS) presampled modulation transfer function (MTF). In addition, observer performance tests for the detectability of microcalcifications and masses are performed. With Gaussian filtering, the WS value decreased to 50% at 2.0 cycles/mm and the detectability score of masses increased 80% and 12%, on 1.34 mGy and 2.62 mGy, respectively (p<0.05). With unsharp-masking (7 x 7 pixels), the MTF value increased to 126% at 2.0 cycles/mm, and the detectability of microcalcification to 32% and 5%, on 1.34 mGy and 5.28 mGy, respectively (p<0.05) compared with the original image. The optimal dose of simulated lesions with unsharp masking became 5.25 mGy. The unsharp masking could reduce 37% of the exposure dose without a loss of detectability of microcalcifications and masses. (author)

  3. Dose banding as an alternative to body surface area-based dosing of chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chatelut (Etienne); M.L. White-Koning (M.); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); F. Puisset (F.); S.D. Baker (Sharyn); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Dose banding is a recently suggested dosing method that uses predefined ranges (bands) of body surface area (BSA) to calculate each patients dose by using a single BSA-value per band. Thus, drugs with sufficient long-term stability can be prepared in advance. The main

  4. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  5. Outage dose reduction achievements during shorter refueling outages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.O.; Taylor, S. [Limerick Generating Station, Sanatoga, PA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Achievement of dose reduction goals has been demonstrated at the Limerick Generating Station during the past three refueling outages in 1995-96. Shorter refueling outages were accomplished by carefully selecting outage work and thoroughly planning the work. Limerick Unit 1 completed its outage in 35 d; Unit 2 in 23 d in 1995; Unit 1 completed its outage in 24 d in 1996. The four previous outages at Unit I had taken from 100 to 127 days. European plants were visited by plant supervisors to develop improved management approaches to optimizing outage performance from work planning to work implement. Cofrentes in Spain and KKL Leibstadt in Switzerland were visited in 1994 because of their similar design and outage durations consistently below 35 d. This paper describes the radiation protection practices observed at European plants and implemented at Limerick to achieve efficiency of work practices and adequacy of radiological controls. Specific radiation protection initiatives discussed include electronic dosimetry system, break areas, wash sinks, scrub suits, zone mapping and self-monitoring. Outage achievements in 1995 and 1996 has assured Limerick continued BWR industry leadership as the lowest annual person-rem BWRs in the U.S..

  6. SU-F-T-424: Mitigation of Increased Surface Dose When Treating Through A Carbon Fiber Couch Top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, E; Misgina, F [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of the Varian carbon fiber couch top on surface dose for patients being treated using single PA beams in the supine position and to identify simple methods for surface dose reduction. Methods: Measurements of surface dose were obtained in Solid Water phantoms using both a parallel plate ionization chamber (PTW Advanced Markus) and EBT2 Radiochromic films for both 6 and 10MV photons. All measurements were referenced to a depth considered a typical for PA Spine fields. Techniques used to reduce the surface dose included introducing an air standoff using Styrofoam sheets to suspend the phantom surface above the couch top and by adding a thin high Z scattering foil on the table surface. Surface doses were evaluated for typical field sizes, standoff heights, and various scattering materials. Comparisons were made to the surface dose obtainable when treating through a Varian Mylar covered tennis racket style couch top. Results: Dependence on typical spine field sizes was relatively minor. Dependence on air gap was much more significant. Surface doses decreased exponentially with increases in air standoff distance. Surface doses were reduced by approximately 50% for an air gap of 10cm and 40% for a 15cm air gap. Surface doses were reduced by an additional 15% by the addition of a 1mm Tin scattering foil. Conclusion: Using simple techniques, it is possible to reduce the surface dose when treating single PA fields through the Varian carbon fiber couch top. Surface doses can be reduced to levels observed when treating though transparent Mylar tops by adding about 15 cm of air gap. Further reductions are possible by adding thin scattering foils, such as Tin or Lead, on the couch surface. This is a low cost approach to reduce surface dose when using the Varian carbon fiber couch top.

  7. SU-F-T-424: Mitigation of Increased Surface Dose When Treating Through A Carbon Fiber Couch Top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E; Misgina, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of the Varian carbon fiber couch top on surface dose for patients being treated using single PA beams in the supine position and to identify simple methods for surface dose reduction. Methods: Measurements of surface dose were obtained in Solid Water phantoms using both a parallel plate ionization chamber (PTW Advanced Markus) and EBT2 Radiochromic films for both 6 and 10MV photons. All measurements were referenced to a depth considered a typical for PA Spine fields. Techniques used to reduce the surface dose included introducing an air standoff using Styrofoam sheets to suspend the phantom surface above the couch top and by adding a thin high Z scattering foil on the table surface. Surface doses were evaluated for typical field sizes, standoff heights, and various scattering materials. Comparisons were made to the surface dose obtainable when treating through a Varian Mylar covered tennis racket style couch top. Results: Dependence on typical spine field sizes was relatively minor. Dependence on air gap was much more significant. Surface doses decreased exponentially with increases in air standoff distance. Surface doses were reduced by approximately 50% for an air gap of 10cm and 40% for a 15cm air gap. Surface doses were reduced by an additional 15% by the addition of a 1mm Tin scattering foil. Conclusion: Using simple techniques, it is possible to reduce the surface dose when treating single PA fields through the Varian carbon fiber couch top. Surface doses can be reduced to levels observed when treating though transparent Mylar tops by adding about 15 cm of air gap. Further reductions are possible by adding thin scattering foils, such as Tin or Lead, on the couch surface. This is a low cost approach to reduce surface dose when using the Varian carbon fiber couch top.

  8. Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs with FSD (Full System decontamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempere Belda, L.; Stiepani, C.; Topf, C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is put into practice through the coordinated application of proven technologies, including: . Full System Decontamination to minimize the activity inventory . The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc . Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. A description of the activities involved is provided, including an approximate timeline for the implementation from the initial planning stages until completion.

  9. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. Methods: The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the d...

  10. Oral anticancer drugs: how limited dosing options and dose reductions may affect outcomes in comparative trials and efficacy in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R; Fojo, Tito

    2014-05-20

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-01-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield

  12. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  13. NOTE: Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.; Currie, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size.

  14. Optimal dose reduction in computed tomography methodologies predicted from real-time dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Christopher Jason

    Over the past two decades, computed tomography (CT) has become an increasingly common and useful medical imaging technique. CT is a noninvasive imaging modality with three-dimensional volumetric viewing abilities, all in sub-millimeter resolution. Recent national scrutiny on radiation dose from medical exams has spearheaded an initiative to reduce dose in CT. This work concentrates on dose reduction of individual exams through two recently-innovated dose reduction techniques: organ dose modulation (ODM) and tube current modulation (TCM). ODM and TCM tailor the phase and amplitude of x-ray current, respectively, used by the CT scanner during the scan. These techniques are unique because they can be used to achieve patient dose reduction without any appreciable loss in image quality. This work details the development of the tools and methods featuring real-time dosimetry which were used to provide pioneering measurements of ODM or TCM in dose reduction for CT.

  15. Filter materials for dose reduction in screen-film radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedooder, K.; Venema, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate both integral absorbed dose in a water phantom and entrance exposure, for the imaging of iodine contrast with x-ray intensifying screens. The effect of filtration of the x-ray beam on integral absorbed dose and entrance exposure was studied for 27

  16. Medical and occupational dose reduction in pediatric barium meal procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Ledesma, J. A.; Legnani, A.; Bunick, A. P.; Sauzen, J.; Yagui, A.; Vosiak, P.

    2017-11-01

    Doses received in pediatric Barium Meal procedure can be rather high. It is possible to reduce dose values following the recommendations of the European Communities (EC) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In the present work, the modifications of radiographic techniques made in a Brazilian hospital according to the EC and the ICRP recommendations and their influence on medical and occupational exposure are reported. The procedures of 49 patients before and 44 after the optimization were studied and air kerma-area product (PK,A) values and the effective doses were evaluated. The occupational equivalent doses were measured next to the eyes, under the thyroid shield and on each hand of both professionals who remained inside the examination room. The implemented modifications reduced by 70% and 60% the PK,A and the patient effective dose, respectively. The obtained dose values are lower than approximately 75% of the results from similar studies. The occupational annual equivalent doses for all studied organs became lower than the limits set by the ICRP. The equivalent doses in one examination were on average below than 75% of similar studies.

  17. Organ and effective dose reduction in adult chest CT using abdominal lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, G R; Brettle, D S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare organ and effective dose savings that could be achieved using conventional lead aprons and a new, custom-designed shield as out-of-plane shielding devices during chest CT scans. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure doses throughout the abdomen and pelvis during CT scans of the chest of a RANDO phantom. Dose measurements were made with no shielding, with lead aprons and with the new shield around the abdomen and pelvis in order to quantify the achievable organ and effective dose reductions. Average dose savings in the 10 phantom sections ranged from 5% to 78% with the highest point dose saving of 93% being found in the mid-pelvis. When shielding was used, the maximum measured organ dose reduction was a 72% dose saving to the testes. Significant dose savings were found throughout the abdomen and pelvis, which contributed to an effective dose saving of 4% that was achieved over and above the dose savings obtained through conventional optimisation strategies. This could yield significant population dose savings and reductions in collective radiation risk. In this study significant organ and effective dose reductions have been achieved through the use of abdominal shielding during chest CT examinations and it is therefore recommended that out-of-plane patient shielding devices should be used for all chest CT scans and potentially for every CT scan, irrespective of body part.

  18. Variation of surface dose in CT; Variacion de la dosis superficial en Tomografia Computarizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles Lucas, P.; Castellano, I. A.; Dance, D. R.; Vano Carruana, E.; Prieto Martin, C.

    2003-07-01

    An experimental study has been made of the variations of the air kerma-length product at the surface of a phantom exposed in a CT scanner using clinical parameters. the effect of patient size, position within the gantry plane and beam-shaping filter type was studied using three different elliptical phantoms. A dose reduction technique based on a sinusoidal tube current modulation system was also investigated. the result of the variation of the surface dose was analysed for the case of CT fluoroscopy procedures. The surface air kerma-length product was shown to be independent of phantom size (within experimental error) but decreases as the surface moves vertically away from the iso centre. The major contributor to this variation the beam-shaping filter. The possibility of underestimating the surface dose if an AAPM body phantom is used (a 36% increase for the head phantom) is an indirect result of the previous conclusion when applied to CT fluoroscopy. This highlights the importance of considering the size and position of the patient when measuring the does. Finally, when the tube current modulation system was used, the maximum surface dose reduction was 18%. (Author) 23 refs.

  19. The benefit of accounting for DQE variations in simulated dose reduction of digital radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, A.; Baath, M.

    2010-01-01

    Adding noise to clinical radiographs to simulate dose reduction can be used to investigate the relationship between dose level and clinical image quality without exposing patients to additional radiation. The purpose of the present paper was to examine the benefits of using a method that accounts for detective quantum efficiency (DQE) variations that may occur in different dose ranges in the simulated dose reduction process. A method initially intended for simulated dose reduction in tomo-synthesis was applied to extremely low-dose posterio-anterior radiographs of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, selected from a group of projection images included in a tomo-synthesis examination and compared with a previous method that do not account for DQE variations. A comparison of images simulated to be collected at a lower dose level (73% of the original dose level) and images actually collected at this lower dose level revealed that the error in the integrated normalised noise power spectrum was smaller than 4% for the method that accounts for DQE variations in the simulated dose reduction, whereas the error was larger than 20% for the previous method. This indicates that an increased validity in dose reduction simulation of digital radiographic systems is obtained with a method accounting for DQE variations. (authors)

  20. The benefit of accounting for DQE variations in simulated dose reduction of digital radiographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Båth, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Adding noise to clinical radiographs to simulate dose reduction can be used to investigate the relationship between dose level and clinical image quality without exposing patients to additional radiation. The purpose of the present paper was to examine the benefits of using a method that accounts for detective quantum efficiency (DQE) variations that may occur in different dose ranges in the simulated dose reduction process. A method initially intended for simulated dose reduction in tomosynthesis was applied to extremely low-dose posterioanterior radiographs of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, selected from a group of projection images included in a tomosynthesis examination and compared with a previous method that do not account for DQE variations. A comparison of images simulated to be collected at a lower dose level (73 % of the original dose level) and images actually collected at this lower dose level revealed that the error in the integrated normalised noise power spectrum was smaller than 4 % for the method that accounts for DQE variations in the simulated dose reduction, whereas the error was larger than 20 % for the previous method. This indicates that an increased validity in dose reduction simulation of digital radiographic systems is obtained with a method accounting for DQE variations.

  1. Dose reduction by the use of erbium filtration in a general radiographic room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranage, R.W. (Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics); Howard, C.J.; Welsh, A.D. (Cheltenham General Hospital (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    The conventional aluminium filtration of a general purpose X-ray tube in a district general hospital was replaced by an erbium filter for a 2-month period. The resulting reduction in skin dose was measured for a number of examinations using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The change in effective dose equivalent was calculated from these measurements and compared with previous theoretical estimates. The use of the erbium filter had no effect on radiograph quality. It was concluded that the use of an erbium filter resulted in a worthwhile reduction in radiation dose, and was a cost-effective method of dose reduction. (author).

  2. TU-E-217BCD-10: Dose Reduction in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis with the Dose Reduction Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (DR-PICCS) Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, J; Tang, J; Zhang, Y; Ruth, C; Jing, Z; Chen, G H

    2012-06-01

    To reduce image noise and radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions. A retrospective study was performed on clinical data sets acquired at a normal dose with Hologic Selenia Dimensions DBT systems. The Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) algorithm was used to reduce image noise. In addition, a prospective study was performed on an American College of Radiology breast phantom at various dose levels and the PICCS algorithm was used to reconstruct images at the corresponding radiation dose levels. The reconstructed images were inspected visually, and the noise levels in various regions of interest were quantitatively measured and compared between images. In the case of the clinical data, the PICCS reconstructions showed dramatic noise reduction (over 35%) with no loss of diagnostically important features such as calcifications or low contrast lesions; visibility of low contrast lesions was improved with PICCS. Dose reduction of 28% was possible with the phantom data, and the low dose PICCS reconstructions of phantom data show improved low contrast lesion detectability and lower noise. The work indicates potential dose savings in digital breast tomosynthesis. The diagnostic quality of the phantom reconstructions at 28% reduced dose was equivalent to or better than those acquired at full dose. The noise suppression in the clinical data sets improved visibility of low contrast lesions without sacrificing important diagnostic features. Support for this project was provided by a grant from Hologic Inc. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Dose reduction by x-ray beam filtration in screen-film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koedooder, C.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical aspects of dose reduction by x-ray beam filtration in screen-film radiography. The thesis deals mainly with dose reduction under the constraint of constant image quality; an analytical approach is chosen. Therefore, part of the thesis deals with the development of an algorithm to calculate patient dose and exposure for different filter materials and different tube load conditions, under the constraint of constant contrast and constant optical density. (Auth.)

  4. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  5. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified ( 81 kg). Results: Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p 61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p 80 kg, there was an over cost of Euro 10.7 per patient. Conclusions: An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of Euro 1.34 per patient.

  6. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-06-01

    To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified (81 kg). Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p80 kg, there was an over cost of euro 10.7 per patient. An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of euro 1.34 per patient.

  7. Marine drag reduction of shark skin inspired riblet surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Y.F.; Yuan, C.Q.; Bai, X.Q.

    2017-01-01

    Shark skin inspired riblet surfaces have been known to have drag reduction effect for the over past 40 years. It first drew the attention from the aircraft industry. With the property of low drag and self-cleaning (antifouling), shark skin inspired riblet surfaces can also be used on navigation objects. In this paper, different marine drag reduction technologies are discussed, and a review of riblet performance studies is also given. Experimental parameters include riblet geometry, continuous...

  8. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Vega-Montesino, S.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2014-01-01

    During interventional radiology procedures patients receive doses which exceed thresholds for non-stochastic effects on the skin, such as erythema (2 Gy) and epilation (3 Gy), so the entrance surface dose imparted during these proceedings should be monitored. The aim of this work was to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) in patients who undergo diagnostic or therapeutic procedures at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN). The procedures were performed using two systems for neuroradiology, an Axiom Artis and an Artis Zeego from Siemens. The ESD was measured, for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, using 15 × 15 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-RV3 film and/or 25 TLD-100 chips that were attached in a holder of 15 × 15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior and left and right lateral positions during all the procedures. The results show that the maximum ESD measured was lower than 1 Gy for the nine diagnostic procedures evaluated whereas four of the ten therapeutic procedures were greater than 2 Gy in at least one position. Seven patients were monitored, three of which have presented epilation and one erythema. - Highlights: • We measured the entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology. • Entrance surface doses were lower than 1 Gy for diagnostic procedures. • In four therapeutic procedures entrance surface doses were greater than 2 Gy. • Three patients presented epilation and one erythema

  9. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT--review of available options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct plasma NOx reduction using single surface dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroushawi, Feisal; Stamate, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    NOx reduction using direct atmospheric barrier discharge in air-NO mixture at different voltages and flow rates is inversigated. Reduction rate of 80% is achieved at 3.18 W/cm2 power density and gas mixture of 20 slm air and 0.006 slm NO. The ozone for NO reduction is produced by a honeycomb...... structured DBD with a total surface of 12.56 cm2. The reduction process is investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, chemiluminsecence, mass spectrometry and optical emission spectroscopy....

  11. Service worker dose reduction: whose job is it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear utilities around the world are scrambling to change radiation protection programmes. In the US there are two reasons: Revised government regulatory requirements lowering radiation dose go into effect in January 1994 with an option for implementation in January 1993. The International Commission on Radiation Protection has recommended not allowing any person to receive greater than 10rem over a five year period. These changes create big challenges not only for the utilities but also for the service companies who receive the bulk of outage radiation exposure. Service companies should anticipate that customer administrative dose limits will be lowered significantly with a goal of 2rem/y or less. Improved worker efficiency, improved equipment reliability, better housekeeping and improved outage planning and management come from more effective field service training and ''as low as reasonably achievable'' ALARA programmes. Service companies should seriously consider expanding and improving these programmes. (Author)

  12. Computerized simulation methods for dose reduction, in radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochi, M.A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The present work presents computational methods that allow the simulation of any situation encountered in diagnostic radiology. Parameters of radiographic techniques that yield a standard radiographic image, previously chosen, and so could compare the dose of radiation absorbed by the patient is studied. Initially the method was tested on a simple system composed of 5.0 cm of water and 1.0 mm of aluminium and, after verifying experimentally its validity, it was applied in breast and arm fracture radiographs. It was observed that the choice of the filter material is not an important factor, because analogous behaviours were presented by aluminum, iron, copper, gadolinium, and other filters. A method of comparison of materials based on the spectral match is shown. Both the results given by this simulation method and the experimental measurements indicate an equivalence of brass and copper, both more efficient than aluminium, in terms of exposition time, but not of dose. (author)

  13. CT colonography at different radiation dose levels: Feasibility of dose reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Rogier E.; Venema, Henk W.; Serlie, Iwo W. O.; Nio, C. Yung; Determann, Rogier M.; Tipker, Corinne A.; Vos, Frans M.; Glas, Afina S.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Laméris, Johan S.; Stoker, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of polyp detection and the image quality of computed tomographic (CT) colonography at different radiation dose levels and to study effective doses reported in literature on CT colonography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT colonography and colonoscopy

  14. Preliminary design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose, originating from radionuclides absorbed in the K East Basin concrete, is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. This report documents a preliminary design review conducted to ensure that design approaches for cleaning/coating basin walls and modifying other basin components were appropriate. The conclusion of this review was that design documents presently conclusion of this review was that design documents presently completed or in process of modification are and acceptable basis for proceeding to complete the design

  15. An experimental study for the reduction of population dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroi, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that to reduce the amount of X-ray exposure, it is absolutely necessary to limit the field size to the minimum needed for the purpose of examination and size of the object. However, as dental X-ray apparatuses are not fitted with movable collimators, a fixed field size is applied to all exposures of intraoral radiography that is most frequently used for the dental region. Therefore, as one means of reducing the field size, the development of a changeable diaphragm for use in intraoral radiography has been undertaken. Also measurements were made of critical organ doses by field size and a nationwide survey was carried out to ascertain the frequency of intraoral radiography, through which review was made of the degree of contribution the changeable diaphragm could bring about in reducing the population dose. Much effort has led to success in the building of a changeable diaphragm into a central ray indicating cone which permits easy tube head alignment and maintenace of a set focus-skin distance. It was also found that approximately 50% of all intraoral radiography performed in Japan could have been accomplished by smaller field sizes. (author)

  16. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R; Oliveira, Helder C R de; Nunes, Polyana F; Bakic, Predrag R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Vieira, Marcelo A C

    2016-06-01

    This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe transformation. NNPS, PS, and local noise

  17. Quality initiatives: CT radiation dose reduction: how to implement change without sacrificing diagnostic quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Eric P; Rong, X John; Cody, Dianna D; Ernst, Randy D; Fitzgerald, Nancy E; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    The risks and benefits of using computed tomography (CT) as opposed to another imaging modality to accomplish a particular clinical goal should be weighed carefully. To accurately assess radiation risks and keep radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable, radiologists must be knowledgeable about the doses delivered during various types of CT studies performed at their institutions. The authors of this article propose a process improvement approach that includes the estimation of effective radiation dose levels, formulation of dose reduction goals, modification of acquisition protocols, assessment of effects on image quality, and implementation of changes necessary to ensure quality. A first step toward developing informed radiation dose reduction goals is to become familiar with the radiation dose values and radiation-associated health risks reported in the literature. Next, to determine the baseline dose values for a CT study at a particular institution, dose data can be collected from the CT scanners, interpreted, tabulated, and graphed. CT protocols can be modified to reduce overall effective dose by using techniques such as automated exposure control and iterative reconstruction, as well as by decreasing the number of scanning phases, increasing the section thickness, and adjusting the peak voltage (kVp setting), tube current-time product (milliampere-seconds), and pitch. Last, PDSA (plan, do, study, act) cycles can be established to detect and minimize negative effects of dose reduction methods on image quality.

  18. SU-F-J-16: Planar KV Imaging Dose Reduction Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershkevitsh, E; Zolotuhhin, D [North Estonia Medical Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT has become an indispensable tool in modern radiotherapy with kV imaging used in many departments due to superior image quality and lower dose when compared to MV imaging. Many departments use manufacturer supplied protocols for imaging which are not always optimised between image quality and radiation dose (ALARA). Methods: Whole body phantom PBU-50 (Kyoto Kagaku ltd., Japan) for imaging in radiology has been imaged on Varian iX accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, USA) with OBI 1.5 system. Manufacturer’s default protocols were adapted by modifying kV and mAs values when imaging different anatomical regions of the phantom (head, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, extremities). Images with different settings were independently reviewed by two persons and their suitability for IGRT set-up correction protocols were evaluated. The suitable images with the lowest mAs were then selected. The entrance surface dose (ESD) for manufacturer’s default protocols and modified protocols were measured with RTI Black Piranha (RTI Group, Sweden) and compared. Image quality was also measured with kVQC phantom (Standard Imaging, USA) for different protocols. The modified protocols have been applied for clinical work. Results: For most cases optimized protocols reduced the ESD on average by a factor of 3(range 0.9–8.5). Further reduction in ESD has been observed by applying bow-tie filter designed for CBCT. The largest reduction in dose (12.2 times) was observed for Thorax lateral protocol. The dose was slightly increased (by 10%) for large pelvis AP protocol. Conclusion: Manufacturer’s default IGRT protocols could be optimised to reduce the ESD to the patient without losing the necessary image quality for patient set-up correction. For patient set-up with planar kV imaging the bony anatomy is mostly used and optimization should focus on this aspect. Therefore, the current approach with anthropomorphic phantom is more advantageous in optimization over standard kV quality

  19. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  20. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterson, Leslie C.; Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A.; Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen; Lim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  1. Dose reduction and cost-benefit analysis at Japan`s Tokai No. 2 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humamoto, Hisao; Suzuki, Seishiro; Taniguchi, Kazufumi [Japan Atomic Power Co., Otemachi (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In the Tokai No. 2 power plant of the Japan Atomic Power Company, about 80% of the annual dose equivalent is received during periodic maintenance outages. A project group for dose reduction was organized at the company`s headquarters in 1986; in 1988, they proposed a five-year program to reduce by half the collective dose of 4 person-Sv per normal outage work. To achieve the target dose value, some dose-reduction measures were undertaken, namely, permanent radiation shielding, decontamination, automatic, operating machines, and ALARA organization. As the result, the collective dose from normal outage work was 1.6 person-Sv in 1992, which was less than the initial target value.

  2. Reduction of doses in the environment of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.L.; Sanches, M.P.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    1997-01-01

    According Brazilian legislation, individual dose levels at IPEN-CNEN/SP entitle staff to receive 10% of their base salary as additional health allowance, 20 holidays per semester, and special retirement after 25 years of work. The present work presents estimates of cost due to health allowances and recommends reduction of individual dose levels for staff including non-radiological personnel

  3. Dose reduction due to the use of pulsed miction-cystourethrography in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettinger, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The miction-cystourethrography (MCU) is the most frequently used radiographic method (30-50%) in pediatrics. The absorbed doses were significantly reduced during the last years aimed to realize the ALARA principle. The scope of the work is to study the possibility of a further dose reduction using pulsed radiation systems based on a computer-aided analysis of the dose-time curve during MCU examination.

  4. Extrapolated surface dose measurements using a NdFeB magnetic deflector for 6 MV x-ray beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrongkijudom, N; Butson, M; Rosenfeld, A

    2007-03-01

    Extrapolated surface dose measurements have been performed using radiographic film to measure 2-Dimensional maps of skin and surface dose with and without a magnetic deflector device aimed at reducing surface dose. Experiments are also performed using an Attix parallel plate ionisation chamber for comparison to radiographic film extrapolation surface dose analysis. Extrapolated percentage surface dose assessments from radiographic film at the central axis of a 6 MV x-ray beam with magnetic deflector for field size 10 x 10 cm2, 15 x 15 cm2 and 20 x 20 cm2 are 9 +/- 3%, 13 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 3%, these compared to 14 +/- 3%, 19 +/- 3%, and 27 +/- 3% for open fields, respectively. Results from Attix chamber for the same field size are 12 +/- 1%, 15 +/- 1% and 18 +/- 1%, these compared to 16 +/- 1%, 21 +/- 1% and 27 +/- 1% for open fields, respectively. Results are also shown for profiles measured in-plane and cross-plane to the magnetic deflector and compared to open field data. Results have shown that the surface dose is reduced at all sites within the treatment field with larger reductions seen on one side of the field due to the sweeping nature of the designed magnetic field. Radiographic film extrapolation provides an advanced surface dose assessment and has matched well with Attix chamber results. Film measurement allows for easy 2 dimensional dose assessments.

  5. Estimate of dose reduction effects due to countermeasures after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.

    1991-01-01

    Various countermeasures introduced in Austria after the Chernobyl accident are compared and their effective dose reduction effects evaluated. As expected, the greatest reductions were obtained with counter measures with regard to milk and directly contaminated food. Three of them (prohibition of sale of fresh vegetables, prohibition of feeding cows on fresh grass and selection of low activity milk in the dairies) accounted for more than 70% of the total reduction of exposure by all countermeasures. Other countermeasures contributed little to the reduction of exposure. By all countermeasures combined, the exposure to be theoretically expected was reduced by 30% for the adult and 50% for the one year old infant. The dose reduction of the one year old infant (0.58 mSv) was approximately double that of the adult (0.33 mSv) resulting basically from higher reductions of the 131 I intake by the infant. (author)

  6. Effect of dose reduction on the detection of mammographic lesions: A mathematical observer model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert; Abbey, Craig; Delong, David

    2007-01-01

    The effect of reduction in dose levels normally used in mammographic screening procedures on the detection of breast lesions were analyzed. Four types of breast lesions were simulated and inserted into clinically-acquired digital mammograms. Dose reduction by 50% and 75% of the original clinically-relevant exposure levels were simulated by adding corresponding simulated noise into the original mammograms. The mammograms were converted into luminance values corresponding to those displayed on a clinical soft-copy display station and subsequently analyzed by Laguerre-Gauss and Gabor channelized Hotelling observer models for differences in detectability performance with reduction in radiation dose. Performance was measured under a signal known exactly but variable detection task paradigm in terms of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves. The results suggested that luminance mapping of digital mammograms affects performance of model observers. Reduction in dose levels by 50% lowered the detectability of masses with borderline statistical significance. Dose reduction did not have a statistically significant effect on detection of microcalcifications. The model results indicate that there is room for optimization of dose level in mammographic screening procedures

  7. Dose reduction with iterative reconstruction: Optimization of CT protocols in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, J; Macri, F; Larbi, A; Fernandez, A; Khasanova, E; Pereira, F; Mekkaoui, C; Beregi, J P

    2015-05-01

    To create an adaptable and global approach for optimizing MDCT protocols by evaluating the influence of acquisition parameters and Iterative Reconstruction (IR) on dose reduction and image quality. MDCT acquisitions were performed on quality image phantom by varying kVp, mAs, and pitch for the same collimation. The raw data were reconstructed by FBP and Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) with different reconstruction kernel and thickness. A total of 4032 combinations of parameters were obtained. Indices of quality image (image noise, NCT, CNR, SNR, NPS and MTF) were analyzed. We developed a software in order to facilitate the optimization between dose reduction and image quality. Its outcomes were verified on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Dose reduction resulted in the increase of image noise and the decrease of SNR and CNR. The use of IR improved these indices for the same dose without affecting NCT and MTF. The image validation was performed by the anthropomorphic phantom. The software proposed combinations of parameters to reduce doses while keeping indices of the image quality adequate. We observed a CTDIvol reduction between -44% and -83% as compared to the French diagnostic reference levels (DRL) for different anatomical localization. The software developed in this study may help radiologists in selecting adequate combinations of parameters that allows to obtain an appropriate image with dose reduction. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies on reduction of dosimeter used in the product dose mapping process at Sinagama Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofian Ibrahim; Syuhada Ramli; Cosmos George; Zarina Mohd Nor; Kamarudin Buyong; Shahidan Yob; Nor Ishadi Ismail; Mohd Sidek Othman; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab; Mohd Khairul Azfar Ramli

    2012-01-01

    Product dose mapping is the determination of the best product loading configuration which will be used during routine sterilization. In product dose mapping, dosimeters are placed throughout products at strategic locations to determine the zones of minimum and maximum dose. On previous Sinagama's product dose mapping method, a total of 240 unit's ceric-cerous dosimeter been used for a tote. Based on the data obtained from Irradiator Dose Mapping Report in 2004 and data from recent studies, the number of dosimeter to be used in product dose mapping can be reduced to 28 units without sacrificing precision and accuracy of the dose mapping results. This also led changes of the placing dosimeter method from Plane system to Coordinate system. Reduction of 88 % on dosimeters usage will directly reduce the cost of expenses on dosimeter, time and labor. (author)

  9. Dose-area product and entrance surface dose in paediatric radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Komppa, T.; Parviainen, T.; Heikkilae, M. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-06-01

    Dose-area products (DAP) in paediatric radiography were measured in four university hospitals in Finland. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was calculated from the measured DAP value for each radiographic projection. The purpose was to combine the results with other European studies for development of diagnostic reference levels for paediatric X-ray examinations. The study included 740 paediatric patients, and a total of 1500 single projections were recorded, including 660 projections from extremities. Results were compared with recommended best practices and diagnostic reference levels for ESD. Ratios of DAP to ESD were studied to estimate the levels of DAP corresponding to recommended ESD reference levels. It is desirable for practical purposes that diagnostic reference levels for radiographic projections are also expressed in terms of dose-area product. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of image quality in head CT studies with different dose-reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Nielsen, Rikke; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke

    The number of multi-detector CT examinations is increasing rapidly. They allow high quality reformatted images providing accurate and precise diagnosis at maximum speed. Brain examinations are the most commonly requested studies, and although they come at a lower effective dose than body CT, can......-reduction maneuvers is reduction of image quality due to image noise or artifacts. The aim of our study was therefore to find the best diagnostic images with lowest possible dose. We present results of dose- and image quality optimizing strategies of brain CT examinations at our institution. We compare sequential...... and helical head CT with different tube current and voltage settings including protocols with and without automated dose modulation and assess quality of noise reduction in conjunction with iterative reconstruction algorithms....

  11. Surface doses under head and neck immobilisation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baveas, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Methods using ion chambers, TLDs and film were developed to measure the skin-sparing properties of three head and neck immobilisation devices used in radiation therapy, viz. Sinmed multi-perforated and micro-perforated posicast thermoplastic masks (used with a supporting carbon fibre back support), and a Kablite vacuum-formed shell plastic mask (used with a Perspex back support). All measurements were performed with 6 MV beams from Elekta Precise linear accelerators. Two situations have been considered in this study. In the first situation, phantom surface doses under the flat unmoulded mask and back-support materials lying on the surface of a 'solid water' phantom were measured with parallel plate ion chambers and correlated with the physical properties of the materials. In the second situation a particular head and neck treatment technique was adopted and the treatment planned on an anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent phantom. The clinical setup consisted of a wedged pair to the right parotid, planned to deliver a reference dose of 63 Gy to the isocentre, plus an anterior supraclavicular field planned to deliver a reference dose of 50 Gy at a depth of 2 cm. The 3 immobilisation masks were each moulded to the anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent phantom. TLD chips were used to measure the phantom skin dose at a set of 18 locations under each of the 3 immobilisation masks and also without an immobilisation device. The results clearly demonstrate the extent to which the various immobilisation devices increase the surface dose. Results for the first situation are summarised. The averages of the doses recorded by the TLDs in three separate regions for the second situation are shown in Table 2. The combined results show that the areal density of the unmoulded mask materials correlates with the surface dose these materials produce before moulding, but this correlation is lost after moulding for the clinical situation considered. This change upon moulding is

  12. Radiation dose in neuroangiography using image noise reduction technology: a population study based on 614 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital - Solna, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute and Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mauti, Maria; Boon, Sjirk; Hoornaert, Bart [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Omar, Artur; Marteinsdottir, Maria [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Section of Imaging Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the reduction in patient radiation dose by X-ray imaging technology using image noise reduction and system settings for neuroangiography and to assess its impact on the working habits of the physician. Radiation dose data from 190 neuroangiographies and 112 interventional neuroprocedures performed with state-of-the-art image processing and reference system settings were collected for the period January-June 2010. The system was then configured with extra image noise reduction algorithms and system settings, which enabled radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Radiation dose data from 174 neuroangiographies and 138 interventional neuroprocedures were collected for the period January-June 2012. Procedures were classified as diagnostic or interventional. Patient radiation exposure was quantified using cumulative dose area product and cumulative air kerma. Impact on working habits of the physician was quantified using fluoroscopy time and number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The optimized system settings provided significant reduction in dose indicators versus reference system settings (p<0.001): from 124 to 47 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 0.78 to 0.27 Gy for neuroangiography, and from 328 to 109 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 2.71 to 0.89 Gy for interventional neuroradiology. Differences were not significant between the two systems with regard to fluoroscopy time or number of DSA images. X-ray imaging technology using an image noise reduction algorithm and system settings provided approximately 60% radiation dose reduction in neuroangiography and interventional neuroradiology, without affecting the working habits of the physician. (orig.)

  13. Patient Outcomes in Dose Reduction or Discontinuation of Long-Term Opioid Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joseph W; Lovejoy, Travis I; Becker, William C; Morasco, Benjamin J; Koenig, Christopher J; Hoffecker, Lilian; Dischinger, Hannah R; Dobscha, Steven K; Krebs, Erin E

    2017-08-01

    Expert guidelines recommend reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy (LTOT) when risks outweigh benefits, but evidence on the effect of dose reduction on patient outcomes has not been systematically reviewed. To synthesize studies of the effectiveness of strategies to reduce or discontinue LTOT and patient outcomes after dose reduction among adults prescribed LTOT for chronic pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from inception through April 2017; reference lists; and expert contacts. Original research published in English that addressed dose reduction or discontinuation of LTOT for chronic pain. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force quality rating criteria. All authors assessed evidence quality using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Prespecified patient outcomes were pain severity, function, quality of life, opioid withdrawal symptoms, substance use, and adverse events. Sixty-seven studies (11 randomized trials and 56 observational studies) examining 8 intervention categories, including interdisciplinary pain programs, buprenorphine-assisted dose reduction, and behavioral interventions, were found. Study quality was good for 3 studies, fair for 13 studies, and poor for 51 studies. Many studies reported dose reduction, but rates of opioid discontinuation ranged widely across interventions and the overall quality of evidence was very low. Among 40 studies examining patient outcomes after dose reduction (very low overall quality of evidence), improvement was reported in pain severity (8 of 8 fair-quality studies), function (5 of 5 fair-quality studies), and quality of life (3 of 3 fair-quality studies). Heterogeneous interventions and outcome measures; poor-quality studies with uncontrolled designs. Very low quality evidence suggests that several types of interventions may be effective to reduce or

  14. Oxidation-reduction induced roughening of platinum (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Platinum (111) single crystal surface was roughened by repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction to study dynamic evolution of surface roughening. The interface roughens progressively upon repeated cycles. The measured width of the interface was fit to an assumed pow law, W ∼t β , with β = 0.38(1). The results are compared with a simulation based on a random growth model. The fraction of the singly stepped surface apparently saturates to 0. 25 monolayer, which explains the apparent saturation to a steady roughness observed in previous studies

  15. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  16. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  17. Marine drag reduction of shark skin inspired riblet surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.F. Fu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin inspired riblet surfaces have been known to have drag reduction effect for the over past 40 years. It first drew the attention from the aircraft industry. With the property of low drag and self-cleaning (antifouling, shark skin inspired riblet surfaces can also be used on navigation objects. In this paper, different marine drag reduction technologies are discussed, and a review of riblet performance studies is also given. Experimental parameters include riblet geometry, continuous and segmented configurations, fluid velocity (laminar and turbulent flow, fluid viscosity (water, oil and gas, and wettability are analyzed. However, force is obtained by area-weighted integral of shear stress distributions. So area of riblet surfaces is a crucial factor which has not been considered in many previous studies. An experiment is given to discuss the impact of area. This paper aims not only to contribute to a better understanding of marine drag reduction, but also to offer new perspectives to improve the current evaluation criteria of riblet drag reduction.

  18. Drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Roberta; Mollicone, Jean-Paul; Battista, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated in a turbulent pipe flow. Wetted superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to trap gas bubbles in their asperities. This stops the liquid from coming in direct contact with the wall in that location, allowing the flow to slip over the air bubbles. We consider a well-defined texture with streamwise grooves at the walls in which the gas is expected to be entrapped. This configuration is modeled with alternating no-slip and shear-free boundary conditions at the wall. With respect to the classical turbulent pipe flow, a substantial drag reduction is observed which strongly depends on the grooves' dimension and on the solid fraction, i.e., the ratio between the solid wall surface and the total surface of the pipe's circumference. The drag reduction is due to the mean slip velocity at the wall which increases the flow rate at a fixed pressure drop. The enforced boundary conditions also produce peculiar turbulent structures which on the contrary decrease the flow rate. The two concurrent effects provide an overall flow rate increase as demonstrated by means of the mean axial momentum balance. This equation provides the balance between the mean pressure gradient, the Reynolds stress, the mean flow rate, and the mean slip velocity contributions.

  19. Intussusception reduction: Effect of air vs. liquid enema on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Summer L.; Edgar, J.C.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Zhu, Xiaowei [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Magill, Dennise; Felice, Marc A. [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Both air and radiopaque liquid contrast are used to reduce ileocolic intussusception under fluoroscopy. Some suggest air lowers radiation dose due to shorter procedure times. However, air enema likely lowers radiation dose regardless of fluoroscopy time due to less density over the automatic exposure control cells. We test the hypothesis that air enema reduction of ileocolic intussusception results in lower radiation dose than liquid contrast enema independent of fluoroscopy time. We describe a role for automatic exposure control in this dose difference. We retrospectively evaluated air and liquid intussusception reductions performed on a single digital fluoroscopic unit during a 26-month period. We compared patient age, weight, gender, exam time of day and year, performing radiologist(s), radiographic image acquisitions, grid and magnification use, fluoroscopy time and dose area product. We compared categorical and continuous variables statistically using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The mean dose area product was 2.7-fold lower for air enema, 1.3 ± 0.9 dGy.cm{sup 2}, than for liquid, 3.5 ± 2.5 dGy.cm{sup 2} (P<0.005). The mean fluoroscopy time was similar between techniques. The mean dose area product/min was 2.3-fold lower for air, 0.6 ± 0.2 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min, than for liquid, 1.4 ± 0.5 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min (P<0.001). No group differences were identified in other measured dose parameters. Fluoroscopic intussusception reduction using air enema uses less than half the radiation dose of liquid contrast enema. Dose savings are independent of fluoroscopy time and are likely due to automatic exposure control interaction. (orig.)

  20. Intussusception reduction: Effect of air vs. liquid enema on radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Summer L.; Edgar, J.C.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Zhu, Xiaowei; Magill, Dennise; Felice, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Both air and radiopaque liquid contrast are used to reduce ileocolic intussusception under fluoroscopy. Some suggest air lowers radiation dose due to shorter procedure times. However, air enema likely lowers radiation dose regardless of fluoroscopy time due to less density over the automatic exposure control cells. We test the hypothesis that air enema reduction of ileocolic intussusception results in lower radiation dose than liquid contrast enema independent of fluoroscopy time. We describe a role for automatic exposure control in this dose difference. We retrospectively evaluated air and liquid intussusception reductions performed on a single digital fluoroscopic unit during a 26-month period. We compared patient age, weight, gender, exam time of day and year, performing radiologist(s), radiographic image acquisitions, grid and magnification use, fluoroscopy time and dose area product. We compared categorical and continuous variables statistically using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The mean dose area product was 2.7-fold lower for air enema, 1.3 ± 0.9 dGy.cm 2 , than for liquid, 3.5 ± 2.5 dGy.cm 2 (P<0.005). The mean fluoroscopy time was similar between techniques. The mean dose area product/min was 2.3-fold lower for air, 0.6 ± 0.2 dGy.cm 2 /min, than for liquid, 1.4 ± 0.5 dGy.cm 2 /min (P<0.001). No group differences were identified in other measured dose parameters. Fluoroscopic intussusception reduction using air enema uses less than half the radiation dose of liquid contrast enema. Dose savings are independent of fluoroscopy time and are likely due to automatic exposure control interaction. (orig.)

  1. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Christiansen, Rasmus Lübeck; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard; Bertelsen, Anders Smedegaard; Asmussen, Jon Thor; Gyldenkerne, Niels; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in H&N patients in terms of delineation consistency and dose calculation precision in radiation treatment planning. Tumor and OAR delineations were evaluated in planning CT scans of eleven oropharynx patients with streaking artifacts in the tumor region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were on average 22% (p metal artifacts for all structures. The average surface distance between contours of different observers improved using the MAR images for GTV and parotids (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01). The median volume receiving a dose difference larger than ±3% was 2.3 cm 3 (range 0-32 cm 3 ). Delineation of structures in the head and neck were affected by metal artifacts and volumes were generally larger and more consistent after reduction of metal artifacts, however, only small changes were observed in the dose calculations.

  2. Radiation dose reduction in cerebral CT perfusion imaging using iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niesten, Joris M.; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Riordan, Alan J.; Jong, Hugo W.A.M. de; Eijspaart, Daniel; Smit, Ewoud J.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    To investigate whether iterative reconstruction (IR) in cerebral CT perfusion (CTP) allows for 50 % dose reduction while maintaining image quality (IQ). A total of 48 CTP examinations were reconstructed into a standard dose (150 mAs) with filtered back projection (FBP) and half-dose (75 mAs) with two strengths of IR (middle and high). Objective IQ (quantitative perfusion values, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), penumbra, infarct area and penumbra/infarct (P/I) index) and subjective IQ (diagnostic IQ on a four-point Likert scale and overall IQ binomial) were compared among the reconstructions. Half-dose CTP with high IR level had, compared with standard dose with FBP, similar objective (grey matter cerebral blood volume (CBV) 4.4 versus 4.3 mL/100 g, CNR 1.59 versus 1.64 and P/I index 0.74 versus 0.73, respectively) and subjective diagnostic IQ (mean Likert scale 1.42 versus 1.49, respectively). The overall IQ in half-dose with high IR level was scored lower in 26-31 %. Half-dose with FBP and with the middle IR level were inferior to standard dose with FBP. With the use of IR in CTP imaging it is possible to examine patients with a half dose without significantly altering the objective and diagnostic IQ. The standard dose with FBP is still preferable in terms of subjective overall IQ in about one quarter of patients. (orig.)

  3. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Oliveira, Helder C. R. de; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. Methods: The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. Results: The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. Conclusions: A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe

  4. Pulsed electromagnetic fields dosing impacts postoperative pain in breast reduction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin M; Hardy, Krista L; Alonso, Amanda; Pilla, Arthur A; Rohde, Christine H

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements in breast augmentation, reduction, and reconstruction patients. PEMF enhances both calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide and/or cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling and phosphodiesterase activity, which blocks cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The clinical effect of these competing responses on PEMF dosing is not known. Two prospective, nonrandomized, active cohorts of breast reduction patients, with 15 min PEMF per 2 h; "Q2 (active)", and 5 min PEMF per 20 min; "5/20 (active)", dosing regimens were added to a previously reported double-blind clinical study wherein 20 min PEMF per 4 h, "Q4 (active)", dosing significantly accelerated postoperative pain reduction compared with Q4 shams. Postoperative visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were compared with results from the previous study. Visual analog scale scores at 24 h were 43% and 35% of pain at 1 h in the Q4 (active) and Q2 (active) cohorts, respectively (P PEMF dosing, accelerated postoperative pain reduction compared with historical shams. The 5/20 (active) regimen increases NO 4-fold faster than the Q4 (active) regimen, possibly accelerating phosphodiesterase inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate sufficiently to block the PEMF effect. This study helps define the dosing limits of clinically useful PEMF signals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  6. Radiation dose reduction in fluoroscopic procedures: left varicocele embolization as a model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstandig, Anthony G.; Shraibman, Vladimir [Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit, POB 3235, Jerusalem (Israel); Shamieh, Bashar [St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jerusalem (Israel); Raveh, David [Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Infectious Diseases Unit, POB 3235, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of a radiation reduction program on total dose, fluoroscopy dose per second corrected for body habitus and degree of collimation in left varicocele embolizations (LVE). A radiation reduction program for LVE was implemented, consisting of a technique minimizing fluoroscopy time, using low-dose presets, virtual collimation, and virtual patient positioning. Height, weight, fluoroscopy time, kerma area product (KAP) and reference air kerma (Ka,r) were recorded for 100 consecutive cases satisfying the inclusion criteria. For each patient, a device specific dose correction factor, determined using a phantom, was used to standardize the KAP to that of the cylindrical diameter of the standard man and a collimation index was derived from the KAP and Ka,r. Median fluoroscopy time was 3 minutes (mean 4.5, range 1-23.8). Median KAP was 0.54 Gy/cm{sup 2} (mean 0.82, range 0.12-6.52). There was a significant decrease in KAP/second corrected for cylindrical diameter (p < 0.001) and the collimation index (p < 0.001) over time. This study shows that a dedicated dose reduction program can achieve very low total radiation dose rates for LVE. The significant decrease in collimation index and standardized KAP per second during this study suggest a learning curve for collimation. (orig.)

  7. Friction reduction using discrete surface textures: principle and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Hua, Diann; Zhang, Huan

    2014-08-01

    There have been many reports on the use of dimples, grooves, and other surface textures to control friction in sliding interfaces. The effectiveness of surface textures in friction reduction has been demonstrated in conformal contacts under high speed low load applications such as mechanical seals and automotive water pump seals, etc., resulting in reduced friction and longer durability. For sliding components with higher contact pressures or lower speeds, conflicting results were reported. Reasons for the inconsistency may be due to the differences in texture fabrication techniques, lack of dimple size and shape uniformity, and different tester used. This paper examines the basic principles on which surface textural patterns influence friction under the three principle lubrication regimes: hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication regimes. Our findings suggest that each regime requires specific dimple size, shape, depth, and areal density to achieve friction reduction. Control experiments were also conducted to explore mechanisms of friction reduction. The dimple geometric shape and the dimple's orientation with respect to the sliding direction influence friction significantly. The underlying mechanisms for friction control via textures are discussed.

  8. Friction reduction using discrete surface textures: principle and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Stephen M; Jing, Yang; Hua, Diann; Zhang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    There have been many reports on the use of dimples, grooves, and other surface textures to control friction in sliding interfaces. The effectiveness of surface textures in friction reduction has been demonstrated in conformal contacts under high speed low load applications such as mechanical seals and automotive water pump seals, etc., resulting in reduced friction and longer durability. For sliding components with higher contact pressures or lower speeds, conflicting results were reported. Reasons for the inconsistency may be due to the differences in texture fabrication techniques, lack of dimple size and shape uniformity, and different tester used. This paper examines the basic principles on which surface textural patterns influence friction under the three principle lubrication regimes: hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication regimes. Our findings suggest that each regime requires specific dimple size, shape, depth, and areal density to achieve friction reduction. Control experiments were also conducted to explore mechanisms of friction reduction. The dimple geometric shape and the dimple's orientation with respect to the sliding direction influence friction significantly. The underlying mechanisms for friction control via textures are discussed. (paper)

  9. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.; Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E; Azorin, J.; Gonzalez, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO 2 +PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO 2 pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO 2 were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO 2 TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  10. Significant dose reduction is feasible in FDG PET/CT protocols without compromising diagnostic quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; García-Velloso, María José; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Morán, Verónica; García-García, Berta; Guillén, Fernando; Morales, María Isabel; Sancho, Lidia; Peñuelas, Iván; Richter, José Ángel; Martí-Climent, Josep María

    2018-02-01

    To reduce the radiation dose to patients by optimizing oncological FDG PET/CT protocols. The baseline PET/CT protocol in our institution for oncological PET/CT examinations consisted of the administration of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG and a CT acquisition with a reference current-time product of 120 mAs. In 2016, FDG activity was reduced to 4.44 and 3.70 MBq/kg and reference CT current-time-product was reduced to 100 and 80 mAs. 322 patients scanned with different protocols were retrospectively evaluated. For each patient, effective dose was calculated. The overall image quality was subjectively rated by the referring physician on a 4-point scale (IQ score: 1 excellent, 2 good, 3 poor but interpretable, 4 poor not interpretable). Image quality was quantitatively evaluated measuring noise in the liver. CT Results: Effective dose was progressively reduced from 9.5 ± 2.8 to 8.0 ± 2.3 and 6.2 ± 1.5 mSv (p dose reduction of 34.9% was achieved. There was a significant degradation of IQ score (p 2) did not increase. PET Results: Effective dose was gradually reduced from 6.5 ± 1.4 to 5.7 ± 1.3 and 5.0 ± 1.0 mSv (p dose reduction was 23.4%. IQ score (p dose reduction of 28.7% was reached. Despite a slight reduction in image quality, the new regime was successfully implemented with readers reporting unchanged clinical confidence. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in rates of decrease of environmental radiation dose rates by ground surface property in Fukushima City after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakamu, Takeyasu; Kanda, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Miyake, Masao; Hayakawa, Takehito; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Yayoi; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Hazama, Akihiro; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, the environmental radiation dose in Fukushima City increased. On 11 April, 1 mo after the earthquake, the environmental radiation dose rate at various surfaces in the same area differed greatly by surface property. Environmental radiation measurements continue in order to determine the estimated time to 50% reduction in environmental radiation dose rates by surface property in order to make suggestions for decontamination in Fukushima. The measurements were carried out from 11 April to 11 November 2011. Forty-eight (48) measurement points were selected, including four kinds of ground surface properties: grass (13), soil (5), artificial turf (7), and asphalt (23). Environmental radiation dose rate was measured at heights of 100 cm above the ground surface. Time to 50% reduction of environmental radiation dose rates was estimated for each ground surface property. Radiation dose rates on 11 November had decreased significantly compared with those on 11 April for all surface properties. Artificial turf showed the longest time to 50% reduction (544.32 d, standard error: 96.86), and soil showed the shortest (213.20 d, standard error: 35.88). The authors found the environmental radiation dose rate on artificial materials to have a longer 50% reduction time than that on natural materials. These results contribute to determining an order of priority for decontamination after nuclear disasters.

  12. Optimal treatment scheduling of ionizing radiation and sunitinib improves the antitumor activity and allows dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleibeuker, Esther A; Hooven, Matthijs A ten; Castricum, Kitty C; Honeywell, Richard; Griffioen, Arjan W; Verheul, Henk M; Slotman, Ben J; Thijssen, Victor L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy with sunitinib is clinically hampered by rare but severe side effects and varying results with respect to clinical benefit. We studied different scheduling regimes and dose reduction in sunitinib and radiotherapy in preclinical tumor models to improve potential outcome of this combination treatment strategy. The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) was used as an angiogenesis in vivo model and as a xenograft model with human tumor cells (HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma, OE19 esophageal adenocarcinoma). Treatment consisted of ionizing radiation (IR) and sunitinib as single therapy or in combination, using different dose-scheduling regimes. Sunitinib potentiated the inhibitory effect of IR (4 Gy) on angiogenesis. In addition, IR (4 Gy) and sunitinib (4 days of 32.5 mg/kg per day) inhibited tumor growth. Ionizing radiation induced tumor cell apoptosis and reduced proliferation, whereas sunitinib decreased tumor angiogenesis and reduced tumor cell proliferation. When IR was applied before sunitinib, this almost completely inhibited tumor growth, whereas concurrent IR was less effective and IR after sunitinib had no additional effect on tumor growth. Moreover, optimal scheduling allowed a 50% dose reduction in sunitinib while maintaining comparable antitumor effects. This study shows that the therapeutic efficacy of combination therapy improves when proper dose-scheduling is applied. More importantly, optimal treatment regimes permit dose reductions in the angiogenesis inhibitor, which will likely reduce the side effects of combination therapy in the clinical setting. Our study provides important leads to optimize combination treatment in the clinical setting

  13. Possible radiation dose reduction by using digital X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation load of population all over the world from medical examinations clearly demonstrates the importance of the introduction of the quality assurance and quality control programmes into the activities of radiology departments. The basic aim of quality assurance program is to ensure that the radiation dose is kept as low as reasonably practicable while still providing an adequate image quality. As many other fields, the rapid development of techniques brought change-over from the conventional analogue technique to the digital technique. In this process, the conventional X-ray film is being abandoned and images are being viewed on either laser film or monitor. The main advantages of using digital equipment lay in improved image quality and diagnostic accuracy through digital image processing, reduction in patients exposure, cost reduction by reduction of the film usage, more efficient storage and retrieval of radiographic images through picture archiving. Several studies that have been conducted for comparison of various diagnostic examinations show , that there is potential for dose saving in the digital image intensifier technique. The aim of this study was to compare measured values of dose-area product for colon investigations using different X-ray equipment types, two digital and two analogue. Our material consisted of 169 randomly selected patients, 115 of them were examined with digital equipment and 54 patients with the analogue equipment. The obtained results have confirmed the dose reduction and increase of diagnostic accuracy when using the digital equipment, with the added benefit of a good image quality. (authors)

  14. Entrance surface dose measurements in pediatric radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.A.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of pediatric radiological examinations was carried out in a reference pediatric hospital of the city of Sao Paulo, in order to investigate the doses to children undergoing conventional X-ray examinations. The results showed that the majority of pediatric patients are below 4 years, and that about 80% of the examinations correspond to chest projections. Doses to typical radiological examinations were measured in vivo with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF: Mg, Cu, P) attached to the skin of the children to determine entrance surface dose (ESD). Also homogeneous phantoms were used to obtain ESD to younger children, because the technique uses a so small kVp that the dosimeters would produce an artifact image in the patient radiograph. Four kinds of pediatric examinations were investigated: three conventional examinations (chest, skull and abdomen) and a fluoroscopic procedure (barium swallow). Relevant information about kVp and mAs values used in the examinations was collected, and we discuss how these parameters can affect the ESD. The ESD values measured in this work are compared to reference levels published by the European Commission for pediatric patients. The results obtained (third-quartile of the ESD distribution) for chest AP examinations in three age groups were: 0.056 mGy (2-4 years old); 0.068 mGy (5-9 years old); 0.069 mGy (10-15 years old). All of them are below the European reference level (0.100 mGy). ESD values measured to the older age group in skull and abdomen AP radiographs (mean values 3.44 and 1.20 mGy, respectively) are above the European reference levels (1.5 mGy to skull and 1.0 mGy to abdomen). ESD values measured in the barium swallow examination reached 10 mGy in skin regions corresponding to thyroid and esophagus. It was noticed during this survey that some technicians use, improperly, X-ray fluoroscopy in conventional examinations to help them in positioning the patient. The results presented here are a

  15. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants: Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    This is the third volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose-reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 80 new projects, covering a wide area of activities. Projects on steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Collective dose data from the United States and other countries are also presented. In the conclusion, we suggest that although new advanced reactor design technology will eventually reduce radiation exposures at nuclear power plants to levels below serious concern, in the interim an aggressive approach to dose reduction remains necessary. 20 refs.

  16. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more

  17. Patient dose reduction by changing the amount of {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical injected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Fernanda G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares; Santana, Priscila C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Mourão Filho, Arnaldo P., E-mail: fgpaiva92@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Biomédica

    2017-07-01

    Images of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) associated with Computed Tomography (CT) have important diagnostic applications, mainly for oncology. These compound tomographic devices allow the overlapping of functional images obtained from the administration of radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical images generated by X-ray beam attenuation. This work evaluated the impact of reducing the effective dose by reducing the activity injected into the patient using the ICRP 106 biokinetic model. The activity to be injected may vary according to the patient mass and the detector sensitivity. In this work was used the fixed mass of Alderson phantoms, as a standard adult, this mass is 73.5 kg for the male, and 50 kg for the female. Different values of activity to be injected were simulated, from 0.07 mCi to 0.15 mCi, and with 10 mCi, protocol used in some services. Thus, for the acquisition of PET scans, any reduction of the administered activity implies a proportional reduction of the effective dose in patient. The effective dose may vary up to 114% altering the injected activity between 0.07 and 0.15 mCi. Comparing the results found for the effective dose range using 10 mCi the effective dose may vary by up to approximately 14000%. It is expected that the PET/CT scans protocols are changed at the end of the study, so that the absorbed and effective dose received by the patient decreases. (author)

  18. Reductive precipitation of neptunium on iron surfaces under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Cui, D.; Grolimund, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Brütsch, R.; Amme, M.; Kutahyali, C.; Wiss, A. T.; Puranen, A.; Spahiu, K.

    2017-12-01

    Reductive precipitation of the radiotoxic nuclide 237Np from nuclear waste on the surface of iron canister material at simulated deep repository conditions was investigated. Pristine polished as well as pre-corroded iron specimens were interacted in a deoxygenated solution containing 10-100 μM Np(V), with 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM NaHCO3 as background electrolytes. The reactivity of each of the two different systems was investigated by analyzing the temporal evolution of the Np concentration in the reservoir. It was observed that pre-oxidized iron specimen with a 40 μm Fe3O4 corrosion layer are considerably more reactive regarding the reduction and immobilization of aqueous Np(V) as compared to pristine polished Fe(0) surfaces. 237Np immobilized by the reactive iron surfaces was characterized by scanning electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At the end of experiments, a 5-8 μm thick Np-rich layer was observed to be formed ontop of the Fe3O4 corrosion layer on the iron specimen. The findings from this work are significant in the context of performance assessments of deep geologic repositories using iron as high level radioactive waste (HLW) canister material and are of relevance regarding removing pollutants from contaminated soil or groundwater aquifer systems.

  19. Improving gold catalysis of nitroarene reduction with surface Pd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzer, Lori A.; Heck, Kimberly N.; Kim, Sean S.; Fang, Yu-Lun; Zhao, Zhun; Guo, Neng; Wu, Tianpin; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Wong, Michael S.

    2016-04-01

    Nitroarene reduction reactions are commercialized catalytic processes that play a key role in the synthesisof many products including medicines, rubbers, dyes, and herbicides. Whereas bimetallic compositionshave been studied, a better understanding of the bimetallic structure effects may lead to improved indus-trial catalysts. In this work, the influence of surface palladium atoms supported on 3-nm Au nanoparticles(Pd-on-Au NPs) on catalytic activity for 4-nitrophenol reduction is explored. Batch reactor studies indi-cate Pd-on-Au NPs exhibit maximum catalytic activity at a Pd surface coverage of 150 sc%, with aninitial turnover frequency of ~3.7 mol-nitrophenol/mol-metalsurface/s, which was ~5.5× and ~13× moreactive than pure Au NPs and Pd NPs, respectively. Pd NPs, Au NPs, and Pd-on-Au NPs below 175 sc%show compensation behavior. Three-dimensional Pd surface ensembles (with ~4–5 atoms) previouslyidentified through X-ray adsorption spectroscopy provide the active sites responsible for the catalyticmaximum. These results demonstrate the ability to adjust systematically a structural feature (i.e., Pdsurface coverage) to yield a more active material.

  20. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Alexander K; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1–100 mm s −1 ), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ∼ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ∼ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ∼ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ∼ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments. (paper)

  1. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  2. Object-based Dimensionality Reduction in Land Surface Phenology Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Bunker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unsupervised classification or clustering of multi-decadal land surface phenology provides a spatio-temporal synopsis of natural and agricultural vegetation response to environmental variability and anthropogenic activities. Notwithstanding the detailed temporal information available in calibrated bi-monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and comparable time series, typical pre-classification workflows average a pixel’s bi-monthly index within the larger multi-decadal time series. While this process is one practical way to reduce the dimensionality of time series with many hundreds of image epochs, it effectively dampens temporal variation from both intra and inter-annual observations related to land surface phenology. Through a novel application of object-based segmentation aimed at spatial (not temporal dimensionality reduction, all 294 image epochs from a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS bi-monthly NDVI time series covering the northern Fertile Crescent were retained (in homogenous landscape units as unsupervised classification inputs. Given the inherent challenges of in situ or manual image interpretation of land surface phenology classes, a cluster validation approach based on transformed divergence enabled comparison between traditional and novel techniques. Improved intra-annual contrast was clearly manifest in rain-fed agriculture and inter-annual trajectories showed increased cluster cohesion, reducing the overall number of classes identified in the Fertile Crescent study area from 24 to 10. Given careful segmentation parameters, this spatial dimensionality reduction technique augments the value of unsupervised learning to generate homogeneous land surface phenology units. By combining recent scalable computational approaches to image segmentation, future work can pursue new global land surface phenology products based on the high temporal resolution signatures of vegetation index time series.

  3. Evaluation of the potential in radiation dose reduction for full-field digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasch, K-U.; Moftah, B.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the image quality for different radiation doses in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The potential of dose reductions is evaluated for both, the transition from screen-film mammography (SFM) to FFDM as well as within FFDM due to the optimization of exposure parameters. Exposures of a 4.5 cm breast phantom rendering different contrasts as well as bar patterns were made using a FFDM system (GE Senographe 2000D). For different kVp and mAs settings as well as different target/filter combinations chosen for the above exposures, average glandular dose (AGD), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) were determined. To benchmark the results, relative change of AGD was evaluated against SNR, CNR and MTF. Eventually, the results were normalized to AGD's rendered by settings typically used in today's clinical routine. For standard settings (automatic mode), both FFDM and SFM deliver approximately the same AGD of about 2.2 mGy. From that, AGD reduction can be substantial in FFDM if only SNR and high contrast CNR are considered. In this case, reduction of up to 40% can be achieved in a wide kVp range if switching from the standard target/filter combination Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh. However, if low contrast CNR is to remain unchanged, dose reduction is practically impossible. The change of peak voltage and target/filter material had no influence on MTF. Assuming current CNR requirements as standards, significant dose reduction in FFDM cannot be achieved. Only by compromising low contrast CNR levels AGD of up to 40% can be saved at current standards of SNR and high contrast CNR. (author)

  4. Surface sputtering in high-dose Fe ion implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Microstructures and elemental distributions in high-dose Fe ion implanted Si were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Single crystalline Si(0 0 1) substrates were implanted at 350 deg. C with 120 keV Fe ions to fluences ranging from 0.1 x 10 17 to 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 . Extensive damage induced by ion implantation was observed inside the substrate below 1.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 , while a continuous iron silicide layer was formed at 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 . It was found that the spatial distribution of Fe projectiles drastically changes at the fluence between 1.0 x 10 17 and 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 due to surface sputtering during implantation

  5. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Rivera-Ordóñez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-01-01

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 ×1 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15×15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  6. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia Manuel Velasco Suarez, 14269 DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  7. The survey of the surface doses of the dental x-ray machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variability of doses with same exposure parameters and evaluate radiographic density according to the variability of doses. Twenty-eight MAX-GLS (Shinhung Co, Seoul, Korea), twenty-one D-60-S (DongSeo Med, Seoul, Korea), and eleven REX-601 (Yoshida Dental MFG, Tokyo, Japan) dental x-ray machines were selected for this study. Surface doses were measured under selected combinations of tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, and constant distance 42 cm from the focal spot to the surface of the Multi-O-meter (Unfors Instrument, Billdal, Sweden). Radiographic densities were measured on the films at maximum, minimum and mean surface doses of each brand of x-ray units. With MAX-GLS, the maximum surface doses were thirteen to fourteen times as much as the minimum surfaces doses. With D-60-S, the maximum surface doses were three to eight times as much as the minimum surface doses. With REX-601, the maximum surface doses were six to ten times as much as the minimum surface doses. The differences in radiographic densities among maximum, mean, and minimum doses were significant (p<0.01). The surface exposure doses of each x-ray machine at the same exposure parameters were different within the same manufacturer's machines.

  8. [Structure of the meeting of the german radiological society and scientific discourse pertaining to radiation dose and dose reduction: an analysis of 1998 - 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, C M; Peters, S; Lemburg, S

    2009-11-01

    Evaluation of the emphasis of themes pertaining to radiation dose and dose reduction at the Meeting of the German Radiological Society from 1998 - 2008 in comparison to international data. Retrospective analysis of 9440 abstracts with documentation of study presentation character, type of imaging, and examined body region. Abstracts stating radiation dose or primarily dealing with radiation dose/dose reduction were documented. Results were compared with a Pubmed query. The percentage of purely scientific presentations sank in the observation period from 88 to 66 %. While contributions dealing with MRI sank from 48 to 34 %, those dealing with CT rose from 30 to 34 %. The percentage of abstracts dealing with radiation dose rose from 7 to 10 %, while that of work primarily pertaining to dose/dose reduction grew from 4 to 6 % and 2 to 4 %, respectively. Of all abstracts concerning CT, 15 % touched on radiation dose, while 9 % and 6 % primarily dealt with dose and dose reduction. The respective numbers for cardiac CT, whose relative share of all CT abstracts rose from 3 % in 1998 to 12 % in 2008, were 10 %, 7 %, and 5 %. An online query produced 137,791 publications on CT, and 2 % of these abstracts mentioned radiation dose and 0.5 % mentioned dose reduction. The number of presentations dealing with dose at the Meeting of the German Radiological Society has risen with time and is higher than the international number. On the other hand, > 90 % of all presentations and > 85 % of all CT abstracts do not mention radiation dose. In light of increasing public concern relating to radiation exposure, more intensive research of these themes is warranted.

  9. Simulated dose reduction by adding artificial noise to measured raw data: A validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, M.; Gunnarsson, M.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify and validate a noise simulation tool called Dose Tutor (VAMP GmbH) in terms of level and texture of the simulated noise. By adding artificial noise to measured computed tomography (CT) raw data, a scan acquired with a lower dose (mAs) than the actual one can be simulated. A homogeneous polyethylene phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were scanned for different mAs levels, tube voltages, slice thicknesses and reconstruction kernels. The simulated noise levels were compared with the noise levels in real transverse slice images actually acquired with corresponding mAs values. In general, the noise comparisons showed acceptable agreement in magnitude (<20% deviation in pixel standard deviation). Also, the calculated noise power spectra were similar, which indicates that the noise texture is correctly reproduced. In conclusion, this study establishes that the Dose Tutor might be a useful tool for estimating the dose reduction potential for CT protocols. (authors)

  10. The child fluoroscopic examination in the I.I.-DR. Reduction of radiation exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Takayuki

    2001-01-01

    This examination for I.I.-DR conditions was done for the purpose of reducing radiation exposure dose in child gastrointestinal fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic apparatus used was Toshiba MAX-1000A with imaging recorder DDX-1000A. Dose was measured with a thimble ionization chamber Radcal Corporation Model 9015. Examinations for conditions were performed with the standard dose determined, the digital value 300, giving the plateau contrast ratio of acryl plate/barium sulfate. Reduction to about 10% dose (57 μGy/min for pulse fluoroscopy and 6.8 μGy/film for filming) relative to the usual method (764 μGy/min and 36.0 μGy/film, respectively) was found attained with additional filter of Al 0.5 mm + Cu 0.2 mm and IRIS diameter 100 with acryl thickness of 10 cm. Actual images of 6 months old baby were presented. (K.H.)

  11. Dose reduction in thorax radiography in simulated neonates with additional filtration and digital luminescence radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.; Jesberger, H.J.; Schneider, G.; Rein, L.; Blass, G.; Limbach, H.G.; Niewald, M.; Sitzmann, F.C.; Kramann, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the minimum acceptable radiation dose for an adequate image quality in thorax a.p. radiographs of neonates using mobile X-ray equipment. Material and Methods: The influence of additional filtration (1.0 mm Al+0.1 mm Cu) on image quality and radiation dose was determined for the speed class 400 screen-film system (SFS) and digital luminescence radiography (DLR) by making radiographs of a test phantom. Conventional and digital thorax a.p. radiographs of a rabbit were produced using various tube current-time products. The quality of the rabbit radiographs was judged by eight radiologists applying image quality criteria according to the German guidelines and the recommendations of the European Community. Results: The added filter resulted in a dose reduction of 39% at 66 kV. DLR gave a further dose reduction of 25% in comparison to the speed class 400 SFS while maintaining adequate image quality, i.e. the radiographs were clinically acceptable with regard to quality criteria. Conclusion: The radiation dose resulting from thorax a.p. radiographs of neonates can be reduced by approximately 50% with the use of additional filtration and DLR. (orig.)

  12. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Kim, Jong Hyo; Wiesmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p < .05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. • Perfusion CT is highly accurate for the detection of ischemic brain lesions • Perfusion CT results in high radiation exposure, therefore low-dose protocols are required • Reduction of tube current down to 72 mAs produces sufficient perfusion maps.

  13. MO-DE-204-00: International Symposium: Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The main topic of the session is to show how dose optimization is being implemented in various regions of the world, including Europe, Australia, North America and other regions. A multi-national study conducted under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) across more than 50 less resourced countries gave insight into patient radiation doses and safety practices in CT, mammography, radiography and interventional procedures, both for children and adults. An important outcome was the capability development on dose assessment and management. An overview of recent European projects related to CT radiation dose and optimization both to adults and children will be presented. Existing data on DRLs together with a European methodology proposed on establishing and using DRLs for paediatric radiodiagnostic imaging and interventional radiology practices will be shown. Compared with much of Europe at least, many Australian imaging practices are relatively new to the task of diagnostic imaging dose optimisation. In 2008 the Australian Government prescribed a requirement to periodically compare patient radiation doses with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), where DRLs have been established. Until recently, Australia had only established DRLs for computed tomography (CT). Regardless, both professional society and individual efforts to improved data collection and develop optimisation strategies across a range of modalities continues. Progress in this field, principally with respect to CT and interventional fluoroscopy will be presented. In the US, dose reduction and optimization efforts for computed tomography have been promoted and mandated by several organizations and accrediting entities. This presentation will cover the general motivation, implementation, and implications of such efforts. Learning Objectives: Understand importance of the dose optimization in Diagnostic Radiology. See how this goal is achieved in different regions of the World. Learn about the global trend

  14. Radiation dose reduction in the invasive cardiovascular laboratory: implementing a culture and philosophy of radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Mathew, Verghese; Lennon, Ryan; Bell, Malcolm R; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S

    2012-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sustained practice and x-ray system technical changes on the radiation dose administered to adult patients during invasive cardiovascular procedures. It is desirable to reduce radiation dose associated with medical imaging to minimize the risk of adverse radiation effects to both patients and staff. Several clinical practice and technical changes to elevate radiation awareness and reduce patient radiation dose were implemented under the guidance of a cardiovascular invasive labs radiation safety committee. Practice changes included: intraprocedure radiation dose announcements; reporting of procedures for which the air-kerma exceeded 6,000 mGy, including procedure air-kerma in the clinical report; and establishing compulsory radiation safety training for fellows. Technical changes included establishing standard x-ray imaging protocols, increased use of x-ray beam spectral filters, reducing the detector target dose for fluoroscopy and acquisition imaging, and reducing the fluoroscopy frame rate to 7.5 s(-1). Patient- and procedure-specific cumulative skin dose was calculated from air-kerma values and evaluated retrospectively over a period of 3 years. Data were categorized to include all procedures, percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary angiography, noncardiac vascular angiography and interventions, and interventions to treat structural heart disease. Statistical analysis was based on a comparison of the cumulative skin dose for procedures performed during the first and last quarters of the 3-year study period. A total of 18,115 procedures were performed by 27 staff cardiologists and 65 fellows-in-training. Considering all procedures, the mean cumulative skin dose decreased from 969 to 568 mGy (40% reduction) over 3 years. This work demonstrates that a philosophy of radiation safety, implemented through a collection of sustained practice and x-ray system changes, can result in a significant decrease in the radiation dose

  15. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  16. MO-DE-204-00: International Symposium: Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The main topic of the session is to show how dose optimization is being implemented in various regions of the world, including Europe, Australia, North America and other regions. A multi-national study conducted under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) across more than 50 less resourced countries gave insight into patient radiation doses and safety practices in CT, mammography, radiography and interventional procedures, both for children and adults. An important outcome was the capability development on dose assessment and management. An overview of recent European projects related to CT radiation dose and optimization both to adults and children will be presented. Existing data on DRLs together with a European methodology proposed on establishing and using DRLs for paediatric radiodiagnostic imaging and interventional radiology practices will be shown. Compared with much of Europe at least, many Australian imaging practices are relatively new to the task of diagnostic imaging dose optimisation. In 2008 the Australian Government prescribed a requirement to periodically compare patient radiation doses with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), where DRLs have been established. Until recently, Australia had only established DRLs for computed tomography (CT). Regardless, both professional society and individual efforts to improved data collection and develop optimisation strategies across a range of modalities continues. Progress in this field, principally with respect to CT and interventional fluoroscopy will be presented. In the US, dose reduction and optimization efforts for computed tomography have been promoted and mandated by several organizations and accrediting entities. This presentation will cover the general motivation, implementation, and implications of such efforts. Learning Objectives: Understand importance of the dose optimization in Diagnostic Radiology. See how this goal is achieved in different regions of the World. Learn about the global trend

  17. Mechanism of drag reduction for circular cylinders with patterned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced drag of patterned cylinders over a wide range of Re numbers. • Hexagonal patterns cannot be characterized as roughness structures. • Hexagonal bumps affect the flow like spherical dimples of smaller k/d ratio do. • Main separation is delayed caused by a partial separation. • Angle of a separation line is not constant over the length of cylinder. -- Abstract: In this paper, the flow over cylinders with a patterned surface (k/d = 1.98 × 10 −2 ) is investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel over Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.14 × 10 4 to 2.77 × 10 5 by measuring drag, flow visualization and measuring velocity profiles above the surface of the cylinders, to observe the effect of hexagonal patterns on the flow of air. These patterns can also be referred as hexagonal dimples or bumps depending on their configuration. The investigations revealed that a patterned cylinder with patterns pressed outwards has a drag coefficient of about 0.65 times of a smooth one. Flow visualization techniques including surface oil-film technique and velocity profile measurement were employed to elucidate this effect, and hence present the mechanism of drag reduction. The measurement of velocity profiles using hot-wire anemometry above the surface reveal that a hexagonal bump cause local separation generating large turbulence intensity along the separating shear layer. Due to this increased turbulence, the flow reattaches to the surface with higher momentum and become able to withstand the pressure gradient delaying the main separation significantly. Besides that, the separation does not appear to occur in a straight line along the length of the cylinder as in case of most passive drag control methods, but follow exactly the hexagonal patterns forming a wave with its crest at 115° and trough at 110°, in contrast to the laminar separation line at 85° for a smooth cylinder

  18. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ahmed E.; Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2015-01-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  19. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  20. Effects of radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Tsai, D.Y.; Lee, Y.; Matsuyama, E.; Kojima, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of the use of wavelet transform on dose reduction in computed radiography (CR). The physical properties of the processed CR images were measured using the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), contrast-to-noise ratio, and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed by Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that sigmoid-type transfer curves for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment could improve the MTF, and three soft-threshold methods could improve the NPS at all spatial frequency ranges. Moreover, our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved with the sigmoid-type transfer curve in hip joint radiography. (13th tc1/tc7 symposium fundamental and applied metrology september 01-03, 2010, london, uk)

  1. Thyroid shields for radiation dose reduction during cone beam computed tomography scanning for different oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xingmin; Li Gang; Zhang Zuyan; Ma Xuchen

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the radiation dose level during cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning for the different oral and maxillofacial regions with and without thyroid collar shielding. Materials and methods: Average tissue-absorbed dose for a DCT PRO CBCT was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a phantom with or without applying thyroid collars. Effective organ dose and total effective dose were derived using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 2007 recommendations. Results: The total effective doses for large, middle and small field of view (FOV) were 254.3 μSv, 249.0 μSv and 180.3 μSv, respectively, when no thyroid collar was used. Applying one thyroid collar around the front neck can reduce the total effective doses to 208.5 μSv (18.0% reduction), 149.1 μSv (40.1% reduction) and 110.5 μSv (38.7% reduction), respectively. When two thyroid collars were used around the front and back neck, the total effective doses were reduced to 219.1 μSv (13.8% reduction), 142.0 μSv (43.0% reduction) and 105.5 μSv (41.5% reduction), respectively. Conclusions: Thyroid collar can reduce the radiation dose during CBCT scanning for the oral and maxillofacial regions. The dose reduction becomes more significant when middle or small FOV is chosen.

  2. Intentional Weight Loss and Dose Reductions of Anti-Diabetic Medications – A Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. METHODS: Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabet...

  3. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report

  4. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  5. Utilization of radiation protection gear for absorbed dose reduction: an integrative literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Flor, Rita de Cassia [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Pereira, Aline Garcia, E-mail: aalinegp@gmail.co [Sinan Project - Sistema de Informacao de Agravos de Notificacao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the relation between the use of radiation protection gear and the decrease in absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, thereby reinforcing the efficacy of its use by both the patients and occupationally exposed personnel. Materials and Methods: The integrative literature review method was utilized to analyze 21 articles, 2 books, 1 thesis, 1 monograph, 1 computer program, 4 pieces of database research (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica and Departamento de Informatica do Sistema Unico de Saude) and 2 sets of radiological protection guidelines. Results: Theoretically, a reduction of 86% to 99% in the absorbed dose is observed with the use of radiation protection gear. In practice, however, the reduction may achieve 88% in patients submitted to conventional radiology, and 95% in patients submitted to computed tomography. In occupationally exposed individuals, the reduction is around 90% during cardiac catheterization, and 75% during orthopedic surgery. Conclusion: According to findings of several previous pieces of research, the use of radiation protection gear is a low-cost and effective way to reduce absorbed dose both for patients and occupationally exposed individuals. Thus, its use is necessary for the implementation of effective radioprotection programs in radiodiagnosis centers. (author)

  6. Does bridging the gap between knowledge and practice help? Example of patient dose reduction in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.; Kaul, Rashmi; Kumar, Pratik; Berry, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper is aimed at bridging the gap between knowledge and practice and evaluating the impact of this activity on reduction of patient dose. While enormous data on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology exists, there is absolute lack of information at user's level. For example, the implications on patient dose from 1cm error in x-ray field size or error of 5 kVp or 5mAs is invariably not known. We estimated that 1 cm increase in field size results in irradiation of 600-900cc of extra volume of patient which may contain sensitive tissue, 5 kVp increase results in exposure of 35-65 mR, with more effect in case of lumbar spine and abdomen x-ray and lesser for chest and D-spine, 5 mAs error results in 4-25 mR. The impact of information supply to users was evaluated and it was found that information based approach results in dose reduction to patient and improved image quality. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Serum free IgE guided dose reduction of omalizumab: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Reiko; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Mizumura, Kenji; Kozu, Yutaka; Hiranuma, Hisato; Iida, Yuko; Shikano, Sotaro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a human IgG1 antibody against IgE used as a therapy for sever asthmatic patients with asthma. According to the guidelines of the Global Initiative for Asthma, omalizumab is an add-on drug at treatment step 5 that is used for severe asthma patients who are allergic to perennial allergens. The effects of omalizumab for severe asthma therapy have been validated in multiple clinical studies. However, the long-term effects of omalizumab on IgE production and possibility of resetting of administration dose of omalizumab remain unknown. The serum total and free IgE levels were measured over time in a 63-year-old female patient with allergic asthma who was administered 375 mg omalizumab biweekly for 36 months. Her symptoms did not worsen and clinical course remained favorable after reducing the dose to 375 mg per month. The serum free IgE levels temporarily increased following a dose reduction of omalizumab. The serum free IgE trough level temporarily increased at 4 weeks after capable to reduce the dosage; however, thereafter, the serum free IgE level decreased to desired levels (below 30 ng/mL). The present case shows the possibility of reducing the dose following the long-term use of omalizumab. Considering the high medical cost of omalizumab, the dose reduction may be a viable option. It may be useful to measure the serum free IgE level to appropriately identify patients in whom the dose can be reduced, and to carefully monitor the clinical course.

  8. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara; Krauss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [de

  9. Reduction of patient doses in X-ray diagnosis using quality control tests on image and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, C.; Tomulescu, V.; Sorescu, Anca; Vladareanu, M.; Olteanu, B.; Enachescu, B.; Zaharia, N.; Lesaru, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of a research program under the contract with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), several patient dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) before and after application of Quality Control tests and patient dose reduction methods. The paper evidenced the practical influence factors (like the need of use of high voltage technique) and possibilities for dose reduction keeping the image quality. (authors)

  10. Influence of standard RF coil materials on surface and buildup dose from a 6 MV photon beam in magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2016-11-01

    magnetic field, the surface dose reduction was more rapid reaching a dose level of 30%-40% with only 3-4 cm gap. In the presence of the parallel magnetic field, as expected, the surface dose did not decrease considerably as the gap between the phantom surface and test materials was increased; the surface dose remained >60% at 10 cm gap for all tested materials except for the thin copper conductor. As expected, placing coil materials in direct contact with the phantom surface increases the surface dose considerably. The surface dose is reduced by creating a gap between the coil materials and phantom surface. This dose reduction happens more rapidly in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. However, the surface dose stays relatively large irrespective of the gap in the presence of a parallel magnetic field. Thus, the standard, off-the-shelf RF coils should be used with caution in integrated linac-MR systems, especially those using a parallel magnetic field orientation in which case the RF coils will probably need to be reconfigured to create open ports for the radiation beam.

  11. Fetal dose reduction in head and neck radiotherapy of a pregnant woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeckli, R.; Pache, G.; Valley, J.F.; Ozsahin, M.; Mirimanoff, R.O.; Azria, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: a pregnant woman was referred for post-operative radiotherapy of a malignant schwannoma in the head and neck region. A best-treatment plan was devised in order to minimize the fetal dose. Material and methods: the fetal dose resulting from radiological examinations was determined according to international protocols, that resulting from radiotherapy was calculated according to recommendation 36 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group. Pre-treatment dosimetry was performed with an anthropomorphic phantom. Several alternative treatment plans were evaluated. The use of a multileaf collimator (MLC) and a virtual wedge (VW) was compared to cerrobend blocks (CB) and physical wedge (PW). In-vivo dosimetry was performed using a vaginal probe containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Results: the total fetal dose resulting from diagnostic and radiotherapy procedures was estimated to be 36 mGy. The technique based on MLC and VW was elected for patient treatment. Measurements for this configuration resulted in a fetal dose reduction of 82%. The shielding of the patient's abdomen further reduced the fetal dose by 42%. Conclusion: the use of VW and MLC for the treatment of a pregnant woman is highly recommended. Each case should be individually studied with pre-treatment and in-vivo dosimetry. (orig.)

  12. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children: Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricarico, Francesco; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Schoepf, U.J.; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Nance, John W.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Cho, Young Jun; Spears, J.R.; Secchi, Francesco; Savino, Giancarlo; Marano, Riccardo; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Apfaltrer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose reductions. Forty neonates and children underwent low radiation CTA with or without ECG synchronisation. Data were reconstructed with FBP, IRIS and SAFIRE. For ECG-synchronised studies, half-dose image acquisitions were simulated. Signal noise was measured and IQ graded. Effective dose (ED) was estimated. Mean absolute and relative image noise with IRIS and full-dose SAFIRE was lower than with FBP (P < 0.001), while SNR and CNR were higher (P < 0.001). Image noise was also lower and SNR and CNR higher in half-dose SAFIRE studies compared with full-and half-dose FBP studies (P < 0.001). IQ scores were higher for IRIS, full-dose SAFIRE and half-dose SAFIRE than for full-dose FBP and higher for half-dose SAFIRE than for half-dose FBP (P < 0.05). Median weight-specific ED was 0.3 mSv without and 1.36 mSv with ECG synchronisation. The estimated ED of half-dose SAFIRE studies was 0.68 mSv. IR improves image noise, SNR, CNR and subjective IQ compared with FBP in low-radiation-dose paediatric CTA and allows further dose reductions without compromising diagnostic IQ. (orig.)

  13. Intentional weight loss and dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications--a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabetes medications after losing weight via attendance at two University-based, outpatient weight management centers were analyzed. Follow-up visits, weight reduction interventions, and decisions for dose reductions or discontinuation of medications were individualized to patient needs by the treating physician. Mean starting BMI was 35 kg/m(2), mean age 53.4 years, and 58% were male. All 50 used at least one anti-diabetic medication (30 metformin, 39 sulfonylureas, 31 insulin, 21 sitagliptin) to manage blood sugar. Mean duration of follow-up was 30.2 months. Mean weight loss was 10.8 ± 4.1 kgs (11.1% of initial body weight ± 4.7%). 22/50 patients (44%) discontinued anti-diabetes medications (14 sulfonylureas [36%], 7 insulin [23%], 4 sitagliptin [19%]). The mean percentage weight loss achieved at the point of successful discontinuation of medication was 11.2% ± 3.5% (14% for sulphonylureas, 11% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin). Mean percentage weight loss of 5.6% ± 2.8% (5.1% for sulphonylureas, 4.3% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin) was required for initial dose reduction. For every 5% weight loss, predicted dose reductions were sulphonylureas, 39%; insulin, 42%; and any anti-diabetic medications, 49%. Among overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes, intentional weight loss of 7-14% was typically required for full discontinuation of at least one anti-diabetic medication. Discontinuation of insulin was achieved at a mean weight reduction of 11% of initial body weight.

  14. Breast dose reduction for chest CT by modifying the scanning parameters based on the pre-scan size-specific dose estimate (SSDE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Sakabe, Daisuke; Hatemura, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of modifying scanning parameters based on the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for a breast-dose reduction for chest CT. We scanned 26 women with a fixed volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (15 mGy) and another 26 with a fixed SSDE (15 mGy) protocol (protocol 1 and 2, respectively). In protocol 2, tube current was calculated based on the patient habitus obtained on scout images. We compared the mean breast dose and the inter-patient breast dose variability and performed linear regression analysis of the breast dose and the body mass index (BMI) of the two protocols. The mean breast dose was about 35 % lower under protocol 2 than protocol 1 (10.9 mGy vs. 16.8 mGy, p < 0.01). The inter-patient breast dose variability was significantly lower under protocol 2 than 1 (1.2 mGy vs. 2.5 mGy, p < 0.01). We observed a moderate negative correlation between the breast dose and the BMI under protocol 1 (r = 0.43, p < 0.01); there was no significant correlation (r = 0.06, p = 0.35) under protocol 2. The SSDE-based protocol achieved a reduction in breast dose and in inter-patient breast dose variability. (orig.)

  15. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  16. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recontruction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  17. Quantification of acute vocal fold epithelial surface damage with increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kojima

    Full Text Available Because the vocal folds undergo repeated trauma during continuous cycles of vibration, the epithelium is routinely susceptible to damage during phonation. Excessive and prolonged vibration exposure is considered a significant predisposing factor in the development of vocal fold pathology. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the extent of epithelial surface damage following increased time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure using an in vivo rabbit phonation model. Forty-five New Zealand white breeder rabbits were randomized to nine groups and received varying phonation time-doses (30, 60, or 120 minutes and magnitude-doses (control, modal intensity phonation, or raised intensity phonation of vibration exposure. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was used to quantify the degree of epithelial surface damage. Results revealed a significant reduction in microprojection density, microprojection height, and depth of the epithelial surface with increasing time and phonation magnitudes doses, signifying increased epithelial surface damage risk with excessive and prolonged vibration exposure. Destruction to the epithelial cell surface may provide significant insight into the disruption of cell function following prolonged vibration exposure. One important goal achieved in the present study was the quantification of epithelial surface damage using objective imaging criteria. These data provide an important foundation for future studies of long-term tissue recovery from excessive and prolonged vibration exposure.

  18. CTPA protocol optimisation audit: challenges of dose reduction with maintained image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nania, A; Weir, A; Weir, N; Ritchie, G; Rofe, C; Van Beek, E

    2018-03-01

    To assess computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography (CTPA) dose and image quality in a large teaching hospital, and subsequently, to optimise the protocol in order to reduce the dose without affecting image quality. Dose-length product (DLP), patient size, and objective quality parameters (contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio on standardised levels) were recorded from 31 patients undergoing CTPA, where also a subjective image quality evaluation was carried out independently by three specialist cardiothoracic consultant radiologists. An equivalent objective and subjective quality assessment was carried out on a cohort of the same size in a different tertiary healthcare centre. Moreover, experimental tests using anthropomorphic chest phantoms were performed, using different scan parameters. In light of the above analysis, two of the scanner settings for CTPA were modified, i.e., the SureExposure pre-set was changed to "Standard" noise level, quantified with standard deviation (SD) of 19, and the minimum amperage setting lowered from 80 to 40 mA. A second cohort of patients using this new protocol was audited, following the same methodology. The average DLP of patients undergoing CTPA was initially found to be higher than both local and national dose reference levels (DRLs; 559 versus 300 mGy·cm and 400 mGy·cm, respectively). The new protocol led to a reduction in average DLP (359 mGy·cm) while the image quality, assessed by three cardiothoracic consultant radiologists, was preserved. The CTPA protocol was implemented in the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh resulting in significant dose reduction, and is now compliant with national and local DRLs. The image quality was maintained. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Corneal Dose Reduction Using a Bismuth-Coated Latex Shield over the Eyes During Brain SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutomo, Norikazu; Fukunaga, Masaaki; Onishi, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoaki

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a bismuth-coated latex shield (B-shield) could protect the eyes during brain SPECT/CT. Methods: A shield containing the heavy metal bismuth (equivalent to a 0.15-mm-thick lead shield) was placed over a cylindric phantom and the eyes of a 3-dimensional brain phantom filled with 99m Tc solution. Subsequently, phantoms with and without the B-shield were compared using SPECT/CT. The CT parameters were 30-200 mA and 130 kV. The dose reduction achieved by the B-shield was measured using a pencil-shaped ionization chamber. The protective effects of the B-shield were determined by evaluating relative radioactivity concentration as well as artifacts (changes in CT number), linear attenuation coefficients, and coefficients of variation on SPECT images. Results: The radiation doses with and without the B-shield were 0.14-0.77 and 0.36-1.93 mGy, respectively, and the B-shield decreased the average radiation dose by about 60%. The B-shield also increased the mean CT number, but only at locations just beneath the surface of the phantom. Streaks of higher density near the underside of the B-shield indicated beam hardening. Linear attenuation coefficients and the coefficients of variation did not significantly differ between phantoms with and without the B-shield, and the relative 99m Tc radioactivity concentrations were not affected. Conclusion: The B-shield decreased the radiation dose without affecting estimated attenuation correction or radioactivity concentrations. Although surface artifacts increased with the B-shield, the quality of the SPECT images was acceptable. B-shields can help protect pediatric patients and patients with eye diseases who undergo SPECT imaging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Treier, Reto; von Allmen, Gabriel; Nauer, Claude; Trueb, Philipp R; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt

    2011-10-01

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cochlear dose reduction by proton beam therapy for medulloblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Emi; Kawabuchi, Koichi; Fuji, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Kumar, Vinay; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction compared with conventional X-ray radiotherapy for medulloblastoma in childhood. We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 6-year-old children with medulloblastoma after treatment with proton or X-ray radiotherapy. The risks of hearing loss were calculated on cochlear dose for each treatment. Three types of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were used for estimation of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for proton beam therapy compared with X-ray radiotherapy was calculated for each HRQOL. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. The ICER for EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were $21 716/QALY, $11 773/QALY, and $20 150/QALY, respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses found that the results were sensitive to discount rate, the risk of hearing loss after proton therapy, and costs of proton irradiation. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 99% probability of proton therapy being cost effective at a societal willingness-to-pay value. Proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range from the payer's standpoint. (author)

  2. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  3. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de, E-mail: pauladuarte@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-07-15

    Objective: several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and methods: the percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results: the authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion: as expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. (author)

  4. SU-E-T-577: Obliquity Factor and Surface Dose in Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, I; Andersen, A; Coutinho, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The advantage of lower skin dose in proton beam may be diminished creating radiation related sequalae usually seen with photon and electron beams. This study evaluates the surface dose as a complex function of beam parameters but more importantly the effect of beam angle. Methods: Surface dose in proton beam depends on the beam energy, source to surface distance, the air gap between snout and surface, field size, material thickness in front of surface, atomic number of the medium, beam angle and type of nozzle (ie double scattering, (DS), uniform scanning (US) or pencil beam scanning (PBS). Obliquity factor (OF) is defined as ratio of surface dose in 0° to beam angle Θ. Measurements were made in water phantom at various beam angles using very small microdiamond that has shown favorable beam characteristics for high, medium and low proton energy. Depth dose measurements were performed in the central axis of the beam in each respective gantry angle. Results: It is observed that surface dose is energy dependent but more predominantly on the SOBP. It is found that as SSD increases, surface dose decreases. In general, SSD, and air gap has limited impact in clinical proton range. High energy has higher surface dose and so the beam angle. The OF rises with beam angle. Compared to OF of 1.0 at 0° beam angle, the value is 1.5, 1.6, 1,7 for small, medium and large range respectively for 60 degree angle. Conclusion: It is advised that just like range and SOBP, surface dose should be clearly understood and a method to reduce the surface dose should be employed. Obliquity factor is a critical parameter that should be accounted in proton beam therapy and a perpendicular beam should be used to reduce surface dose

  5. Evaluation of the stepwise collimation method for the reduction of the patient dose in full spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunyoung [Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Injeong [Seoul National University Hospital Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myeonggeun [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose reduction when using the stepwise collimation method for scoliosis patients undergoing full spine radiography. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to acquire dose vs. volume data for organs at risk (OAR) in the human body. While the effective doses in full spine radiography were reduced by 8, 15, 27 and 44% by using four different sizes of the collimation, the doses to the skin were reduced by 31, 44, 55 and 66%, indicating that the reduction of the dose to the skin is higher than that to organs inside the body. Although the reduction rates were low for the gonad, being 9, 14, 18 and 23%, there was more than a 30% reduction in the dose to the heart, suggesting that the dose reduction depends significantly on the location of the OARs in the human body. The reduction rate of the secondary cancer risk based on the excess absolute risk (EAR) varied from 0.6 to 3.4 per 10,000 persons, depending on the size of the collimation. Our results suggest that the stepwise collimation method in full spine radiography can effectively reduce the patient dose and the radiation-induced secondary cancer risk.

  6. Reduction in Surface Ocean Carbon Storage across the Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babila, T. L.; Sosdian, S. M.; Foster, G. L.; Lear, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    During the Middle Miocene, Earth underwent a profound climate shift from the warmth of the Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; 14-17 Ma) to the stable icehouse of today during the Middle Miocene Climate transition (MMCT). Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO2) revealed by boron isotope records (δ11B) link massive volcanic outputs of Columbia River Flood Basalts to the general warmth of MCO. Superimposed on the long-term cooling trend (MMCT) is a gradual pCO2 decline and numerous positive carbon isotope (δ13C) excursions that indicate dynamic variations in the global carbon cycle. Enhanced organic carbon burial via marine productivity, increased silicate weathering and volcanic emission cessation are each invoked to explain the drawdown of pCO2. To better constrain the oceanic role in carbon sequestration over the Middle Miocene detailed records of carbonate chemistry are needed. We present high resolution Boron/Calcium (B/Ca) and δ13C records in planktonic foraminifer T.trilobus spanning 12-17 Ma at ODP 761 (tropical eastern Indian Ocean) to document changes in surface ocean carbonate chemistry. An overall 30% increase in B/Ca ratios is expressed as two stepwise phases occurring at 14.7 and 13 Ma. Cyclic B/Ca variations are coherent with complimentary δ13C records suggesting a tight coupling between ocean carbonate chemistry parameters. Lower resolution B/Ca data at DSDP 588 (Pacific) and ODP 926 (Atlantic) corroborate the trends observed at ODP 761. We employ a paired approach that combines B/Ca (this study) to δ11B (Foster et al., 2012) and an ad hoc calibration to estimate changes in surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). We estimate a substantial decrease in surface ocean DIC spanning the Middle Miocene that culminates with modern day like values. This gradual decline in surface ocean DIC is coeval with existing deep-ocean records which together suggests a whole ocean reduction in carbon storage. We speculate that enhanced weathering

  7. Reduction of outdoor and indoor ambient dose equivalent after decontamination in the Fukushima evacuation zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida-Ohuchi, Hiroko; Kanagami, Takashi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan); Naitoh, Yutaka; Kameyama, Mizuki [Japan Environment Research Co., Ltd., Miyagi (Japan); Hosoda, Masahiro [Dept. of Radiological Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    One of the most urgent issues following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) was the remediation of the land, in particular, for residential area contaminated by the radioactive materials discharged. In this study, the effect of decontamination on reduction of ambient dose equivalent outdoors and indoors was evaluated. The latter is essential for residents as most individuals spend a large portion of their time indoors. From December 2012 to November 2014, thirty-seven Japanese single-family detached wooden houses were investigated before and after decontamination in evacuation zones. Outdoor and indoor dose measurements (n=84 and 114, respectively) were collected based on in situ measurements using the NaI (Tl) scintillation surveymeter. The outdoor ambient dose equivalents [H{sup *}(10){sub out}] ranged from 0.61 to 3.71 μSv h{sup -1} and from 0.23 to 1.32 μSv h{sup -1} before and after decontamination, respectively. The indoor ambient dose equivalents [H{sup *}(10){sup in}] ranged from 0.29 to 2.53 μSv h{sup -1} and from 0.16 to 1.22 μSv h{sup -1} before and after decontamination, respectively. The values of reduction efficiency (RE), defined as the ratio by which the radiation dose has been reduced via decontamination, were evaluated as 0.47±0.13, 0.51±0.13, and 0.58±0.08 (average±σ) when H{sup *}(10){sub out} <1.0 μSv h{sup -1}, 1.0 μSv h{sup -1} dose is essential as most individuals spend a large portion of their time indoors. The difference between outdoors and indoors should be considered carefully in order to estimate residents’ exposure dose before their returning home.

  8. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  9. Dose reduction using non lineal diffusion and smoothing filters in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, M.G.; Juste, B.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.; Mayo, P.; Rodenas, F.

    2014-01-01

    The use of Computed Radiography (CR) into clinical practice has been followed by a high increase in the number of examinations performed and overdose cases in patients, especially children in pediatric applications. Computed radiographic images are corrupted by noise because either data acquisition or data transmission. The level of this inherent noise is related with the X-ray dose exposure: lower radiation exposure involves higher noise level. The main aim of this work is to reduce the noise present in a low radiation dose CR image in order to the get a CR image of the same quality as a higher radiation exposure image. In this work, we use a non lineal diffusion filtering method to reduce the noise level in a CR, this means that we are able to reduce the exposure, milliampere-second (mAs), and the dose absorbed by the patients. In order to get an optimal result, the diffusive filter is complemented with a smoothing filter with edge detection in order to preserve edges. Therefore, the proposed method consists in obtaining a good quality CR image for diagnostic purposes by selection of lower X-ray exposure jointly with a reduction of the noise. We conclude that a good solution to minimize the dose to patients, especially children in pediatric applications, in X-ray computed radiography consists in decreasing the mAs of the X-ray exposure and then processing the image with the proposed method. - Highlights: • We have investigated the techniques to obtain the image quality to make a confident diagnosis. • We have used diffusion and smoothing filter in order to reduce the exposure. • Reducing CR doses, especially in pediatric applications. • The new CR images allow medical researchers to analyze how low dose affects the patient diagnosis

  10. The detection of simulated periapical lesions in human dry mandibles with cone-beam computed tomography: a dose reduction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nuaimi, N; Patel, S; Foschi, F; Mannocci, F

    2016-11-01

    To assess in an ex vivo model the accuracy of detection of simulated periapical lesions using two cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dose modes and periapical radiography. Small and large artificial periapical lesions were created with burs at the base of the socket of eleven mandibular molars, in seven human dry mandibles. Digital periapical radiographs, 360° and 180° rotations CBCT scans with standard dose and dose reduction (DR) modes were obtained before and after periapical lesions were prepared. Six blinded examiners scored the presence/absence of lesions. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (overall accuracy) were determined for each modality. The mean sensitivity and specificity of both CBCT rotations with dose reduction mode were higher compared to that of standard dose CBCT scans. The ROC Az mean values for periapical radiographs, 360° scan with standard dose and dose reduction and 180° scans with standard dose and dose reduction were 0.62, 0.94, 0.95, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively. No significant difference in the diagnostic accuracy of CBCT scans taken with standard and dose reduction modes, whilst their accuracy was significantly higher than periapical radiographs. Using dose reduction with 360° and 180° CBCT scans demonstrated good diagnostic accuracy in the detection of simulated periapical lesions whilst reducing the radiation dose by 54% and 51%, respectively, compared to conventional settings. Clinical evaluation is now needed to determine whether this is applicable to patients. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dose reduction using non lineal diffusion and smoothing filters in computed radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M. G.; Juste, B.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.; Mayo, P.; Rodenas, F.

    2014-02-01

    The use of Computed Radiography (CR) into clinical practice has been followed by a high increase in the number of examinations performed and overdose cases in patients, especially children in pediatric applications. Computed radiographic images are corrupted by noise because either data acquisition or data transmission. The level of this inherent noise is related with the X-ray dose exposure: lower radiation exposure involves higher noise level. The main aim of this work is to reduce the noise present in a low radiation dose CR image in order to the get a CR image of the same quality as a higher radiation exposure image. In this work, we use a non lineal diffusion filtering method to reduce the noise level in a CR, this means that we are able to reduce the exposure, milliampere-second (mAs), and the dose absorbed by the patients. In order to get an optimal result, the diffusive filter is complemented with a smoothing filter with edge detection in order to preserve edges. Therefore, the proposed method consists in obtaining a good quality CR image for diagnostic purposes by selection of lower X-ray exposure jointly with a reduction of the noise. We conclude that a good solution to minimize the dose to patients, especially children in pediatric applications, in X-ray computed radiography consists in decreasing the mAs of the X-ray exposure and then processing the image with the proposed method.

  12. Dose reduction in multidetector CT of the urinary tract. Studies in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppenrath, E.; Meindl, T.; Herzog, P.; Khalil, R.; Mueller-Lisse, U.; Krenn, L.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.

    2006-01-01

    A novel ureter phantom was developed for investigations of image quality and dose in CT urography. The ureter phantom consisted of a water box (14 cm x 32 cm x 42 cm) with five parallel plastic tubes (diameter 2.7 mm) filled with different concentrations of contrast media (1.88-30 mg iodine/ml). CT density of the tubes and noise of the surrounding water were determined using two multidetector scanners (Philips MX8000 with four rows, Siemens Sensation 16 with 16 rows) with varying tube current-time product (15-100 mAs per slice), voltage (90 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV), pitch (0.875-1.75), and slice thickness (1 mm, 2 mm, 3.2 mm). Contrast-to-noise ratio as a parameter of image quality was correlated with dose (CTDI) and was compared with image evaluation by two radiologists. The CT densities of different concentrations of contrast media and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher when low voltages (90 kV versus 120 kV, 100 kV versus 120 kV) were applied. Smaller slice thickness (1 mm versus 2 mm) did not change CT density but decreased contrast-to-noise ratio due to increased noise. Contrast phantom studies showed favourable effects of low tube voltage on image quality in the low dose range. This may facilitate substantial dose reduction in CT urography. (orig.)

  13. Alternate-day dosing of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors for cholesterol reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, C A; Lucas, K H

    2001-04-01

    Assess efficacy, safety, and cost of alternate-day dosing with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (HRIs). International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and MEDLINE (English-language clinical trials, 1966-April 2000) were searched. Established efficacy of HRIs is based on daily administration. Many patients who could benefit from these agents are unable to afford them; therefore, alternate-day dosing may be a solution for reducing expense without decreasing therapy benefits. Studies addressing alternate-day HRI therapy are evaluated to determine the usefulness of this option for cholesterol reduction. Although limited studies imply a trend toward benefit with alternate-day HRI therapy, large, controlled, randomized trials are needed before making this a standard recommendation.

  14. Radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for dose reduction. Report of a co-ordinated research programme (1991-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    It is well recognized that diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to the collective dose from all man-made sources of radiation. Large differences in radiation doses from the same procedures among different X ray rooms have led to the conclusion that there is a potential for dose reduction. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction, involving Member States with different degrees of development, was launched by the IAEA in co-operation with the CEC. This report summarizes the results of the second and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 4 to 8 October 1993. 22 refs, 6 figs and tabs

  15. Evaluation of the Entrance Surface Dose (ESD and Radiation Dose to the Radiosensitive Organs in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients' dosimetry is crucial in order to enhance radiation protection optimization and to deliver low radiation dose to the patients in a radiological procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the entrance surface dose (ESD and radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods The studied population included 98 pediatric patients of both genders referred to anteroposterior (AP projection of pelvic radiography. The radiation dose was directly measured using high radiosensitive cylindrical lithium fluoride thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD-GR200. Two TLDs were placed at the center point of the radiation field to measure the ESD of pelvis. Moreover for each patient, 2 TLDs were placed upon each eyelid, 2 TLDs upon each breast, 2 TLDs upon the surface anatomical position of the thyroid gland and finally 2 TLDs at the surface anatomical position of the gonads to measure the received dose. Results The ESD ± standard deviation for AP pelvic radiography was obtained 591.7±76 µGy. Statistically significant difference was obtained between organs located outside and inside of the radiation field with respect to dose received (P

  16. Comparison of dimensionality reduction methods for wood surface inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Matti; Silven, Olli

    2003-04-01

    Dimensionality reduction methods for visualization map the original high-dimensional data typically into two dimensions. Mapping preserves the important information of the data, and in order to be useful, fulfils the needs of a human observer. We have proposed a self-organizing map (SOM)- based approach for visual surface inspection. The method provides the advantages of unsupervised learning and an intuitive user interface that allows one to very easily set and tune the class boundaries based on observations made on visualization, for example, to adapt to changing conditions or material. There are, however, some problems with a SOM. It does not address the true distances between data, and it has a tendency to ignore rare samples in the training set at the expense of more accurate representation of common samples. In this paper, some alternative methods for a SOM are evaluated. These methods, PCA, MDS, LLE, ISOMAP, and GTM, are used to reduce dimensionality in order to visualize the data. Their principal differences are discussed and performances quantitatively evaluated in a few special classification cases, such as in wood inspection using centile features. For the test material experimented with, SOM and GTM outperform the others when classification performance is considered. For data mining kinds of applications, ISOMAP and LLE appear to be more promising methods.

  17. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment's ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020

  18. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  19. Reduction of the irradiation dose and reproducibility of the volumetry of pulmonary nodules; Reduction de la dose d'irradiation et reproductibilite de la volumetrie de nodules pulmonaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, N.; Maertelaer, V. de; Tack, D.; Gevenois, P

    2006-10-15

    The objective of this work is to estimate the influence of the reduction of the irradiation dose of the T.D.M. on the reproducibility of the semi-automatic volumetric measure of lung nodules. After study it seems that the reproducibility of the volumetric measures of lung nodules is good in standard doses and in low doses but not in passing from the one to the other one. (N.C.)

  20. A study on the dependence of exposure dose reduction and image evaluation on the distance from the dental periapical X-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Kyu-Ji; Shin, Jae-Woo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Lim, Chang-Seon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the exposure dose from a periapical X-ray machine is an important aim in dental radiography. Although the radiation exposure dose is generally low, any radiation exposure is harmful to the human body. Therefore, this study developed a method that reduces the exposure dose significantly compared to that encountered in a normal procedure, but still produces an image with a similar resolution. The correlation between the image resolution and the exposure dose of the proposed method was examined with increasing distance between the dosimeter and the X-ray tube. The results were compared with those obtained from the existing radiography method. When periapical radiography was performed once according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the measured skin surface dose was low at 7 mGy or below. In contrast, the skin surface dose measured using the proposed method was only 1.57 mGy, showing a five-fold reduction. These results suggest that further decreases in dose might be achieved using the proposed method.

  1. Dose of Biocoagulant-Mixing Rate Combinations for Optimum Reduction of COD in Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia, Maria Faustina; Purwono; Budihardjo, Mochamad Arief

    2018-02-01

    Chemical oxygen demand (COD) in domestic wastewater can be treated using flocculation-coagulation process with addition of Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in powder form as biocoagulant. The fungal cell wall of Oyster mushroom comprises of chitin that is high polyelectrolyte and can be function as an absorbent of heavy metals in wastewater. The effectiveness of flocculation-coagulation process in treating wastewater depends on dose of coagulant and mixing rate. Therefore, this study aims to determine the best combination of three variation of dose of biocoagulant which are 600 mg/l, 1000 mg/l, and 2000 mg/l and mixing rate which are 100 rpm, 125 rpm, and 150 rpm that give the most reduction of COD in the wastewater. The result indicates that the combination of 1000 mg/l of biocoagulant and 100 rpm of mixing rate were found to be the most optimum combination to treat COD in the wastewater with COD reduction of 47.7%.

  2. Dose of Biocoagulant-Mixing Rate Combinations for Optimum Reduction of COD in Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustina Patricia Maria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical oxygen demand (COD in domestic wastewater can be treated using flocculation-coagulation process with addition of Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus in powder form as biocoagulant. The fungal cell wall of Oyster mushroom comprises of chitin that is high polyelectrolyte and can be function as an absorbent of heavy metals in wastewater. The effectiveness of flocculation-coagulation process in treating wastewater depends on dose of coagulant and mixing rate. Therefore, this study aims to determine the best combination of three variation of dose of biocoagulant which are 600 mg/l, 1000 mg/l, and 2000 mg/l and mixing rate which are 100 rpm, 125 rpm, and 150 rpm that give the most reduction of COD in the wastewater. The result indicates that the combination of 1000 mg/l of biocoagulant and 100 rpm of mixing rate were found to be the most optimum combination to treat COD in the wastewater with COD reduction of 47.7%.

  3. Dose reduction using bismuth shielding during paediatric CT examinations in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbelcova, L.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the massive increase of computer tomography (CT) examinations in Slovakia during the last 10 y, it can be expected that a higher radiation load may be observed in the Slovak population. Since child population is more sensitive to radiation than adult population, a monitoring has started to see how high the radiation dose is for paediatric patients during CT examinations in chosen departments in Slovakia. The CT examination of the head is one of the most frequently done examinations in Slovakian departments and that is why measurements were done to clarify how usage of bismuth shields for eyes and thyroid can affect the eye and thyroid doses. For simulation, 215 thermoluminescent dosimeters were exposed on anthropomorphic phantom of a child with and without usage of bismuth shields. The result was that only two of the three chosen departments confirmed a reduction. On the other hand, one of the departments confirmed that the reduction can be up to 56-65 %, which is significant. (authors)

  4. Radiation dose reduction during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation using a new imaging technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, C., E-mail: c.spink@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Avanesov, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Schmidt, T. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Grass, M. [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Schoen, G. [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, G.; Bannas, P.; Koops, A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The new imaging technology halved the radiation exposure. • DSA image quality observed was not decreased after technology upgrade. • Radiation time and contrast consumption not significantly increased using the new technology. - Abstract: Objective: To compare patient radiation dose in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) implantation before and after an imaging-processing technology upgrade. Methods: In our retrospective single-center-study, cumulative air kerma (AK), cumulative dose area product (DAP), total fluoroscopy time and contrast agent were collected from an age- and BMI-matched collective of 108 patients undergoing TIPS implantation. 54 procedures were performed before and 54 after the technology upgrade. Mean values were calculated and compared using two-tailed t-tests. Two blinded, independent readers assessed DSA image quality using a four-rank likert scale and the Wilcoxcon test. Results: The new technology demonstrated a significant reduction of 57% of mean DAP (402.8 vs. 173.3 Gycm{sup 2}, p < 0.001) and a significant reduction of 58% of mean AK (1.7 vs. 0.7 Gy, p < 0.001) compared to the precursor technology. Time of fluoroscopy (26.4 vs. 27.8 min, p = 0.45) and amount of contrast agent (109.4 vs. 114.9 ml, p = 0.62) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The DSA image quality of the new technology was not inferior (2.66 vs. 2.77, p = 0.56). Conclusions: In our study the new imaging technology halved radiation dose in patients undergoing TIPS maintaining sufficient image quality without a significant increase in radiation time or contrast consumption.

  5. Shutdown dose rate analysis with CAD geometry, Cartesian/tetrahedral mesh, and advanced variance reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondo, Elliott D.; Davis, Andrew; Wilson, Paul P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A CAD-based shutdown dose rate analysis workflow has been implemented. • Cartesian and superimposed tetrahedral mesh are fully supported. • Biased and unbiased photon source sampling options are available. • Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques accelerate photon transport. • The workflow has been validated with the FNG-ITER benchmark problem. - Abstract: In fusion energy systems (FES) high-energy neutrons born from burning plasma activate system components to form radionuclides. The biological dose rate that results from photons emitted by these radionuclides after shutdown—the shutdown dose rate (SDR)—must be quantified for maintenance planning. This can be done using the Rigorous Two-Step (R2S) method, which involves separate neutron and photon transport calculations, coupled by a nuclear inventory analysis code. The geometric complexity and highly attenuating configuration of FES motivates the use of CAD geometry and advanced variance reduction for this analysis. An R2S workflow has been created with the new capability of performing SDR analysis directly from CAD geometry with Cartesian or tetrahedral meshes and with biased photon source sampling, enabling the use of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) variance reduction technique. This workflow has been validated with the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)-ITER SDR benchmark using both Cartesian and tetrahedral meshes and both unbiased and biased photon source sampling. All results are within 20.4% of experimental values, which constitutes satisfactory agreement. Photon transport using CADIS is demonstrated to yield speedups as high as 8.5·10 5 for problems using the FNG geometry.

  6. Shutdown dose rate analysis with CAD geometry, Cartesian/tetrahedral mesh, and advanced variance reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondo, Elliott D., E-mail: biondo@wisc.edu; Davis, Andrew, E-mail: davisa@engr.wisc.edu; Wilson, Paul P.H., E-mail: wilsonp@engr.wisc.edu

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A CAD-based shutdown dose rate analysis workflow has been implemented. • Cartesian and superimposed tetrahedral mesh are fully supported. • Biased and unbiased photon source sampling options are available. • Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques accelerate photon transport. • The workflow has been validated with the FNG-ITER benchmark problem. - Abstract: In fusion energy systems (FES) high-energy neutrons born from burning plasma activate system components to form radionuclides. The biological dose rate that results from photons emitted by these radionuclides after shutdown—the shutdown dose rate (SDR)—must be quantified for maintenance planning. This can be done using the Rigorous Two-Step (R2S) method, which involves separate neutron and photon transport calculations, coupled by a nuclear inventory analysis code. The geometric complexity and highly attenuating configuration of FES motivates the use of CAD geometry and advanced variance reduction for this analysis. An R2S workflow has been created with the new capability of performing SDR analysis directly from CAD geometry with Cartesian or tetrahedral meshes and with biased photon source sampling, enabling the use of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) variance reduction technique. This workflow has been validated with the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)-ITER SDR benchmark using both Cartesian and tetrahedral meshes and both unbiased and biased photon source sampling. All results are within 20.4% of experimental values, which constitutes satisfactory agreement. Photon transport using CADIS is demonstrated to yield speedups as high as 8.5·10{sup 5} for problems using the FNG geometry.

  7. Normal tissue complication probabilities: dependence on choice of biological model and dose-volume histogram reduction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) reduction schemes and models of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) on ranking of radiation treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Data for liver complications in humans and for spinal cord in rats were used to derive input parameters of four different NTCP models. DVH reduction was performed using two schemes: 'effective volume' and 'preferred Lyman'. DVHs for competing treatment plans were derived from a sample DVH by varying dose uniformity in a high dose region so that the obtained cumulative DVHs intersected. Treatment plans were ranked according to the calculated NTCP values. Results: Whenever the preferred Lyman scheme was used to reduce the DVH, competing plans were indistinguishable as long as the mean dose was constant. The effective volume DVH reduction scheme did allow us to distinguish between these competing treatment plans. However, plan ranking depended on the radiobiological model used and its input parameters. Conclusions: Dose escalation will be a significant part of radiation treatment planning using new technologies, such as 3-D conformal radiotherapy and tomotherapy. Such dose escalation will depend on how the dose distributions in organs at risk are interpreted in terms of expected complication probabilities. The present study indicates considerable variability in predicted NTCP values because of the methods used for DVH reduction and radiobiological models and their input parameters. Animal studies and collection of standardized clinical data are needed to ascertain the effects of non-uniform dose distributions and to test the validity of the models currently in use

  8. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.; Takx, R.A.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Budde, R.P.; Bleys, R.L.; Das, M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Prokop, M.; Buls, N.; Mey, J. de; Schilham, A.M.; Leiner, T.

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS).Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels

  9. The effect of dose reduction on the detection of anatomical structures on panoramic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, G; Dietz, K; Reinert, S

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy using different screen-film combinations and digital techniques for panoramic radiography. Five observers assessed 201 pairs of panoramic radiographs (a total of 402 panoramic radiographs) taken with the Orthophos Plus (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany), for visualization of 11 anatomical structures on each side, using a 3-point scale -1, 0 and 1. Two radiographs of each patient were taken at two different times (conventional setting and setting with decreased dose, done by increasing tube potential settings or halving tube current). To compare the dose at different tube potential settings dose-length product was measured at the secondary collimator. Films with medium and regular intensifying screens (high and low tube potential settings) and storage phosphor plates (low tube potential setting, tube current setting equivalent to regular intensifying screen and halved) were compared. The five observers made 27 610 assessments. Intrarater agreement was expressed by Cohen's kappa coefficient. The results demonstrated an equivalence of regular screens (low tube potential setting) and medium screens (high and low tube potential settings). A significant difference existed between medium screens (low tube potential setting, mean score 0.92) and the group of regular film-screen combinations at high tube potential settings (mean score 0.89) and between all film-screen combinations and the digital system irrespective of exposure (mean score below 0.82). There were no significant differences between medium and regular screens (mean score 0.88 to 0.92) for assessment of the periodontal ligament space, but there was a significant difference compared with the digital system (mean score below 0.76). The kappa coefficient for intrarater agreement was moderate (0.55). New regular intensifying screens can replace medium screens at low tube potential settings. Digital panoramic radiographs should be taken at low

  10. Radiation dose reduction with dictionary learning based processing for head CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yang; Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Yang, Jiang; Yin, Xindao; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In CT, ionizing radiation exposure from the scan has attracted much concern from patients and doctors. This work is aimed at improving head CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast Dictionary learning (DL) based post-processing. Both Low-dose CT (LDCT) and Standard-dose CT (SDCT) nonenhanced head images were acquired in head examination from a multi-detector row Siemens Somatom Sensation 16 CT scanner. One hundred patients were involved in the experiments. Two groups of LDCT images were acquired with 50 % (LDCT50 %) and 25 % (LDCT25 %) tube current setting in SDCT. To give quantitative evaluation, Signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were computed from the Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of GM, WM and CSF tissues. A blinded qualitative analysis was also performed to assess the processed LDCT datasets. Fifty and seventy five percent dose reductions are obtained for the two LDCT groups (LDCT50 %, 1.15 ± 0.1 mSv; LDCT25 %, 0.58 ± 0.1 mSv; SDCT, 2.32 ± 0.1 mSv; P < 0.001). Significant SNR increase over the original LDCT images is observed in the processed LDCT images for all the GM, WM and CSF tissues. Significant GM–WM CNR enhancement is noted in the DL processed LDCT images. Higher SNR and CNR than the reference SDCT images can even be achieved in the processed LDCT50 % and LDCT25 % images. Blinded qualitative review validates the perceptual improvements brought by the proposed approach. Compared to the original LDCT images, the application of DL processing in head CT is associated with a significant improvement of image quality.

  11. Blood pressure reduction induced by low dose of epinephrine via different routes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ji, Mu-Huo; Wang, Zhong-Yun; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Jian-Jun; Peng, Yong G

    2013-09-01

    Epinephrine was recently shown to induce a hypotension episode. Activation of β₂-adrenoceptors with smooth muscle relaxation may be the underlying mechanism. This study investigated the effects of ICI 118551, a β₂-adrenoceptors antagonist, on epinephrine-induced blood pressure reduction via different administration routes in rats. A total of 144 Sprague Dawley rats were equally randomized into 3 groups (intranasal, intravenous, and intra-arterial administration), each with 4 subgroups: saline + saline, ICI 118551 + saline, saline + epinephrine, and ICI 118551 + epinephrine. All rats were anesthetized while spontaneously breathing. Epinephrine was administered at doses of 5 μg/kg via nose, 0.25 μg/kg via femoral vein, and 0.1 μg/kg via aorta. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were monitored. Mean arterial pressure decreased in all 3 saline + epinephrine subgroups after administration (P blood pressure reduction can be prevented by ICI 118551 in rats, suggesting that the activation of β₂-adrenoceptors contributes to blood pressure reduction.

  12. Initial substantial reduction in air dose rates of Cs origin and personal doses for residents owing to the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Saito, Junko; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The initial substantial reduction in the air dose rate and personal dose equivalent [Hp(10)] for residents were compared between the Marumori and Kosugo regions for the period from September 2011 to September 2012 after the occurrence of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Marumori is a rural settlement, and Kosugo is a suburban city along a freeway. A similar tendency was observed in the Hp(10) results for Marumori residents and in the air dose rates for both regions: values dropped during the heavy snow season and a faster reduction in the air dose rate than the radioactive decay of 134 Cs and 137 Cs was observed after the snow had thawed. These reductions are considered to be caused by the weathering and/or migration of radionuclides down the soil column. However, neither a drop due to an accumulation of snow nor faster reduction was observed in Hp(10) for Kosugo residents. This discrepancy between the air dose rate and Hp(10) for Marumori and Kosugo residents might be caused by differences in their living environment. (author)

  13. Quantification and reduction of peripheral dose from leakage radiation on Siemens Primus accelerators in electron therapy mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Collins; Karotki, Alex; Hunt, Dylan; Holly, Rick

    2010-06-15

    In this work, leakage radiation from EA200 series electron applicators on Siemens Primus accelerators is quantified, and its penetration ability in water and/or the shielding material Xenolite-NL established. Initially, measurement of leakage from 10 x 10 - 25 x 25 cm2 applicators was performed as a function of height along applicator and of lateral distance from applicator body. Relative to central-axis ionization maximum in solid water, the maximum leakage in air observed with a cylindrical ion chamber with 1 cm solid water buildup cap at a lateral distance of 2 cm from the front and right sidewalls of applicators were 17% and 14%, respectively; these maxima were recorded for 18 MeV electron beams and applicator sizes of >or=20 x 20 cm2. In the patient plane, the applicator leakage gave rise to a broad peripheral dose off-axis distance peak that shifted closer to the field edge as the electron energy increases. The maximum peripheral dose from normally incident primary electron beams at a depth of 1 cm in a water phantom was observed to be equal to 5% of the central-axis dose maximum and as high as 9% for obliquely incident beams with angles of obliquity dose curves showed that the "practical range" of the leakage electrons in water varies from approximately 1.4 to 5.7 cm as the primary electron beam energy is raised from 6 to 18 MeV. Next, transmission measurements of leakage radiation through the shielding material Xenolite-NL showed a 4 mm thick sheet of this material is required to attenuate the leakage from 9 MeV beams by two-thirds, and that for every additional 3 MeV increase in the primary electron beam energy, an additional Xenolite-NL thickness of roughly 2 mm is needed to achieve the aforementioned attenuation level. Finally, attachment of a 1 mm thick sheet of lead to the outer surface of applicator sidewalls resulted in a reduction of the peripheral dose by up to 80% and 74% for 9 and 18MeV beams, respectively. This sidewall modification had an

  14. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  15. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  16. Leidenfrost point reduction on micro-patterned metallic surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnaldo del Cerro, D.; Gomez Marin, Alvaro; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Pathiraj, B.; Lohse, Detlef; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Droplets are able to levitate when deposited over a hot surface exceeding a critical temperature. This is known as the Leidenfrost effect. This phenomenon occurs when the surface is heated above the so-called Leidenfrost point (LFP), above which the vapor film between the droplet and hot surface is

  17. Assessment of patient dose reduction when using AEC technique in toshiba 64 MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khojali, Wadah Mohamed Ali.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of research is to evaluate the efficiency of AEC (SUREDOSE) used in Toshiba CT scanner in reducing patient radiation dose. 107 patients were studied from four CT scanners. Scan factors and radiation dose received during abdominal CT scan was registered between the contract phases of abdominal CT scan, where the arterial contrast phases was done with Routine Manual Protocol i.e. fixed mA and kVp regardless patient age, weight and reason of scan, while the vinous phase done using AEC. The mA values were considerably less in vinous phase than in the arterial phase for all hospitals with exceptional to hospital 4 where the mA values had increased. There were no variations between the two phases in the other scan factors (kVp. pitch, slice thickness, scan length), which indicates that the software was mainly changing the mA values. The mA also showed wide variations during venous phase as a result of the varying mA applied by the AEC for the different patient ages and weights. The data collection has showed that, the application of SURDOSE decreases that average mA by 56.6%, 61%6 and 56.6 for hospitals 1, 2, and 3 respectively. The reduction of the average of the CTD1 v ol were 54.2%. 64.1% in hospital 1.2. and 3 respectively. The average DLPs were also less by 57.1%. 62.8%. 57.5% in hospital, 2, and 3 respectively between the phases. In hospital 4 one raw of the CT detector was not functioning this has disturbed the SURDOSE software. Leading to increase of the mA values and hence the patient radiation dose mA, CTD1 v ol and DLP in this hospital increased by 47.7%, 54.3% and 42.8% respectively. This highlighted the risk of not applying the AEC correctly. The non application of this software was only due to lake of knowledge how to use it and the benefits of dose reduction associated with it. Application of this software is very useful and operator should be trained to use it in all CT exams. (Author)

  18. A consideration on internal dose evaluation and intervention based on a surface contamination concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H.

    1997-01-01

    Long-term radiation doses received by the inhabitants after the Chernobyl accident have been evaluated according to the surface contamination levels on the ground surface. The health effects have also been discussed by comparison between the surface-contaminated area and the uncontaminated control area. Selected protective measures were carried out in accordance with the contamination level of surface soil. These have been based on the 'surface contamination concept' which assumes that the radiation risk to inhabitants is proportional to the level of ground-surface contamination. The observations collected in regions around Chernobyl, however, show that the internal radiation doses to the inhabitants poorly correlate with the surface contamination level. This fact poses a question on the suitability of dose evaluations and interventions based on this concept

  19. Radiation dose reduction for CT assessment of urolithiasis using iterative reconstruction. A prospective intra-individual study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Annemarie M. den; Willemink, Martin J.; Wessels, Frank J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doormaal, Pieter J. van; Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lock, M.T.W.T. [University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2018-01-15

    To assess the performance of hybrid (HIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MIR) in patients with urolithiasis at reduced-dose computed tomography (CT). Twenty patients scheduled for unenhanced abdominal CT for follow-up of urolithiasis were prospectively included. Routine dose acquisition was followed by three low-dose acquisitions at 40%, 60% and 80% reduced doses. All images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), HIR and MIR. Urolithiasis detection rates, gall bladder, appendix and rectosigmoid evaluation and overall subjective image quality were evaluated by two observers. 74 stones were present in 17 patients. Half the stones were not detected on FBP at the lowest dose level, but this improved with MIR to a sensitivity of 100%. HIR resulted in a slight decrease in sensitivity at the lowest dose to 72%, but outperformed FBP. Evaluation of other structures with HIR at 40% and with MIR at 60% dose reductions was comparable to FBP at routine dose, but 80% dose reduction resulted in non-evaluable images. CT radiation dose for urolithiasis detection can be safely reduced by 40 (HIR)-60 (MIR) % without affecting assessment of urolithiasis, possible extra-urinary tract pathology or overall image quality. (orig.)

  20. Influence of Surface Roughness on Polymer Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ceccio, Steven L; Dowling, David R; Perlin, Marc; Solomon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    .... The details of that effort can be found in the final technical report for that project. The purpose of the additional investigation was to examine the physics and engineering of friction drag reduction methods for turbulent boundary layers (TBL...

  1. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  2. Laminar flow drag reduction on a soft porous media surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenxing; Tambasco, Michael; Mirbod, Parisa

    2017-11-01

    The ability to control flow reduction in microchannels could significantly advance microfluidic-based devices in a wide range of industrial applications including biomedical fields. The aim of this work is to understand the fundamental physics of the laminar skin friction coefficient and the related drag reduction due to the existence of porous media in the pressure-driven flow. We conducted an analytical framework to predict a laminar Newtonian fluid flow and corresponding drag reduction in a rectangular microchannel which coated with various soft random porous media. Specifically, we present predictions of the laminar skin friction coefficient, and drag reduction for pressure-driven flows. We found the laminar drag reduction is strongly depended on the Darcy permeability of porous medium, the thickness of the permeable layer, and the height of the microchannel. To verify the accuracy of our analytical predictions, several pressure-drop experiments were conducted. We chose various combinations of porous material and the morphology of the fibers to achieve a unique height ratio, between the height of two domains, and permeability parameter of porous media for each experiment. We found a good agreement between the experiments and analytical predictions of laminar drag reduction. Supported by NSF Grant CBET#1706766.

  3. Rectal and bladder dose reduction with the addition of intravaginal balloons to vaginal packing in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, T Y; Patel, A J; Ha, C S

    2016-01-01

    The use of intravaginal Foley balloons in addition to conventional packing during high-dose-rate (HDR) tandem and ovoids intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is a means to improve displacement of organs at risk, thus reducing dose-dependent complications. The goal of this project was to determine the reduction in dose achieved to the bladder and rectum with intravaginal Foley balloons with CT-based planning and to share our packing technique. One hundred and six HDR-ICBT procedures performed for 38 patients were analyzed for this report. An uninflated Foley balloon was inserted into the vagina above and below the tandem flange separately and secured in place with vaginal packing. CT images were then obtained with both inflated and deflated Foley balloons. Plan optimization occurred and dose volume histogram data were generated for the bladder and rectum. Maximum dose to 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 cm(3) volumes for the rectum and bladder were analyzed and compared between inflated and deflated balloons using parametric statistical analysis. Inflation of intravaginal balloons allowed significant reduction of dose to the bladder and rectum. Amount of reduction was dependent on the anatomy of the patient and the placement of the balloons. Displacement of the organs at risk by the balloons allowed an average of 7.2% reduction in dose to the bladder (D0.1 cm(3)) and 9.3% to the rectum (D0.1 cm(3)) with a maximum reduction of 41% and 43%, respectively. For patients undergoing HDR-ICBT, a significant dose reduction to the bladder and rectum could be achieved with further displacement of these structures using intravaginal Foley balloons in addition to conventional vaginal packing. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic exposure control in pediatric and adult computed tomography examinations: can we estimate organ and effective dose from mean MAS reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Antonios E; Perisinakis, Kostas; Oikonomou, Ismini; Damilakis, John

    2011-10-01

    : The purpose of this study was (i) to measure absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and estimate the effective dose associated with fixed tube current and automatic exposure control (AEC)-activated standard computed tomography (CT) examinations, and (ii) to investigate the relationship between the average reduction of tube current achieved by AEC and the reduction in organ and effective dose. : Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms that represent the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old child, and the Rando phantom that simulates the average adult individual were employed. The phantoms were subjected to standard head and neck, thorax, and abdomen and pelvis scans using a 16-slice CT system. The scans were performed both with fixed tube current and with AEC. Dose measurements were performed for each scan using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at internal locations in the phantoms and on the phantoms' surface. Dose measurements were performed for all radiosensitive organs according to the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. Effective dose was estimated on the basis of weighted sum of measured organ absorbed doses (EDMEAS). Percent reduction of organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with the mean percent reduction of the tube current. : The percent organ dose reduction achieved when AEC was activated in standard head and neck CT scans ranged from 26.6% to 42% for neonate, 8.1% to 63.8% for 1-year-old, -2.9% to 22.5% for 5-year-old, -8.7% to 44.9% for 10-year-old, and 16.3% to 50.1% for an adult. The corresponding values for thorax scans were found to range from -26.1% to 9.9% for neonate, -2.5% to 37.7% for 1-year-old, -20.8% to 15.4% for 5-year-old, -61.9% to 9.3% for 10-year-old, and 5.6% to 42.2% for an adult, whereas the corresponding values for abdomen and pelvis scans were found to range from -12.1% to 29.1% for neonate, -4.9% to 26.6% for 1-year-old, -11.7% to 38.9% for

  5. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [German] Metallische Implantate verursachen streifenfoermige Artefakte in CT-Bildern, welche die Dosisberechnung beeinflussen. In dieser Studie soll der Nutzen des iterativen Metall-Artefakt-Reduktions-Algorithmus iMAR hinsichtlich der Wiedergabetreue von Hounsfield-Werten (HU) und der Genauigkeit von Dosisberechnungen untersucht werden. Es wurden heterogene Phantome aus verschiedenen Arten gewebeaequivalenten Materials mit

  6. Application of quantitative microbial risk assessment for selection of microbial reduction targets for hard surface disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael O; Haas, Charles N; Gurian, Patrick L; Gerba, Charles P; Panzl, Brian M; Rose, Joan B

    2014-11-01

    This quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) included problem formulation for fomites and hazard identification for 7 microorganisms, including pathogenic Escherichia coli and E coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, norovirus, Pseudomonas spp, Salmonella spp, and Staphylococcus aureus. The goal was to address a risk-based process for choosing the log10 reduction recommendations, in contrast to the current US Environmental Protection Agency requirements. For each microbe evaluated, the QMRA model included specific dose-response models, occurrence determination of aerobic bacteria and specific organisms on fomites, exposure assessment, risk characterization, and risk reduction. Risk estimates were determined for a simple scenario using a single touch of a contaminated surface and self-inoculation. A comparative analysis of log10 reductions, as suggested by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the risks based on this QMRA approach was also undertaken. The literature review and meta-analysis showed that aerobic bacteria were the most commonly studied on fomites, averaging 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm(2). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found at a level of 3.3 × 10(-1) CFU/cm(2); methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), at 6.4 × 10(-1) CFU/cm(2). Risk estimates per contact event ranged from a high of 10(-3) for norovirus to a low of 10(-9) for S aureus. This QMRA analysis suggests that a reduction in bacterial numbers on a fomite by 99% (2 logs) most often will reduce the risk of infection from a single contact to less than 1 in 1 million. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computed tomography in multiple trauma patients. Technical aspects, work flow, and dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellner, F.A.; Krieger, J.; Floery, D.; Lechner, N.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with severe, life-threatening trauma require a fast and accurate clinical and imaging diagnostic workup during the first phase of trauma management. Early whole-body computed tomography has clearly been proven to be the current standard of care of these patients. A similar imaging quality can be achieved in the multiple trauma setting compared with routine imaging especially using rapid, latest generation computed tomography (CT) scanners. This article encompasses a detailed view on the use of CT in patients with life-threatening trauma. A special focus is placed on radiological procedures in trauma units and on the methods for CT workup in routine cases and in challenging situations. Another focus discusses the potential of dose reduction of CT scans in multiple trauma as well as the examination of children with severe trauma. Various studies have demonstrated that early whole-body CT positively correlates with low morbidity and mortality and is clearly superior to the use of other imaging modalities. Optimal trauma unit management means a close cooperation between trauma surgeons, anesthesiologists and radiologists, whereby the radiologist is responsible for a rapid and accurate radiological workup and the rapid communication of imaging findings. However, even in the trauma setting, aspects of patient radiation doses should be kept in mind. (orig.) [de

  8. Sludge reduction by ozone: Insights and modeling of the dose-response effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Silva-Hernández, B C; Hooijmans, C M; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Esparza-Soto, M; Lucero-Chávez, M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2018-01-15

    Applying ozone to the return flow in an activated sludge (AS) process is a way for reducing the residual solids production. To be able to extend the activated sludge models to the ozone-AS process, adequate prediction of the tri-atoms effects on the particulate COD fractions is needed. In this study, the biomass inactivation, COD mineralization, and solids dissolution were quantified in batch tests and dose-response models were developed as a function of the reacted ozone doses (ROD). Three kinds of model-sludge were used. S1 was a lab-cultivated synthetic sludge with two components (heterotrophs X H and X P ). S2 was a digestate of S1 almost made by the endogenous residues, X P . S3 was from a municipal activated sludge plant. The specific ozone uptake rate (SO 3 UR, mgO 3 /gCOD.h) was determined as a tool for characterizing the reactivity of the sludges. SO 3 UR increased with the X H fraction and decreased with more X P . Biomass inactivation was exponential (e -β.ROD ) as a function of the ROD doses. The percentage of solids reduction was predictable through a linear model (C Miner  + Y sol ROD), with a fixed part due to mineralization (C Miner ) and a variable part from the solubilization process. The parameters of the models, i.e. the inactivation and the dissolution yields (β, 0.008-0.029 (mgO 3 /mgCOD ini ) -1 vs Y sol , 0.5-2.8 mg COD sol /mgO 3 ) varied in magnitude, depending on the intensity of the scavenging reactions and potentially the compactness of the flocs for each sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of pFSH dose reduction on in vivo embryo production in Dorper ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Loiola Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of pFSH dose on the in vivo embryo production of Dorper ewes in the semi-arid northeast of Brazil, 40 sheep females were distributed into two groups of 20 animals that received intravaginal CIDR for 14 days, and two days before device removal, they received one of the following treatments: in the FSH200 group, the ewes received 200 mg of pFSH; and in the FSH128 group, the ewes received a total of 128 mg in decreasing doses every 12 h. Beginning 12 h after the conclusion of the treatments, estrus detection was performed every four hours using two Dorper rams of proven fertility. The ewes were mated at estrus onset and 24 hours later. Seven days after intravaginal device removal, the superovulatory response was evaluated, and embryo collection was performed using the laparotomy method. The recovered flushings were subjected to embryo searches under a stereomicroscope and classified according to their qualities. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs and LSD tests were used to compare the different parameters. The data expressed as percentages were analysed by chi-square test. The ovulation rate was higher in the FSH200 group, which had 16.3 ± 0.3 corpora lutea (CL, than in the FSH128 group, which had 11.3 ± 0.3 CL (P<0.05. However, higher fertilization rate (83.6% vs. 62.4% and higher transferable (86.0% vs. 71.6% and freezable (67.9% vs. 40.8% embryo rates were observed in the FSH 128 group compared with the group that received 200 mg. Furthermore, no significant differences in the remaining parameters were observed between the experimental groups (P>0.05, demonstrating that pFSH dose reduction promoted a greater production of freezable and transferable embryos in Dorper ewes subjected to MOET.

  10. Surface-reconstructed Cu Electrode via a Facile Electrochemical Anodization-Reduction Process for Low Overpotential CO 2 reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Min, Shixiong

    2017-03-21

    A high-surface-area Cu electrode, fabricated by a simple electrochemical anodization-reduction method, exhibits high activity and selectivity for CO2 reduction at low overpotential in 0.1 M KHCO3 solution. A faradaic efficiency of 37% for HCOOH and 27% for CO production was achieved with the current density of 1.5 mA cm-2 at −0.64 V vs. RHE, much higher than that of polycrystalline Cu. The enhanced catalytic performance is a result of the formation of the high electrochemical active surface area and high density of preferred low-index facets.

  11. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris David W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI. Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care. The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual sessions

  12. Pressure loss reduction in hydrogen pipelines by surface restructuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peet, Y.; Sagaut, P. [Insitut Jean Le Rond d' Alembert, UMR CNRS 7190, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu - case 162, F-75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Charron, Y. [IFP- Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison Cedex, 92852 (France)

    2009-11-15

    This paper concerns the reduction of pressure losses during pipeline hydrogen transportation, as the cost of hydrogen compression is a significant obstacle for efficient hydrogen pumping on a large-scale basis. The use of organized micro-structures on pipeline walls is proposed to obtain lower values of pressure losses with respect to smooth walls. Three-dimensional micro-structures of a sinusoidal shape are investigated as potentially more efficient counterparts to conventional two-dimensional structures (riblets) developed in aerospace industry. Aerodynamic performance of three-dimensional structures is investigated computationally in terms of both skin friction and pressure drag, two constituents of the total drag. Three-dimensional structures are shown to provide larger total drag reduction than two-dimensional structures for some range of geometrical parameters (14.5% versus 11%). Parametric dependence of both pressure and skin friction drag on structure geometry is analyzed, and an optimum configuration maximizing the total drag reduction is proposed. (author)

  13. Dose distribution considerations of medium energy electron beams at extended source-to-surface distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Pawlicki, Todd; Korb, Leroy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) on dose distributions for a range of medium energy electron beams and cone sizes. Methods and Materials: The depth-dose curves and isodose distributions of 6 MeV, 10 MeV, and 14 MeV electron beams from a dual photon and multielectron energies linear accelerator were studied. To examine the influence of cone size, the smallest and the largest cone sizes available were used. Measurements were carried out in a water phantom with the water surface set at three different SSDs from 101 to 116 cm. Results: In the region between the phantom surface and the depth of maximum dose, the depth-dose decreases as the SSD increases for all electron beam energies. The effects of extended SSD in the region beyond the depth of maximum dose are unobservable and, hence, considered minimal. Extended SSD effects are apparent for higher electron beam energy with small cone size causing the depth of maximum dose and the rapid dose fall-off region to shift deeper into the phantom. However, the change in the depth-dose curve is small. On the other hand, the rapid dose fall-off region is essentially unaltered when the large cone is used. The penumbra enlarges and electron beam flatness deteriorates with increasing SSD

  14. Surface roughness reduction using spray-coated hydrogen silsesquioxane reflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Jiri; Pranov, Henrik; Kofod, Guggi; Matschuk, Maria; Murthy, Swathi; Taboryski, Rafael

    2013-09-01

    Surface roughness or texture is the most visible property of any object, including injection molded plastic parts. Roughness of the injection molding (IM) tool cavity directly affects not only appearance and perception of quality, but often also the function of all manufactured plastic parts. So called “optically smooth” plastic surfaces is one example, where low roughness of a tool cavity is desirable. Such tool surfaces can be very expensive to fabricate using conventional means, such as abrasive diamond polishing or diamond turning. We present a novel process to coat machined metal parts with hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) to reduce their surface roughness. Results from the testing of surfaces made from two starting roughnesses are presented; one polished with grit 2500 sandpaper, another with grit 11.000 diamond polishing paste. We characterize the two surfaces with AFM, SEM and optical profilometry before and after coating. We show that the HSQ coating is able to reduce peak-to-valley roughness more than 20 times on the sandpaper polished sample, from 2.44(±0.99) μm to 104(±22) nm and more than 10 times for the paste polished sample from 1.85(±0.63) μm to 162(±28) nm while roughness averages are reduced 10 and 3 times respectively. We completed more than 10,000 injection molding cycles without detectable degradation of the HSQ coating. This result opens new possibilities for molding of affordable plastic parts with perfect surface finish.

  15. Interdependence between body surface area and ultraviolet B dose in vitamin D production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, M K B; Schmedes, Anne; Philipsen, P A

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) B radiation increases serum vitamin D level expressed as 25-hydroxyvitamin-D(3) [25(OH)D], but the relationship to body surface area and UVB dose needs investigation.......Ultraviolet (UV) B radiation increases serum vitamin D level expressed as 25-hydroxyvitamin-D(3) [25(OH)D], but the relationship to body surface area and UVB dose needs investigation....

  16. Boron Diffused Thermoluminescent Surface Layer in LiF TLDs for Skin Dose Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Majborn, Benny

    1980-01-01

    A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry.......A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry....

  17. Electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction on rough copper surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable development and climate change is considered to be one of the top challenges of humanity. Electrochemical carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction to fuels or fuel precursor using renewable electricity is a very promising way to recycle CO2 and store the electricity. This would also provide

  18. Universality in Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis on Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we extend the activity volcano for oxygen reduction from the face-centered cubic (fcc) metal (111) facet to the (100) facet. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the recent findings of constant scaling between OOH* and OH* holds on the fcc metal (100) facet, as...

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  20. Surface roughness reduction using spray-coated hydrogen silsesquioxane reflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cech, Jiri; Pranov, Henrik; Kofod, Guggi

    2013-01-01

    Surface roughness or texture is the most visible property of any object, including injection molded plastic parts. Roughness of the injection molding (IM) tool cavity directly affects not only appearance and perception of quality, but often also the function of all manufactured plastic parts. So...... are reduced 10 and 3 times respectively. We completed more than 10,000 injection molding cycles without detectable degradation of the HSQ coating. This result opens new possibilities for molding of affordable plastic parts with perfect surface finish....... called “optically smooth” plastic surfaces is one example, where low roughness of a tool cavity is desirable. Such tool surfaces can be very expensive to fabricate using conventional means, such as abrasive diamond polishing or diamond turning. We present a novel process to coat machined metal parts...

  1. Full system decontamination for dose reduction at the preventive maintenance work of the reactor core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Inami, I.; Suzuki, N.; Fujimori, A.; Wille, H.

    2000-01-01

    At the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station unit 3 and unit 2 of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the replacement of the core shroud and internals have been conducted respectively in the FY 1997 outage and in the FY 1998 outage. The replacement of the welded core internals in operating BWR plants is the first time in the world as complete countermeasure to improve SCC resistance. At present both units are operating smoothly. The developed technology concept is to restore those internals in air inside the reactor pressure vessel. To reduce the radiation dose rate inside the RPV, not only a shielding method was applied to cut the radiation from the irradiated structures but also a chemical decontamination method was applied to dissolve the radioactive crud deposit on the surface by using chemical agents. The CORD UV process was applied for this Full System Decontamination including operating the reactor recirculation pumps. The critical pass time required was approximately 7 days for each unit. In both units the radioactivity of 10 TBq (280 Ci) and the Fe, Ni, Cr crud of 60-70 kg as metal in total was dissolved and removed by 5 m 3 (175 ft 3 ) ion exchange resins as only waste generated. The obtained decontamination factor (DF) at the RPV bottom reached 40-100. As result, the dose rate decreased to approximately 0.1 mSv/h under water. Before and after the installation of the in-vessel shielding, a mechanical cleaning was extensively applied inside the RPV to remove the residual crud as well as the cutting particles. As result, the RPV bottom dose rate decreased further to 0.03 mSv/h under water and 0.2 mSv/h in air. A better working environment for human access than expected was established inside the RPV, resulting the 70, 140 man*Sv saving respectively at unit 3 (1F-3) and unit 2 (1F-2). (author)

  2. SU-C-12A-07: Effect of Vertical Position On Dose Reduction Using X-Care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silosky, M; Marsh, R [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reduction of absorbed dose to radiosensitive tissues is an important goal in diagnostic radiology. Siemens Medical has introduced a technique (X-CARE) to lower CT dose to anterior anatomy by reducing the tube current during 80° of rotation over radiosensitive tissues. Phantom studies have shown 30-40% dose reduction when phantoms are positioned at isocenter. However, for CT face and sinus exams, the center of the head is commonly positioned below isocenter. This work investigated the effects of vertical patient positioning on dose reduction using X-CARE. Methods: A 16cm Computed Tomography Dose Index phantom was scanned on a Siemens Definition Flash CT scanner using a routine head protocol, with the phantom positioned at scanner isocenter. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters were placed on the anterior and posterior sides of the phantom. The phantom was lowered in increments of 2cm and rescanned, up to 8cm below isocenter. The experiment was then repeated using the same scan parameters but adding the X-CARE technique. The mean dosimeter counts were determined for each phantom position, and the difference between XCARE and routine scans was plotted as a function of distance from isocenter. Results: With the phantom positioned at isocenter, using XCARE reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom by 40%, compared to dose when X-CARE was not used. Positioned below isocenter, anterior dose was reduced by only 20-27%. Additionally, using X-CARE at isocenter reduced dose to the anterior portion of the phantom by 45.6% compared to scans performed without X-CARE 8cm below isocenter. Conclusion: While using X-CARE substantially reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom, this effect was diminished when the phantom was positioned below isocenter, simulating common practice for face and sinus scans. This indicates that centering the head in the gantry will maximize the effect of X-CARE.

  3. Dose reduction according to the exposure condition in intervention procedure: Focus on the change of dose area and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jun Ho; Jung, Ku Min; Lee, Kyung Bae [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo; Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to suggest a method to reduce the dose by Analyzing the dose area product (DAP) and image quality according to the change of tube current using NEMA Phantom. The spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were used as evaluation criteria in addition to signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR), which are important image quality parameters of intervention. Tube voltage was fixed at 80 kVp and the amount of tube current was changed to 20, 30, 40, and 50 mAs, and the dose area product and image quality were compared and analyzed. As a result, the dose area product increased from 1066 mGycm2 to 6160 mGycm2 to 6 times as the condition increased, while the spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were higher than 20 mAs and 30 mAs, Spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were observed below the evaluation criteria. In addition, the SNR and CNR increased up to 30 mAs, slightly increased at 40 mAs, but not significantly different from the previous one, and decreased at 50 mAs. As a result, the exposure dose significantly increased due to overexposure of the test conditions and the image quality deteriorated in all areas of spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, SNR and CNR.

  4. The clinical meaning of radiodermatitis considering the surface dose of supervoltage electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Tatsunosuke; Rikimaru, Shigeho; Kakishita, Masao; Kuranishi, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    In our experience using supervoltage betatron electron beam, the skin surface dose of the electron decreased when the energy became either greater of less than 18 MeV. When we considered 18 MeV to be a 100% dose, the dose with 4 MeV, which was the least amount, corresponded to 81% of the dose. The skin surface dose of 10 MeV betatron electrons or more became greater than the 90% standard tumor dose. An external irradiation of more than 10 MeV should not be applied to neoplasms of which the curative ratio is less than 1.0. Therefore another methods such as intraoperative irradiation, should be used. The surface skin dose about 4-6 MeV betatron postoperative irradiation, particularly after resection of breast cancer, was less than the skin dose with 10 MeV. Close care should be taken to prevent hot lesions which are caused by duplication of irradiation fields. It should be kept in mind that the late effects of hot lesions caused by electron beam irradiation with an energy of 10 MeV or more are serious. (Kashu, E.)

  5. Dose Prediction for surface nuclear explosions: case studies for Semipalatinsk and Lop Nur tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Dose prediction method RAPS after surface nuclear explosion has been developed by using the empirical dose function of USA nuclear test. This method which provides us external total dose, dose rate at any distant, at any time for any yield of nuclear explosion, is useful for radiation protection in case of nuclear events such as terrorism and nuclear war. The validity of RAPS has been confirmed by application to historical surface nuclear test explosions. The first test case study which was done for the first test explosion of the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site on August 29th 1949, shows a good agreement with luminescence dosimetry on a brick. This dose prediction method was applied nuclear tests in Lop Nur. The results indicate dangerous nuclear radiation influences including fatal risk in the wide Uygur area. (author)

  6. Reaccumulation of globotriaosylceramide in podocytes after agalsidase dose reduction in young Fabry patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrunes, Rannveig; Svarstad, Einar; Kampevold Larsen, Kristin; Leh, Sabine; Tøndel, Camilla

    2017-05-01

    Agalsidase-α 0.2 mg/kg every other week (eow) and agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow are licensed in Europe as equipotent treatment of the α-galactosidase deficiency in Fabry disease. This case series describes the effects of agalsidase dose adjustments in serial kidney biopsies in switch patients. All treatment-naïve patients with classical Fabry disease in our centre started on agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow and subsequently switched to agalsidase-α 0.2 mg/kg/eow were included ( n = 3). The median age at enzyme replacement therapy start was 11 (range 7-18) years. Kidney biopsies were performed at baseline, after 5 years of agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow and after 3 subsequent years of agalsidase-α 0.2 mg/kg/eow. One patient was re-biopsied 2 years after reswitch to agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow. The scoring system of the International Scoring Group of Fabry Nephropathy was used. The patients completely cleared globotriaosylceramide (GL3) from mesangial and endothelial cells and partly cleared podocytes on agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow. Reaccumulation of GL3 in podocytes, but not in the mesangium or endothelium, occurred after 3 years of agalsidase-α 0.2 mg/kg/eow. Subsequent reduction of podocyte GL3 was observed in the single patient rebiopsied 2 years after reswitch to agalsidase-β 1.0 mg/kg/eow. Partial clearance, reaccumulation and renewed partial clearance of podocyte GL3 deposits in serial kidney biopsies over 8-10 years were seen in parallel with agalsidase dose adjustments. Repeated kidney biopsies may impact therapeutic choices in Fabry disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose reduction in general radiography while maintaining diagnostic confidence for selected examinations in selected Hospitals in the Ashanti Region, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amponsah, E.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study is to explore the potential for dose reduction in the selected X- ray facilities for the selected examinations and to ensure that images obtained after the reduction of dose are satisfactory for diagnosis. DAP were measured on a total of 327 patients for chest (PA), skull (PA/LAT), lumbar spine (AP/LAT), abdomen (AP) and pelvis (AP) examinations at COCL, MNDH, TAFH and MMGH. The effective dose incurred by patients per examination was estimated using a PCXMC version 1.5. In order to explore the potential for dose reduction, an anthropomorphic woman phantom was used. Seventy-five radiographs were obtained from the phantom studies at COCL. MNDH and TAFH for the image quality assessment. An experienced senior radiologist at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital performed the image quality assessment, which was based on the CEC 1996 image criteria. The range of the mean DAP and the effective dose recorded for the patient dose assessment for the selected examinations at the selected facilities is (21.1 - 752.1) µGy.m 2 and (0.007 - 1.402) mSv respectively. The range of the DAP and the effective dose from the phantom studies were (15.1 - 200.1) µGy.m 2 and (0.03 - 0.70) mSv respectively. In all, there was an overall average dose reduction of 49.7% in the DAP values for the selected examinations at COCL, MNDH and TAFH. (author)

  8. Dose reduction of bone morphogenetic protein-2 for bone regeneration using a delivery system based on lyophilization with trehalose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaochen Zhang,1,* Quan Yu,2,* Yan-an Wang,1 Jun Zhao2 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck Oncology, 2Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Ninth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: To induce sufficient new bone formation, high doses of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 are applied in regenerative medicine that often induce serious side effects. Therefore, improved treatment strategies are required. Here, we investigate whether the delivery of BMP-2 lyophilized in the presence of trehalose reduced the dose of BMP-2 required for bone regeneration. Materials and methods: A new growth factor delivery system was fabricated using BMP-2-loaded TiO2 nanotubes by lyophilization with trehalose (TiO2-Lyo-Tre-BMP-2. We measured BMP-2 release characteristics, bioactivity, and stability, and determined the effects on the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of this formulation to regenerate new bone around implants in rat femur defects by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT, sequential fluorescent labelling, and histological analysis. Results: Compared with absorbed BMP-2-loaded TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2-BMP-2, TiO2-Lyo-Tre-BMP-2 exhibited sustained release, consistent bioactivity, and higher stability of BMP-2, and resulted in greater osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Eight weeks post-operation, TiO2-Lyo-Tre-BMP-2 nanotubes, with various dosages of BMP-2, regenerated larger amounts of new bone than TiO2-BMP-2 nanotubes. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that delivery of BMP-2 lyophilized with trehalose may be a promising method to reduce the dose of BMP-2 and avoid the associated side effects. Keywords: bone morphogenetic protein-2, dose reduction, delivery system, trehalose, lyophilization, TiO2 nanotubes, BMP-2, regenerative medicine, surface

  9. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  10. Tip vorticity reduction and optimization of lifting surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparenberg, JA

    In linearized optimization theory, lifting surfaces, moving in an inviscid and incompressible fluid, shed tip vorticity of which the strength has infinite square-root singularities. Here we discuss that an optimization procedure can be coupled to constraints so that the strength of the shed

  11. Use of biocidal surfaces for reduction of healthcare acquired infections

    CERN Document Server

    Borkow, Gadi

    2014-01-01

    A "must read" by all infection control officers determined to protect their patients from infections The Book reviews and discusses "out of the box" measures to fight Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAI) The Book describes how using self-sterilizing surfaces can fight HAI, including those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens.

  12. SU-G-IeP2-10: Lens Dose Reduction by Patient Position Modification During Neck CT Exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Butman, J; Biassou, N; Folio, L [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Irradiation of the lens during a neck CT may increase a patient’s risk of developing cataracts later in life. Radiologists and technologists at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed new CT imaging protocols that include a reduction in scan range and modifying neck positioning using a head tilt. This study will evaluate the efficacy of this protocol in the reduction of lens dose. Methods: We retrieved CT images of five male patients who had two sets of CT images: before and after the implementation of the new protocol. The lens doses before the new protocol were calculated using an in-house CT dose calculator, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT), where computational human phantoms with no head tilt are included. We also calculated the lens dose for the patient CT conducted after the new protocol by using an adult male computational phantom with the neck position deformed to match the angle of the head tilt. We also calculated the doses to other radiosensitive organs including the globes of the eye, brain, pituitary gland and salivary glands before and after head tilt. Results: Our dose calculations demonstrated that modifying neck position reduced dose to the lens by 89% on average (range: 86–96%). Globe, brain, pituitary and salivary gland doses also decreased by an average of 65% (51–95%), 38% (−8–66%), 34% (−43–84%) and 14% (13–14%), respectively. The new protocol resulted in a nearly ten-fold decrease in lens dose. Conclusion: The use of a head tilt and scan range reduction is an easy and effective method to reduce radiation exposure to the lens and other radiosensitive organs, while still allowing for the inclusion of critical neck structures in the CT image. We are expanding our study to a total of 10 males and 10 females.

  13. Dose analysis in Brjansk region during the restoration period of nuclear accident and effects of dose reduction methods in Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzaev, V.; Kovalenko, V.; Krivonsov, S.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure pathways to the people in this area were analysed and some decontamination methods and techniques were explained. The spatial dose rate, whole-body dose and external exposure of four kinds of classes such as pensioner, jobless person, outdoor laborer, indoor laborer and child were measured. New whole-body counter used can decrease the effect of external dose on 661 keV γ-ray. The relation coefficient between the soil contamination level and the external exposure was 0.99, but that between the cesium 137 content in soil and the internal exposure was -0.2, showing no correlation. Main source of cesium 137 in body was milk from private cow in each village. The concentration of radioactive cesium of 40% milk samples were more than 370 Bq/l. More than 75% mushroom and strawberry showed 600 Bq/kg and over. Other foods indicated less cesium content than that of above foods. The decontamination methods of roof, garden, milk and improved manure of grass were carried out in Smajalch. The most effective method seemed to be the filtration of milk. Each method came into effect to reduce the average annual dose to 1 mSv until the next year. (S.Y.)

  14. Minimizing exposure to radiation in invasive cardiology using modern dose-reduction technology: evaluation of the real-life effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroux, Laurent; Blanpain, Thierry; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Tassan-Mangina, Sophie; Herce, Benoît; Tourneux, Christophe; Metz, Damien

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to measure the reduction in the estimated dose of radiation received by patients that can be achieved using dose-reduction technology (ClarityIQ, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), among all patients undergoing invasive cardiology procedures. Medical procedures remain the primary source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the general population. The study population comprised all patients (without exclusion criteria) undergoing invasive coronary procedures over a 1-year study period in a large referral centre equipped with two catheterization laboratories (cathlabs). Both cathlabs (A and B) were equipped with the Allura Xper FD10 imaging system (Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), but only Cathlab B was equipped with ClarityIQ technology. The primary endpoint was the estimated total dose of radiation received by the patient, as assessed by Air Kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP). In total, 2095 invasive coronary procedures were analyzed. The patients who underwent procedures in Cathlab B received an average estimated dose that was 23% (AK) and 43% (DAP) lower than the dose received by patients undergoing procedures in Cathlab A (P technology reduced the estimated radiation dose received by patients by 23-43%, according to the method of measurement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Liang, H.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-08-01

    This is the fourth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from a data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 118 new or updated projects, covering a wide range of activities. Projects including steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section of the report. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Included in this volume is a detailed description of how to access the BNL data bases which store this information. All project abstracts from this report, as well as many other useful documents, can be accessed, with permission, through our on-line system, ACE. A computer equipped with a modem, or a fax machine is all that is required to connect to ACE. Many features of ACE, including software, hardware, and communications specifics, are explained in this report.

  16. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Liang, H.; Baum, J.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This is the fourth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from a data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 118 new or updated projects, covering a wide range of activities. Projects including steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section of the report. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Included in this volume is a detailed description of how to access the BNL data bases which store this information. All project abstracts from this report, as well as many other useful documents, can be accessed, with permission, through our on-line system, ACE. A computer equipped with a modem, or a fax machine is all that is required to connect to ACE. Many features of ACE, including software, hardware, and communications specifics, are explained in this report.

  17. Patient and radiographer perspectives of two lead shielding devices for foetal dose reduction in CT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iball, Gareth R., E-mail: gri@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Brettle, David S. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, LS1 3EX (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: In many UK hospitals pregnant patients undergoing chest CT scans have lead shielding placed over their abdomen/pelvis in order to reduce foetal radiation dose. In the majority of cases conventional lead aprons are used even though these are not designed for the task. The purpose of the study was to compare these aprons with a new shielding device, from both patient and radiographer perspectives. Materials and methods: The study was performed using 35 volunteer radiographers who alternately acted as both radiographer and pregnant patient; pregnancy was simulated at the time of the study. In both roles the volunteers experienced the two products and then completed a questionnaire to determine the relative merits of the products in terms of weight, manoeuvrability and fit to patient shape. The study received local ethics committee approval (09/H1304/33). Results: Both patients and radiographers showed a strong preference for the new shielding device with average favourable ratings of 83% for radiographers and 72% for patients compared with 27% and 17% for the lead aprons. The new device was particularly favoured in terms of manoeuvrability (97% vs. 46%), fit to patient shape (91% vs. 17%) and the perceived weight reduction on the patient's abdomen. Conclusions: A new shielding device for foetal radiation protection in all stages of pregnancy has been evaluated and has been shown to be preferred by both patients and radiographers when compared to conventional lead aprons.

  18. Dose reduction in CT while maintaining diagnostic confidence: A feasibility/demonstration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation in medical imaging has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, both in terms of continuing innovation and of its global application. The great majority of patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago, and the technological basis for their successful dissemination only began to flourish in the last decade or so. This evolution is evident in the technology on which this publication is based, CT scanning and its widespread application throughout the world. However, this advance is often achieved at the cost of a large radiation burden to the individual patient, and to the community when the technology is widely deployed. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit to be gained will not be achieved at the cost of an undue level of detriment. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications validated in the clinical environment. It is evident that regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures, and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This TECDOC, reporting on a Coordinated Research Project (CRP), is designed to help both the medical community and equipment manufacturers/suppliers make their respective important contributions to dose reduction. In particular, it is possible that significant dose savings may be achieved in individual patients by tailoring the exposure they receive to their individual profile. It should be possible to achieve this without any loss in the level of confidence in the images produced, a possibility examined in this publication. This CRP and TECDOC were developed within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) framework of statutory responsibility to

  19. Radiation dose in pneumatic reduction of ileo-colic intussusceptions - results from a single-institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullmann, Jennifer L.; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Puig, Stefan [Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, Institute for Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    Air enema under fluoroscopy is a well-accepted procedure for the treatment of childhood intussusception. However, the reported radiation doses of pneumatic reduction with conventional fluoroscopy units have been high in decades past. To compare current radiation doses at our institution to past doses reported by others for fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction of ileo-colic intussusception in children. Since 2007 radiologists and residents in our department who perform reduction of intussusceptions have received a radiation risk training. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 45 children (5 months-8 years) who underwent a total of 48 pneumatic reductions of ileo-colic intussusception between 2008 and 2012. We analyzed data for screening time and dose area product (DAP) and compared these data to those reported up to and including the year 2000. Our mean screening time measured by the DAP-meter was 53.8 s (range 1-320 s, median 33.0 s). The mean DAP was 11.4 cGy circle cm{sup 2} (range 1-145 cGy circle cm{sup 2}, median 5.45 cGy circle cm{sup 2}). There was one bowel perforation, in a 1-year-old boy requiring surgical revision. Only three studies in the literature presented radiation exposure results on children who received pneumatic or hydrostatic reduction of intussusception under fluoroscopy. Screening times and dose area products in those studies, which were published in the 1990s and in the year 2000, were substantially higher than those in our sample. Low-frequency pulsed fluoroscopy and other dose-saving keys as well as the radiation risk training might have helped to improve the quality of the procedure in terms of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  20. Surface dose measurement with Gafchromic EBT3 film for intensity modulated radiotherapy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Ugur; Kesen, Nazmiye Donmez; Koksal, Canan; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Becerir, Hatice Bilge

    2017-09-01

    Accurate dose measurement in the buildup region is extremely difficult. Studies have reported that treatment planning systems (TPS) cannot calculate surface dose accurately. The aim of the study was to compare the film measurements and TPS calculations for surface dose in head and neck cancer treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IMRT plans were generated for 5 head and neck cancer patients by using Varian Eclipse TPS. Quality assurance (QA) plans of these IMRT plans were created on rando phantoms for surface dose measurements. EBT3 films were cut in size of 2.5 x 2.5 cm2 and placed on the left side, right side and the center of larynx and then the films were irradiated with 6 MV photon beams. The measured doses were compared with TPS. The results of TPS calculations were found to be lower compared to the EBT3 film measurements at all selected points. The lack of surface dose calculation in TPS should be considered while evaluating the radiotherapy plans.

  1. Surface dose in the treatment of breast cancer with helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibold, Felix; Sterzing, Florian; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Schubert, Kai; Wagenknecht, Katja; Major, Gerald; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: investigation of the effects of breathing motion- and misregistration-induced errors on the superficial dose in the treatment of breast cancer using helical tomotherapy (HT). Material and methods: surface dose measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Two treatment plans with different planning target volume (PTV) definitions of the left breast were used: PTV{sub skin} had its ventral border exactly on skin level, while PTV{sub air} included also a 10-mm extension ventral to the PTV{sub skin}. With a thoracic static phantom, misregistration errors in an HT were simulated. A dynamic phantom was used to simulate a breathing patient during HT. Surface doses of breast cancer patients were measured both for an HT (179 points) and a conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment (70 points). Results: in the static phantom misregistration setup, dose deviations of -31.9% for PTV{sub skin} to +35.4% for PTV{sub air} could be observed. The dynamic phantom measurements resulted in surface dose deviations from those in a static position between 0.8% and 3.8% without a significant difference for the PTV definitions. The measured surface doses on patients averaged (mean {+-} standard deviation) 1.65 {+-} 0.13 Gy for the HT and 1.42 {+-} 0.11 Gy for the three-dimensional conformal treatment. Conclusion: HT enables a homogeneous and reproducible surface dose with small dose deviations in the treatment of breast cancer. HT is a feasible method to treat breast cancer under free shallow breathing of the patient using a treatment plan with a ventral PTV border on the skin level. (orig.)

  2. Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmus NG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Naside Gozde Durmus1, Erik N Taylor1, Fatih Inci3,4, Kim M Kummer1, Keiko M Tarquinio5, Thomas J Webster1,21School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine (BAMM Laboratory, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, MA, USA; 4Istanbul Technical University, Molecular Biology-Genetics and Biotechnology Program, Mobgam, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Patients on mechanical ventilators for extended periods of time often face the risk of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia. During the ventilation process, patients incapable of breathing are intubated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC endotracheal tubes (ETTs. PVC ETTs provide surfaces where bacteria can attach and proliferate from the contaminated oropharyngeal space to the sterile bronchoalveolar area. To overcome this problem, ETTs can be coated with antimicrobial agents. However, such coatings may easily delaminate during use. Recently, it has been shown that changes in material topography at the nanometer level can provide antibacterial properties. In addition, some metabolites, such as fructose, have been found to increase the efficiency of antibiotics used to treat Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections. In this study, we combined the antibacterial effect of nanorough ETT topographies with sugar metabolites to decrease bacterial growth and biofilm formation on ETTs. We present for the first time that the presence of fructose on the nanorough surfaces decreases the number of planktonic S. aureus bacteria in the solution and biofilm formation on the surface after 24 hours. We thus envision that this method has the potential to impact the future of surface engineering of

  3. Reduction of surface hydrophobicity using a stimulus-responsive polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedeva, Iliana G; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Beattie, David A

    2010-10-19

    The adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer has been characterized using the quartz crystal microbalance (with dissipation monitoring, QCM-D). Adsorption was studied as a function of initial solution conditions. CMC adsorbs to a greater extent at high ionic strength (10(-1) M KCl as opposed to 10(-2) M KCl) or low pH (3 as opposed to 9). The solution conditions that yielded the lowest initial adsorbed amount (10(-2) M KCl, pH 9) were used as a reference to investigate the response of the adsorbed layer to a switch in solution conditions after adsorption (i.e., to higher ionic strength (10(-1) M KCl) or lower pH (pH 3)). The adsorbed layer released significant amounts of hydration water after each solution switch, as determined by the QCM-D measurements. This expulsion of hydration water was fully reversible. For the two solution switches, reducing the solution pH resulted in a more pronounced change in the amount of hydration water within the adsorbed CMC, accompanied by a distinct conformational change, as determined from a QCM D-f plot. In addition to studying adsorption using QCM-D, the effect of adsorbed CMC on surface hydrophobicity has been investigated using captive bubble contact angle measurements. The effect of the polymer on the contact angle of the surface was seen to be greatest when adsorbed at low pH or at higher ionic strength. CMC was also seen to have a significantly enhanced ability to reduce the surface hydrophobicity after both the ionic strength and pH switches, lowering the advancing water contact angle by 6 and 23° and the receding water contact angle by 10 and 40° for the ionic strength and pH switches, respectively. As with the change in hydration water content, the change in the contact angle of the polymer-coated surface following the solution switches was reversible.

  4. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xia; Li, Guangji; Huang, Hanlu

    2016-04-15

    Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  6. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh

    2014-10-01

    In computed tomography (CT), some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI) measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly) should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT.

  7. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Akhlaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In computed tomography (CT, some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT.

  8. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores : a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s

  9. A study on the application of countermeasure for the reduction of the ingestion dose after nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Suh, Kyung Suk; Kim, Eun Han; Choi, Young Gil; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of dose reduction resulting from the application of countermeasures for ingestion pathways after nuclear accidents was investigated together with the derivation of optimized intervention levels for Korean foodstuffs. The radioactivity in foodstuffs was predicted from a dynamic food chain model DYNACON for the date which the deposition occurs. The effectiveness of countermeasures strongly depended on radionuclides, foodstuffs and date of deposition

  10. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients. Low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, T. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Baldauf, A.Q. [Theresienkrankenhaus Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Ludwig, K. [Klinikum Herford (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. Results: The mean dose area product was 16.8 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for antero-posterior images and 26.6 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). Conclusion: When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of patient dose reduction by bismuth shielding in CT using measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPX simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Costa, F; Figueira, C; Madeira, P; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    This work reports on the use of two different Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX) for assessing the dose reduction using bismuth shields in computer tomography (CT) procedures in order to protect radiosensitive organs such as eye lens, thyroid and breast. Measurements were performed using head and body PMMA phantoms and an ionisation chamber placed in five different positions of the phantom. Simulations were performed to estimate Computed Tomography Dose Index values using GEANT4 and MCNPX. The relative differences between measurements and simulations were bismuth shielding ranges from 2 to 45 %, depending on the position of the bismuth shield. The percentage of dose reduction was more significant for the area covered by the bismuth shielding (36 % for eye lens, 39 % for thyroid and 45 % for breast shields). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Radiation dose reduction without compromise to image quality by alterations of filtration and focal spot size in cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Min Keun; Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Jung Han; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Different angiographic protocols may influence the radiation dose and image quality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of filtration and focal spot size on radiation dose and image quality for diagnostic cerebral angiography using an in-vitro model and in-vivo patient groups. Radiation dose and image quality were analyzed by varying the filtration and focal spot size on digital subtraction angiography exposure protocols (1, inherent filtration + large focus; 2, inherent + small; 3, copper + large; 4, copper + small). For the in-vitro analysis, a phantom was used for comparison of radiation dose. For the in-vivo analysis, bilateral paired injections, and patient cohort groups were compared for radiation dose and image quality. Image quality analysis was performed in terms of contrast, sharpness, noise, and overall quality. In the in-vitro analysis, the mean air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP)/frame were significantly lower with added copper filtration (protocols 3 and 4). In the in-vivo bilateral paired injections, AK and DAP/frame were significantly lower with filtration, without significant difference in image quality. The patient cohort groups with added filtration (protocols 3 and 4) showed significant reduction of total AK and DAP/patient without compromise to the image quality. Variations in focal spot size showed no significant differences in radiation dose and image quality. Addition of filtration for angiographic exposure studies can result in significant total radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Focal spot size does not influence radiation dose and image quality. The routine angiographic protocol should be judiciously investigated and implemented.

  13. Changes in entrance surface dose in relation to the location of shielding material in chest computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y. M.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of entrance surface dose (ESD) on the abdomen and pelvis of the patient when undergoing chest computed tomography (CT) procedure, and evaluated the effects of ESD reduction depending on the location of radiation shield. For CT scanner, the 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography was used. The alderson radiation therapy phantom and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), which enabled measurement from low to high dose, were also used. For measurement of radiation dose, the slice number from 9 to 21 of the phantom was set as the test range, which included apex up to both costophrenic angles. A total of 10 OSLD nanoDots were attached for measurement of the front and rear ESD. Cyclic tests were performed using the low-dose chest CT and high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol on the following set-ups: without shielding; shielding only on the front side; shielding only on the rear side; and shielding for both front and rear sides. According to the test results, ESD for both front and rear sides was higher in HRCT than low-dose CT when radiation shielding was not used. It was also determined that, compared to the set-up that did not use the radiation shield, locating the radiation shield on the front side was effective in reducing front ESD, while locating the radiation shield on the rear side reduced rear ESD level. Shielding both the front and rear sides resulted in ESD reduction. In conclusion, it was confirmed that shielding the front and rear sides was the most effective method to reduce the ESD effect caused by scatter ray during radiography.

  14. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  15. Reflectivity reduction of retro-reflector installed in LHD due to plasma surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, N.; Ohtawa, Y.; Ebihara, A.; Akiyama, T.; Tokitani, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Kawahata, K.

    2008-10-01

    Optical reflectivity of the retro-reflector installed in LHD as the first mirror was reduced seriously by plasma wall interaction. In order to understand the mechanism of the reflectivity reduction, optical and material properties of the mirror surfaces have been examined extensively. It was found that the deposited impurity layers caused the serious reduction of the reflectivity. Formation of iron oxide, bulges structure and He bubbles are the major factors for the reflectivity reduction in the wide wave length range. (author)

  16. Surface dose of X rays to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Qingqi; Weng Zhigeng; Feng Ming; Wang Guomin.

    1990-01-01

    During extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), the fluoroscopy must be made to show the location and size of the stone thus the patient has to be exposed to X rays. The surface dose to patients during ESWL was measured in an investigation on 134 cases of renal lithiasis admitted in a certain hospital of Shanghai. The results show that the average skin dose equivalent for these patients was 162 mSv and the magnitude of doses was depended upon some factors such as the size and location of the stone

  17. Surface and bulk-loss reduction research by low-energy hydrogen doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S.

    1985-01-01

    Surface and bulk loss reduction by low energy hydrogen doping of silicon solar cells was examined. Hydrogen ions provided a suppression of space charge recombination currents. Implantation of hydrogen followed by the anneal cycle caused more redistribution of boron than the anneal which could complicate processing. It was demonstrated that passivation leads to space charge current reduction.

  18. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  19. Delivery of adjuvant sequential dose-dense FEC-Doc to patients with breast cancer is feasible, but dose reductions and toxicity are dependent on treatment sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, H; Dirix, L; Neven, P; Prové, A; Clement, P; Squifflet, P; Amant, F; Skacel, T; Paridaens, R

    2009-03-01

    This study prospectively investigates the impact of dose densification and altering sequence of fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide [FEC(100)] and docetaxel [Doc] on dose delivery and tolerability of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. 117 patients with high-risk primary operable breast cancer were randomized (1:1:2:2) to conventional (three cycles of 3-weekly FEC(100) then three cycles of 3-weekly Doc 100 mg/m(2) or reverse sequence) or dose-dense (dd) treatment (four 10- to 11-day cycles of FEC(75) then four 2-weekly cycles of Doc 75 mg/m(2), or the reverse). In the dd arms, pegfilgrastim was given on day 2 of each cycle, but only as secondary prophylaxis in conventional arms. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients completing intended cycles at relative dose intensity >or=85% and this was achieved by 95% of patients in each group except for the ddDoc-->FEC group (90%). Dose intensity in the dd arms increased by 48% for FEC and 11% for docetaxel, compared with the conventional arms (both P Doc dose reductions were more frequent with dd treatment and when Doc was given after FEC. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly more frequent with conventional treatment, while fatigue and hand-foot syndrome were numerically more common with dd treatment, particularly when Doc was given after FEC. Discussion Delivery of adjuvant sequential ddFEC and Doc is feasible with growth factor support, and chemotherapy sequence appeared to affect delivery of target doses and toxicity.

  20. The effect of 18F-florbetapir dose reduction on region-based classification of cortical amyloid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K.; Evans, R.; Anton-Rodriguez, J.; Hinz, R.; Matthews, J.C. [University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    There are specific dose recommendations for diagnostic amyloid PET imaging with 18F-florbetapir, but they may not apply to research studies using regional quantitative analysis. We, therefore, studied the effect of tracer dose reduction on the discriminative power of regional analysis. Using bootstrap resampling of list-mode data from 18F-florbetapir scans, a total of 800 images were reconstructed for four different dosage levels: 100, 50, 20, and 10 %. The effect of the injected dose on the variation of measured radiotracer uptake was determined in large cortical regions defined on co-registered and segmented magnetic resonance images. The impact of the observed variation on the discrimination between normal controls and patients with AD was then assessed using data in a cohort study described by Fleisher et al. (Arch Neurol 68(11):1404-1411, 2011). The coefficient of variance for the cortex to cerebellum uptake ratio increased from 0.9 % at full dose of 300 MBq to 2.5 % at 10 % of this dose, but was still small compared to biological variation. It, therefore, had very little impact on discrimination between AD and elderly controls. The original area under the ROC curve was 0.881, decreasing to 0.878 at 10 % of full dose. Original sensitivity for discrimination between AD and controls was 82.0 %, while specificity was 77.3 %; these decreased to 81.8 and 77.1 %, respectively, at the reduced dose. However, the number of subjects within the classification border zone between proven amyloid pathology and young healthy controls increased substantially by 7 to 14 %. A substantial reduction of tracer dose increases uncertainty at the classification border zone while still providing good discrimination between AD patients and controls when using activity data from cortical regions defined on co-registered and segmented MR scans. (orig.)

  1. Dimensionality reduction and network inference for sea surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Fabrizio; Bracco, Annalisa; Nenes, Athanasios; Dovrolis, Constantine; Fountalis, Ilias

    2017-04-01

    Earth's climate is a complex dynamical system. The underlying components of the system interact with each other (in a linear or non linear way) on several spatial and time scales. Network science provides a set of tools to study the structure and dynamics of such systems. Here we propose an application of a novel network inference method, δ-MAPS, to investigate sea surface temperature (SST) fields in reanalyses and models. δ-MAPS first identifies the underlying components (domains) of the system, modeling them as spatially contiguous, potentially overlapping regions of highly correlated temporal activity, and then infers the weighted and potentially lagged interactions between them. The SST network is represented as a weighted and directed graph. Edge direction captures the temporal ordering of events, while edge weights capture the magnitude of the interaction between the domains. We focus on two reanalysis datasets (HadISST and COBE ) and on a dozen of runs of the CESM model (extracted from the so-called large ensemble). The networks are built using 45 years of data every 3 years for the total dataset temporal coverage (from 1871 to 2015 for HadISST, from 1891 to 2015 for COBE and from 1920 to 2100 for CESM members). We then explore similarities and differences between reanalyses and models in terms of the domains identified, the networks inferred and their time evolution. The spatial extent and shape of the identified domains is consistent between observations and models. According to our analysis the largest SST domain always corresponds to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) while most of the other domains correspond to known climate modes. However, the network structure shows significant differences. For example, the unique role played by the South Tropical Atlantic in the observed network is not captured by any model run. Regarding the time evolution of the system we focus on the strength of ENSO: while we observe a positive trend for observations and

  2. Calculated dose factors for the radiosensitive tissues in bone irradiated by surface-deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiers, F.W.; Whitwell, J.R.; Beddoe, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The method of calculating dose factors for the haemopoietic marrow and endosteal tissues in human trabecular bone, used by Whitwell and Spiers for volume-seeking radionuclides, has been developed for the case of radionuclides which are deposited as very thin layers on bone surfaces. The Monte Carlo method is again used, but modifications to the computer program are made to allow for a surface rather than a volume source of particle emission. The principal change is the introduction of a surface-orientation factor which is shown to have a value of approximately 2, varying slightly with bone structure. Results are given for β-emitting radionuclides ranging from 171 Tm(anti Esub(β) = 0.025 MeV) to 90 Y(anti Esub(β) = 0.93 MeV), and also for the α-emitter 239 Pu. It is shown that where the particle ranges are short compared with the dimensions of the bone structures the dose factors for the surface seekers are much greater than those for the volume seekers. For long range particles the dose factors for surface- and volume-seeking radionuclides converge. Comparisons are given relating the dose factors calculated in this paper on the basis of measured bone structures to those of other workers based on single plane geometry. (author)

  3. SU-F-T-93: Breast Surface Dose Enhancement Using a Clinical Prone Breast Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, M; Jozsef, G [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of specialized patient set-up devices in radiotherapy, such as prone breast boards, may have unwanted dosimetric effects. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of a clinically used prone breast board on skin dose due to buildup. Methods: GafChromic film (EBT3) was used for dose measurements on the surface of a solid water phantom shaped to mimic the curvature of the breast. We investigated two setup scenarios: the medial field border placed at the medial edge of the board and 1 cm contralaterally from that edge. A strip of film was taped to the medial surface of the phantom. Gantry angles varied from 10 to 30 degrees below the lateral gantry position, representing anterior oblique fields. The measurements were performed with and without the presence of the board; the ratio of their corresponding doses (dose enhancement) was evaluated. Results: For the cases where the field edge is at the edge of the board, the dose enhancement is negligible for all the tested angles. When the field edge is 1 cm inside the board, the maximum surface dose enhancement varies depending on the gantry angle between 2.2 for 30 degrees and 3.2 for 20 degrees. The length on the film at which the presence of the board is detectable (i.e. where there is dose enhancement) is longer for the shallower angles. Conclusion: Even the low-density, thin carbon fiber board with a thin soft foam pad on the top can produce significant dose enhancement on the skin in prone breast treatment due to loss of buildup. However, it happens only when the patient mid-sternum is over the board, i.e. the medial edge of the field traverses through the board and pad. Even then, the effect occurs only at the field edge, i.e. the penumbral region.

  4. Dose reduction to normal tissues as compared to the gross tumor by using intensity modulated radiotherapy in thoracic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla NK

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is a powerful tool, which might go a long way in reducing radiation doses to critical structures and thereby reduce long term morbidities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of IMRT in reducing the dose to the critical normal tissues while maintaining the desired dose to the volume of interest for thoracic malignancies. Materials and methods During the period January 2002 to March 2004, 12 patients of various sites of malignancies in the thoracic region were treated using physical intensity modulator based IMRT. Plans of these patients treated with IMRT were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results An average dose reduction of the mean values by 73% to the heart, 69% to the right lung and 74% to the left lung, with respect to the GTV could be achieved with IMRT. The 2 year disease free survival was 59% and 2 year overall survival was 59%. The average number of IMRT fields used was 6. Conclusion IMRT with inverse planning enabled us to achieve desired dose distribution, due to its ability to provide sharp dose gradients at the junction of tumor and the adjacent critical organs.

  5. SU-E-I-37: Eye Lens Dose Reduction From CT Scan Using Organ Based Tube Current Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H [Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Liu, T; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Wu, J; Zhuo, W [Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the eye lens dose reduction by CT scan with organ based tube current modulation (OBTCM) using GPU Monte Carlo code ARCHER-CT. Methods: 36 X-ray sources and bowtie filters were placed around the patient head with the projection angle interval of 10° for one rotation of CT scan, each projection was simulated respectively. The voxel eye models with high resolution(0.1mm*0.1mm*0.1mm) were used in the simulation and different tube voltage including 80kVp, 100kVp, 120kVp and 140kVp were taken into consideration. Results: The radiation doses to the eye lens increased with the tube voltage raised from 80kVp to 140kVp, and the dose results from 0° (AP) direction are much higher than those from 180° (PA) direction for all the 4 different tube voltage investigated. This 360° projection dose characteristic enables organ based TCM, which can reduce the eye lens dose by more than 55%. Conclusion: As the eye lens belongs to superficial tissues, its radiation dose to external exposure like CT is direction sensitive, and this characteristic feature makes organ based TCM to be an effective way to reduce the eye lens dose, so more clinical use of this technique were recommended. National Nature Science Foundation of China(No.11475047)

  6. Pelvic X-ray examinations in follow-up of hip arthroplasty or femoral osteosynthesis – Dose reduction and quality criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten, E-mail: jost.kloth@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rickert, Markus, E-mail: markus.rickert@ortho.med.uni-giessen.de [Department of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Klinikstrasse 33, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Gotterbarm, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.gotterbarm@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstraße 200a, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Burkholder, Iris, E-mail: stabil@burkholder.de [Department of Nursing and Health, University of Applied Sciences of the Saarland, Goebenstrasse 40, D-66117 Saarbruecken (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ewerbeck, Volker, E-mail: volker.ewerbeck@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstraße 200a, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, Marc-André, E-mail: marcandre.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Pelvic radiographs with speed class 400 and 800 in follow-up of hip arthroplasty were compared. • Radiographs with reduced dose (800) were not inferior to those with standard dose (400). • We recommend speed class 800 as new reference parameter in these examinations. - Abstract: Objective: Digital plain radiographs of the pelvis are frequently performed in follow-up examinations of patients who received total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis (OS). Thus, the purpose was to reduce the radiation dose and to determine objective quality control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained. In this prospective randomized study, 289 patients underwent X-ray examination of the pelvis as follow up after receiving THA or OS with standard and reduced dose. The evaluation of the plain radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: bone–implant interface, implant–implant discrimination, implant–surface character and periarticular heterotopic ossification. Two radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If a single criterion had been evaluated with a score of 3 or more or more than 2 criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as “not assessable“. The study was designed as non-inferiority-trial. Results: Seven (2.4%) examined X-rays were scored as not assessable. There was no statistical inferiority between the examinations with standard (0.365 mSv) or reduced dose (0.211 mSv). Reduced dose only led to limitations in the evaluation of ceramic components with low clinical impact in most scenarios. Conclusion: Plain radiography of the pelvis in patients with THA or OS can be performed with a dose reduction of about 42% without a loss of important information. The obtained quality control criteria were clinically applicable.

  7. Prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy patients after health plan opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Korff, Michael; Walker, Rod L; Saunders, Kathleen; Shortreed, Susan M; Thakral, Manu; Parchman, Michael; Hansen, Ryan N; Ludman, Evette; Sherman, Karen J; Dublin, Sascha

    2017-08-01

    No studies have assessed the comparative effectiveness of guideline-recommended interventions to reduce risk of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy (COT) patients. We compared the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from intervention clinics that had implemented opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives for more than 4 years relative to control clinics that had not. After a healthcare system in Washington State implemented interventions to reduce opioid dose and risks, we surveyed 1588 adult primary care COT patients to compare the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from the intervention and control clinics. Intervention clinics managed COT patients at lower COT doses and with more consistent use of risk reduction practices. Control clinics cared for similar COT patients but prescribed higher opioid doses and used COT risk reduction practices inconsistently. Prescription opioid use disorder was assessed with the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders. The prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder was 21.5% (95% CI=18.9% to 24.4%) among COT patients in the intervention clinics and 23.9% (95% CI=20.5% to 27.6%) among COT patients in the control clinics. The adjusted relative risk of prescription opioid use disorder was 1.08 (95% CI=0.89, 1.32) among the control clinic patients relative to the intervention clinic patients. Long-term implementation of opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives was not associated with lower rates of prescription opioid use disorder among prevalent COT patients. Extreme caution should be exercised by clinicians considering COT for patients with chronic non-cancer pain until benefits of this treatment and attendant risks are clarified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen dosing the surface of SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudy, L.; Scheiderer, P.; Schuetz, P.; Gabel, J.; Buchwald, M.; Sing, M.; Claessen, R. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Denlinger, J.D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94270 (United States); Schlueter, C.; Lee, T.L. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The highly mobile two-dimensional electron system (2DES) on the surface of the insulating SrTiO{sub 3}(STO) offers exciting perspectives for advanced material design. This 2DES resides in a depletion layer caused by oxygen deficiency of the surface. With photoemission spectroscopy, we monitor the appearance of quasi-particle weight (QP) at the Fermi energy and oxygen vacancy induced states in the band gap (IG). Both, QP and IG weight, increase and decrease respectively upon exposure to extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light and in-situ oxygen dosing. By a proper adjustment of oxygen dosing, any intermediate state can be stabilized providing full control over the charge carrier density. From a comparison of the charge carrier concentrations obtained from an analysis of core-level spectra and the Fermi-surface volume, we conclude on a spatially inhomogeneous surface electronic structure with at least two different phases.

  9. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction of Limited-Range CT in the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Michael; Sanchez, Thomas R; Lamba, Ramit; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Corwin, Michael T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of limited-range CT prescribed from the top of L2 to the top of the pubic symphysis in children with suspected acute appendicitis. We performed a retrospective study of 210 consecutive pediatric patients from December 11, 2012, through December 11, 2014, who underwent abdominopelvic CT for suspected acute appendicitis. Two radiologists independently reviewed the theoretic limited scans from the superior L2 vertebral body to the top of the pubic symphysis, to assess for visualization of the appendix, acute appendicitis, alternative diagnoses, and incidental findings. Separately, the same parameters were assessed on the full scan by the same two reviewers. Whole-body effective doses were determined for the full- and limited-range scans and were compared using the paired t test. The appendix or entire cecum was visualized on the limited scan in all cases, and no cases of acute appendicitis were missed on the simulated limited scan compared with the full scan. Two alternative diagnoses were missed with the limited scan: one case of hydronephrosis and one of acute acalculous cholecystitis. The mean effective dose for the original scan was 5.6 mSv and that for the simulated limited scan was 3.0 mSv, resulting in a dose reduction of 46.4% (p appendicitis and reduces the dose by approximately 46%.

  10. Albuminuria Reduction after High Dose of Vitamin D in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Soares Felício

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome studies suggest an association between diabetic kidney disease (DKD and vitamin D (VD, but there is no data about the effect of high dose of VD on DKD in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Our pilot study aims to evaluate albuminuria reduction in patients with T1DM supplemented with high dose of VD.Methods22 patients received doses of 4,000 and 10,000 IU/day of cholecalciferol for 12 weeks according to patient’s previous VD levels. They were submitted to continuous glucose monitoring system, 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio before and after VD supplementation.ResultsThere was a reduction of DKD prevalence at the end of the study (68 vs 32%; p = 0.05, with no changes on insulin doses, glycated hemoglobin, glycemic variability and blood pressure values. A correlation between percentage variation of VD levels (ΔVD and albuminuria at the end of the study was presented (r = −0.5; p < 0.05. Among T1DM patients with DKD at the beginning of the study, 8/13 (62% had their DKD stage improved, while the other five ones (38% showed no changes (p < 0.05.ConclusionOur pilot study suggests an association between VD high dose supplementation, lower prevalence and improvement in stages of DKD in T1DM.

  11. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Jong, Pim A. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bleys, Ronald L.A.W. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Das, Marco; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buls, Nico; Mey, Johan de [UZ Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS). Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels using unenhanced prospectively ECG-triggered protocols. Tube voltage was 120 kV and tube current differed between protocols. CT data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and reduced dose CT data with IR. CCS was quantified with Agatston scores, calcification mass and calcification volume. Differences were analysed with the Friedman test. Fourteen hearts showed coronary calcifications. Dose reduction with FBP did not significantly change Agatston scores, calcification volumes and calcification masses (P > 0.05). Maximum differences in Agatston scores were 76, 26, 51 and 161 units, in calcification volume 97, 27, 42 and 162 mm{sup 3}, and in calcification mass 23, 23, 20 and 48 mg, respectively. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes with significant differences for one vendor (P < 0.05). Median relative differences between reference FBP and reduced dose IR for Agatston scores remained within 2.0-4.6 %, 1.0-5.3 %, 1.2-7.7 % and 2.6-4.5 %, for calcification volumes within 2.4-3.9 %, 1.0-5.6 %, 1.1-6.4 % and 3.7-4.7 %, for calcification masses within 1.9-4.1 %, 0.9-7.8 %, 2.9-4.7 % and 2.5-3.9 %, respectively. IR resulted in increased, decreased or similar calcification masses. CCS derived from standard FBP acquisitions was not affected by radiation dose reductions up to 80 %. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes. (orig.)

  12. A dose of nature: Tree cover, stress reduction, and gender differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Jiang; Chun-Yen Chang; William C. Sullivan

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that exposure to nearby nature can help reduce stress in individuals, the shape of the dose-response curve is entirely unclear. To establish this dose-response curve, we recruited 160 individuals for a laboratory experiment. Participants engaged in the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to induce psychological stress, and were then randomly...

  13. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgogne, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  14. Oral dosing by voluntary  administration of jellybeans. Refinement and reduction of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakula, Malgorzata Maria; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    induce stress and this may also influence parameters under study. Different methods for voluntary oral dosing has been described in the literature, among the methods proposed as an alternative to oral gavage is dosing in chocolate cream, sucker water etc. In this study we used jellybeans to give...

  15. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Chen Guanghong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  16. [Dose reduction and image quality in MDCT of the upper abdomen: potential of an adaptive post-processing filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröpil, P; Lanzman, R S; Walther, C; Röhlen, S; Godehardt, E; Mödder, U; Cohnen, M

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a 2D non-linear adaptive post-processing filter (2D-NLAF) on image quality in dose-reduced multi-detector CT (MDCT) of the upper abdomen. MDCT of the upper abdomen was simulated on a 64-slice scanner using a multi-modal anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, USA). While keeping the collimation (64 x 0.6 mm) and pitch (p = 1) unchanged, the tube current (100 - 500 mAs) and tube potential (80 - 140 kVp) were varied to perform MDCT as high dose (CTDI > 20), middle dose (CTDI 10 - 20) and low dose (CTDI images with a thickness of 7 and 3 mm with respect to the presentation of "mesenteric low contrast lesions", "liver veins", "liver cysts", "renal cysts" and "big vessels". The subjective image quality of original data and post-processed images using a 2D-NLAF (SharpViewCT, Linköping, Sweden) was graded on a 5-point scale (from "1" not visible to "5" excellent) and statistically analyzed. The effective dose (E) was estimated using commercial software (CT-EXPO). For all protocol groups, 2D-NLAF led to a significant improvement in subjective image quality for all examined lesions (p < 0.01), particularly at the protocols of middle dose (E: 5 - 8 mSv) and low dose level (E: 1 - 5 mSv). A maximum effect was seen in middle dose protocols for "low contrast lesions" (score "3.3" with filter versus "2.5" without) and "liver veins" ("4.5" versus "3.9"). The phantom study indicates a potential dose reduction of up to 50 % in MDCT of the upper abdomen by use of a 2D-NLAF, which should be further examined in clinical trails. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  17. Does the choice of mobile C-arms lead to a reduction of the intraoperative radiation dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, P H; Steinbrener, J; Schicho, A; Gebhard, F

    2016-08-01

    Mobile C-arm imaging is commonly used in operating rooms worldwide. Especially in orthopaedic surgery, intraoperative C-arms are used on a daily basis. Because of new minimally-invasive surgical procedures a development in intraoperative imaging is required. The purpose of this article is investigate if the choice of mobile C-arms with flat panel detector technology (Siemens Cios Alpha and Ziehm Vision RFD) influences image quality and dose using standard, commercially available test devices. For a total of four clinical application settings, two zoom formats, and all dose levels provided, the transmission dose was measured and representative images were recorded for each test device. The data was scored by four observers to assess low contrast and spatial resolution performance. The results were converted to a relative image quality figure allowing for a direct image quality and dose comparison of the two systems. For one test device, the Cios Alpha system achieved equivalent (within the inter-observer standard error) or better low contrast resolution scores at significantly lower dose levels, while the results of the other test device suggested that both systems achieved similar image quality at the same dose. The Cios Alpha system achieved equivalent or better spatial resolution at significantly lower dose for all application settings except for Cardiac, where a comparable spatial resolution was achieved at the same dose. The correct choice of a mobile C-arm is very important, because it can lead to a reduction of the intraoperative radiation dose without negative effects on image quality. This can be a big advantage to reduce intraoperative radiation not only for the patient but also for the entire OR-team. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Treating to target with etanercept in rheumatoid arthritis: cost-effectiveness of dose reductions when remission is achieved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelt, Gisela

    2014-07-01

    Current management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) focuses on inducing remission as early as possible to avoid lasting joint damage, and maintenance of remission has become important. A 12-month clinical trial in 834 patients with moderate RA investigated whether etanercept 50 mg/wk could be reduced to half dose or discontinued in patients who achieved low disease activity after 36 weeks. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the three maintenance strategies. A Markov model integrated the three strategies from the clinical trial and extrapolated to 10 years using data from the Swedish RA registry. Assumed treatment strategies after the trial were similar in all three arms, with patients failing to maintain remission on half-dose etanercept or methotrexate alone switching to the full dose of etanercept and patients maintaining remission on full-dose etanercept allowed switching to half dose. Resource use and utilities were taken from an observational study. Results are presented as cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) (both discounted 3%) in the societal perspective. The cost/QALY gained with half-dose etanercept versus methotrexate ranged from €14,000 to €29,000: Longer simulations result in a higher cost/QALY, as the acquisition cost of etanercept increases. Half-dose etanercept technically dominates the full dose (lower costs [€-3000 to 6300] and similar effectiveness [0.007-0.011]). Although ultimately all three strategies explored achieve a similar outcome as all three continuously manage patients to maintain remission, it appears that a dose reduction is the most advantageous strategy in patients with moderate disease activity. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Full Dose-Reduction Potential of Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Head CT Protocols in a Predominantly Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirro, A E; Brady, S L; Kaufman, R A

    2016-07-01

    A statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm provides an effective approach to reduce patient dose by compensating for increased image noise in CT due to reduced radiation output. However, after a point, the degree to which a statistical iterative algorithm is used for image reconstruction changes the image appearance. Our aim was to determine the maximum level of statistical iterative reconstruction that can be used to establish dose-reduced head CT protocols in a primarily pediatric population while maintaining similar appearance and level of image noise in the reconstructed image. Select head examinations (brain, orbits, sinus, maxilla, and temporal bones) were investigated. Dose-reduced head protocols using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction were compared for image quality with the original filtered back-projection reconstructed protocols in a phantom by using the following metrics: image noise frequency (change in perceived appearance of noise texture), image noise magnitude, contrast-to-noise ratio, and spatial resolution. Dose-reduction estimates were based on CT dose index values. Patient volume CT dose index and image noise magnitude were assessed in 737 pre- and post-dose-reduced examinations. Image noise texture was acceptable for up to 60% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for the soft reconstruction kernel (at both 100 and 120 kV[peak]) and up to 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for the standard reconstruction kernel. Implementation of 40% and 60% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction led to an average reduction in the volume CT dose index of 43% for brain, 41% for orbit, 30% for maxilla, 43% for sinus, and 42% for temporal bone protocols for patients between 1 month and 26 years of age, while maintaining an average noise magnitude difference of 0.1% (range, -3% to 5%), improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of low-contrast soft-tissue targets and the spatial resolution of high-contrast bony anatomy

  20. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  1. Surface membrane based bladder registration for evaluation of accumulated dose during brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2011-01-01

    of the fixed surface. Optional landmark based matches can be included in the suggested iterative solver. The technique is demonstrated for bladder registration in brachytherapy treatment evaluation of cervical cancer. It holds promise to better estimate the accumulated but unintentional dose delivered...

  2. Larger Blood Pressure Reduction by Fixed-Dose Compared to Free Dose Combination Therapy of ACE Inhibitor and Calcium Antagonist in Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Valeria; Finelli, Rosa; Pascale, Antonietta Valeria; Giannotti, Rocco; Fabbricatore, Davide; Ragosa, Nicola; Ciccarelli, Michele; Iaccarino, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of fixed combination of ACEi+CCB (Fixed) has significantly increased patients compliance and adherence to therapy. At the moment, however, there are no data suggesting the better control of once-daily fixed (Fixed) over free doses in separate administrations combination therapy in hypertensives. In a population of 39 consecutive outpatient patients referred to the departmental Hypertension clinic of the University Hospital of Salerno Medical School with the first diagnosis of arterial hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that the Fixed achieve a better control of blood pressure than the Free combination. Patients were randomized to either strategy and after 3 months patients underwent a clinical assessment to evaluate the antihypertensive effect. The two groups, matched for anthropometric and clinical parameters, received Amlodipine (5-10 mg/daily) and Perindopril (5-10 mg/daily). Perindopril and Amlodipine doses did not significantly differ between the two groups. After 3 months BP control was improved in both groups and BP targets were similarly reached in both groups (SBP; Fixed: 61.54%; Free 69.23%; n.s. DPB; Fixed: 80.77%; Free 84.62%; n.s.). The reduction in systolic blood pressure was similar in both groups (Fixed:7.64±2.49%; Free: 7.81±4.00%, n.s.), while the reduction of diastolic blood pressure was greater in the Fixed group (Fixed: 14.22±2.03%; Free: 4.92±5.00%, p<0.05). Although both strategies are effective in reducing BP, the use of Fixed dose has an advantage in the reduction of BP. The present study does not allow to identify the mechanisms of this difference, which can be assumed to be due to the pharmacokinetics of the drugs administered in once-daily fixed combination.

  3. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface; Retention et reduction de l'uranium a la surface de la pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglizaud, N

    2006-12-15

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS{sub 2}). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH {>=} 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. {>=} -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage ({>=} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup -1}. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the

  4. Impact of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose calculated with Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanqun; Li Jie; Wu Liping; Wang Pei; Lang Jinyi; Wu Dake; Xiao Mingyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To calculate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose. Methods: The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo Code system, designed especially for computer simulation of radioactive sources, was performed to evaluate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose.Thermoplastic mask came from our center with a material density of 1.12 g/cm 2 . The masks without holes, with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm, and with holes size of 0. 1 cm x 0.2 cm, and masks with different depth (0.12 cm and 0.24 cm) were evaluated separately. For those with holes, the material width between adjacent holes was 0.1 cm. Virtual masks with a material density of 1.38 g/cm 3 without holes with two different depths were also evaluated. Results: Thermoplastic mask affected X-rays surface dose. When using a thermoplastic mask with the depth of 0.24 cm without holes, the surface dose was 74. 9% and 57.0% for those with the density of 1.38 g/cm 3 and 1.12 g/cm 3 respectively. When focusing on the masks with the density of 1.12 g/cm 3 , the surface dose was 41.2% for those with 0.12 cm depth without holes; 57.0% for those with 0. 24 cm depth without holes; 44.5% for those with 0.24 cm depth with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.2 cm;and 54.1% for those with 0.24 cm depths with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm.Conclusions: Using thermoplastic mask during the radiation increases patient surface dose. The severity is relative to the hole size and the depth of thermoplastic mask. The surface dose change should be considered in radiation planning to avoid severe skin reaction. (authors)

  5. Technical Note: Out-of-field dose measurement at near surface with plastic scintillator detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgouin, Alexandra; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Archambault, Louis

    2016-09-08

    Out-of-field dose depends on multiple factors, making peripheral dosimetry com-plex. Only a few dosimeters have the required features for measuring peripheral dose. Plastic scintillator dosimeters (PSDs) offer numerous dosimetric advantages as required for out-of-field dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to determine the potential of using PSD as a surface peripheral dosimeter. Measurements were performed with a parallel-plate ion chamber, a small volume ion chamber, and with a PSD. Lateral-dose measurements (LDM) at 0.5 cm depth and depth-dose curve (PDD) were made and compared to the dose calculation provided by a treatment planning system (TPS). This study shows that a PSD can measure a dose as low as 0.51 ± 0.17 cGy for photon beam and 0.58 ± 0.20 cGy for electron beam with a difference of 0.2 and 0.1 cGy compared to a parallel-plate ion chamber. This study demonstrates the potential of using PSD as an out-of-field dosimeter since measure-ments with PSD avoid averaging over a too-large depth, at 1 mm diameter, and can make precise measurement at very low dose. Also, electronic equilibrium is easier to reach with PSD due to its small sensitive volume and its water equivalence. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. X-ray tube output based calculation of patient entrance surface dose: validation of the method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harju, O.; Toivonen, M.; Tapiovaara, M.; Parviainen, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-06-01

    X-ray departments need methods to monitor the doses delivered to the patients in order to be able to compare their dose level to established reference levels. For this purpose, patient dose per radiograph is described in terms of the entrance surface dose (ESD) or dose-area product (DAP). The actual measurement is often made by using a DAP-meter or thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The third possibility, the calculation of ESD from the examination technique factors, is likely to be a common method for x-ray departments that do not have the other methods at their disposal or for examinations where the dose may be too low to be measured by the other means (e.g. chest radiography). We have developed a program for the determination of ESD by the calculation method and analysed the accuracy that can be achieved by this indirect method. The program calculates the ESD from the current time product, x-ray tube voltage, beam filtration and focus- to-skin distance (FSD). Additionally, for calibrating the dose calculation method and thereby improving the accuracy of the calculation, the x-ray tube output should be measured for at least one x-ray tube voltage value in each x-ray unit. The aim of the present work is to point out the restrictions of the method and details of its practical application. The first experiences from the use of the method will be summarised. (orig.)

  7. Reduction of radiation dose by using digital luminescence radiography compared to conventional screen film system with grid cassette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyne, J.P.; Merbold, H.; Neumann, R.; Freesmeyer, M.; Jonetz-Mentzel, L.; Kaiser, W.A.; Sehner, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: How much can the radiation dose be reduced for skull radiography by using digital luminescence radiography (DLR) compared to a conventional screen film system with a grid cassette? Methods and Materials: A skull phantom (3M) was X-rayed in anterior-posterior orientation using both a conventional screen film system with grid cassette and DLR (ADC-70, Agfa). The tube current time product (mAs) was diminished gradually while keeping the voltage constant. The surface entrance dose was measured by a sensor of Dosimax (Wellhoefer). Five investigators evaluated the images by characteristic and critical features, spatial resolution and contrast. Results: The surface entrance dose at 73 kV/22 mAs was 0,432 mGy in conventional screen film system and 0,435 mGy in DLR. The images could be evaluated very well down to an average dose of 71% (0,308 mGy; SD 0,050); sufficient images were obtained down to an average dose of 31% (0,136 mGy; SD 0,065). The resolution of the line pairs were reduced down to a 2 levels depending on the investigator. Contrast was assessed as being very good to sufficient. The acceptance of the postprocessed images (MUSICA-software) was individually different and resultde in an improvement of the assessment of bone structures an contrast in higher dose ranges only. Conclusion: For the sufficient assessment of a possible fracture/of paranasal sinuses/of measurement the skull the dose can be reduced to at least 56% (31%; SD 14,9%)/40% (27%; SD 9,3%)/18% (14%; SD 4,4%). Digital radiography allows question-referred exposure parameters with clearly reduced dose, so e.g. for fracture exclusion 73 kV/12,5 mAs and to skull measurement 73 kV/4 mAs. (orig.) [de

  8. Effect of rare earth filtration on patient exposure, dose reduction, and image quality in oral panoramic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyndall, D.A.; Washburn, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth intensifying screen material (Gd2O2S:Tb) was added to the standard Al filtration of an oral panoramic x-ray unit, resulting in a beam capable of achieving reductions in patient dose without a loss of image quality. The added rare earth filtration technique resulted in patient dose reductions of 21-56%, depending on anatomic sites, when compared to the conventional Al filtration technique. Films generated from both techniques were measured densitometrically and evaluated by a panel of practicing clinicians. Diagnostically significant differences were minimal. The results indicate that use of rare earth filters in oral panoramic radiography is an effective means of reducing exposures of dental patients to ionizing radiation

  9. Strategies for dose reduction in ordinary radiographic examinations using CR and DR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Uncoupling of display from acquisition in computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR) introduces the potential for systematic overexposure without necessarily compromising image quality. Although the magnitude of radiation doses in general radiography is low compared to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, the dose to the patient is more critical in pediatric examinations than in adults, because of the greater radiosensitivity of children. This manuscript examines a variety of countermeasures for managing radiation doses in pediatric CR and DR examinations, including use of derived exposure indicators, modifications of imaging practice, and development of more efficient radiographic detectors. (orig.)

  10. Technical note: Reduction of radiation dose using ultrasound guidance during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan S Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS procedure for decompression of the portal venous system generally performed under fluoroscopic guidance has undergone continuous technical modifications recently. Due to the length of the procedure, the fluoroscopy times are reasonably high, thus increasing the risk from ionizing radiation. Radiation doses were measured for 19 patients using dose area product (DAP meter. The average DAP value for the TIPS procedure was 63.86 Gy cm 2 (21.12-117.07. Radiation doses to patients can be reduced with the use of USG guidance and intermittent fluoroscopy screening.

  11. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  12. Surface structured platinum electrodes for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanc-Scherer, Florin A; Montiel, Miguel A; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M

    2015-10-07

    The direct CO2 electrochemical reduction on model platinum single crystal electrodes Pt(hkl) is studied in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], a suitable room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) medium due to its moderate viscosity, high CO2 solubility and conductivity. Single crystal electrodes represent the most convenient type of surface structured electrodes for studying the impact of RTIL ion adsorption on relevant electrocatalytic reactions, such as surface sensitive electrochemical CO2 reduction. We propose here based on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrolysis measurements, for the first time, the formation of a stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] by a radical-radical coupling after the simultaneous reduction of CO2 and [C2mim(+)]. It means between the CO2 radical anion and the radical formed from the reduction of the cation [C2mim(+)] before forming the corresponding electrogenerated carbene. This is confirmed by the voltammetric study of a model imidazolium-2-carboxylate compound formed following the carbene pathway. The formation of that stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] blocks CO2 reduction after a single electron transfer and inhibits CO2 and imidazolium dimerization reactions. However, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 under those conditions provokes the electrochemical cathodic degradation of the imidazolium based RTIL. This important limitation in CO2 recycling by direct electrochemical reduction is overcome by adding a strong acid, [H(+)][NTf2(-)], into solution. Then, protons become preferentially adsorbed on the electrode surface by displacing the imidazolium cations and inhibiting their electrochemical reduction. This fact allows the surface sensitive electro-synthesis of HCOOH from CO2 reduction in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], with Pt(110) being the most active electrode studied.

  13. Radiation dose reduction at a price: the effectiveness of a male gonadal shield during helical CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Yusuf E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that 60 million computed tomography (CT scans were performed during 2006, with approximately 11% of those performed on children age 0–15 years. Various types of gonadal shielding have been evaluated for reducing exposure to the gonads. The purpose of this study was to quantify the radiation dose reduction to the gonads and its effect on image quality when a wrap-around male pediatric gonad shield was used during CT scanning. This information is obtained to assist the attending radiologist in the decision to utilize such male gonadal shields in pediatric imaging practice. Methods The dose reduction to the gonads was measured for both direct radiation and for indirect scattered radiation from the abdomen. A 6 cm3 ion chamber (Model 10X5-6, Radcal Corporation, Monrovia, CA was placed on a Humanoid real bone pelvic phantom at a position of the male gonads. When exposure measurements with shielding were made, a 1 mm lead wrap-around gonadal shield was placed around the ion chamber sensitive volume. Results The use of the shields reduced scatter dose to the gonads by a factor of about 2 with no appreciable loss of image quality. The shields reduced the direct beam dose by a factor of about 35 at the expense of extremely poor CT image quality due to severe streak artifacts. Conclusion Images in the direct exposure case are not useful due to these severe artifacts and the difficulties in positioning these shields on patients in the scatter exposure case may not be warranted by the small absolute reduction in scatter dose unless it is expected that the patient will be subjected to numerous future CT scans.

  14. Low dose effect of bisphosphonates on hMSCs osteogenic response to titanium surface in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Alqhtani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, titanium (Ti implants have been routinely used to replace missing teeth. This success is mainly due to the good biocompatibility of Ti and the phenomenon of osseointegration, with very early events at implant placement being important in determining good osseointegration. However, enhancing implant performance with coatings such as hydroxyapatite (HA and calcium phosphate has proved largely unsuccessful. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are the first osteogenic cells to colonise implant surfaces and offer a target for enhancing osseointegration. We previously reported that small doses of bisphosphonate (BP may play an integral role in enhancing hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether small doses of bisphosphonates enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on Ti surfaces, to enhance bone osseointegration and to accelerate wound healing around the implant surface. Our data suggests that treating cells with small doses of BP (100 nM & 10 nM induces significant hMSC stimulation of osteogenic markers including calcium, collagen type I and ALP compared to control group on titanium surfaces (P < 0.05. In addition, cell proliferation and migration were significantly enhanced on titanium surfaces (P < 0.05.

  15. MO-D-BRA-01: Limits of Dose Reduction in CT: Where are They and How Will We Know When We Get There?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNitt-Gray, M; Noo, F; Fessier, J; Samei, E

    2012-06-01

    Radiation Dose continues to be a concern with respect to all diagnostic imaging using ionizing radiation, but especially so with CT imaging. We have always known how to reduce radiation dose in CT - for example, simply turning down the system output (e.g. reduce mAs). What we have not been able to do is to simultaneously reduce dose and maintain "diagnostic image quality". Many recent technical developments have appeared, and will continue to appear, that will allow users to reduce radiation dose in CT while "maintaining image quality". However, this last term is ill-defined and current metrics of image quality are not very applicable to actual clinical practice. The purpose of this symposium is to: (a) describe several current and possible future radiation dose reduction methods and the magnitude of their potential for dose reduction, (b) some description of what "diagnostic image quality" means, the effects that dose reductions methods have on this property, description of some metrics that may help us assess this property quantitatively and this information can be used to guide how low radiation doses can be reduced. 1. Understand both conventional and emerging radiation dose reduction methods in CT. 2. Understand the implications on diagnostic image quality for each radiation dose reduction method. 3. Understand some of the issues in evaluating how much radiation dose can be reduced and still accomplish a diagnostic imaging task. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...... derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Results: Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were...

  17. A case of relapsed tardive dyskinesia due to clozapine dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, O; Cansever, A; Ozsahin, A

    2001-11-01

    There is no proven effective treatment for tardive dyskinesia (TD). However, clozapine has been reported to be effective in suppressing TD symptoms. In this article, we report a TD case who received clozapine. The patient recovered from TD symptoms with a dose of 450 mg/day clozapine. At the end of the first year, clozapine was decreased to a dose of 250 mg/day and TD symptoms re-emerged.

  18. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, contains the third in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This report also contains abstracts from the two previous volumes. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics are also included

  19. Dose reduction in high-resolution MSCT. Examinations of the chest for early detection of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, J.; Adam, G.; Wedegaertner, U.; Wildberger, J.E.; Dichtl, D.; Nagel, H.D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: the purpose of this study was to optimize high-resolution MSCT chest protocols for the evaluation of symptomatic immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia using a dose-simulating program. Materials and methods: using the MSCT (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), 30 immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia were examined with a low-dose HRCT of the chest (120 kV, 100 eff.mAs and collimation of 4 x 1 mm). A dose-simulating program was used to reconstruct the raw data at four different dose levels (70, 50, 35 und 25 mAs). For dose simulation for each mAs product, the correspondent noise level was added to the data. Images were generated with a slice thickness of 1 mm and 5 mm in the lung window. The images were then evaluated independently by two radiologists and graded on a scale of 1 to 3 points: 1 = no pneumonia, 2 = unclear, 3 = pneumonia. A receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis was performed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC). The actual dosage in mSv was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Results: out of 30 patients, 7 had a normal chest finding and 23 had pneumonia. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 1.0 for every dosage and slice thickness. Infiltrates were detected correctly for all dosage levels. The sensitivity was 100% for all dose levels and slice thicknesses. There was one false positive finding at 35 mAs and 1 mm slice thickness. At this dose level the specificity was reduced to 93%. A reduction to 25 mAs had no influence on the detection of pneumonia. Thus, MSCT examinations of the chest can be performed with 25 mAs without missing the right diagnosis, resulting in an effective dose of 1.15 mSv (men), 1.5 mSv (women) and a CTDIvol of 2.5 mGy. (orig.)

  20. Fully Convolutional Architecture for Low-Dose CT Image Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badretale, S.; Shaker, F.; Babyn, P.; Alirezaie, J.

    2017-10-01

    One of the critical topics in medical low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is how best to maintain image quality. As the quality of images decreases with lowering the X-ray radiation dose, improving image quality is extremely important and challenging. We have proposed a novel approach to denoise low-dose CT images. Our algorithm learns directly from an end-to-end mapping from the low-dose Computed Tomography images for denoising the normal-dose CT images. Our method is based on a deep convolutional neural network with rectified linear units. By learning various low-level to high-level features from a low-dose image the proposed algorithm is capable of creating a high-quality denoised image. We demonstrate the superiority of our technique by comparing the results with two other state-of-the-art methods in terms of the peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error, and a structural similarity index.

  1. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  2. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  3. SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, P; Wahi-Anwar, M; Kim, H [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Young, S; Hoffman, J [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing radiation dose levels on emphysema scores from lung cancer screening CT exams. Methods: 52 cases were selected from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) patients for which we had both the image series and the raw CT data. All scans were acquired with fixed effective mAs (25 for standard-sized patients, 40 for large patients) on a 64-slice scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) using 120kV, 64×0.6mm collimation and pitch 1.0. All images were reconstructed with 1mm slice thickness, B50 kernel. Based on a previously-published technique, we added noise to the raw data to simulate reduced-dose versions at 50% and 25% of the original dose (approximately 1.0- and 0.5-mGy CTDIvol). Lung segmentations were obtained via region growing from manual seed point at a threshold of 600HU followed by manual removal of trachea and major airways. Lung segmentations were only performed on original dose scans, and mapped to simulated reduced-dose scans. Emphysema scores based on relative area of lung with attenuation values lower than −950HU (RA950) were computed for all cases. Results: Average RA950 of all 50 cases were 31.6 (±5.5), 32.5 (±4.9) and 32.8 (±4.6) for 100%, 50% and 25% dose level respectively. The average absolute difference in RA950 between simulated and original dose scans were 1.0 (±0.7) and 1.4 (±1.1) for 50% and 25% dose level respectively. Conclusion: RA950 is relatively robust to dose level, with a difference of no more than 5 from the original dose scans. The average RA950 of this population was high for a two reasons: This was a high risk population of patients with substantial smoking history; The use of B50 kernel, which may be biased towards high emphysema scores. Further exploration with smoother kernels will be conducted in the future. Institutional research agreement, Siemens Healthcare; Past recipient, research grant support, Siemens Healthcare; Consultant, Toshiba

  4. SU-F-P-45: Clinical Experience with Radiation Dose Reduction of CT Examinations Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V [Baylor Scott and White Healthcare System, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have been adopted by medical centers in the past several years. IR has a potential to substantially reduce patient dose while maintaining or improving image quality. This study characterizes dose reductions in clinical settings for CT examinations using IR. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed dose information from patients who underwent abdomen/pelvis CT examinations with and without contrast media in multiple locations of our Healthcare system. A total of 743 patients scanned with ASIR on 64 slice GE lightspeed VCTs at three sites, and 30 patients scanned with SAFIRE on a Siemens 128 slice Definition Flash in one site was retrieved. For comparison, patient data (n=291) from a GE scanner and patient data (n=61) from two Siemens scanners where filtered back-projection (FBP) was used was collected retrospectively. 30% and 10% ASIR, and SAFIRE Level 2 was used. CTDIvol, Dose-length-product (DLP), weight and height from all patients was recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated accordingly. To convert CTDIvol to SSDE, AP and lateral dimensions at the mid-liver level was measured for each patient. Results: Compared with FBP, 30% ASIR reduces dose by 44.1% (SSDE: 12.19mGy vs. 21.83mGy), while 10% ASIR reduced dose by 20.6% (SSDE 17.32mGy vs. 21.83). Use of SAFIRE reduced dose by 61.4% (SSDE: 8.77mGy vs. 22.7mGy). The geometric mean for patients scanned with ASIR was larger than for patients scanned with FBP (geometric mean is 297.48 mmm vs. 284.76 mm). The same trend was observed for the Siemens scanner where SAFIRE was used (geometric mean: 316 mm with SAFIRE vs. 239 mm with FBP). Patient size differences suggest that further dose reduction is possible. Conclusion: Our data confirmed that in clinical practice IR can significantly reduce dose to patients who undergo CT examinations, while meeting diagnostic requirements for image quality.

  5. Impact of source position on high-dose-rate skin surface applicator dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeho; Barker, Christopher A; Zaider, Marco; Cohen, Gil'ad N

    2016-01-01

    Skin surface dosimetric discrepancies between measured and treatment planning system predicted values were traced to source position sag inside the applicator and to source transit time. We quantified their dosimetric impact and propose corrections for clinical use. We measured the dose profiles from the Varian Leipzig-style high-dose-rate (HDR) skin applicator, using EBT3 film, photon diode, and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter for three different GammaMedplus HDR afterloaders. The measured dose profiles at several depths were compared with BrachyVision Acuros calculated profiles. To assess the impact of the source sag, two different applicator orientations were considered. The dose contribution during source transit was assessed by comparing diode measurements using an HDR timer and an electrometer timer. Depth doses measured using the three dosimeters were in good agreement, but were consistently higher than the Acuros dose calculations. Measurements with the applicator face up were significantly (exceeding 10%) lower than those in the face down position, due to source sag inside the applicator. Based on the inverse square law, the effective source sag was evaluated to be about 0.5 mm from the planned position. The additional dose during source transit was evaluated to be about 2.8% for 30 seconds of treatment with a 40700 U (10 Ci) source. With a very short source-to-surface distance, the small source sag inside the applicator has a significant dosimetric impact. This effect is unaccounted for in the vendor's treatment planning template and should be considered before the clinical use of the applicator. Further investigation of other applicators with large source lumen diameter may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Drag reduction in reservoir rock surface: Hydrophobic modification by SiO{sub 2} nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yong-Li, E-mail: yylhill@163.com [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Shiyou University, Xi’an 710065 (China); Cui, Ming-Yue; Jiang, Wei-Dong; He, An-Le; Liang, Chong [Langfang Branch of Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development, Langfang 065007 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures at the sandstone core surface are constructed by adsorption of the modified silica nanoparticles, which leads to the effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate in ultra-low permeability reservoirs. - Highlights: • A micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure is formed at the reservoir rock surface. • An inversion has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic modified by nanofluids. • The effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate is realized. • The mechanism of drag reduction induced from the modified core surface was unclosed. - Abstract: Based on the adsorption behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in the sandstone core surface, the hydrophobic surface was constructed, which consists of micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure. This modified core surface presents a property of drag reduction and meets the challenge of high injection pressure and low injection rate in low or ultra-low permeability reservoir. The modification effects on the surface of silica nanoparticles and reservoir cores, mainly concerning hydrophobicity and fine structure, were determined by measurements of contact angle and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that after successful modification, the contact angle of silica nanoparticles varies from 19.5° to 141.7°, exhibiting remarkable hydrophobic properties. These modified hydrophobic silica nanoparticles display a good adsorption behavior at the core surface to form micro-nanobinary structure. As for the wettability of these modified core surfaces, a reversal has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic and its contact angle increases from 59.1° to 105.9°. The core displacement experiments show that the relative permeability for water has significantly increased by an average of 40.3% via core surface modification, with the effects of reducing injection pressure and improving injection performance of water

  7. Drag reduction in reservoir rock surface: Hydrophobic modification by SiO2 nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yong-Li; Cui, Ming-Yue; Jiang, Wei-Dong; He, An-Le; Liang, Chong

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures at the sandstone core surface are constructed by adsorption of the modified silica nanoparticles, which leads to the effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate in ultra-low permeability reservoirs. - Highlights: • A micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure is formed at the reservoir rock surface. • An inversion has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic modified by nanofluids. • The effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate is realized. • The mechanism of drag reduction induced from the modified core surface was unclosed. - Abstract: Based on the adsorption behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in the sandstone core surface, the hydrophobic surface was constructed, which consists of micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure. This modified core surface presents a property of drag reduction and meets the challenge of high injection pressure and low injection rate in low or ultra-low permeability reservoir. The modification effects on the surface of silica nanoparticles and reservoir cores, mainly concerning hydrophobicity and fine structure, were determined by measurements of contact angle and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that after successful modification, the contact angle of silica nanoparticles varies from 19.5° to 141.7°, exhibiting remarkable hydrophobic properties. These modified hydrophobic silica nanoparticles display a good adsorption behavior at the core surface to form micro-nanobinary structure. As for the wettability of these modified core surfaces, a reversal has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic and its contact angle increases from 59.1° to 105.9°. The core displacement experiments show that the relative permeability for water has significantly increased by an average of 40.3% via core surface modification, with the effects of reducing injection pressure and improving injection performance of water

  8. Dose reduction through gridless technique in digital full-field mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, F.; Diekmann, S.; Berzeg, S.; Blick, U.; Fischer, T.; Hamm, B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of the scatter grid in digital full-field mammography with respect to image quality and dose and to compare the experimental results with initial clinical experience. Materials and Methods: A phantom consisting of 205 fields that enclose gold dots of different thickness and size (CD-Mam phantom, Medical Department, Nijmegen, Netherlands) was used for digital full-field mammography with the conventional grid module and a special gridless module. Four different breast thicknesses were simulated using Plexiglas as scatter material. First, the phantom was exposed at the parameter and dose settings automatically selected in each experimental setup (with and without grid). Subsequently, the phantom was exposed at the different simulated breast thicknesses using the gridless module in combination with the parameters automatically selected for the grid module. This was followed by a series of phantom mammograms obtained with the experimental setup reversed. The 16 mammograms were evaluated by 3 readers and the results compared considering breast thickness, radiation dose, and quality. The gridless module was used for preoperative labeling in 16 patients for comparison of mammograms obtained with and without a grid. Results: For the same entrance dose used in routine mammography, digital mammography without grid is superior to digital mammography with grid when performed on simulated thin breasts (Plexiglas less than 3 cm), with no difference found when performed on simulated large breasts. The advantages of gridless mammography are more pronounced at a markedly reduced entrance dose (identical parenchymal dose without and with grid using the dose automatically selected for the gridless module). This tendency is confirmed by the initial clinical comparison. (orig.) [de

  9. In situ surface reduction of a NiO-YSZ-alumina composite using scanning probe microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2014-01-01

    In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning of topogr...

  10. Immunosensing by luminescence reduction in surface-modified microstructured SU-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eravuchira, Pinkie Jacob; Baranowska, Malgorzata; Eckstein, Chris [Departament d’Enginyeria Electrònica, Elèctrica i Automàtica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avda. Països Catalans 26, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Díaz, Francesc [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Marcelí Domingo s/n, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Llobet, Eduard; Marsal, Lluis F. [Departament d’Enginyeria Electrònica, Elèctrica i Automàtica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avda. Països Catalans 26, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Ferré-Borrull, Josep, E-mail: josep.ferre@urv.cat [Departament d’Enginyeria Electrònica, Elèctrica i Automàtica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avda. Països Catalans 26, Tarragona 43007 (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The reduction of photoluminescence of SU-8 upon surface modification is reported. • Micropillar structuring of SU-8 surface results in an increased photoluminescence reduction rate (10% glass, 15% silicon). • Photoluminescence reduction rate can be a transduction parameter for the detection of antibody-antigen binding events. • The proposed sensing mechanism can be used to quantify small concentrations of antibody. • Lower limit of detection (LOD) of 28 μg/ml on silicon substrates and 42 μg/ml on glass substrates was achieved. - Abstract: SU-8, an epoxy based negative photoresist is extensively used as a structural material for the fabrication of microelectro-mechanical systems and in microelectronics technology. However, the possible applications of SU-8 for biosensing have not been explored much, mainly because of the photoluminescence SU-8 possesses in the near-UV and visible wavelength ranges which hinders fluorescent labelling of biorecognition events. In this study we demonstrate that photoluminescence of SU-8 can be employed itself as a sensing transduction parameter to produce a tool for immunosensing: the photoluminescence shows a systematic reduction upon modification of its surface chemistry, and in particular upon attachment of an antigen-antibody (aIgG-IgG) pair. We investigate the relation of the amount of reduction of photoluminescence on planar and microstructured surfaces, and we show that microstructuring leads to a higher reduction than a planar surface. Furthermore, we evaluated the dependence of photoluminescence reduction as a function of analyte concentration to prove that this magnitude can be applied to immunosensing.

  11. 1. Dose reduction of occupational exposure in cardiac catheterization and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoshimi [Kyushu Kosei Nenkin Hospital, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Fujihashi, Hiroshi; Umeda, Kazuhiro

    2000-08-01

    Occupational exposure to scattered radiation and protective equipment was assessed in 4 medical institutions in Kyushu, Japan. The areas where scattered radiation occurred, the scattered radiation dose in the operator's position, fluoroscopy time, the number of cinematography sessions, and annual number of patients were assessed, and the annual scattered radiation dose to the operator was estimated. Approximately 90% of scattered radiation was generated by the subject and the collimator. Measurement of scattered radiation during coronary arteriography yielded a dose of 255-1200 [{mu}Sv/hr.] during fluoroscopy and 3.8-26.7 [{mu}Sv/10 sec.] during radiography. The duration of fluoroscopy for ablation was much longer than during general examinations and PTCA, suggesting a possible contribution to occupational exposure. The data for the past 5 years show no marked change in total number of catheterizations, but the number of ablations has rapidly increased. Ablation requires specific skills, and thus it is frequently performed by only a few staff members, resulting in exposure being concentrated in a few specific persons. The estimated doses of scattered radiation to the eyes and thyroid gland, which are assumed to be the most highly exposed sites, were 116.2 [mSv/year] during fluoroscopy and 8.9 [mSv/year] during radiography, for a total of 125.1 [mSv/year]. This dose is very close to the maximum occupational exposure dose recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), i.e., 150 [mSv/year]. A protective device that does not impose a burden on the operator or limit the functions of x-ray units was installed on top of the examining table as a measure to reduce the occupational dose. In an experiment using this device the scattered radiation dose during inguinal puncture decreased from 0.8 [mSv/hr.] to 0.02 [mSv/hr.], and the shielding rate was 2.5%. The dose was reduced 97.5%. The authors conclude that radiological personnel must make

  12. Reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in laparoscopic bariatric surgery: In support of dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaoui, Rachid; Cabaret, Aurélie; Alami, Youssef; Zogheib, Elie; Popov, Ivan; Lorne, Emmanuel; Dupont, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Sugammadex is the first molecule able to antagonize steroidal muscle relaxants with few adverse effects. Doses are adjusted to body weight and the level of neuromuscular blockade. Sleeve gastrectomy is becoming a very popular form of bariatric surgery. It requires deep muscle relaxation followed by complete and rapid reversal to decrease postoperative and especially post-anaesthetic morbidity. Sugammadex is therefore particularly indicated in this setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deep neuromuscular blockade reversal time after administration of various doses of sugammadex (based on real weight or at lower doses). Secondary endpoints were the interval between the sugammadex injection and extubation and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room. We then investigated any complications observed in the recovery room. This pilot, prospective, observational, clinical practice evaluation study was conducted in the Amiens University Hospital. Neuromuscular blockade was induced by rocuronium. At the end of the operation, deep neuromuscular blockade was reversed by sugammadex at the dose of 4mg/kg. Sixty-four patients were included: 31 patients received sugammadex at a dosage based on their real weight (RW) and 33 patients received a lower dose (based on ideal weight [IW]). For identical rocuronium doses calculated based on IBW, sugammadex doses were significantly lower in the IW group: 349 (± 65) mg versus 508 (± 75) mg (Pneuromuscular blockade reversal took 115 (± 69) s in the IW group versus 87 (± 40) s in the RW group, but with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.08). The intervals between injection of sugammadex and extubation (P=0.07) and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room (P=0.68) were also non-significantly longer in the IW group. The mean dose of sugammadex used by anaesthetists in the IW group was 4mg/kg of ideal weight increased by 35% to 50% (n=20; 351±34mg). No sugammadex adverse

  13. Post-processing image filtration enabling dose reduction in standard abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Peter; Söderberg, Marcus; Fält, Tobias; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Albertsson, Ida

    2010-01-01

    The collective effective radiation dose to the population is increasing due to a higher use of computerised tomography. SharpView AB, Linköping, Sweden, has developed an adaptive non-linear post-processing image filtration that may enable the use of lower radiation doses. The present study assessed if a lower dose with image filtration had the same image quality as a higher dose without the filter applied. All imaging was performed on a Siemens Somatom Sensation 16 CT. The parameters used were 120 kV and 200 mAs (40 patients) and 130 mAs without and with image filtering (40 patients), respectively. All studies were quantitatively evaluated for noise and image quality was assessed by visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis. After image filtration, the noise in the processed images was lowered and the image quality was improved as shown by the VGC analysis. However, images using the higher dose were still ranked as the best in five out of eight criteria as shown by the VGC analysis. Image filtration enhances CT images significantly and further studies will show if 130 mAs with image filtration may be sufficient for clinically general abdominal CT.

  14. Heart dose reduction by prone deep inspiration breath hold in left-sided breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Veldeman, Liv; Speleers, Bruno; Mahjoubi, Khalil; Remouchamps, Vincent; Van Greveling, Annick; Gilsoul, Monique; Berwouts, Dieter; Lievens, Yolande; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac disease has been related to heart dose after left-sided breast radiotherapy. This trial evaluates the heart sparing ability and feasibility of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the prone position for left-sided whole breast irradiation (WBI). Twelve patients underwent CT-simulation in supine shallow breathing (SB), supine DIBH, prone SB and prone DIBH. A validation cohort of 38 patients received prone SB and prone DIBH CT-scans; the last 30 patients were accepted for prone DIBH treatment. WBI was planned with a prescription dose of 40.05 Gy. DIBH was able to reduce (p<0.001) heart dose in both positions, with results for prone DIBH at least as favorable as for supine DIBH. Mean heart dose was lowered from 2.2 Gy for prone SB to 1.3 Gy for prone DIBH (p<0.001), while preserving the lung sparing ability of prone positioning. Moreover prone DIBH nearly consistently reduced mean heart dose to less then 2 Gy, regardless of breast volume. All patients were able to perform the simulation procedure, 28/30 patients were treated with prone DIBH. This trial demonstrates the ability and feasibility of prone DIBH to acquire optimal heart and lung sparing for left-sided WBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality-controlled dose reduction of full-leg radiography in patients with knee malalignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Neumann, Regina; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre; Stillfried, Eva von; Ewerbeck, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Digital plain radiographs of the full leg are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults. Thus, the objective of this work was to reduce the radiation exposure dependent on specific indications, and to determine objective quality-control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. In this prospective, randomized controlled, blinded, two-armed single-center study, 288 evaluable patients underwent plain radiography of the full leg with standard and reduced doses. The evaluation of the plain radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: mechanical axis, leg length, and maturation of the epiphyseal plate. Two blinded radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If a single criterion had been evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or all criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as ''not assessable''. The study was designed as a non-inferiority trial. Eleven (3.8 %) examined X-rays were scored as not assessable. The rate of non-assessable radiographs with 33 % reduced dose was significantly not inferior to the rate of non-assessable radiographs with standard dose. The evaluation of the quality criteria was dose independent. Full-leg plain radiography in patients with knee malalignment can be performed at 33 % reduced dose without loss of relevant diagnostic information. (orig.)

  16. Cannabidiol reverses the reduction in social interaction produced by low dose Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Daniel Thomas; Jongejan, Dennis; Taylor, David Alan

    2009-08-01

    While Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive constituent of the cannabis plant, a non-psychoactive constituent is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD has been implicated as a potential treatment of a number of disorders including schizophrenia and epilepsy and has been included with THC in a 1:1 combination for the treatment of conditions such as neuropathic pain. This study investigated the effect of THC and CBD, alone or in combination, on some objective behaviours of rats in the open field. Pairs of rats were injected with CBD or vehicle followed by THC or vehicle and behaviour in the open field was assessed for 10 min. In vehicle pretreated rats THC (1 mg/kg) significantly reduced social interaction between rat pairs. Treatment with CBD had no significant effect alone, but pretreatment with CBD (20 mg/kg) reversed the THC-induced decreases in social interaction. A higher dose of THC (10 mg/kg) produced no significant effect on social interaction. However, the combination of high dose CBD and high dose THC significantly reduced social interaction between rat pairs, as well as producing a significant decrease in locomotor activity. This data suggests that CBD can reverse social withdrawal induced by low dose THC, but the combination of high dose THC and CBD impairs social interaction, possibly by decreasing locomotor activity.

  17. Quality-controlled dose reduction of full-leg radiography in patients with knee malalignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Neumann, Regina; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Stillfried, Eva von; Ewerbeck, Volker [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    Digital plain radiographs of the full leg are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults. Thus, the objective of this work was to reduce the radiation exposure dependent on specific indications, and to determine objective quality-control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. In this prospective, randomized controlled, blinded, two-armed single-center study, 288 evaluable patients underwent plain radiography of the full leg with standard and reduced doses. The evaluation of the plain radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: mechanical axis, leg length, and maturation of the epiphyseal plate. Two blinded radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If a single criterion had been evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or all criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as ''not assessable''. The study was designed as a non-inferiority trial. Eleven (3.8 %) examined X-rays were scored as not assessable. The rate of non-assessable radiographs with 33 % reduced dose was significantly not inferior to the rate of non-assessable radiographs with standard dose. The evaluation of the quality criteria was dose independent. Full-leg plain radiography in patients with knee malalignment can be performed at 33 % reduced dose without loss of relevant diagnostic information. (orig.)

  18. Reduction method of the radiation dose for the urography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Kazuo; Chiba, Nobuyuki; Terashima, Kazumitsu

    1976-01-01

    An Al-Filter corresponding to the half value layer of exposure voltage was used at the lower abdomen to protect the sexual gland, when the urography was done. In I.V.P., the picture was taken by covering the site lower than the illiac region with an Al-Filter, Supposing that an ovary is located at the one-half of the thickness of the abdomen, exposure dose to the sexual gland was determined using the Mix D P phantom. The dose exposed at 56 kv, 2mAs was 5.2 mRad in the skin. On the other hand, it was decreased to one-half dose (2.6 mRad) in the skin by exposured with filter. The exposure dose to the sexual gland was decreased to about 20% of non-filter exposure. It was decreased to 45% at 72 kv, 8 mA. Therefore, the Al-Filter can reasonably reduce exposure dose to the sexual gland. (serizawa, K.)

  19. Effect of topogram-tube angle combination on CT radiation dose reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J.; Yoon, M.

    2017-09-01

    This study assessed the ability of various types of topograms, when used with an automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) technique, to reduce radiation dose from computed tomography (CT) scans. Three types of topograms were used with the ATCM technique: (i) anteroposterior (AP) topograms alone, (ii) AP topograms followed by lateral topograms, and (iii) lateral topograms followed by AP topograms. Various regions (chest, abdomen and whole-body) of a humanoid phantom were scanned at several tube voltages (80, 100 and 120 kVp) with the selected topograms. Although the CT dose depended on the order of topograms, the CT dose with respect to patient positioning depended on the number of topograms performed. The magnitude of the difference in CT dose between number and order of topograms was greater for the scans of the abdomen than the chest. These results suggest that, for the Siemens SOMATOM Definition AS CT scanner, choosing the right combination of CT scan conditions with the ATCM technique can minimize radiation dose to a patient.

  20. Calculation of rectal dose surface histograms in the presence of time varying deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C.; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, S.; Forman, Jeffrey D.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose volume (DVH) and dose surface histograms (DSH) of the bladder and rectum are usually calculated from a single treatment planning scan. These DVHs and DSHs will eventually be correlated with complications to determine parameters for normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). However, from day to day, the size and shape of the rectum and bladder may vary. The purpose of this study is to compare a more accurate estimate of the time integrated DVHs and DSHs of the rectum (in the presence of daily variations in rectal shape) to initial DVHs/DSHs. Methods: 10 patients were scanned once per week during the course of fractionated radiotherapy, typically accumulating a total of six scans. The rectum and bladder were contoured on each of the studies. The model used to assess effects of rectal contour deformation is as follows: the contour on a given axial slice (see figure) is boxed within a rectangle. A line drawn parallel to the AP axis through the rectangle equally partitions the box. Starting at the intersection of the vertical line and the rectal contour, points on the contour are marked off representing the same rectal dose point, even in the presence of distortion. Corresponding numbered points are used to sample the dose matrix and create a composite DSH. The model assumes uniform stretching of the rectal contour for any given axial cut, and no twist of the structure or vertical displacement. A similar model is developed for the bladder with spherical symmetry. Results: Normalized DSHs (nDSH) for each CT scan were calculated as well as the time averaged nDSH over all scans. These were compared with the nDSH from the initial planning scan. Individual nDSHs differed by 8% surface area irradiated at the 80% dose level, to as much as 20% surface area in the 70-100% dose range. DSH variations are due to position and shape changes in the rectum during different CT scans. The spatial distribution of dose is highly variable, and depends on the field

  1. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  2. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: florian.buttner@icr.ac.uk

    2009-09-07

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  3. Modern digital plain-radiography of the whole spine in scoliosis patients. Dose reduction and quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Stiller, W.; Kauczor, H.U.; Weber, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure of plain radiographs of the entire spine depending on specific indications, since these are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults with scoliosis and to determine objective quality control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. In this prospective randomized study 323 patients underwent plain-radiography of the entire spine with standard and 50 % reduced dose. In an experimental pilot-study this target-dose was determined using an Alderson-Phantom. The evaluation of the experimental radiographs, as well as, the randomized plain-radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: endplates (Cobb-angle), spinal process and pedicel (rotation), lateral margin of the vertebral body (lateral alignment), identification of C7 / S1 (perpendicular). Two radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If one single criteria was evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or more than 2 criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as ''not assessable''. The statistical analysis was conducted as a non-inferiority-trial. Seven (2.4 %) of the 290 examined x-rays were scored as not assessable. There was no statistic inferiority between the examinations with standard or reduced dose, while singular assessment of the defined criteria was likewise dose-independent. Plain-radiography of the total spine in patients with scoliosis can be performed with a dose reduction of 50 % without a loss of validity. The obtained quality control criteria were clinically applicable. (orig.)

  4. Descriptors and Thermodynamic Limitations of Electrocatalytic Carbon Dioxide Reduction on Rutile Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmik, Arghya; Vegge, Tejs; Hansen, Heine Anton

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the electrochemical reduction of CO2 into liquid fuels on rutile metal oxide surfaces is developed by using DFT calculations. We consider oxide overlayer structures on RuO2(1 1 0) surfaces as model catalysts to elucidate the trends and limitations in the CO2 reduction...... reaction (CO2RR) based on thermodynamic analysis. We aim to specify the requirements for CO2RR catalysts to establish adsorbate scaling relations and use these to derive activity volcanoes. Computational results show that the OH* binding free energy is a good descriptor of the thermodynamic limitations...

  5. Survey of practice in pediatrics computed tomography and potential for reduction of patient doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.; Vassileva, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the current practice in pediatrics computed tomography (CT) examinations in several hospitals in Bulgaria and providing information how the pediatrics CT protocols can be optimized. The survey was performed in 12 CT rooms with scanners of different type, using standardized questionnaires and forms for recording of data for patient, exposure parameters and dose. The questionnaires were answered by 13 radiologists and 12 radiographers. Dedicated scanning protocols for children are available in most of the departments but they are not well optimized and exposure parameters are subjectively modified. The use of adult protocols for scanning of pediatrics patient results in higher patient doses. Inadequate is the utilization of immobilization devices resulting in use of sedation for more than 50% of pediatrics patients under 5 years old, or need of parents support. The lack of written referral guidelines for imaging was demonstrated. Some recommendations were given how to optimize examinations and to reduce patient doses

  6. Original Article. Studies on trinexapac-ethyl dose reduction by combined application with adjuvants in spring barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziniak Wojciech

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trinexapac-ethyl is a popular plant growth regulator used in various crops, mostly due to its unique anti-lodging properties. Recently it has been found that this substance is also active in stress protection, which may increase its importance in the coming years. This paper presents a new approach to its application. Trinexapac-ethyl belongs to the cyclohexanedione class of herbicide chemistry, thus it is structurally similar to common graminicides frequently used with adjuvants. This study examines the effects of the application of trinexapac-ethyl with adjuvants. Field trials were conducted in the Institute of Plant Protection in Poznań (Poland, in 2014 and 2015. Trinexapac-ethyl was applied at recommended (0.4l・ha-1 and reduced doses (0.2l・ha-1 with organosilicone surfactant, ammonium sulphate and citric acid on spring barley. Stem shortening, yield components and grain quality were examined. The results of the study confirmed the possibility of dose reduction of trinexapac-ethyl by way of combined application with citric acid that reduced the pH of spray liquid or with ammonium sulphate without affecting its effectiveness. The greatest stem height reduction was observed after the application of a full dose of trinaxapac ethyl and its reduced dose in the mixture with citric acid or ammonium sulphate. Depending on the year of study, the effectiveness of the substances on stem reduction ranged from 5.6 to 16.5%. The tested mixtures did not have any significant impact on the number of grains per ear or the yield of spring barley. Trinexapac-ethyl and its mixtures with adjuvants did not influence the crude protein and starch in spring barley grains.

  7. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  8. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  9. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-01

    A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors' task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%-67% (head phantom) and 68%-82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%-75% for head phantom and 67%-77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the model observers using the IR images was always higher

  10. SU-F-J-39: Dose Reduction Strategy Using Attenuation-Based Tube Current Modulation Method in CBCT for IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, K; Lee, H; Kim, C; Cho, S [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J [Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose to the patients, tube current modulation (TCM) method has been actively used in diagnostic CT systems. However, TCM method has not yet been applied to a kV-CBCT system on a LINAC machine. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of TCM method is desirable in kV-CBCT system for IGRT. We have developed an attenuation-based tube current modulation (a-TCM) method using the prior knowledge of treatment CT image of a patient. Methods: Patients go through a diagnostic CT scan for RT planning; therefore, using this prior information of CT images, one can estimate the total attenuation of an x-ray through the patient body in a CBCT setting for radiation therapy. We performed a numerical study incorporating major factors into account such as polychromatic x-ray, scatter, noise, and bow-tie filter to demonstrate that a-TCM method can produce equivalent quality of images at reduced imaging radiation doses. Using the CT projector program, 680 projection images of the pediatric XCAT phantom were obtained both in conventional scanning condition, i.e., without modulating the tube current, and in the proposed a-TCM scanning condition. FDK reconstruction algorithm was used for image reconstruction, and the organ dose due to imaging radiation has been calculated in both cases and compared using GATE/Geant4 simulation toolkit. Results: Reconstructed CT images in the a-TCM method showed similar SSIM values and noise properties to the reference images acquired by the conventional CBCT. In addition, reduction of organ doses ranged from 12% to 27%. Conclusion: We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility and dosimetric merit of the a-TCM method for kV-CBCT, and envision that it can be a useful option of CBCT scanning that provides patient dose reduction without degrading image quality.

  11. Shape based automated detection of pulmonary nodules with surface feature based false positive reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Itoh, H.; Masutani, Y.; Ohtomo, K.; Maeda, E.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hayashi, N.

    2007-01-01

    We proposed a shape based automated detection of pulmonary nodules with surface feature based false positive (FP) reduction. In the proposed system, the FP existing in internal of vessel bifurcation is removed using extracted surface of vessels and nodules. From the validation with 16 chest CT scans, we find that the proposed CAD system achieves 18.7 FPs/scan at 90% sensitivity, and 7.8 FPs/scan at 80% sensitivity. (orig.)

  12. Surface wear reduction of bulk solids handling equipment using bionic design

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Bulk solids handling continues to play an important role in a number of industries. One of the issues during bulk solids handling processes is equipment surface wear. Wear results in high economic loss and increases downtime. Current wear reduction methods such as optimizing transfer conditions or using wear-resistant materials, have brought notable progress. Nevertheless, the wear loss is still significant. Therefore, new solutions for reducing the surface wear must be investigated.Because w...

  13. Modeling drag reduction and meniscus stability of superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of random roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaha, Mohamed A.; Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies dedicated to modeling drag reduction and stability of the air-water interface on superhydrophobic surfaces were conducted for microfabricated coatings produced by placing hydrophobic microposts/microridges arranged on a flat surface in aligned or staggered configurations. In this paper, we model the performance of superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of randomly distributed roughness (e.g., particles or microposts) that resembles natural superhydrophobic surfaces, or those produced via random deposition of hydrophobic particles. Such fabrication method is far less expensive than microfabrication, making the technology more practical for large submerged bodies such as submarines and ships. The present numerical simulations are aimed at improving our understanding of the drag reduction effect and the stability of the air-water interface in terms of the microstructure parameters. For comparison and validation, we have also simulated the flow over superhydrophobic surfaces made up of aligned or staggered microposts for channel flows as well as streamwise or spanwise ridges configurations for pipe flows. The present results are compared with theoretical and experimental studies reported in the literature. In particular, our simulation results are compared with work of Sbragaglia and Prosperetti, and good agreement has been observed for gas fractions up to about 0.9. The numerical simulations indicate that the random distribution of surface roughness has a favorable effect on drag reduction, as long as the gas fraction is kept the same. This effect peaks at about 30% as the gas fraction increases to 0.98. The stability of the meniscus, however, is strongly influenced by the average spacing between the roughness peaks, which needs to be carefully examined before a surface can be recommended for fabrication. It was found that at a given maximum allowable pressure, surfaces with random post distribution produce less drag reduction than those made up of

  14. Critical appraisal of a fixed combination of esomeprazole and low dose aspirin in risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Vachhani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ravi Vachhani1, Doumit Bouhaidar1, Alvin Zfass1, Bimaljit Sandhu1, Ali Nawras21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298–0341, USA; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43606-3390, USAAbstract: Low dose aspirin (≤325 mg is routinely used for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The use of low dose aspirin is associated with two-to four-fold greater risk of symptomatic or complicated peptic ulcers. Risk factors associated with low dose aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity includes prior history of ulcer or upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding, concomitant use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid or warfarin, dual antiplatelet therapy, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, and advanced age. Esomeprazole, like other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs is very effective in decreasing the risk of aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity. Although evidence to support esomeprazole or other PPIs for primary prophylaxis in aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity is limited, its role in secondary prophylaxis is well established.Keywords: esomeprazole, proton pump inhibitors, low dose aspirin, gastrointestinal toxicity, gastrointestinal bleeding

  15. Reduction of external dose in a wet-contaminated housing area in the Bryansk region, Russia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Jørn; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    An investigation of the feasibility of reducing the external dose rate in a recreational housing area located between the settlements of Guta and Muravinka, Bryansk Region, Russia, which had been contaminated by the Chernobyl accident more than a decade earlier was made. Removal of contaminated...

  16. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography perfusion using spatial-temporal Bayesian methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruogu; Raj, Ashish; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-03-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated X-ray radiation dose is of significant concern to patients and operators, especially CT perfusion (CTP) imaging that has higher radiation dose due to its cine scanning technique. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) parameter as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and degrade CT perfusion maps greatly if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. To capture the essential dynamics of CT perfusion, a simple spatial-temporal Bayesian method that uses a piecewise parametric model of the residual function is used, and then the model parameters are estimated from a Bayesian formulation of prior smoothness constraints on perfusion parameters. From the fitted residual function, reliable CTP parameter maps are obtained from low dose CT data. The merit of this scheme exists in the combination of analytical piecewise residual function with Bayesian framework using a simpler prior spatial constrain for CT perfusion application. On a dataset of 22 patients, this dynamic spatial-temporal Bayesian model yielded an increase in signal-tonoise-ratio (SNR) of 78% and a decrease in mean-square-error (MSE) of 40% at low dose radiation of 43mA.

  17. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  18. SSD effects on high energy x-ray surface and build up dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Dose in the build up region for high energy x-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator is affected by the x-ray source to patient surface distance (SSD). The use of isocentric treatments whereby the tumour is positions 100cm from the source means that depending of the depth of the tumour and the size of the patient, the SSD can vary from distances of 80cm to 100cm. To achieve larger field sizes, the SSD can also be extended out to 120cm at times. Results have shown that open fields are not significantly affected by SSD changes with deviations in percentage dose being less than 4% of maximum dose for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm SSD. With the introduction of beam modifying devices such as Perspex blocking trays, the effects are significant with a deviation of up to 22% measured at 6MV energy with a 6mm Perspex tray for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm. These variations are largest at the skin surface and reduce with depth. The use of a multi leaf collimator for blocking removes extra skin dose caused by the Perspex block trays with decreasing SSD. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Dose reduction for CT in children with cystic fibrosis: is it feasible to reduce the number of images per scan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Pim A. de; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.; Nakano, Yasutaka; Lequin, Maarten H.

    2006-01-01

    Reducing the dose for each CT scan is important for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To determine whether the number of CT images and therefore the dose per CT scan could be reduced without any significant loss of information in children with CF. A cohort of children with CF was followed with biennial surveillance CT scans, obtained in inspiration after a voluntary breath-hold as 1-mm thick images at 10-mm intervals from lung apex to base. A random set of 20 baseline CT scans and 10 follow-up CT scans were blinded. Sets of every image (10-mm intervals), every second image (20-mm intervals), every third image (30-mm intervals) and a selection of three and five images were scored randomly using a published CT scoring system by one experienced observer. The 20 subjects were 10 years of age with a range of 3.7-17.6 years at baseline. Fewer CT images resulted in a significantly lower (less abnormal) CT score and the number of patients positive for abnormalities decreased subsequently. At intervals greater than 20 mm no significant change in CT score over 2 years could be detected, while the CT scores at 10-mm (P=0.02) and 20-mm (P=0.02) intervals worsened significantly. A reduction in the number of inspiratory CT images by increasing the interval between images to greater than 10 mm is not a valid option for radiation dose reduction in children with CF. (orig.)

  20. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesel, Alenka, E-mail: alenka.vesel@guest.arnes.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mozetic, Miran [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 Rue du four solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Oxidized Inconel alloy was exposed to hydrogen at temperatures up to 1500 K. • Oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma started at approximately 1300 K. • AES depth profiling revealed complete reduction of oxides in plasma. • Oxides were not reduced, if the sample was heated just in hydrogen atmosphere. • Surface of reduced Inconel preserved the same composition as the bulk material. - Abstract: Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  1. SU-F-I-46: Optimizing Dose Reduction in Adult Head CT Protocols While Maintaining Image Quality in Postmortem Head Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rajderkar, D; Bennett, J; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize adult head CT protocol by reducing dose to an appropriate level while providing CT images of diagnostic quality. Methods: Five cadavers were scanned from the skull base to the vertex using a routine adult head CT protocol (120 kVp, 270 mA, 0.75 s rotation, 0.5 mm × 32 detectors, 70.8 mGy CTDIvol) followed by seven reduced-dose protocols with varying combinations of reduced tube current, reduced rotation time, and increased detectors with CTDIvol ranging from 38.2 to 65.6 mGy. Organ doses were directly measured with 21 OSL dosimeters placed on the surface and implanted in the head by a neurosurgeon. Two neuroradiologists assessed grey-white matter differentiation, fluid space, ventricular size, midline shift, brain mass, edema, ischemia, and skull fractures on a three point scale: (1) Unacceptable, (2) Borderline Acceptable, and (3) Acceptable. Results: For the standard scan, doses to the skin, lens of the eye, salivary glands, thyroid, and brain were 37.55 mGy, 49.65 mGy, 40.67 mGy, 4.63 mGy, and 27.33 mGy, respectively. Two cadavers had cerebral edema due to changing dynamics of postmortem effects, causing the grey-white matter differentiation to appear less distinct. Two cadavers with preserved grey-white matter received acceptable scores for all image quality features for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 57.3 mGy, allowing organ dose savings ranging from 34% to 45%. One cadaver allowed for greater dose reduction for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 42 mGy. Conclusion: Efforts to optimize scan protocol should consider both dose and clinical image quality. This is made possible with postmortem subjects, whose brains are similar to patients, allowing for an investigation of ideal scan parameters. Radiologists at our institution accepted scan protocols acquired with lower scan parameters, with CTDIvol values closer to the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Achievable Dose level of 57 mGy.

  2. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergy TM linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central 'target zone' and a partially attenuated beam for an outer 'set-up zone'. Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error

  3. Skin Friction Reduction Characteristics of Nonsmooth Surfaces Inspired by the Shapes of Barchan Dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wen Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of nonsmooth surface inspired by the shape of barchan dunes has been proposed and is intended to reduce skin friction, a major cause of overall drag. Simulations were carried out to obtain skin friction reduction characteristics for the nonsmooth surface using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software Fluent. A realizable k-ε model was employed to assess the influence of the nonsmooth structure on turbulent flow and velocity fields. The numerical simulation results showed that the new nonsmooth surface possesses the desired skin friction reduction effect and that the maximum skin friction reduction percentage reached 33.63% at a fluid speed of 30 m/s. Various aspects of the skin friction reduction mechanism were discussed, including the distribution of velocity vectors and shear stress contours and the variations in boundary layer thickness. The accuracy of the flow field for the nonsmooth unit was further verified by particle image velocimetry test results. The new bionic nonsmooth surface, which exceeds the limitations of existing nonsmooth bionic structures, can effectively reduce skin friction and should provide insights into engineering applications in the future.

  4. The interaction of oxygen with Ni(100) and the reduction of the surface oxide by hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokx, P.K. de; Labohm, F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Bootsma, B.A.; Geus, John W.

    The interaction of oxygen with Ni(100) has been studied with ellipsometry, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The observations of other workers are completely confirmed. The same techniques and procedures have been used to study the reduction of the surface oxide with

  5. Probing the Active Surface Sites for CO Reduction on Oxide-Derived Copper Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Li, Christina W.; Johansson, Tobias Peter

    2015-01-01

    CO electroreduction activity on oxide-derived Cu (OD-Cu) was found to correlate with metastable surface features that bind CO strongly. OD-Cu electrodes prepared by H-2 reduction of Cu2O precursors reduce CO to acetate and ethanol with nearly 50% Faradaic efficiency at moderate overpotential. Tem...

  6. Reduction of surface subsidence risk by fly ash exploitation as filling material in deep mining areas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trčková, Jiřina; Šperl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2010), s. 251-258 ISSN 0921-030X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : undermining * subsidence of the surface * impact reduction Subject RIV: DO - Wilderness Conservation Impact factor: 1.398, year: 2010 www.springerlink.com/content/y8257893528lp56w/

  7. Surface wear reduction of bulk solids handling equipment using bionic design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Bulk solids handling continues to play an important role in a number of industries. One of the issues during bulk solids handling processes is equipment surface wear. Wear results in high economic loss and increases downtime. Current wear reduction methods such as optimizing transfer conditions or

  8. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  9. Conceptual design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project clean and coat task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. The concrete walls need to be coated to prevent future radionuclide absorption into the walls. This report documents a conceptual design review of equipment to clean and coat basin walls. The review concluded that the proposed concepts were and acceptable basis for proceeding with detailed final design

  10. Final design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project Clean and Coat Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-02-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. The concrete walls need to be coated to prevent future radionuclide absorption into the walls. This report documents a final design review of equipment to clean and coat basin walls. The review concluded that the design presented was acceptable for release for fabrication

  11. Conceptual design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project clean and coat task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, L.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. The concrete walls need to be coated to prevent future radionuclide absorption into the walls. This report documents a conceptual design review of equipment to clean and coat basin walls. The review concluded that the proposed concepts were and acceptable basis for proceeding with detailed final design.

  12. Assessment of the image contrast improvement and dose reduction in mammography with synchrotron radiation compared to standard units

    CERN Document Server

    Moeckli, R; Fiedler, S; Pachoud, M; Hessler, C; Meuli, R; Valley, J F

    2001-01-01

    An objective method was used to evaluate image quality and dose in mammography with synchrotron radiation and to compare them to standard units. It was performed systematically in the energy range of interest for mammography through the evaluation of the contrast and the measurement of the mean glandular dose. Synchrotron radiation measurements were performed at the ESRF and a slit was placed between the test object and the screen-film system in order to reduce scatter. The conventional films were obtained on mammography units with an anti-scatter grid. In a recent paper, it was shown that the use of synchrotron radiation leads to a noticeable improvement of the image quality-dose relationship (Moeckli et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 45(12)3509). The reason of that enhancement is partly due to the monochromaticity of the synchrotron beam and partly due to the use of a slit instead of a grid. The dose reduction with synchrotron radiation can be attributed to a better X-ray total transmission of the slit and the contra...

  13. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE's nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers'' and PNL-6577 ''Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.'' The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility

  14. Reduction in flatulence factors in mung beans (Vigna radiata) using low-dose gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaiah, J.P.; Pednekar, M.D.; Thomas, P.

    1999-01-01

    Mungbeans (Vigna radiata), control and gamma-irradiated at insect disinfestation dose levels (0.25 and 0.75 kGy) were germinated (0-6 Bays) and the qualitative and quantitative changes in soluble carbohydrates were studied in detail. The key flatulence-producing raffinose family oligosaccharides inmungbeans were degraded in the irradiated samples at the onset of the germination (0-2 days) compared to the control where it occurred much later (>4days). However, the reducing sugars, mainly glucose, fructose and galactose, which are metabolised easily, were enhanced in the irradiated samples. At low dose (0.25 kGy), irradiation had no effect on germination and sprout length, indicating that irradiated beans are suitable for use as sprouted beans. These observations clearly indicate that gamma-irradiation at insect disinfestation dose levels improved the digestibility and nutritional quality of mung beans by reducing the content of oligosaccharides responsible for intestinal gas production. (C) 1999 Society of Chemical Industry

  15. SU-E-T-44: Angular Dependence of Surface Dose Enhancement Measured On Several Inhomogeneities Using Radiochromic EBT3 Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, A; Schoenfeld, A; Poppinga, D; Chofor, N; Poppe, B [University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Pius Hospital Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm{sup 3} were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurements were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat.

  16. SU-E-T-44: Angular Dependence of Surface Dose Enhancement Measured On Several Inhomogeneities Using Radiochromic EBT3 Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, A; Schoenfeld, A; Poppinga, D; Chofor, N; Poppe, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm 3 were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurements were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat

  17. Reduction in radiation doses from paediatric CT scans in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Harbron, Richard W; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Although CT scans provide great medical benefits, concerns have been raised about the magnitude of possible associated cancer risk, particularly in children who are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Unnecessary high doses during CT examinations can also be delivered to children, if the scan parameters are not adjusted for patient age and size. We conducted the first survey to directly assess the trends in CT scan parameters and doses for paediatric CT scans performed in Great Britain between 1978 and 2008. We retrieved 1073 CT film sets from 36 hospitals. The patients were 0-19 years old, and CT scans were conducted between 1978 and 2008. We extracted scan parameters from each film including tube current-time product [milliampere seconds (mAs)], tube potential [peak kilovoltage (kVp)] and manufacturer and model of the CT scanner. We estimated the mean mAs for head and trunk (chest and abdomen/pelvis) scans, according to patient age (0-4, 5-9, 10-14 and 15-19 years) and scan year (trunk CTs: a 46% decline on an average from before 1990 to after 2000. Although mean mAs for trunk CTs did not vary with age before 1990, the value varied markedly by age, from 63 mAs for age 0-4 years compared with 315 mAs for those aged >15 years after 2000. No material changes in kVp were found. Estimated brain-absorbed dose from head CT scans decreased from 62 mGy before 1990 to approximately 30 mGy after 2000. For chest CT scans, the lung dose to children aged 0-4 years decreased from 28 mGy before 1990 to 4 mGy after 2000. We found that mAs for head and trunk CTs was approximately halved starting around 1990, and age-specific mAs was generally used for paediatric scans after this date. These changes will have substantially reduced the radiation exposure to children from CT scans in Great Britain. The study shows that mAs and major organ doses for paediatric CT scans in Great Britain began to decrease around 1990.

  18. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  19. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts

  20. Reduction in radiation doses from paediatric CT scans in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Harbron, Richard W; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although CT scans provide great medical benefits, concerns have been raised about the magnitude of possible associated cancer risk, particularly in children who are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Unnecessary high doses during CT examinations can also be delivered to children, if the scan parameters are not adjusted for patient age and size. We conducted the first survey to directly assess the trends in CT scan parameters and doses for paediatric CT scans performed in Great Britain between 1978 and 2008. Methods: We retrieved 1073 CT film sets from 36 hospitals. The patients were 0–19 years old, and CT scans were conducted between 1978 and 2008. We extracted scan parameters from each film including tube current–time product [milliampere seconds (mAs)], tube potential [peak kilovoltage (kVp)] and manufacturer and model of the CT scanner. We estimated the mean mAs for head and trunk (chest and abdomen/pelvis) scans, according to patient age (0–4, 5–9, 10–14 and 15–19 years) and scan year (CT dose index and estimated organ doses. Results: For head CT scans, mean mAs decreased by about 47% on average from before 1990 to after 2000, with the decrease starting around 1990. The mean mAs for head CTs did not vary with age before 1990, whereas slightly lower mAs values were used for younger patients after 1990. Similar declines in mAs were observed for trunk CTs: a 46% decline on an average from before 1990 to after 2000. Although mean mAs for trunk CTs did not vary with age before 1990, the value varied markedly by age, from 63 mAs for age 0–4 years compared with 315 mAs for those aged >15 years after 2000. No material changes in kVp were found. Estimated brain-absorbed dose from head CT scans decreased from 62 mGy before 1990 to approximately 30 mGy after 2000. For chest CT scans, the lung dose to children aged 0–4 years decreased from 28 mGy before 1990 to 4 mGy after 2000. Conclusion: We found that mAs for head and trunk

  1. Extensive reduction of surface UV radiation since 1750 in world's populated regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kvalevåg

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human activity influences a wide range of components that affect the surface UV radiation levels, among them ozone at high latitudes. We calculate the effect of human-induced changes in the surface erythemally weighted ultra-violet radiation (UV-E since 1750. We compare results from a radiative transfer model to surface UV-E radiation for year 2000 derived by satellite observations (from Total Ozone Mapping Spectroradiometer and to ground based measurements at 14 sites. The model correlates well with the observations; the correlation coefficients are 0.97 and 0.98 for satellite and ground based measurements, respectively. In addition to the effect of changes in ozone, we also investigate the effect of changes in SO2, NO2, the direct and indirect effects of aerosols, albedo changes and aviation-induced contrails and cirrus. The results show an increase of surface UV-E in polar regions, most strongly in the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, our study also shows an extensive surface UV-E reduction over most land areas; a reduction up to 20% since 1750 is found in some industrialized regions. This reduction in UV-E over the industrial period is particularly large in highly populated regions.

  2. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity on surface-decorated perovskite thin films for solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mutoro, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Surface-decoration of perovskites can strongly affect the oxygen reduction activity, and therefore is a new and promising approach to improve SOFC cathode materials. In this study, we demonstrate that a small amount of secondary phase on a (001) La 0.8Sr 0.2CoO 3-δ (LSC) surface can either significantly activate or passivate the electrode. LSC (001) microelectrodes prepared by pulsed laser deposition on a (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate were decorated with La-, Co-, and Sr-(hydr)oxides/carbonates. "Sr"-decoration with nanoparticle coverage in the range from 50% to 80% of the LSC surface enhanced the surface exchange coefficient, k q, by an order of magnitude while "La"- decoration and "Co"-decoration led to no change and reduction in k q, respectively. Although the physical origin for the enhancement is not fully understood, results from atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that the observed k q enhancement for "Sr"-decorated surfaces can be attributed largely to catalytically active interface regions between surface Sr-enriched particles and the LSC surface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Optical microtopographic inspection of the surface of tooth subjected to stripping reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Manuel F.; Pereira, Pedro B.

    2011-05-01

    In orthodontics, the decreasing of tooth-size by reducing interproximal enamel surfaces (stripping) of teeth is a common procedure which allows dental alignment with minimal changes in the facial profile and no arch expansion. In order to achieve smooth surfaces, clinicians have been testing various methods and progressively improved this therapeutic technique. In order to evaluate the surface roughness of teeth subject to interproximal reduction through the five most commonly used methods, teeth were inspected by scanning electron microscopy and microtopographically measured using the optical active triangulation based microtopographer MICROTOP.06.MFC. The metrological procedure will be presented as well as the comparative results concluding on the most suitable tooth interproximal reduction method.

  4. Lubricant-impregnated surfaces for drag reduction in viscous laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Brian; Khalil, Karim; Varanasi, Kripa; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, we explore the potential of lubricant impregnated surfaces (LIS) in reducing drag. LIS, inspired by the surface of the Nepenthes pitcher plant, have been introduced as a novel way of functionalizing a surface. LIS are characterized by extremely low contact angle hysteresis and have been show to effectively repel various liquids including water, oils, ketchup and blood. Motivated by the slippery nature of such surfaces, we explore the potential of LIS to reduce drag in internal flows. We observe a reduction in drag for LIS surfaces in a viscous laminar drag flow and model the impact of relevant system parameters (lubricant viscosity, working fluid viscosity, solid fraction, depth of texture, etc.).

  5. [Dose reduction in high-resolution MSCT examinations of the chest for early detection of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, J; Wildberger, J E; Nagel, H-D; Dichtl, D; Adam, G; Wedegärtner, U

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize high-resolution MSCT chest protocols for the evaluation of symptomatic immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia using a dose-simulating program. Using the MSCT (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), 30 immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia were examined with a low-dose HRCT of the chest (120 kV, 100 eff.mAs and collimation of 4 x 1 mm). A dose-simulating program was used to reconstruct the raw data at four different dose levels (70, 50, 35 und 25 mAs). For dose simulation for each mAs product, the correspondent noise level was added to the data. Images were generated with a slice thickness of 1 mm and 5 mm in the lung window. The images were then evaluated independently by two radiologists and graded on a scale of 1 to 3 points: 1 = no pneumonia, 2 = unclear, 3 = pneumonia. A receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis was performed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC). The actual dosage in mSv was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Out of 30 patients, 7 had a normal chest finding and 23 had pneumonia. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 1.0 for every dosage and slice thickness. Infiltrates were detected correctly for all dosage levels. The sensitivity was 100 % for all dose levels and slice thicknesses. There was one false positive finding at 35 mAs and 1 mm slice thickness. At this dose level the specificity was reduced to 93 %. A reduction to 25 mAs had no influence on the detection of pneumonia. Thus, MSCT examinations of the chest can be performed with 25 mAs without missing the right diagnosis, resulting in an effective dose of 1.15 mSv (men), 1.5 mSv (women) and a CTDIvol of 2.5 mGy. For the evaluation of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients, MSCT examination of the chest can be performed with 25 mAs. Thus, radiation exposure was reduced to a quarter compared to the standard protocol.

  6. Dose reduction in mammography as a consequence of quality assurance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniszewska, M. A.; Jankowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Mammography became one of more frequent radiological examinations in the most of European countries. This is accepted as a sensitive method for detection of early breast cancers. On the other hand, this is the special imaging technique, where reliability of result is strongly influenced by technical conditions. Hence, the exposure parameters should have been chosen in dependence on image recording system. In opposite, an informative quality of the produced image is not sufficient for a true clinical diagnosis. Thus, optimisation of the practice is not achieved and a benefit for patient is none. Implementation of Quality Assurance programme can prevent the situation: systematic quality control of mammographic x-ray units allows finding the technical and methodological incorrectness. If these findings are followed by the appropriate remedial actions, the main aim will be achieved, i.e. good quality of image with reasonable low doses to patients. This approach was verified on 15 mammographic units in Lodz, covered by full cycle of quality control programme. Doses were measured during CC projection for over 100 patients. Quality of image was evaluated for RMI 156 accreditation phantom as a standard object. The main technical incorrectness was found for automatic exposure control system, and especially for compensation of object thickness. The available remedial actions allowed reducing the doses to patients by 21% (on average). Additionally, after the remedial action quality of phantom image was found better for 3 facilities where primary had been below the acceptance level. The main points of Quality Assurance programme are available for most of x-ray diagnostic facilities and should have been obligatory. (authors)

  7. Comparison of fluoro and cine coronary angiography: balancing acceptable outcomes with a reduction in radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcay, Ayhan; Guler, Ekrem; Karaca, Ibrahim Oguz; Omaygenc, Mehmet Onur; Kizilirmak, Filiz; Olgun, Erkam; Yenipinar, Esra; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Duman, Dursun

    2015-04-01

    Use of last fluoro hold (LFH) mode in fluoroscopy, which enables the last live image to be saved and displayed, could reduce radiation during percutaneous coronary intervention when compared with cine mode. No previous study compared coronary angiography radiation doses and image quality between LFH and conventional cine mode techniques. We compared cumulative dose-area product (DAP), cumulative air kerma, fluoroscopy time, contrast use, interobserver variability of visual assessment between LFH angiography, and conventional cine angiography techniques. Forty-six patients were prospectively enrolled into the LFH group and 82 patients into the cine angiography group according to operator decision. Mean cumulative DAP was higher in the cine group vs the LFH group (50058.98 ± 53542.71 mGy•cm² vs 11349.2 ± 8796.46 mGy•cm²; Pcine group vs the LFH group (3.87 ± 5.08 minutes vs 1.66 ± 1.51 minutes; Pcine group vs the LFH group (112.07 ± 43.79 cc vs 88.15 ± 23.84 cc; Pcine and LFH angiography groups (0.66680 ± 0.19309 vs 0.54193 ± 0.31046; P=.20). Radiation doses, contrast use, and fluoroscopy times are lower in fluoroscopic LFH angiography vs cine angiography. Interclass variability of visual stenosis estimation between three operators was not different between cine and LFH groups. Fluoroscopic LFH images conventionally have inferior diagnostic quality when compared with cine coronary angiography, but with new angiographic systems with improved LFH image quality, these images may be adequate for diagnostic coronary angiography.

  8. Dose reduction for chest CT: comparison of two iterative reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kulkarni, Naveen; Muse, Victorine; Digumarthy, Subba R; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2015-06-01

    Lowering radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) scan results in low quality noisy images. Iterative reconstruction techniques are used currently to lower image noise and improve the quality of images. To evaluate lesion detection and diagnostic acceptability of chest CT images acquired at CTDIvol of 1.8 mGy and processed with two different iterative reconstruction techniques. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 60 ± 14 years; men, 13; women, 9; body mass index, 27.4 ± 6.5 kg/m(2)) gave informed consent for acquisition of low dose (LD) series in addition to the standard dose (SD) chest CT on a 128 - multidetector CT (MDCT). LD images were reconstructed with SafeCT C4, L1, and L2 settings, and Safire S1, S2, and S3 settings. Three thoracic radiologists assessed LD image series (S1, S2, S3, C4, L1, and L2) for lesion detection and comparison of lesion margin, visibility of normal structures, and diagnostic confidence with SD chest CT. Inter-observer agreement (kappa) was calculated. Average CTDIvol was 6.4 ± 2.7 mGy and 1.8 ± 0.2 mGy for SD and LD series, respectively. No additional lesion was found in SD as compared to LD images. Visibility of ground-glass opacities and lesion margins, as well as normal structures visibility were not affected on LD. CT image visibility of major fissure and pericardium was not optimal in some cases (n = 5). Objective image noise in some low dose images processed with SafeCT and Safire was similar to SD images (P value > 0.5). Routine LD chest CT reconstructed with iterative reconstruction technique can provide similar diagnostic information in terms of lesion detection, margin, and diagnostic confidence as compared to SD, regardless of the iterative reconstruction settings. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Measuring ventricular width on cranial computed tomography. Feasibility of dose reduction in a custom-made adult phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daubner, D.; Cerhova, J.; Linn, J. [Dresden Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Spieth, S. [Dresden Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kirchhof, K. [Chemnitz Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuradiology

    2016-01-15

    To estimate feasible dose reduction to reliably measure ventricular width in adults with hydrocephalus in follow-up cranial computed tomography (CCT) using a custom-made phantom. A gelatine-filled adult calvarium with embedded central fibers of two carrots representing the lateral ventricles was used as a phantom. The phantom was scanned 11 times with two CT scanners (LightSpeed Ultra, GE and Somatom Sensation, Siemens), using tube currents of 380/400, 350, 300, 250, 200, 150 and 100 mA, and tube voltages of 140, 120, 100 and 80 kV. The width of the carrots was measured at four sites in consensus decision of two principle investigators blinded to the scan parameters. Values measured at 380/400 mA and 140 kV served as a reference for the width of the ventricles. Measurements received 1 point if they did not differ more than 0.5 mm from the reference values. A maximum score of 4 could be achieved. The relationship between the correct width measurement of the carrots (lateral ventricles) and the radiation dose can be described by a quadratic regression function. Pixel noise increases and accuracy of measurements decreases with a lower radiation dose. Starting from a tube current of 380/400 mA and a tube voltage of 140 kV, the dose can be reduced by 76 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 80 % for Somatom Sensation provided that a margin of error of 37.5 % (score = 2.5) for correct width measurement of the carrots is accepted. Lowering the radiation dose by up to 48 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 52 % for Somatom Sensation, compared to the standard protocol (120 kV and 400 mA) still allowed reliable measurements of ventricular widths in this model.

  10. Reduction of microbial Toxin producting capacity by low-dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Hirotaka; Takatori, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Akiko; Narita, Noriko [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    The changes in pathogenicity and toxin producing capacity by radiation exposure were investigated with Vero toxin producing E coli O157 and mycotoxin producing eumycetes including A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. ochraceus and A. usamii. Each cell suspension was exposed to {gamma}-ray ({sup 60}Co, 150 kCi) at 0-2.0 kGy and an aliquot of the suspension was cultured on agar plate for counting the living cell number. The producing ability of Vero toxin was determined according to reverse passive latex agglutination. Analysis of aflatoxin and ochratoxin were performed using HPLC. It was demonstrated that E.coli O157:H7 could be sterilized by {gamma}-ray exposed at a lower dose than that of ordinary strain of E.coli and Vero toxin producing ability were higher in the cells exposed to 0.1 kGy than non-exposed cells. In addition, the aflatoxin productions of A. flavus and A. parasiticus were slightly increased by {gamma}-ray exposure at a low dose, whereas A. ochraceus showed comparatively higher resistance to {gamma}-ray exposure, but its producing ability for ochratoxin A was reduced and the producing ability of A. usamii was slightly increased. (M.N.)

  11. Structural, chemical surface and transport modifications of regenerated cellulose dense membranes due to low-dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.I.; Heredia-Guerrero, J.A.; Galan, P.; Benitez, J.J.; Benavente, J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Low dose γ-radiation causes slight structural, chemical and morphological changes on regenerated cellulose films. → Induced structural changes increase the fragility of irradiated films. → Structural modifications reduce ion permeability of films. - Abstract: Modifications caused in commercial dense regenerated cellulose (RC) flat membranes by low-dose γ-irradiation (average photons energy of 1.23 MeV) are studied. Slight structural, chemical and morphological surface changes due to irradiation in three films with different RC content were determined by ATR-FTIR, XRD, XPS and AFM. Also, the alteration of their mechanical elasticity has been studied. Modification of membrane performance was determined from solute diffusion coefficient and effective membrane fixed charge concentration obtained from NaCl diffusion measurements. Induced structural changes defining new and effective fracture propagation directions are considered to be responsible for the increase of fragility of irradiated RC membranes. The same structural changes are proposed to explain the reduction of the membrane ion permeability through a mechanism involving either ion pathways elongation and/or blocking.

  12. Therapeutic doses of radiation alter proliferation and attachment of osteoblasts to implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mansur; Sampair, Christopher; Nazmul-Hossain, Abu N M; Khurana, Neerja; Nerness, Andrew; Wutticharoenmongkol, Patcharaporn

    2008-09-15

    Osseointegration of implants in irradiated bone is inadequate. The effect of radiation on cell-implant material interaction has not been adequately studied. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiationon the proliferation, differentiation, and attachment of osteoblasts to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) were irradiated either before or after plating in tissue culture (TC) dishes with or without cpTi disks. Radiation was single dose of 10 cGy, 25 cGy, 50 cGy, 1 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy or 8 Gy. Cell proliferation was determined by counting trypsinized cells on 7 days after irradiation. Attachment of irradiated hFOB was measured indirectly by counting cells 2 and 6 h after plating. Differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity. Compared with nonirradiated sham controls, higher doses of radiation significantly reduced cell attachment and proliferation. Both proliferation and attachment were significantly lower on cpTi compared with TC. Attachment decreased based on the length of postirradiation period. Although differentiation was significantly enhanced by a dose of 8 Gy, proliferation was lowest. These initial studies show that effects of therapeutic doses of radiation on osteoblasts varied depending on the surface, time-elapsed, and amount of radiation.

  13. Low Overpotential and High Current CO2 Reduction with Surface Reconstructed Cu Foam Electrodess

    KAUST Repository

    Min, Shixiong

    2016-06-23

    While recent reports have demonstrated that oxide-derived Cu-based electrodes exhibit high selectivity for CO2 reduction at low overpotential, the low catalytic current density (<2 mA/cm2 at -0.45 V vs. RHE) still largely limits its applications for large-scale fuel synthesis. Here we report an extremely high current density for CO2 reduction at low overpotential using a Cu foam electrode prepared by air-oxidation and subsequent electroreduction. Apart from possessing three-dimensional (3D) open frameworks, the resulting Cu foam electrodes prepared at higher temperatures exhibit enhanced electrochemically active surface area and distinct surface structures. In particular, the Cu foam electrode prepared at 500 °C exhibits an extremely high geometric current density of ~9.4 mA/cm2 in CO2-satrurated 0.1 M KHCO3 aqueous solution and achieving ~39% CO and ~23% HCOOH Faradaic efficiencies at -0.45 V vs. RHE. The high activity and significant selectivity enhancement are attributable to the formation of abundant grain-boundary supported active sites and preferable (100) and (111) facets as a result of reconstruction of Cu surface facets. This work demonstrates that the structural integration of Cu foam with open 3D frameworks and the favorable surface structures is a promising strategy to develop an advanced Cu electrocatalyst that can operate at high current density and low overpotential for CO2 reduction.

  14. Radiological passports as a decision support technique for post Chernobyl dose reduction in contaminated settlements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Mansoux, H.; Yakushau, A.; Antsipov, G.; Averin, V.; Zhouchenko, Y.; Minenko, V.; Tirmarche, M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, IRSN and GRS initiated a support for collecting, securing and validating of existing data in the field of Chernobyl accident consequences and establishing a database including a detailed documentation in order to make available all reliable and objective information for decision makers, for planning of actions, for information of the public and for further scientific work. Three projects as a part of French/German Initiative (FGI) for humanitarian and technical assistance in favour of the Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have been established. The authors represent sub-project 3.9.1, which objectives are as follows: (i) develop and replenish the database for the Radiological-Hygienic Passports (RHP) and perform additional investigation of the target settlements in Belarus where comprehensive information has not been acquired yet, (ii) establish conditions and communication infrastructure for database availability, (iii) provide data analysis involving data on individual effective dose monitoring and results of countermeasures applied, and (iii) formulate the wider recommendations for the target settlements located in contaminated areas, concerning radiation, health, sanitary and social protection, countermeasures, industrial infrastructure development and reviving the local economy. During implementation of the project, 96 settlements with total population of 25 thousand were investigated and their RHPs were compiled. Every RHP consisted of 13 separate forms grouped under three principal headings: Statistics (societal and demographic structure of population, housing, land used and predominant soil type); Economical infrastructure and public utilities (farms, industries, schools, hospitals, shops, service, etc.); Radiological data and doses (total area subdivided vs. level of contamination, Cs-137 content in human body, contamination of agricultural products, contamination of households, annual effective dose). Every RHP was concluded with proposals as to the

  15. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  16. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  17. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  18. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  19. Boron-doped diamond semiconductor electrodes: Efficient photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction through surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nitish; Hirano, Yuiri; Kuriyama, Haruo; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Suzuki, Norihiro; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Nakata, Kazuya; Kondo, Takeshi; Yuasa, Makoto; Serizawa, Izumi; Takayama, Tomoaki; Kudo, Akihiko; Fujishima, Akira; Terashima, Chiaki

    2016-01-01

    Competitive hydrogen evolution and multiple proton-coupled electron transfer reactions limit photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolyte. Here, oxygen-terminated lightly boron-doped diamond (BDDL) thin films were synthesized as a semiconductor electron source to accelerate CO2 reduction. However, BDDL alone could not stabilize the intermediates of CO2 reduction, yielding a negligible amount of reduction products. Silver nanoparticles were then deposited on BDDL because of their selective electrochemical CO2 reduction ability. Excellent selectivity (estimated CO:H2 mass ratio of 318:1) and recyclability (stable for five cycles of 3 h each) for photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction were obtained for the optimum silver nanoparticle-modified BDDL electrode at −1.1 V vs. RHE under 222-nm irradiation. The high efficiency and stability of this catalyst are ascribed to the in situ photoactivation of the BDDL surface during the photoelectrochemical reaction. The present work reveals the potential of BDDL as a high-energy electron source for use with co-catalysts in photochemical conversion. PMID:27892544

  20. Boron-doped diamond semiconductor electrodes: Efficient photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction through surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nitish; Hirano, Yuiri; Kuriyama, Haruo; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Suzuki, Norihiro; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Kazuya; Kondo, Takeshi; Yuasa, Makoto; Serizawa, Izumi; Takayama, Tomoaki; Kudo, Akihiko; Fujishima, Akira; Terashima, Chiaki

    2016-11-01

    Competitive hydrogen evolution and multiple proton-coupled electron transfer reactions limit photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolyte. Here, oxygen-terminated lightly boron-doped diamond (BDDL) thin films were synthesized as a semiconductor electron source to accelerate CO2 reduction. However, BDDL alone could not stabilize the intermediates of CO2 reduction, yielding a negligible amount of reduction products. Silver nanoparticles were then deposited on BDDL because of their selective electrochemical CO2 reduction ability. Excellent selectivity (estimated CO:H2 mass ratio of 318:1) and recyclability (stable for five cycles of 3 h each) for photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction were obtained for the optimum silver nanoparticle-modified BDDL electrode at -1.1 V vs. RHE under 222-nm irradiation. The high efficiency and stability of this catalyst are ascribed to the in situ photoactivation of the BDDL surface during the photoelectrochemical reaction. The present work reveals the potential of BDDL as a high-energy electron source for use with co-catalysts in photochemical conversion.

  1. Natural Radioactivity and External Dose Assessment of Surface Soils in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huy, N.Q.; Hien, P.D.; Hoang, D.V.; Quang, N.H.; Long, N.Q.; Binh, N.T.; Hai, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, natural radioactivity in surface soils of Vietnam and external dose assessment to human population, deduces from activities of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K nuclides, were determined. From 528 soil samples collected in 63 provinces of Vietnam, including five centrally governed cities, the average activities were obtained and equal to 42.77 ± 18.15 Bq kg -1 for 226 Ra, 59.84 ± 19.81 Bq kg -1 for 232 Th and 411.93 ± 230.69 Bq kg -1 for 40 K. The outdoor absorbed dose rates (OADRs) in air at 1 m above the ground level for 63 provinces were calculated, and their average value was 71.72 ± 24.72 nGy h -1 , with a range from 17.45 to 149.40 nGy h -1 . The population-weighted OADR of Vietnam was 66.70 nGy h -1 , which lies in the range of 18-93 nGy h -1 found in the World. From the OADR obtained, it was estimated that the outdoor annual effective dose and indoor annual effective dose to the population were 0.082 and 0.458 mSv, which are higher than the corresponding values 0.07 and 0.41 mSv, respectively, of the World. The radium equivalent activity Ra eq and the external hazard index H ex of surface soils of Vietnam are lower than the corresponding permissible limits of 370 Bq kg -1 and 1, respectively. Therefore, soil from Vietnam is safe for the human population when it used as a building material. (author)

  2. Natural radioactivity and external dose assessment of surface soils in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huy, N. Q.; Hien, P. D.; Luyen, T. V.; Hoang, D. V.; Hiep, H. T.; Quang, N. H.; Long, N. Q.; Nhan, D. D.; Binh, N. T.; Hai, P. S.; Ngo, N. T.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, natural radioactivity in surface soils of Vietnam and external dose assessment to human population, deduced from activities of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K nuclides, were determined. From 528 soil samples collected in 63 provinces of Vietnam, including five centrally governed cities, the average activities were obtained and equal to 42.77 ± 18.15 Bq kg -1 for 226 Ra, 59.84 ± 19.81 Bq kg -1 for 232 Th and 411.93 ± 230.69 Bq kg -1 for 40 K. The outdoor absorbed dose rates (OADRs) in air at 1 m above the ground level for 63 provinces were calculated, and their average value was 71.72 ± 24.72 nGy h -1 , with a range from 17.45 to 149.40 nGy h -1 . The population-weighted OADR of Vietnam was 66.70 nGy h -1 , which lies in the range of 18-93 nGy h -1 found in the World. From the OADRs obtained, it was estimated that the outdoor annual effective dose and indoor annual effective dose to the population were 0.082 and 0.458 mSv, which are higher than the corresponding values 0.07 and 0.41 mSv, respectively, of the World. The radium equivalent activity Ra eq and the external hazard index H ex of surface soils of Vietnam are lower than the corresponding permissible limits of 370 Bq kg -1 and 1, respectively. Therefore, soil from Vietnam is safe for the human population when it is used as a building material. (authors)

  3. Split-bolus CT-urography using dual-energy CT: Feasibility, image quality and dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuru, E-mail: m2rbimn@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Kawai, Tatsuya; Ito, Masato; Ogawa, Masaki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Ohashi, Kazuya [Nagoya City University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) split-bolus CT-urography (CTU) and the quality of virtual non-enhanced images (VNEI) and DE combined nephrographic-excretory phase images (CNEPI), and to estimate radiation dose reduction if true non-enhanced images (TNEI) could be omitted. Patients and methods: Between August and September 2011, 30 consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected urothelial cancer or with hematuria underwent DE CT. Single-energy TNEI and DE CNEPI were obtained. VNEI was reconstructed from CNEPI. Image quality of CNEPI and VNEI was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The attenuation of urine in the bladder on TNEI and VNEI was measured. The CT dose index volume (CTDI (vol)) of the two scans was recorded. Results: The mean image quality score of CNEPI and VNEI was 4.7 and 3.3, respectively. The mean differences in urine attenuation between VNEI and TNEI were 14 {+-} 15 [SD] and -16 {+-} 29 in the anterior and posterior parts of the bladder, respectively. The mean CTDI (vol) for TNEI and CNEPI was 11.8 and 10.9 mGy, respectively. Omission of TNEI could reduce the total radiation dose by 52%. Conclusion: DE split-bolus CTU is technically feasible and can reduce radiation exposure; however, an additional TNEI scan is necessary when the VNEI quality is poor or quantitative evaluation of urine attenuation is required.

  4. Reduction in life span on normal human fibroblasts exposed to low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Yamaguchi, Chizuru; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effect of in vitro life span in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO 2 incubator, which was set in the irradiation room for biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and exposed to scattered radiations produced with heavy-ion beams throughout the life span of the cell population. Absorbed dose, which was measured using a thermoluminescence dosimeter(TLD) and a Si-semiconductor detector, was to be 1.4 mGy per day when operating the HIMAC machine for biological experiments. The total population doubling number of the exposed cells reduced to 79-93% of non-exposed control cells in the three independent experiments. There is evidence that the exposure of chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field promotes the life-span reduction in cellular level. (author)

  5. Response surfaces and sensitivity analyses for an environmental model of dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iooss, Bertrand; Van Dorpe, Francois; Devictor, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    A parametric sensitivity analysis is carried out on GASCON, a radiological impact software describing the radionuclides transfer to the man following a chronic gas release of a nuclear facility. An effective dose received by age group can thus be calculated according to a specific radionuclide and to the duration of the release. In this study, we are concerned by 18 output variables, each depending of approximately 50 uncertain input parameters. First, the generation of 1000 Monte-Carlo simulations allows us to calculate correlation coefficients between input parameters and output variables, which give a first overview of important factors. Response surfaces are then constructed in polynomial form, and used to predict system responses at reduced computation time cost; this response surface will be very useful for global sensitivity analysis where thousands of runs are required. Using the response surfaces, we calculate the total sensitivity indices of Sobol by the Monte-Carlo method. We demonstrate the application of this method to one site of study and to one reference group near the nuclear research Center of Cadarache (France), for two radionuclides: iodine 129 and uranium 238. It is thus shown that the most influential parameters are all related to the food chain of the goat's milk, in decreasing order of importance: dose coefficient 'effective ingestion', goat's milk ration of the individuals of the reference group, grass ration of the goat, dry deposition velocity and transfer factor to the goat's milk

  6. Optimal dose reduction algorithm using an attenuation-based tube current modulation method for cone-beam CT imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihong Son

    Full Text Available To reduce the radiation dose given to patients, a tube current modulation (TCM method has been widely used in diagnostic CT systems. However, the TCM method has not yet been applied to a kV-CBCT system on a LINAC machine. The purpose of this study is to investigate if a TCM method would be desirable in a kV-CBCT system for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT or not. We have developed an attenuation-based TCM method using prior knowledge from planning CT images of patients. The TCM method can provide optimized dose reductions without degrading image quality for kV-CBCT imaging. Here, we investigate whether or not our suggested TCM method is desirable to use in kV-CBCT systems to confirm and revise the exact position of a patient for IGRT. Patients go through diagnostic CT scans for RT planning; therefore, using information from prior CT images can enable estimations of the total X-ray attenuation through a patient's body in a CBCT setting for radiation treatment. Having this planning CT image allows to use the proposed TCM method in RT. The proposed TCM method provides a minimal amount of current for each projection, as well as total current, required to reconstruct the current modulated CBCT image with an image quality similar to that of CBCT. After applying a calculated TCM current for each projection, projection images were acquired and the current modulated CBCT image was reconstructed using a FDK algorithm. To validate the proposed approach, we used a numerical XCAT phantom and a real ATOM phantom and evaluated the performance of the proposed method via visual and quantitative image quality metrics. The organ dose due to imaging radiation was calculated in both cases and compared using the GATE simulation toolkit. As shown in the quantitative evaluation, normalized noise and SSIM values of the TCM were similar to those of conventional CBCT images. In addition, the proposed TCM method yielded comparable image quality to that of conventional

  7. Methods for Reducing Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Dose Reduction or Planning Target Volume Elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Vineberg, Karen; Lee, Jae; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Brock, Kristy K., E-mail: kbrock@med.umich.edu

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Strategies to reduce the toxicities of head and neck radiation (ie, dysphagia [difficulty swallowing] and xerostomia [dry mouth]) are currently underway. However, the predicted benefit of dose and planning target volume (PTV) reduction strategies is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to compare the normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for swallowing and salivary structures in standard plans (70 Gy [P70]), dose-reduced plans (60 Gy [P60]), and plans eliminating the PTV margin. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) plans were analyzed. Standard organ-sparing volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (P70) were created and then modified by eliminating the PTVs and treating the clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) only (C70) or maintaining the PTV but reducing the dose to 60 Gy (P60). NTCP dose models for the pharyngeal constrictors, glottis/supraglottic larynx, parotid glands (PGs), and submandibular glands (SMGs) were analyzed. The minimal clinically important benefit was defined as a mean change in NTCP of >5%. The P70 NTCP thresholds and overlap percentages of the organs at risk with the PTVs (56-59 Gy, vPTV{sub 56}) were evaluated to identify the predictors for NTCP improvement. Results: With the P60 plans, only the ipsilateral PG (iPG) benefited (23.9% vs 16.2%; P<.01). With the C70 plans, only the iPG (23.9% vs 17.5%; P<.01) and contralateral SMG (cSMG) (NTCP 32.1% vs 22.9%; P<.01) benefited. An iPG NTCP threshold of 20% and 30% predicted NTCP benefits for the P60 and C70 plans, respectively (P<.001). A cSMG NTCP threshold of 30% predicted for an NTCP benefit with the C70 plans (P<.001). Furthermore, for the iPG, a vPTV{sub 56} >13% predicted benefit with P60 (P<.001) and C70 (P=.002). For the cSMG, a vPTV{sub 56} >22% predicted benefit with C70 (P<.01). Conclusions: PTV elimination and dose-reduction lowered the NTCP of the iPG, and PTV elimination lowered the NTCP of the cSMG. NTCP thresholds and the

  8. Growth and surface modification of LaFeO3 thin films induced by reductive annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, Brendan T.; Zhang, Kelvin H.L.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Oleksak, Richard P.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chambers, Scott A.; Henderson, Michael A.; Herman, Gregory S.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • LaFeO 3 was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on ZrO 2 :Y 2 O 3 . • The film was highly oriented but not single crystalline. • Angle resolved XPS revealed differences between surface and bulk oxygen. • Annealing the film in vacuum resulted in the sequential reduction of Fe cations. • A greater degree of Fe reduction was found at the surface. - Abstract: The mixed electronic and ionic conductivity of perovskite oxides has enabled their use in diverse applications such as automotive exhaust catalysts, solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, and visible light photocatalysts. The redox chemistry at the surface of perovskite oxides is largely dependent on the oxidation state of the metal cations as well as the oxide surface stoichiometry. In this study, LaFeO 3 (LFO) thin films grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was characterized using both bulk and surface sensitive techniques. A combination of in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) demonstrated that the film is primarily textured in the [1 0 0] direction and is stoichiometric. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements show regions that are dominated by [1 0 0] oriented LFO grains that are oriented with respect to the substrates lattice. However, selected regions of the film show multiple domains of grains that are not [1 0 0] oriented. The film was annealed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber to simulate reducing conditions and studied by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Iron was found to exist as Fe(0), Fe(II), and Fe(III) depending on the annealing conditions and the depth within the film. A decrease in the concentration of surface oxygen species was correlated with iron reduction. These results should help guide and enhance the design of LFO materials for catalytic applications

  9. Moving gantry method for electron beam dose profile measurement at extended source-to-surface distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Gábor; Fodor, Emese; Pesznyák, Csilla

    2015-03-08

    A novel method has been put forward for very large electron beam profile measurement. With this method, absorbed dose profiles can be measured at any depth in a solid phantom for total skin electron therapy. Electron beam dose profiles were collected with two different methods. Profile measurements were performed at 0.2 and 1.2 cm depths with a parallel plate and a thimble chamber, respectively. 108cm × 108 cm and 45 cm × 45 cm projected size electron beams were scanned by vertically moving phantom and detector at 300 cm source-to-surface distance with 90° and 270° gantry angles. The profiles collected this way were used as reference. Afterwards, the phantom was fixed on the central axis and the gantry was rotated with certain angular steps. After applying correction for the different source-to-detector distances and incidence of angle, the profiles measured in the two different setups were compared. Correction formalism has been developed. The agreement between the cross profiles taken at the depth of maximum dose with the 'classical' scanning and with the new moving gantry method was better than 0.5 % in the measuring range from zero to 71.9 cm. Inverse square and attenuation corrections had to be applied. The profiles measured with the parallel plate chamber agree better than 1%, except for the penumbra region, where the maximum difference is 1.5%. With the moving gantry method, very large electron field profiles can be measured at any depth in a solid phantom with high accuracy and reproducibility and with much less time per step. No special instrumentation is needed. The method can be used for commissioning of very large electron beams for computer-assisted treatment planning, for designing beam modifiers to improve dose uniformity, and for verification of computed dose profiles.

  10. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R; Hou, Qinghua; Patrie, James T; Wintermark, Max; Mukherjee, Sugoto

    2016-11-01

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. "Virtual non-contrast images" were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction.

  11. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R.; Hou, Qinghua; Mukherjee, Sugoto [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Patrie, James T. [University of Virginia, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. ''Virtual non-contrast images'' were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction. (orig.)

  12. Reduction of 4-dim self dual super Yang-Mills onto super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, A.; Restuccia, A.; Martin, I.

    1990-05-01

    Recently self dual super Yang-Mills over a super Riemann surface was obtained as the zero set of a moment map on the space of superconnections to the dual of the super Lie algebra of gauge transformations. We present a new formulation of 4-dim Euclidean self dual super Yang-Mills in terms of constraints on the supercurvature. By dimensional reduction we obtain the same set of superconformal field equations which define self dual connections on a super Riemann surface. (author). 10 refs

  13. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamova, Olga [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Cottbus JointLab, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Bounhalli, Mourad [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université St. Etienne, Bâtiment F 18 Rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Reif, Juergen, E-mail: REIF@TU-COTTBUS.DE [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Cottbus JointLab, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  14. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Reif, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  15. Overview of activities for the reduction of dose rates in Swiss boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Schenker, E.

    1993-01-01

    Since March 1990, zinc has been added to the reactor water of the boiling water reactor (BWR) Leibstadt (KKL) and, since January 1991, iron has been added to the BWR Muehleberg (KKM). These changes in reactor water chemistry were accompanied by a comprehensive R+D programme. This paper covers three selected topics: a) the statistical analysis of KKL reactor water data before and after zinc addition; b) the analysis of the KKL reactor water during the 1991 annual shutdown; c) laboratory autoclave tests to clarify the role of water additives on the cobalt deposition on austenitic steel surfaces. (author) 2 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Toward a dose reduction strategy using model-based reconstruction with limited-angle tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Eri; Tkaczyk, J. E.; Palma, Giovanni; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Muller, Serge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is an emerging technique for several imaging modalities and appli- cations including medical CT, security CT, PET, and microscopy. Its success derives from an ability to preserve image resolution and perceived diagnostic quality under impressively reduced signal level. MBIR typically uses a cost optimization framework that models system geometry, photon statistics, and prior knowledge of the recon- structed volume. The challenge of tomosynthetic geometries is that the inverse problem becomes more ill-posed due to the limited angles, meaning the volumetric image solution is not uniquely determined by the incom- pletely sampled projection data. Furthermore, low signal level conditions introduce additional challenges due to noise. A fundamental strength of MBIR for limited-views and limited-angle is that it provides a framework for constraining the solution consistent with prior knowledge of expected image characteristics. In this study, we analyze through simulation the capability of MBIR with respect to prior modeling components for limited-views, limited-angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under low dose conditions. A comparison to ground truth phantoms shows that MBIR with regularization achieves a higher level of fidelity and lower level of blurring and streaking artifacts compared to other state of the art iterative reconstructions, especially for high contrast objects. The benefit of contrast preservation along with less artifacts may lead to detectability improvement of microcalcification for more accurate cancer diagnosis.

  17. Design and functionalities of the MADORR software suite for dose-reduction management after DTPA therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprince, B.; Fritsch, P.; Romeo, P.H.; Berard, P.

    2016-01-01

    A software suite on biokinetics of radionuclides and internal dosimetry intended for the occupational health practitioners of nuclear industry and for expert opinions has been developed under Borland C++ Builder TM . These computing tools allow physicians to improve the dosimetric follow-up of workers in agreement with the French regulations and to manage new internal contaminations by radionuclides such as Pu and/or Am after diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid treatments. In this paper, the concept and functionalities of the first two computing tools of this MADOR R suite are described. The release 0.0 is the forensic application, which allows calculating the derived recording levels for intake by inhalation or ingestion of the main radioisotopes encountered in occupational environment. Indeed, these reference values of activity are convenient to interpret rapidly the bioassay measurements and make decisions as part of medical monitoring. The release 1.0 addresses the effect of DTPA treatments on Pu/Am biokinetics and the dose benefit. The forensic results of the MADOR R suite were validated by comparison with reference data. (authors)

  18. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D' Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  19. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-01-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the 51 Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients

  20. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Patient Eye-Lens Dose Reduction in Routine Brain CT Examinations Using Organ-Based Tube Current Modulation and In-Plane Bismuth Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Liao, Ying-Lan [Chang Gung University, Taoyun, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyun, Taiwan (China); Lai, Nan-Ku; Chen, Tou-Rong [Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jun-Rong [Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyun, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess eye-lens dose for patients who underwent brain CT examinations using two dose reduction Methods: organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and in-plane bismuth shielding method. Methods: This study received institutional review board approval; written informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. Ninety patients who underwent the routine brain CT examination were randomly assigned to three groups, ie. routine, OBTCM, and bismuth shield. The OBTCM technique reduced the tube current when the X-ray tube rotates in front of patients’ eye-lens region. The patients in the bismuth shield group were covered one-ply bismuth shield in the eyes’ region. Eye-lens doses were measured using TLD-100H chips and the total effective doses were calculated using CT-Expo according to the CT scanning parameters. The surface doses for patients at off-center positions were assessed to evaluate the off-centering effect. Results: Phantom measurements indicates that OBTCM technique could reduced by 26% to 28% of the surface dose to the eye lens, and increased by 25% of the surface dose at the opposed incident direction at the angle of 180°. Patients’ eye-lens doses were reduced 16.9% and 30.5% dose of bismuth shield scan and OBTCM scan, respectively compared to the routine scan. The eye-lens doses were apparently increased when the table position was lower than isocenter. Conclusion: Reducing the dose to the radiosensitive organs, such as eye lens, during routine brain CT examinations could lower the radiation risks. The OBTCM technique and in-plane bismuth shielding could be used to reduce the eye-lens dose. The eye-lens dose could be effectively reduced using OBTCM scan without interfering the diagnostic image quality. Patient position relative the CT gantry also affects the dose level of the eye lens. This study was supported by the grants from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan (MOST103-2314-B-182

  1. Autocatalytic surface reduction and its role in controlling seed-mediated growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tung-Han; Zhou, Shan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Xia, Younan

    2017-12-26

    The growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals typically involves an autocatalytic process, in which the salt precursor adsorbs onto the surface of a growing nanocrystal, followed by chemical reduction to atoms for their incorporation into the nanocrystal. Despite its universal role in the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals, it is still poorly understood and controlled in terms of kinetics. Through the use of well-defined nanocrystals as seeds, including those with different types of facets, sizes, and internal twin structure, here we quantitatively analyze the kinetics of autocatalytic surface reduction in an effort to control the evolution of nanocrystals into predictable shapes. Our kinetic measurements demonstrate that the activation energy barrier to autocatalytic surface reduction is highly dependent on both the type of facet and the presence of twin boundary, corresponding to distinctive growth patterns and products. Interestingly, the autocatalytic process is effective not only in eliminating homogeneous nucleation but also in activating and sustaining the growth of octahedral nanocrystals. This work represents a major step forward toward achieving a quantitative understanding and control of the autocatalytic process involved in the synthesis of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

  2. Decimal reduction dose (D10) and optimal dose determination to eliminate salmonella typhimurium in chicken hamburgers through 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basurto B, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Under aerobic conditions and at room temperature, decimal reduction dose (D 10 ) of S. typhimurium in casoy broth (TSB) was determined through irradiation, inoculating 9,78 log ufc/mL of a strain during 24±2 hours and obtaining a D 10 of 0,425 kGy. Next, the D 10 value of S. typhimurium inoculated in chicken hamburger with a 9,3 log ufc/g concentration was determined under the same conditions of the previous case, obtaining a D 10 of 0,547 kGy, 22,3% higher than the first value. Then, hamburgers were irradiated at 2, 4 and 6 kGy and kept under storage for 57 days at 2±2 o C. During evaluations, it was observed that there is a synergic effect between the irradiation dose and the time of storage (α=5%) for S. typhimurium inoculated in hamburgers. Besides, in the case of the non-irradiated samples, the number of total coliforms increased from 29 to 4250 NMP/g in day 22, while fecal coliforms increased from 4 to 240 NMP/g during the same period, dropping at the end of storage. In the case of irradiated samples, no coliforms were found (<3 NMP/g). Mesofilic and psicrotrofic bacteria diminished their ability to form colonies proportionally to the applied irradiation doses. Nevertheless, as storage time goes by, these bacteria recover the ability to grow up and cause deterioration. Peroxide rate values of irradiated samples were 100% higher than those of the non-irradiated samples. However, there was no significant difference between samples treated at 2,4 and 6 kGy. Finally, useful life of hamburgers was determined through sensorial evaluation of characteristics such as color, external appearance and smell of raw hamburgers, and taste, smell and texture of fried hamburgers. The results obtained were 13, 19, 41 and 34 days for non-irradiated samples, at 2, 4, and 6 kGy respectively

  3. ISD technology: a strategy for reduction of low-dose radiation exposure in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, D.A.; Larsen, K.; Fertel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project is to refocus the current national health care debate. It is the first attempt to provide scientists, health care providers, health care policy makers, politicians, health care payers and public health advocates with a method to improve health care and cut costs through decision-making strategies based primarily on medical standards and secondarily on fiscal considerations. The method for decision-making described in this paper proves more cost-effective and medically sound than current practices. Illness Specific Diagnostic (ISD) tables are introduced as a method to reduce inappropriate use of ionizing radiation in medicine. The use of ISD tables destroys the myth of a single medical standard of care and focuses on the diagnostician as the individual most capable of diagnosing disease(s) in human beings. Additionally, ionizing radiation has been used routinely under the guise that the resulting benefits outweigh the risks involved in a procedure. This dubious tradition is questioned in this document. Attention is drawn to the inappropriate amount of radiation patients receive when ionizing diagnostic tests are performed with marginal or no diagnostic benefit. The results of a pilot study are presented that explicate the reduction of needless radiation to patients and associated reduction of costs that becomes possible in the presence of appropriate scientific medical standards. Ultimately, quality medicine is indeed the most cost-effective medicine possible. The current practice by which the United States Congress issues laws aimed at dictating quality medicine is both desperate and dangerous. Politicians and legislators would be wise to focus their efforts on methodologies that establish standards of care in a scientific manner that does not interfere with medical practice. ISD technology is precisely such a scientific method. It establishes the standard of medical care at the facility from which the ISD tables are generated

  4. Developing equations to predict surface dose and therapeutic interval in bolused electron fields: A Monte Carlo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Nasrollah; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2017-07-01

    In this research, we aim to investigate the influence of different materials, as a bolus, on the low-energy electron beam dose distributions and to develop equations for predicting surface dose based on bolus thickness, as well as the therapeutic interval based on surface dose. All the Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and measurements were conducted on a Siemens PRIMUS linac. Based on EGSnrc MC code, BEAMnrc system was used to model a Siemens linac and generate phase-space files for three electron beams (6, 8, and 10 MeV). The particles were transported from the phase-space files to the bolus materials and the simulated water phantom using DOSXYZnrc. Various materials with different thicknesses were examined as a bolus, and appropriate equations were determined for each material and electron beam. The comparison of percent depth dose (PDD) curves and beam profiles, using MC, with the measured data demonstrated that the calculated values properly matched with the measurements. The results indicated that the use of bolus materials with the density of higher than soft tissue can increase both surface dose and therapeutic interval simultaneously. This finding arises from the fact that the required bolus thickness for achieving the therapeutic surface dose decreases in the case of high-density materials. Two series of prediction equations were proposed for predicting the surface dose based on bolus thickness and the therapeutic interval based on surface dose. These equations are able to calculate properly the bolus thickness required for producing a therapeutic surface dose (above 90%) for any therapeutic interval.

  5. Dose reduction in diagnostic radiology. Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association meeting on 8th December 1983 at Birbeck College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, S.E.; Putney, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nine chapters review the Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association Meeting held in London in 1983 on 'Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology'. Among the topics discussed were the balance between dose reduction and image quality, various procedures and techniques for keeping the dose to the patient to a minimum including the use of K-edge filtration and rare-earth intensifying screens, equipment for assessing the area exposure product in patients and the balance between radiation risk and benefit from radiographic examinations. All nine chapters are indexed separately. (U.K.)

  6. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 Diabetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Linde, Annemiek; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; de Brabander, Eric Carl; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Vissink, Arjan

    Nesse W, Linde A, Abbas F, Spijkervet FKL, Dijkstra PU, de Brabander EC, Gerstenbluth I, Vissink A. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 diabetics. J Clin Periodontol 2009; 36: 295-300. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01377.x. A dose-response

  7. Modeling Urinary Dysfunction After External Beam Radiation Therapy of the Prostate Using Bladder Dose-Surface Maps: Evidence of Spatially Variable Response of the Bladder Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noorazrul; Ebert, Martin A; House, Michael J; Kennedy, Angel; Matthews, John; Joseph, David J; Denham, James W

    2017-02-01

    We assessed the association of the spatial distribution of dose to the bladder surface, described using dose-surface maps, with the risk of urinary dysfunction. The bladder dose-surface maps of 754 participants from the TROG 03.04-RADAR trial were generated from the volumetric data by virtually cutting the bladder at the sagittal slice, intersecting the bladder center-of-mass through to the bladder posterior and projecting the dose information on a 2-dimensional plane. Pixelwise dose comparisons were performed between patients with and without symptoms (dysuria, hematuria, incontinence, and an International Prostate Symptom Score increase of ≥10 [ΔIPSS10]). The results with and without permutation-based multiple-comparison adjustments are reported. The pixelwise multivariate analysis findings (peak-event model for dysuria, hematuria, and ΔIPSS10; event-count model for incontinence), with adjustments for clinical factors, are also reported. The associations of the spatially specific dose measures to urinary dysfunction were dependent on the presence of specific symptoms. The doses received by the anteroinferior and, to lesser extent, posterosuperior surface of the bladder had the strongest relationship with the incidence of dysuria, hematuria, and ΔIPSS10, both with and without adjustment for clinical factors. For the doses to the posteroinferior region corresponding to the area of the trigone, the only symptom with significance was incontinence. A spatially variable response of the bladder surface to the dose was found for symptoms of urinary dysfunction. Limiting the dose extending anteriorly might help reduce the risk of urinary dysfunction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  9. Effects of ground surface decontamination on the air radiation dose rate. Results of a decontamination trial at a playground lot in a Fukushima residential area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency decontaminated schools, playgrounds, swimming pools, and houses in nonevacuated, less-contaminated areas in Fukushima for environmental restoration. A small, 150 m 2 playground lot in the residential area was chosen for decontamination demonstration, which used routinely available tools and commodities to carry out the work. The surfaces of playground lot equipment, such as swings, slides, and horizontal iron bars, were completely decontaminated by brushing with water and/or detergent. Side gutters around the playground lot were cleaned by removing the mud and then brushed and washed with a high-pressure water jet (7 MPa). The air dose rate at the playground lot was dominated by radiation from the ground surface and adjacent surroundings, such as apartments and rice fields. Two or three centimeters of the surface soil contaminated with cesium was removed manually with shovels, hoes, and other gardening tools. This significantly reduced the average air dose rate of the entire playground lot from 1.5 μSv/h before decontamination to 0.6 μSv/h. These results showed that ground surface decontamination can contribute measurably to the reduction in air dose rate in relatively small areas in residential areas. (author)

  10. Modelling of aflatoxin G1 reduction by kefir grain using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Farzaneh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Rezaei, Karamatollah; Rahmani, Anosheh

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) is one of the main toxic contaminants in pistachio nuts and causes potential health hazards. Hence, AFG1 reduction is one of the main concerns in food safety. Kefir-grains contain symbiotic association of microorganisms well known for their aflatoxin decontamination effects. In this study, a central composite design (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to develop a model in order to predict AFG1 reduction in pistachio nuts by kefir-grain (already heated at 70 and 110°C). The independent variables were: toxin concentration (X1: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 ng/g), kefir-grain level (X2: 5, 10, 20, 10 and 25%), contact time (X3: 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h), and incubation temperature (X4: 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60°C). There was a significant reduction in AFG1 (p kefir-grain used. The variables including X1, X3 and the interactions between X2-X4 as well as X3-X4 have significant effects on AFG1 reduction. The model provided a good prediction of AFG1 reduction under the assay conditions. Optimization was used to enhance the efficiency of kefir-grain on AFG1 reduction. The optimum conditions for the highest AFG1 reduction (96.8%) were predicted by the model as follows: toxin concentration = 20 ng/g, kefir-grain level = 10%, contact time = 6 h, and incubation temperature = 30°C which validated practically in six replications.

  11. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  12. The optimal dose reduction level using iterative reconstruction with prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA using 256-slice MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yang; Xu, Shu; Guo, Wenli; Vembar, Mani [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Guo, Qiyong, E-mail: guoqy@sj-hospital.org [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: To assess the image quality (IQ) of an iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose{sup 4}) from prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) on a 256-slice multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner and determine the optimal dose reduction using IR that can provide IQ comparable to filtered back projection (FBP). Method and materials: 110 consecutive patients (69 men, 41 women; age: 54 ± 10 years) underwent coronary CTA on a 256-slice MDCT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare). The control group (Group A, n = 21) were scanned using the conventional tube output (120 kVp, 210 mAs) and reconstructed using FBP. The other 4 groups were scanned with the same kVp but successively reduced tube output as follows: B[n = 15]: 125 mAs; C[n = 22]: 105 mAs; D[n = 36]: 84 mAs: E[n = 16]: 65 mAs) and reconstructed using IR levels of L3 (Group B), L4 (Group C) and L5 (Groups D and E), to compensate for the noise increase. All images were reconstructed using the same kernel (XCB). Two radiologists graded IQ in a blinded fashion on a 4-point scale (4 – excellent, 3 – good, 2 – fair and 1 – poor). Quantitative measurements of CT values, image noise and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were measured in each group. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine a radiation reduction threshold up to which excellent IQ was maintained. Results: There were no significant differences in objective noise, SNR and CNR values among Groups A, B, C, D, and E (P = 0.14, 0.09, 0.17, respectively). There were no significant differences in the scores of the subjective IQ between Group A, and Groups B, C, D, E (P = 0.23–0.97). Significant differences in image sharpness and study acceptability were observed between groups A and E (P < 0.05). Using the criterion of excellent IQ (score 4), the ROC curve of dose levels and IQ acceptability established a reduction of 60% of tube output (Group D) as optimum cutoff point

  13. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-07

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations.

  14. An analysis of radiation dose reduction in paediatric interventional cardiology by altering frame rate and use of the anti-scatter grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, S L; Hughes, C M; Winder, Robert J; Mooney, R B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate removal of the anti-scatter grid and alteration of the frame rate in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) and assess the impact on radiation dose and image quality. Phantom based experimental studies were performed in a dedicated cardiac catheterisation suite to investigate variations in radiation dose and image quality, with various changes in imaging parameters. Phantom based experimental studies employing these variations in technique identified that radiation dose reductions of 28%–49% can be made to the patient with minimal loss of image quality in smaller sized patients. At present, there is no standard technique for carrying out paediatric IC in the UK or Ireland, resulting in the potential for a wide variation in radiation dose. Dose reductions to patients can be achieved with slight alterations to the imaging equipment with minimal compromise to the image quality. These simple modifications can be easily implemented in clinical practice in IC centres. (paper)

  15. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tony

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT. While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Methods Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Results Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2% reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. Conclusion The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment.

  16. [Image quality in multidetector CT of paranasal sinuses: potential of dose reduction using an adaptive post-processing filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröpil, P; Cohnen, M; Andersen, K; Heinen, W; Stegmann, V; Mödder, U

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of subjective image quality in dose-reduced multi-detector CT (MDCT) of paranasal sinuses using a 2D non-linear adaptive post-processing filter (2D-NLAF). MDCT of paranasal sinuses was simulated using a human head phantom at a Somatom Sensation Cardiac 64 (Siemens, Erlangen). At constant collimation (64 × 0.6 mm) und pitch (p = 1), the tube current (50, 100, 200 mAs) and tube potential (80, 100, 120 kVp) were modified. The radiation exposure was represented by CTDIvol. Four independent blinded radiologists evaluated the image quality of axial 2 mm images and coronal reformations concerning the assessment of "fractures" and "soft tissue processes". The subjective image quality of original and post-processed images using a 2D-NLAF (SharpViewCT®, Sweden) was graded on a 5-point scale ("1" excellent - "5" not adequate) and compared. Compared to the protocol with the best image quality (120kVp/ 200 mAs) 2D-NLAF led to a significant improvement in the subjective image quality at 100 kVp/ 100 mAs (score "1.4" with filter versus "2.2" without) and 120 kVp/ 50 mAs ("1.6" versus "2.0") (p image quality was rated "good", and down to 5 mGy "diagnostic". The phantom study indicates a dose reduction potential in MDCT of paranasal sinuses up to 58% compared to a standard dose protocol using a 2D-NLAF without an essential loss of image quality. 2D-NLAF is particularly effective at 100 kVp/ 100 mAs and 120 kVp/ 50 mAs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Reduction Expansion Synthesis as Strategy to Control Nitrogen Doping Level and Surface Area in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, Russell; Gonzalez, Edwin; MacDonald, Caleb; Osswald, Sebastian; Zea, Hugo; Luhrs, Claudia C

    2015-10-16

    Graphene sheets doped with nitrogen were produced by the reduction-expansion (RES) method utilizing graphite oxide (GO) and urea as precursor materials. The simultaneous graphene generation and nitrogen insertion reactions are based on the fact that urea decomposes upon heating to release reducing gases. The volatile byproducts perform two primary functions: (i) promoting the reduction of the GO and (ii) providing the nitrogen to be inserted in situ as the graphene structure is created. Samples with diverse urea/GO mass ratios were treated at 800 °C in inert atmosphere to generate graphene with diverse microstructural characteristics and levels of nitrogen doping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the microstructural features of the products. The effects of doping on the samples structure and surface area were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, and Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET). The GO and urea decomposition-reduction process as well as nitrogen-doped graphene stability were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis of the evolved gases. Results show that the proposed method offers a high level of control over the amount of nitrogen inserted in the graphene and may be used alternatively to control its surface area. To demonstrate the practical relevance of these findings, as-produced samples were used as electrodes in supercapacitor and battery devices and compared with conventional, thermally exfoliated graphene.

  18. Reduction Expansion Synthesis as Strategy to Control Nitrogen Doping Level and Surface Area in Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Canty

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Graphene sheets doped with nitrogen were produced by the reduction-expansion (RES method utilizing graphite oxide (GO and urea as precursor materials. The simultaneous graphene generation and nitrogen insertion reactions are based on the fact that urea decomposes upon heating to release reducing gases. The volatile byproducts perform two primary functions: (i promoting the reduction of the GO and (ii providing the nitrogen to be inserted in situ as the graphene structure is created. Samples with diverse urea/GO mass ratios were treated at 800 °C in inert atmosphere to generate graphene with diverse microstructural characteristics and levels of nitrogen doping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to study the microstructural features of the products. The effects of doping on the samples structure and surface area were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, and Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET. The GO and urea decomposition-reduction process as well as nitrogen-doped graphene stability were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA coupled with mass spectroscopy (MS analysis of the evolved gases. Results show that the proposed method offers a high level of control over the amount of nitrogen inserted in the graphene and may be used alternatively to control its surface area. To demonstrate the practical relevance of these findings, as-produced samples were used as electrodes in supercapacitor and battery devices and compared with conventional, thermally