WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface control electronics

  1. Electronically controllable spoof localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liu; Xun Xiao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Electronically controllable multipolar spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are experimentally demonstrated in the microwave frequencies. It has been shown that half integer order LSPs modes exist on the corrugated ring loaded with a slit, which actually arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances. By mounting active components across the slit in the corrugated rings, electronic switchability and tunability of spoof LSPs modes have been accomplished. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate efficient dynamic control of the spoof LSPs. These elements may form the basis of highly integrated programmable plasmonic circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  2. Electronic-state control of amino acids on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masato; Nakayama, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Electronic structures of amino acids on the Si(1 1 1) surfaces are investigated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. It is shown that among various polar amino acids, a histidine is the only one that can be positively ionized when hole carriers are supplied in the Si substrate, by transferring the hole charge from Si substrate to an amino acid. This result indicates that the ionization of a histidine, which will activate the protein functions, can be controlled electrically by producing amino acid/Si junctions

  3. Collaborative Research: Fundamental studies of plasma control using surface embedded electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); PanneerChelvam, PremKumar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Levko, Dimtry [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-26

    The proposed study will investigate the effect of active electron injection of from electrode surfaces To the best of our knowledge, no such a study has ever been attempted even though it could lead to the formation of whole new classes of plasma based devices and systems. We are motivated by recent articles and simple theory which gives strong reason to believe that embedded electronic devices can be used to exert control over the SEE coefficient of semiconductor surfaces (and maybe other surface types as well). Furthermore, the research will explore how such sub-surface electronic devices can best be used to exert control over an associated plasma.

  4. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Graphene Using Surface-Adsorbate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    able to achieve relatively good control over the concentration of defects in graphene by introducing oxide impurities into the Ni(111) substrate and...1 Controlling the electronic structure of graphene using surface-adsorbate interactions Piotr Matyba, Adra V. Carr, Cong Chen, David L. Miller...atomic orbitals in graphene on Ni(111) opens a large energy gap of ≈2.8 eV between non-hybridized states at the K-point. Here we use alkali metal

  5. Electron beam deflection control system of a welding and surface modification installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, E.; Dzharov, V.; Gerasimov, V.; Tsvetkov, K.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we examined the patterns of the electron beam motion when controlling the transverse with respect to the axis of the beam homogeneous magnetic field created by the coils of the deflection system the electron gun. During electron beam processes, the beam motion is determined the process type (welding, surface modification, etc.), the technological mode, the design dimensions of the electron gun and the shape of the processed samples. The electron beam motion is defined by the cumulative action of two cosine-like control signals generated by a functional generator. The signal control is related to changing the amplitudes, frequencies and phases (phase differences) of the generated voltages. We realized the motion control by applying a graphical user interface developed by us and an Arduino Uno programmable microcontroller. The signals generated were calibrated using experimental data from the available functional generator. The free and precise motion on arbitrary trajectories determines the possible applications of an electron beam process to carrying out various scientific research tasks in material processing.

  6. Collaborative Research: Fundamental Studies of Plasma Control Using Surface Embedded Electronic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overzet, Lawrence J. [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States); Raja, L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-06-06

    The research program was collaborative between the researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Texas at Austin. The primary subject of this program was to investigate the possibility of active control of secondary electron emission (SEE) from surfaces in contact with plasmas and thereby actively control plasmas. Very few studies of ion-induced electron emission (IIEE) from semiconductors exist, and those that do exist primarily used high-energy ion beams in the experiments. Furthermore, those few studies took extreme measures to ensure that the measurements were performed on atomically clean surfaces because of the surface sensitivity of the IIEE process. Even a small exposure to air can change the IIEE yield significantly. In addition, much of the existing data for IIEE from semiconductors was obtained in the 1950s and ‘60s, when semiconductor materials were first being refined. As a result, nearly all of that data is for p-type Ge and Si. Before this investigation, experimental data on n-type materials was virtually non-existent. While the basic theory assumed that IIEE yields ought to be substantially independent of doping type and concentration, recent measurements of near atmospheric pressure plasmas and of breakdown suggested otherwise. These indirect measurements were made on surfaces that were not atomically clean and seemed to indicate that deep sub-surface changes to the bulk conduction band electron density could lead to substantial variations in the IIEE yield. Exactly in contradiction to the generally accepted theory. Insufficient direct data existed to settle the matter. We performed both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of IIEE yields from both Si and Ge in order to help clarify whether or not conduction band electrons substantially change the IIEE yield. We used three wafers of each material to carry out the investigation: a heavily doped p-type, an intrinsic and a heavily doped n-type wafer. There

  7. Collaborative Research: Fundamental Studies of Plasma Control Using Surface Embedded Electronic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overzet, Lawrence J.; Raja, L.

    2015-01-01

    The research program was collaborative between the researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Texas at Austin. The primary subject of this program was to investigate the possibility of active control of secondary electron emission (SEE) from surfaces in contact with plasmas and thereby actively control plasmas. Very few studies of ion-induced electron emission (IIEE) from semiconductors exist, and those that do exist primarily used high-energy ion beams in the experiments. Furthermore, those few studies took extreme measures to ensure that the measurements were performed on atomically clean surfaces because of the surface sensitivity of the IIEE process. Even a small exposure to air can change the IIEE yield significantly. In addition, much of the existing data for IIEE from semiconductors was obtained in the 1950s and '60s, when semiconductor materials were first being refined. As a result, nearly all of that data is for p-type Ge and Si. Before this investigation, experimental data on n-type materials was virtually non-existent. While the basic theory assumed that IIEE yields ought to be substantially independent of doping type and concentration, recent measurements of near atmospheric pressure plasmas and of breakdown suggested otherwise. These indirect measurements were made on surfaces that were not atomically clean and seemed to indicate that deep sub-surface changes to the bulk conduction band electron density could lead to substantial variations in the IIEE yield. Exactly in contradiction to the generally accepted theory. Insufficient direct data existed to settle the matter. We performed both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of IIEE yields from both Si and Ge in order to help clarify whether or not conduction band electrons substantially change the IIEE yield. We used three wafers of each material to carry out the investigation: a heavily doped p-type, an intrinsic and a heavily doped n-type wafer

  8. Control of single-electron charging of metallic nanoparticles onto amorphous silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Martin; Gmucová, Katarína; Nádazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignác; Satka, Alexander; Kopáni, Martin; Cirák, Július; Majková, Eva

    2008-11-01

    Sequential single-electron charging of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in oleic acid/oleyl amine envelope and deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto Pt electrode covered with undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon film is reported. Single-electron charging (so-called quantized double-layer charging) of nanoparticles is detected by cyclic voltammetry as current peaks and the charging effect can be switched on/off by the electric field in the surface region induced by the excess of negative/positive charged defect states in the amorphous silicon layer. The particular charge states in amorphous silicon are created by the simultaneous application of a suitable bias voltage and illumination before the measurement. The influence of charged states on the electric field in the surface region is evaluated by the finite element method. The single-electron charging is analyzed by the standard quantized double layer model as well as two weak-link junctions model. Both approaches are in accordance with experiment and confirm single-electron charging by tunnelling process at room temperature. This experiment illustrates the possibility of the creation of a voltage-controlled capacitor for nanotechnology.

  9. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  10. CONTROL OF METAL SURFACES MACHINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DIAMOND NANOMACHINING TECHNOLOGY BASED ON THE ELECTRON WORK FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Sharonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional machining technology is based on the use of integrated geometric parameters of machined surfaces. Technological impact of a pick results in oxidation processes and changes in physic-chemical parameters of surface. Control of only geometric parameters is insufficient to describe characteristics of machining and formation of ultra-smooth surfaces. The electron work function is therefore used. The aim of the work was to study electrophysical states of optic surfaces of non-ferrous metals and alloys in relation to geometric and physic-chemical parameters according to the distribution of the electron work function over the surface. We conducted the study on experimental metal samples made of copper and aluminum alloy, machined in accordance with the diamond nanomachining technology. The diamond nanomachining technology would be capable of ensuring the roughness of non-ferrous metals and alloys machined at the level of Ra ≤ 0,005 µm. Modernized Kelvin probe was used as the registration technique of the changes of the electron work function over the surface. Dependence between the electron work function value, as well as its alteration and the physicchemical and geometric parameters of a surface has been determined. It has been shown that the diamond nanomachining technology makes it possible to obtain electro-physically uniform optical surfaces on copper and aluminum alloy with the minimal range of the distribution of the electric potential over the surface

  11. Control of two-dimensional electronic states at anatase Ti O2(001 ) surface by K adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, R.; Minohara, M.; Shiga, D.; Kitamura, M.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Horiba, K.; Kumigashira, H.

    2018-04-01

    The nature of the intriguing metallic electronic structures appearing at the surface of anatase titanium dioxide (a-Ti O2 ) remains to be elucidated, mainly owing to the difficulty of controlling the depth distribution of the oxygen vacancies generated by photoirradiation. In this study, K atoms were adsorbed onto the (001) surface of a-Ti O2 to dope electrons into the a-Ti O2 and to confine the electrons in the surface region. The success of the electron doping and its controllability were confirmed by performing in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy as well as core-level measurements. Clear subband structures were observed in the surface metallic states, indicating the creation of quasi-two-dimensional electron liquid (q2DEL) states in a controllable fashion. With increasing electron doping (K adsorption), the q2DEL states exhibited crossover from polaronic liquid states with multiple phonon-loss structures originating from the long-range Fröhlich interaction to "weakly correlated metallic" states. In the q2DEL states in the weakly correlated metallic region, a kink due to short-range electron-phonon coupling was clearly observed at about 80 ±10 meV . The characteristic energy is smaller than that previously observed for the metallic states of a-Ti O2 with three-dimensional nature (˜110 meV ) . These results suggest that the dominant electron-phonon coupling is modulated by anisotropic carrier screening in the q2DEL states.

  12. Control of Electronic Conduction at an Oxide Heterointerface using Surface Polar Adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Christopher

    2011-08-19

    We study the effect of the surface adsorption of a variety of common laboratory solvents on the conductivity at the interface between LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. This interface possesses a range of intriguing physics, notably a proposed connection between the surface state of the LaAlO{sub 3} and the conductivity buried in the SrTiO{sub 3}. We show that the application of chemicals such as acetone, ethanol, and water can induce a large change (factor of three) in the conductivity. This phenomenon is observed only for polar solvents. These data provide experimental evidence for a general polarization-facilitated electronic transfer mechanism.

  13. Local digital control of power electronic converters in a dc microgrid based on a-priori derivation of switching surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bibaswan

    In power electronic basedmicrogrids, the computational requirements needed to implement an optimized online control strategy can be prohibitive. The work presented in this dissertation proposes a generalized method of derivation of geometric manifolds in a dc microgrid that is based on the a-priori computation of the optimal reactions and trajectories for classes of events in a dc microgrid. The proposed states are the stored energies in all the energy storage elements of the dc microgrid and power flowing into them. It is anticipated that calculating a large enough set of dissimilar transient scenarios will also span many scenarios not specifically used to develop the surface. These geometric manifolds will then be used as reference surfaces in any type of controller, such as a sliding mode hysteretic controller. The presence of switched power converters in microgrids involve different control actions for different system events. The control of the switch states of the converters is essential for steady state and transient operations. A digital memory look-up based controller that uses a hysteretic sliding mode control strategy is an effective technique to generate the proper switch states for the converters. An example dcmicrogrid with three dc-dc boost converters and resistive loads is considered for this work. The geometric manifolds are successfully generated for transient events, such as step changes in the loads and the sources. The surfaces corresponding to a specific case of step change in the loads are then used as reference surfaces in an EEPROM for experimentally validating the control strategy. The required switch states corresponding to this specific transient scenario are programmed in the EEPROM as a memory table. This controls the switching of the dc-dc boost converters and drives the system states to the reference manifold. In this work, it is shown that this strategy effectively controls the system for a transient condition such as step changes

  14. Carrier-Density Control of the SrTiO3 (001) Surface 2D Electron Gas studied by ARPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Siobhan McKeown; Bruno, Flavio Yair; Wang, Zhiming; de la Torre, Alberto; Riccó, Sara; Tamai, Anna; Kim, Timur K; Hoesch, Moritz; Shi, Ming; Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; King, Phil D C; Baumberger, Felix

    2015-07-08

    The origin of the 2D electron gas (2DEG)stabilized at the bare surface of SrTiO3 (001) is investigated. Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission and core-level spectroscopy, it is shown conclusively that this 2DEG arises from light-induced oxygen vacancies. The dominant mechanism driving vacancy formation is identified, allowing unprecedented control over the 2DEG carrier density. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  16. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned

  17. Reflection of Slow Electrons from Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Ainov, Matsak; Kaganovich, Igor; Demidov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    Given that progress of future plasma technologies depends on control of electron coefficient reflection r0, the development of methods of measurement and control of r0 is of great importance. Published experimental data on r0 for slow electrons are inconsistent and sometime give large values up to r0 ~ 0 , 8 and even higher. This talk presents a technique for r0 measurements in low pressure plasmas in the presence of transverse magnetic field. It is found that for poly-crystal surface, effective reflection coefficient can really reach value of 0.8. It is demonstrated that it is connected to additional reflection from potential barrier near the surfaces. The contribution of electron reflection from the barrier and the surface has been divided and studied. The data have been confirmed at different mono-crystal surfaces. This work was supported by DoE Fusion Energy Sciences contract DE-SC0001939 and Education Ministry of the RF.

  18. Electronically Controlled Resistor Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Walter L.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance quickly varied in small steps over wide range. Device with no moving parts provides variable electrical resistance. Used with analog or digital circuity to provide electronic selection of large number of resistance values for testing, simulation, control, or other purposes. Nearest electromechanical equivalent of all-electronic device is potentiometer driven by servomotor.

  19. Enhancing Electron Mobility at the LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 Interface by Surface Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yanwu; Bell, Christopher; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Harashima, Satoshi; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2013-07-15

    Mobility of electrons confined at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface is significantly enhanced by surface control using surface charges and adsorbates, reaching a low temperature value more than 20 000 cm2 V-1s-1. A uniform trend that mobility increases with decreasing sheet carrier density is observed.

  20. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things

  1. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  2. Electron backscattering for process control in electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardenne, T. von; Panzer, S.

    1983-01-01

    A number of solutions to the automation of electron beam welding is presented. On the basis of electron backscattering a complex system of process control has been developed. It allows an enlarged imaging of the material's surface, improved adjustment of the beam focusing and definite focus positioning. Furthermore, both manual and automated positioning of the electron beam before and during the welding process has become possible. Monitoring of the welding process for meeting standard welding requirements can be achieved with the aid of a control quantity derived from the results of electronic evaluation of the high-frequency electron backscattering

  3. Integrated control system for electron beam processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, L.; Koleva, E.; Batchkova, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ISO/IEC 62264 standard is widely used for integration of the business systems of a manufacturer with the corresponding manufacturing control systems based on hierarchical equipment models, functional data and manufacturing operations activity models. In order to achieve the integration of control systems, formal object communication models must be developed, together with manufacturing operations activity models, which coordinate the integration between different levels of control. In this article, the development of integrated control system for electron beam welding process is presented as part of a fully integrated control system of an electron beam plant, including also other additional processes: surface modification, electron beam evaporation, selective melting and electron beam diagnostics.

  4. Development of a LabVIEW-based surface with innovative controls for the control system of the spin-polarized electron test source Photo-CATCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, Heidi Ayse; Enders, Joachim; Espig, Martin; Fritzsche, Yuliya; Wagner, Markus [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Operations of the spin-polarized electron source of the S-DALINAC will be supported by a photo-cathode activation, test and cleaning system, Photo-CATCH. Besides cathode-performance studies, this teststand produces spin-polarized electron bunches from a GaAs photo-cathode that are then transported, manipulated, and characterized by devices in a low-energy beam line. To set and monitor the various components of the beamline, a control system was developed, based on the EPICS framework. As interfaces, LabVIEW was used in combination with a gamepad as a controlling device.

  5. Method for surface treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Doehler, H.; Bartel, R.; Ardenne, T. von.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at simplifying the technology and saving energy in modifying surfaces with the aid of electron beams. The described beam-object geometry allows to abandon additional heat treatments. It can be used for surface hardening

  6. Secondary electron emission from textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Patino, M. I.; Wirz, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo model is used to investigate electron induced secondary electron emission for varying effects of complex surfaces by using simple geometric constructs. Geometries used in the model include: vertical fibers for velvet-like surfaces, tapered pillars for carpet-like surfaces, and a cage-like configuration of interlaced horizontal and vertical fibers for nano-structured fuzz. The model accurately captures the secondary electron emission yield dependence on incidence angle. The model shows that unlike other structured surfaces previously studied, tungsten fuzz exhibits secondary electron emission yield that is independent of primary electron incidence angle, due to the prevalence of horizontally-oriented fibers in the fuzz geometry. This is confirmed with new data presented herein of the secondary electron emission yield of tungsten fuzz at incidence angles from 0-60°.

  7. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  8. Electronic Control Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Je Hwong; Cha, In Su

    2001-08-01

    This book consists of nine chapters, which are basis of thyristor about its use and classify, structure of thyristor like outside, inside, manufacturing and structure of thyristor sorts of thyristor family and sub thyristor, how to use thyristor such as standard chart, choice of thyristor and way of on and off, electric heat control circuit like control temperature of heating apparatus and cooker, lighting control circuit for light bulb, neon lamp, traffic signal, lamp regulator and strobe, motor control circuit including an inverter circuit transistor and speed control of direct motor by transistor, electric power source circuit and a spark-plug, applied circuit for protection of fire.

  9. Surface control of flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The polarization response of a material to a strain gradient, known as flexoelectricity, holds great promise for novel electromechanical applications. Despite considerable recent progress, however, the effect remains poorly understood. From both the fundamental and practical viewpoints, it is of crucial importance to know whether the coupling coefficients are primarily governed by the properties of the bulk material or by the details of the sample surface. Here we provide, by means of first-principles calculations, quantitative evidence supporting the latter scenario. In particular, we demonstrate that a SrTiO3 film can yield a positive or negative voltage upon bending, depending on whether it is terminated by a TiO2 or SrO layer. This result points to a full control of the flexoelectric effect via surface/interface engineering, opening exciting new avenues for device design.

  10. Oxides Surfaces and Novel Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Pratik

    The scope of this thesis extends to the study of surface structures and electronic properties in a number of complex oxides. The c(6x2) surface reconstruction on SrTiO3 (001) was solved using a combination of plan view transmission electron microscopy imaging, atomic resolution secondary electron imaging, and density functional theory calculations. This work provided fundamental insights on the effects of dielectric screening in secondary electron generation. A thorough analysis on the limitation and functionality of transmission plan view imaging showed that the kinematical approximations used in the separation of top and bottom surfaces is only valid in thin samples (˜5 nm or less for SrTiO3). The presence of an inversion center in the surface structure also made separation of the top and bottom surfaces more robust. Surface studies of two other oxides, KTaO3 and NdGaO3, provided understanding on the mechanism of surface heterogeneity and segregation. In the case of KTaO3, selective ion sputtering and the loss of K resulted in large stoichiometric variations at the surface. Annealing of such samples led to the formation of a potassium deficient tetragonal phase (K 6Ta10.8O30) on the surface. A similar phenomenon was also observed in NdGaO3. Exploratory surface studies of the rare earth scandates (ReScO3 , Re = Gd, Tb, Dy) led to the observation of large flexoelectric bending inside an electron microscope. Thin rods of these scandates bent by up to 90 degree under a focused electron beam; the bending was fully reversible. Ex-situ measurements of flexoelectric coe cient performed by an- other graduate student, Christopher Mizzi, confirmed that the scandates have a large flexocoupling voltage (˜42 V). Electronic structure of the lanthanide scandates was studied using temperature depen- dent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The amount of charging under X-ray illumination was greatly reduced with increasing

  11. Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2010-05-05

    Thermal management plays an important part in the cost of electric drives in terms of power electronics packaging. Very promising results have been obtained by using microporous coatings and skived surfaces in conjunction with single-phase and two-phase flows. Sintered materials and thermoplastics with embedded fibers show significant promise as thermal interface materials, or TIMs. Appropriate cooling technologies depend on the power electronics package application and reliability.

  12. Unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Dowben, P.A.; Ortega, J.E.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) was investigated with high-resolution inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. An empty surface state near E F is observed at bar Γ. Two other surface-sensitive features are also revealed at 1.2 and 3.1 eV above the Fermi level. Hydrogen adsorption on Gd surfaces was used to distinguish the surface-sensitive features from the bulk features. The unoccupied bulk-band critical points are determined to be Γ 3 + at 1.9 eV and A 1 at 0.8 eV

  13. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  14. Electron emission at the rail surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, L.; Battech, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the processes by which current is transferred from the cathode rail to the plasma armature in an arc-driven railgun. Three electron emission mechanisms are considered, namely thermionic emission, field-enhanced thermionic emission (or Schottky emission), and photoemission. The author's calculations show that the dominant electron emission mechanism depends, to a great extent, on the work function of the rail surface, the rail surface temperature, the electric field at the rail surface, and the effective radiation temperature of the plasma. For conditions that are considered to be typical of a railgun armature, Schottky emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism, providing current densities on the order of 10 9 A/m 2

  15. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  16. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  17. Controllability of Surface Water Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riasi, M. Sadegh; Yeghiazarian, Lilit

    2017-12-01

    To sustainably manage water resources, we must understand how to control complex networked systems. In this paper, we study surface water networks from the perspective of structural controllability, a concept that integrates classical control theory with graph-theoretic formalism. We present structural controllability theory and compute four metrics: full and target controllability, control centrality and control profile (FTCP) that collectively determine the structural boundaries of the system's control space. We use these metrics to answer the following questions: How does the structure of a surface water network affect its controllability? How to efficiently control a preselected subset of the network? Which nodes have the highest control power? What types of topological structures dominate controllability? Finally, we demonstrate the structural controllability theory in the analysis of a wide range of surface water networks, such as tributary, deltaic, and braided river systems.

  18. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  19. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  20. Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The {\\it Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials} research program provided conceptual understanding of and theoretical methodologies for understanding the properties of surfaces and interfaces involving materials exhibiting strong electronic correlations. The issues addressed in this research program are important for basic science, because the behavior of correlated electron superlattices is a crucial challenge to and crucial test of our understanding of the grand-challenge problem of correlated electron physics and are important for our nation's energy future because correlated interfaces offer opportunities for the control of phenomena needed for energy and device applications. Results include new physics insights, development of new methods, and new predictions for materials properties.

  1. Surface control of flexoelectricity

    OpenAIRE

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    The polarization response of a material to a strain gradient, known as flexoelectricity, holds great promise for novel electromechanical applications. Despite considerable recent progress, however, the effect remains poorly understood. From both the fundamental and practical viewpoints, it is of crucial importance to know whether the coupling coefficients are primarily governed by the properties of the bulk material or by the details of the sample surface. Here we provide, by means of first-p...

  2. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  3. Digital control in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Buso, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the reader, whether an electrical engineering student in power electronics or a design engineer, a selection of power converter control problems and their basic digital solutions, based on the most widespread digital control techniques. The presentation is primarily focused on different applications of the same power converter topology, the half-bridge voltage source inverter, considered both in its single- and three-phase implementation. This is chosen as the test case because, besides being simple and well known, it allows the discussion of a significant spectrum of the mo

  4. Digital control in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Buso, Simone

    2006-01-01

    This book presents the reader, whether an electrical engineering student in power electronics or a design engineer, some typical power converter control problems and their basic digital solutions, based on the most widespread digital control techniques. The presentation is focused on different applications of the same power converter topology, the half-bridge voltage source inverter, considered both in its single- and three-phase implementation. This is chosen as the case study because, besides being simple and well known, it allows the discussion of a significant spectrum of the more frequent

  5. Controlling electronics boards with PVSS

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobsson, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of implementing a control system for electronics boards in order to perform remote Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programming, hardware configuration, register control, and monitoring, as well as interfacing it to an expert system. The paper presents an implementation, using the Distributed Information Management (DIM) package and the industrial SCADA system PVSS II from ETM, in which the access mechanisms to the board resources are completely generic and in which the device prescription and the handling of mapping between functional parameters and physical registers follow a common structure independent of the board type. The control system also incorporates mechanisms by which it may be controlled from a finite state machine based expert system. Finally the paper suggests an improvement in which the mapping between logical parameters and physical registers is represented by descriptors in the device description such that the translation can be handled by a common m...

  6. Surface dynamics using pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ally S. Y.; Jones, Robert G.

    2000-04-01

    Line of sight time of flight has been used to measure the translational energy of ethene formed by dissociative electron attachment of adsorbed dihalocarbons (XCH 2CH 2Y) on Cu(111) at 100 K. A pulsed electron beam was used to generate low energy secondary electrons at the surface, which were the active agents in initiating the decomposition, XCH 2CH 2Y(ads)+e -→XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)+Y(chem)+e -, XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)→C 2H 4(g)+X(chem). For 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) adsorbed with a spacer layer of chemisorbed chlorine between it and the Cu(111)surface, the TOF data could be fitted using three Maxwell distributions with fast (960 K), slow (180 K) and diffusion ('20 K') components. For a single monolayer of DCE adsorbed directly on the clean Cu(111) surface the fast (1230 K) and slow (225 K) components increased in temperature, indicating that the copper surface was affecting the reaction. For 1-bromo-2-chloroethane the results were the same, consistent with both molecules dissociating via a common intermediate, ClC 2H 4rad (ads). For 1,2-dibromoethane the intermediate is different, BrC 2H 4rad , and decomposition of a monolayer of this molecule on clean Cu(111) exhibited fast (1850 K) and slow (270 K) components, both higher than the corresponding temperatures for DCE. The dynamics of these reactions and the origin of the two Maxwell distributions are discussed in terms of the energy available within the radical, and from the formation of the chemisorbed halogen when the radical dissociates.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  8. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  9. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Meier, Christoph [Laboratoire Colisions, Agrégats et Reactivité, UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Sola, Ignacio R., E-mail: isola@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-20

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  10. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  11. Theoretical model of fast electron emission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, C.; Burgdoerfer, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Electron emission in glancing-angle ion-surface collisions has become a focus of ion-surface interactions. Electron spectra can provide detailed information on the above surface neutralization dynamics of multiply charged ions, the electronic structure of the surface (surface density of states), and the long-ranged image interactions near the surface. Recent experiments have found that the convoy peak, well known from ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is dramatically altered. The peak is broadened and shifted in energy which has been attributed to dynamical image interactions. We present a microscopic model for the emission of fast electrons in glancing-angle surface collisions. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach is utilized to calculate the evolution of electrons in the presence of their self image, the projectile Coulomb field and the image potential induced by the projectile. The excitation of collective surface modes is also incorporated.

  12. Controls Over Electronic Document Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Electronic Document Management contributes to the initiative by digitizing paper documents and offering read-only access to official contracts and modifications, invoices, and accounting and finance documents...

  13. Controlling Electronics Boards with PVS

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    - Introduction - Control System Architecture - Device Description - FPGA Programming - Register Control - Data Subscription - Examples of Graphics User Interfaces - Parameter - Register Translation - Application on the LHCb Timing Fast Control System

  14. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  15. Simulation of secondary electron emission from rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, J.; Ohya, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the secondary electron emission from a beryllium surface under low-energy (≤1 keV) electron bombardment is investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation combined with the model of bowl-structured surface. With increasing aspect ratio H/W of the bowl structure, the secondary electron yield becomes greater than that for a flat surface, whereas for large H/W the yield is smaller; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The former is due to emission of electrons, which cannot escape from the flat surface, from an inclined plane; it increases the low-energy component in the energy distribution. The latter is due to re-entrance of once-emitted electrons into the next part of the topographic surface; it decreases the number of electrons emitted with oblique angles. ((orig.))

  16. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  17. Surface excitations in electron backscattering from silicon surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Lesiak, B.; Jablonski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 562, - (2004), s. 92-100 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron-solid interactions * electron-solid scattering and transmission-elastic * electron-solid scattering and transmission-inelastic * Monte Carlo simulation * electron bombardment * silicon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  18. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  19. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  20. Surface and volume photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions....

  1. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  2. The effect of hot electrons and surface plasmons on heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Si Woo; Moon, Song Yi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-01-01

    Hot electrons and surface-plasmon-driven chemistry are amongst the most actively studied research subjects because they are deeply associated with energy dissipation and the conversion processes at the surface and interfaces, which are still open questions and key issues in the surface science community. In this topical review, we give an overview of the concept of hot electrons or surface-plasmon-mediated hot electrons generated under various structural schemes (i.e. metals, metal–semiconductor, and metal–insulator–metal) and their role affecting catalytic activity in chemical reactions. We highlight recent studies on the relation between hot electrons and catalytic activity on metallic surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms for how hot electrons participate in chemical reactions. We also introduce controlled chemistry to describe specific pathways for selectivity control in catalysis on metal nanoparticles. (topical review)

  3. Surface influence on convoy electron emission at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the dependence of the production of convoy electrons induced by H + - 60 KeV with surface conditions of Al targets by in situ deposition of Na and O. The conclusion is that convoy electron production increases with the work function of the surface. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. Periodic Control of Power Electronic Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Keliang; Danwei, Wang; Yang, Yongheng

    Advanced power electronic converters convert, control and condition electricity. Power converters require control strategies for periodic signal compensation to assure good power quality and stable power system operation. This comprehensive text presents the most recent internal model principle...... based periodic control technology, which offers the perfect periodic control solution for power electronic conversion. It also provides complete analysis and synthesis methods for periodic control systems, and plenty of practical examples to demonstrate the validity of proposed periodic control...... technology for power converters. It proposes a unified framework for housing periodic control schemes for power converters, and provides a general proportional-integral-derivative control solution to periodic signal compensation in extensive engineering applications. Periodic Control of Power Electronic...

  5. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: cropers@gwdg.de [4th Physical Institute - Solids and Nanostructures, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  6. The simulation of the electron beam spot control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Emilian Oltean

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron beams have many special properties which make them particularly well suited for use in materials processing, wherever conventional techniques failed or proved to be inefficient. The entire process has a lot of time varying parameters, so using a distributed control system for 3d position of the electron beam spot may improve the quality of the material processing. Matlab environment was used for model implementation and simulations of the control system which contains the focusing and deflecting components. Due the nature of the process and knowing the electron beam equipment we proposed for the simulations scenarios with a 3D virtual surface.

  7. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  8. Rate control for electron gun evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellingerhout, A.J.G.; Janocko, M.A.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Principles for obtaining high-quality rate control for electron gun evaporation are discussed. The design criteria for rate controllers are derived from this analysis. Results are presented which have been obtained with e-guns whose evaporation rate is controlled by a Wehnelt electrode or by sweeping of the electron beam. Further improvements of rate stability can be obtained by improved design of e-guns and power supplies

  9. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  10. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  11. Some unusual electronic patterns on graphite surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gives rise to one-dimensional fringe-like pattern as seen with the STM. We are also reporting here observation of such large-scale linear fringes near defects. 2. Experimental details. Experiments were done with a home-built compact STM similar to the one de- scribed in [10]. This STM uses commercial electronics and ...

  12. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  13. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  14. Intelligent Electronic Speed Controller, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project intends to design and develop an Intelligent Electronic Speed Controller (IESC) for use on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The IESC will advance the...

  15. Can electronic stability control replace studded tyres?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Highlights • Electronic stability control can substitute studded tyres. • This makes it easier to discourage the use of studded tyres. • A certain level of use of studded tyres makes roads less slippery.......Highlights • Electronic stability control can substitute studded tyres. • This makes it easier to discourage the use of studded tyres. • A certain level of use of studded tyres makes roads less slippery....

  16. Electrostatic Dust Control on Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Calle, C. I.; Curtis, S. A.; Keller, J. F.; Minetto, F.; Mantovani, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    Successful operation for exploration of planetary regoliths will depend on the capability to keep surfaces free of dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Such study is essential in order to resolve issues in dealing with regolith fines identified during the Apollo missions where dust behaved like abrasive Velcro before returning to the Moon. During Moon landings, locally-induced stirring of the regolith caused dust to be suspended long enough to come into contact with conducting surfaces. Lunar fines, because of their electrostatic charging, were difficult to collect and sparsely sampled: bag seals were broken, samples contaminated and lost. Our objectives here are to describe a multi-faceted electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue, as well as to present our preliminary results which confirm the view that the successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Our device concept combines electron or ion beams, acting as a plasma dust sweeper to control the flow of dust by systematic scanning of the surface with an electrostatically controlled potential. A plate of the opposite potential used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on extensive areas of exposed impact-generated regolith, on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  17. The role of electron scattering in electron-induced surface chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Electron-induced chemistry on surfaces plays a key role in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), a single-step lithography technique that has increasingly gained interest in the past decade. It is crucial for the understanding and modelling of this process to know the role of the surface

  18. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  19. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  20. The surface electronic structure of Y(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, C.

    1998-12-01

    Yttrium has been grown epitaxially on W(110). The growth was monitored by using photoemission spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. The film thickness has been gauged by the attenuation of the W 4f 7/2 bulk component. The films have been grown reproducibly and show a prominent surface state which is indicative of good order and low contamination. Angle-Resolved Ultra-Violet Photoemission Spectroscopy has been used to examine the valence band of these ultra-thin films. The films show a very different structure to the valence band of a bulk crystal of yttrium. The differences have been investigated by a series of model calculations using the LMASA-46 tight-binding LMTO program. The calculations suggest that the ultra-thin film surface state may be hybridised with a tungsten orbital having (x 2 - y 2 ) character. (author)

  1. EVOLUTION OF IONS AFTER MULTIPLE ELECTRON-CAPTURE FROM SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R; DAS, J

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the electronic processes which occur when a multiply charged ion is approaching an atomic target on the one hand or a metal surface on the other hand. In both caws three collision phases can be identified: those of attraction, of electron capture and of decay in the vacuum;

  2. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homoge- neously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with ...

  3. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with different ...

  4. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  5. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-12-19

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  6. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  7. Electronic collective modes and instabilities on semiconductor surfaces. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1984-01-01

    A Green's-function theory of electronic collective modes is presented which leads to a practical scheme for a microscopic determination of surface elementary excitations in conducting as well as nonconducting solids. Particular emphasis is placed on semiconductor surfaces where the jellium approximation is not valid, due to the importance of density fluctuations on a microscopic scale (reflected in the local-field effects). Starting from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green's function of the surface system, an equation of motion for the electron-hole pair is obtained. Its solutions determine the energy spectra, lifetimes, and amplitudes of the surface elementary excitations, i.e., surface plasmons, excitons, polaritons, and magnons. Exchange and correlation effects are taken into account through the random-phase and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (screened electron-hole attraction) approximations. The formalism is applied to the study of electronic (charge- and spin-density) instabilities at covalent semiconductor surfaces. Quantitative calculations for an eight-layer Si(111) slab display an instability of the ideal paramagnetic surface with respect to spin-density waves with wavelength nearly corresponding to (2 x 1) and (7 x 7) superstructures

  8. Automatic control variac system for electronic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuocheng; Wang Dan; Jing Lan; Qiao Weimin; Ma Yunhai

    2006-01-01

    An automatic control variac system is designed in order to satisfy the controlling requirement of the electronic accelerator developed by the Institute. Both design and operational principles, structure of the system as well as the software of industrial PC and micro controller unit are described. The interfaces of the control module are RS232 and RS485. A fiber optical interface (FOC) could be set up if an industrial FOC network is necessary, which will extend the filed of its application and make the communication of the system better. It is shown in practice that the system can adjust the variac output voltage automatically and assure the accurate and automatic control of the electronic accelerator. The system is designed in accordance with the general design principles and possesses the merits such as easy operation and maintenance, good expansibility, and low cost, thus it could also be used in other industrial branches. (authors)

  9. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  10. A surface diffuse scattering model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices is studied on the basis of the results previously obtained, considering a surface diffuse scattering; the importance of the results obtained for a better understanding of the influence of the fringing field in surface charge coupled devices is discussed. (author)

  11. 78 FR 11553 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... adequacy under Sec. 611 of Public Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special...; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Awareness and Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation...) associated with the control surface awareness and mode annunciation of the electronic flight control system...

  12. Control system in the technological electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boriskin, V.N.; Akchurin, Yu.I.; Bahmetev, N.N.; Gurin, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The special system has been developed for linac control.It controls the electron beam current,the energy and the position,protects the accelerating and scanning systems from the damage caused by the beam;blocks the modulator and the klystron amplifier in the case of intolerable operating modes;regulates the phase and power of the HF signals in the injecting system and also regulates the source power currents in the magnetic system

  13. Model based design of electronic throttle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Fenin; Ranjan, Ashish; Bhowmick, Pathikrit; Rammohan, A.

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of torque based Engine Management Systems, the precise control and robust performance of the throttle body becomes a key factor in the overall performance of the vehicle. Electronic Throttle Control provides benefits such as improved air-fuel ratio for improving the vehicle performance and lower exhausts emissions to meet the stringent emission norms. Modern vehicles facilitate various features such as Cruise Control, Traction Control, Electronic Stability Program and Pre-crash systems. These systems require control over engine power without driver intervention, which is not possible with conventional mechanical throttle system. Thus these systems are integrated to function with the electronic throttle control. However, due to inherent non-linearities in the throttle body, the control becomes a difficult task. In order to eliminate the influence of this hysteresis at the initial operation of the butterfly valve, a control to compensate the shortage must be added to the duty required for starting throttle operation when the initial operation is detected. Therefore, a lot of work is being done in this field to incorporate the various nonlinearities to achieve robust control. In our present work, the ETB was tested to verify the working of the system. Calibration of the TPS sensors was carried out in order to acquire accurate throttle opening angle. The response of the calibrated system was then plotted against a step input signal. A linear model of the ETB was prepared using Simulink and its response was compared with the experimental data to find out the initial deviation of the model from the actual system. To reduce this deviation, non-linearities from existing literature were introduced to the system and a response analysis was performed to check the deviation from the actual system. Based on this investigation, an introduction of a new nonlinearity parameter can be used in future to reduce the deviation further making the control of the ETB more

  14. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  15. ELECTRON AVALANCHE MODEL OF DIELECTRIC-VACUUM SURFACE BREAKDOWN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, E J

    2007-02-21

    The model assumes that an 'initiating event' results in positive ions on the surface near the anode and reverses the direction of the normal component of electric field so that electrons in vacuum are attracted to the dielectric locally. A sequence of surface electron avalanches progresses in steps from the anode to the cathode. For 200 kV across 1 cm, the spacing of avalanches is predicted to be about 13 microns. The time for avalanches to step from the anode to the cathode is predicted to be about a ns.

  16. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  17. Controller for control of pulsed electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryazgin, A.A.; Faktorovich, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The controller is based on the K1816VE31 microprocessor and contains 22-channel integrating 10-digital two-wire analog-to-digital converter, 8-channel 12-digit digital-to-analog converter, 24-digit output register, 16-digit input register pulse generator in the range of 0.5 - 50 Hz with the regulation step of 0.05 Hz and delayed pulse generator. The controller is used for pulsed electron linear accelerator control and is reduced to regulation of the electron beam pulse repetition rate and beam energy. 1 ref., 1 fig

  18. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low-energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  19. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  20. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  1. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  2. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  3. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  4. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck's law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author)

  5. An electronically controlled automatic security access gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A. ENOKELA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The security challenges being encountered in many places require electronic means of controlling access to communities, recreational centres, offices, and homes. The electronically controlled automated security access gate being proposed in this work helps to prevent an unwanted access to controlled environments. This is achieved mainly through the use of a Radio Frequency (RF transmitter-receiver pair. In the design a microcontroller is programmed to decode a given sequence of keys that is entered on a keypad and commands a transmitter module to send out this code as signal at a given radio frequency. Upon reception of this RF signal by the receiver module, another microcontroller activates a driver circuitry to operate the gate automatically. The codes for the microcontrollers were written in C language and were debugged and compiled using the KEIL Micro vision 4 integrated development environment. The resultant Hex files were programmed into the memories of the microcontrollers with the aid of a universal programmer. Software simulation was carried out using the Proteus Virtual System Modeling (VSM version 7.7. A scaled-down prototype of the system was built and tested. The electronically controlled automated security access gate can be useful in providing security for homes, organizations, and automobile terminals. The four-character password required to operate the gate gives the system an increased level of security. Due to its standalone nature of operation the system is cheaper to maintain in comparison with a manually operated type.

  6. Electron at the Surface of Water: Dehydrated or Not?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlig, Frank; Maršálek, Ondřej; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2013), s. 338-343 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrated electron * surface solvation * ab initio molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.687, year: 2013

  7. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental design: Thirty ...

  8. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  9. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  10. Surface hardening of AISI 4340 steel by electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chienchun; Hwang Jiunren

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of electron beam (EB) surface hardening on the abrasive wear property of AISI 4340 steel. The heat treatment conditions were varied so that the influence of microstructures on the wear resistance could be evaluated. A dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion test was selected to evaluate the high stress wear properties. The results show that the weight loss decreases with increasing hardness of surface layer or base material. The EB surface hardening can improve the abrasive wear resistance by about 10%. The best heat treatment process for AISI 4340 steel against abrasive wear is oil quenching from 840 C, tempering at 370 C, the EB surface hardening under heat input of 135-150 J mm -1 . The width and depth of the wear tracks are reduced after the EB surface hardening treatment. (orig.)

  11. Controlling Underwater Robots with Electronic Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We are developing robot controllers based on biomimetic design principles. The goal is to realise the adaptive capabilities of the animal models in natural environments. We report feasibility studies of a hybrid architecture that instantiates a command and coordinating level with computed discrete-time map-based (DTM neuronal networks and the central pattern generators with analogue VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration electronic neuron (aVLSI networks. DTM networks are realised using neurons based on a 1-D or 2-D Map with two additional parameters that define silent, spiking and bursting regimes. Electronic neurons (ENs based on Hindmarsh–Rose (HR dynamics can be instantiated in analogue VLSI and exhibit similar behaviour to those based on discrete components. We have constructed locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs with aVLSI networks that can be modulated to select different behaviours on the basis of selective command input. The two technologies can be fused by interfacing the signals from the DTM circuits directly to the aVLSI CPGs. Using DTMs, we have been able to simulate complex sensory fusion for rheotaxic behaviour based on both hydrodynamic and optical flow senses. We will illustrate aspects of controllers for ambulatory biomimetic robots. These studies indicate that it is feasible to fabricate an electronic nervous system controller integrating both aVLSI CPGs and layered DTM exteroceptive reflexes.

  12. Mineral mining installation with electronic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumper, T.

    1983-01-11

    A shearer-type mineral winning machine has three-phase A.C. Motors on its main body for driving cutting drums and for propelling the machine along a mineral face. The frequency of the A.C. power supplied to the motor which serves to move the machine is varied and controlled in dependence on the operation of the cutting drums. Electronic control means for monitoring the performance of the cutting drums and for controlling the frequency of the A.C. power supplied to the machine drive motor are located in a control station in a protected position in a gallery remote from the machine and power is supplied to the machine via cables and/or bus bars.

  13. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis resu...

  14. Dissociative electron attachment on surfaces and in bulk media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-01-01

    A theory of dissociative electron attachment to molecules condensed at surfaces and embedded within bulk media is developed. The theory of low-energy electron diffraction is used to obtain the width for electron-molecule resonance scattering in the condensed phase from the width for the gas phase. It is then employed for the calculation of dissociative attachment in the framework of the nonlocal complex potential theory. Specific calculations using the effective mass approximation are carried out for electron attachment to CH 3 Cl and CF 3 Cl molecules physisorbed on the surface of a Kr film. The role of image states and image-potential resonances is analyzed. The results show an increase by several orders of magnitude in the cross section for physisorbed molecules as compared with gas-phase molecules. This is in general agreement with the measured cross sections. However, the position of the peak in the cross section for CH 3 Cl is significantly shifted towards higher energies as compared to experiment [K. Nagesha et al., J. Chem. Phys. 114, 4934 (2001)], and the magnitude of the calculated cross section for CF 3 Cl at the surface is significantly higher than the measured value. Possible reasons for disagreements are analyzed

  15. The Spartan attitude control system - Control electronics assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. W.

    1986-10-01

    The Spartan attitude control system (ACS) represents an evolutionary development of the previous STRAP-5 ACS through the use of state-of-the-art microprocessors and hardware. Despite a gyro rate signal noise problem that caused the early depletion of argon gas, the Spartan 101 experiment was able to collect several hours of data from two targets. Attention is presently given to the ACS sequencer module, sensor interface box, valve driver box, control electronics software, jam tables, and sequencer programs.

  16. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  17. Cell surface engineering to control cellular interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Custódio, Catarina A.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface composition determines all interactions of the cell with its environment, thus cell functions such as adhesion, migration and cell–cell interactions can potentially be controlled by engineering and manipulating the cell membrane. Cell membranes present a rich repertoire of molecules, therefore a versatile ground for modification. However the complex and dynamic nature of the cell surface is also a major challenge for cell surface engineering that should also involve strategies co...

  18. Surface Relaxations, Surface Energies and Electronic Structures of BaSnO3 (001) Surfaces: Ab Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slassi, A.; Hammi, M.; El Rhazouani, O.

    2017-07-01

    The surface relaxations, surface energies and electronic structures of BaO- and SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surfaces have been studied by employing the first-principles density functional theory. For both terminations, we find that the upper-layer Ba and Sn atoms move inward, whereas upper-layer O atoms move outward from the surface. Moreover, the largest relaxations are occurred on the first-layer atoms of both terminations. The surface rumpling of BaO-terminated BaSnO3 (001) is slightly less than that of the SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surface. The surface energies show that both terminated surfaces are energetically stable and favorable. Finally, the surface band gap is slightly decreased for the BaO termination, while it is dramatically decreased for the SnO2 termination.

  19. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  20. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  1. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a comprehensive study of the surface physics of epitaxial CuInSe 2 films. It comprises analyses of the surface morphology and reconstruction, electronic band structure as well as hetero-junctions relevant to photovoltaic applications. Therefore, especially the aspect of stoichiometry variation from the CuInSe 2 to the copper-deficient defect phases was considered. Preparation and analysis was completely performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions in order to ensure the investigation of well-defined samples free of contaminants. For some of the analysis techniques, single-crystalline samples are indispensable: They allow for the determination of surface periodicity by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). In combination with concentration depth profiling by angle-resolved x-ray photoemission, to types of surface reconstructions could be distinguished for the near-stoichiometric CuInSe 2 (112) surface. In the copper-rich case, it is stabilized by Cu In anti-site defects and on the indium-rich side by 2 V Cu defects, as predicted by surface total energy calculations by Jaffe and Zunger. Both configurations correspond to a c(4 x 2) reconstruction of the zinc blende type (111) surface. For the defect compound CuIn 3 Se 5 , a sphalerite order of the surface was found, which points at a weakening or absence of the chalcopyrite order in the bulk of the material. The unusual stability of the (112) surface could also be proven by comparison with the reconstruction and surface order of (001) and (220) surfaces. The results from surface analysis were used to measure the valence band structure of the epitaxial samples by synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The CuInSe 2 (001) surface gives access to the high symmetry directions Γ-T and Γ-N of momentum space. By contrasting the data obtained for the stoichiometric surface with the copper-poor defect compound, a reduction of the valence band dispersion and a broadening of

  2. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjorchmar; Johansson, Martin; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO 2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm 2 have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and work function measurements. Energy spectra of electron emission from the devices under an applied bias voltage have been recorded for the clean Au surface and for two Cs coverages and simultaneous work function curves have been obtained. The electron emission onset is seen to appear at the surface work function. A method for cleaning the ex situ deposited Au top electrodes to a degree satisfactory to surface science studies has been developed, and a threshold for oxide damage by low-energy ion exposure between 0.5 and 1 keV has been determined.

  3. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudikov, D.A.; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  4. Controlled double-slit electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Roger; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman; Pope, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Double-slit diffraction is a corner stone of quantum mechanics. It illustrates key features of quantum mechanics: interference and the particle-wave duality of matter. In 1965, Richard Feynman presented a thought experiment to show these features. Here we demonstrate the full realization of his famous thought experiment. By placing a movable mask in front of a double-slit to control the transmission through the individual slits, probability distributions for single- and double-slit arrangements were observed. Also, by recording single electron detection events diffracting through a double-slit, a diffraction pattern was built up from individual events. (paper)

  5. Morphology and electronic properties of silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shu

    2007-12-01

    Several issues related to SiC surfaces are studied in the thesis using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Specific surfaces examined include electropolished SiC, epitaxial graphene on SiC, and vicinal (i.e. slightly miscut from a low-index direction) SiC that have been subjected to high temperature hydrogen-etching. The electropolished surfaces are meant to mimic electrochemically etched SiC, which forms a porous network. The chemical treatment of the surface is similar between electropolishing and electrochemical etching, but the etching conditions are slightly different such that the former produces a flat surface (that is amenable to STM study) whereas the latter produces a complex 3-dimensional porous network. We have used these porous SiC layers as semi-permeable membranes in a biosensor, and we find that the material is quite biocompatible. The purpose of the STM/STS study is to investigate the surface properties of the SiC on the atomic scale in an effort to explain this biocompatibility. The observed tunneling spectra are found to be very asymmetric, with a usual amount of current at positive voltages but no observable current at negative voltages. We propose that this behavior is due to surface charge accumulating on an incompletely passivated surface. Measurements on SiC surfaces prepared by various amounts of hydrogen-etching are used to support this interpretation. Comparison with tunneling computations reveals a density of about 10 13 cm-2 fixed charges on both the electro-polished and the H-etched surfaces. The relatively insulating nature observed on the electro-polished SiC surface may provide an explanation for the biocompatibility of the surface. Graphene, a monolayer of carbon, is a new material for electronic devices. Epitaxial graphene on SiC is fabricated by the Si sublimation method in which a substrate is heated up to about 1350°C in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of the graphene is

  6. Tuning the electronic properties at the surface of BaBiO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreyra, C. [GIyA y INN, CNEA, Av.Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guller, F.; Llois, A. M.; Vildosola, V. [GIyA y INN, CNEA, Av.Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Marchini, F.; Williams, F. J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, INQUIMAE-CONICET, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón 2, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lüders, U. [CRISMAT, CNRS UMR 6508, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Albornoz, C. [GIyA y INN, CNEA, Av.Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Leyva, A. G. [GIyA y INN, CNEA, Av.Gral Paz 1499, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, UNSAM, Campus Miguelete, (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2016-06-15

    The presence of 2D electron gases at surfaces or interfaces in oxide thin films remains a hot topic in condensed matter physics. In particular, BaBiO{sub 3} appears as a very interesting system as it was theoretically proposed that its (001) surface should become metallic if a Bi-termination is achieved (Vildosola et al., PRL 110, 206805 (2013)). Here we report on the preparation by pulsed laser deposition and characterization of BaBiO{sub 3} thin films on silicon. We show that the texture of the films can be tuned by controlling the growth conditions, being possible to stabilize strongly (100)-textured films. We find significant differences on the spectroscopic and transport properties between (100)-textured and non-textured films. We rationalize these experimental results by performing first principles calculations, which indicate the existence of electron doping at the (100) surface. This stabilizes Bi ions in a 3+ state, shortens Bi-O bonds and reduces the electronic band gap, increasing the surface conductivity. Our results emphasize the importance of surface effects on the electronic properties of perovskites, and provide strategies to design novel oxide heterostructures with potential interface-related 2D electron gases.

  7. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Johansson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm(2) have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission...... characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS...

  8. Surface-Controlled Metal Oxide Resistive Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr-Jian

    2015-10-28

    To explore the surface effect on resistive random-access memory (ReRAM), the impact of surface roughness on the characteristics of ZnO ReRAM were studied. The thickness-independent resistance and the higher switching probability of ZnO ReRAM with rough surfaces indicate the importance of surface oxygen chemisorption on the switching process. Furthermore, the improvements in switching probability, switching voltage and resistance distribution observed for ReRAM with rough surfaces can be attributed to the stable oxygen adatoms under various ambience conditions. The findings validate the surface-controlled stability and uniformity of ReRAM and can serve as the guideline for developing practical device applications.

  9. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  10. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  11. JCMT active surface control system: implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian A.

    1998-05-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii is a 15 meter sub-millimeter telescope which operates in the 350 microns to 2 millimeter region. The primary antenna surface consists of 276 panels, each of which is positioned by 3 stepper motors. In order to achieve the highest possible surface accuracy we are embarking upon a project to actively control the position of the panels adjuster system is based on a 6809 micro connected to the control computer by a GPIB interface. This system is slow and inflexible and it would prove difficult to build an active surface control system with it. Part of the upgrade project is to replace the existing micro with a 68060 VME micro. The poster paper will describe how the temperature of the antenna is monitored with the new system, how a Finite Element Analyses package transforms temperature changes into a series of panel adjuster moves, and how these moves are then applied to the surface. The FEA package will run on a high end Sun workstation. A series of DRAMA tasks distributed between the workstation and the Baja 68060 VxWorks Active Surface Control System micro will control the temperature monitoring, FEA and panel adjustment activities. Users can interact with the system via a Tcl/TK based GUI.

  12. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  13. Reversible Compositional Control of Oxide Surfaces by Electrochemical Potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Mutoro, Eva

    2012-01-05

    Perovskite oxides can exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics such as being catalytically active and electronically/ionically conducting, and thus, they have been used in a number of solid-state devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sensors. As the surface compositions of perovskites can greatly influence the catalytic properties, knowing and controlling their surface compositions is crucial to enhance device performance. In this study, we demonstrate that the surface strontium (Sr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations of perovskite-based thin films can be controlled reversibly at elevated temperatures by applying small electrical potential biases. The surface compositional changes of La 0.8Sr 0.2CoO 3-δ (LSC 113), (La 0.5Sr 0.5) 2CoO 4±δ (LSC 214), and LSC 214-decorated LSC 113 films (LSC 113/214) were investigated in situ by utilizing synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), where the largest changes of surface Sr were found for the LSC 113/214 surface. These findings offer the potential of reversibly controlling the surface functionality of perovskites. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Relation between surface crystallography and surface electron structure of the superlattice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Igor; Strasser, T.; Schattke, W.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, 2&3 (2003), s. 195-199 ISSN 0218-625X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : surface electron structure * superlattices * one-step photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.586, year: 2003

  15. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  16. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  17. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    In the field of electron transport in metal films and wires, the 'size effect' refers to the increase in the resistivity of the films and wires as their critical dimensions (thickness of film, width and height of wires) approach or become less than the electron mean free path lambda, which is, for example, 39 nm for bulk copper at room temperature. This size-effect is currently of great concern to the semiconductor industry because the continued downscaling of feature sizes has already lead to Cu interconnect wires in this size effect regime, with a reported 2.5 times higher resistivity for 40 nm wide Cu wires than for bulk Cu. Silver is a possible alternate material for interconnect wires and titanium nitride is proposed as a gate metal in novel field-effect-transistors. Therefore, it is important to develop an understanding of how the growth, the surface morphology, and the microstructure of ultrathin (few nanometers) Cu, Ag and TiN layers affect their electrical properties. This dissertation aims to advance the scientific knowledge of electron scattering at surfaces (external surfaces and grain boundaries), that are, the primary reasons for the size-effect in metal conductors. The effect of surface and grain boundary scattering on the resistivity of Cu thin films and nanowires is separately quantified using (i) in situ transport measurements on single-crystal, atomically smooth Cu(001) layers, (ii) textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers and patterned wires with independently varying grain size, thickness and line width, and (iii) in situ grown interfaces including Cu-Ta, Cu-MgO, Cu-vacuum and Cu-oxygen. In addition, the electron surface scattering is also measured in situ for single-crystal Ag(001), (111) twinned epitaxial Ag(001), and single-crystal TiN(001) layers. Cu(001), Ag(001), and TiN(001) layers with a minimum continuous thickness of 4, 3.5 and 1.8 nm, respectively, are grown by ultra-high vacuum magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates with

  18. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5...... nm. We argue that excitation of this mode, featuring very strong absorption, has a crucial role in experimental realizations of non-resonant light absorption by ultra-sharp convex grooves with fabrication-induced asymmetry. The occurrence of the antisymmetric GSP mode along with the fundamental GSP...

  19. Metals: Phonon states, electron states and Fermi surfaces. Subvolume a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, P.H.; Schober, H.; Sellmyer, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of tables and diagrams is the first contribution to a larger programme aiming at a complete and critical tabulation of reliable data relevant to metal physics. No such complete collection exists at present, and these tables should fill a long felt need of both experimentalists and theoreticians. Group III in the New Series of the Landolt-Boernstein tables deals with Crystal and Solid State Physics. Volume III/13 to which this subvolume 13a belongs will cover all data published up to 1980 on phonon and electron states and Fermi surfaces in metals. Both experimental and theoretical results are included. (orig./WL)

  20. Electromagnetic surface waves at the interface of a relativistic electron beam with vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.M.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation for electromagnetic surface waves propagating at the interface between a relativistic electron beam and vacuum is derived. The excitation of surface modes in a plasma at rest by a relativistic electron beam is discussed

  1. Controlled adsorption of cytochrome c to nanostructured gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Inês; Feio, Maria J.; Santos, Nuno C.; Eaton, Peter; Serro, Ana Paula; Saramago, Benilde; Pereira, Eulália; Franco, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Controlled electrostatic physisorption of horse heart cytochrome c (Cyt c) onto nanostructured gold surfaces was investigated using Quartz-Crystal Microbalance measurements in planar gold surfaces with or without functionalization using a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of the alkanethiol mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). MUA is a useful functionalization ligand for gold surfaces, shedding adsorbed biomolecules from the excessive electron density of the metal. A parallel analysis was conducted in the corresponding curved surfaces of 15 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), using zeta-potential and UV– visible spectroscopy. Atomic Force Microscopy of both types of functionalized gold surfaces with a MUA SAM, allowed for visualization of Cyt c deposits on the nanostructured gold surface. The amount of Cyt c adsorbed onto the gold surface could be controlled by the solution pH. For the assays conducted at pH 4.5, when MUA SAM- functionalized planar gold surfaces are positive or neutral, and Cyt c has a positive net charge, only 13 % of the planar gold surface area was coated with protein. In contrast, at pH 7.4, when MUA SAM-functionalized planar gold surfaces and Cyt c have opposite charges, a protein coverage of 28 % could be observed implying an adsorption process strongly governed by electrostatic forces. Cyt c adsorption on planar and curved gold surfaces are found to be greatly favored by the presence of a MUA-capping layer. In particular, on the AuNPs, the binding constant is three times larger than the binding constant obtained for the original citrate-capped AuNPs.

  2. Controlled adsorption of cytochrome c to nanostructured gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Ines [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica (Portugal); Feio, Maria J. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Santos, Nuno C. [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Medicina Molecular (Portugal); Eaton, Peter [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Serro, Ana Paula; Saramago, Benilde [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Instituto Superior Tecnico (Portugal); Pereira, Eulalia [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Franco, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardo.franco@fct.unl.pt [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    Controlled electrostatic physisorption of horse heart cytochrome c (Cyt c) onto nanostructured gold surfaces was investigated using Quartz-Crystal Microbalance measurements in planar gold surfaces with or without functionalization using a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of the alkanethiol mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). MUA is a useful functionalization ligand for gold surfaces, shedding adsorbed biomolecules from the excessive electron density of the metal. A parallel analysis was conducted in the corresponding curved surfaces of 15 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), using zeta-potential and UV- visible spectroscopy. Atomic Force Microscopy of both types of functionalized gold surfaces with a MUA SAM, allowed for visualization of Cyt c deposits on the nanostructured gold surface. The amount of Cyt c adsorbed onto the gold surface could be controlled by the solution pH. For the assays conducted at pH 4.5, when MUA SAM- functionalized planar gold surfaces are positive or neutral, and Cyt c has a positive net charge, only 13 % of the planar gold surface area was coated with protein. In contrast, at pH 7.4, when MUA SAM-functionalized planar gold surfaces and Cyt c have opposite charges, a protein coverage of 28 % could be observed implying an adsorption process strongly governed by electrostatic forces. Cyt c adsorption on planar and curved gold surfaces are found to be greatly favored by the presence of a MUA-capping layer. In particular, on the AuNPs, the binding constant is three times larger than the binding constant obtained for the original citrate-capped AuNPs.

  3. Controlled thinning and surface smoothening of silicon nanopillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalem, S; Werner, P; Talalaev, V G; Nilsson, B; Hagberg, M; Arthursson, Oe; Soedervall, U

    2009-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed to thin electron beam fabricated silicon nanopillars under controlled surface manipulation by transforming the surface of the pillars to an oxide shell layer followed by the growth of sacrificial ammonium silicon fluoride coating. The results show the formation of an oxide shell and a silicon core without significantly changing the original length and shape of the pillars. The oxide shell layer thickness can be controlled from a few nanometers up to a few hundred nanometers. While downsizing in diameter, smooth Si pillar surfaces of less than 10 nm roughness within 2 μm were produced after exposure to vapors of HF and HNO 3 mixture as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The attempt to expose for long durations leads to the growth of a thick oxide whose strain effect on pillars can be assessed by coupled LO-TO vibrational modes of Si-O bonds. Photoluminescence (PL) of the pillar structures which have been downsized exhibits visible and infrared emissions, which are attributable to microscopic pillars and to the confinement of excited carriers in the Si core, respectively. The formation of smooth core-shell structures while reducing the diameter of the Si pillars has a potential in fabricating nanoscale electronic devices and functional components.

  4. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  5. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Angelucci, M.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  6. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron yield (SEY curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  7. Development of the electron gun control system of SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dayong; Lin Guoqiang; Liu Dekang; Shen Liren

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun is the key part of a linac, the beam quality of which depends on beam quality of the electron gun, hence the need of a stable control system of the electron gun to ensure its safe operation.In this paper, we report our progresses in developing the linac's electron gun control system of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). It uses PLC as the device controllers, with the monitoring software developed on EPICS. The whole system is connected by Ethernet. The PLC and Ethernet technology ensures good reliability and easy maintenance of the electron gun control system. (authors)

  8. Recent advances in ion and electron spectroscopy of polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardella, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of microdomains and bonding at multicomponent polymer material interfaces has been studied using a variety of surface sensitive spectroscopic techniques. In our laboratory, low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) serve to complement results from angular dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sampling and SEM techniques to provide a quantitative picture of the relationships between structure, bonding, morphology and microdomain formation in near surface regions of polymeric systems. The added surface sensitivity of ISS can yield quantitative information at a sampling depth of 3-5 Å, which, with ESCA and FTIR analysis yields a "non-destructive" depth profile of domain formation in copolymer and blend systems. These studies will be illustrated with results from siloxane and siloxane/polycarbonate copolymer systems, where a complete picture of surface domain formation and morphology as a function of composition and polymer crystallinity has been developed. ISS can also yield information regarding the orientation of surface functional groups which ESCA and FTIR do not have either sensitivity and/or sufficient detection limits to analyze. These studies will be illustrated by the analysis of plasma hydrolysis/oxidation of stereoregular poly(methyl-methacrylate). The effects of functional group orientation on reactivity will be explored using results from ISS, ESCA and FTIR for stereoregular (isotatic, syndiotactic) and random (atactic) PMMA. Electron energy loss spectroscopy at high resolution (HREELS) has recently been extended to the examination of polymer and organic surfaces. Vibrational information from this experiment can yield very precise results about surface functional groups (1-20 Å) but at much lower resolution than is typical from IR and Raman techniques. However, the promise of evaluating surface

  9. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shutthanandan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power free electron lasers (FEL. Photocathode quantum efficiency degradation is due to residual gases in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include helium ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, atomic force microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but show evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements, the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  10. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  11. Control of Surface and Edge Oxidation on Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kaci L; Wells, Rebekah A; Hu, Jun; Yang, Teng; Dong, Baojuan; Guo, Huaihong; Woomer, Adam H; Druffel, Daniel L; Alabanza, Anginelle; Tománek, David; Warren, Scott C

    2017-03-15

    Phosphorene is emerging as an important two-dimensional semiconductor, but controlling the surface chemistry of phosphorene remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that controlled oxidation of phosphorene determines the composition and spatial distribution of the resulting oxide. We used X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to measure the binding energy shifts that accompany oxidation. We interpreted these spectra by calculating the binding energy shift for 24 likely bonding configurations, including phosphorus oxides and hydroxides located on the basal surface or edges of flakes. After brief exposure to high-purity oxygen or high-purity water vapor at room temperature, we observed phosphorus in the +1 and +2 oxidation states; longer exposures led to a large population of phosphorus in the +3 oxidation state. To provide insight into the spatial distribution of the oxide, transmission electron microscopy was performed at several stages during the oxidation. We found crucial differences between oxygen and water oxidants: while pure oxygen produced an oxide layer on the van der Waals surface, water oxidized the material at pre-existing defects such as edges or steps. We propose a mechanism based on the thermodynamics of electron transfer to interpret these observations. This work opens a route to functionalize the basal surface or edges of two-dimensional (2D) black phosphorus through site-selective chemical reactions and presents the opportunity to explore the synthesis of 2D phosphorene oxide by oxidation.

  12. Surface topography analysis for dimensional quality control of replication at the micrometre scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcon, M.; Marinello, F.; Tosello, Guido

    2011-01-01

    and replica surfaces must be quantitatively analysed and compared. In the present work, reference simulated surfaces were considered and studied in order to evaluate the effectiveness and traceability of different analysis tools for replication quality control. Topographies were analysed simulating different...... surface mapping techniques, such as optical profilometry, scanning probe microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Different strategies for surface analysis and comparison are proposed and discussed taking into account the instrument, the measuring range and the functionality of the surface....

  13. Hydrogeological controls of groundwater - land surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Etienne; Batelaan, Okke; Goderniaux, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Interaction of groundwater with the land surface impacts a wide range of climatic, hydrologic, ecologic and geomorphologic processes. Many site-specific studies have successfully focused on measuring and modelling groundwater-surface water interaction, but upscaling or estimation at catchment or regional scale appears to be challenging. The factors controlling the interaction at regional scale are still poorly understood. In this contribution, a new 2-D (cross-sectional) analytical groundwater flow solution is used to derive a dimensionless criterion that expresses the conditions under which the groundwater outcrops at the land surface (Bresciani et al., 2016). The criterion gives insights into the functional relationships between geology, topography, climate and the locations of groundwater discharge along river systems. This sheds light on the debate about the topographic control of groundwater flow and groundwater-surface water interaction, as effectively the topography only influences the interaction when the groundwater table reaches the land surface. The criterion provides a practical tool to predict locations of groundwater discharge if a limited number of geomorphological and hydrogeological parameters (recharge, hydraulic conductivity and depth to impervious base) are known, and conversely it can provide regional estimates of the ratio of recharge over hydraulic conductivity if locations of groundwater discharge are known. A case study with known groundwater discharge locations located in South-West Brittany, France shows the feasibility of regional estimates of the ratio of recharge over hydraulic conductivity. Bresciani, E., Goderniaux, P. and Batelaan, O., 2016, Hydrogeological controls of water table-land surface interactions. Geophysical Research Letters 43(18): 9653-9661. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2016GL070618

  14. Cells at risk for the production of bone tumors in man: an electron microscope study of the endosteal surface of control bone and bone from a human radium case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Henning, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    The endosteal cells of bone from a radium dial worker are documented for the first time by electron microscopy. Fresh samples of bone and tumor tissue from the femur were made available as a result of amputation for a fibrosarcoma in the region of the right knee joint. Bone was examined from a site proximal to the tumor where no invasion of tumor tissue was evident. The patient, who was exposed at age 16 in 1918, died in 1978 with a terminal body burden, calculated to be 1.2 μCi, 226 Ra. A sample of bone, also obtained at amputation from an unirradiated control patient, age 65, was examined from the same site in the femur. A comparison of the bone bone-marrow interface from the two patients showed that, unlike the control bone where cells were seen close to bone mineral, an intervening fibrotic layer was interposed between the marrow cells and the bone mineral in the radium bone. This layer varied in thickness up to 50 μm and was usually acellular, although cell remnants and occasionally cells, which appeared viable, were seen. Autoradiographs of sections of bone adjacent to those used for the electron microscope studies are being evaluated

  15. Control and characterization of textured, hydrophobic ionomer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyuan

    Polymer thin films are of increasing interest in many industrial and technological applications. Superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces have attracted a lot of attention for their application in self-cleaning, anti-sticking coatings, stain resistance, or anti-contamination surfaces in diverse technologies, including medical, transportation, textiles, electronics and paints. This thesis focuses on the preparation of nanometer to micrometer-size particle textured surfaces which are desirable for super water repellency. Textured surfaces consisting of nanometer to micrometer-sized lightly sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (SPS) particles were prepared by rapid evaporation of the solvent from a dilute polymer solution cast onto silica. The effect of the solvent used to spin coat the film, the molecular weight of the ionomer, and the rate of solvent evaporation were investigated. The nano-particle or micron-particle textured ionomer surfaces were prepared by either spin coating or solution casting ionomer solutions at controlled evaporation rates. The surface morphologies were consistent with a spinodal decomposition mechanism where the surface first existed as a percolated-like structure and then ripened into droplets if molecular mobility was retained for sufficient time. The SPS particles or particle aggregates were robust and resisted deformation even after annealing at 120°C for one week. The water contact angles on as-prepared surfaces were relatively low, ~ 90° since the polar groups in ionomer reduce the surface hydrophobicity. After chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, the surface contact angles increased to ~ 109° on smooth surfaces and ~140° on the textured surfaces. Water droplets stuck to these surfaces even when tilted 90 degrees. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared by spraying coating ionomer solutions and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane onto textured surfaces. The

  16. 77 FR 57039 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... adequacy under Sec. 611 of Public Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special... Flight Control System: Control Surface Awareness and Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation... feature(s) associated with the control surface awareness and mode annunciation of the electronic flight...

  17. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  18. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  19. SURFACE TEXTURE ANALYSIS FOR FUNCTIONALITY CONTROL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This docume...... contains a short description of each case story, 3-D roughness parameters analysis and relation with the product’s functionality.......This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This document...

  20. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    mediated by tunneling through a potential barrier which is determined by the thickness of the ice layer. In the second system electron solvation at small alkali/water clusters directly prepared at the metal substrate is investigated. In these experiments the average number of water molecules in such a cluster can be controlled so that the population and stabilization dynamics of excess electrons can be investigated as a function of D 2 O coverage. Two main effects are observed: (i) the alkalis are solvated by a reorientation of the surrounding solvent molecules in the cluster; and (ii) above a critical number of water molecules per alkali excess electrons can localize at the clusters where they are energetically stabilized. This critical ratio depends on the type of alkali and is inversely proportional to the alkali-induced dipole moment. Finally, it is demonstrated that trapped electrons in crystalline ice adsorbed on Ru(001) can very efficiently mediate chemical reactions via dissociative electron attachment. When electronegative molecules like CFCl 3 are coadsorbed with crystalline ice a DEA process between trapped electrons and CFCl 3 molecules occurs, resulting in the formation of .CFCl 2 radicals and Cl - anions. These results suggest that photoexcited trapped electrons can play an important role in heterogeneous chemical processes on ice surfaces and could thus be relevant in the polar stratosphere chemistry.

  1. Control of insect pests with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Imamura, Taro; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2003-01-01

    Effects of electron beams with an energy of 2.5 MeV on insect pests were slightly smaller than those of gamma-rays. Electron beams at 400 Gy inactivated all the pests for cut flowers tested; spider mite (Tetraychus urticae), mealybug (Pseudococcus comstocki), leaf miner (Liriomyza trifolii), thrips (Thrips palmi, and Thrips tabaci), cutworm (Spodoptera litura) and aphid (Myzus persicae). Carnation, alstromeria, gladiolus, tulip, statice, stock, dendrobium, prairie gentian, oncidium, campanula, gloriosa, fern, gypsophila, freesia, lobelia, triteleia and gerbera were tolerant to electron beams at 400-600 Gy, while chrysanthemum, rose, lily, calla, antherium, sweet pea and iris were intolerant. Radiation-induced deterioration of chrysanthemum could be prevented by post-irradiation treatment with commercial preservative solutions or sugar solutions. Soft-electrons at 60 keV effectively inactivated eggs, larvae and pupae of red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella) and eggs of adzuki bean weevil (Callosobruchus chinensis) at a dose of 1 kGy. The adults of T. castaneum and P. interpunctella were inactivated by electron treatment at 5.0 kGy and 7.5 kGy, respectively. Adults of C. chinensis survived at 7.5 kGy, but were inactivated having lost ability to walk at 2.5 kGy. Soft-electrons at 60 keV could not completely inactivate the larvae of C. chinensis and smaller larvae (2nd instar) of maize weevil (Stiophilus zeamais) inside beans and grains, because the electrons with low penetration did not reach the larvae due to the shield of beans or grains. However, soft-electrons at 60 keV inactivated eggs, larger larvae (4th instar) and pupae of S. zeamais in rice grains, which indicated that S. zeamais was exposed to electrons even inside the grains. (author)

  2. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  3. Materials of the Regional Training Course on Validation and Process Control for Electron Beam Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluska, I.; Gluszewski, W.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation with electron beams is used in the polymer industry, food, pharmaceutical and medical device industries for sterilization of surfaces. About 20 lectures presented during the Course were devoted to all aspects of control and validation of low energy electron beam processes. They should help the product manufacturers better understand the application of the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 11137 norm, which defines the requirements and standard practices for validation of the irradiation process and the process controls required during routine processing

  4. First principles predictions of electron tunneling rates between atoms and crystalline surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidfeldt, Keith

    Charge transfer is a critical process that controls many important reactions such as photosynthesis, corrosion, and catalysis. We developed a quantitative method for calculating charge transfer rates using periodic density functional theory (DFT). This approach allows us to model from first principles the interaction between an adsorbate and arbitrary material surfaces. By deconvoluting the projected density of states of the ionization level of the atom, we can determine its width, which is proportional to the charge transfer rate. These rates can be used to predict important properties such as adsorbate excited state lifetimes and neutralization fractions for scattered ions. By comparing neutralization fractions for Li scattering off of Al(001) to experimental data, we validated our first principles method of predicting charge transfer rates. While our results are consistent with the classic Langmuir-Gurney (LG) model of adsorption for nearly-free-electron-like metal surfaces, we find several important deviations caused by the actual electronic structure of more complicated material surfaces. For example, we find that the d-band of transition metal surfaces mediates an intra-atomic hybridization of the Li ionization level. Secondly, we find that surface-projected band gaps (e.g., in Cu(111)) enhance the lifetimes of alkali atoms above surfaces containing such band gaps. In addition, our method allows us to also study atoms interacting with non-metallic surfaces where the LG model does not apply. For example, we find that alkali charge transfer rates are controlled by dangling bonds on covalently-bonded surfaces (e.g., Si(001)-(2xl)) instead of by the traditional image potential.

  5. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B. F.; Miller, A.; Helt-Hansen, J.; Buchanan, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through electron beam irradiation allows for the early release of incorporated agents such as bioactive additives. Samples were e-beam irradiated at an energy of 125 keV and doses of either 150 kGy or 500 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were degraded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), to simulate bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium.

  6. Simulation of electron beam from two strip electron guns and control of power density by rotation of gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, G K; Baruah, S; Thakur, K B

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam is preferably used for large scale evaporation of refractory materials. Material evaporation from a long and narrow source providing a well collimated wedge shaped atomic beam has applications in isotopic purification of metals relevant to nuclear industry. The electron beam from an electron gun with strip type filament provides a linear heating source. However, the high power density of the electron beam can lead to turbulence of the melt pool and undesirable splashing of molten metal. For obtaining quiet surface evaporation, the linear electron beam is generally scanned along its length. To further reduce the power density to maintain quiet evaporation the width of the vapour source can be controlled by rotating the electron gun on its plane, thereby scanning an inclined beam over the molten pool. The rotation of gun has further advantages. When multiple strip type electron guns are used for scaling up evaporation length, a dark zone appears between two beams due to physical separation of adjacent guns. This dark zone can be reduced by rotating the gun and thereby bringing two adjacent beams closer. The paper presented here provides the simulation results of the electron beam trajectory and incident power density originating from two strip electron guns by using in-house developed code. The effect of electron gun rotation on the electron beam trajectory and power density is studied. The simulation result is experimentally verified with the image of molten pool and heat affected zone taken after experiment. This technique can be gainfully utilized in controlling the time averaged power density of the electron beam and obtaining quiet evaporation from the metal molten pool.

  7. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  8. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  9. Nonlinear Control of Marine Surface Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swarup; Talole, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, a robust yaw control law design derived from nonlinear extended state observer (NESO) based nonlinear state error feedback controller (NSEFC) in conjunction with nonlinear tracking differentiator (NTD) for marine surface vessels is presented. As marine vessel operates in an environment where significant uncertainties and disturbances are present, an NESO is used to estimate the effect of the uncertainties and disturbances along with the plant states leading to a robust design through disturbance estimation and compensation. Convergence of NESO and NTD is demonstrated. The notable feature of the formulation is that to achieve robustness, accurate plant model or any characterization of the uncertainties and disturbances is not needed. Efficacy of the design is illustrated by simulation. Further, performance of the proposed design is compared with some existing controllers to showcase the effectiveness of the proposed design.

  10. Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-06-01

    Reduced surface area targets were studied using an ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser in order to determine the effect of electron sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a {K}α imaging crystal. Electrons were observed to travel along the surface of wire targets, and were slowed mainly by the induced fields. Targets with reduced surface areas were correlated with increased hot electron densities and proton energies. Hybrid Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations demonstrated increased electric sheath field strength in reduced surface area targets.

  11. Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control for Generator Excitation Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiu-yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the generator excitation control system which is equipped with static var compensator (SVC and unknown parameters, a novel adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed based on neural network and tracking error transformed function with the following features: (1 the transformation of the excitation generator model to the linear systems is omitted; (2 the prespecified performance of the tracking error can be guaranteed by combining with the tracking error transformed function; (3 the computational burden is greatly reduced by estimating the norm of the weighted vector of neural network instead of the weighted vector itself; therefore, it is more suitable for the real time control; and (4 the explosion of complicity problem inherent in the backstepping control can be eliminated. It is proved that the new scheme can make the system semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results show the effectiveness of this control scheme.

  12. Possible correlation effects of surface state electrons on a solid hydrogen film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Albrecht, Uwe; Leiderer, Paul; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of surface state electrons on thin quench-condensed hydrogen films for various electron densities. The surface state electron mobility showed a continuous dependence on the plasma parameter Gamma in the range from 20 to 130, indicating a strong influence

  13. High quality flux control system for electron gun evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelbloom, A.M.; Hadley, P.; van der Marel, D.; Mooij, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a high quality flux control system for electron gun evaporation developed and tested for the MBE growth of high temperature superconductors. The system can be applied to any electron gun without altering the electron gun itself. Essential elements of the system are a high bandwidth mass spectrometer, control electronics and a high voltage modulator to sweep the electron beam over the melt at high frequencies. the sweep amplitude of the electron beam is used to control the evaporation flux at high frequencies. The feedback loop of the system has a bandwidth of over 100 Hz, which makes it possible to grow superlattices and layered structures in a fast and precisely controlled manner

  14. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-04

    Jan 4, 2014 ... E-mail: kpsingh@iisermohali.ac.in. DOI: 10.1007/s12043-013-0646-9; ... and controlling coherent superposition of the symmetric and antisymmetric electronic states, it becomes possible to confine the ... ultraviolet (EUV) pulses in various ways to successfully demonstrate the control of electronic dynamics.

  15. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  16. Fabrication of surface micro- and nanostructures for superhydrophobic surfaces in electric and electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Yonghao

    In our study, the superhydrophobic surface based on biomimetic lotus leave is explored to maintain the desired properties for self-cleaning. Parameters in controlling bead-up and roll-off characteristics of water droplets were investigated on different model surfaces. The governing equations were proposed. Heuristic study is performed. First, the fundamental understanding of the effect of roughness on superhydrophobicity is performed. The effect of hierarchical roughness, i.e., two scale roughness effect on roughness is investigated using systems of (1) monodisperse colloidal silica sphere (submicron) arrays and Au nanoparticle on top and (2) Si micrometer pyramids and Si nanostructures on top from KOH etching and metal assisted etching of Si. The relation between the contact area fraction and water droplet contact angles are derived based on Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equation for the systems and the two scale effect is explained regarding the synergistic combination of two scales. Previously the microscopic three-phase-contact line is thought to be the key factor in determining contact angles and hystereses. In our study, Laplace pressure was brought up and related to the three-phase-contact line and taken as a key figure of merit in determining superhydrophobicity. In addition, we are one of the first to study the effect of tapered structures (wall inclination). Combining with a second scale roughness on the tapered structures, stable Cassie state for both water and low surface energy oil may be achieved. This is of great significance for designing both superhydrophobicity and superoleophobicity. Regarding the origin of contact angle hysteresis, study of superhydrophobicity on micrometer Si pillars was performed. The relation between the interface work of function and contact angle hysteresis was proposed and derived mathematically based on the Young-Dupre equation. The three-phase-contact line was further related to a secondary scale roughness induced. Based on

  17. Influence of surface topography on elastically backscattered electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Da, B; Gong, J B; Ding, Z J; Mao, S F

    2014-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation, taking into account of the detailed surface roughness of a realistic solid sample, has been performed to study the surface topography influence on elastic peak intensity. To describe quantitatively the surface topography effect, here we introduce surface roughness parameter (SRP) according to the ratio of elastic peak intensities between a rough surface and an ideal planar surface. Simulation results for Al sample have shown that SRP varies with surface roughness particularly at large incidence/emission angles

  18. An Electron-Beam Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    transport processes are linear, i.e the drift velocity is v = pE and the diffusion coeffient follows the Einstein relation D = ikBT/e where k9 denotes...357/19 SEMICONDUC OR SWITCH WIrH 3,917,943 11/1975 Auston............................. 250/211 J CATHODOLLJNE SCENT ELECTRON

  19. Design and remote fiber communication of NSRL electron gun controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weibing; Gao Hui; Hong Jun; Chen Jun; Wang Guicheng; He Duohui; Chen Gang

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of pulse electron gun controller for 200 MeV LINAC at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory was introduced in this paper, including the working principle of the pulse electron gun, the applications of I 2 C serial bus and embedded microcontroller in controlling system. The emphasis is on the hardware design of digital controlled current regulator, digital controlled switch voltage source and high voltage pulse power supply. The software design of fiber communication and PC controlling is also presented. The electron gun controller has successfully been used in NSRL. The result shows that it is quite reliable and the performance is good. This electronic digital system has completely replaced the old mechanical control system. (authors)

  20. Ride control of surface effect ships using distributed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgeir J. Sørensen

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available A ride control system for active damping of heave and pitch accelerations of Surface Effect Ships (SES is presented. It is demonstrated that distributed effects that are due to a spatially varying pressure in the air cushion result in significant vertical vibrations in low and moderate sea states. In order to achieve a high quality human comfort and crew workability it is necessary to reduce these vibrations using a control system which accounts for distributed effects due to spatial pressure variations in the air cushion. A mathematical model of the process is presented, and collocated sensor and actuator pairs are used. The process stability is ensured using a controller with appropriate passivity properties. Sensor and actuator location is also discussed. The performance of the ride control system is shown by power spectra of the vertical accelerations obtained from full scale experiments with a 35 m SES.

  1. Dynamic Surface Control and Its Application to Lateral Vehicle Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsob Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the design and analysis methodology of dynamic surface control (DSC in Song and Hedrick, 2011, for a more general class of nonlinear systems. When rotational mechanical systems such as lateral vehicle control and robot control are considered for applications, sinusoidal functions are easily included in the equation of motions. If such a sinusoidal function is used as a forcing term for DSC, the stability analysis faces the difficulty due to highly nonlinear functions resulting from the low-pass filter dynamics. With modification of input variables to the filter dynamics, the burden of mathematical analysis can be reduced and stability conditions in linear matrix inequality form to guarantee the quadratic stability via DSC are derived for the given class of nonlinear systems. Finally, the proposed design and analysis approach are applied to lateral vehicle control for forward automated driving and backward parallel parking at a low speed as well as an illustrative example.

  2. Surface and interface electronic structure: Three year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3-year activity report covers surface structure and phonon anomalies (surface reconstruction on W(001) and Mo(001), adsorbate lateral ordering, surface Fermi contours and phonon anomalies on Pt(111) and Pd(001)), adsorbate vibrational damping, charge transfer in momentum space: W(011)-K, surface states and resonances (relativistic effects ampersand computations, surface resonances)

  3. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Fan, Xue; Diao, Dongfeng

    2016-10-01

    We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp2 nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp2 nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp2 nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  4. Effect of transverse electron drift on absorption of surface acoustic waves in CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmita, A.M.; Medved', A.V.; Fedorets, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the transverse electron drift on acousto-electron interaction in CdS has been studied. It has been revealed that the free electron drift only in the direction normal to the plane of propagation of surface acoustic waves may change the sound electron absorption coefficient in a wide range. In the case of metallization of the active part of a crystal surface a decrease in sound absorption has been observed both on the electron drift to a working crystal surface and on the opposite direction. Whereas in the case of a free crystal surface the transverse electron drift directed to the working plate surface causes an increase in sound absorption, and with the opposite drift electron absorption of the Rayleigh ultrasound waves is almost not observed. An explanation of the effects observed is proposed

  5. First Principle Calculation of Electronic, Optical Properties and Photocatalytic Potential of CuO Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Faozan

    2016-01-01

    We have performed DFT calculations of electronic structure, optical properties and photocatalytic potential of the low-index surfaces of CuO. Photocatalytic reaction on the surface of semiconductor requires the appropriate band edge of the semiconductor surface to drive redox reactions. The calculation begins with the electronic structure of bulk system; it aims to determine realistic input parameters and band gap prediction. CuO is an antiferromagnetic material with strong electronic correla...

  6. Micro-Shaping of Nanopatterned Surfaces by Electron Beam Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that planar nanopatterned thin films on standard polycarbonate (PC compact discs (CD can be micro-shaped in a non-contact manner via direct e-beam exposure. The shape of the film can be controlled by proper selection of the e-beam parameters. As an example of application, we demonstrate a two-dimensional (2D array of micro-lenses/reservoirs conformally covered by an Al 2D nanohole array (NHA film on a PC CD substrate. It is also shown that such a curvilinear Al NHA layer can be easily transferred onto a flexible polymeric support. The presented technique provides a new tool for creating lab-on-CD architectures and developing multifunctional (flexible non-planar nanostructured films and surfaces.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heefner, J.W.; Williams, C.W.; Lauze, R.R.; Karsner, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The ECRH Control System was installed on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) in 1980. The system provides approximately 1 MW of 28 GHz microwave power to the TMX-U plasma. The subsystems of ECRH that must be controlled include high-voltage charging supplies, series pass tubes, and magnet supplies. In addition to the devices that must be controlled, many interlocks must be continuously monitored. The previous control system used relay logic and analog controls to operate the system. This approach has many drawbacks such as lack of system flexibility and maintainability. In order to address these problems, it was decided to go with a CAMAC and Modicon based system that uses a Hewlett-Packard 9836C personal computer to replace the previous analog controls. 2 figs

  8. Electronic control system for irradiation probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluza, E.; Neumann, J.; Zahalka, F.

    1980-01-01

    The EROS-78 system for the supply and power control of six heating sections of the irradiation probe of the CHOUCA type placed in the reactor vessel is described. The system allows temperature control at the location of the heat sensor with an accuracy of +-1% of the rated value within the region of 100 to 1000 degC. The equipment is provided with its own quartz controlled clock. The temperature is picked up by a chromel-alumel jacket thermocouple. The power input of the heating elements is thyristor controlled. (J.B.)

  9. Height Control and Deposition Measurement for the Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication (EBF3) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seufzer, William J. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method of controlling a height of an electron beam gun and wire feeder during an electron freeform fabrication process includes utilizing a camera to generate an image of the molten pool of material. The image generated by the camera is utilized to determine a measured height of the electron beam gun relative to the surface of the molten pool. The method further includes ensuring that the measured height is within the range of acceptable heights of the electron beam gun relative to the surface of the molten pool. The present invention also provides for measuring a height of a solid metal deposit formed upon cooling of a molten pool. The height of a single point can be measured, or a plurality of points can be measured to provide 2D or 3D surface height measurements.

  10. Extracellular Electron Uptake: Among Autotrophs and Mediated by Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Angenent, Largus T.; Zhang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron-transfer mechan......Autotrophic microbes can acquire electrons from solid donors such as steel, other microbial cells, or electrodes. Based on this feature, bioprocesses are being developed for the microbial electrosynthesis (MES) of useful products from the greenhouse gas CO2. Extracellular electron......; or (iii) mediator-generating enzymes detached from cells. This review explores the interactions of autotrophs with solid electron donors and their importance in nature and for biosustainable technologies....

  11. Electron mobility on the surface of liquid Helium: influence of surface level atoms and depopulation of lowest subbands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Dyugaev, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility is examined. We calculate the contribution to the electron scattering rate from the surface level atoms (SLAs), proposed in [10]. This contribution is substantial at low temperatures T < 0.5, when the He vapor concentration is exponentially small. We also study the effect of depopulation of the lowest energy subband, which leads to an increase in the electron mobility at high temperature. The results explain certain long-standing discrepancies between the existing theory and experiment on electron mobility on the surface of liquid helium

  12. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  13. Electron beam processed plasticized epoxy coatings for surface protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mervat S.; Mohamed, Heba A.; Kandile, Nadia G.; Said, Hossam M.; Mohamed, Issa M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Coating formulations with EA 70%, HD 20%, and castor oil 10% under 1 Mrad pass -1 irradiation dose showed the best adhesion and passed bending tests. · The prepared EP-SF-An adduct improve anti-corrosion properties of coatings without any significant effect on physical, mechanical and chemical properties of the cured film. The optimum amount of aniline adduct as corrosion inhibitor was found to be 0.4 g for 100 g of coating formulation. · The corrosion inhibition efficiency of the prepared adduct competed the commercial efficiency. - Abstract: Epoxy acrylate oligomer (EA) was plasticized by adding different plasticizers such as epoxidized soybean oil, glycerol and castor oil and cured by electron beam (EB). Different irradiation doses (1, 2.5 and 5 Mrad pass -1 ) were used in the curing process. The effect of both different irradiation doses and plasticizers on the end use performance properties of epoxy acrylate coating namely, pencil hardness, bending test, adhesion test, acid and alkali resistance test were studied. It was observed that incorporation of castor oil in epoxy acrylate diluted by 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HD) monomer with a ratio (EA 70%, HD 20%, castor oil 10%) under 1 Mrad pass -1 irradiation dose improved the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of cured films than the other plasticizer. Sunflower free fatty acid was epoxidized in situ under well established conditions. The epoxidized sunflower free fatty acids (ESFA) were subjected to react with aniline in sealed ampoules under inert atmosphere at 140 deg. C. The produced adducts were added at different concentrations to epoxy acrylate coatings under certain EB irradiation dose and then evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel surfaces in terms of weight loss measurements and corrosion resistance tests. It was found that, addition of 0.4 g of aniline adduct to 100 g epoxy acrylate formula may give the best corrosion protection for carbon steel and compete the

  14. Cell surface control of differentiation in Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Villemez, C

    1994-12-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii (Neff) is a free-living soil amoeba with close relatives that are opportunistic pathogens. Trophozoites differentiate into cysts when deprived of nutrients; cysts convert into trophozoites, leaving the wall behind, in the presence of nutrients. The data presented here, which includes immunoaffinity purification of the receptor, indicate that cell surface molecular signals also control Acanthamoeba differentiation in both directions. Monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to a 40 kD trophozoite protein initiate the encystment of trophozoites. When bound to cysts the same monoclonal antibodies prevent excystment. Washing away the antibody allows both trophozoites and cysts to resume normal activity. One of these monoclonal antibodies inhibits pinocytosis, while another has no effect on pinocytosis.

  15. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  16. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars manufactured in the period 1998 to 2011 and the principle of induced exposure, 2 measures of the effectiveness of ESC were calculated: The crude odds ratio and the adjusted odds ratio, the latter by means of logistic regression. The logistic regression controlled for a number of confounding factors, of which the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section characteristics. The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across the injury severity categories (slight, severe, and fatal). In line with previous results, this study concludes that ESC reduces the risk for single-vehicle injury accidents by 31% when controlling for various confounding factors related to the driver, the car, and the accident surroundings. Furthermore, it is concluded that it is important to control for human factors (at a minimum age and gender) in analyses where evaluations of this type are performed.

  17. Attosecond control of electron beams at dielectric and absorbing membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Ultrashort electron pulses are crucial for time-resolved electron diffraction and microscopy of the fundamental light-matter interaction. In this work, we study experimentally and theoretically the generation and characterization of attosecond electron pulses by optical-field-driven compression and streaking at dielectric or absorbing interaction elements. The achievable acceleration and deflection gradient depends on the laser-electron angle, the laser's electric and magnetic field directions, and the foil orientation. Electric and magnetic fields have similar contributions to the final effect and both need to be considered. Experiments and theory agree well and reveal the optimum conditions for highly efficient, velocity-matched electron-field interactions in the longitudinal or transverse direction. We find that metallic membranes are optimum for light-electron control at mid-infrared or terahertz wavelengths, but dielectric membranes are excellent in the visible and near-infrared regimes and are therefore ideal for the formation of attosecond electron pulses.

  18. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  19. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Kociak, Mathieu

    2017-10-01

    Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London) 514, 209 (2014), 10.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London) 543, 529 (2017), 10.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014), 10.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989), 10.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015), 10.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  20. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  1. Modeling and Control of a teletruck using electronic load sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rico Hjerm; Iversen, Asger Malte; Jensen, Mads Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    components and the potential of increased dynamic performance and efficiency, this paper investigates how HLS can be replaced with electronic control, i.e. Electronic Load Sensing (ELS). The investigation is performed by taking a specific application, a teletruck, and replace the HLS control with ELS. To aid...... the controller design for the ELS system, a complete model of the teletruck’s articulated arm and fluid power system is developed. To show the feasibility, a preliminary control structure for the ELS system is developed. The controller is tested on the machine, validating that features such as pump pressure...

  2. Passive water control at the surface of a superhydrophobic lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Christopher A E; Shirtcliffe, Neil James; Pyatt, F Brian; Newton, Michael I; McHale, Glen; Koch, Kerstin

    2011-12-01

    Some lichens have a super-hydrophobic upper surface, which repels water drops, keeping the surface dry but probably preventing water uptake. Spore ejection requires water and is most efficient just after rainfall. This study was carried out to investigate how super-hydrophobic lichens manage water uptake and repellence at their fruiting bodies, or podetia. Drops of water were placed onto separate podetia of Cladonia chlorophaea and observed using optical microscopy and cryo-scanning-electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) techniques to determine the structure of podetia and to visualise their interaction with water droplets. SEM and optical microscopy studies revealed that the surface of the podetia was constructed in a three-level structural hierarchy. By cryo-SEM of water-glycerol droplets placed on the upper part of the podetium, pinning of the droplet to specific, hydrophilic spots (pycnidia/apothecia) was observed. The results suggest a mechanism for water uptake, which is highly sophisticated, using surface wettability to generate a passive response to different types of precipitation in a manner similar to the Namib Desert beetle. This mechanism is likely to be found in other organisms as it offers passive but selective water control.

  3. The Controlling Parameters for EMIC Wave Scattering of Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bortnik, J.

    2016-12-01

    Although there is growing support for relativistic electron losses due to precipitation from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave scattering, this mechanism is yet to be quantified. Such a quantification has been difficult in the past, because equatorial electron measurements simultaneous with EMIC waves have been limited, due to the highly localized presence of EMIC waves in the magnetosphere. In this study, we examine parameters controlling characteristics of EMIC wave induced relativistic (0.3-6 MeV) electron scattering, directly based on simultaneous wave and particle measurements from Van Allen Probes. We first present a case study when relativistic electrons respond differently during two intervals of intense ( 1 nT) EMIC wave observations: one with no scattering signature and one with efficient electron losses at >1.8 MeV. Based on the observed EMIC wave spectra and background plasma conditions, we calculate the wave diffusion rates and model the evolution of electron pitch angle distributions. By comparing the modeled results with local observations of pitch angle distributions, we demonstrate that fpe/fce is critical in controlling the effectiveness of EMIC waves in scattering multi-MeV electrons. We then expand our analysis to explore the conditions (such as fpe/fce, wave frequency spectra, and ring current ion temperature and anisotropy levels) favorable for EMIC wave scattering multi-MeV electrons through multi-event analyses. Our study is important for accurately modeling relativistic electron loss processes in radiation belt electron forecasts.

  4. Electronic Monitoring and Family Control in Probation and Parole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James F.; Holman, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Examined effects of electronic monitoring on family's contribution to external constraint of felony offenders under community supervision. Data from probationers and parolees (n=121) indicated that reported levels of family control did not change significantly during three months of electronic monitoring. Demographic variables, offense type, and…

  5. Electron Gun for Computer-controlled Welding of Small Components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dupák, Jan; Vlček, Ivan; Zobač, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 62, 2-3 (2001), s. 159-164 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2065015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Electron beam-welding machine * Electron gun * Computer- control led beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2001

  6. Surface electron states on the quasi-two-dimensional excess-electron compounds Ca2N and Y2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Takeshi; Takemoto, Seiji; Tada, Tomofumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Compounds having excess electrons from the formal valence viewpoint (electrides) are a new class of materials, which often take low-dimensional structures. We studied the (001) surface electronic structures of quasi-two-dimensional electrides Ca2N and Y2C by density functional theory using a slab model. Both materials were found to have a clean surface state well separated in energy from the bulk states. Furthermore, this state virtually floats above the surface and may be considered to be a hallmark of two-dimensional electrides. For Ca2N , a tight-binding model in the Wannier representation was derived and analyzed, from which we concluded that the surface state, described by extra-surface s -like orbitals, is a Tamm state originating from an abrupt increase in potential energy at the surface.

  7. Homogenization mechanism of the residual surface potential of insulating specimens under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingjing; Zhang Haibo; Feng Renjian

    2007-01-01

    A homogenized surface potential is desirable for the observation of a pre-irradiated insulating specimen using a scanning electron microscope because the residual surface potential may affect the imaging properties of the specimen. To homogenize the residual surface potential, the specimen should be subjected to the irradiation of an electron beam with the total electron yield greater than one. The expression of the equilibrium potential is derived based on the charge balance condition in the equilibrium state and the potential value is found to increase mainly with the secondary electron (SE) yield and the most probable emission energy of SEs. Further numerical calculations of SE trajectories show that affected by different surface potentials, SEs leave or return to the specimen surface to change the net charge flux into the specimen. This thereby increases the surface potential below the equilibrium potential and decreases that above the equilibrium potential, homogenizing the surface potential

  8. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin; Li, Shengtao; Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri; Wang, Xuan; Lin, Shengjun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  9. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: stli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Lin, Shengjun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pinggao Group Company Ltd., State Grid High Voltage Switchgear Insulation Materials Laboratory, Pingdingshan 467001 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  11. Assessment of Safety Standards for Automotive Electronic Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study that assessed and compared six industry and government safety standards relevant to the safety and reliability of automotive electronic control systems. These standards include ISO 26262 (Road Vehicles - ...

  12. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  13. Controlling front-end electronics boards using commercial solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Beneyton, R; Jost, B; Schmeling, S

    2002-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated B-physics experiment under construction at CERN's large hadron collider (LHC) accelerator. This paper will describe the novel approach LHCb is taking toward controlling and monitoring of electronics boards. Instead of using the bus in a crate to exercise control over the boards, we use credit-card sized personal computers (CCPCs) connected via Ethernet to cheap control PCs. The CCPCs will provide a simple parallel, I2C, and JTAG buses toward the electronics board. Each board will be equipped with a CCPC and, hence, will be completely independently controlled. The advantages of this scheme versus the traditional bus-based scheme will be described. Also, the integration of the controls of the electronics boards into a commercial supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system will be shown. (5 refs).

  14. Electron beam processed plasticized epoxy coatings for surface protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Mervat S. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City (Egypt); Mohamed, Heba A., E-mail: hebaamohamed@gmail.com [National Research Center, Dokki (Egypt); Kandile, Nadia G. [University College for Girls, Ain Shams University (Egypt); Said, Hossam M.; Mohamed, Issa M. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City (Egypt)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} Coating formulations with EA 70%, HD 20%, and castor oil 10% under 1 Mrad pass{sup -1} irradiation dose showed the best adhesion and passed bending tests. {center_dot} The prepared EP-SF-An adduct improve anti-corrosion properties of coatings without any significant effect on physical, mechanical and chemical properties of the cured film. The optimum amount of aniline adduct as corrosion inhibitor was found to be 0.4 g for 100 g of coating formulation. {center_dot} The corrosion inhibition efficiency of the prepared adduct competed the commercial efficiency. - Abstract: Epoxy acrylate oligomer (EA) was plasticized by adding different plasticizers such as epoxidized soybean oil, glycerol and castor oil and cured by electron beam (EB). Different irradiation doses (1, 2.5 and 5 Mrad pass{sup -1}) were used in the curing process. The effect of both different irradiation doses and plasticizers on the end use performance properties of epoxy acrylate coating namely, pencil hardness, bending test, adhesion test, acid and alkali resistance test were studied. It was observed that incorporation of castor oil in epoxy acrylate diluted by 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HD) monomer with a ratio (EA 70%, HD 20%, castor oil 10%) under 1 Mrad pass{sup -1} irradiation dose improved the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of cured films than the other plasticizer. Sunflower free fatty acid was epoxidized in situ under well established conditions. The epoxidized sunflower free fatty acids (ESFA) were subjected to react with aniline in sealed ampoules under inert atmosphere at 140 deg. C. The produced adducts were added at different concentrations to epoxy acrylate coatings under certain EB irradiation dose and then evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel surfaces in terms of weight loss measurements and corrosion resistance tests. It was found that, addition of 0.4 g of aniline adduct to 100 g epoxy acrylate formula may give the best corrosion

  15. Guide on the use of low energy electron beams for microbiological decontamination of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Gondim, Ondina

    This Guide describes the validation and routine monitoring of microbiological decontamination of surfaces by low energy electron beams (100-200 keV). The Guide is mainly based on experience gained in connection with installation of electron beam systems for surface decontamination of pre-steriliz...

  16. The role of substrate electrons in the wetting of a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, Klas Jerker

    2010-01-01

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution...... of charge that enables surface wetting. On open d-shell Pt(111), the ligand field of water alters the distribution of metal d-electrons to reduce the repulsion. The closed-shell Cu d(10) configuration of isostructural Cu(111), however, does not afford this mechanism, resulting in a hydrophobic surface...

  17. Sintered silver joints via controlled topography of electronic packaging subcomponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are sintered silver bonded electronic package subcomponents and methods for making the same. Embodiments of the sintered silver bonded EPSs include topography modification of one or more metal surfaces of semiconductor devices bonded together by the sintered silver joint. The sintered silver bonded EPSs include a first semiconductor device having a first metal surface, the first metal surface having a modified topography that has been chemically etched, grit blasted, uniaxial ground and/or grid sliced connected to a second semiconductor device which may also include a first metal surface with a modified topography, a silver plating layer on the first metal surface of the first semiconductor device and a silver plating layer on the first metal surface of the second semiconductor device and a sintered silver joint between the silver plating layers of the first and second semiconductor devices which bonds the first semiconductor device to the second semiconductor device.

  18. Simple scalings for various regimes of electron acceleration in surface plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riconda, C.; Vialis, T. [LULI, Sorbonne Université, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7605, CEA, Paris 75005 (France); Raynaud, M. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, CNRS UMR 7642, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Grech, M. [LULI, CNRS UMR 7605, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-07-15

    Different electron acceleration regimes in the evanescent field of a surface plasma wave are studied by considering the interaction of a test electron with the high-frequency electromagnetic field of a surface wave. The non-relativistic and relativistic limits are investigated. Simple scalings are found demonstrating the possibility to achieve an efficient conversion of the surface wave field energy into electron kinetic energy. This mechanism of electron acceleration can provide a high-frequency pulsed source of relativistic electrons with a well defined energy. In the relativistic limit, the most energetic electrons are obtained in the so-called electromagnetic regime for surface waves. In this regime, the particles are accelerated to velocities larger than the wave phase velocity, mainly in the direction parallel to the plasma-vacuum interface.

  19. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozanski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Many digital control circuits in current literature are described using analog transmittance. This may not always be acceptable, especially if the sampling frequency and power transistor switching frequencies are close to the band of interest. Therefore, a digital circuit is considered as a digital controller rather than an analog circuit. This helps to avoid errors and instability in high frequency components. Digital Signal Processing in Power Electronics Control Circuits covers problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using

  20. Electron attenuation anisotropy at crystal surfaces from LEED

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Bartoš, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 603, č. 17 (2009), s. 2789-2792 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0601; GA AV ČR IAA100100628 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : electron attenuation length, low energy electron diffraction, photoelectron diffraction, electron–solid scattering and transmission, copper * low energy electron diffraction * photoelectron diffraction * electron–solid scattering and transmission * copper Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.798, year: 2009 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.susc.2009.07.024

  1. Neutralizing trapped electrons on the hydrogenated surface of a diamond amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss our investigation of electron trapping in a diamond amplifier (DA. Our previous work demonstrated that some electrons reaching the DA’s hydrogenated surface are not emitted. The state and the removal of these electrons is important for DA applications. We found that these stopped electrons are trapped, and cannot be removed by a strong reversed-polarity electric field; to neutralize this surface charge, holes must be sent to the hydrogenated surface to recombine with the trapped electrons through the Shockley-Read-Hall surface-recombination mechanism. We measured the time taken for such recombination on the hydrogenated surface, viz. the recombination time, as less than 5 ns, limited by the resolution of our test system. With this measurement, we demonstrated that DA could be operated in an rf cavity with frequency of a few hundred megahertz.

  2. Surface morphological, mechanical and thermal characterization of electron beam irradiated fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Han, Seong Ok; Lee, Jung Soon

    2008-01-01

    The surface morphology of henequen irradiated by electron beam has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, the extents to which electron beam irradiation affected the tensile and thermal properties of henequen fiber were investigated with Instron tensile tests and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The AFM studies showed that the pectin, waxy and primary layers (P) of henequen fiber, which have heterogeneous structures, were removed from the fiber surface by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength and thermal stability of henequen fiber decreased with increasing dose of electron beam. At the irradiation of 10 kGy, the surface roughness increased because of the removal of the pectin, waxy and P layer, but the tensile strength of henequen irradiated with 10 kGy were maintained. It has been suggested that the use of a 10 kGy dose of electron beam to modify the henequen fiber surface can improve the surface properties and preserve the fibers' mechanical and thermal properties.

  3. Relativistic Electron Acceleration by Surface Plasma Waves in the High Intensity Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Aurand, Bastian; Prasad, Rajendra; Andreev, Alexander; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    High field plasmonics is one of the new research fields which has synergetically benefited from the advances in laser technology. The availability of radiation fields of intensities exceeding 1018 W/cm2 brought plasmonics into a new regime where relativistic and nonlinear effects start to dominate the dynamics of the surface plasma waves (SPWs). Moreover, surface plasma waves are a very efficient route to transfer the laser energy to the secondary sources including laser driven particle and radiation beams and to control and optimize the physical properties of these sources. We present here experimental evidence of a novel regime of the SPWs excitation by ultra-high intensity laser field (I>1020 W/cm2) on grating targets and its effect on high energy surface electron acceleration. The peak of the electron emission was detected at a laser incidence angle of 45°. The results indicate new conditions for resonant excitation of SPWs since in the limit of the linear regime (moderate intensities of 1019 W/cm2 and step preplasma profile), the resonance angle is predicted at 30°. 2D PIC simulations and a novel analytical model confirm the experimental data and reveal that, at laser intensities above 1020W/cm2, nonlinearities induced by the preplasma condition and relativistic effects change the SPWs resonance.

  4. Electronic circuit for control rod attracting electromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention provides a discharging circuit for control rod attracting electromagnet used for a reactor which is highly reliable and has high performance. The resistor of the circuit comprises a non-linear resistor element and a blocking rectification element connected in series. The discharging circuit can be prevented from short-circuit by selecting a resistor having a resistance value about ten times as great as the coil resistance, even in a case where the blocking rectification element and the non-linear resistor element are failed. Accordingly, reduction of attracting force and the increase of scream releasing time can be minimized. (I.S.)

  5. Electronic control of a plutonium extraction battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degryse, M.

    1967-03-01

    The various aspects of the measurement of plutonium retention in an extraction battery using neutron detectors are studied. The static and dynamic tests carried out on the battery are described and an elementary theory concerning its method of operation is drawn up. Two essential modes are defined: with and without leakage of plutonium into the refined liquid; the optimum operational conditions are determined. The control chain which has been built is described and the estimated performance given. The work concludes with a comparison of the equilibrium and of the transient states, observed after regulation, with those calculated theoretically, and with a comparison of operational results obtained before and after regulation. (author) [fr

  6. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modeled...... at two levels of approximation, first as a simple external potential and later as a 20-atom cluster. We perform a number of calculations on an electron hitting the adsorbed molecule from inside the surface and establish a picture, where the resonance is being probed by the hot electron. This enables us...

  7. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  8. Advanced and intelligent control in power electronics and drives

    CERN Document Server

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics and variable frequency drives are continuously developing multidisciplinary fields in electrical engineering, and it is practically not possible to write a book covering the entire area by one individual specialist. Especially by taking account the recent fast development in the neighboring fields like control theory, computational intelligence and signal processing, which all strongly influence new solutions in control of power electronics and drives. Therefore, this book is written by individual key specialist working on the area of modern advanced control methods which penetrates current implementation of power converters and drives. Although some of the presented methods are still not adopted by industry, they create new solutions with high further research and application potential. The material of the book is presented in the following three parts: Part I: Advanced Power Electronic Control in Renewable Energy Sources (Chapters 1-4), Part II: Predictive Control of Power Converters and D...

  9. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2018-01-30

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanoparticle/nanohole arrays fabricated through electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsunghsueh; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates from gold nanoparticle and gold nanohole arrays were successfully fabricated through electron beam lithography with precise computer-aided control of the unit size and intergap distance. Their SERS performance was evaluated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). These gold arrays yielded strong SERS signals under 785 nm laser excitation. The enhancement factors for 4-MBA molecules on the prepared gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays maxed at 1.08 × 107 and 8.61 × 106, respectively. The observed increase in SERS enhancement was attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength shifting toward the near-infrared regime when the gold nanohole diameter increased, in agreement with the theoretical prediction in this study. The contribution of LSPR to the Raman enhancement from nanohole arrays deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass was elucidated by comparing SERS and transmission spectra. This simple fabrication procedure, which entails employing electron beam lithography and the controllability of the intergap distance, suggests highly promising uses of nanohole arrays as functional components in sensing and photonic devices.

  11. Dose controlled low energy electron irradiator for biomolecular films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S V K; Tare, Satej T; Upalekar, Yogesh V; Tsering, Thupten

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a multi target, Low Energy Electron (LEE), precise dose controlled irradiator for biomolecular films. Up to seven samples can be irradiated one after another at any preset electron energy and dose under UHV conditions without venting the chamber. In addition, one more sample goes through all the steps except irradiation, which can be used as control for comparison with the irradiated samples. All the samples are protected against stray electron irradiation by biasing them at -20 V during the entire period, except during irradiation. Ethernet based communication electronics hardware, LEE beam control electronics and computer interface were developed in house. The user Graphical User Interface to control the irradiation and dose measurement was developed using National Instruments Lab Windows CVI. The working and reliability of the dose controlled irradiator has been fully tested over the electron energy range of 0.5 to 500 eV by studying LEE induced single strand breaks to ΦX174 RF1 dsDNA.

  12. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces: Effect on the Secondary Electron Yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F.

    2004-12-13

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (< 1.3, value of many pure elements [1] ), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  13. Magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer at the multichannel surface scattering of conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsishin, P.P.; Nakhodkin, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer with the (110) surface was studied at the adsorption of tungsten dioxide. The method of low-energy electron diffraction was used to study the symmetry of ordered surface structures. Using the method of the magnetoresistance measurement the character of the scattering of conduction electrons was investigated. THe dependence of magnetoresistance on the surface concentration of tungsten dioxide correlated w1th the structure of the surface layer of atoms, what was explained with allowance for diffraction of conduction electrons at the metal boundary. The magnetoresistance maximum for the (2x2) structure, which characterised decrease in surface conduction under the conditions of static skin effect, was explained by multichannel mirror reflection with the recombinations of electron and ho.le sections of Fermi Surface

  14. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL, STATIC CONTROL SERIES. REMOTE CONTROL BY INDUSTRIAL TELEMETRY. UNIT 9C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Industrial Education Div.

    THIS SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMED TEXT IS FOR STUDENT USE IN STUDYING INDUSTRIAL TELEMETRY CONTROL SYSTEMS IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS AND TESTED BY STUDENT USE. THE MATERIAL IS DIVIDED INTO FUNDAMENTAL IDEAS AND LANGUAGE OF INDUSTRIAL TELEMETRY AND THE LOGIC OF THE…

  15. Development of control system for the electron gun modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nagasawa, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Hanaki, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing a compact and inexpensive electron gun modulator for the SPring-8 Linac. The modulator was redesigned and manufactured to achieve good maintainability and high controllability. A control system of the modulator and a high voltage station is composed mainly of PLCs as a controller and touch panels for human interface. This simplified construction will result in enhancement of its reliability. The rich graphical user interface on the touch panels greatly extends the function of the control system. (author)

  16. Laser controlled melting of pre-treated zirconia surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, S.S. [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering College, Hacettepe University, (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Laser treatment of pre-prepared zirconia surface is carried out. The pre-prepared surface, prior to laser treatment, consists of 50 {mu}m carbon film and 7% titanium carbide particles, which are imbedded in the carbon film. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser treated surface layer are examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness of the laser treated surface is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is determined from the X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the microhardness of the laser treated surface increased slightly due to the dense layer formed at the surface vicinity. However, the laser treatment process reduces the fracture toughness of the surface due to improved surface hardness and the residual stress formed in the surface vicinity.

  17. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Fan, Xue, E-mail: fanx@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Low-energy electron irradiation was proposed to nanocrystallize the top-surface of the as-deposited amorphous carbon film, and sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites formed in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. Display Omitted - Abstract: We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp{sup 2} nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  18. Test Cases for the Benchmark Active Controls: Spoiler and Control Surface Oscillations and Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Scott, Robert C.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2000-01-01

    sets from the first two tests have been chosen for Test Cases for computational comparisons concentrating on static conditions and cases with harmonically oscillating control surfaces. Several flutter Test Cases from both tests have also been included. Some aerodynamic comparisons with the BACT data have been made using computational fluid dynamics codes at the Navier-Stokes level (and in the accompanying chapter SC). Some mechanical and active control studies have been presented. In this report several Test Cases are selected to illustrate trends for a variety of different conditions with emphasis on transonic flow effects. Cases for static angles of attack, static trailing-edge and upper-surface spoiler deflections are included for a range of conditions near those for the oscillation cases. Cases for trailing-edge control and upper-surface spoiler oscillations for a range of Mach numbers, angle of attack, and static control deflections are included. Cases for all three types of flutter instability are selected. In addition some cases are included for dynamic response measurements during forced oscillations of the controls on the flexible mount. An overview of the model and tests is given, and the standard formulary for these data is listed. Some sample data and sample results of calculations are presented. Only the static pressures and the first harmonic real and imaginary parts of the pressures are included in the data for the Test Cases, but digitized time histories have been archived. The data for the Test Cases are also available as separate electronic files.

  19. Surface and interface electronic structure: Sixth year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Several productive runs were made on beamline U4A at NSLS. An upgrade of angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer was largely completed on the beamline. Progress was made on studies of surface states and reconstruction on Mo(001) and W(001), and of surface states and resonances on Pt(111)

  20. Study on surface structures with the aid of slow electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedyanin, V.K.; Mozol'kov, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    A short review is presented on experimental and theoretical data published on slow electron diffraction. The theory of slow electron diffraction on two-dimensional surface structures caused by the presence of an absorbed gas on the surface which has been earlier proposed by the authors is discussed. The model is based on a quantum-statistical model of adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Its application allows one to explain most important aspects of this problem

  1. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Christian Glattli, D; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-01-22

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  2. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Glattli, D. Christian; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  3. Conformational Control of Electron Tunneling in Redox Proteins: Sulfite Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya; Kawatsu, Tsutomu; Beratan, David

    2004-03-01

    Many redox proteins mediate electron transfer over large (10-25A) distances, with the reaction rate being, in some cases, remarkably sensitive to the protein structure and dynamics (e.g., Science 290, 114-117 (2000)). These properties make redox proteins excellent candidates for molecular electronics applications. Sulfite oxidase (SO) is a molybdenum-containing electron-transfer enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sulfite to sulfate. The enzyme consists of two domains, one hosting a molybdopterin moiety, which receives an electron from sulfite, and the other hosting a heme, from which electrons travels to cytochrome c. The domains are connected together by a flexible link, which allows for the domains to move relative to each other. This motion is believed to control electron transfer from the molybdopterin to the heme, which is only possible when the enzyme assumes a closed conformation (the two domains are in contact with each other). The only available crystallographic structure of SO (PDB code 1SOX) characterizes an open conformation, when the two domains are separated. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the enzyme in solvent, combined with semi-empirical quantum chemistry calculations, were performed to identify possible closed conformations of SO and to investigate the electron transfer rate in these conformations. Steered MD simulations supplemented by analytical modeling were used to characterize kinetics of conformational transitions, particularly opening and closing of the enzyme, which controls the electron tunneling rate.

  4. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  5. 78 FR 76254 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Control Surface Awareness and Mode...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR... with control surface awareness and mode annunciation provided by the electronic flight control system... suitable flight control position annunciation and control system mode of operation to be provided to the...

  6. Development of an electronic vehicular traffic signal controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the design, construction, and test of an electronic signal controller for urban vehicular traffic control. The design is based on a series of fixed-time signal plans for different time zones of the day and can accommodate sixty-four signal plans. Finite state machine concept was used in the design of the signal ...

  7. Method’s and Test Stand for Electronic PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Paul Chioncel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents method’s and a testing stand for electronic controller using for this a signal generator and a digital oscilloscope respectively the virtual instrumentation and the signal acquisitions from the controllers input and output through an data acquisition board and an PC on that Lab View program runs.

  8. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. IV: Electronic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Weaver, Tamar A.; Lewis, James D.; Kessler, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a system for electronically tracking relevant plan, prescription, and treatment data for computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy is described. Methods and Materials: The electronic charting system is implemented on a computer cluster coupled by high-speed networks to computer-controlled therapy machines. A methodical approach to the specification and design of an integrated solution has been used in developing the system. The electronic chart system is designed to allow identification and access of patient-specific data including treatment-planning data, treatment prescription information, and charting of doses. An in-house developed database system is used to provide an integrated approach to the database requirements of the design. A hierarchy of databases is used for both centralization and distribution of the treatment data for specific treatment machines. Results: The basic electronic database system has been implemented and has been in use since July 1993. The system has been used to download and manage treatment data on all patients treated on our first fully computer-controlled treatment machine. To date, electronic dose charting functions have not been fully implemented clinically, requiring the continued use of paper charting for dose tracking. Conclusions: The routine clinical application of complex computer-controlled conformal treatment procedures requires the management of large quantities of information for describing and tracking treatments. An integrated and comprehensive approach to this problem has led to a full electronic chart for conformal radiation therapy treatments

  9. Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0012 Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures PHILIP Kim HARVARD COLLEGE PRESIDENT... Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4003 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F...Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-15-1-4003 “Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures” 2/18/2018 Name of

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of surface features of hamster embryo cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Fenoglio, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope studies were carried out on Syrian hamster embryo cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation (300 rads) (x-ray transformed) and on normal nonirradiated and irradiated nontransformed controls. Transformed cells appeared in scanning electron microscopy as pleomorphic, thick cells piling up over each other and exhibiting extensive surface features consisting of microvilli, blebs, and ruffles. These surface structures were seen on single as well as on densely cultured transformed cells during both interphase and mitosis. The complex surface was observed shortly after transformation (on cells of a 20-day-old clone) and seems a permanent feature of the x-ray transformed cells (present after 8 years in culture). All controls appeared by scanning electron microscopy as regular, flat, and smooth cells which grew in high-density cultures to seemingly contact-inhibited monolayers. During mitosis the normal cells (control, nontransformed) displayed surface excrescences similar to those of the transformed cells making the mitotic normal cells indistinguishable from transformed cells. The complex surface features in the normal cells were temporary and reversed back to characteristic smoothness upon reentrance into interphase

  11. Nuclear Dynamics and Electronic Effects of Hydrogen on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, K; Wilde, M; Ogura, S

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen is involved in a variety of chemical processes on surfaces. While hydrogen exhibits vibrational and rotational dynamics in its adsorption state, it in some cases undergoes diffusion into the substrate as well as on the surface, and participates in chemical reactions. Furthermore, hydrogen exchanges an electron with surfaces having a significant effect on the surface electronic structure. In this personal account, we review our recent studies on surface nuclear dynamics of hydrogen, hydrogen transport across surfaces, catalytic hydrogenation/isotope exchange reactions, and charge transfer between the surface and hydrogen by using a depth-resolved technique of nuclear reaction analysis and a quantum-state-selective detection of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in combination with surface science techniques. As a future prospect, we refer to ultraslow μ spin rotation spectroscopy for a direct probe of the hydrogen charge state at surfaces. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. X-ray free electron laser as a real-time probe of chemistry on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free electron laser has opened up new possibilities for the study of surface chemical reactions on ultrafast time scale. This article reviews the recent work on the desorption of a molecule from a surface, which is one of the most fundamental surface chemical process. (author)

  13. Pollen grain surface in Vaccinium myrtillus as seen in scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain surface of Vaccinium myrtillus L. was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Pollen grains remain in tetrahedral tetrads. Grain surface is verrucose, consisting of thick, irregularly shaped muri, surrounding small, round or oval lumina. The surface of the muri is fissured, and minute papillae can also be noted.

  14. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Electronic Informed Consent Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Wong, Bob; Rose, Nancy C.; Anderson, Rebecca; Fedor, Beth; Stark, Louisa A.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.

    2018-01-01

    A pilot study assessed an electronic informed consent model within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Participants who were recruited for the parent RCT project were randomly selected and randomized to either an electronic consent group (n = 32) or a simplified paper-based consent group (n = 30). Results from the electronic consent group reported significantly higher understanding of the purpose of the study, alternatives to participation, and who to contact if they had questions or concerns about the study. However, participants in the paper-based control group reported higher mean scores on some survey items. This research suggests that an electronic informed consent presentation may improve participant understanding for some aspects of a research study. PMID:25747685

  16. Process control of laser surface alloying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.; Olde Benneker, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    In spite of the many advantages of laser surface treatment, such as high production rates and low induced thermal distortion, and its great potential for modifying the surface properties of a wide range of new and existing materials, industrial applications are still limited. This is not only

  17. Quality control of the documentation process in electronic economic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutova A.S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that the main tool that will provide adequate information resources e economic activities of social and economic relations are documenting quality control processes as the basis of global information space. Directions problems as formation evaluation information resources in the process of documentation, namely development tools assess the efficiency of the system components – qualitative assessment; development of mathematical modeling tools – quantitative evaluation. A qualitative assessment of electronic documentation of economic activity through exercise performance, efficiency of communication; document management efficiency; effectiveness of flow control operations; relationship management effectiveness. The concept of quality control process documents electronically economic activity to components which include: the level of workflow; forms adequacy of information; consumer quality documents; quality attributes; type of income data; condition monitoring systems; organizational level process documentation; attributes of quality, performance quality consumer; type of management system; type of income data; condition monitoring systems. Grounded components of the control system electronic document subjects of economic activity. Detected components IT-audit management system economic activity: compliance audit; audit of internal control; detailed multilevel analysis; corporate risk assessment methodology. The stages and methods of processing electronic transactions economic activity during condition monitoring of electronic economic activity.

  18. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  19. Theory of coherent molecule to surface electron injection: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    erogeneous electron transfer from a molecule to a semiconductor occurs before full vibrational relaxa- tion of the excited molecule is achieved. 5,6. Accor- dingly, theoretical description of the decay of the initial state has been formulated to include vibra- tional coherence in the transfer process. 4. 2. Analytical model.

  20. The interaction of swift electrons with surface excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1992-01-01

    For many decades swift electrons have comprised a powerful tool for the study of the dynamical properties of condensed matter. The development of this technique has involved much important physics. Here we sketch the historical background of the field and some important developments in theory and experiment. Possible directions for future research are indicated

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  3. Diffuse Surface Scattering in the Plasmonic Resonances of Ultralow Electron Density Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, R Carmina; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Apell, S Peter

    2015-05-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) have recently been identified in extremely diluted electron systems obtained by doping semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we investigate the role that different surface effects, namely, electronic spill-out and diffuse surface scattering, play in the optical properties of these ultralow electron density nanosystems. Diffuse scattering originates from imperfections or roughness at a microscopic scale on the surface. Using an electromagnetic theory that describes this mechanism in conjunction with a dielectric function including the quantum size effect, we find that the LSPRs show an oscillatory behavior in both position and width for large particles and a strong blue shift in energy and an increased width for smaller radii, consistent with recent experimental results for photodoped ZnO nanocrystals. We thus show that the commonly ignored process of diffuse surface scattering is a more important mechanism affecting the plasmonic properties of ultralow electron density nanoparticles than the spill-out effect.

  4. Intensity distributions of reflected surface channeling protons scattered on surfaces of electron-bombarded alkali halide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukazawa, Y.; Kihara, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Susuki, Y.

    2013-11-01

    We have examined the surface-channeling of 550 keV protons on electron-bombarded KBr(0 0 1) surfaces at grazing incidence. On the surface, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) resulting from the irradiation of 5 keV electrons changes the surface morphology. In order to investigate the change of the surface morphology, the luminous intensity distributions observed on a fluorescent screen (scattering patterns) of the reflected protons under the surface-channeling conditions are measured. Normalized specular intensity of the protons oscillates, and the results of computer simulations show that the period of the intensity oscillation agrees with the period of layer-by-layer desorption. The measured period of the oscillation is comparable to the simulated one, i.e., the period of the desorption, however, the measured amplitude of the oscillation is weak. This shows that the layer-by-layer desorption of the experimental surface is observed but is not as remarkable as that of the perfect surface introduced in the simulation.

  5. Intensity distributions of reflected surface channeling protons scattered on surfaces of electron-bombarded alkali halide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Y., E-mail: yukofu@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp; Kihara, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Susuki, Y.

    2013-11-15

    We have examined the surface-channeling of 550 keV protons on electron-bombarded KBr(0 0 1) surfaces at grazing incidence. On the surface, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) resulting from the irradiation of 5 keV electrons changes the surface morphology. In order to investigate the change of the surface morphology, the luminous intensity distributions observed on a fluorescent screen (scattering patterns) of the reflected protons under the surface-channeling conditions are measured. Normalized specular intensity of the protons oscillates, and the results of computer simulations show that the period of the intensity oscillation agrees with the period of layer-by-layer desorption. The measured period of the oscillation is comparable to the simulated one, i.e., the period of the desorption, however, the measured amplitude of the oscillation is weak. This shows that the layer-by-layer desorption of the experimental surface is observed but is not as remarkable as that of the perfect surface introduced in the simulation.

  6. Ultra-morphology of root surface subsequent to periodontal instrumentation: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristic following root planing with various hand and power driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single rooted teeth were used in this study, of which two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette (2 Ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing was measured. After treatment, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope and surface roughness was measured by using Roughness and loss of tooth substance index (RLTSI. Results: The mean RLTSI scores for Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667 respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50. Conclusion: All the three instruments namely Gracey curette, Ultrasonic tip and Rotary bur were effective in mechanical debridement of root surface. The results favoured the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve smooth clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  7. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Mendon, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Annavarapu, Suresh (Brookline, MA); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  8. Monitoring and control system of the Saclay electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafontaine, Antoine

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the automatic monitoring and control system of the 60MeV electron linear accelerator of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay. The paper is mostly concerned with the programmation of the system. However, in a real time device, there is a very close association between computer and electronics, the latter are therefore described in details and make up most of the paper. [fr

  9. Secondary Electron Yield on Cryogenic Surfaces as a Function of Physisorbed Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzucan, Asena; Taborelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In LHC the electron cloud induced by photoelectrons, gas ionization and secondary electrons emitted from the beam pipe walls could be a limitation of the performance. The electron cloud induce heat load on the cryogenic system, cause pressure rise, emittance growth and beam instabilities, which in the end will limit the beam’s lifetime. Beam- induced multipacting, which can arise through oscillatory motion of photoelectrons and low-energy secondary electrons bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber during successive passage of proton bunches, represent therefore a potential problem for the machine. The secondary electron yield (SEY) is one of the key parameters for the electron cloud build up and multipacting phenomenon. An electron cloud occurs if the metal surface secondary electron yield is high enough for electron multiplication. This parameter has been extensively studied on room temperature samples but uncertainties remain for samples at cryogenic temperature. Indeed, at l...

  10. Accuracy control in ultra-large-scale electronic structure calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    Numerical aspects are investigated in ultra-large-scale electronic structure calculation. Accuracy control methods in process (molecular-dynamics) calculation are focused. Flexible control methods are proposed so as to control variational freedoms, automatically at each time step, within the framework of generalized Wannier state theory. The method is demonstrated in silicon cleavage simulation with 10^2-10^5 atoms. The idea is of general importance among process calculations and is also used...

  11. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  12. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  13. Influence of the projectile charge state on electron emission spectra from a Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Double differential electron emission distributions produced by grazing impact of fast dressed ions on a Cu(111) surface are investigated focusing on the effects of the electronic band structure. The process is described within the Band-Structure-Based approximation, which is a perturbative method that includes an accurate representation of the electron-surface interaction, incorporating information of the electronic band structure of the solid. Differences in the behavior of the emission spectra for He+ q, Li+ q, Be+ q and C+ q projectiles with different charge states q are explained by the combined effect of the projectile trajectory and the projectile charge distribution.

  14. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  15. Surface electronic properties of discontinuous Pd films during hydrogen exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ming; Nagata, Shinji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Inouye, Aichi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    This paper explored the change in the surface resistance of the discontinuous palladium (Pd) films during hydrogen exposure. In our experiments, we observed a remarkable rise in the electrical resistance of the discontinuous film which consists of nano-sized particles, when it was exposed to thin hydrogen. By studying the resistance change ratio before and after hydrogen exposure, we have found that it demonstrates an inverse exponential relationship with the ratio of on-film particle radius to the inter island separation. This suggests that the change in the film resistance under hydrogen exposure is primarily associated with the variation of surface work function which is caused by the hydrogen absorption on the Pd surface. (author)

  16. Magnetite Fe3O4 (111) Surfaces: Impact of Defects on Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-04

    We present a comprehensive investigation, via first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, of various surface terminations of magnetite, Fe3O4 (111), a major iron oxide which has also a number of applications in electronics and spintronics. We compare the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure among the different surfaces terminations. Interestingly, we find that surfaces modified with point defects and adatoms can be more stable than bulk-like terminations. These surfaces show different surface chemistry, electronic structures and distinctive spin polarization features near the Fermi level from those previously considered in the literature. Our studies provide an atomic level insight for magnetite surfaces, which is a necessary step to understanding their interfaces with organic layers in OLED and spintronic devices.

  17. A scanning electron microscope study of olivine crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, E. J.; Grossman, L.

    1974-01-01

    SEM photographs were taken of euhedral olivine grains from the Murchison C2 chondrite and several terrestrial and lunar occurrences. In general, the crystal faces of the meteorite grains are rough and uneven, with irregular growth patterns. They are very similar to crystal faces on terrestrial olivine grains that formed by sublimation from a vapor phase. They are very different from the relatively smooth and featureless surfaces of magmatic olivine crystals that precipitated from igneous melts. Qualitatively, the surface morphology of the crystal supports the contention that many euhedral crystals of olivine in C2 meteorites condensed from a gas phase.

  18. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  19. Electronic Structure of Solids and Their Surfaces and Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    I!*l.7* ser~iccrd--otors and the more iconic I-VII ~nslatT’. Tey servo! yis %_test of calculationp.1 mothods previo-usly ,j s I o n t h c! i1, pr I1I...upper bon -.s, since electrons and holes are not as localized as this mo4el potrays them. The Hartree-Fock calculation and the following correlation

  20. Electron sterilization validation techniques using the controlled depth of sterilization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleghorn, D.A.; Nablo, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    Many pharmaceutical products, especially parenteral drugs, cannot be sterilized with gamma rays or high energy electrons due to the concomitant product degradation. In view of the well-controlled electron energy spectrum available in modern electron processors, it is practical to deliver sterilizing doses over depths considerably less than those defining the thickness of blister-pack constructions or pharmaceutical containers. Because bremsstrahlung and X-ray production are minimized at these low electron energies and in these low Z materials, very high electron: penetrating X-ray dose ratios are possible for the application of the technique. Thin film dosimetric techniques have been developed utilizing radiochromic film in the 10-60 g/m 2 range for determining the surface dose distribution in occluded surface areas where direct electron illumination is not possible. Procedures for validation of the process using dried spore inoculum on the product as well as in good geometry are employed to determine the process lethality and its dependence on product surface geometry. Applications of the process to labile pharmaceuticals in glass and polystyrene syringes are reviewed. It has been applied to the sterilization of commercial sterile products since 1987, and the advantages and the natural limitations of the technique are discussed. (author)

  1. Suppression secondary electrons from target surface under pulsed ion beams bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhen; Peng Yufei; Long Jidong; Lan Chaohui; Dong Pan; Shi Jinshui

    2012-01-01

    The producing mechanism of secondary electrons from target surface under ion beams bombardment is discussed. Several methods to suppress the secondary electrons in special vacuum devices and their advantages and disadvantages are introduced. The ways of using self-bias and curved surface target are proposed and verified in the experiment. The results show that the secondary electrons can be effectively suppressed when the self-bias is larger than 80 V. The secondary electron yield decreases by using curved surface target instead of flat target. The secondary electron yield calculated from the experimental data is about 0.67, which is slightly larger than the value (0.58) from the literature due to the impurities of the ion beam and target surface. The effect of suppressing the electron countercurrent by the self-bias method is analyzed. The result shows that the self-bias method can not only suppress the secondary electrons from target surface under ion beams bombardment, but also suppress the electron countercurrent resulting from the instability of the pulsed power source. (authors)

  2. The electronic structure of anodized and etched aluminum alloy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, W. M.; Averbach, B. L.

    1988-11-01

    Specimens of 6061 and 5052 aluminum alloys which had been anodized and etched by several commonly used procedures were examined by means of bias-reference X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The spectra were compared with those obtained from single crystals of pure aluminum oxides. The chemical shifts observed from the A12p surface oxide lines were interpreted as differences in the Fermi energy levels relative to those in the bulk oxide crystals, and the Fermi energy levels of the surface oxides were thus determined. Using an earlier experimental correlation obtained for values of the point of zero charge (pzc) with Fermi energy levels in aluminum oxide powders, a value of the pzc of the surface oxide was then determined. The surface exhibited the maximum alkalinity, pzc = 8.9, after a caustic etch, and the maximum acidity, pzc = 3.6, after a phosphoric acid anodizing treatment. The significance of these pzc values in the adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys is discussed.

  3. Controlling competing electronic orders via non-equilibrium acoustic phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuett, Michael; Orth, Peter; Levchenko, Alex; Fernandes, Rafael

    The interplay between multiple electronic orders is a hallmark of strongly correlated systems displaying unconventional superconductivity. While doping, pressure, and magnetic field are the standard knobs employed to assess these different phases, ultrafast pump-and-probe techniques opened a new window to probe these systems. Recent examples include the ultrafast excitation of coherent optical phonons coupling to electronic states in cuprates and iron pnictides. In this work, we demonstrate theoretically that non-equilibrium acoustic phonons provide a promising framework to manipulate competing electronic phases and favor unconventional superconductivity over other states. In particular, we show that electrons coupled to out-of-equilibrium anisotropic acoustic phonons enter a steady state in which the effective electronic temperature varies around the Fermi surface. Such a momentum-dependent temperature can then be used to selectively heat electronic states that contribute primarily to density-wave instabilities, reducing their competition with superconductivity. We illustrate this phenomenon by computing the microscopic steady-state phase diagram of the iron pnictides, showing that superconductivity is enhanced with respect to the competing antiferromagnetic phase.

  4. Influence of the Electron-Electron Interaction in the Surface Valence Band on Low Energy Ion Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Vladimir M.; Devreese, Jozef T.

    1996-03-01

    The influence of the electron-electron interaction in the surface valence band on the low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) is investigated in the framework of the modified Muda---Newns approach. With this aim the Anderson-type electron-electron interaction term is taken into account in the Hamiltonian of the system and a resulting nonlinear set of equations of motion for the occupation number matrix is solved for various values of the effective electron-electron coupling constant U. It is demonstrated that for increasing U the steady-state value of the atomic level occupation number after the scattering increases. As a result, the ion survival probability is found, e. g., for the scattering of ^4He^+ ions from Cu to be a decreasing function of U. These results allow a consistent interpretation of the recent experimental data on low-energy He^+ ion scattering from metals. The work is supported by the C.E.C. Human Capital and Mobility Project "Quantification of Surface Analysis by Low Energy Ion Scattering". Also at the Technical University of Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  5. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulzar, A. [Materials Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ajmal, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2009-07-30

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe{sub 3}C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  6. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  7. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  8. Relation between bulk compressibility and surface energy of electron-hole liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singwi, K.S.; Tosi, M.P.

    1979-08-01

    Attention is drawn to the existence of an empirical relation chiσ/asup(*)sub(B) approximately 1 between the compressibility, the surface energy and the excitonic radius in electron-hole liquids. (author)

  9. Auger electron spectroscopy of the surface of a pipe-like solid C60+18n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostov, V.V.; Chernozatonskij, L.A.; Kosakovskaya, Z.Ya.; Babaev, V.V.; Guseva, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Auger and electron energy loss spectra obtained when probing the surface of nanofiber carbon material by an electron beam point out to C 60 football-type of covers with the outlet to the surface of nanopipe carbon molecules

  10. A first approach to runaway electron control in FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncagni, L. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Carnevale, D., E-mail: carnevaledaniele@gmail.com [Dipartimento Ing. Civile ed Ing. Informatica Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cianfarani, C.; Esposito, B. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Granucci, G. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Maddaluno, G.; Marocco, D. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Martin-Solis, J.R. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes-Madrid (Spain); Pucella, G. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sozzi, C. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Varano, G. [Dipartimento Ing. Civile ed Ing. Informatica Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Vitale, V. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Zaccarian, L. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 av. du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ. de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-10-15

    The Plasma Control System (PCS) of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is not equipped with any runaway electron (RE) beam control or suppression tool. In this paper we propose an upgraded PCS including an architecture for the control of disruption-generated REs that, making use of filtering techniques to estimate the onsets of the current quench (CQ) and of the RE beam current plateau, provides a controlled plasma current shut-down and a simultaneous RE position control. The control strategy is based on a nonlinear technique, called Input Allocation, that allows to re-configure the current in the poloidal field (PF) coils and improve the PCS responsiveness needed for RE position control. Preliminary results on the implementation of the Input Allocation and an experimental proposal to test the control scheme architecture are discussed.

  11. Control of Nuclear Dynamics through Conical Intersections and Electronic Coherences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Caroline; Vendrell, Oriol; Welsch, Ralph; Santra, Robin

    2018-03-01

    The effect of nuclear dynamics and conical intersections on electronic coherences is investigated employing a two-state, two-mode linear vibronic coupling model. Exact quantum dynamical calculations are performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. It is found that the presence of a nonadiabatic coupling close to the Franck-Condon point can preserve electronic coherence to some extent. Additionally, the possibility of steering the nuclear wave packets by imprinting a relative phase between the electronic states during the photoionization process is discussed. It is found that the steering of nuclear wave packets is possible given that a coherent electronic wave packet embodying the phase difference passes through a conical intersection. A conical intersection close to the Franck-Condon point is thus a necessary prerequisite for control, providing a clear path towards attochemistry.

  12. Optical polarimeter based on Fourier analysis and electronic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilardy, J; Salas, V.; Torres, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show the design and implementation of an optical polarimeter using electronic control and the Fourier analysis. The polarimeter prototype will be used as a main tool for the students of the Universidad Popular del Cesar that belong to the following university programs: Electronics engineering (optoelectronics area), Math and Physics degree and the Master in Physics Sciences, in order to learning the theory and experimental aspects of the state of optical polarization via the Stokes vector measurement. Using the electronic polarimeter proposed in this paper, the students will be able to observe (in an optical bench) and understand the different interactions of the states of optical polarization when the optical waves pass through to the polarizers and retarder waves plates. The electronic polarimeter has a software that captures the optical intensity measurement and evaluates the Stokes vector. (Author)

  13. Theoretical studies of growth processes and electronic properties of nanostructures on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yina

    Low dimensional nanostructures have been of particular interest because of their potential applications in both theoretical studies and industrial use. Although great efforts have been put into obtaining better understanding of the formation and properties of these materials, many questions still remain unanswered. This thesis work has focused on theoretical studies of (1) the growth processes of magnetic nanowires on transition-metal surfaces, (2) the dynamics of pentacene thin-film growth and island structures on inert surfaces, and (3) our proposal of a new type of semiconducting nanotube. In the first study, we elucidated a novel and intriguing kinetic pathway for the formation of Fe nanowires on the upper edge of a monatomic-layer-high step on Cu(111) using first-principles calculations. The identification of a hidden fundamental Fe basal line within the Cu steps prior to the formation of the apparent upper step edge Fe wire produces a totally different view of step-decorating wire structures and offers new possibilities for the study of the properties of these wires. Subsequent experiments with scanning tunneling microscopy unambiguously established the essential role of embedded Fe atoms as precursors to monatomic wire growth. A more general study of adatom behavior near transition-metal step edges illustrated a systematic trend in the adatom energetics and kinetics, resulted from the electronic interactions between the adatom and the surfaces. This work opens the possibility of controlled manufacturing of one-dimensional nanowires. In the second study, we investigated pentacene thin-films on H-diamond, H-silica and OH-silica surfaces via force field molecular dynamics simulations. Pentacene island structures on these surfaces were identified and found to have a 90-degree rotation relative to the structure proposed by some experimental groups. Our work may facilitate the design and control of experimental pentacene thin-film growth, and thus the development

  14. Self-consistent electronic structure of the contracted tungsten (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posternak, M.; Krakauer, H.; Freeman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave energy-band studies using the warped muffin-tin approximation for a seven-layer W(001) single slab with the surface-layer separation contracted by 6% of the bulk interlayer spacing are reported. Surface electronic structure, local densities of states, generalized susceptibility for the surface, work function, and core-level shifts are found to have insignificant differences with corresponding results for the unrelaxed surface. Several differences in surface states between theory and recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments are discussed in the light of new proposed models of the actual unreconstructed surface structure at high temperatures

  15. Metal substrates with nanometer scale surface roughness for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Lam; Kim, Kisoo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we present a novel way in fabricating a metal substrate with nanometer scale in surface roughness (Ra INVAR (Invariable alloy) one (20 cm × 20 cm, Ra = 1.40 nm) were demonstrated. The INVAR film was used as a substrate for fabricating organic light emitting diodes (OLED) and organic photovoltaic (OPV). The optical and electrical characteristics of OLEDs and OPVs using the INVAR were comparable to those using a conventional ITO glass substrate.

  16. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  17. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  18. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data

  19. Electron work function and composition of gallium-indium alloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorova, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The dependences of electron work functions on the composition for gallium-indium alloy obtained under different conditions are compared. An attempt is made to estimate a change in the alloy surface composition caused by a change in temperature and in the boundary phase nature. For the case under consideration it has been shown to be reasonable to compare the dependences of the electron work functions not on the alloy volumetric composition but on the composition of its surface

  20. Effects of electronic correlation, physical structure, and surface termination on the electronic structure of V2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Li, Jing-bin; Sutter, Eli; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Fernández-Serra, M.-V.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a density functional theory (DFT) study of the electronic structure of vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) in both bulk and nanowire form. In particular, our study focuses on the role of spin polarization and electronic correlations, as computed within the local (spin) density approximation (L(S)DA) and the LDA+U formalism. As expected for a mean-field approach such as DFT, our optimized bulk V2O3 structure is shown to be metallic in nature, while an adequate choice of the Hubbard U parameter (U = 4 eV) is enough to open the band gap, making the system insulating. However, this formalism predicts a nonmagnetic insulator, as opposed to the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic structure, to be the ground state. The electronic structure of the V2O3 nanowire system is more complex, and it strongly depends on the surface termination of the structures. Our results show that non-spin-polarized LDA calculations of 001-grown nanowires are metallic in nature. However, LSDA predicts that some surface terminations are half-metals, with a large band gap opening for one of the spins. When LSDA+U was used to study the nanowire model with a closed-shell oxygen surface termination, we observe insulating behavior with no net magnetic moment, with a 104 meV band gap. This is consistent with the experimentally observed gap recently reported in the literature for similar wires. To experimentally address the surface structure of these nanowires, we perform surface specific nano-Auger electron spectroscopy on as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires. Our experimental results show a higher O:V peak ratio (1.93:1) than expected for pure V2O3, thereby suggesting higher oxygen content at the surface of the nanowires. From our results, we conclude that oxygen termination is likely the termination for our as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires.

  1. Influence on rod-pinch diode performance of suppressing electron emission from different cathode surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yi; Lv Min; Qiu Aici; Yang Hailiang; Liang Tianxue; Zhang Zhong

    2010-01-01

    The electron pinching process of a rod-pinch diode is simulated with UNIPIC. It indicates that the pinching characteristics of the electrons emitted from different cathode surfaces differ significantly. The electrons emitted from the downstream surface pinch worst, with large amount of electrons hitting upstream of the rod, which increases the axial bremsstrahlung X-ray spot size. The simulation results show that suppressing electron emission from the downstream surface will reduce the axial X-ray spot size and improve the pinching quality. Composite cathodes are designed to investigate the influence of suppressing electron emission from the upstream or downstream surface. Experiments are performed on the new-built IVA (Inductive Voltage Adder) device at the peak voltage of ∼1.5 MV, and the peak current of ∼44 kA. It is shown that the composite cathode is effective in suppressing electron emission from the specific surface, the axial X-ray spot size in the case of downstream suppression is about 14.5% less than the case of upstream suppression and in both cases, the axis-on X-ray dose at 1 meter from the rod tip is ∼1.9rads, validating the simulation results. (authors)

  2. Surface sensitization mechanism on negative electron affinity p-GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Feng, Shu; Lu, Feifei

    2018-03-01

    The surface sensitization is the key to prepare negative electron affinity photocathode. The thesis emphasizes on the study of surface sensitization mechanism of p-type doping GaN nanowires utilizing first principles based on density function theory. The adsorption energy, work function, dipole moment, geometry structure, electronic structure and optical properties of Mg-doped GaN nanowires surfaces with various coverages of Cs atoms are investigated. The GaN nanowire with Mg doped in core position is taken as the sensitization base. At the initial stage of sensitization, the best adsorption site for Cs atom on GaN nanowire surface is BN, the bridge site of two adjacent N atoms. Surface sensitization generates a p-type internal surface with an n-type surface state, introducing a band bending region which can help reduce surface barrier and work function. With increasing Cs coverage, work functions decrease monotonously and the "Cs-kill" phenomenon disappears. For Cs coverage of 0.75 ML and 1 ML, the corresponding sensitization systems reach negative electron affinity state. Through surface sensitization, the absorption curves are red shifted and the absorption coefficient is cut down. All theoretical calculations can guide the design of negative electron affinity Mg doped GaN nanowires photocathode.

  3. Calculating the SnS(010) surface electronic structure using the green function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirli, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure of the (010) surface in a layered SnS semiconductor terminating with Sn and S atomic planes is calculated by the Green function method. The electronic structure of a perfect crystal is calculated according to the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) using Slater s-, p-, and d-orbitals. Defect-induced changes in the density of states and the origin and orbital composition of electronic states in the band gap are discussed.

  4. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered......The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  5. Power electronic converters PWM strategies and current control techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Monmasson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A voltage converter changes the voltage of an electrical power source and is usually combined with other components to create a power supply. This title is devoted to the control of static converters, which deals with pulse-width modulation (PWM) techniques, and also discusses methods for current control. Various application cases are treated. The book is ideal for professionals in power engineering, power electronics, and electric drives industries, as well as practicing engineers, university professors, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students.

  6. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  7. Electronic Performance Monitoring: An Organizational Justice and Concertive Control Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, G. Stoney; Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1997-01-01

    Applies theories of organizational justice/concertive control to account for contradictions inherent in electronic monitoring of workers by organizations. Argues that results are usually positive when workers are involved in the design and implementation of monitoring systems, and monitoring is restricted to performance-related activities with…

  8. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-04

    Jan 4, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 1. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in molecules ... To highlight recent experimental progress, we explain how one can employ few-cycle IR pulses and different attosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses in ...

  9. Adaptive robust control of longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Schilcher, Thomas; Smith, Roy S.

    2016-05-01

    Feedback control of the longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles are considered to be critical for beam control in accelerators. In the feedback scheme, the longitudinal or transverse beam profile is measured and compared to a desired profile to give an error estimate. The error is then used to act on the appropriate actuators to correct the profile. The role of the transverse feedback is to steer the beam in a particular trajectory, known as the "orbit." The common approach for orbit correction is based on approximately inverting the response matrix, and in the best case, involves regulating or filtering the singular values. In the current contribution, a more systematic and structured way of handling orbit correction is introduced giving robustness against uncertainties in the response matrix. Moreover, the input bounds are treated to avoid violating the limits of the corrector currents. The concept of the robust orbit correction has been successfully tested at the SwissFEL injector test facility. In the SwissFEL machine, a photo-injector laser system extracts electrons from a cathode and a similar robust control method is developed for the longitudinal feedback control of the current profile of the electron bunch. The method manipulates the angles of the crystals in the laser system to produce a desired charge distribution over the electron bunch length. This approach paves the way towards automation of laser pulse stacking.

  10. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Longqing; Syed, Ahad; Wong, Kimchong; Wang, Xianbin

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. (paper)

  11. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Ionic liquids influence on the surface properties of electron beam irradiated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Doroftei, Florica; Parparita, Elena; Vasile, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Wood veneers impregnated with three imidazolium-based ionic liquids and irradiated with electron beam were studied by FTIR-ATR, SEM/EDX, AFM, contact angle and image analysis. • ILs preserve the surface properties of the wood (surface energy, roughness, color) upon irradiation, in comparison with the reference wood, but the surface composition is changed by treatment with IL-s, mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. • Under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of three imidazolium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) on the structure and surface properties of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) veneers submitted to electron beam irradiation with a dose of 50 kGy has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as image, scanning electron microscopy/SEM/EDX, atomic force microscopy and contact angle analysis. The experimental results have proven that the studied ionic liquids determine a better preservation of the structural features of wood (cellulose crystallinity index and lignin concentration on the surface) as well as some of surface properties such as surface energy, roughness, color upon irradiation with electron beam, in comparison with the reference wood, but surface composition is changed by treatment with imidazolium-based ionic liquids mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. Also, under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface

  13. Tuning a fuzzy controller using quadratic response surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Response surface methodology, an alternative method to traditional tuning of a fuzzy controller, is described. An example based on a simulated inverted pendulum 'plant' shows that with (only) 15 trial runs, the controller can be calibrated using a quadratic form to approximate the response surface.

  14. The X-37 Hot Structure Control Surface Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Larry D.; Stephens, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-structural testing of three hot structure control surface subcomponent test articles (STA) designed for the X-37 (Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, California) Orbital Vehicle (OV) has been completed. The test articles were subcomponents of the X-37 OV bodyflap and flaperon control surfaces.

  15. Radiological monitoring. Controlling surface water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Maxime

    2018-01-01

    Throughout France, surface waters (from rivers to brooks) located at the vicinity of nuclear or industrial sites, are subject to regular radiological monitoring. An example is given with the radiological monitoring of a small river near La Hague Areva's plant, where contaminations have been detected with the help of the French IRSN nuclear safety research organization. The sampling method and various measurement types are described

  16. MIS hot electron devices for enhancement of surface reactivity by hot electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    is monitored using the calibrated resistance of the metal layer. The MIS hot electron emitters are cleaned in-situ in a background pressure of 3 £ 10¡7 mbar O2. Thermal desorption experiments with labeled CO are carried out with a reproducibility of 7%. The detection limit of labeled CO for the mass...... spectrometer setup is estimated to 3 £ 109 s¡1 from the desorption experiments. The theoretical hot electron induced desorption rate is estimated to 2£104 s¡1....

  17. Spatial Control of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Behm, K.; Zhao, T.; Joglekar, A. S.; Hussein, A.; Nees, J.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Elle, J.; Lucero, A.; Samarin, G. M.; Sarry, G.; Warwick, J.

    2017-10-01

    The laser wakefield experiments to study and control spatial properties of electron beams were performed using HERCULES laser at the University of Michigan at power of 100 TW. In the first experiment multi-electron beam generation was demonstrated using co-propagating, parallel laser beams with a π-phase shift mirror and showing that interaction between the wakefields can cause injection to occur for plasma and laser parameters in which a single wakefield displays no significant injection. In the second experiment a magnetic triplet quadrupole system was used to refocus and stabilize electron beams at the distance of 60 cm from the interaction region. This produced a 10-fold increase in remote gamma-ray activation of 63Cu using a lead converter. In the third experiment measurements of un-trapped electrons with high transverse momentum produce a 500 mrad (FWHM) ring. This ring is formed by electrons that receive a forward momentum boost by traversing behind the bubble and its size is inversely proportional to the plasma density. The characterization of divergence and charge of this electron ring may reveal information about the wakefield structure and trapping potential. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Modeling the process of interaction of 10 keV electrons with a plane dielectric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokhmyanina, Kristina; Sotnikova, Valentina; Sotnikov, Alexey; Kaplii, Anna; Nikulicheva, Tatyana; Kubankin, Alexandr; Kishin, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    The effect of guiding of charged particles by dielectric channels is of noticeable interest at the present time. The phenomenon is widely studied experimentally and theoretically but some points still need to be clarified. A previously developed model of interaction of fast electrons with dielectric surface at grazing incidence is used to study the independence of electron deflection on the value of electron beam current. The calculations were performed assuming a smooth dependence of the surface conductivity on the beam current in the 40-3000 nA range.

  19. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emtsev, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  20. Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the laser-irradiated target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Liu, B C; Du, F; Wang, S J; Li, C; Zhou, M L; Zhang, L; Liu, X; Wang, J; Liu, X L; Chen, L M; Wang, Z H; Ma, J L; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J; Liu, F; Liu, F

    2010-01-01

    Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the target surfaces irradiated by femtosecond intense laser pulses is measured by k α x-ray imaging technique when a preplasma is presented. An annular halo surrounding a bright spot is observed in the x-ray images when the scale length of the electron density is large. For an incidence angle of 70 0 the x-ray images show a non-symmetrical distribution peaked to the laser propagation direction. The x-ray photons in the halo are mainly excited by the fast electrons that flow in the preplasma when their paths intersect the high density regions near the target surface.

  1. New electron-ion-plasma equipment for modification of materials and products surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Electron-ion-plasma treatment of materials and products, including surface clearing and activation, formation surface layers with changed chemical and phase structure, increased hardness and corrosion resistance; deposition of various functional coatings, has received a wide distribution in a science and industry. Widespread methods of ion-plasma modification of material and product surfaces are ion etching and activation, ion-plasma nitriding, arc or magnetron deposition of functional coatings, including nanostructured. The combination of above methods of surface modification allows essentially to improve exploitation properties of treated products and to optimize the characteristics of modified surfaces for concrete final requirements. For the purpose of a combination of various methods of ion-plasma treatment in a single work cycle at Institute of High Current Electronics of SB RAS (IHCE SB RAS) specialized technological equipment 'DUET', 'TRIO' and 'QUADRO' and 'KVINTA' have been developed. This equipment allow generating uniform low-temperature gas plasma at pressures of (0.1-1) Pa with concentration of (10 9 -10 11 ) cm -3 in volume of (0.1-1) m 3 . In the installations consistent realization of several various operations of materials and products treatment in a single work cycle is possible. The operations are preliminary heating and degassing, ion clearing, etching and activation of materials and products surface by plasma of arc discharges; chemicothermal treatment (nitriding) for formation of diffusion layer on a surface of treated sample using plasma of nonself-sustained low-pressure arc discharge; deposition of single- or multilayered superhard (≥40 GPa) nanocrystalline coatings on the basis of pure metals or their compounds (nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides) by the arc plasma-assisted method. For realization of the modes all installations are equipped by original sources of gas and metal plasma. Besides, in

  2. Applications of low-energy electron diffraction to ordering at crystal and quasicrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, E.G.; Malic, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to measure low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity profiles has been enhanced by use of low-current well-defined primary electron beams in conjunction with position-sensitive detection (PSD) of the diffracted electrons. The following are examples of applications of LEED-PSD. Compositional ordering at ordering alloy Cu 3 Au (100) and (110) surfaces - the ordering of the (100) surface is believed to conform to a conventional picture in which the already-ordered bulk acts as a template, but the profiles measured in the course of ordering of the (110) surface are of the shapes expected if the ordering occurred first at the surface. Disordering of Ge(111) surface 150 K below the bulk melting temperature - the intensities and profiles are inconsistent with surface melting or roughening, but a model based on molecular dynamics simulations is not ruled out. Order and disordering at decagonal quasicrystal Al 65 Cu 15 Co 20 surfaces - at room temperature the quasicrystalline order is well developed at both the 'ten-fold' surface (perpendicular to the ten-fold surface (perpendicular to the ten-fold periodic axis) and a 'two-fold' one (parallel to the ten-fold axis) as evidenced by narrow beam profiles. The ten-fold surface undergoes a disordering transition at 700 K, but the temperature dependence of the profiles is unlike that expected for the roughening transition anticipated theoretically. 57 refs., 15 figs

  3. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  5. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2016-05-03

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  7. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2017-04-04

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  8. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  9. Electron precipitation control of the Mars nightside ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Girazian, Z.; Mitchell, D. L.; Adams, D.; Xu, S.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M. K.; Larson, D. E.; McFadden, J. P.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The nightside ionosphere of Mars is known to be highly variable, with densities varying substantially with ion species, solar zenith angle, solar wind conditions and geographic location. The factors that control its structure include neutral densities, day-night plasma transport, plasma temperatures, dynamo current systems driven by neutral winds, solar energetic particle events, superthermal electron precipitation, chemical reaction rates and the strength, geometry and topology of crustal magnetic fields. The MAVEN mission has been the first to systematically sample the nightside ionosphere by species, showing that shorter-lived species such as CO2+ and O+ are more correlated with electron precipitation flux than longer lived species such as O2+ and NO+, as would be expected, and is shown in the figure below from Girazian et al. [2017, under review at Geophysical Research Letters]. In this study we use electron pitch-angle and energy spectra from the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) instruments, ion and neutral densities from the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS), electron densities and temperatures from the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument, as well as electron-neutral ionization cross-sections. We present a comprehensive statistical study of electron precipitation on the Martian nightside and its effect on the vertical, local-time and geographic structure and composition of the ionosphere, over three years of MAVEN observations. We also calculate insitu electron impact ionization rates and compare with ion densities to judge the applicability of photochemical models of the formation and maintenance of the nightside ionosphere. Lastly, we show how this applicability varies with altitude and is affected by ion transport measured by the Suprathermal and thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) instrument.

  10. Control system by the technological electron Linac KUT-20

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, Y I; Gurin, V A; Demidov, N V

    2001-01-01

    The high-power technological electron linac KUT-20 was developed at the Science Research Complex 'Accelerator' of NSC KIPT. The linac consists of two 1.2 m length accelerating structures with a variable geometry and an injector. The latter comprises a diode electron gun,a klystron type buncher and an accelerating cavity.With a RF supply power at accelerating structure entries of 11 MW and with a current at the accelerator exit of 1A,the beam energy will be up to 20 MeV.An average beam power is planned to be 20 kW.All systems of the accelerator are controlled by a computerised control system. The program and technical complex consist of PC equipped with fast ADC control console, synchronization unit, microprocessor-operated complexes.

  11. Supply system with microprocessor control for electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplin, N.I.; Sergeev, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Precision supply system for electron gun used in Auger-spectrometer is described. The supply system consists of control and high-voltage parts, made as separate units. Supply high-voltage unit includes system supply module, filament module to supply electron gun cathode and 6 high-volt modules to supply accelerating, modulating and three focusing electrodes of the gun. High-voltage modules have the following characteristics: U-(100-1000)V output voltage, 5x10 -5 U stability, 10 -5 xU pulsation amplitude, J-(0-5)A filament current change range at 10 -4 xJ stability. Control unit including microprocessor, timer and storage devices forms control voltage for all modules and regulates voltage and current of filament at electrodes

  12. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  13. Passive water control at the surface of a superhydrophobic lichen

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlett, Christopher; Shirtcliffe, Neil; Pyatt, F. Brian; Newton, Michael; McHale, Glen; Koch, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Some lichens have a super-hydrophobic upper surface, which repels water drops, keeping the surface dry but probably preventing water uptake. Spore ejection requires water and is most efficient just after rainfall. This study was carried out to investigate how super-hydrophobic lichens manage water uptake and repellence at their fruiting bodies, or podetia. Drops of water were placed onto separate podetia of Cladonia chlorophaea and observed using optical microscopy and cryo-scanning-electron ...

  14. Surface buckling of black phosphorus: Determination, origin, and influence on electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongwei; Jin, Wencan; Yu, Jie-Xiang; Grady, Maxwell; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Kim, Young Duck; Hone, James; Dadap, Jerry I.; Zang, Jiadong; Osgood, Richard M.; Pohl, Karsten

    2017-12-01

    The surface structure of black phosphorus materials is determined using surface-sensitive dynamical microspot low energy electron diffraction (μ LEED ) analysis using a high spatial resolution low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) system. Samples of (i) crystalline cleaved black phosphorus (BP) at 300 K and (ii) exfoliated few-layer phosphorene (FLP) of about 10 nm thickness which were annealed at 573 K in vacuum were studied. In both samples, a significant surface buckling of 0.22 Å and 0.30 Å, respectively, is measured, which is one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. As direct evidence for large buckling, we observe a set of (for the flat surface forbidden) diffraction spots. Using first-principles calculations, we find that the presence of surface vacancies is responsible for the surface buckling in both BP and FLP, and is related to the intrinsic hole doping of phosphoresce materials previously reported.

  15. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  16. Speed Control of General Purpose Engine with Electronic Governor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawut, Umerujan; Tohti, Gheyret; Takigawa, Buso; Tsuji, Teruo

    This paper presents a general purpose engine speed control system with an electronic governor in order to improve the current system with a mechanical governor which shows unstable characteristics by change of mecanical friction or A/F ratio (Air/Fuel ratio). For the control system above, there are problems that the feedback signal is only a crank angle because of cost and the controlled object is a general purpose engine which is strongly nonlinear. In order to overcome these problems, the system model is shown for the dynamic estimation of the amount of air flow and the robust controller is designed. That is, the proposed system includes the robust sliding-mode controller by the feedback signal of only a crank angle where Genetic Algorithm is applied for the controller design. The simulation and the experiments by MATLAB/Simulink are performed to show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  17. The Electronic Valve Instrument (EVI), an electronic musical wind controller for playing synthesizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Nyle A.

    2004-05-01

    The Electronic Valve Instrument (EVI) is an electronic musical wind instrument with playing techniques similar to that of a trumpet. Invented by Nyle Steiner in the early 1970's, it was designed to give the performer control of dynamics from breath pressure and the ability to make a humanly generated vibrato. Other musical paramaters can be controlled as well. It has a playing range of seven octaves (similar to that of a piano). When musical lines are played using this instrument (controller) connected to an electronic music synthesizer, the sound is much more natural sounding and expressive than when a normal musical keyboard is used. The evolution of this instrument from the pre-Midi era to it latest Midi configuration, principles of operation, synthesizer programming, and its wide use in movie and TV scoring will be discussed. The EVI has played featured musical lines in many major movie soundtracks and TV shows such as Apocalypse Now, Witness, Dead Poets Society, Fatal Attraction, No Way Out, Gorillas in the Mist, and many others. The EVI design has also been adapted as an Electronic Woodwind Instrument (EWI) by Nyle Steiner and has been manufactured and sold worldwide by the AKAI Co. in Japan.

  18. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics

  19. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature 500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  20. Electronic structure and band alignment of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the room-temperature deposition of the organic molecule 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) reduces the surface defect density of the silicon (100) surface by chemically bonding to the surface dangling bonds. Using various spectroscopic measurements we have investigated the electronic structure and band alignment properties of the PQ/Si interface. The band-bending at the PQ-passivated silicon surface is negligible for both n- and p-type substrates, demonstrating a low density of surface defects. Finally we show that PQ forms a semiconducting wide-bandgap type-I heterojunction with silicon.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy study of protein immobilized on SIO2 Sol-gel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform attachment of enzymes to solid surfaces is essential in the development of bio and optical sensor devices. Immobilization by adsorption according to hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature is dependent on the charges and defects of the support surfaces. Sol-gel SiO2 densified glass surfaces, frequently used as supports for protein immobilization, are evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. The model protein is globular enzyme lysozyme, deposited by adsorption on functionalized surfaces. Formation of a protein layer is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the SEM images suggest discontinuous adsorption in areas where cracks predominate on the glass surface.

  2. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  3. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lollobrigida, V.; Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F.; Borgatti, F.; Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G.; Tortora, L.; Stefani, G.; Offi, F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  4. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda-Cepa, M., E-mail: golda@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Syrek, K. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Brzychczy-Wloch, M. [Department of Bacteriology, Microbial Ecology and Parasitology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Czysta 18, 31-121 Krakow (Poland); Sulka, G.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Kotarba, A., E-mail: kotarba@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function–bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces. - Highlights: • The correlation between work function and bacteria adhesion was discovered. • The discovered correlation is rationalized in terms of electrostatic bacteria–surface repulsion. • The results provide basis for the simple evaluation of implant surfaces against infection.

  5. Electron energy-loss spectroscopic study of the surface of ceria abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliss, Shelley R.; Bentley, James; Carter, C. Barry

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces of ceria (CeO 2 ) particles have been studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope. All the ceria particles analyzed contained Ce 3+ at the surface. Rare-earth impurities such as La were enriched at the surface and were observed for particles ranging from tens to hundreds of nanometers in size. Fluorine in the abrasives corresponded to a lower average cerium valence. Time series investigations indicate that fluorine substitutes on the oxygen sub-lattice and is charge-balanced by some cerium changing from Ce 4+ to Ce 3+

  6. Electron energy-loss spectroscopic study of the surface of ceria abrasives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliss, Shelley R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Avenue S.E., 151 Amundson Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455 0132 (United States); Bentley, James [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Metals and Ceramics Division, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 6024 (United States); Carter, C. Barry [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Avenue S.E., 151 Amundson Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455 0132 (United States)]. E-mail: carter@cems.umn.edu

    2005-02-28

    Surfaces of ceria (CeO{sub 2}) particles have been studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope. All the ceria particles analyzed contained Ce{sup 3+} at the surface. Rare-earth impurities such as La were enriched at the surface and were observed for particles ranging from tens to hundreds of nanometers in size. Fluorine in the abrasives corresponded to a lower average cerium valence. Time series investigations indicate that fluorine substitutes on the oxygen sub-lattice and is charge-balanced by some cerium changing from Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+}.

  7. Implementation to spanish protocol of quality control of accelerators to daily control of electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaimi Hernandez, P.; Ramirez Ros, J. C.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Cabello Murillo, E.; Diaz Fuente, R.; Ferrando Sanchez, A.

    2011-01-01

    A revised procedure for daily control of the electron beams to make measurements more meaningful physically, having a better reproducibility and more in line with the recommendations of the Spanish Protocol for Quality Control in Electron Linear Accelerators Clinical Use. The daily quality control beams of high energy electrons that had been done so far was the finding that the record of a series of measures (symmetry, uniformity, stability, energy, beam central dose) were within tolerance values established. The amendment is to check the beam quality by directly measuring changes in absorption depth at which the dose is reduced to half its maximum value, R50.

  8. Influence of surface topography on the secondary electron yield of clean copper samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Chuan; Cao, Meng; Cui, Wan-Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) due to electron impact depends strongly on surface topography. The SEY of copper samples after Ar-ion bombardment is measured in situ in a multifunctional ultrahigh vacuum system. Increasing the ion energy or duration of ion bombardment can even enlarge the SEY, though it is relatively low under moderate bombardment intensity. The results obtained with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that many valley structures of original sample surfaces can be smoothed due to ion bombardment, but more hill structures are generated with stronger bombardment intensity. With increasing the surface roughness in the observed range, the maximum SEY decreases from 1.2 to 1.07 at a surface characterized by valleys, while it again increases to 1.33 at a surface spread with hills. This phenomenon indicates that hill and valley structures are respectively effective in increasing and decreasing the SEY. These obtained results thus provide a comprehensive insight into the surface topography influence on the secondary electron emission characteristics in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical studies of MBE-grown InN nanocolumns: Evidence of surface electron accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2009-03-01

    Vertically self-aligned InN nanocolumns have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Different nanocolumn morphologies corresponding to different molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions have been studied. Raman spectra revealed strain-free nanocolumns with high crystalline quality for the full set of samples studied. Longitudinal optical modes both uncoupled and coupled to an electron plasma coexist in the Raman spectra pointing to the existence of two distinctive regions in the nanocolumn: a surface layer of degenerated electrons and a nondegenerated inner core. The characteristics of the low-temperature photoluminescence and its dependence on temperature and excitation power can be explained by a model considering localized holes recombining with degenerated electrons close to the nonpolar surface. The differences observed in the optical response of different samples showing similar crystalline quality have been attributed to the variation in the electron accumulation layer with the growth conditions.

  10. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  11. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autocla...

  12. Hot Electron Photoemission from Plasmonic Nanoparticles: Role of Transient Absorption in Surface Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze and compare surface- and vol ume-based internal photoelectric effects from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expression s for the photoemission rate in both cases. Similar to results for a flat metal surface, one can show that the surface mechanism preva ils, since it is un...... it is unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions. Transient ab sorption results from dielectric permittivity discontinuity at the nanoparticle boundary and leads to a substantial (by ~5 times) increase of the photoelectron emission rate....

  13. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  14. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of In induced superstructures on Si(5 5 7) surface during RT and HT adsorption/desorption process. • Kinetics is governed by substrate temperature which exhibits various growth modes (FM, SK, VB) under different conditions. • Strain relaxation play significant role in the commencement of desorption/rearrangement of atoms. • A consolidated phase diagram of In/Si(5 5 7) interface has been reported with new √3 × √3-R30° and 4 × 1 phases. - Abstract: This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500°C, growth of In follows Stranski–Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500°C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250–340°C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520°C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560°C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580°C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  15. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  16. Chemical formation of palladium-free surface-nickelized polyimide film for flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Y.-S.; Whang, W.-T.; Wu, S.-C.; Chuang, Kuen-Ru

    2008-01-01

    Flexible polyimide (PI) films for flexible electronics were surface-nickelized using a fully solution-based process and excellent adhesion between the nickel and polyimide phases was observed. Polyimide substrates were modified by alkaline hydrolysis, ion exchange, reduction and nickel electroless deposition without palladium. Atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to follow the growth of nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) and nickel layers on the polyimide surface. The surface resistances of the Ni-NPs/PI films and Ni/PI films, measured using a four-point probe, were 1.6 x 10 7 and 0.83 Ω/cm 2 , respectively. The thicknesses of Ni-NPs and the Ni layer on the polyimide surface were 82 nm and 382 nm, respectively, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, and the Ni layer adhered well to PI, as determined by the adhesive tape testing method

  17. Surface hardening of 30CrMnSiA steel using continuous electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulei; Hu, Jing; Shen, Xianfeng; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Wansheng

    2017-11-01

    30CrMnSiA high strength low alloy (HSLA) carbon structural steel is typically applied in equipment manufacturing and aerospace industries. In this work, the effects of continuous electron beam treatment on the surface hardening and microstructure modifications of 30CrMnSiA are investigated experimentally via a multi-purpose electron beam machine Pro-beam system. Micro hardness value in the electron beam treated area shows a double to triple increase, from 208 HV0.2 on the base metal to 520 HV0.2 on the irradiated area, while the surface roughness is relatively unchanged. Surface hardening parameters and mechanisms are clarified by investigation of the microstructural modification and the phase transformation both pre and post irradiation. The base metal is composed of ferrite and troostite. After continuous electron beam irradiation, the micro structure of the electron beam hardened area is composed of acicular lower bainite, feathered upper bainite and part of lath martensite. The optimal input energy density for 30CrMnSiA steel in this study is of 2.5 kJ/cm2 to attain the proper hardened depth and peak hardness without the surface quality deterioration. When the input irradiation energy exceeds 2.5 kJ/cm2 the convective mixing of the melted zone will become dominant. In the area with convective mixing, the cooling rate is relatively lower, thus the micro hardness is lower. The surface quality will deteriorate. Chemical composition and surface roughness pre and post electron beam treatment are also compared. The technology discussed give a picture of the potential of electron beam surface treatment for improving service life and reliability of the 30CrMnSiA steel.

  18. Research on fuzzy PID control to electronic speed regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-gang; Chen, Xue-hui; Zheng, Sheng-guo

    2007-12-01

    As an important part of diesel engine, the speed regulator plays an important role in stabilizing speed and improving engine's performance. Because there are so many model parameters of diesel-engine considered in traditional PID control and these parameters present non-linear characteristic.The method to adjust engine speed using traditional PID is not considered as a best way. Especially for the diesel-engine generator set. In this paper, the Fuzzy PID control strategy is proposed. Some problems about its utilization in electronic speed regulator are discussed. A mathematical model of electric control system for diesel-engine generator set is established and the way of the PID parameters in the model to affect the function of system is analyzed. And then it is proposed the differential coefficient must be applied in control design for reducing dynamic deviation of system and adjusting time. Based on the control theory, a study combined control with PID calculation together for turning fuzzy PID parameter is implemented. And also a simulation experiment about electronic speed regulator system was conducted using Matlab/Simulink and the Fuzzy-Toolbox. Compared with the traditional PID Algorithm, the simulated results presented obvious improvements in the instantaneous speed governing rate and steady state speed governing rate of diesel-engine generator set when the fuzzy logic control strategy used.

  19. Control systems for power electronics a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patil, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the book covers most of the aspects as a primer on power electronics starting from a simple diode bridge to a DC-DC convertor using PWM control. The thyristor-bridge and the mechanism of designing a closed loop system are discussed in chapter one, two and three. The concepts are applied in the fourth chapter as a case study for buck converter which uses MOSFETs as switching devices and the closed loop system is elaborated in the fifth chapter. Chapter six is focused on the embedded system basics and the implementation of controls in the digital domain. Chapter seven is a case study of application of an embedded control system for a DC motor. With this book, the reader will find it easy to work on the practical control systems with microcontroller implementation. The core intent of this book is to help gain an accelerated learning path to practical control system engineering and transform control theory to an implementable control system through electronics. Illustrations are provided for most of...

  20. Power electronic converters modeling and control with case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bacha, Seddik; Bratcu, Antoneta Iuliana

    2014-01-01

    Modern power electronic converters are involved in a very broad spectrum of applications: switched-mode power supplies, electrical-machine-motion-control, active power filters, distributed power generation, flexible AC transmission systems, renewable energy conversion systems and vehicular technology, among them. Power Electronics Converters Modeling and Control teaches the reader how to analyze and model the behavior of converters and so to improve their design and control. Dealing with a set of confirmed algorithms specifically developed for use with power converters, this text is in two parts: models and control methods. The first is a detailed exposition of the most usual power converter models: ·        switched and averaged models; ·        small/large-signal models; and ·        time/frequency models. The second focuses on three groups of control methods: ·        linear control approaches normally associated with power converters; ·        resonant controllers b...

  1. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, Nicholas F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C2H3 and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  2. Emission spectra of dimethoxybenzenes by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro; Imasaka, Totaro; Toyoda, Minoru; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ishibashi, Nobuhiko

    1975-01-01

    The emission spectra of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzenes under controlled electron impact excitation (200 eV) were measured in the 220 - 450 nm region at very low pressures. The photoemissions of the excited parent species and such fragment species as H, CH, CO, and CO + were observed and assigned. The relative intensities of the photoemissions of the parent species were compared with those of the fluorescence spectra (photoexcitation) in an n-hexane solution. The excited parent species, H, and CH were concluded to be produced in one-electron processes; however, the CO + species were assumed to be produced in both one- and two-electron processes, and the relative contributions are evaluated. It was concluded that the rate of the predissociation of o-dimethoxybenzene was faster than those of the other two isomers, and the observed characteristics of o-dimethoxybenzene had something to do with this faster rate. (auth.)

  3. Low-energy electron scattering at surfaces using STM tips as a field emission gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, S.; Iwanaga, M.; Tochihara, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The field emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) tips has the potential to probe small surface areas with electron beams. Several groups have demonstrated their capabilities. Intensity mapping of the secondary electrons and projection of the transmitted electrons have been shown to have high lateral resolution. Spin-polarized secondary electron microscopy, energy loss spectroscopy and scanning Auger electron microscopy have been also reported. We examined low-energy electron scattering at surfaces. Our final target is a development of a low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique using field emission from STM tips to determine structures of surface small regions. Our apparatus was designed based on a commercial STM system (UNISOKU USM-1100). The STM part was suspended by four springs to remove vibrations. The sample holder was mounted on a tube-type piezo scanner, while the tip was fixed rigidly on the holder. The bias voltages were applied to the sample up to +100 V. The tunnel current and the emission current were monitored on the tip. The emission current was fixed at 0.1 nA in the field emission mode. The apparatus was designed to detect backscattered electrons toward surface normal direction. The scattered electrons were guided by the electric field of the tip shield and an extractor, passed through a three-grid electron energy filter, and detected by a microchannel plate equipped with a phosphor screen. Tips were made of tungsten single crystal wire with a diameter of 0.25 mm. They have orientation of direction, and were sharpened by electrochemical etching with a NaOH solution of 2 N. The tips were welded on a tantalum wire for annealing in a preparation chamber. Field emission patterns and field ion microscopy images of them were obtained before and after experiments. The sensitivity and stability of the apparatus were sufficient to observe scattering patterns on the screen. We measured the kinetic energies of the scattered

  4. Surface decontamination of cheddar cheese by electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuzzaman, K.

    1991-01-01

    Cheddar cheese samples inoculated with two different levels of Penicillium cyclopium or Aspergillus ochraceus spores were vacuum-packed and irradiated at various doses up to 3.5 kGy with electrons from a 10-MeV linear accelerator. Unirradiated cheese showed visible mold growth in 8-25 d at 10 degrees C, and 7-12 d at 15 degrees C, depending on species and spore concentration. Only marginal extension of shelf life at 15 degrees C was achieved with cheese inoculated with 10 2 cfu per sample of either of the mold spores, followed by irradiation at 0.21 or 0.52 kGy. However, at these doses the average shelf life at 10 degrees C was extended by 41.5 and 50.5 d respectively when the inoculum was A. ochraceus. When the inoculum level was increased tenfold, irradiation at 1.2 and 3.5 kGy extended the average shelf life of cheese containing P. cyclopium by 44.5 and >262 d respectively at 10 degrees C, and by 3 and >166 d respectively at 15 degrees C. The shelf life of samples containing A. ochraceus and irradiated at 1.2 or 3.5 kGy was extended by at least 255.5 d at 10 degrees C and at least 160 d at 15 degrees C. The results clearly showed that low radiation doses are effective in the mold decontamination of cheese. The results also suggest that P. cyclopium in Cheddar cheese is more radiation-resistant than A. ochraceus. This was supported by determination of radiation survival curves for the two species incorporated into Cheddar cheese: D 10 values for P. cyclopium and A. ochraceus were found to be 0.40 and 0.21 kGy respectively. The radiation sensitivity of the two organisms was found not to vary with pH in the pH range 5.0-6.2

  5. Size Control Technology of Silver Nanoparticles Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Byungnam; Kim, Hye Won; Koo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hyun [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Hyung Bin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changmoon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The manufacturing of silver nanoparticles using an electron beam is easy, fast, and highly productive, and it is possible at room temperature with no chemical residuals. Its various advantages therefore make this an important method for manufacturing nanoparticles such as silver, copper, and platinum. In particular, despite the use of electron beam irradiation, the results show that this method makes it possible to produce silver nanoparticles at low cost since low beam energy and low doses are used. This means that middle and high-energy electron beam accelerators are very expensive, but a low-energy electron beam accelerator has a relatively low cost of around 4-5 times, and mass production for a flow reaction without the need for extra radiation shielding is possible. Silver nanoparticles are of great interest to many researchers owing to their ability to be used in many applications such as catalysis, nanoelectronics, optical filters, electromagnetic interference shielding, surface Raman scattering, medical supplies, fabrics, cosmetics, hygiene and kitchen supplies, and electric home appliances.

  6. Size Control Technology of Silver Nanoparticles Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Byungnam; Kim, Hye Won; Koo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Ji Hyun; Bae, Hyung Bin; Park, Changmoon

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing of silver nanoparticles using an electron beam is easy, fast, and highly productive, and it is possible at room temperature with no chemical residuals. Its various advantages therefore make this an important method for manufacturing nanoparticles such as silver, copper, and platinum. In particular, despite the use of electron beam irradiation, the results show that this method makes it possible to produce silver nanoparticles at low cost since low beam energy and low doses are used. This means that middle and high-energy electron beam accelerators are very expensive, but a low-energy electron beam accelerator has a relatively low cost of around 4-5 times, and mass production for a flow reaction without the need for extra radiation shielding is possible. Silver nanoparticles are of great interest to many researchers owing to their ability to be used in many applications such as catalysis, nanoelectronics, optical filters, electromagnetic interference shielding, surface Raman scattering, medical supplies, fabrics, cosmetics, hygiene and kitchen supplies, and electric home appliances

  7. Coupling a Surface Acoustic Wave to an Electron Spin in Diamond via a Dark State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Andrew Golter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of quantum acoustics explores interactions between acoustic waves and artificial atoms and their applications in quantum information processing. In this experimental study, we demonstrate the coupling between a surface acoustic wave (SAW and an electron spin in diamond by taking advantage of the strong strain coupling of the excited states of a nitrogen vacancy center while avoiding the short lifetime of these states. The SAW-spin coupling takes place through a Λ-type three-level system where two ground spin states couple to a common excited state through a phonon-assisted as well as a direct dipole optical transition. Both coherent population trapping and optically driven spin transitions have been realized. The coherent population trapping demonstrates the coupling between a SAW and an electron spin coherence through a dark state. The optically driven spin transitions, which resemble the sideband transitions in a trapped-ion system, can enable the quantum control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom and potentially a trapped-ion-like solid-state system for applications in quantum computing. These results establish an experimental platform for spin-based quantum acoustics, bridging the gap between spintronics and quantum acoustics.

  8. Electronic Properties of Metallic Nanoclusters on Semiconductor Surfaces: Implications for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Takhee; Liu Jia; Chen, N.-P.; Andres, R.P.; Janes, D.B.; Reifenberger, R.

    2000-01-01

    We review current research on the electronic properties of nanoscale metallic islands and clusters deposited on semiconductor substrates. Reported results for a number of nanoscale metal-semiconductor systems are summarized in terms of their fabrication and characterization. In addition to the issues faced in large-area metal-semiconductor systems, nano-systems present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. Imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy as well as electrical characterization by current-voltage spectroscopy enable the study of the electrical properties of nanoclusters/semiconductor systems at the nanoscale. As an example of the low-resistance interfaces that can be realized, low-resistance nanocontacts consisting of metal nanoclusters deposited on specially designed ohmic contact structures are described. To illustrate a possible path to employing metal/semiconductor nanostructures in nanoelectronic applications, we also describe the fabrication and performance of uniform 2-D arrays of such metallic clusters on semiconductor substrates. Using self-assembly techniques involving conjugated organic tether molecules, arrays of nanoclusters have been formed in both unpatterned and patterned regions on semiconductor surfaces. Imaging and electrical characterization via scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy indicate that high quality local ordering has been achieved within the arrays and that the clusters are electronically coupled to the semiconductor substrate via the low-resistance metal/semiconductor interface

  9. Electronic integrated disease surveillance system and pathogen asset control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Tom G; Burdakov, Aleksey V; Oukharov, Andrey O; Zhilokov, Azamat K

    2012-06-20

    Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS) has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO) data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS) has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS.Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA).

  10. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and Pathogen Asset Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G. Wahl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS. Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA.

  11. The effect of electron-surface scattering and thiol adsorption on the electrical resistivity of gold ultrathin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquez, Ricardo; Del Campo, Valeria; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio; Correa-Puerta, Jonathan; Moraga, Luis; Flores, Marcos; Segura, Rodrigo; Donoso, Sebastián; Marín, Francisca; Bravo, Sergio; Häberle, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We prepared ultra thin films (10 nm) on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). • We prepared samples with different topographies controlling the substrate temperature. • We studied the contribution of the different scattering mechanims on the resistivity. • We developed a discernment method based on thiol adsorption. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of electron-surface scattering in gold ultrathin films (∼10 nm), we have prepared a set of Au samples on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). Chromium is added as a metallic surfactant which enables surpassing the electric percolation threshold for substrate temperatures above room temperature. We prepared samples with the same thickness but different topographies setting different substrate temperatures. These modifications modulate the contributions of the different electronic scattering mechanisms to the film resistivity. A second set of gold thin films deposited on mica at room temperature, with different thicknesses between 8 and 100 nm, was also prepared to compare the resisitivities of both sets through Mayadas and Shatzkes theory. We found that in samples with thicknesses below 15 nm, the electron-surface scattering is indeed the dominant mechanism influencing the film resistivity. To obtain further evidence of this prevalence, we developed a discrimination method based on thiol adsorption. The film with the highest resistivity increase is the sample in which electron-surface scattering is dominant. With this method, we observed that a large enhancement of the electron-surface scattering not only occurs in samples with large diameters grains, but also if the film has a reduced surface roughness.​

  12. The effect of electron-surface scattering and thiol adsorption on the electrical resistivity of gold ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardo.henriquez@usm.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile); Del Campo, Valeria; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile); Correa-Puerta, Jonathan [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Moraga, Luis [Universidad Central de Chile, Toesca 1783, Santiago 8370178 (Chile); Flores, Marcos [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Segura, Rodrigo [Instituto de Química y Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile); Donoso, Sebastián; Marín, Francisca; Bravo, Sergio; Häberle, Patricio [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We prepared ultra thin films (10 nm) on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). • We prepared samples with different topographies controlling the substrate temperature. • We studied the contribution of the different scattering mechanims on the resistivity. • We developed a discernment method based on thiol adsorption. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of electron-surface scattering in gold ultrathin films (∼10 nm), we have prepared a set of Au samples on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). Chromium is added as a metallic surfactant which enables surpassing the electric percolation threshold for substrate temperatures above room temperature. We prepared samples with the same thickness but different topographies setting different substrate temperatures. These modifications modulate the contributions of the different electronic scattering mechanisms to the film resistivity. A second set of gold thin films deposited on mica at room temperature, with different thicknesses between 8 and 100 nm, was also prepared to compare the resisitivities of both sets through Mayadas and Shatzkes theory. We found that in samples with thicknesses below 15 nm, the electron-surface scattering is indeed the dominant mechanism influencing the film resistivity. To obtain further evidence of this prevalence, we developed a discrimination method based on thiol adsorption. The film with the highest resistivity increase is the sample in which electron-surface scattering is dominant. With this method, we observed that a large enhancement of the electron-surface scattering not only occurs in samples with large diameters grains, but also if the film has a reduced surface roughness.​.

  13. Impact of Surface Treatment on the Structural and Electronic Properties of Polished CdZnTe Surfaces for Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Suleyman; Aqariden, F.; Chang, Y.; Grein, C.; Li, Jin; Kioussis, N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the effects of surface treatments on the structural and electronic properties of chemomechanically polished Cd0.9Zn0.1Te before contact deposition. Specifically, polished CdZnTe (CZT) samples were treated with four distinct chemical etchants: (1) bromine methanol (BM), (2) bromine in lactic acid, (3) bromine in methanol followed by bromine-20% lactic acid in ethylene glycol, and (4) hydrochloric acid (HCl). The surface structure and surface electronic properties were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images showed that three of the four etchants significantly altered the surface morphology and structure of CZT. All etchants created smoother surfaces; however, all except HCl also introduced high densities of defects. HCl was found to not affect the surface structure. XPS measurements indicated that a thick, ˜3 nm to 4 nm, TeO2 layer formed about 1 h after etching; hence, it is very important to process devices immediately after etching to prevent oxide formation.

  14. Electronic structure of (001) semiconducting MTe surfaces (M = Zn, Cd, Hg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Camacho, A.; Quiroga, L.; Baquero, R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the tight-binding scheme with ten orbitals per atom (SP 3 s * and two spin orientations) the electronic projected bulk band structure, surface band structure (both anion- and cation-terminated surfaces), and the wave-vector-resolved density of states for these II-VI semiconductors are calculated. A quickly convergent iterative technique is employed for calculating the Green function of the actual semi-infinite crystal. This calculational method allows to precise very accurately, the energy of localized surface states. All the materials considered in this work present surface states with energies lying in the fundamental gap as well as surface states in the lenses opened in the projected bulk valence-band continuum. The atomic weight of each surface state is determined. The states in the fundamental gap turn out to be 'bridge-bond'-type states for anion-terminated surfaces and 'dangling-bond'-type states for cation-terminated surfaces. (author)

  15. Light-responsive smart surface with controllable wettability and excellent stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yin-Ning; Li, Jin-Jin; Zhang, Qing; Luo, Zheng-Hong

    2014-10-21

    Novel fluorinated gradient copolymer was designed for smart surface with light-responsive controllable wettability and excellent stability. The switchable mechanism and physicochemical characteristics of the as-prepared surface decorated by designed polymeric material were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thanks to the functional film and surface roughening, etched silicon surface fabricated by copolymer involving spiropyran (Sp) moieties possesses a fairly large variation range of WCA (28.1°) and achieves the transformation between hydrophilicity (95.2° 109.2°) relative to blank sample (109.2°). The synthetic strategy and developed smart surface offer a promising application in coating with controllable wettability, which bridge the gap between chemical structure and material properties.

  16. Electronic Control Of Small Hydro-Generators Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz B, Pedro; Torres M, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    The present project arises for the Colombian population's necessity to overcome the underdevelopment, the poverty, the education and the level of life in rural areas of difficult access, for an economic rural electrification. The UIS, by means of the advisory committee of investigations of the ability of Physical-mechanical Sciences and the ability of Electricity and Electronic, it begins the process of developing in 1991 a study of economic and reliable control for the handling of small micro-centrals. Providing from electric power to the rural sector is a world problem, and have more than enough this some countries (China, Nepal, Peru, The islands of Papua, New Guinea), they have made investigations, outlining and building central micro controlled by microprocessor. The present study is developed with the objective of carrying out a load control that acts reliable and quickly. Traditionally they have been come using mechanical governors, which are those in charge of making the load control by means of valves that regulate the flow of water in the turbines, involving this way big retards characteristic of any mechanical control. In summary, the electronic governor of load presents on the mechanical governor, the advantage of acting to more speed and consequently to maintain stable the frequency of the system. To continue with the study, the objective that this project must develop, is an electronic control of load which presents to a small hydro generator, a relatively constant and independent electric load that the demanded consumption for the user varies from none to full load, given as initial parameters a constant flow in the turbine and a control in the line tension. This way it seeks to improve the energy quality given by isolated generators

  17. Electron sterilization validation techniques using the controlled depth of sterilization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleghorn, Denise A.; Nablo, Sam V.

    Many pharmaceutical products, especially parenteral drugs, cannot be sterilized with gamma rays or high energy electrons due to the concomitant product degradation. most of these products are filled under aseptic conditions so that for qualification as a sterile product, techniques are often required only for treatment of the container surfaces and package interior. Gas sterilization (ETO) is often used for this purpose but is beset with difficulties known to the reader, especially for critical "contact" products such as in the ophthalmic field. In view of the well-controlled electron energy spectrum available in modern electron processors, it is practical to deliver sterilizing doses over depths considerably less than those defining the thickness of blister-pack constructions or pharmaceutical containers. Because bremsstrahlung and x-ray production are minimized at these low electron energies and in these low Z materials, very high electron: penetrating x-ray dose ratios are possible for the application of the technique. Some of these data illustrating package: parenteral ratios of 10 5:1 have been reported (Rangwalla et al, 1985; Aaronson and Nablo, 1988). Standard techniques have been developed for the validation of the process and are reported here. Thin film dosimetric techniques have been developed utilizing radiochromic film in the 10-60 g/m 2 range for determining the surface dose distribution in occluded surface areas where direct electron illumination is not possible. Procedures for validation of the process using dried spore inoculum on the product as well as in good geometry are employed to determine the process lethality and its dependence on product surface geometry. Applications of the process to labile pharmaceuticals in glass and polystyrene syringes are reviewed. It has been applied to the sterilization of commercial sterile products since 1987, and the advantages and the natural limitations of the technique are discussed.

  18. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  19. Gate-controlled guiding of electrons in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J R; Low, Tony; Lundstrom, M S; Marcus, C M

    2011-04-01

    Ballistic semiconductor structures have allowed the realization of optics-like phenomena in electronic systems, including the magnetic focusing and electrostatic lensing of electrons. An extension that appears unique to graphene is to use both n and p carrier types to create electronic analogues of optical devices with both positive and negative indices of refraction. Here, we use the gate-controlled density of both p and n carrier types in graphene to demonstrate the electronic analogue of fibre-optic guiding. Two basic effects are investigated: bipolar p-n junction guiding, based on the principle of angle-selective transmission through the interface between the graphene and the p-n junction; and unipolar fibre-optic guiding, using total internal reflection controlled by carrier density. We also demonstrate modulation of the guiding efficiency through gating, and comparison of these data with numerical simulations indicates that guiding performance is limited by the roughness of the interface. The development of p-n and fibre-optic guiding in graphene may lead to electrically reconfigurable wiring in high-mobility devices.

  20. The control mechanism of surface traps on surface charge behavior in alumina-filled epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role surface traps play in the charge injection and transfer behavior of alumina-filled epoxy composites, surface traps with different trap levels are introduced by different surface modification methods which include dielectric barrier discharges plasma, direct fluorination, and Cr 2 O 3 coating. The resulting surface physicochemical characteristics of experimental samples were observed using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The surface potential under dc voltage was detected and the trap level distribution was measured. The results suggest that the surface morphology of the experimental samples differs dramatically after treatment with different surface modification methods. Different surface trap distributions directly determine the charge injection and transfer property along the surface. Shallow traps with trap level of 1.03–1.11 eV and 1.06–1.13 eV introduced by plasma and fluorination modifications are conducive for charge transport along the insulating surface, and the surface potential can be modified, producing a smoother potential curve. The Cr 2 O 3 coating can introduce a large number of deep traps with energy levels ranging from 1.09 to 1.15 eV. These can prevent charge injection through the reversed electric field formed by intensive trapped charges in the Cr 2 O 3 coatings. (paper)

  1. Excess electrons at anatase TiO2 surfaces and interfaces: insights from first principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, Sencer; Selloni, Annabella

    2017-07-01

    TiO2 is an important technological material with widespread applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics and self-cleaning surfaces. Excess electrons from intrinsic defects, dopants and photoexcitation play a key role in the properties of TiO2 that are relevant to its energy-related applications. The picture of excess and photoexcited electrons in TiO2 is based on the polaron model, where the electron forms a localized state that is stabilized by an accompanying lattice distortion. Here, we focus on excess and photoexcited electrons in anatase, the TiO2 polymorph most relevant to photocatalysis and solar energy conversion. For anatase, evidence of both small and large electron polarons has been reported in the literature. In addition, several studies have revealed a remarkable dependence of the photocatalytic activity of anatase on the crystal surface. After an overview of experimental studies, we briefly discuss recent progress in the theoretical description of polaronic states in TiO2, and finally present a more detailed account of our computational studies on the trapping and dynamics of excess electrons near the most common anatase surfaces and aqueous interfaces. The results of these studies provide a bridge between surface science experiments under vacuum conditions and observations of crystal-face-dependent photocatalysis on anatase, and support the idea that optimization of the ratio between different anatase facets can help enhance the photocatalytic activity of this material.

  2. Control of climatics environments to enhance reliability of electronics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekhon, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    The techniques to control temperature and humidity to reduce failures in semiconductor devices are presented. The maximum operating junction temperature affects the electronic system reliability, and the equation for the junction temperature of the device shows that internal and external thermal resistances affect component life. Junction temperature reductions up to 60 C were achieved by the development of heat pipes for microcircuits, which will enhance electronics life by 32 times. Humidity control by improved sealing and use of heaters to prevent moisture condensation proved difficult and costly, and high pressure dehydrators were heavy and expensive. Therefore, low pressure dehydrator was developed which is smaller, lighter, and less expensive. The development of low pressure dehumidifying system including test data is presented

  3. Diagnostics of microwave assisted electron cyclotron resonance plasma source for surface modification of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Supriya E.; Das, Partha Sarathi; Bansode, Avinash; Dhamale, Gayatri; Ghorui, S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Mathe, Vikas L.

    2018-01-01

    Looking at the increasing scope of plasma processing of materials surface, here we present the development and diagnostics of a microwave assisted Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma system suitable for surface modification of polymers. Prior to the surface-treatment, a detailed diagnostic mapping of the plasma parameters throughout the reactor chamber was carried out by using single and double Langmuir probe measurements in Ar plasma. Conventional analysis of I-V curves as well as the elucidation form of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) has become the source of calibration of plasma parameters in the reaction chamber. The high energy tail in the EEDF of electron temperature is seen to extend beyond 60 eV, at much larger distances from the ECR zone. This proves the suitability of the rector for plasma processing, since the electron energy is much beyond the threshold energy of bond breaking in most of the polymers. Nylon 6 is used as a representative candidate for surface processing in the presence of Ar, H2 + N2, and O2 plasma, treated at different locations inside the plasma chamber. In a typical case, the work of adhesion is seen to almost get doubled when treated with oxygen plasma. Morphology of the plasma treated surface and its hydrophilicity are discussed in view of the variation in electron density and electron temperature at these locations. Nano-protrusions arising from plasma treatment are set to be responsible for the hydrophobicity. Chemical sputtering and physical sputtering are seen to influence the surface morphology on account of sufficient electron energies and increased plasma potential.

  4. Secondary electron emission from rough metal surfaces: a multi-generation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Meng; Zhang, Na; Wang, Fang; Hu, Tian-Cun; Cui, Wan-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    We develop a multi-generation model to examine secondary electron emission (SEE) from a rough metal surface. In this model, the traces of both primary electrons (PEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are tracked by combining the electron scattering in the material and the multi-interaction with the rough surface. The effective secondary electron emission yield (SEY) is then obtained from the final states of the multi-generation SEs. Using this model, the SEE properties of the surfaces with rectangular and triangular grooves have been examined. We find that a rectangular groove can be used for effective SEE suppression. For a triangular groove, the criterion of SEY enhancement/suppression has been achieved, indicating that a small groove angle is required for effective SEE suppression, especially for a high PE energy. Furthermore, the SEE properties for some random rough surfaces are examined and some preliminary results are presented. Accordingly, our model and results could provide a powerful tool to give a comprehensive insight into the SEE of rough metal surfaces. (paper)

  5. InN/GaN quantum dot superlattices: Charge-carrier states and surface electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanouni, F.; Brezini, A.; Djenane, M.; Zou, Q.

    2018-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the electron energy spectra and surface states energy in the three dimensionally ordered quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) made of InN and GaN semiconductors. The QDSL is assumed in this model to be a matrix of GaN containing cubic dots of InN of the same size and uniformly distributed. For the miniband’s structure calculation, the resolution of the effective mass Schrödinger equation is done by decoupling it in the three directions within the framework of Kronig-Penney model. We found that the electrons minibands in infinite ODSLs are clearly different from those in the conventional quantum-well superlattices. The electrons localization and charge-carrier states are very dependent on the quasicrystallographic directions, the size and the shape of the dots which play a role of the artificial atoms in such QD supracrystal. The energy spectrum of the electron states localized at the surface of InN/GaN QDSL is represented by Kronig-Penney like-model, calculated via direct matching procedure. The calculation results show that the substrate breaks symmetrical shape of QDSL on which some localized electronic surface states can be produced in minigap regions. Furthermore, we have noticed that the surface states degeneracy is achieved in like very thin bands located in the minigaps, identified by different quantum numbers nx, ny, nz. Moreover, the surface energy bands split due to the reduction of the symmetry of the QDSL in z-direction.

  6. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  7. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  8. Thermal control system for SSF sensor/electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akau, R. L.; Lee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal control system was designed for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) sensor/electronics box (SSTACK). Multi-layer insulation and heaters are used to maintain the temperatures of the critical components within their operating and survival temperature limits. Detailed and simplified SSTACK thermal models were developed and temperatures were calculated for worst-case orbital conditions. A comparison between the two models showed very good agreement. Temperature predictions were also compared to measured temperatures from a thermal-vacuum test.

  9. The upper level of control system of electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribov, I.V.; Nedeoglo, F.N.; Shvedunov, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    The upper level software of a three-level control system that supports several electron accelerators is described. This software operates in the Linux and RTLinux (Real Time Linux) environment. The object information model functions on the basis of a parametric description supported by the SQLite Data Base Management System. The Javascript sublanguage is used for script forming, and the Qt Designer application is used to construct the user interface [ru

  10. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B.F.; Miller, Arne

    2014-01-01

    or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through...... electron beam irradiation allows for the early release of incorporated agents such as bioactive additives. Samples were e-beam irradiated at an energy of 125 keV and doses of either 150 kGy or 500 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were degraded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), to simulate...... bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium....

  11. Theoretical studies of inelastic molecule-surface and resonant electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowrey, R.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, two problems in the inelastic scattering of molecules from nonvibrating surfaces are discussed. First, the close coupling (CC) method is used to study the orientational dependence of the transition probabilities for vibrationally and rotationally inelastic scattering of H 2 and N 2 from flat surfaces. The dependence of vibrational transition probabilities on the orientation of the molecule is strong but decreases as the energy increases. Second, a new approximation to the CC method for treating scattering of molecules from corrugated surfaces is discussed. The proposed local normal model of j/sub z/ conservation assumes that the component of the rotational angular momentum of the incident molecule which is parallel to the normal to the surface at the impact point is conserved during a collision. In part II, the use of the complex basis function method to study two shape resonances in electron scattering is discussed. The complex self-consistent-field (CSCF) method was used to obtain the position and width of the 2 D shape resonance in electron-calcium scattering. Comparison with experimental results shows that the lifetime is influenced by correlation effects. The CSCF and complex configuration interaction (CCI) methods were used to obtain the complex potential energy function for nuclear motion for the 2 Σ/sub u/ + resonance state of H 2 -

  12. Investigation of the electron emission properties of silver: From exposed to ambient atmosphere Ag surface to ion-cleaned Ag surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gineste, T., E-mail: Thomas.Gineste@onera.fr [ONERA The French Aerospace Lab, 31055 Toulouse (France); Belhaj, M. [ONERA The French Aerospace Lab, 31055 Toulouse (France); Teyssedre, G. [LAPLACE - Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’Energie -UMR 5213, Université Paul Sabatier - 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Puech, J. [CNES, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin 31055 Toulouse Cédex 9 (France)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We investigated the electron emission yield of an air exposed Ag to a cleaned Ag. • Air exposed Ag sample was cleaned by ion Ar etching. • Surface composition was determined by AES. • Electron emission yield was related to surface composition evolution. • Natural contamination hugely influence electron properties of Ag sample. - Abstract: Electron emission properties of materials are highly dependent to the surface and the first nanometres subsurface. Technical materials, i.e. used within applications are ordinarily exposed to atmosphere, which interacts with the surface. The contamination layer building up at the surface of materials and/or oxidation layer affects dramatically the electron emission proprieties. In this paper, starting from 99.99% pure silver sample, exposed 4 years to ambient atmosphere, we monitored the variations of the electron emission properties and the surface composition during step by step ion etching procedure.

  13. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  14. Pulse energy control through dual loop electronic feedback

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, Cobus

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available University of Stellenbosch WWW.LASER-RESEARCH.CO.ZA University of Stellenbosch Pulse Energy Control Through Dual Loop Electronic Feedback Cobus Jacobs, Steven Kriel Christoph Bollig, Thomas Jones Cobus Jacobs et al. Overview head2righthead2right...What is Laser Pulse Energy Control? head2righthead2rightWhy do we need it? head2righthead2rightHow do we get it? head2righthead2rightSimulation head2righthead2rightExperimental Setup head2righthead2rightResults Cobus Jacobs et al. head2righthead2right...

  15. Phase coexistence in gallium nanoparticles controlled by electron excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, S; MacDonald, K F; Knize, R J; Zheludev, N I

    2004-04-09

    In gallium nanoparticles 100 nm in diameter grown on the tip of an optical fiber from an atomic beam we observed equilibrium coexistence of gamma, beta, and liquid structural phases that can be controlled by e-beam excitation in a highly reversible and reproducible fashion. With 2 keV electrons only 1 pJ of excitation energy per nanoparticle is needed to exercise control, with the equilibrium phase achieved in less than a few tenths of a microsecond. The transformations between coexisting phases are accompanied by a continuous change in the nanoparticle film's reflectivity.

  16. Atomic interactions at the (100) diamond surface and the impact of surface and interface changes on the electronic transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferme, Wim

    Centuries and centuries already, diamond is a material that speaks to ones imagination. Till the 18th century it was only mined in India, after it was also found in Brazil and South-Africa. But along the fascinating properties of diamond, it is also a very interesting material for industry. After the discovery at the end of the 18th century that diamond consists of carbon, it took until the 50's of the previous century before research groups from Russia, Japan and the USA were able to reproduce the growth process of diamond. In 1989 it was discovered that the surface of intrinsic, insulation diamond can be made conductive by hydrogenating the surface. It was clear that not only hydrogen at the surface but also the so called "adsorbates" were responsible for this conductivity. It was still not completely clear what was the influence of other species (like oxygen) on the mechanism of surface conductivity and therefore in this thesis the influence of oxygen on the electronic transport properties of atomically flat diamond are researched. Besides the growth of atomically flat diamond with the use of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) en the study of the grown surfaces with characterising techniques such as AFM (atomic force microscopy) and STM (scanning tunnelling microscopy), the study of the surface treatment with plasma techniques is the main topic of this thesis. The influence of oxygen on the surface conductivity is studied and with the ToF (Time-of-Flight) technique the transport properties of the freestanding diamond are examined. With a short laserflash, electrons and holes are created at the diamond/aluminium interface and due to an electric field (up to 500V) the charge carriers are translated to the back contact. In this way the influence of the surface and the changes at the aluminum contacts is studied leading to very interesting results.

  17. Surface free energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene modified by electron and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Kader, A.M.; Turos, A.; Radwan, R.M.; Kelany, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface free energy of biocompatible polymers is important factor which affects the surface properties such as wetting, adhesion and biocompatibility. In the present work, the change in the surface free energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples, which is produced by electron beam and gamma ray irradiation were, investigated. Mechanism of the changes in surface free energy induced by irradiations of doses ranging from 25 to 500 kGy was studied. FTIR technique was applied for sample analysis. Contact angle measurements showed that wettability and surface free energy of samples have increased with increasing the irradiation dose, where the values of droplet contact angle of the samples decrease gradually with increasing the radiation dose. The increase in the wettability and surface free energy of the irradiated samples are attributed to formation of hydrophilic groups on the polymer surface by the oxidation, which apparently occurs by exposure of irradiated samples to the air.

  18. New aspects of electronic excitations at the bismuth surface: Topology, thermalization and coupling to coherent phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, L., E-mail: luca.perfetti@polytechnique.edu [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, Ecole Polytechnique – CEA/DSM – CNRS UMR 7642, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Faure, J. [Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée, Ecole Polytechnique – ENSTA – CNRS UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Papalazarou, E.; Mauchain, J.; Marsi, M.; Goerbig, M.O. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 8502, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Ohtsubo, Y. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin-BP 48, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    We review measurements of angle and time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the surface states of the Bi(1 1 1) surface. The work covers several aspects of these surface states, discussing the topological properties, the strong anisotropy of the spin–orbit splitting and the dynamical relaxation of photoexcited electrons. Since time resolved experiments disentagle interaction processes in real time, the reported data offer a novel perspective on the motion of charge carriers in surface states and will serve as an unuseful reference for other systems with strong spin–orbit coupling.

  19. Control system for 10 MeV irradiation electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Ziqiang; Zhang Lifeng; Lu Weixing; Gao Zhenjiang; Zhang Yan; Han Guangwen; Wang Shuxian

    2005-01-01

    Control system of the 10 MeV electron linac using Distributed Control System (DCS) was studied. The hardware of control system consists of four SIEMENS PLCs and monitor computer, the software bases on STEP 7, Labwindows/CVI and SQL Server. The bus between the monitor computer and the main PLC is 100 M industrial networks, between PLCs is MPI bus, between PLC and remote partner is PROFIBUS, between PLC and terminals is RS485/422. The software of control system can provide a friendly human machine interface to operate the machine, protect the human and equipment from risk, and storage the status of the accelerator real time to the database. The monitor and maintenance of the linac can been carried out not only on local computer or local network, but also in internet. (author)

  20. Piezoelectric composite morphing control surfaces for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Osgar J., III; Karni, Etan D.; Olien, Chris C.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Kochersberger, Kevin B.; Gelhausen, Paul A.; Brown, Bridget L.

    2011-04-01

    The authors have explored the use of morphing control surfaces to replace traditional servo-actuated control surfaces in UAV applications. The morphing actuation is accomplished using Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators in a bimorph configuration to deflect the aft section of a control surface cross section. The resulting camber change produces forces and moments for vehicle control. The flexible piezoelectric actuators are damage tolerant and provide excellent bandwidth. The large amplitude morphing deflections attained in bench-top experiments demonstrate the potential for excellent control authority. Aerodynamic performance calculations using experimentally measured morphed geometries indicate changes in sectional lift coefficients that are superior to a servo-actuated hinged flap airfoil. This morphing flight control actuation technology could eliminate the need for servos and mechanical linkages in small UAVs and thereby increase reliability and reduce drag.

  1. Laser control melting of alumina surfaces with presence of B{sub 4}C particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [Mechanical Engineering Dept., King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Al-Aqeeli, N. [Mechanical Engineering Dept., King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering faculty, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-10-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dense and fine grains are formed in the surface region and columnar structures are formed underneath. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of carbon film enables to form AlN, AlON, and Al(C, N) compounds at surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of B{sub 4}C particles and nitride species increases surface microhardness notably. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The residual stress formed at the surface is compressive. - Abstract: Laser gas assisted controlled melting of alumina tile surface is carried out in this work. A carbon coating containing 5% of B{sub 4}C particles is formed at the tile surface prior to laser treatment process. The morphological and microstructural changes in the treated layer are examined using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope. The surface microhardness is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is obtained from the X-ray diffractograms. It was found that microhardness of the surface increases significantly after the laser treatment process, which is attributed to high cooling rates and the formation of nitride species at the surface. The residual stress formed at the surface is compressive and no micro- or major-cracks are observed at the laser treated surface.

  2. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control

    OpenAIRE

    Schurtenberger E; Heuberger M

    2011-01-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under am...

  3. Terahertz instability of surface optical-phonon polaritons that interact with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoruk, O.; Solymar, L.; Shamonina, E.; Kalinin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave interaction between optical phonons and electrons drifting in diatomic semiconductors has potential for amplification and generation of terahertz radiation. Existing models of this interaction were developed for infinite materials. As a more practically relevant configuration, we studied theoretically a finite semiconductor slab surrounded by a dielectric. This paper analyzes the optical-phonon instability in the slab including the Lorentz force and compares it to the instability in an infinite material. As the analysis shows, the slab instability occurs because of the interaction of surface optical-phonon polaritons with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift. The properties of the instability depend on the slab thickness when the thickness is comparable to the wavelength. For large slab thicknesses, however, the dispersion relation of the slab is similar to that of an infinite material, although the coupling is weaker. The results could be used for the design of practical terahertz traveling-wave oscillators and amplifiers.

  4. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  5. Chemical changes induced on a TiO2 surface by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, L.I.; Passeggi, M.C.G.; Ferron, J.

    2007-01-01

    We study the TiO 2 (Ti 4+ ) chemical reduction induced by electron bombardment using Auger electron spectroscopy and factor analysis. We show that the electron irradiation of a TiO 2 sample is characterized by the appearance of a lower Ti oxidation state, Ti 2 O 3 (Ti 3+ ), followed by a further deposition of carbon, which is present inevitably in the environment even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The appearance of C over the surface is found to be a complex mechanism which affects the reduction process through passivation of the electron-induced oxygen desorption and formation of titanium carbide. For very high irradiation doses, we also found that the chemical changes on the surface are stopped due to the deposition of carbon in a graphitic form

  6. Hot Electron Photoemission from Plasmonic Nanostructures: The Role of Surface Photoemission and Transition Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh

    2015-01-01

    We study mechanisms of photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoparticles. We analyze the contribution of "transition absorption", i.e., loss of energy of electrons passing through the boundary between different materials, to the surface mechanism of photoemission. We calculate photoemis......We study mechanisms of photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoparticles. We analyze the contribution of "transition absorption", i.e., loss of energy of electrons passing through the boundary between different materials, to the surface mechanism of photoemission. We calculate...... photoemission rate and transition absorption for nanoparticles surrounded by various media with a broad range of permittivities and show that photoemission rate and transition absorption follow the same dependence on the permittivity. Thus, we conclude that transition absorption is responsible...

  7. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    2010-01-01

    electrons useful for driving chemical reactions at surfaces. Using the binary collision approximation and a nonadiabatic model that takes into account the time-varying nature of the ion–surface interaction, the energy loss of the ions is reproduced. The energy loss for Na + ions incident on the devices......We have made Na + and He + ions incident on the surface of solid state tunnel junctions and measured the energy loss due to atomic displacement and electronic excitations. Each tunnel junction consists of an ultrathin film metal–oxide–semiconductor device which can be biased to create a band of hot...... shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange....

  8. Optimal Control Surface Layout for an Aeroservoelastic Wingbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a technique for locating the optimal control surface layout of an aeroservoelastic Common Research Model wingbox, in the context of maneuver load alleviation and active utter suppression. The combinatorial actuator layout design is solved using ideas borrowed from topology optimization, where the effectiveness of a given control surface is tied to a layout design variable, which varies from zero (the actuator is removed) to one (the actuator is retained). These layout design variables are optimized concurrently with a large number of structural wingbox sizing variables and control surface actuation variables, in order to minimize the sum of structural weight and actuator weight. Results are presented that demonstrate interdependencies between structural sizing patterns and optimal control surface layouts, for both static and dynamic aeroelastic physics.

  9. Morphing Flight Control Surface for Advanced Flight Performance, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, a new Morphing Flight Control Surface (MFCS) will be developed. The distinction of the research effort is that the SenAnTech team will employ...

  10. Flexible and Safe Control of Mobile Surface Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary innovation of this work is a novel Petri net based approach for safe and flexible control of highly capable mobile surface systems, such as long-duration...

  11. Flexible and Safe Control of Mobile Surface Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary innovation of this work is a novel approach for flexible and safe control of highly capable mobile surface systems, such as long-duration science rovers,...

  12. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of boron and phosphorus incorporation in phenolic resin precursor to the oxidation resistance of glassy carbon have been studied. In order to reveal the nature and composition of the oxygen complexes formed at the surface of doped glassy carbon, under controlled atmosphere, the surface of the samples was ...

  13. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of boron and phosphorus incorporation in phenolic resin precursor to the oxidation resistance of glassy carbon have been studied. In order to reveal the nature and composition of the oxygen complexes formed at the surface of doped glassy carbon, under controlled atmosphere, the surface of the ...

  14. Controlling grass weeds on hard surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Kristoffersen, Palle; Andreasen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    : Annual bluegrass, Poa annua L.; perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L. Resumen Se realizó un experimento en una superficie dura especialmente diseñada para estudiar el impacto de los intervalos de tiempo entre los tratamientos de quema con lanzallamas en la regeneración y producción de flores de dos...... malezas gramíneas. El objetivo de este experimento fue optimizar el control de Poa annua y Lolium perenne, ambas especies muy difíciles de controlar sin herbicidas. La biomasa aérea de 72 plantas por tratamiento se cosechó y los pesos secos se registraron en intervalos regulares para investigar cómo las...... plantas respondían a la quema. La regeneración de las malezas fue medida a través de la cosecha de la biomasa aérea dos semanas después del segundo tratamiento con fuego, que a su vez fueron realizados en diferentes intervalos de tiempo. Los tratamientos con fuego disminuyeron la biomasa de ambas especies...

  15. Anomalous Surface Wave Launching by Handedness Phase Control

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2015-10-09

    Anomalous launch of a surface wave with different handedness phase control is achieved in a terahertz metasurface based on phase discontinuities. The polarity of the phase profile of the surface waves is found to be strongly correlated to the polarization handedness, promising polarization-controllable wavefront shaping, polarization sensing, and environmental refractive-index sensing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  17. Secondary Electron Yield on Cryogenic Surfaces as a Function of Physisorbed Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzucan, A; Taborelli, M; Störi, H

    2011-01-01

    Electron cloud is a serious limitation for the operation of particle accelerators with intense positively charged beams. It occurs if the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam-pipe surface is sufficiently high to induce an electron multiplication. At low surface temperatures, the SEY is strongly influenced by the nature of the physisorbed gases and by the corresponding surface coverage. These conditions occur in many accelerators operating with superconducting magnets and cold vacuum sections such as the LHC and RHIC. In this work, we investigated the variation of the SEY of copper, aluminium and electro-polished copper as a function of physisorbed N2, CO, CO2, CH4, Kr, C2H6 at cryogenic temperatures. The conditioning by electron bombardment of the surface after the physisorption of H2O on electro polished copper will also be presented. The results of the various gases are compared in order to find a rationale for the behaviour of the secondary electrons for the various adsorbates.

  18. Construction and characterization of a spin polarized helium ion beam for surface electronic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Ion neutralization and metastable de-excitation spectroscopy, INS and MDS, allow detailed analysis of the surface electronic configuration of metals. The orthodox application of these spectroscopies may be enhanced by electronic spin polarization of the probe beams. For this reason, a spin polarized helium ion beam has been constructed. The electronic spin of helium metastables created within an rf discharge may be spacially aligned by optically pumping the atoms. Subsequent collisions between metastables produce helium ions which retain the orientation of the electronic spin. Extracted ion polarization, although not directly measurable, may be estimated from extracted electron polarization, metastable polarization, pumping radiation absorption and current modulation measurements. Ions extracted from the optically pumped discharge exhibit an estimated polarization of about ten per cent at a beam current of a few tenths of a microampere. Extraction of helium ions from the discharge requires that the ions have a high kinetic energy. However, to avoid undesirable kinetic electron ejection from the target surface, the ions must be decelerated. Examination of various deceleration configurations, in paticular exponential and linear deceleration fields, and experimental observation indicate that a linear decelerating field produces the best low energy beam to the target surface

  19. Characterizing the geometric and electronic structure of defects in the "29" copper surface oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Andrew J.; Hensley, Alyssa J. R.; Zhang, Renqin; Pronschinske, Alex; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric and electronic structural characterization of thin film metal oxides is of fundamental importance to many fields such as catalysis, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry. Surface defects are also well known to impact a material's performance in any such applications. Here, we focus on the "29" oxide Cu2O/Cu(111) surface and we observe two common structural defects which we characterize using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and density functional theory. The defects are proposed to be O vacancies and Cu adatoms, which both show unique topographic and spectroscopic signatures. The spatially resolved electronic and charge state effects of the defects are investigated, and implications for their reactivity are given.

  20. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G., E-mail: giulia.berti@polimi.it; Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  1. Different quantization mechanisms in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, P.; Gloos, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types of quanti......We have studied the acoustoelectric current in single-electron pumps driven by surface acoustic waves. We have found that in certain parameter ranges two different sets of quantized steps dominate the acoustoelectric current versus gate-voltage characteristics. In some cases, both types...

  2. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  3. Positron study of electron momentum density and Fermi surface in titanium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Osawa, Makoto; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Matsumoto, Makoto; Shiotani, Nobuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum densities have been obtained on Ti and Zr from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation followed by an image reconstruction technique based on direct Fourier transformation. Augmented-plane wave band structure calculations have been carried out and the results are compared with the experiments. Agreement between the experiment and the theory leads to a conclusion that both Ti and Zr have electron surface sheets which are centered at H and hole surface sheets which are running along the Γ-A axis. (author)

  4. Asymptotic theory of dissipative trapped electron mode overlapping many rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Hasselberg, G.

    1978-01-01

    The two dimensional eigenvalue equation describing the dissipative trapped electron mode is solved exactly in the limit of the mode overlapping many rational surfaces using the Pogutse model for the magnetic field and the pitch angle collision operator. The trapped electron contribution to the growth rate decreases, with respect to the standard theory, by a factor of order Δ/chi sub(T) << 1 where chi sub(T) is the position of the turning point and Δ the distance between rational surfaces

  5. Closed loop coherent control of electronic transitions in gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sima; Hu, Zhan; Gordon, Robert J

    2011-06-16

    A genetic algorithm was used to control the photoluminesce-nce (PL) from GaAs(100). A spatial light modulator (SLM) used feedback from the emission to optimize the spectral phase profile of an ultrashort laser pulse. Most of the experiments were performed using a sine phase function to optimize the integrated PL spectrum over a specified wavelength range, with the amplitude and period of the phase function treated as genetic parameters. An order of magnitude increase in signal was achieved after only one generation, and an optimized waveform, consisting of three equally spaced pulses approximately 0.8 ps apart, was obtained after 15 generations. The effects of fluence, polarization, relative phase of the subpulses, and spectral range of the optimized PL were investigated. In addition, preliminary experiments were performed using the phases of individual pixels of the SLM as genetic variables. The PL spectrum is identified with recombination of electron-hole pairs in the L-valley of the Brillouin zone. Control is achieved by coherent manipulation of plasma electrons. It is proposed that hot electrons excite lattice phonons, which in turn scatter carriers into the L-valley. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Controlling competing orders via nonequilibrium acoustic phonons: Emergence of anisotropic effective electronic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Michael; Orth, Peter P.; Levchenko, Alex; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast perturbations offer a unique tool to manipulate correlated systems due to their ability to promote transient behaviors with no equilibrium counterpart. A widely employed strategy is the excitation of coherent optical phonons, as they can cause significant changes in the electronic structure and interactions on short time scales. One of the issues, however, is the inevitable heating that accompanies these resonant excitations. Here, we explore a promising alternative route: the nonequilibrium excitation of acoustic phonons, which, due to their low excitation energies, generally lead to less heating. We demonstrate that driving acoustic phonons leads to the remarkable phenomenon of a momentum-dependent effective temperature, by which electronic states at different regions of the Fermi surface are subject to distinct local temperatures. Such an anisotropic effective electronic temperature can have a profound effect on the delicate balance between competing ordered states in unconventional superconductors, opening a so far unexplored avenue to control correlated phases.

  7. Surface characterization and surface electronic structure of organic quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have thoroughly characterized the surfaces of the organic charge-transfer salts TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF)(2)PF6 which are generally acknowledged as prototypical examples of one-dimensional conductors. In particular x-ray-induced photoemission spectroscopy turns out to be a valuable nondestructive d...

  8. Surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    were identified with the scanning electron microscope. A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, and in the juxtasaccular half of the duct, two additional types of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopic observations...... microscopy was attained by coating of the specimens with osmium tetroxide and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. This technique permitted, for the first time, an investigation of the surface morphology of the epithelial cells in the endolymphatic duct. Three types of cells...... are compared and discussed with reference to previous transmission electron microscopic studies of the endolymphatic duct....

  9. Towards an electronic dog nose: surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for security and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-09-05

    This review describes an "electronic dog nose" based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor and an antigen-antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol), dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described.

  10. Towards an Electronic Dog Nose: Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Security and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Onodera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes an “electronic dog nose” based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor and an antigen–antibody interaction for security and safety. We have concentrated on developing appropriate sensor surfaces for the SPR sensor for practical use. The review covers different surface fabrications, which all include variations of a self-assembled monolayer containing oligo(ethylene glycol, dendrimer, and hydrophilic polymer. We have carried out detection of explosives using the sensor surfaces. For the SPR sensor to detect explosives, the vapor or particles of the target substances have to be dissolved in a liquid. Therefore, we also review the development of sampling processes for explosives, and a protocol for the measurement of explosives on the SPR sensor in the field. Additionally, sensing elements, which have the potential to be applied for the electronic dog nose, are described.

  11. Surface potential measurement of negative-ion-implanted insulators by analysing secondary electron energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki.

    1994-01-01

    The negative ion implantation method we have proposed is a noble technique which can reduce surface charging of isolated electrodes by a large margin. In this paper, the way to specify the surface potential of negative-ion-implanted insulators by the secondary electron energy analysis is described. The secondary electron energy distribution is obtained by a retarding field type energy analyzer. The result shows that the surface potential of fused quartz by negative-ion implantation (C - with the energy of 10 keV to 40 keV) is negatively charged by only several volts. This surface potential is extremely low compared with that by positive-ion implantation. Therefore, the negative-ion implantation is a very effective method for charge-up free implantation without charge compensation. (author)

  12. Potential and Kinetic Electron Emissions from HOPG Surface Irradiated by Highly Charged Xenon and Neon Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Yu, Wang; Yong-Tao, Zhao; Jian-Rong, Sun; De-Hui, Li; Jin-Yu, Li; Ping-Zhi, Wang; Guo-Qing, Xiao; Abdul, Qayyum

    2011-01-01

    Highly charged 129 Xe q+ (q = 10−30) and 40 Ne q+ (q = 4−8) ion-induced secondary electron emissions on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are reported. The total secondary electron yield is measured as a function of the potential energy of incident ions. The experimental data are used to separate contributions of kinetic and potential electron yields. Our results show that about 4.5% and 13.2% of ion's potential energies are consumed in potential electron emission due to different Xe q+ -HOPG and Ne q+ -HOPG combinations. A simple formula is introduced to estimate the fraction of ion's potential energy for potential electron emission. (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Falkenberg, Jesper Toft

    2016-01-01

    morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity....... Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic......ecent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline...

  14. Absorption and backscatter of internal conversion electrons in the measurements of surface contamination of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunoki, A.; Kawada, Y.; Yamada, T.; Unno, Y.; Sato, Y.; Hino, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We measured 4π and 2π counting efficiencies for internal conversion electrons (ICEs), gross β-particles and also β-rays alone with various source conditions regarding absorber and backing foil thickness using e-X coincidence technique. Dominant differences regarding the penetration, attenuation and backscattering properties among ICEs and β-rays were revealed. Although the abundance of internal conversion electrons of 137 Cs- 137 Ba is only 9.35%, 60% of gross counts may be attributed to ICEs in worse source conditions. This information will be useful for radionuclide metrology and for surface contamination monitoring. - Highlights: • Counting efficiencies for internal conversion electrons from 137 Cs were measured, and compared with those for β-rays. • Electron-X coincidence technique was employed. • A thin NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was used for X-ray detection. • Backscattering fractions of electrons and beta particles were studied by similar experiments

  15. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of surface chemistry requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of elementary processes at surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the FEL can be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime. With the current parameters for LCLS this corresponds to radiation with energy corresponding to excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces or phonons in substrates. The coherent radiation can coherently manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by coherent atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. Since the THz radiation is generated from the same source as the FEL radiation full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The possibility to perform time-resolved X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements as a probe of chemical dynamics is an exciti...

  16. Surface morphology and chemical composition of TiTa-based surface alloy formed on TiNi by electron beam additive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimova, E. Yu.; Meisner, L. L.; Meisner, S. N.; Yakovlev, E. V.; Shabalina, O. I.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents research results on the physiochemical and topographic surface properties of a NiTi alloy and their changes after different surface treatments: mechanical polishing, electron beam cleaning, and TiTa-based surface alloying. The possibility of using electron beam treatment for surface preparation with no additional methods is shown. Experiments demonstrate that the TiTa-based alloy surface formed by multiple magnetron deposition of TiTa film and subsequent pulsed electron beam melting of the film/substrate system is chemically and morphologically homogeneous.

  17. Electrospinning onto Insulating Substrates by Controlling Surface Wettability and Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooSeok; Kim, Geon Hwee; Shin, Jung Hwal; Lim, Geunbae; An, Taechang

    2017-11-28

    We report a simple method for electrospinning polymers onto flexible, insulating substrates by controlling the wettability of the substrate surface. Water molecules were adsorbed onto the surface of a hydrophilic polymer substrate by increasing the local humidity around the substrate. The adsorbed water was used as the ground electrode for electrospinning. The electrospun fibers were deposited only onto hydrophilic areas of the substrate, allowing for patterning through wettability control. Direct writing of polymer fiber was also possible through near-field electrospinning onto a hydrophilic surface.

  18. A novel grounded to floating admittance converter with electronic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Dinesh; Ahmad, Javed; Srivastava, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    This article suggests a new grounded to floating admittance convertor employing only two voltage differencing transconductance amplifiers (VDTAs). The proposed circuit can convert any arbitrary grounded admittance into floating admittance with electronically controllable scaling factor. The presented converter enjoys the following beneficial: (1) no requirement of any additional passive element (2) scaling factor can be tuned electronically through bias currents of VDTAs (3) no matching constraint required (4) low values of active/passive sensitivity indexes and (5) excellent non ideal behavior that indicates no deviation in circuit behavior even under non ideal environment. Application of the proposed configuration in realization of floating resistor and floating capacitor has been presented and the workability of these floating elements has been confirmed by active filter design examples. SPICE simulations have been performed to demonstrate the performance of the proposed circuits.

  19. Control and electronic subsystems for the advanced servomanipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.L.; Hamel, W.R.; Killough, S.M.; Spille, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced servomanipulator (ASM) represents a new generation of electrically driven force-reflecting manipulator systems designed to be remotely maintainable. This ASM is being developed to perform remote maintenance in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant where human access is not allowed. The primary function of the manipulator control system is to maintain stable, accurate master/slave operation while providing sensitive force reflection to the operator. The control system is based upon tightly coupled distributed digital microprocessing methods. The architectural structure of the control system is outlined and is compared to the previously developed Model M-2 control system, and justification for the advances incorporated into the ASM structure are given. The various modes of operation and diagnostics are described, and throughput requirements associated with joint servo-control and counter-balancing are discussed. The fundamental elements of the control system are reviewed, including the processor selection (Motorola MC68000) and the language (FORTH). The purpose of this document is to review the design decisions and the resulting design selections to serve as a base for future improvements. Four main areas will be covered: (1) system overview, (2) hardware implementation, (3) software partitioning, and (4) remote electronics considerations. Each area will address the specifics of the selected equipment or the functional requirements of the control method. 9 references, 4 figures

  20. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  1. [Scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) aspects of intestinal mucosal surface in childhood coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, R; Bottaro, G; Ricca, O; Galasso, S

    1982-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal surface in 5 children suffered with Coeliac Disease was observed at Scanning Electron Microscopy. The comparison between two techniques of dehydration demonstrated that the Alcool-Amile Acetate dehydration reduces the technical errors to the minimum. Therefore, a better visualization allows us to recognize the surface coat, the microvillous and some mucosal functional aspects (scale off), which were previously undistinguished. There are no differences between the mucosal aspects in adult coeliac disease and childhood coelia disease.

  2. Effectiveness Of Security Controls On Electronic Health Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everleen Wanyonyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Health Record EHR systems enhance efficiency and effectiveness in handling patients information in healthcare. This study focused on the EHR security by initially establishing the nature of threats affecting the system and reviewing the implemented security safeguards. The study was done at a referral hospital level 6 government facility in Kenya. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 196 out of 385 staff and a questionnaire designed for qualitative data collection. Data was analyzed using SPSS software. Correlations and binary logistic regression were obtained. Binary Logistic Regression BLR was used to establish the effect of the safeguards predictors on EHR security. It was established that physical security contributes more to the security of an information system than administrative controls and technical controls in that order. BLR helped in predicting effective safeguards to control EHR security threats in limited resourced public health facilities.

  3. An Electronically Controlled 8-Element Switched Beam Planar Array

    KAUST Repository

    Sharawi, Mohammad S.

    2015-02-24

    An 8-element planar antenna array with electronically controlled switchable-beam pattern is proposed. The planar antenna array consists of patch elements and operates in the 2.45 GHz ISM band. The array is integrated with a digitally controlled feed network that provides the required phases to generate 8 fixed beams covering most of the upper hemisphere of the array. Unlike typical switchable beam antenna arrays, which operate only in one plane, the proposed design is the first to provide full 3D switchable beams with simple control. Only a 3-bit digital word is required for the generation of the 8 different beams. The integrated array is designed on a 3-layer PCB on a Taconic substrate (RF60A). The total dimensions of the fabricated array are 187.1 × 261.3 × 1.3mm3.

  4. Adhesion control between resist patterns and photomask blank surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Nagai, Takaharu; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Masaharu; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-04-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We measured adhesion and frictional forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding. We also studied the effect of surface property of the Cr and quartz surfaces to resist adhesion. The adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes and surface roughness on Cr blanks. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  5. Plasma Discharge Effect on Secondary Electron Yield of Various Surface Locations on SRF Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos; Samolov, Ana; Cuckov, Filip; Tomovic, Mileta; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposava

    2015-09-01

    Electron activity (field emission and multipacting) has been identified as the main limiting factor of Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) cavity performance. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is highly dependent on the state of the cavity's surface, which is investigated before and after plasma exposure. Current methods for simulating the electron activity in SRF cavity consider it as a uniform surface. Due to fabricating procedure there are three distinct areas of the cavity's microstructure: weld zone, heat affected zone, and base metal zone. Each zone has a characteristic microstructure even after the treatments that are currently used to clean the surface of the cavities. Improvement of existing surface treatment techniques, or use of a new is required in order to increase the limit of Q factor towards the theoretical limit of Nb. RF discharge is a promising technique for this purpose. In order to test the effect of the plasma on the SEY of the various cavity surface zones we have developed the experimental setup to measure the energy distribution of the SEY from coupon-like samples. Samples are made in a way that all three zones of cavity surface will be included in the examination. We will present the SEY changes in these three zones before and after plasma treatment.

  6. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Dian; Tang, Guangze; Ma, Xinxin; Gu, Le; Sun, Mingren; Wang, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm 2 . Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm 2 ) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation

  7. Surface morphology and electronic structure of halogen etched InAs (1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eassa, N., E-mail: nashwa.eassa@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Murape, D.M. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Betz, R. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (South Africa); Neethling, J.H.; Venter, A.; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    The reaction of halogen-based etchants with n-InAs (1 1 1)A and the resulting surface morphology and surface electronic structure are investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using the intensity ratio of the unscreened longitudinal optical (LO) phonon to the transverse optical (TO) phonon in the Raman spectrum, a significant reduction in band bending is deduced after exposure of the InAs surface to HCl:H{sub 2}O, Br-methanol and I-ethanol for moderate times and concentrations. These procedures also lead to smooth and defect-free InAs surfaces. The improvements in surface properties are reversed, however, if the concentrations of the etchants are increased or the etch time is too long. In the worst cases, pit formation and inverted pyramids with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} side facets are observed. The influence of the etchant concentration and etch time on the morphological and electronic properties of the etched surfaces is reported.

  8. Nano-diamonds surface modifications: understanding of electron exchange mechanisms and evidence of a therapeutic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a therapeutic effect of nano-diamonds (NDs) has been evidenced by investigating the role of NDs surface chemistry on their electronic properties. More precisely, the generation of reactive oxygen species from detonation NDs under ionizing radiation, which could improve current radiotherapy treatments, has been demonstrated. To this end, surface treatments facilitating electron transfer from NDs to their environment, namely hydrogenation and surface graphitization, were developed. Experimental conditions ensuring an efficient hydrogenation by hydrogen plasma were determined under ultrahigh vacuum, before being used to prepare large quantities of NDs in powder phase. A similar procedure was applied to the surface graphitization of NDs, performed by annealing under vacuum at high temperature. The impact of such surface treatments on the electronic interaction properties of NDs has been investigated under ambient air and after dispersion in water. These surface treatments induce a positive Zeta potential to NDs in water, which origin has been discussed. Finally, their interactions with human tumor cells were observed. Radiosensitization of tumor cells using NDs under gamma irradiation was demonstrated, opening new perspectives for NDs in nano-medicine. (author) [fr

  9. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  10. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  11. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  12. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  13. Modeling and the analysis of control logic for a digital PWM controller based on a nano electronic single electron transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnakannan Kailasam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modelling and the analysis of control logic for a Nano-Device- based PWM controller. A comprehensive simple SPICE schematic model for Single Electron transistor has been proposed. The operation of basic Single Electron Transistor logic gates and SET flip flops were successfully designed and their performances analyzed. The proposed design for realizing the logic gates and flip-flops is used in constructing the PWM controller utilized for switching the buck converter circuit. The output of the converter circuit is compared with reference voltage, and when the error voltage and the reference are matched the latch is reset so as to generate the PWM signal. Due to the simplicity and accuracy of the compact model, the simulation time and speed are much faster, which makes it potentially applicable in large-scale circuit simulation. This study confirms that the SET-based PWM controller is small in size, consumes ultra low power and operates at high speeds without compromising any performance. In addition these devices are capable of measuring charges of extremely high sensitivity.

  14. Controlling electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization of triatomic molecules with orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Kling, M. F.; Emmanouilidou, A.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the control of electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization (FDI) of the two-electron triatomic molecule D3 + when driven by two orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We employ a three-dimensional semiclassical model that fully accounts for the electron and nuclear motion in strong fields. We analyze the FDI probability and the distribution of the momentum of the escaping electron along the polarization direction of the longer wavelength and more intense laser field. These observables, when considered in conjunction, bear clear signatures of the prevalence or absence of electron-electron correlation in FDI, depending on the time delay between the two laser pulses. We find that D3 + is a better candidate than H2 for demonstrating also experimentally that electron-electron correlation indeed underlies FDI.

  15. Electron microscopy studies of zirconia-alumina nanolaminates and nickel oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Marvin Allan

    Understanding the atomic scale properties and behavior of materials systems offers exciting potential for the development of fresh and innovative technological applications to impact the world in which we live. The basic materials physics problem addressed in this dissertation involves separate studies of the effects owing to the existence of surfaces present in two types of oxide systems: that of polycrystalline zirconia in zirconia-alumina multilayer films, and that of single-crystal NiO. The first surface science problem involved study of nanometer-sized zirconia crystallites. Due to the small crystallite size, energetics occurring at the surface of crystallites affected properties of the bulk material including its crystallographic phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize zirconia crystallites within sputter-deposited films containing a range of zirconia layer thickness, i.e. zirconia crystallite size, and crystallographic phase identification of individual crystallites was made directly from digital high resolution images. Information about the growth behavior of zirconia crystallites was inferred from the observed phase and morphology of crystallites as a function of zirconia layer thickness, i.e. growth time. The capabilities for rapid phase identification of individual crystallites allowed for in situ experimentation into the crystallographic phase transformation behavior of the zirconia nanocrystallites, and for a comparison of that behavior to be made against reported behavior of systems containing much larger, micron-sized zirconia crystals. The second surface science problem involved study of surfaces of single-crystal NiO, specifically, the polar-(111) surface. The NiO(111) surface, when the surface atoms are in their bulk-terminated positions, has an infinite surface energy. Studies were carried out to examine by what mechanisms the polar surface of NiO overcomes this large surface energy. Transmission electron

  16. Optimization of an Aeroservoelastic Wing with Distributed Multiple Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the aeroelastic optimization of a subsonic transport wingbox under a variety of static and dynamic aeroelastic constraints. Three types of design variables are utilized: structural variables (skin thickness, stiffener details), the quasi-steady deflection scheduling of a series of control surfaces distributed along the trailing edge for maneuver load alleviation and trim attainment, and the design details of an LQR controller, which commands oscillatory hinge moments into those same control surfaces. Optimization problems are solved where a closed loop flutter constraint is forced to satisfy the required flight margin, and mass reduction benefits are realized by relaxing the open loop flutter requirements.

  17. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodak, I.V.; Kushnir, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described

  18. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described.

  19. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E. [Dip. di Ingegneria Elettronica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-07-14

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, WO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and MoO{sub 3}. The low electron affinity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  20. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  1. Dose distribution considerations of medium energy electron beams at extended source-to-surface distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Pawlicki, Todd; Korb, Leroy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) on dose distributions for a range of medium energy electron beams and cone sizes. Methods and Materials: The depth-dose curves and isodose distributions of 6 MeV, 10 MeV, and 14 MeV electron beams from a dual photon and multielectron energies linear accelerator were studied. To examine the influence of cone size, the smallest and the largest cone sizes available were used. Measurements were carried out in a water phantom with the water surface set at three different SSDs from 101 to 116 cm. Results: In the region between the phantom surface and the depth of maximum dose, the depth-dose decreases as the SSD increases for all electron beam energies. The effects of extended SSD in the region beyond the depth of maximum dose are unobservable and, hence, considered minimal. Extended SSD effects are apparent for higher electron beam energy with small cone size causing the depth of maximum dose and the rapid dose fall-off region to shift deeper into the phantom. However, the change in the depth-dose curve is small. On the other hand, the rapid dose fall-off region is essentially unaltered when the large cone is used. The penumbra enlarges and electron beam flatness deteriorates with increasing SSD

  2. Nanoparticle-Based Surface Modifications for Microtribology Control and Superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kendall Matthew

    2010-11-01

    The emergence of miniaturization techniques for consumer electronics has brought forth the relatively new and exciting field of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, due to the inherent forces that exist between surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale, scientists and semiconductor manufacturers are still struggling to improve the lifetime and reliability of complex microdevices. Due to the extremely large surface area-to-volume ratio of typical MEMS and microstructured surfaces, dominant interfacial forces exist which can be detrimental to their operational lifetime. In particular, van der Waals, capillary, and electrostatic forces contribute to the permanent adhesion, or stiction , of microfabricated surfaces. This strong adhesion force also contributes to the friction and wear of these silicon-based systems. The scope of this work was to examine the effect of utilizing nanoparticles as the basis for roughening surfaces for the purpose of creating films with anti-adhesive and/or superhydrophobic properties. All of the studies presented in this work are focused around a gas-expanded liquid (GXL) process that promotes the deposition of colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into conformal thin films. The GXL particle deposition process is finalized by a critical point drying step which is advantageous to the microelectromechanical systems and semiconductor (IC) industries. In fact, preliminary results illustrated that the GXL particle deposition process can easily be integrated into current MEMS microfabrication processes. Thin films of AuNPs deposited onto the surfaces of silicon-based MEMS and tribology test devices were shown to have a dramatic effect on the adhesion of microstructures. In the various investigations, the apparent work of adhesion between surfaces was reduced by 2-4 orders of magnitude. This effect is greatly attributed to the roughening of the typically smooth silicon oxide surfaces which, in turn, dramatically decreases the "real are of

  3. Accuracy of surface strain measurements from transmission electron microscopy images of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Liu, Pei; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2017-01-01

    Strain analysis from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images offers a convenient tool for measuring strain in materials at the atomic scale. In this paper we present a theoretical study of the precision and accuracy of surface strain measurements directly from aberration...

  4. Electrical conductivity and electron cyclotron current drive efficiencies for non-circular flux surfaces in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    As is well known, the presence of electron trapping can strongly reduce the electrical conductivity and rf current drive efficiencies of tokamak plasmas. For example, the conductivity (in the low collisionality limit) of a flux surface with inverse aspect ratio ε=0.1 is approximately one half of the Spitzer conductivity (σ sp )for uniform magnetic fields. Previous estimates of these effects have assumed that the variation of magnetic field strength around a flux surface is given by the standard form for circular flux surfaces. (author) 11 refs., 4 figs

  5. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO3 by high-density electronic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, A.S.; Wilhelm, R.A.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions

  7. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO{sub 3} by high-density electronic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Said, A.S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Lab, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Wilhelm, R.A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Facsko, S. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions.

  8. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  9. Surface Magnetism of Cobalt Nanoislands Controlled by Atomic Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jewook; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Li, An-Ping

    2017-01-11

    Controlling the spin states of the surface and interface is key to spintronic applications of magnetic materials. Here, we report the evolution of surface magnetism of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) upon hydrogen adsorption and desorption with the hope of realizing reversible control of spin-dependent tunneling. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy reveals three types of hydrogen-induced surface superstructures, 1H-(2 × 2), 2H-(2 × 2), and 6H-(3 × 3), with increasing H coverage. The prominent magnetic surface states of Co, while being preserved at low H coverage, become suppressed as the H coverage level increases, which can then be recovered by H desorption. First-principles calculations reveal the origin of the observed magnetic surface states by capturing the asymmetry between the spin-polarized surface states and identify the role of hydrogen in controlling the magnetic states. Our study offers new insights into the chemical control of magnetism in low-dimensional systems.

  10. Electron spectroscopy studies of surface In-Ag alloy formation on the tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukaluk, A.; Trzcinski, M.; Okulewicz, K.

    2008-01-01

    XPS and UPS investigations of ultrathin films of In/Ag and Ag/In, deposited onto the W(1 1 0) surface in the ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed. Indium and silver films were formed by 'in-situ' evaporation on W(1 1 0) substrate. XPS and UPS studies have been performed by means of SCIENTA ESCA200 instrument. The changes of In4d core-level and Ag4d valence band emissions with increasing Ag and In coverage were monitored to observe the energy shift and shape of the spin-orbit doublet of In4d and Ag4d lines in the Ag/In/W and In/Ag/W systems. UPS (HeI and HeII) measurements were supported by XPS AlK α measurements of In3d and W4p levels, as well as by investigations of Ag3d levels. XPS and UPS data allowed to evaluate the coverage and make conclusions concerning intermixing and surface alloying in the In/Ag/W and Ag/In/W systems. W(1 1 0) substrate can be cleaned after each deposition by thermal desorption and no alloying in the In/W and Ag/W systems is observed

  11. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  12. The near-surface electron radiation environment of Saturn's moon Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C. J. A.; Hendrix, A. R.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    Saturn's inner mid-size moons are exposed to a number of external weathering processes, including charged particle bombardment and UV photolysis, as well as deposition of E-ring grains and interplanetary dust. While optical remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed a number of weathering patterns across the surfaces of these moons, it is not entirely clear which external process is responsible for which observed weathering pattern. Here we focus on Saturn's moon Mimas and model the effect of energetic electron bombardment across its surface. By using a combination of a guiding center, bounce-averaged charged particle tracing approach and a particle physics code, we investigate how the radiation dose due to energetic electrons is deposited with depth at different locations. We predict a lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern that extends down to ∼cm depths at low latitudes centered around the apex of the leading hemisphere (90° W). These results are consistent with previous remote sensing observations of a lens-shaped color anomaly observed by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument as well as a thermal inertia anomaly observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Our results confirm that these features are produced by MeV electrons that have a penetration depth into the surface comparable to the effective sampling depths of these instruments. On the trailing hemisphere we predict a similar lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern, whose effects have to date not been observed by the Cassini remote sensing instruments. We suggest that no corresponding lens-shaped weathering pattern has been observed on the trailing hemisphere because of the comparatively short range of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons into surface ice, as well as competing effects from cold plasma, neutral, and dust bombardment.

  13. Electronic Control System Of Home Appliances Using Speech Command Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Min Soe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The main idea of this paper is to develop a speech recognition system. By using this system smart home appliances are controlled by spoken words. The spoken words chosen for recognition are Fan On Fan Off Light On Light Off TV On and TV Off. The input of the system takes speech signals to control home appliances. The proposed system has two main parts speech recognition and smart home appliances electronic control system. Speech recognition is implemented in MATLAB environment. In this process it contains two main modules feature extraction and feature matching. Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients MFCC is used for feature extraction. Vector Quantization VQ approach using clustering algorithm is applied for feature matching. In electrical home appliances control system RF module is used to carry command signal from PC to microcontroller wirelessly. Microcontroller is connected to driver circuit for relay and motor. The input commands are recognized very well. The system is a good performance to control home appliances by spoken words.

  14. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  15. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  16. Electronic Nose for Microbiological Quality Control of Food Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Falasconi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic noses (ENs have recently emerged as valuable candidates in various areas of food quality control and traceability, including microbial contamination diagnosis. In this paper, the EN technology for microbiological screening of food products is reviewed. Four paradigmatic and diverse case studies are presented: (a Alicyclobacillus spp. spoilage of fruit juices, (b early detection of microbial contamination in processed tomatoes, (c screening of fungal and fumonisin contamination of maize grains, and (d fungal contamination on green coffee beans. Despite many successful results, the high intrinsic variability of food samples together with persisting limits of the sensor technology still impairs ENs trustful applications at the industrial scale. Both advantages and drawbacks of sensor technology in food quality control are discussed. Finally, recent trends and future directions are illustrated.

  17. The electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowacki, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC). (author)

  18. Electronic ceramic structure within the Voronoi cells model and microstructure fractals contacts surfaces new frontier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, in order to establish grain shapes of sintered ceramics, new approach on correlation between microstructure and doped BaTiO3 -ceramics properties based, on Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations on fractal geometry, has been developed. BaTiO3-ceramics doped with Yb2O3 (from 0.1 to 1.0wt% of Yb were prepared by using conventional solid state procedure and were sintered from 1320°C to 1380°C for four hours. The microstructure of sintered specimens was investigated by Scanning electron microscope JEOL-SEM-5300. For better and deeper characterization and understanding of the ceramics material microstructure, the methods which include the fractal nature structure, and also Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations, are applied. In our research the Voronoi is one specific interface between fractal structure nature and different stochastically contact surfaces, defined by statistical mathematical methods. Also, the Voronoi model practically provided possibility to control the ceramics microstructure fractal nature. Mathematical statistic methods enabled establishing the real model for the prognosis based on correlation: synthesis-structures-properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057 i br. III44006

  19. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of inner surface modified imogolite nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Chagas Da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the modified imogolites have been investigated using self consistent charge-density functional-tight binding method with a posteriori treatment of the dispersion interaction (SCC-DFTB-D. The zigzag (12,0 imogolite has been used as the initial structure for the calculations. The functionalization of the interior (12,0 imogolite nanotubes by organosilanes and by heat treatment leading to the dehydroxylation of the silanols were investigated. The reaction of the silanols with the trimethylmethoxysilanes is favored and the arrangement of the different substitutions that leads to the most symmetrical structures are preferred. The Young moduli and band gaps are slightly decreased. However, the dehydroxylation of the silanol groups in the inner surface of the imogolite leads to the increase of the Young moduli and a drastic decrease of the band gap of about 4.4 eV. It has been shown that the degree of the dehydroxylation can be controlled by heat treatment and tune the band gap, eventually, leading to a semiconductor material with well defined nanotube structure.

  20. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  1. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  2. Electron beam irradiation effects on the mechanical, thermal and surface properties of a fluoroelastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Pino, Eddy Segura; Rossi, Marcelo Rabello; Machado, Luci Diva Brocardo

    2007-01-01

    Fluoroelastomer can be used as a sealing material for different purposes. The aim of this work is the evaluation of the effects of the ionizing radiation of an electron beam (EB) on the mechanical, thermal and surface properties of a commercial fluoroelastomer containing carbon black and inorganic fillers. The material was irradiated with overall doses between 10 and 250 kGy. Tensile strength (stress and strain at break), hardness (Shore A) and compression set were evaluated. Thermal behavior was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Surface modifications were inspected using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The experiments have shown that EB irradiation promotes beneficial changes in the fluoroelastomer tensile strength behavior while compression set remain constant and the glass transition temperature increases. The SEM micrographs have shown compactness in the irradiated samples, although optical observations showed no surface morphology changes

  3. Models for Surface Roughness Scattering of Electrons in a 2DEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarar, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In this work surface roughness scattering of electrons in a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at heterojunction interfaces is investigated for different auto-correlation tions and potential forms. Gaussian, exponentiaI and lorentsian auto-correlation tions are used to represent surface roughness. Both an infinitely deep triangular potential model and the potential that is found from the numerical solution of Poisson Shrodinger equations self consistently are used as the potential that holds 2DEG at the hetero Interface. Using the wave functions appropriate for the potentials just mentioned and the auto-correlation functions indicated above, the scattering rates due to surface roughness are calculated. The calculations were repeated when the effect of screening is also included for the case of triangular potential

  4. Electron Injection to Control Self-Assembly and Disassembly of Phenylacetylene on Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddorf, Arthur P.; Li, Qing; Han, Chengbo; Bernholc, J.; Terrones, Humberto; Sumpter, Bobby; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Yi, Jieyu; Gai, Zheng; Maksymovych, Peter; Pan, Minghu

    2013-03-01

    The power of two-dimensional organic molecular systems for applications including electronics, functionalization and nanolithography is enabled by our ability to produce structures through self-assembly on a surface. Unfortunately, relying on thermal fluctuations to drive the surface attachment reactions has limited self-assembled molecules (SAMs) to little beyond alkanethiols on gold. We demonstrate a seminal example of non-thermal control over molecular self-assembly, where hot-electron injection rather than thermal fluctuations transform a disordered layer of weakly bonded hydrocarbon molecules into an ordered, dense monolayer. The process is reversible, in that injection of holes reverts to a disordered state. Since electron and hole injection is accomplished with a STM, unprecedented local control over ordered and disordered domains is achieved. STM imaging and correlated density functional calculations reveal that ordered domains consist of molecules vertically aligned and more strongly attached to the gold substrate through the acetylene tail, while disordered domains contain weakly bound molecules lying flat. Research was conducted at the CNMS, sponsored by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Neuromechanical Control for Hexapedal Robot Walking on Challenging Surfaces and Surface Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    The neuromechanical control principles of animal locomotion provide good insights for the development of bio-inspired legged robots for walking on challenging surfaces. Based on such principles, we developed a neuromechanical controller consisting of a modular neural network (MNN) and of virtual...... agonist–antagonist muscle mechanisms (VAAMs). The controller allows for variable compliant leg motions of a hexapod robot, thereby leading to energy-efficient walking on different surfaces. Without any passive mechanisms or torque and position feedback at each joint, the variable compliant leg motions...

  6. Wetting Controls Separation of Inertial Flows from Solid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, Cyril; Ybert, Christophe; Clanet, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the flow of liquids around solid surfaces in the inertial regime, a situation commonly encountered with the so-called “teapot effect”, the annoying tendency for a liquid to trickle down the outside of a receptacle after pouring. We demonstrate that surface wettability is an unexpected key factor in controlling flow separation and trickling, the latter being completely suppressed in the limit of superhydrophobic substrates. This unforeseen coupling is rationalized in terms of an inertial-capillary adhesion framework, which couples inertial flows to surface wettability effects. This description of flow separation successfully captures the observed dependence on the various experimental parameters, wettability, flow velocity, solid surface edge curvature. As a further illustration of this coupling, a real-time control of flow separation is demonstrated using electrowetting for contact angle actuation.

  7. Alternative surfacing materials for weed control at BC Hydro substations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, T.C.; Shrimpton, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    A two year study was conducted by BC Hydro in which a variety of surfacing materials were tested for their suitability for use in substations. Ideally, surfacing materials should have the following characteristics: high electrical resistivity in both dry and wet conditions, resistance to invasion by weeds, good driveability, good drainage, non-flammable, reasonably priced, no dust to foul conductors, and be aesthetically pleasing. Trials at Vernon Koksilah, and Ingledow substations were conducted to test the materials. A qualitative estimate of the amount of weed control provided by each material was recorded. The trials were meant to provide operational recommendations and screening information to allow for future testing of promising materials or combination of materials. Results showed that no single material meets all the desired criteria. The surfaces that best combined good weed control, electrical resistance and surface stability was a 15 cm deep layer of crushed gravel, especially if underlain by a layer of geotextile. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Near-surface electron acceleration during intense laser-solid interaction in the grazing incidence regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    When a relativistically intense p-polarized laser pulse is grazingly incident onto a planar solid-state target, a slightly superluminal field structure is formed near the target surface due to the incident and reflected waves superposition. This field structure can both extract the electrons from the target and accelerate them. It is theoretically shown that the acceleration is possible and stable for a wide range of electron initial conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm that this mechanism can actually take place for realistic parameters. As a result, the electron bunches with a charge of tens of nC and GeV-level energy can be produced using a laser intensity 1021-1022 W/cm2. It is also shown that the presence of a preplasma can improve acceleration, which becomes possible because of more efficient electron injection into the accelerating field structure.

  9. Propagation of a surface electromagnetic wave in a plasma with allowance for electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, A.G.; Prokopov, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Considered is propagation of a surface high-frequency wave in a semibounded plasma, which electron component is heated within the wave field. Dissipative effects are considered small, that is possible if wave frequency is much higher than the collision frequency and phase velocity of wave considerably exceeds electron heat velocity. Under conditions of anomalous skin-effect the distributions of electron temperature and wave damping have been found. It is established, that higher electron temperature on the boundary results in a higher decrease of temperature inside a plasma, far from the boundary temperature decreases exponentially; damping coefficient under anomalous skin-effect conditions is characterized by a stronger dependence not only on the wave amplitude, but as well as on gas pressure and wave frequency in comparison with normal conditions

  10. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-07

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of low-index stoichiometric BiOI surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wen-Wu; Zhao, Zong-Yan, E-mail: zzy@kmust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    As promising photocatalyst driven by visible-light, BiOI has attracted more and more attention in the past years. However, the surface structure and properties of BiOI that is the most important place for the photocatalytic have not been investigated in details. To this end, density functional theory was performed to calculate the structural and electronic properties of four low-index stoichiometric surfaces of BiOI. It is found that the relaxation of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small, especially the (001) surface. Thus, the surface energies of BiOI are very relatively small. Moreover, there are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer except the (001) surface, which maybe capture the photo-excited carriers. In all of the most stable terminated planes, all the dangling bonds are cleaved from the broken Bi-O bonds. In the case of (001) surface, the dangling bond density of Bi atoms for the (001) surface is zero per square nano. Therefore, the (001) surface is thermodynamically lowest-energy surface of BiOI, and it is the predominant surface (51.4%). As a final remark, the dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. Finally, the equilibrium morphology of BiOI was also proposed and provided, which is determined through the Wulff construction. These results will help us to better understand the underlying photocatalytic mechanism that is related to BiOI surfaces, and provide theoretical support for some experimental studies about BiOI-based photocatalyst in future. - Highlights: • Four low-index BiOI surfaces have been calculated by DFT method. • The relaxations of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small. • There are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer. • The dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. • The thermodynamic

  12. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  13. Electron beam induced Hg desorption and the electronic structure of the Hg depleted surface of Hg1/sub -//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.K.; Friedman, D.J.; Bertness, K.A.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Wilson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) were used to study the electron beam induced Hg desorption from a cleaved (110)Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te surface and the electronic structure of the Hg depleted surface. Solid state recrystallized Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te single crystals were used. It was found that the electron beam heating dominated the electron beam induced Hg desorption on Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te. At the electron beam energy used, the electron beam heating extended several thousand angstroms deep. However, the Hg depletion saturated after a few monolayers were depleted of Hg atoms. At the initial stage of Hg loss (only 3%), the surface band bends upward (more p type). The ARPES spectrum showed the loss of some E vs k dispersion after 22% Hg atoms were removed from the surface region, and no dispersion was observed after 43% Hg atoms were removed. These results have important implications on the electronic structure of the surfaces and interfaces of which the stoichiometry is altered

  14. Electron energy distribution control by fiat: breaking from the conventional flux ratio scaling rules in etch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Alok; Wang, Mingmei; Sherpa, Sonam; Ventzek, Peter

    2015-03-01

    With shrinking critical dimensions, minimizing each of aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE), bowing, undercut, selectivity, and within die uniformly across a wafer is met by trading off one requirement against another. The problem of trade-offs is especially critical. At the root of the problem is that roles radical flux, ion flux and ion energy play may be both good and bad. Increasing one parameter helps meeting one requirement but hinders meeting the other. Managing process by managing flux ratios and ion energy alone with conventional sources is not adequate because surface chemistry is uncontrollable. At the root of lack of control is that the electron energy distribution function (eedf) has not been controlled. Fortunately the high density surface wave sources control the eedf by fiat. High density surface wave sources are characterized by distinct plasma regions: an active plasma generation region with high electron temperature (Te) and an ionization free but chemistry rich diffusive region (low Te region). Pressure aids is segregating the regions by proving a means for momentum relaxation between the source and downstream region. "Spatial pulsing" allows access to plasma chemistry with reasonably high ion flux, from the active plasma generation region, just above the wafer. Low plasma potential enables precise passivation of surfaces which is critical for atomic layer etch (ALE) or high precision etch where the roles of plasma species can be limited to their purposed roles. High precision etch need not be at the cost of speed and manufacturability. Large ion flux at precisely controlled ion energy with RLSATM realizes fast desorption steps for ALE without compromising process throughput and precision.

  15. Controlling Reaction Selectivity through the Surface Termination of Perovskite Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo-Garzon, Felipe [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Yang, Shi-Ze [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Fung, Victor [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Foo, Guo Shiou [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Bickel, Elizabeth E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville TN 38505 USA; Chisholm, Matthew F. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Jiang, De-en [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Wu, Zili [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA

    2017-07-19

    Although well known in the material science field, surface reconstruction of perovskites has not been implemented in heterogeneous catalysis. In this work, we employ multiple surface sensitive techniques to characterize the surface reconstruction of SrTiO3 (STO) after thermal pretreatment (Sr-enrichment) and chemical etching (Ti-enrichment). We show, using the conversion of 2-propanol as a probe reaction, that the surface reconstruction of STO can be controlled to greatly tune catalytic acid/base properties and consequently the reaction selectivities in a wide range, which are inaccessible using single metal oxides, either SrO or TiO2. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations well explain the selectivity tuning and reaction mechanism on differently reconstructed surfaces of STO. Similar catalytic tunability is also observed on BaZrO3, highlighting the generality of the finding from this work.

  16. Wettability modification of human tooth surface by water and UV and electron-beam radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@gmail.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Coyoacan, México, D.F. (Mexico); Elefterie, Florina, E-mail: elefterie_florina@yahoo.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Beyens, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.beyens@ed.univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Maschke, Ulrich, E-mail: Ulrich.Maschke@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Brès, Etienne F., E-mail: etienne.bres@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-01

    The wettability of the human tooth enamel and dentin was analyzed by measuring the contact angles of a drop of distilled water deposited on the surface. The samples were cut along the transverse and longitudinal directions, and their surfaces were subjected to metallographic mirror-finish polishing. Some samples were also acid etched until their microstructure became exposed. Wettability measurements of the samples were done in dry and wet conditions and after ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) irradiations. The results indicate that water by itself was able to increase the hydrophobicity of these materials. The UV irradiation momentarily reduced the contact angle values, but they recovered after a short time. EB irradiation raised the contact angle and maintained it for a long time. Both enamel and dentin surfaces showed a wide range of contact angles, from approximately 10° (hydrophilic) to 90° (hydrophobic), although the contact angle showed more variability on enamel than on dentin surfaces. Whether the sample's surface had been polished or etched did not influence the contact angle value in wet conditions. - Highlights: • Human tooth surface wettability changes in dry/wet and UV/EB radiation conditions. • More variability in contact angle is observed on enamel than on dentin surfaces. • Water by itself increases the hydrophobicity of the human tooth surface. • UV irradiation reduces momentarily the human tooth surface hydrophobicity. • EB irradiation increases and maintains the hydrophobicity for a long time.

  17. Effect of MeV Electron Radiation on Europa’s Surface Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, Murthy; Henderson, Bryana; Bateman, Fred

    2017-10-01

    MeV electrons that impact Europa’s trailing hemisphere and cause both physical and chemical alteration of the surface and near-surface. The trailing hemisphere receives far lower fluxes above 25 MeV as compared with lower energy particles, but can cause significant chemical and physical modifications at these energies. With NASA's planned Europa Clipper mission and a Europa Lander Concept on the horizon, it is critical to understand and quantify the effect of Europa’s radiation environment on the surface and near surface.Electrons penetrate through ice by far the deepest at any given energy compared to protons and ions, making the role of electrons very important to understand. In addition, secondary radiation - Bremsstrahlung, in X-ray wavelengths - is generated during high-energy particle penetration through solids. Secondary X-rays are equally lethal to life and penetrate even deeper than electrons, making the cumulative effect of radiation on damaging organic matter on the near surface of Europa a complex process that could have effects several meters below Europa’s surface. Other physical properties such as coloration could be caused by radiation.In order to quantify this effect under realistic Europa trailing hemisphere conditions, we devised, built, tested, and obtained preliminary results using our ICE-HEART instrument prototype totally funded by JPL’s internal competition funding for Research and Technology Development. Our Ice Chamber for Europa High-Energy Electron And Radiation-Environment Testing (ICE-HEART) operates at ~100 K. We have also implemented a magnet that is used to remove primary electrons subsequent to passing through an ice column, in order to determine the flux of secondary X-radiation and its penetration through ice.Some of the first results from these studies will be presented and their relevance to understand physical and chemical properties of Europa’s trailing hemisphere surface.This work has been carried out at Jet

  18. Electronic structure at metal-smiconductor surfaces and interfaces: effects of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the study of the electronic structure at metal and semiconductor surfaces or interfaces, with special emphasis in the effects of disorder and local microstructure upon them. Various factors which determine this structure are presented and those of central importance are identified. A model that allows the efficient and exact calculation of the local density of states at disordered interfaces is described. This model is based on a tight-binding hamiltonian that has enough flexibility so as to allow an adequate description of real solids. The disorder is taken into account by including stochastic perturbations in the diagonal elements of the hamiltonian in a site orbital basis. These perturbations are taken at each layer from a lorentzian probability distribution. An exact expression for the calculation of the local density of states is derived and applied to a model surface built up from a type orbitals arranged in a simple cubic lattice. The effects of disorder on the local densities of states and on the existence of surface Tamm states are studied. The properties of the electronic states with this kind of model of disorder are considered. The self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of the Si(111) - (1x1) surface is presented. The effects of disorder on the electronic properties such as the work function or the position of surface states within the gap are evaluated. The surface of the metallic compound NiSi 2 is also treated. The first self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of its (111) surface is presented. The electronic structure of the Si/NiSi 2 (111) interfaces is calculated for the two types of junctions that can be grown experimentally. The origin of the difference between the Schottky barrier heights at both interfaces is discussed. The results are compared with available experimental data. The implications of this calculation on existing theories about the microscopic mechanism that causes

  19. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  20. Control of surface composition and hydrogen recycling by plasma conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1984-01-01

    Data from a laboratory simulator, TEXTOR, JET, and other tokamaks are used to show that oxygen and carbon surface impurities on the walls of plasma chambers are interrelated and can be manipulated by controlling the composition of the gas used for plasma surface conditioning. Not only can oxygen be reduced to low levels, but carbon (and other elements) can be either removed or deposited and reacted with the substrate. In the case of carbon deposits, a thin metal-carbide layer can be formed or thicker deposits of elemental carbon can be made. Surface compositions can be reproduced easily and reversibly in a controlled way. Furthermore, these composition changes can alter the hydrogen recycling speed and plasma impurity levels by an order of magnitude or more. In the simulator we have related gas composition to surface composition changes and resulting recycling behavior. Surface oxygen levels can be reduced from 30 to less than 3 at.% in less than 45 min of discharge cleaning. Carbon and oxygen levels as well as those of other surface active impurities are interrelated. Examples are shown and discussed. Comparisons are made to show the changes in the hydrogen recycling behavior caused by various surface preparations (compositions). (orig.)