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Sample records for suppression therapy ast

  1. Duration of short-course androgen suppression therapy and the risk of death as a result of prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Amico, Anthony V

    2011-12-10

    We evaluated whether the duration of androgen suppression therapy (AST) had an impact on the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer (PC) within established Gleason score (GS) categories.

  2. Acid Suppressive Therapy for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in Noncritically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Minh T; Monye, Leslie C; Seifert, Charles F

    2015-09-01

    The current literature discourages the use of acid suppressive therapy (AST) for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in noncritically ill patients. However, several sources indicate that the majority of noncritically ill patients are given AST for SUP while there may only be a small proportion of high-risk patients who need SUP therapy. There is a new scoring system to aid practitioners in stratifying the risk of stress ulcer-related gastrointestinal bleeding in noncritically ill patients developed by Herzig et al and appropriately prescribe AST for SUP in this population. Our primary objective was to determine the current usage of AST in noncritically ill patients at a tertiary teaching hospital and use the new scoring system to identify non-intensive care unit patients who were inappropriately given AST. We retrospectively determined the percentage of noncritically ill patients who were given AST on medical floors between January 2010 and December 2012. After identifying these patients, we randomly selected a sample and retrospectively collected data from their medical record to determine the gastrointestinal bleeding risk score to determine if the patient was appropriately given AST. Of the 42 600 admissions, 22 949 (53.7%) noncritically ill patients were given AST. A total of 442 patients were randomly selected for data collection and 156 patients were excluded. Gastrointestinal bleeding risk score was calculated in 286 patients. This new risk stratification tool identified 253 (88.5%) patients to have a low (≤7) and low-medium risk score (8-9). A large percentage of noncritically ill patients were given AST during their hospital stay; 88.5% of these medications were given inappropriately to patients who were at extremely low risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Using the above information and the AST prescribing patterns at our institution, we estimate a potential inpatient medication cost savings of $114 622 for the study period. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Acid Suppressive Therapy Use in Hematology/Oncology Patients at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaleb, Rachael V; Gandhi, Arpita S; Clark, Stephen Michael; Clemmons, Amber B

    2016-07-01

    Acid suppressive therapy (AST)-namely, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs)-is routinely prescribed to hospitalized patients for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP). To identify the incidence of and indications for AST use in the hematology/oncology population as well as to identify the occurrence of the following PPI-associated adverse events: pneumonia and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). A retrospective chart review was conducted on adult hematology/oncology patients admitted to any oncology service for ≥48 hours from October 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Of the 298 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 73% (n = 218) received an AST during admission. The most common indication for an AST was SUP (63%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) was 10%, 0%, and 4% in patients who received a PPI, H2RA, and no AST, respectively (14/142 vs 0/70 vs 3/80; odds ratio [OR] for PPI vs no AST = 2.68; 95% CI = 0.75-9.63). The incidence of CDAD was 3%, 1.3%, and 1.2% in patients who received a PPI, H2RA, and no AST, respectively (4/142 vs 1/70 vs 1/80; OR for PPI vs H2RA = 1.92; 95% CI = 0.21-17.47). This is the first study to describe the incidence of and indications for AST use in the hospitalized hematology/oncology population. There was a high occurrence of AST use, particularly PPIs, in these patients at our institution. Additionally, there was a trend toward an increased risk of HAP and CDAD in patients who received AST during admission. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Old and New Gut Hormone, Gastrin and Acid Suppressive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruma, Ken; Kamada, Tomoari; Manabe, Noriaki; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Shiotani, Akiko

    2018-03-27

    Gastrin acts physiologically as a gut hormone to stimulate acid secretion after meal and as a cell-growth factor of oxyntic mucosa. Increase in serum gastrin level happens under various conditions including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, antral G cell hyperplasia, autoimmune gastritis, atrophic gastritis, renal failure, vagotomy, Helicobacter pylori infection and acid suppressive therapy. As acid suppressive therapy causes hypergastrinemia, the association between acid suppressive therapy and gastric neuroendocrine cell tumor (NET) has been discussed during the past 30 years. In this review article, the definition of hypergastrinemia and the related disorders including acid suppressive therapy and gastric NET are discussed. © 2018 Japanese Gastroenterological Association Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003472.htm Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test measures the level of the enzyme AST in ...

  6. Modifying Antiretroviral Therapy in Virologically Suppressed HIV-1-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean E; Grant, Philip M; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-infected patients with suppressed plasma viral loads often require changes to their antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to manage drug toxicity and intolerance, to improve adherence, and to avoid drug interactions. In patients who have never experienced virologic failure while receiving ARV therapy and who have no evidence of drug resistance, switching to any of the acceptable US Department of Health and Human Services first-line therapies is expected to maintain virologic suppression. However, in virologically suppressed patients with a history of virologic failure or drug resistance, it can be more challenging to change therapy while still maintaining virologic suppression. In these patients, it may be difficult to know whether the discontinuation of one of the ARVs in a suppressive regimen constitutes the removal of a key regimen component that will not be adequately supplanted by one or more substituted ARVs. In this article, we review many of the clinical scenarios requiring ARV therapy modification in patients with stable virologic suppression and outline the strategies for modifying therapy while maintaining long-term virologic suppression.

  7. Dynamic α-fetoprotein, platelets and AST-to-platelet ratio index predict hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virological response after antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Hung, Chao-Hung; Tseng, Po-Lin; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Tsai, Ming-Chao; Lin, Ming-Tsung; Yen, Yi-Hao; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who achieve viral eradication may still develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known about the impact of dynamic change of serum markers on HCC development. We enrolled 1351 HCV-infected patients who achieved sustained virological response (SVR). Laboratory data were collected at least 1 year after IFN-based therapy and to the latest follow-up. Data on α-fetoprotein (AFP) were obtained >6 months prior to HCC development to exclude HCC-related AFP elevation. HCC developed in 49 patients. Risk factors for HCC in SVR patients were old age, liver cirrhosis, higher pre- and post-treatment AFP and high post-treatment AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI). Patients with pre-AFP ≥15 ng/mL → post-AFP ≥15 ng/mL (at 1 year, 23.1%; 5 years, 42.3%) and pre-AFP highest risk of HCC development, followed by pre-AFP ≥15 ng/mL → post-AFP highest risk of HCC development, followed by comparable risks among the other three groups. SVR patients with a persistently high AFP level (≥15 ng/mL) and a high APRI (≥0.7) before and after treatment had the highest incidence of HCC development. Patients with a reduction of AFP and APRI to the normal range after treatment had a markedly decreased risk of HCC. The risk was lowest for patients who kept persistently normal AFP and APRI before and after treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Counterregulatory Mechanism Impacting Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion Therapy." Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, 7th edition. Ed. Fanaroff, A . A ., Martin, R. J. Philadelphia: Mosby-Year Book Inc, 2002. 1254...demonstrated a separation of the sample set into 2 groups based on the metabolic profiles (Figure 7A), thus confirm- ing that the metabolic profile of...transfection using mass spectrometry (n 4). A , Principle component (PC) analysis revealed the unsupervised separation between of the 2 sample groups

  9. AST-500 safety analysis experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falikov, A.A.; Bakhmetiev, A.M.; Kuul, V.S.; Samoilov, O.B.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristic AST-type NHR safety features and requirements are described briefly. The main approaches and results of design and beyond-design accidents analyses for the AST-500 NHR, and the results of probabilistic safety assessments are considered. It is concluded that the AST-500 possesses a high safety level in virtue of the development and realization in the design of self-protection, passivity and defence-in-depth principles. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs

  10. Malaria in immuno-suppressed individuals on antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria in immuno-suppressed individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in north-central Nigeria. C.R. Pam, B.T. Abubakar, G.O. Inwang, G.A. Amuga. Abstract. The immune deficiency caused by HIV infection reduces the immune response to malaria parasitaemia and therefore leads to an increased frequency of clinical ...

  11. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST

  12. Osteoporosis and thyrotropin-suppressive therapy: reduced effectiveness of alendronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Annalisa; Lupoli, Gelsy Arianna; Fonderico, Francesco; Marciello, Francesca; Martinelli, Addolorata; Assante, Roberta; Lupoli, Giovanni

    2009-05-01

    Many reports of the effect of exogenous thyroxine therapy on bone mineral density (BMD) show a relationship between excess thyroid hormone administration and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of antibone resorptive agents, in particular alendronate (ALN) on BMD in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with thyroid carcinoma who were receiving long-term thyrotropin (TSH)-suppressive therapy with thyroxine. Seventy-four postmenopausal women with low BMD (T-score or =0.05 and < or =0.1 microU/mL) for about 3-9 years were selected for the study. The patients were divided into three groups according to the length of levothyroxine (LT(4)) treatment prior to the beginning of the study: group A (TSH-suppressive therapy for about 3 years), group B (for about 6 years), and group C (for about 9 years). These patients were compared with 74 matched women not taking LT(4). All patients and controls were treated with bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D for 2 years and evaluated. After 24 months of treatment group A showed a 7.8% increase in lumbar BMD; group B, a 4.6% increase; and group C, a 0.86% increase. In the control group BMD increased 8.2%. A significant difference was found in both lumbar and femoral BMD increase among the three groups: group C had a lower BMD increase than group A (p < 0.001) and B (p < 0.001). In postmenopausal women who were receiving adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D in their diet ALN was less effective for those who were also receiving TSH-suppressive doses of LT(4) for either 6 or 9 years. The positive effect of ALN on BMD was less for longer periods of LT(4) treatment. It seems likely that other bisphosphonates would also be less effective in increasing BMD in postmenopausal women receiving TSH-suppressing doses of LT(4).

  13. Indication of acid suppression therapy and predictors for the prophylactic use of proton-pump inhibitors vs. histamine-2 receptor antagonists in a Malaysian tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RA are common acid suppressants used in gastrointestinal disorders. The trend of usage in Malaysia has changed from predominantly H2RA to PPI from 2007 to 2008, 3.46 versus 2.87 and 2.99 versus 3.24 DDD (Defined Daily Dose/1000 population/day respectively. This raises concerns as PPI overutilization amounts to higher cost expenditure and are associated with various untoward consequences such as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, pneumonia, and osteoporosis. Objectives: To evaluate the indication of acid suppression therapy (AST and to look for predictors associated with the prophylactic use of PPI as compared to H2RA. Methods: Data collection was conducted via a standardized surveillance form over a 2-month period in the general medical wards of Sarawak General Hospital. All patients who received at least one dose of PPI or H2RA in any dosage form were included in the study. Appropriateness of prophylaxis was determined using current available guidelines. Selected risk factors were analysed using simple logistic regression to look for predictors associated with the choice of PPI in prophylactic AST. Results: Out of 212 cases in the present cohort, about three quarters (75.5%, n=160 of acid suppressants were given as prophylaxis. Over half of these did not have appropriate indications for prophylactic AST (58.1%, n=93. Among all cases given prophylactic AST, 75.0% (n=120 of them were given PPI. Renal insufficiency was identified as the only predictor associated with the use of prophylactic PPI in preference to H2RA (OR=2.86, 95%CI 1.21:6.72, p=0.011. Conclusion: Inappropriate prophylactic AST is a major concern and may even be underestimated due to the lack of appropriate guidelines. More data is required to guide the selection between PPI and H2RA, specifically the more cost-effective use of H2RA in patients with lower gastrointestinal risk or in whom PPI has

  14. Suppressive therapy for radiation-associated nodular thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Kazuo; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Tsukada, Yoshiaki; Razack, M.S.; Sciasicia, Michael.

    1981-01-01

    A thyroid screening program for individuals who had irradiation to the head and neck areas was started at Roswell Park Memorial Institute in February 1977 and by June 1979, 1,071 patients were seen in the clinic. Three hundred and ninety-six patients were found to have palpable abnormalities of the thyroid, and following pretreatment evaluation, suppressive therapy with triiodothyronine (T3) (50 μg/day) or DT (desiccated thyroid) (120 mg/day) was administered in a double-blind fashion. Two hundred fifty patients with nodular disease completed 6 mo of treatment and are analyzed in this paper. Pretreatment thyroid function tests showed that two patients had hypothyroidism with a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and a low thyroxine level. A high incidence of thyroid autoantibodies was also noted and surgical findings confirmed a high incidence of chronic thyroiditis. Complete disappearance of the nodules was seen in 29% of the patients, and in addition, 38% of the patients were seen to have significant shrinkage of the nodules, indicating that radiation-associated thyroid nodules were as sensitive to the thyroactive agents as nonirradiated nodular thyroid disease. There was little difference in the response rate between T3 and DT. Both agents suppressed circulating TSH levels to an unmeasurable level in 76% of the patients. There was no correlation between scan findings and response rates. Thyroid carcinoma was found in 19% of the patients who underwent surgery; although all were well-differentiated carcinomas, two-thirds of the patients already had evidence of dissemination and/or invasion suggesting the aggressive nature of postirradiation thyroid carcinoma. (author)

  15. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jikun; Sandison, George A; Hsi, W-C; Ringor, Michael; Lu Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity

  16. AST Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/asttest.html AST Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an AST Test? AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme that is ...

  17. [Liver disorders in adults: ALT and AST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorden, Susanna M I; Buffart, Tineke E; Bakker, Annemieke; Buijs, Madelon M

    2013-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are commonly used biomarkers for liver damage. As well as in liver tissue, AST is also present in cardiac and skeletal muscle and in erythrocytes, making ALT the most specific marker for liver damage. Here, we describe two patients with sustained increases in ALT and AST levels. The first patient is a 79-year-old woman who developed elevated serum transaminases shortly after having a myocardial infarction. The second patient, an obese 40-year-old woman presented with increased ALT and AST levels in the absence of physical symptoms. Notably, her father died of liver cirrhosis without a history of alcohol abuse. Based upon these case reports we discuss the differential diagnostic work-up of elevated serum transaminase levels. Furthermore, we explain monitoring, test performance, reference values and analytical pitfalls of these biomarkers.

  18. Kirjavahetus Kaarel Robert Pustaga / Karl Ast Rumor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rumor, Karl, pseud., 1886-1971

    2009-01-01

    Kirjavahetus Rio de Janeiros elava Karl Ast Rumori ja New Yorgis elava Kaarel Robert Pusta vahel Eesti kongressi kokkukutsumise vajalikkuse, väliseesti ühingute ja nõukogude, ajakirjanduse ning üldise poliitilise olukorra teemadel

  19. Factors affecting the purpose suppressive antiviral therapy for patients with recurrent genital herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Коlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the factors that influence the destination of suppressive antiviral therapy in patients with recurrent genital herpes doctors of different specialties.Material and Methods: The study was conducted based on an anonymous survey of professionals providing medical care to patients with genital herpes. The survey involved 67 experts – 44 dermatologist, 13 obstetricians and 10 urologists working in Skin and Venereal Diseases, Women’s consuitation post and Saint Petersburg clinics.Results: Most respondents indicated that among patients with genital herpes, seeking an appointment, dominated by patients with relapsing nature of the disease. Suppressive antiviral therapy is recommended 68,7% of specialists, including dermatologists 61,3%, 84,6% of obstetricians and gynecologists, and 80% of urologists. The main indications for its experts consider high frequency of relapses, the patient’s tendency to promiscuity, the desire of the patient with fewer relapses, and the emotional response of the patient for the presence of the disease. Do not prescribe suppressive therapy for recurrent genital herpes 31,4% of the doctors surveyed. Among the reasons for which are not appointed by the type of treatment, the patient is dominated by the rejection of this type of treatment, the lack of experience of the destination suppressive therapy, as well as the uncertainty of specialists in its effectiveness.Conclusion: Suppressive antiviral therapy is recommended 68,7% of specialists. Do not prescribe this type of treatment for recurrent genital herpes 31,4% of the doctors surveyed. The proportion of professionals who refuse the appointment of suppressive antiviral therapy, the highest among dermatologists (38,7% compared with 15,4% among obstetricians and 20% of urologists. The most frequent grounds for refusal from this type of treatment is the lack of confidence in its effectiveness. 

  20. Reliability and Validity of Korean Version of Apraxia Screen of TULIA (K-AST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Yang, You-Na; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jin-Youn; Jeong, Eunhwa; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of Korean version of AST (K-AST) as a bedside screening test of apraxia in patients with stroke for early and reliable detection. AST was translated into Korean, and the translated version received authorization from the author of AST. The performances of K-AST in 26 patients (21 males, 5 females; mean age 65.42±17.31 years) with stroke (23 ischemic, 3 hemorrhagic) were videotaped. To test the reliability and validity of K-AST, the recorded performances were assessed by two physiatrists and two occupational therapists twice at a 1-week interval. The patient performances at admission in Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE), self-care and transfer categories of Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and motor praxis area of Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment, the second edition (LOTCA-II) were also evaluated. Scores of motor praxis area of LOTCA-II was used to assess the validity of K-AST. Inter-rater reliabilities were 0.983 (papraxia.

  1. Asteroids Dynamic Site-AstDyS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Zoran; Milani, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The AstDyS online information service (http://hamilton.dm.unipi.it/astdys/) contains data on numbered and multi - opposition asteroids, including orbital elements, their uncertainty, proper elements, ephemerides with uncertainty, and more. AstDyS also provides additional scientific output computed from the raw observational data. This value added currently includes: more accurate orbits computed with advanced dynamical and observational error model s; their uncertainty, as expressed by the covariance matrix formalism; ephemerides computed on request for each observer, with uncertainty; mean and proper orbital elements (for this output, AstDyS is the primary source worldwide); statistical quality control, providing a rigorous observational error model. All this is available with a sophisticated web interface, providing multiple search functions and online computations as well as complete orbital and residual files. There are several ways in which the A stDyS service could be expanded and improved in the next future, like the explicit classification of asteroids into asteroid families, the classification of resonant asteroids, and an updated self - consistent population model (to be used, e.g., for survey simulations). The IAU Division I endorsed the proposal for AstDyS to become an IAU (permanent) service, which would include the IAU supervision of the AstDyS system, keeping under control the quality of the work and the continuous update under conditions of scientific competition.

  2. Risk-benefit ratio for TSH- suppressive Levothyroxine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Cao, C; Wémeau, J-L

    2015-02-01

    In the setting of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) management, levothyroxine dose should be carefully adjusted with respect to underlying individual health status, dynamically reassessed risk of relapse and medical monitoring. Future guidelines should give priority to a tailored approach to TSH suppression therapy in DTC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The thyroid axis 'setpoints' are significantly altered after long-term suppressive LT4 therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, F.A.; Mader, U.; Grelle, I.; Visser, T.J.; Peeters, R.P.; Smit, J.W.A.; Reiners, C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the thyroid axis setpoint after long-term suppressive levothyroxine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma and the resulting changes in levothyroxine requirement. Ninety-nine differentiated thyroid cancer patients were reviewed. All

  4. Effect of AST-120 on Endothelial Dysfunction in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Inami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic kidney disease (CKD represents endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte adhesion is recognized as the initial step of arteriosclerosis. Indoxyl sulfate (IS is considered to be a risk factor for arteriosclerosis in CKD. Oral adsorbent AST-120 retards deterioration of renal function, reducing accumulation of IS. In the present study, we determined the monocyte adhesion in the adenine-induced uremic rats in vivo and effects of AST-120 on the adhesion molecules. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into control, control+AST-120, adenine, and adenine+AST-120 groups. The number of monocytes adherent to the endothelium of thoracic aorta by imaging the entire endothelial surface and the mRNA expressions of adhesion and atherosclerosis-related molecules were examined on day 49. The mRNA expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were also examined. Results. Adenine increased the number of adherent monocytes, and AST-120 suppressed the increase. The monocyte adhesion was related to serum creatinine and IS in sera. Overexpression of VCAM-1 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the arterial walls was observed in uremic rats. IS induced increase of the ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions in vitro. Conclusion. It appears that uremic condition introduces the monocyte adhesion to arterial wall and AST-120 might inhibit increasing of the monocyte adherence with CKD progression.

  5. Dopa therapy and action impulsivity: subthreshold error activation and suppression in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluchère, Frédérique; Deveaux, Manon; Burle, Borís; Vidal, Franck; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Witjas, Tatiana; Eusebio, Alexandre; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Hasbroucq, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    Impulsive actions entail (1) capture of the motor system by an action impulse, which is an urge to act and (2) failed suppression of that impulse in order to prevent a response error. Several studies indicate that dopaminergic treatment can induce action impulsivity in patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether this effect is due to increased impulse expression or to decreased impulse suppression remains to be deciphered. We used a novel approach based on electromyographic (EMG) analyses to decipher the effects of the patient's usual dopaminergic therapy on the expression and suppression of subliminal erroneous impulses. To this end, we used a within-subject design and took advantage of the Simon task, that elicits prepotent response tendencies. The patients (N = 15) performed the task on their usual dopaminergic medication and after complete medication withdrawal (for at least 12 h). The correction rate that measures the ability to suppress subthreshold impulsive muscle activity was lower when the patients were on medication as compared to their off medication state (p < 0.05). The incorrect activation rate that measures the capture of the motor system by action impulses was unaffected by medication. Dopa therapy affected action impulsivity. Although medication did not influence the incidence of fast action impulses, it significantly reduced patients' ability to abort and suppress muscle activation related to the incorrect response alternative.

  6. ASteCA: Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.; Piatti, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    We present the Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis package (ASteCA), a suit of tools designed to fully automate the standard tests applied on stellar clusters to determine their basic parameters. The set of functions included in the code make use of positional and photometric data to obtain precise and objective values for a given cluster's center coordinates, radius, luminosity function and integrated color magnitude, as well as characterizing through a statistical estimator its probability of being a true physical cluster rather than a random overdensity of field stars. ASteCA incorporates a Bayesian field star decontamination algorithm capable of assigning membership probabilities using photometric data alone. An isochrone fitting process based on the generation of synthetic clusters from theoretical isochrones and selection of the best fit through a genetic algorithm is also present, which allows ASteCA to provide accurate estimates for a cluster's metallicity, age, extinction and distance values along with its uncertainties. To validate the code we applied it on a large set of over 400 synthetic MASSCLEAN clusters with varying degrees of field star contamination as well as a smaller set of 20 observed Milky Way open clusters (Berkeley 7, Bochum 11, Czernik 26, Czernik 30, Haffner 11, Haffner 19, NGC 133, NGC 2236, NGC 2264, NGC 2324, NGC 2421, NGC 2627, NGC 6231, NGC 6383, NGC 6705, Ruprecht 1, Tombaugh 1, Trumpler 1, Trumpler 5 and Trumpler 14) studied in the literature. The results show that ASteCA is able to recover cluster parameters with an acceptable precision even for those clusters affected by substantial field star contamination. ASteCA is written in Python and is made available as an open source code which can be downloaded ready to be used from its official site.

  7. [Panarteritis nodosa-Special aspects of glucocorticoid and immune suppressive therapy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B; Utz, G; Döhnert, G; Suchezky, H; Mörl, H; Horsch, A K

    1975-12-12

    Report dealing with the clinical and pathoanatomical course as well as the autopsy findings in a 54 year old female suffering from panarteritis nodosa. Onset of the illness with polyneuritis and arthralgia. One year later diagnosis of panarteritis nodosa verified by muscle biopsy. Deterioration of the disease leading to the development of peripheral gangrene could not be prevented in spite of intensive therapy with steroids, immune suppressive agents, digitalis and antihypertensive drugs. Death 4 years later by myocardial infarction. Autopsy revealed generalized healed panarteritis nodosa with scarring and obliteration of vessels. A short description of the symptoms of the disease is given and the efficacy of the therapy with steroids and immune suppressive drugs is discussed from the clinical as well as the pathoanatomical point of view. Immunopathologic mechanisms are considered to be the responsible factors for pathogenesis.

  8. Acid suppression therapy does not predispose to Clostridium difficile infection: the case of the potential bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Novack

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An adverse effect of acid-suppression medications on the occurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has been a common finding of many, but not all studies. We hypothesized that association between acid-suppression medications and CDI is due to the residual confounding in comparison between patients with infection to those without, predominantly from non-tested and less sick subjects. We aimed to evaluate the effect of acid suppression therapy on incidence of CDI by comparing patients with CDI to two control groups: not tested patients and patients suspected of having CDI, but with a negative test. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of adult patients hospitalized in internal medicine department of tertiary teaching hospital between 2005-2010 for at least three days. Controls from each of two groups (negative for CDI and non-tested were individually matched (1:1 to cases by primary diagnosis, Charlson comorbidity index, year of hospitalization and gender. Primary outcomes were diagnoses of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-coded CDI occurring 72 hours or more after admission. RESULTS: Patients with CDI were similar to controls with a negative test, while controls without CDI testing had lower clinical severity. In multivariable analysis, treatment by acid suppression medications was associated with CDI compared to those who were not tested (OR = 1.88, p-value = 0.032. Conversely, use of acid suppression medications in those who tested negative for the infection was not associated with CDI risk as compared to the cases (OR = 0.66; p = 0.059. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the reported epidemiologic associations between use of acid suppression medications and CDI risk may be spurious. The control group choice has an important impact on the results. Clinical differences between the patients with CDI and those not tested and not suspected of having the infection may explain the different conclusions

  9. Limiting the testing of AST: a diagnostically nonspecific enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Higgins, Trefor; Cembrowski, George S

    2015-09-01

    Annually, millions of pairs of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) tests are ordered. These enzymes are highly correlated, and ALT is far more specific diagnostically than AST. To reduce AST testing, we suggest measuring AST only when ALT exceeds a predetermined limit. We derived the proportions of elevated ASTs that would not be measured based on 15 months of paired inpatient and outpatient ALT and AST data. For inpatients, a 35 U/L ALT limit for initiating AST testing would reduce AST testing by 51%, missing only 3% and 7.5% of ASTs exceeding 50 U/L and 35 U/L, respectively. In outpatients, AST testing can be reduced by more than 65%, with fewer missed elevated ASTs (0.5% and 2% of the ASTs exceeding 50 U/L and 35 U/L, respectively). Conservatively, $100 million could be saved annually in the US health care budget by selectively limiting AST testing in just the US outpatient environment. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  10. Effect of an Oral Adsorbent, AST-120, on Dialysis Initiation and Survival in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Hatakeyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral adsorbent AST-120 has the potential to delay dialysis initiation and improve survival of patients on dialysis. We evaluated the effect of AST-120 on dialysis initiation and its potential to improve survival in patients with chronic kidney disease. The present retrospective pair-matched study included 560 patients, grouped according to whether or not they received AST-120 before dialysis (AST-120 and non-AST-120 groups. The cumulative dialysis initiation free rate and survival rate were compared by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the impact of AST-120 on dialysis initiation. Our results showed significant differences in the 12- and 24-month dialysis initiation free rate (P<0.001, although no significant difference was observed in the survival rate between the two groups. In conclusion, AST-120 delays dialysis initiation in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients but has no effect on survival. AST-120 is an effective therapy for delaying the progression of CKD.

  11. Association of Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence With Inflammation in Virologically Suppressed Individuals Enrolled in the SMART Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Phillips, Andrew N; Neaton, James D

    2018-01-01

    Suboptimal (ie, <100%) antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence has been associated with heightened inflammation in cohort studies, even among people with virologic suppression. We aimed to evaluate this association among participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMAR...... suboptimal vs 100% adherence, respectively. These findings confirm previous observations and support the hypothesis that suboptimal ART adherence, even in the context of virologic suppression, may have significant biological consequences. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00027352....

  12. Photodynamic therapy with simultaneous suppression of multiple treatment escape pathways (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Z.; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    We introduce photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposomes (PMILs) for photodynamic tumor cell and microvessel damage in synchrony with photo-initiation of tumor-confined, multikinase inhibitor release. The PMIL is a biodegradable delivery system comprised of a nanoliposome carrying a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A, BPD) in its bilayer. A multikinase inhibitor-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticle is encapsulated within the liposome, which acts a barrier to nanoparticle erosion and drug release. Following intravenous PMIL administration, near infrared irradiation of tumors triggers photodynamic therapy and initiates tumor-confined drug release from the nanoparticle. This talk presents promising preclinical data in mouse models of pancreatic cancer utilizing this concept to suppress the VEGF and MET signaling pathways—both critical to cancer progression, metastasis and treatment escape. A single PMIL treatment using low doses of a multikanse inhibitor (cabozantinib, XL184) achieves sustained tumor reduction and suppresses metastatic escape, whereas combination therapy by co-administration of the individual agents has significantly reduced efficacy. The PMIL concept is amenable to a number of molecular inhibitors and offers new prospects for spatiotemporal synchronization of combination therapies whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  13. Binocular Therapy for Childhood Amblyopia Improves Vision Without Breaking Interocular Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Manuela; Tailor, Vijay K; Anderson, Elaine J; Bex, Peter J; Greenwood, John A; Dahlmann-Noor, Annegret; Dakin, Steven C

    2017-06-01

    Amblyopia is a common developmental visual impairment characterized by a substantial difference in acuity between the two eyes. Current monocular treatments, which promote use of the affected eye by occluding or blurring the fellow eye, improve acuity, but are hindered by poor compliance. Recently developed binocular treatments can produce rapid gains in visual function, thought to be as a result of reduced interocular suppression. We set out to develop an effective home-based binocular treatment system for amblyopia that would engage high levels of compliance but that would also allow us to assess the role of suppression in children's response to binocular treatment. Balanced binocular viewing therapy (BBV) involves daily viewing of dichoptic movies (with "visibility" matched across the two eyes) and gameplay (to monitor compliance and suppression). Twenty-two children (3-11 years) with anisometropic (n = 7; group 1) and strabismic or combined mechanism amblyopia (group 2; n = 6 and 9, respectively) completed the study. Groups 1 and 2 were treated for a maximum of 8 or 24 weeks, respectively. The treatment elicited high levels of compliance (on average, 89.4% ± 24.2% of daily dose in 68.23% ± 12.2% of days on treatment) and led to a mean improvement in acuity of 0.27 logMAR (SD 0.22) for the amblyopic eye. Importantly, acuity gains were not correlated with a reduction in suppression. BBV is a binocular treatment for amblyopia that can be self-administered at home (with remote monitoring), producing rapid and substantial benefits that cannot be solely mediated by a reduction in interocular suppression.

  14. Outcome of patients over 80 years of age on prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy for at least 6 months for prosthetic joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Prendki

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy is an alternative therapy in elderly patients with PJI when surgery is contraindicated and when the bacteria are susceptible to well-tolerated oral antimicrobial therapy such as beta-lactams.

  15. Oral fluconazole as suppressive therapy of disseminated cryptococcosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, A M; Saunders, C

    1988-10-01

    Because of the increasing numbers of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who will require treatment for cryptococcosis and because of the problems associated with long-term administration of intravenous amphotericin B, an alternative therapeutic approach in the form of an efficacious and easily administered oral antifungal drug would be of great benefit. Fluconazole, a new triazole antifungal agent, represents such an alternative. We therefore conducted an open, non-randomized trial of oral fluconazole as maintenance suppressive therapy of disseminated cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS. Twenty patients with AIDS, 19 of whom had cryptococcal meningitis, were studied. Patients were followed for up to 21 months. All patients received amphotericin B as primary therapy, from 20 to 257 days prior to entry (500 to 5,080 mg total dose). Eight also received flucytosine. After administration of amphotericin B for acute disseminated cryptococcosis, and prior to initiation of fluconazole therapy, Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in two patients and from the blood in one patient. Fluconazole was given once daily, in doses of 50 to 200 mg/day. Following initiation of fluconazole, results of CSF and blood cultures continued to be negative, except for the CSF culture in one patient who had a relapse in the 32nd week of therapy. Fluconazole therapy has been successfully continued in nine patients, for a median of 11 months (nine to 21 months). Seven patients died; five had no evidence of active cryptococcosis at the time of death. Two patients had a relapse, although the CSF culture showed growth of the fungus in only one patient. One patient was lost to follow-up after five months of therapy and one was unevaluable. Fluconazole had to be discontinued in only one patient in whom thrombocytopenia developed, and then resolved when the drug was stopped. We conclude that oral fluconazole represents a significant advance in

  16. HIV viral suppression and geospatial patterns of HIV antiretroviral therapy treatment facility use in Rakai, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billioux, Veena G; Grabowski, Mary K; Ssekasanvu, Joseph; Reynolds, Steven J; Berman, Amanda; Bazaale, Jeremiah; Patel, Eshan U; Bugos, Eva; Ndyanabo, Anthony; Kisakye, Alice; Kagaayi, Joseph; Gray, Ronald H; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Ssekubugu, Robert; Nalugoda, Fred; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J; Chang, Larry W

    2018-03-27

    To assess geospatial patterns of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment facility use and whether they were impacted by viral load suppression. We extracted data on the location and type of care services utilized by HIV-positive persons accessing ART between February 2015 and September 2016 from the Rakai Community Cohort Study in Uganda. The distance from Rakai Community Cohort Study households to facilities offering ART was calculated using the open street map road network. Modified Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of distance traveled and, for those traveling beyond their nearest facility, the probability of accessing services from a tertiary care facility. In total, 1554 HIV-positive participants were identified, of whom 68% had initiated ART. The median distance from households to the nearest ART facility was 3.10 km (interquartile range, 1.65-5.05), but the median distance traveled was 5.26 km (interquartile range, 3.00-10.03, P < 0.001) and 57% of individuals travelled further than their nearest facility for ART. Those with higher education and wealth were more likely to travel further. In total, 93% of persons on ART were virally suppressed, and there was no difference in the distance traveled to an ART facility between those with suppressed and unsuppressed viral loads (5.26 vs. 5.27 km, P = 0.650). Distance traveled to HIV clinics was increased with higher socioeconomic status, suggesting that wealthier individuals exercise greater choice. However, distance traveled did not vary by those who were or were not virally suppressed.

  17. Low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy suppresses inflammasome-mediated brain damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2017-11-01

    Use of photostimulation including low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy has broadened greatly in recent years because it is compact, portable, and easy to use. Here, the effects of photostimulation by LED (610 nm) therapy on ischemic brain damage was investigated in mice in which treatment started after a stroke in a clinically relevant setting. The mice underwent LED therapy (20 min) twice a day for 3 days, commencing at 4 hours post-ischemia. LED therapy group generated a significantly smaller infarct size and improvements in neurological function based on neurologic test score. LED therapy profoundly reduced neuroinflammatory responses including neutrophil infiltration and microglia activation in the ischemic cortex. LED therapy also decreased cell death and attenuated the NLRP3 inflammasome, in accordance with down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain. Moreover, the mice with post-ischemic LED therapy showed suppressed TLR-2 levels, MAPK signaling and NF-kB activation. These findings suggest that by suppressing the inflammasome, LED therapy can attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and tissue damage following ischemic stroke. Therapeutic interventions targeting the inflammasome via photostimulation with LED may be a novel approach to ameliorate brain injury following ischemic stroke. Effect of post-ischemic low-level light emitting diode therapy (LED-T) on infarct reduction was mediated by inflammasome suppression. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. AST/ALT ratio > or = 1 is not diagnostic of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, D W; Loo, A T; Levine, R A

    1998-09-01

    Medical guidelines for interferon-alpha2a or -alpha2b (IFN-alpha) treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection depend upon baseline liver histology. A better long-term response to IFN-alpha therapy correlates with less inflammation and absence of cirrhosis. It has been suggested that the presence of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection may be predicted based on an AST/ALT ratio > or = 1. This study was designed to determine if the presence of cirrhosis can be predicted in patients with chronic HCV infection by such a ratio. Seventy-seven patients, including 23 cirrhotics, with chronic HCV infection were studied. Serum ALT, AST, and HCV-RNA levels and hepatic activity index (HAI), reflecting histologic inflammation in all liver biopsies, were assessed. AST/ALT ratios and mean ALT, AST, and HCV-RNA were determined for both cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. HAI was correlated with ALT, AST, and HCV-RNA levels, the latter determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The likelihood ratio (LR) and positive predictive value of an AST/ALT ratio > or = 1 for cirrhosis was 7.3 and only 77%, respectively. In cirrhotics vs noncirrhotics, there were no significant differences between mean serum ALT (149 +/- 28 vs 176 +/- 17 units/liter), AST (139 +/- 28 vs 102 +/- 8 units/liter), or HCV-RNA levels (589,160 +/- 147,053 vs 543,915 +/- 75,497 copies/ml), respectively. There was a significant, but clinically weak, correlation between serum ALT and HAI (r = 0.234), and none between HAI and either serum AST or HCV-RNA levels. Our results support the need for a liver biopsy prior to treatment of chronic HCV infection, since the AST/ALT ratio fails to predict accurately the presence of cirrhosis.

  19. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load.......Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load....

  20. ELEVATED ALT AND AST IN AN ASYMPTOMATIC PERSON

    OpenAIRE

    KEW ST; LOH KY

    2009-01-01

    -Abnormal liver function test with raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and raised aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are commonly seen in primary care setting. -Chronic alcohol consumption, drugs, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and chronic viral hepatitis are common causes associated with raised ALT and AST. -In chronic viral hepatitis, the elevation of liver enzyme may not correlate well with the degree of liver damage. -Non-hepatic causes of raised ALT and AST include polymyositis, a...

  1. Early versus deferred androgen suppression therapy for patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy with curative intent: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is currently no consensus regarding the optimal timing for androgen suppression therapy in patients with prostate cancer that have undergone local therapy with curative intent but are proven to have node-positive disease without signs of distant metastases at the time of local therapy. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the benefits and harms of early (at the time of local therapy) versus deferred (at the time of clinical disease progression) androgen suppression therapy for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy. Methods The protocol was registered prospectively (CRD42011001221; http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO). We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases, as well as reference lists, the abstracts of three major conferences, and three trial registers, to identify randomized controlled trials (search update 04/08/2012). Two authors independently screened the identified articles, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. Results Four studies including 398 patients were identified for inclusion. Early androgen suppression therapy lead to a significant decrease in overall mortality (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.84), cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.18-0.64), and clinical progression at 3 or 9 years (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.16-0.52 at 3 years and RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.36-0.67 at 9 years). One study showed an increase of adverse effects with early androgen suppression therapy. All trials had substantial methodological limitations. Conclusions The data available suggest an improvement in survival and delayed disease progression but increased adverse events for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy treated with early androgen suppression therapy versus deferred androgen suppression therapy. However, quality of data is low. Randomized controlled trials with blinding of outcome assessment, planned to determine the timing of androgen suppression therapy in node

  2. Suppression of experimental tractional retinal detachment by low-dose radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, T.A.; Ficker, L.; Stevens, R.; Olkowski, Z.; Anderson, M.; Hartmann, J.; Crocker, I.

    1988-01-01

    We used a standardized model of traction retinal detachment (TRD) created by cellular membranes in the rabbit to test the effects of low-dose radiation therapy in suppressing TRD. The vitreous and lens were removed from pigmented rabbits, and homologous conjunctival fibroblasts were grown in cell culture. After resolution of postoperative inflammation, 50,000 fibroblasts in 0.1 mL of culture fluid were injected into the vitreous cavity. Ten eyes were maintained as controls. Nineteen eyes received 6 Gy (600 rad) of x-ray irradiation one to three hours after cellular injection. Eyes were monitored weekly for three weeks with indirect ophthalmoscopy. Seven (70%) of ten control eyes developed TRD at one week; no additional TRDs were noted at weeks 2 and 3. Significantly smaller numbers of irradiated eyes developed TRD: at week 1, two (11%) of 19; at week 2, five (28%) of 18; and at week 3, five (29%) of 17

  3. Suppression of experimental tractional retinal detachment by low-dose radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meredith, T.A.; Ficker, L.; Stevens, R.; Olkowski, Z.; Anderson, M.; Hartmann, J.; Crocker, I.

    1988-05-01

    We used a standardized model of traction retinal detachment (TRD) created by cellular membranes in the rabbit to test the effects of low-dose radiation therapy in suppressing TRD. The vitreous and lens were removed from pigmented rabbits, and homologous conjunctival fibroblasts were grown in cell culture. After resolution of postoperative inflammation, 50,000 fibroblasts in 0.1 mL of culture fluid were injected into the vitreous cavity. Ten eyes were maintained as controls. Nineteen eyes received 6 Gy (600 rad) of x-ray irradiation one to three hours after cellular injection. Eyes were monitored weekly for three weeks with indirect ophthalmoscopy. Seven (70%) of ten control eyes developed TRD at one week; no additional TRDs were noted at weeks 2 and 3. Significantly smaller numbers of irradiated eyes developed TRD: at week 1, two (11%) of 19; at week 2, five (28%) of 18; and at week 3, five (29%) of 17.

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression Among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Tanyka Suzanne; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-11-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9 % (n = 118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed.

  5. Gastric ulcer treatment: cure of Helicobacter pylori infection without subsequent acid-suppressive therapy: is it effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; van der Knoop, Bloeme

    2008-06-01

    Whether it is a requirement to continue with anti-secretory therapy following anti-Helicobacter therapy in H. pylori positive gastric ulcers is an important question. As gastric ulcers tend to heal more slowly than duodenal ulcers, may be asymptomatic or only causing mild symptoms and success at curing H. pylori with current fist line therapies is 80% at best, clinicians will likely err on the side of caution and continue acid suppressive therapy to ensure healing of gastric ulcers. This is certainly recommended when dealing with bleeding ulcers.

  6. Several notes on the OH&ast; layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grygalashvyly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This brief note introduces several analytical approaches to OH&ast; layer parameters. The number density and height of the OH&ast; layer peak are determined by the distributions of atomic oxygen and temperature, and by corresponding vertical gradients. The theory can be applied to satellite-borne and ground-based airglow measurements, as well as to model results.

  7. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Antagonizes Response to Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer by Suppressing BIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-A; Niederst, Matthew J; Lochmann, Timothy L; Hata, Aaron N; Kitai, Hidenori; Ham, Jungoh; Floros, Konstantinos V; Hicks, Mark A; Hu, Haichuan; Mulvey, Hillary E; Drier, Yotam; Heisey, Daniel A R; Hughes, Mark T; Patel, Neha U; Lockerman, Elizabeth L; Garcia, Angel; Gillepsie, Shawn; Archibald, Hannah L; Gomez-Caraballo, Maria; Nulton, Tara J; Windle, Brad E; Piotrowska, Zofia; Sahingur, Sinem E; Taylor, Shirley M; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Sequist, Lecia V; Bernstein, Bradley; Ebi, Hiromichi; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Faber, Anthony C

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers resistance to a number of targeted therapies and chemotherapies. However, it has been unclear why EMT promotes resistance, thereby impairing progress to overcome it. Experimental Design: We have developed several models of EMT-mediated resistance to EGFR inhibitors (EGFRi) in EGFR -mutant lung cancers to evaluate a novel mechanism of EMT-mediated resistance. Results: We observed that mesenchymal EGFR -mutant lung cancers are resistant to EGFRi-induced apoptosis via insufficient expression of BIM, preventing cell death despite potent suppression of oncogenic signaling following EGFRi treatment. Mechanistically, we observed that the EMT transcription factor ZEB1 inhibits BIM expression by binding directly to the BIM promoter and repressing transcription. Derepression of BIM expression by depletion of ZEB1 or treatment with the BH3 mimetic ABT-263 to enhance "free" cellular BIM levels both led to resensitization of mesenchymal EGFR -mutant cancers to EGFRi. This relationship between EMT and loss of BIM is not restricted to EGFR -mutant lung cancers, as it was also observed in KRAS -mutant lung cancers and large datasets, including different cancer subtypes. Conclusions: Altogether, these data reveal a novel mechanistic link between EMT and resistance to lung cancer targeted therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 197-208. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effect of chrysophanol, an active component of AST2017-01 on atopic dermatitis in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hee-Yun; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2018-01-01

    AST2017-01 mainly consists of Rumex crispus and -Cordyceps militaris and has been widely consumed as an herbal medicine or functional food in Korea. Here we investigated the influences of AST2017-01 and its active component, chrysophanol on human mast cell (HMC-1 cell) and human keratinocyte (HaCaT cell)-mediated inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with AST2017-01 or chrysophanol suppressed intracellular calcium levels and histamine release in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-treated HMC-1 cells. Levels of phosphorylated-mitogen-activated protein kinase increased by PMACI stimulation were reduced by AST2017-01 or chrysophanol pretreatment. Protein levels of IκB kinaseβ and receptor-interacting protein 2 in PMACI-treated HMC-1 cells were decreased by AST2017-01 or chrysophanol pretreatment. Pretreatment with AST2017-01 or chrysophanol significantly blocked PMACI-induced activation of caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB. In addition, pretreatment with AST2017-01 or chrysophanol significantly decreased the PMACI-induced levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on HMC-1 cells. In activated HaCaT cells, pretreatment with AST2017-01 or chrysophanol significantly reduced production of TSLP and activation of caspase-1. In conclusion, these findings indicate that chrysophanol is an active component of AST2017-01 and AST2017-01 acts as a novel potent anti-inflammatory herbal medicine or functional food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gonadal suppressive and cross-sex hormone therapy for gender dysphoria in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine P; Madison, Christina M; Milne, Nikki M

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with gender dysphoria experience distress associated with incongruence between their biologic sex and their identified gender. Gender dysphoric natal males receive treatment with antiandrogens and estrogens to become feminized (transsexual females), whereas natal females with gender dysphoria receive treatment with androgens to become masculinized (transsexual males). Because of the permanence associated with cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT), adolescents diagnosed with gender dysphoria receive gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to suppress puberty. High rates of depression and suicide are linked to social marginalization and barriers to care. Behavior, emotional problems, depressive symptoms, and global functioning improve in adolescents receiving puberty suppression therapy. Gender dysphoria, psychological symptoms, quality of life, and sexual function improve in adults who receive CSHT. Within the first 6 months of CSHT, changes in transsexual females include breast growth, decreased testicular volume, and decreased spontaneous erections, and changes in transsexual males include cessation of menses, breast atrophy, clitoral enlargement, and voice deepening. Both transsexual females and males experience changes in body fat redistribution, muscle mass, and hair growth. Desired effects from CSHT can take between 3 and 5 years; however, effects that occur during puberty, such as voice deepening and skeletal structure changes, cannot be reversed with CSHT. Decreased sexual desire is a greater concern in transsexual females than in transsexual males, with testosterone concentrations linked to sexual desire in both. Regarding CSHT safety, bone mineral density is preserved with adequate hormone supplementation, but long-term fracture risk has not been studied. The transition away from high-dose traditional regimens is tied to a lower risk of venous thromboembolism and cardiovascular disease, but data quality is poor. Breast cancer has been reported in

  11. Combination therapy of PKCζ and COX-2 inhibitors synergistically suppress melanoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Qin, Jiaqi; Li, Yuan; Li, Guoxia; Wang, Yinsong; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Peng; Li, Chunyu

    2017-09-02

    Metastatic malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies and its treatment remains challenging. Recent studies demonstrate that the melanoma metastasis has correlations with the heightened activations of protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling pathways. Targeted inhibitions for PKCζ and COX-2 have been considered as the promising strategies for the treatment of melanoma metastasis. Thus, the PKCζ inhibitor J-4 and COX-2 inhibitor Celecoxib were combined to treat melanoma metastasis in this study. The Transwell assay, Wound-healing assay and Adhesion assay were used to evaluate the inhibition of combined therapy of J-4 and Celecoxib on melanoma cells invasion, migration and adhesion in vitro, respectively. The impaired actin polymerization was observed by confocal microscope and inactivated signal pathways about PKCζ and COX-2 were confirmed by the Western blotting assay. The B16-F10/C57BL mouse melanoma model was used to test the inhibition of combined therapy of J-4 and Celecoxib on melanoma metastasis in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the combination of J-4 and Celecoxib exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on the migration, invasion and adhesion of melanoma B16-F10 and A375 cells with combination index less than 1. The actin polymerization and phosphorylation of Cofilin required in cell migration were severely impaired, which is due to the inactivation of PKCζ related signal pathways and the decrease of COX-2. The combined inhibition of PKCζ and COX-2 induced Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition (MET) in melanoma cells with the expression of E-Cadherin increasing and Vimentin decreasing. The secretion of MMP-2/MMP-9 also significantly decreased after the combination treatment. In C57BL/6 mice intravenously injected with B16-F10 cells (5 × 10 4 cells/mouse), co-treatment of J-4 and Celecoxib also severely suppressed melanoma lung metastasis. The body weight monitoring and HE staining results indicated the

  12. Switching from tenofovir and nucleoside analogue therapy to tenofovir monotherapy in virologically suppressed chronic hepatitis B patients with antiviral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Yun; Lee, Hye Won; Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Beom Kyung; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Park, Jun Yong

    2018-03-01

    It is unclear whether chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with antiviral resistance, who achieve a complete virologic response (CVR) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and nucleoside analogue (NUC) combination therapy, maintain CVR if switched to TDF monotherapy. We investigated the persistence of CVR after cessation of NUC in virologically suppressed antiviral resistant CHB patients using TDF+NUC combination therapy. This study recruited 76 antiviral-resistant CHB patients showing CVR on TDF+entecavir (ETV) (n = 52), TDF+lamivudine (LAM; n = 14), and TDF+telbivudine (LdT; n = 10) combination therapy, who were switched to TDF monotherapy as step-down therapy. At baseline, 47 patients were male and the median age was 53.0 years (range: 30-78 years); 72.3% cases were hepatitis B e antigen-positive (HBeAg+) and 23.7% were of liver cirrhosis. The median duration of TDF+NUC combination therapy was 20.8 months (range: 3-46 months). At a median follow-up of 24.7 months (range: 12-48 months) after switching to TDF monotherapy, all 76 patients maintained CVR, regardless of the duration of combination therapy and the type of prior NUC and antiviral resistance. Renal dysfunction was not observed during the treatment period. The step-down strategy of switching from TDF+NUC combination therapy to TDF monotherapy in virologically suppressed CHB patients with antiviral resistance should be considered. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Cognitive functions and mood during chronic thyrotropin-suppressive therapy with L-thyroxine in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, J; Kucharska, A; Rajewska-Rager, A; Lacka, K

    2012-09-01

    Subclinical thyroid dysfunctions may cause cognitive deficits and mood disorders. Chronic TSH-suppressive therapy with L-T(4) causing subclinical hyperthyroidism has been widely used in treatment of patients with thyroid differentiated carcinoma. The impact of this therapy on cognitive functions and mood have not been systematically studied. The aim of this study was to asses executive functions, working memory, attention, and depression in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism in the course of TSH-suppressive therapy. Thirty-one patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism in the course of suppressive treatment with L-T(4) following the total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablative therapy were included in the study. Cognitive functioning in patients and control group were investigated using the battery of neuropsychological tests [Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), The Oral Word Association Test (OWAT), Trail Making Test, The Stroop Color-Word Interference test and Digit span]. Psychometric evaluation was performed using 17-items the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The performance on tests assessed executive functions, psychomotor speed, and attention was significantly lower in patients group. There was no differences in results of Stroop test and Digit Span forward and backwards between both groups. The intensity of depressive symptoms negatively correlated with a number of completed categories on WCST and results of OWAT. Cognitive deficits were still observed when patients with concomitant general medical conditions and depression were excluded from the analysis. Our findings provide evidence of neuropsychological impairment in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with chronic TSH-suppressive therapy.

  15. Adjudicated morbidity and mortality outcomes by age among individuals with HIV infection on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Miller

    Full Text Available Non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease and non-AIDS defining cancers dominate causes of morbidity and mortality among persons with HIV on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy. Accurate estimates of disease incidence and of risk factors for these conditions are important in planning preventative efforts.With use of medical records, serious non-AIDS events, AIDS events, and causes of death were adjudicated using pre-specified criteria by an Endpoint Review Committee in two large international trials. Rates of serious non-AIDS which include cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease, decompensated liver disease, and non-AIDS cancer, and other serious (grade 4 adverse events were determined, overall and by age, over a median follow-up of 4.3 years for 3,570 participants with CD4+ cell count ≥300 cells/mm³ who were taking antiretroviral therapy and had an HIV RNA level ≤500 copies/mL. Cox models were used to examine the effect of age and other baseline factors on risk of a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, AIDS, or serious non-AIDS.Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of the composite outcome, overall and by age were 8.3% (overall, 3.6% (<40, 8.7% (40-49 and 16.1% (≥50, respectively (p<0.001. In addition to age, smoking and higher levels of interleukin-6 and D-dimer were significant predictors of the composite outcome. The composite outcome was dominated by serious non-AIDS events (overall 65% of 277 participants with a composite event. Most serious non-AIDS events were due to cardiovascular disease and non-AIDS cancers.To date, few large studies have carefully collected data on serious non-AIDS outcomes. Thus, reliable estimates of event rates are scarce. Data cited here, from a geographically diverse cohort, will be useful for planning studies of interventions aimed at reducing rates of serious non-AIDS events among people with HIV.

  16. Trends in Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Antiretroviral Therapy Prescription and Viral Suppression in the United States, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Linda; Bradley, Heather; Mattson, Christine L; Johnson, Christopher H; Hoots, Brooke; Shouse, Roy L

    2016-12-01

    To examine trends in racial/ethnic disparities in antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care, overall and among men who have sex with men (MSM), from 2009 to 2013. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected June 2009-May 2014 to estimate the prevalence of ART prescription and viral suppression among racial/ethnic groups overall and among MSM. We found significant increases in ART prescription and viral suppression among all racial/ethnic groups from 2009 to 2013, both overall and among MSM. By 2013, overall and among MSM, the Hispanic-white disparity in ART prescription was nonexistent, and the black-white disparity was not significant after accounting for differences between blacks and whites in age and length of HIV diagnosis. Despite reductions in racial/ethnic disparities in viral suppression over the time period, significant disparities remained among the total population, even after adjusting for differences in racial/ethnic group characteristics. Encouragingly, however, there was no significant Hispanic-white disparity in viral suppression among MSM by 2013. Despite significant improvements in ART prescription and viral suppression in recent years, racial and ethnic disparities persist, particularly for black persons. If the United States is to achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategy goal of reducing HIV-related health disparities, continued efforts to accelerate the rate of improvement in ART prescription and viral suppression among Hispanic and black persons may need to be prioritized.

  17. [The importance of AST / ALT rate in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamin, Júnior Idilio; de Mattos, Angelo Alves; Perin, Christiano; Ramos, Gabriel Zatti

    2002-01-01

    There is a histologic similarity between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease and in some cases differential diagnosis may be difficult, since some patients do not report abusive alcohol consumption. Evaluating the usefulness of setting the rate AST/ALT for the differential diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. Twenty nine obese patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis were compared with 28 patients with alcoholic liver disease. The diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was made after exclusion of other causes of liver disease and by histologic findings of, at least, macrovesicular steatosis and hepatocellular necrosis. In patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis the medium AST value was 52.3 +/- 21.2 U/L and ALT of 90.1 +/- 37.9 U/L, being the AST/ALT rate lower than 1 in all patients. In patients with alcoholic liver disease the medium AST value was 140 +/- 82.5 U/L and ALT was 50.6 +/- 40.3 U/L. The rate was higher than 1 in all cases and higher than 2 in 24 (85.7%), being statistically significant when compared with patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The AST/ALT rate seems to be useful in the differential diagnosis of liver diseases, while lower than 1 is highly suggestive of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  18. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy suppresses dental plaque formation in healthy adults: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose-Tsuno, Akiko; Aoki, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Kirikae, Teruo; Shimbo, Takuro; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Maruoka, Yutaka; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-12-15

    Oral care is important for oral and systemic health, especially for elderly institutionalized individuals and compromised patients. However, conventional mechanical plaque control is often difficult for these patients because of the pain or the risk of aspiration. Although antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), which is considered an alternative or adjunct to mechanical approaches, has potential application as a less stressful method of daily plaque control, no clinical application of this technique has been reported. We investigated the inhibitory effect of a combination of toluidine blue O (TBO), and a red light-emitting diode (LED) on dental plaque formation in healthy volunteers. The optimal concentration of TBO was determined in preliminary in vitro experiments to evaluate the bactericidal effect of aPDT on Streptococcus oralis and to clarify its safety in fibroblast cells. To survey the mechanism of TBO-mediated aPDT, the quality and quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during aPDT were also examined using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of aPDT on dental plaque formation was investigated in eleven subjects as a clinical pilot study. The right or left mandibular premolars were randomly assigned to the treatment (with aPDT) or control (without aPDT) groups. In total, aPDT was applied six times (twice per day) to the teeth in the test group over a period of four days. On the fourth day, the study concluded and the analyses were performed. A combination of 500 or 1000 μg/ml TBO and LED irradiation for 20 s significantly decreased the number of colony forming units of Streptococcus oralis. The cytotoxicity of aPDT was comparable to that of standard antiseptics used in the oral cavity. Hydroxyl radicals were detected by ESR analysis, but singlet oxygen was not. A randomized controlled trial demonstrated that aPDT with 1000 μg/ml TBO and red LED irradiation significantly suppressed dental plaque

  19. The Efficacy of Thyrotropin Suppression Therapy in Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer after Total Thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo-Touk Niveen A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess the effect of the TSH suppression on both disease-free and overall survivals in patients with nonmetastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC after total thyroidectomy.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy, immune suppression and renal impairment in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review recent literature on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and immune suppression as risk factors for renal impairment in HIV-positive persons, and to discuss pending research questions within this field.......The purpose of this article is to review recent literature on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and immune suppression as risk factors for renal impairment in HIV-positive persons, and to discuss pending research questions within this field....

  1. Biological aspects of the potential interaction between androgen suppression and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, Anthony L.

    1996-01-01

    It is a basic axiom of radiotherapy that the radiation dose required for tumor eradication increases with increasing tumor volume. These Patterns of Care Studies and prospective studies using rebiopsy have shown that this holds true for prostate cancer as well. Despite our best endeavors with conventional dose, there remains a substantial element of local failure following radiotherapy, and this is T-stage related. Unlikely many other solid tumors, a convenient method of volume reduction exists for prostate carcinoma. Approximately 90% demonstrate shrinkage following androgen suppression, an effect that is more pronounced at the primary site than metastatic sites. Transrectal ultrasound studies have shown a median of 40% prostatic tumor volume reduction after 3-4 months of androgen suppression. With more protracted androgen suppression the shrinkage progresses and a small minority of patients may actually have a complete response determined pathologically. Animal models demonstrate clearly that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors may be decreased by prior androgen depression. This effect is most pronounced if radiation is deferred until the time of maximal tumor regression. The advantage is lost if the tumor is allowed to regrow in an androgen independent fashion to its original volume. It is not clear whether this benefit of neoadjuvant androgen suppression results solely from volume shrinkage. The potential for synergy exists as both radiation and androgen suppression have an element of apoptosis as a common pathway of cell death. Although apoptosis is certainly the major cause of cell death from androgen suppression its' contribution to radiation cell kill in prostatic adenocarcinomas is yet to be evaluated. If the two effects are additive and not synergistic, then sequence should be unimportant. Animal models, however, demonstrate that the TCD 50 of androgen dependent tumors is not significantly reduced by adjuvant androgen suppression. Human data is still

  2. ELEVATED ALT AND AST IN AN ASYMPTOMATIC PERSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEW ST

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available -Abnormal liver function test with raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT and raised aspartate aminotransferase (AST are commonly seen in primary care setting. -Chronic alcohol consumption, drugs, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and chronic viral hepatitis are common causes associated with raised ALT and AST. -In chronic viral hepatitis, the elevation of liver enzyme may not correlate well with the degree of liver damage. -Non-hepatic causes of raised ALT and AST include polymyositis, acute muscles injury, acute myocardial infarction and hypothyroidism. -In the primary care setting, the doctor should obtain a complete history regarding the risk factors for viral hepatitis, substance abuse and request investigations accordingly. -Suspected chronic viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis are best referred to hepatologist for further management.

  3. The effects of levothyroxine replacement or suppressive therapy on health status, mood, and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Mary H; Kolobova, Irina; Smeraglio, Anne; Peters, Dawn; Janowsky, Jeri S; Schuff, Kathryn G

    2014-03-01

    TSH-suppressive doses of levothyroxine (L-T4) have adverse effects on bone and cardiac function, but it is unclear whether central nervous system function is also affected. The aim of the study was to determine whether women receiving TSH-suppressive L-T4 doses have decrements in health status, mood, or cognitive function. A cross-sectional comparison was made among three groups of women in an academic medical center research clinic. Twenty-four women receiving chronic TSH-suppressive L-T4 doses, 35 women receiving chronic replacement L-T4 doses, and 20 untreated control women participated in the study. Subjects underwent testing at a single outpatient visit. We measured health status (SF-36), mood (Profile of Mood States, Symptom Checklist 90-R, Affective Lability Scale), and cognitive function (declarative memory [Paragraph Recall], working memory [N-back, Subject Ordered Pointing], motor learning [Pursuit Rotor, Motor Sequence Learning Test], and executive function [Letter Cancellation Test, Trail Making Test, Iowa Gambling Test]). Women receiving TSH-suppressive or replacement L-T4 doses had decrements in health status and mood compared to healthy controls. These decrements were more pronounced in women receiving replacement, rather than suppressive, L-T4 doses. Memory and executive function were not affected in either treated group, compared to healthy controls. Women receiving TSH-suppressive doses of L-T4 do not have central nervous system dysfunction due to exogenous subclinical thyrotoxicosis, but TSH-suppressed and L-T4-replaced women have slight decrements in health status and mood that may be related to self-knowledge of the presence of a thyroid condition or other uncharacterized factors. These mood alterations do not impair cognitive function.

  4. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of AST-120 (Kremezin) in patients with moderate to severe CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Gerald; Agarwal, Rajiv; Acharya, Muralidhar; Berl, Tomas; Blumenthal, Samuel; Kopyt, Nelson

    2006-04-01

    AST-120 (Kremezin; Kureha Chemical Industry Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) is an orally administered adsorbent showing adsorption ability superior to activated charcoal for certain organic compounds known to be precursors of substances that accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and that are believed to accelerate the decline in kidney function. AST-120 is approved in Japan for prolonging time to hemodialysis therapy and improving uremic symptoms in patients with CKD. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study was designed to examine the nephroprotective effects of 3 doses of AST-120 versus placebo in adult patients with moderate to severe CKD and elevated serum indoxyl sulfate levels while following an adequate protein-intake diet. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 doses of AST-120 (0.9, 2.1, or 3.0 g) or placebo 3 times daily for 12 weeks. AST-120 decreased serum indoxyl sulfate levels in a dose-dependent fashion. During the 12-week treatment period, AST-120 did not affect serum creatinine levels or 24-hour urine creatinine appearance. Significant improvements in malaise were observed in a dose-dependent fashion. All doses of AST-120 were well tolerated and did not adversely affect the general health status of patients. Results suggest that the dose of 3 g 3 times daily is an optimal dose for the US population, and it may be useful in the treatment of patients with CKD. Because AST-120 did not directly affect serum creatinine levels or 24-hour urine creatinine appearance, the composite end point of doubling of serum creatinine level, transplantation, and dialysis therapy would be appropriate for a confirmatory phase III therapeutic outcome study.

  5. Underside corrosion of above ground storage tanks (ASTs) | Rim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Underside corrosion of a failed above ground storage tank (AST) was investigated by the physio-chemical analysis of water sample that was ingress between the tank bottom plate and the concrete foundation. The results of the water sample analysis showed pH (5.8), temperature (30°C), Conductivity (4800 μs/cm), ...

  6. Dopa therapy and action impulsivity: subthreshold error activation and suppression in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluchère, F.; Deveaux, M.; Burle, B.; Vidal, F.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Witjas, T.; Eusebio, A.; Azulay, J.-P.; Hasbroucq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Impulsive actions entail (1) capture of the motor system by an action impulse, which is an urge to act and (2) failed suppression of that impulse in order to prevent a response error. Several studies indicate that dopaminergic treatment can induce action impulsivity in patients diagnosed

  7. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on oesophageal acid exposure in GERD during acid suppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Kuipers, EJ; Ganesh, S; Sluiter, WJ; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Background: Helicobacter pylori exaggerates the effect of acid suppressive drugs on intragastric pH. It is unknown whether this is relevant for the treatment of GERD. Aim: To compare oesophageal acid exposure and symptoms in H. pylori-negative and H. pylori-positive GERD patients during low and

  8. An assessment of the clinical utility of serum ALT and AST in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson; Zeng; Rock; Yoshida

    2000-07-01

    Background: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is frequently used as the sole biochemical marker for chronic hepatitis C (CHC), however, its value may be normal in cases with active disease. Recently, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) has been suggested as a useful predictor of liver pathology and conflicting results were obtained by using AST/ALT ratio to predict cirrhosis. Aims: To evaluate clinical utility of serum ALT and AST in CHC. Methods: The charts of 133 patients with CHC, whose ALT and AST were simultaneously tested from 1994 to 1996, were reviewed. ALT and AST were analyzed for both the entire cohort of patients and subgroups stratified for histopathology, age, gender, alcohol consumption, and risk factors of transmission. In 53 patients, the AST/ALT ratio was evaluated during interferon treatment. Results: The elevation of ALT significantly correlated with that of AST (r=0.79). The AST/ALT ratio increased with liver histological progression. The ratio >/=1 was predominantly in cirrhotic patients. During treatment the ratio increased. The AST remained elevated in eight of the 33 patients in whom the ALT had returned to normal during and after treatment. Conclusions: Both ALT and AST are useful markers for CHC. However, the AST may elevate alone, suggesting that measuring AST may be useful when the ALT is consistently normal. The AST/ALT ratio varies in different patients but increases with histological progression of fibrosis. An AST/ALT ratio >/=1 is highly suggestive of the presence of cirrhosis.

  9. Higher Anti-CMV IgG Concentrations are Associated with Worse Neurocognitive Performance During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Scott; Bharti, Ajay; Perez-Valero, Ignacio; Hanson, Barbara; Franklin, Donald; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara; de Oliveira, Michelli Faria; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor; Landay, Alan L; Lurain, Nell

    2018-03-01

    To determine the association of CMV infection with neurocognitive performance in HIV+ adults. Cross-sectional, observational, exploratory study. Anti-CMV IgG concentrations in blood and CMV DNA copies in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured in stored specimens of 80 HIV+ adults who were previously assessed with a standardized, comprehensive neurocognitive test battery. Thirty-eight were taking suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART, HIV RNA ≤ 50 copies/mL) and 42 were not taking ART. A panel of 7 soluble biomarkers were also measured by immunoassay in CSF. Anti-CMV IgG concentrations ranged from 5.2 to 46.1 U/mL. CMV DNA was detected in 7 (8.8%) blood plasma but in none of the CSF specimens. Higher anti-CMV IgG levels were associated with older age (p=0.0017), lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count (pperformance overall (p=0.059). This correlation was present in those taking suppressive ART (p=0.0049) but not in those who were not taking ART (p=0.92). Worse neurocognitive performance remained associated with higher anti-CMV IgG levels after accounting for other covariates in multivariate models (Model p=0.0038). Detectable plasma CMV DNA was associated with AIDS (p=0.05) but not with neurocognitive performance. CMV may influence neurocognitive performance in HIV+ adults taking suppressive ART. Future clinical trials of anti-CMV therapy should help determine whether the observed relationships are causal.

  10. HIV-associated neurodevelopmental delay: prevalence, predictors and persistence in relation to antiretroviral therapy initiation and viral suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlau, R; Kuhn, L; Abrams, E J; Coovadia, A

    2016-11-01

    HIV infection in infancy may influence the developing brain, leading to adverse neurodevelopmental consequences. We aim to describe neurodevelopmental characteristics of a cohort of HIV-infected infants and young children prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and after achieving viral suppression. As part of the Neverest 2 trial, 195 HIV-infected children under 2 years of age were assessed using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) prior to ART initiation and at subsequent age-appropriate time points after ART had been started. The ASQ is a simple screening questionnaire used to identify children at risk of neurodevelopmental delays. Questionnaires completed by the parent/caregiver assess neurodevelopmental functioning in five domains: communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem solving and personal-social. Median age pre-ART was 8.8 months (range 2.2-24.9) and 53.9% were male. Mean time to viral suppression was 9.4 months (range 5.9-14.5). Compared with pre-ART better outcomes were reported at time of viral suppression with a lower proportion of children failing the gross motor (31.5% vs. 13%, p = 0.0002), fine motor (21.3% vs. 10.2%, p = 0.017), problem solving (26.9% vs. 9.3%, p = 0.0003) and personal-social (19.6% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.019) domains. However, there was no change in the communication domain (14.8% vs. 12.0%, p = 0.6072). Although achieving viral suppression on ART resulted in significant improvements in markers of neurodevelopmental function of young HIV-infected children, potential neurodevelopmental delays still persisted in a large proportion. Further interventions are needed to limit potential disabilities and maximize developmental outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, Mar?a Bego?a; R?o, Isabel; Jer?nimo, Adri?n; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodr?guez, Carmen; Castilla, Jes?s

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment. A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended...

  12. Acid-suppressing therapies and subsite-specific risk of stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerström, E Christina M; Simonsen, Jacob; Camargo, M Constanza; Rabkin, Charles S

    2017-04-25

    Associations of stomach cancer risk with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists (H 2 RA) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are controversial. We hypothesised that proximal extension of Helicobacter pylori infection from acid suppression would disproportionately increase cancers at proximal subsites. A total of 1 563 860 individuals in the Danish Prescription Drug Registry first prescribed acid-suppressive drugs 1995-2011 were matched to unexposed population-based controls. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by Cox proportional hazard regression for stomach cancers diagnosed more than one year after first prescription. There were 703 stomach cancers among H 2 RA-exposed individuals and 1347 among PPI-exposed. Restricted to individuals with five or more prescriptions, subsite-specific HRs for H 2 RA and PPI were 4.1 and 6.4 for proximal subsites vs 8.0 and 10.3 for distal subsites, respectively. Moderate exposures to acid-suppressive drugs did not favour proximal tumour localisation. Given confounding by indication, these findings do not resolve potential contribution to gastric carcinogenesis overall.

  13. Concomitant medication polypharmacy, interactions and imperfect adherence are common in Australian adults on suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siefried, Krista J; Mao, Limin; Cysique, Lucette A; Rule, John; Giles, Michelle L; Smith, Don E; McMahon, James E.; Read, Tim R; Ooi, Catriona; Tee, Ban K; Bloch, Mark; de Wit, John|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06883652X; Carr, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We quantified concomitant medication polypharmacy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions, adverse effects and adherence in Australian adults on effective antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. METHODS: Patients recruited into a nationwide cohort and assessed for

  14. Performance of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe AST-201 Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David K.; vanBezooijen, Roelof; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) was launched to create a full-sky map of the cosmic microwave background. MAP incorporates two modified Lockheed Martin AST-201 (Autonomous Star Tracker) star trackers. The AST-201 employs an eight element radiation hardened lens assembly which is used to focus an image on a charge coupled device (CCD). The CCD image is then processed by a star identification algorithm which outputs a three-axis attitude. A CCD-shift algorithm called Time Delayed Integration (TDI) was also included in each star tracker. In order to provide some radiation effect filtering during MAP's three to five phasing loop passes through the Van Allen radiation belts, a simple pixel filtering scheme was implemented, rather than using a more complex, but more robust windowing algorithm. The trackers also include a fiber optic data interface. This paper details the ground testing that was accomplished on the MAP trackers.

  15. The AST/ALT (De-Ritis) ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Rief, Peter; Pichler, Martin; Raggam, Reinhard; Hafner, Franz; Gerger, Armin; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Gary, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aspartat aminotransferase (AST)/alanin aminotransferase (ALT) (De-Ritis) ratio (AAR) is an easily applicable blood test. An elevated AAR on the one hand has been associated with an increase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD on the other hand is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and diabetes. As the AAR is also elevated in case of muscular damage, we investigated AAR and its association with critical limb ischemia (CLI) in...

  16. The majority of Danish nontoxic goitre patients are ineligible for Levothyroxine suppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    is contraindicated. Exclusion criteria included (1) Serum TSH menopausal status, or males older than 60 years, (3) Thyroid volume above 100 ml, (4) Intrathoracic goitre, (5) Clinical suspicion of malignancy, (6) Dominant thyroid cyst, (7) Nondiagnostic FNA, (8) Previous ineffective LT4-therapy......, (9) Elevated serum calcitonin, (10) Osteoporosis or cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Of patients 84% were ineligible for LT4-therapy. In diffuse goitre (n = 35) 63%, in uninodular goitre (n = 320) 77% and in multinodular goitre (n = 390) 91% were ineligible. Main ineligibility reasons were a low...... serum TSH, post-menopausal status, a large goitre or clinical suspicion of malignancy. CONCLUSION: The vast majority of consecutive Danish nontoxic goitre patients (84%) were ineligible for LT4-therapy. Due to low efficacy and potential long-term adverse effects on the skeleton and cardiovascular system...

  17. Does Prolonged Therapy with a Long-Acting Stimulant Suppress Growth in Children with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Lerner, Marc; Cooper, Kimberly M.; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether prolonged therapy with a long-acting stimulant affects growth in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: One hundred seventy-eight children ages 6 to 13 years received OROS methylphenidate (OROS MPH, CONCERTA) for at least 21 months. Height and weight were measured monthly during the…

  18. Functional analysis of the ASTE11 gene from the dimorphic yeast Arxula adeninivorans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Fiki, A.; El Metabteb, G.; Boer, E.; Kunze, G.

    2010-01-01

    Arxula adeninivorans is dimorphic yeast with unusual biochemical and physiological characteristic. It is thermo- and osmo- resistance and it can use a wide range of carbon sources for growth. One kinase of the HOG pathway, the MAPKKK is encoded by ASTE11 gene which was isolated from A. adeninivorans. The aste11 mutant was achieved by gene disruption procedure. The Sck1p gene encoding MAPKKK in S. cerevisiae can complement with aste11 mutation. Growth rate of G1211/pAL-ALEU2m, G1211/pAL-ALEU2m-ASTE11 (over-expression transformants) and IS1 [aleu2 aste11 ALEU2] (aste11 mutant), the ASTE11 expression level dose not correlates with salt resistance. However, the growth rate of G1211/pAL-ALEU2m, G1211/pAL-ALEU2m-ASTE11 (over-expression transformants) and IS1 [aleu2 aste11::ALEU2] (aste11 mutant) and the response to thermo stress were affected in the deleted mutant, the Aste11p influenced the thermo resistance of A. adeninivorans. The MAPKKK encoding by STE11 gene from various yeast species is involved in the mating process. The mutant strains and their transformants were lost the capacity to mate. Assessment of the ASTE11 promoter activity with lacZ reporter gene confirmed its inducibility by osmolaytes.

  19. Opiate-induced suppression of rat hypoglossal motoneuron activity and its reversal by ampakine therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Lorier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglossal (XII motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of mu-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s. We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity.A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717 alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons.The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract mu-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron activity and resultant impairment of airway patency.

  20. Oropharyngeal flora in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit: clinical factors and acid suppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandah, Wesam; Colmer-Hamood, Jane; Mojazi Amiri, Hoda; Raj, Rishi; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-05-01

    Acid suppression therapy in critically ill patients significantly reduces the incidence of stress ulceration and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; however, recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase the risk of pneumonia. We wanted to test the hypothesis that acid suppressive therapy promotes alteration in the bacterial flora in the GI tract and leads to colonization of the upper airway tract with pathogenic species, potentially forming the biological basis for the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in these patients. This was a prospective observational study on patients (adults 18 years or older) admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at a tertiary care centre. Exclusion criteria included all patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia at admission, with infection in the upper airway, or with a history of significant dysphagia. Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained on day 1 and days 3 or 4 of admission. We collected data on demographics, clinical information, and severity of the underlying disease using APACHE II scores. There were 110 patients enrolled in the study. The mean age was 49±16 years, 50 were women, and the mean APACHE II score was 9.8 ± 6.5. Twenty per cent of the patients had used a PPI in the month preceding admission. The first oropharyngeal specimen was available in 110 cases; a second specimen at 72-96 h was available in 68 cases. Seventy-five per cent of the patients admitted to the MICU had abnormal flora. In multivariate logistic regression, diabetes mellitus and PPI use were associated with abnormal oral flora on admission. Chronic renal failure and a higher body mass index reduced the frequency of abnormal oral flora on admission. Most critically ill patients admitted to our MICU have abnormal oral flora. Patients with diabetes and a history of recent PPI use are more likely to have abnormal oral flora on admission.

  1. Enteral Nutrition and Acid-Suppressive Therapy in the PICU: Impact on the Risk of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ben D; Zurakowski, David; Bechard, Lori J; Priebe, Gregory P; Duggan, Christopher P; Heyland, Daren K; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2016-10-01

    Enteral nutrition has been implicated as a risk factor for ventilator-associated pneumonia. We explored the prevalence of ventilator-associated pneumonia and its association with clinical and nutrition-related therapies in mechanically ventilated children. Prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Fifty-nine PICU in 15 countries. Children less than 18 years old, mechanically ventilated for more than 48 hours. None. Multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Data are presented as median (interquartile range) or counts (%). We enrolled 1,245 subjects (45% women; 42% surgical), age 20 months (4-84 mo), and duration of mechanical ventilation 7 days (3-13 d). Culture-positive ventilator-associated pneumonia was diagnosed in 80 patients (6.4%); duration of mechanical ventilation for this subgroup was 17 days (8-39 d). Enteral nutrition was delivered in 985 patients (79%), initiated within 48 hours in 592 patients (60%), and via postpyloric route in 354 patients (36%). Acid-suppressive agents were used in 763 patients (61%). The duration of enteral nutrition (p = 0.21), route (gastric vs postpyloric) of delivery (p = 0.94), severity of illness (p = 0.17), and diagnostic category on admission (p = 0.31) were not associated with ventilator-associated pneumonia. After adjusting for enteral nutrition days, illness severity, and site, ventilator-associated pneumonia was significantly associated with mechanical ventilation more than 10 days (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.2-6.5; p associated pneumonia was diagnosed in 6.5% of mechanically ventilated children in a heterogeneous multicenter cohort. We did not find a link between enteral nutrition duration or route of delivery and ventilator-associated pneumonia. In addition to duration of mechanical ventilation and length of PICU stay, the use of acid-suppressive therapy independently increased the likelihood of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia in this population

  2. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combination Therapy with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor and a Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Additively Suppresses Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michishige Terasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4is, in addition to their antihyperglycemic roles, have antiatherosclerotic effects. We reported that sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is suppress atherosclerosis in a glucose-dependent manner in diabetic mice. Here, we investigated the effects of combination therapy with SGLT2i and DPP-4i on atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. SGLT2i (ipragliflozin, 1.0 mg/kg/day and DPP-4i (alogliptin, 8.0 mg/kg/day, either alone or in combination, were administered to db/db mice or streptozotocin-induced diabetic apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe−/− mice. Ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies improved glucose intolerance; however, combination therapy did not show further improvement. The foam cell formation of peritoneal macrophages was suppressed by both the ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies and was further enhanced by combination therapy. Although foam cell formation was closely associated with HbA1c levels in all groups, DPP-4i alone or the combination group showed further suppression of foam cell formation compared with the control or SGLT2i group at corresponding HbA1c levels. Both ipragliflozin and alogliptin monotherapies decreased scavenger receptors and increased cholesterol efflux regulatory genes in peritoneal macrophages, and combination therapy showed additive changes. In diabetic Apoe−/− mice, combination therapy showed the greatest suppression of plaque volume in the aortic root. In conclusion, combination therapy with SGLT2i and DPP4i synergistically suppresses macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in diabetic mice.

  4. [Percutaneous ethanol injection in combination with euthyrox suppressive therapy in the treatment of benign nodular goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhi, I A; Sikharulidze, E N; Natmeladze, K V

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to clarify the efficacy of combination of thyroid hormone (euthyrox) therapy and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in benign nodular thyroid diseases. 55 patients with benign nodular goiter after the first PEI session during the whole study period (from 3 till 12 months after PEI) daily received euthyrox in a dosage - 50 mkg. 48 women and 7 men with thyroid nodules of the various sizes, structures and echogenecity have been included in the study group. The control group consisted of 32 patients: 29 women and 3 men in the same age range as in the study group. In both groups PEI procedure was performed but in the control group no thyroid hormone was added. In patients who were receiving 50 mkg daily after 3 months of PEI progressive reduction of the nodule sizes was registered, the volume of a thyroid gland has decreased and approached to normal parameters (15,79+/-1,21 ml), and in 6-2 months the normal volume of the thyroid gland was registered. Thus, combination of thyroid hormone therapy and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in treatment of patients with benign nodular goiter normalizes the size of a thyroid gland. Euthyrox is the additional factor causing reduction of thyroid nodules and constraining occurrence of new nodules in a thyroid gland.

  5. The influence of magnesium on the activity of some enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP) and lead content in some tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Tatjana; Vujanovic, Dragana

    2002-12-01

    Many authors in different studies have reported the antagonism between Mg and Pb. Our previous results suggested that oral Mg treatment have better effect on investigation biochemical parameters (protoporphyrins, aminolevulinic acid--ALA and d-aminolevulinic dehydratase ALA-D) used in evaluating Pb intoxication, then CaNa2EDTA, chelation agents, currently used in therapy of Pb intoxication. The toxic effect of Pb induced considerably modifies the activity of many other enzymes. In this work we have examined the influence of Mg (as alternative therapy of Pb poisoning) on enzymes activity--biochemical markers for general health conditions--aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in condition of lead intoxication. Many studies showed disturbances of activity ALT, AST and ALP. The aim of this study was to confirm positive effects of Mg intake in condition of such intoxication at the level on activity of investigated enzymes. The experiment was performed on 45 male Wister rats, divided in three groups. I--control group; II--group treated daily for 30 days with 100 mg Pb, per kg body weight and next 60 without Pb treatment (spontaneous detoxication); III group--the same treatment as II group for the first 30 days, but next 60 days rats were treated orally with 40 mg Mg/kg body weight. Activity of AST and ALT was significant increased in condition of Pb poisoning, but ALP activity was significant reduced. Influence of excessive oral Mg treatment was positive: decrease of AST activity and ALT activity, which was probably in correlation with significant elimination of Pb from liver and increase of ALT enzyme activity at the normal level.

  6. Coupling of AST-500 heating reactors with desalination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourachenkov, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The general issues regarding NHR and desalination facility joint operation for potable water production are briefly considered. AST-500 reactor plant and DOU GTPA-type evaporating desalination facilities, both relying on proven technology and solid experience of construction and operation, are taken as a basis for the design of a large-output nuclear desalination complex. Its main design characteristics are given. Similarity of NHR operation for a heating grid and a desalination facility in respect of reactor plant operating conditions and power regulation principles is pointed out. The issues of nuclear desalination complexes composition are discussed briefly as well. (author)

  7. Sexual Activity Without Condoms and Risk of HIV Transmission in Serodifferent Couples When the HIV-Positive Partner Is Using Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodger, Alison J.; Cambiano, Valentina; Bruun, Tina; Vernazza, Pietro; Collins, Simon; van Lunzen, Jan; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Estrada, Vicente; Geretti, Anna Maria; Beloukas, Apostolos; Asboe, David; Viciana, Pompeyo; Gutiérrez, Félix; Clotet, Bonaventura; Pradier, Christian; Gerstoft, Jan; Weber, Rainer; Westling, Katarina; Wandeler, Gilles; Prins, Jan M.; Rieger, Armin; Stoeckle, Marcel; Kümmerle, Tim; Bini, Teresa; Ammassari, Adriana; Gilson, Richard; Krznaric, Ivanka; Ristola, Matti; Zangerle, Robert; Handberg, Pia; Antela, Antonio; Allan, Sris; Phillips, Andrew N.; Lundgren, Jens; Pompeyo, V.; Trastoy, M.; Palacio, R.; Gutiérrez, F.; Masiá, M.; Padilla, S.; Robledano, C.; Clotet, B.; Coll, P.; Peña, J.; Estrada, V.; Rodrigo, M.; Santiago, E.; Rivero, A.; Antela, A.; Losada, E.; Lires, C.; Aguilera, A.; Gatell, J.; Guerrero, J.; Dronda, F.; Soriano, V.; Asboe, D.; Nwokolo, N.; Sewell, J.; Gilson, R.; Esteban, N.; McNamara, S.; Rodger, A.; Sturgeon, K.; Gompels, M.; Jennings, L.; Allan, S.; Leen, C.; Morris, S.; Brady, M.; Campbell, L.; Fisher, M.; Dhar, J.; O'Connell, R.; White, D.; Fox, J.; Fidler, S.; Stanley, P.; Natarajan, U.; Ghanem, M.; Ainsworth, J.; Waters, A.; Wilkins, E.; Minton, J.; Calderwood, J.; Patel, H.; Lascar, M.; Lunzen, J.; Kümmerle, T.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Rund, E.; Lehmann, C.; Krznaric, I.; Ingiliz, P.; Motsch, J.; Baumgarten, A.; Bogner, J.; Brockmeyer, N.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Jessen, H.; Rockstroh, J.; Stoeckle, M.; Battegay, M.; Weber, R.; Grube, C.; Braun, D.; Günthard, H.; Wandeler, G.; Furrer, H.; Konrad, T.; Rauch, A.; Vernazza, P.; Rasi, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Tarr, P.; Gerstoft, J.; Quist, T.; Handberg, P.; Clausen, B.; Mathiesen, L.; Oestergaard, Skejby; Stenvang, S.; Ristola, M.; Kivelä, P.; Westling, K.; Frisén, E.; Blaxhult, A.; Cortney, G.; Clumeck, N.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Prins, J.; Brinkman, K.; Verhagen, D.; Eeden, A.; Pradier, C.; Durant, J.; Serini, M.; Bréaud, S.; Raffi, F.; Pialoux, G.; Ohayon, M.; Coquelin, V.; Rieger, A.; Touzeau-Roemer, V.; Zangerle, R.; Kitchen, M.; Gisinger, M.; Sarcletti, M.; Geit, M.; Bini, T.; Comi, L.; Pandolfo, A.; Suardi, E.; Ammassari, A.; Pierro, P.; Carli, G.; Orchi, N.; Celesia, M.; Mussini, C.; Biagio, A.; Janerio, N.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE A key factor in assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as a prevention strategy is the absolute risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex with suppressed HIV-1 RNA viral load for both anal and vaginal sex. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the rate of

  8. During Stably Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy Integrated HIV-1 DNA Load in Peripheral Blood is Associated with the Frequency of CD8 Cells Expressing HLA-DR/DP/DQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ruggiero

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The observed positive association between integrated HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+DR/DP/DQ+ cells indicates that a close correlation between HIV persistence and immune activation continues during consistently suppressive therapy. The inducers of the distinct activation profile warrant further investigation.

  9. Mathematical Models of Androgen Resistance in Prostate Cancer Patients under Intermittent Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Baez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the timing of a castrate resistant prostate cancer is critical to lowering medical costs and improving the quality of life of advanced prostate cancer patients. We formulate, compare and analyze two mathematical models that aim to forecast future levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA. We accomplish these tasks by employing clinical data of locally advanced prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. While these models are simplifications of a previously published model, they fit data with similar accuracy and improve forecasting results. Both models describe the progression of androgen resistance. Although Model 1 is simpler than the more realistic Model 2, it can fit clinical data to a greater precision. However, we found that Model 2 can forecast future PSA levels more accurately. These findings suggest that including more realistic mechanisms of androgen dynamics in a two population model may help androgen resistance timing prediction.

  10. Laboratory tests in patients treated with isotretinoin: occurrence of liver and muscle abnormalities and failure of AST and ALT to predict liver abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Guy F; Webster, Timothy G; Grimes, Lorraine R

    2017-05-15

    Current laboratory monitoring may not be optimal. A retrospective chart review was performed on thelaboratory results of 246 patients who were treated with isotretinoin for acne over a 9-year period. Tests obtained were CBC, lipid panel, AST, ALT, CK, GGT,and C-reactive protein. Thirty-five patients had an elevated AST and 35 of these had an elevated CK; 32 had an elevated ALT and 11 of these had an elevated CK. Thirteen patients had an elevated GGT; in 5 this was the only abnormality, whereas 8 had a GGT elevation accompanied by an elevated AST or ALT. Two had an elevated GGT and an elevated CK with normal AST and ALT. Fifty-two patients had a single episode of elevated CK, of which 22 were female. However, 57 had multiple CK elevations and only one was female. Thirty-five patients had CK elevations <2 times normal; 38 had levels between 2 and 3 times normal, 18 had levels between 3 and 4 times normal, and 18 had levels greater than 4 times normal. We suggest that ALT and AST are not useful for monitoring isotretinoin therapy and that GGT and CK may be of greater value in managing patients.

  11. Interferon-Beta Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Patients Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells for Immune Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Trinschek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by imbalanced immune regulatory networks, and MS patient-derived T effector cells are inefficiently suppressed through regulatory T cells (Treg, a phenomenon known as Treg resistance. In the current study we investigated T cell function in MS patients before and after interferon-beta therapy. We compared cytokine profile, responsiveness for Treg-mediated suppression ex vivo and evaluated reactivity of T cells in vivo using a humanized mouse model. We found that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of therapy-naive MS patients were resistant to Treg-mediated suppression. Treg resistance is associated with an augmented IL-6 production, enhanced IL-6 receptor expression, and increased PKB/c-Akt phosphorylation. These parameters as well as responsiveness of T cells to Treg-mediated suppression were restored after interferon-beta therapy of MS patients. Following transfer into immunodeficient mice, MS T cells induced a lethal graft versus host disease (GvHD and in contrast to T cells of healthy volunteers, this aggressive T cell response could not be controlled by Treg, but was abolished by anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies. However, magnitude and lethality of GvHD induced by MS T cells was significantly decreased after interferon-beta therapy and the reaction was prevented by Treg activation in vivo. Our data reveals that interferon-beta therapy improves the immunoregulation of autoaggressive T effector cells in MS patients by changing the IL-6 signal transduction pathway, thus restoring their sensitivity to Treg-mediated suppression.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  13. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. - Highlights: • Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells. • Oroxin B significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice.

  14. Liquid L-thyroxine versus tablet L-thyroxine in patients on L- thyroxine replacement or suppressive therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Irakoze; Tang, Siying; Astère, Manirakiza; Wang, Kan Ran; Deng, Shuhua; Xiao, Ling; Li, Qi Fu

    2018-03-23

    To compare the effectiveness of liquid L-T4 (L-thyroxine) and tablet L-T4 in patients on L-T4 replacement or suppressive therapy. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched to identify relevant articles. All prospective or randomized controlled studies (RCTs) comparing liquid L-T4 and tablet L-T4 in patients on L-T4 replacement or suppressive therapy were included in the analysis. Overall, the initial search of the four databases identified 1278 published studies; of these, eight studies were ultimately included in the meta-analysis. TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) levels were significantly suppressed in patients on liquid L-T4 compared with those on tablet L-T4, in patients on L-T4 suppressive therapy with L-T4 malabsorption (Mean Difference (MD) = -2.26, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): -3.59, -0.93; P = 0.0009)). However, liquid L-T4 and tablet L-T4 did not show a statistically significant difference in patients on L-T4 suppressive therapy without malabsorption (MD = 0.08, 95% CI: -0.31, 0.47; P = 0.69). TSH levels were significantly normalized in patients on liquid L-T4 compared with those on tablet L-T4, in Patients on L-T4 replacement therapy with L-T4 malabsorption (MD = -3.20, 95% CI: -5.08, -1.32; P = 0.0009). However, liquid L-T4 and tablet L-T4 did not show a statistically significant difference in patients on L-T4 replacement therapy without malabsorption (MD = 0.91, 95% CI: -0.03, 1.86; P = 0.06). Liquid L-T4 is more efficient than tablet L-T4 in patients on L-T4 replacement or suppressive therapy with malabsorption. No significant differences were observed in patients without malabsorption. Further studies should be conducted to verify these findings.

  15. Long-term side-effects of intermittent androgen suppression therapy in prostate cancer: results of a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Segal, Roanne; Dahrouge, Simone; Crook, Juanita

    2005-09-01

    To assess the feasibility and tolerability of intermittent androgen suppression therapy (IAS) in prostate cancer. Patients with recurrent or metastic prostate cancer received cyclical periods of treatment with leuprolide acetate and nilutamide for 8 months, and rest periods. Cycles were repeated at progression until the treatment failed to achieve normal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Patients were followed with PSA level, testosterone level, haemoglobin level, weight and bone mineral density evaluations. The median time to treatment failure, recovery from anaemia, or normalization of testosterone level was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. In all, 95 patients received 245 cycles; the median duration of rest periods was 8 months and median time to treatment failure 47 months. Testosterone recovery during rest periods was documented in 117 (61%) of cycles. Anaemia was mild and reported in 33%, 44% and 67% of cycles 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Sexual function recovered during the rest periods in 47% of cycles. There was no significant overall change in body mass index at the end of the treatment period. Osteoporosis was documented in at least one site evaluated in 41 patients (37%). IAS has the potential to reduce side-effects, including recovery of haemoglobin level, return of sexual function and absence of weight gain at the end of the study period.

  16. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, Shoshana Y; Jenkins, Richard A; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer-assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single-headed households, percent

  17. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Y Kahana

    Full Text Available The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States.The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer-assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1 being on antiretroviral therapy (ART currently; (2 being on ART for at least 6 months; (3 missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments over the past 12 months; and (4 viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability.Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%; ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%; at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50; and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%. After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single-headed households, percent

  18. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  19. Evolution of HIV-1 tropism at quasispecies level after 5 years of combination antiretroviral therapy in patients always suppressed or experiencing episodes of virological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozera, Gabriella; Abbate, Isabella; Giombini, Emanuela; Castagna, Antonella; De Luca, Andrea; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Cozzi Lepri, Alessandro; Cassola, Giovanni; Torti, Carlo; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria R

    2014-11-01

    Tropism evolution of HIV-1 quasispecies was analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) in patients on first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) always suppressed or experiencing virological failure episodes. Among ICONA patients, two groups of 20 patients on cART for ≥5 years, matched for baseline viraemia and therapy duration, were analysed [Group I, patients always suppressed; and Group II, patients experiencing episode(s) of virological failure]. Viral tropism was assessed by V3 UDPS on plasma RNA before therapy (T0) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proviral DNA before-after therapy (T0-T1), using geno2pheno false positive rate (FPR) (threshold for X4: 5.75). For each sample, quasispecies tropism was assigned according to X4 variant frequency: R5, tropism switch is not an 'on-off' phenomenon, but may result from a profound re-shaping of viral quasispecies, even under suppressive cART. However, episodes of virological failure seem to prevent reduction of proviral DNA and to accelerate viral evolution, as suggested by decreased FPR and increased %X4 at T1 in Group II patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Pattern of AST and ALT changes in Relation to Hemolysis in sickle cell Disease

    OpenAIRE

    K. Nsiah; V.P. Dzogbefia; D. Ansong; A. Osei Akoto; H. Boateng; D. Ocloo

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated aminotransferase levels are commonly associated with compromised hepatic integrity from various insults. In sickle cell disease, aspartate transaminase (AST) is also released via intravascular hemolysis. This study was done to determine the pattern of changes in AST and alanine transaminase (ALT), in particular the AST:ALT ratio, and to relate these to the hemolytic state, which we consider to be more important than hepatic and cardiac dysfunction in some individuals with ...

  1. Elevated Alt and Ast in an Asymptomatic Person: What the primary care doctor should do?

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Loh Keng; Tong, Kew Siang

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal liver function test with raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and raised aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are commonly seen in primary care setting.Chronic alcohol consumption, drugs, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and chronic viral hepatitis are common causes associated with raised ALT and AST.In chronic viral hepatitis, the elevation of liver enzyme may not correlate well with the degree of liver damage.Non-hepatic causes of raised ALT and AST include polymyositis, acute mus...

  2. Can AST/ALT ratio indicate recovery after acute paracetamol poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Allison J; Vitkovitsky, Irena V; Jones, Daniel L; Mullins, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen or APAP) is the most common pharmaceutical exposure in the US. Elevations in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels indicate hepatic toxicity. AST and ALT levels rise in similar proportions but later decline at different rates, with AST falling more rapidly than ALT. To determine whether the AST/ALT ratio can indicate that a patient has passed the time of peak AST concentration. We retrospectively identified cases of patients hospitalized for acute APAP poisoning by querying the pharmacy database of all patients treated with acetylcysteine (NAC) from January 1, 2001 to March 19, 2013. We included all patients with severe APAP poisoning, defined as AST or ALT greater than 1000 IU/L. Patients who were given NAC for other indications, those without APAP poisoning, and those receiving liver transplantation were excluded. We then recorded paired AST and ALT concentrations from each patient's hospital course. We classified each pair as clearly post-peak or not, and calculated the AST/ALT ratio for each pair of values. We compared different thresholds of AST/ALT ratio in increments of 0.1 to find the optimal value that reliably indicated resolving transaminases. We identified 1820 patients who received NAC during the study period. Of these, 333 received NAC for suspected poisoning by APAP. After excluding patients without severe APAP poisoning, other diagnoses explaining transaminase elevations, and patients who underwent liver transplantation, we had 37 evaluable patients with 343 evaluable pairs of AST and ALT concentrations. An AST/ALT ratio less than or equal to 0.4 was 99% sensitive for identifying patients with resolving transaminases. An AST/ALT ratio less than or equal to 0.4 following severe hepatoxicity from paracetamol poisoning appears to be highly predictive of recovery in patients treated with NAC. This has potential to be an indicator of safe discontinuation of NAC treatment.

  3. Remission from Kaposi's sarcoma on HAART is associated with suppression of HIV replication and is independent of protease inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, V; Caumes, E; Gambotti, L; Ittah, H; Morini, J-P; Deleuze, J; Gorin, I; Katlama, C; Bricaire, F; Dupin, N

    2006-04-10

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces the incidence and improves the prognosis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). This study was designed to identify factors associated with KS clinical responses in HIV-infected patients during HAART. We reviewed the files of 138 HIV-1-infected patients with KS. Epidemiologic and HIV-related clinical and biological parameters were recorded at KS diagnosis (baseline) and every 6 months thereafter. In a subset of 73 antiretroviral-naive patients, we compared the clinical outcome of KS according to the use or nonuse of protease inhibitors (PI). After 6 months of follow-up, KS remission was more frequent in patients who were naive of HAART and who were at ACTG stage S0 at baseline (P = 0.03 and 0.02). Undetectable HIV viral load was strongly associated with KS remission (Ptime points), while CD4 cell count was not. Among the 73 antiretroviral-naive patients at baseline, and who were studied for 24 months, KS outcome did not differ between patients who were prescribed PI-containing and PI-sparing regimens. Intercurrent multicentric Castleman's disease was associated with poor outcome after 60 months of follow-up (P< or = 0.0001). Fourteen deaths occurred after a median follow-up of 37.5 months, eight of which were KS related. Suppression of HIV replication appears to be crucial to control KS. Non-PI-based regimens were equivalent to PI-based regimens as regards the clinical and virological outcome of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients with KS.

  4. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Neil B; Sidhu, Manpreet K; Baby, Rekha; Moss, Rebecca A; Nissenblatt, Michael J; Chen, Ting; Lu, Shou-En; Jabbour, Salma K

    2016-04-01

    To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehensive suppression of all apoptosis-induced proliferation pathways as a proposed approach to colorectal cancer prevention and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bordonaro

    Full Text Available Mutations in the WNT/beta-catenin pathway are present in the majority of all sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs, and histone deacetylase inhibitors induce apoptosis in CRC cells with such mutations. This apoptosis is counteracted by (1 the signaling heterogeneity of CRC cell populations, and (2 the survival pathways induced by mitogens secreted from apoptotic cells. The phenomena of signaling heterogeneity and apoptosis-induced survival constitute the immediate mechanisms of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors, and probably other chemotherapeutic agents. We explored the strategy of augmenting CRC cell death by inhibiting all survival pathways induced by the pro-apoptotic agent LBH589, a histone deacetylase inhibitor: AKT, JAK/STAT, and ERK signaling. The apoptosis-enhancing ability of a cocktail of synthetic inhibitors of proliferation was compared to the effects of the natural product propolis. We utilized colorectal adenoma, drug-sensitive and drug-resistant colorectal carcinoma cells to evaluate the apoptotic potential of the combination treatments. The results suggest that an effective approach to CRC combination therapy is to combine apoptosis-inducing drugs (e.g., histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as LBH589 with agents that suppress all compensatory survival pathways induced during apoptosis (such as the cocktail of inhibitors of apoptosis-associated proliferation. The same paradigm can be applied to a CRC prevention approach, as the apoptotic effect of butyrate, a diet-derived histone deacetylase inhibitor, is augmented by other dietary agents that modulate survival pathways (e.g., propolis and coffee extract. Thus, dietary supplements composed by fermentable fiber, propolis, and coffee extract may effectively counteract neoplastic growth in the colon.

  6. Activation of HIV transcription with short-course vorinostat in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Julian H; Wightman, Fiona; Solomon, Ajantha; Ghneim, Khader; Ahlers, Jeffrey; Cameron, Mark J; Smith, Miranda Z; Spelman, Tim; McMahon, James; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Brown, Gregor; Roney, Janine; Watson, Jo; Prince, Miles H; Hoy, Jennifer F; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Rémi; Procopio, Francesco A; Zeidan, Joumana; Palmer, Sarah; Odevall, Lina; Johnstone, Ricky W; Martin, Ben P; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Deeks, Steven G; Hazuda, Daria J; Cameron, Paul U; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lewin, Sharon R

    2014-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065). Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90%) with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1). CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065.

  7. Activation of HIV Transcription with Short-Course Vorinostat in HIV-Infected Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Ajantha; Ghneim, Khader; Ahlers, Jeffrey; Cameron, Mark J.; Smith, Miranda Z.; Spelman, Tim; McMahon, James; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Brown, Gregor; Roney, Janine; Watson, Jo; Prince, Miles H.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Rémi; Procopio, Francesco A.; Zeidan, Joumana; Palmer, Sarah; Odevall, Lina; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Martin, Ben P.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Deeks, Steven G.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Cameron, Paul U.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065). Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90%) with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1). CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065 PMID:25393648

  8. Activation of HIV transcription with short-course vorinostat in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian H Elliott

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065. Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90% with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1. CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065.

  9. Use of a Risk-Stratification Tool in Identification of Potential Adrenal Suppression Preceding Steroid Injection Therapy in Chronic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Aneesh Paul; Nguyen, Vu Huy; Hamill-Ruth, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Patients who present for steroid injections are not routinely screened for potential hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression from previous steroid exposure. Patients often receive various steroid therapies that are not reported by the patient or recorded in available medical records. Yet, HPA axis suppression has been reported with a single intra-articular injection. An IRB-approved quality improvement questionnaire was implemented to comprehensively screen patients for risk of HPA axis suppression secondary to prior and/or concurrent corticosteroid use. This questionnaire was given to adult patients seen in a University Pain Management Clinic, who were being considered for a steroid injection, to define the extent of exposure to corticosteroids either by mouth, topically, inhaled, or systemic/local injection within the past 6 months. Two hundred patients completed the questionnaire. Eighty-nine patients (44.5%) screened positive for significant steroid exposure with a screen score of three or above. The average score for the screen positive group was 6.31 ± 3.47 (range 3-22). Women were 1.9 times more likely to screen positive than men (53.4% vs 27.5%, P steroids from many sources and may be at risk for HPA axis suppression. Further testing is necessary to determine if these patients indeed have biochemical evidence of adrenal suppression. Utilization of a screening questionnaire might help identify patients who should be considered for HPA axis testing prior to steroid injections. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pattern of AST and ALT changes in Relation to Hemolysis in sickle cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nsiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Elevated aminotransferase levels are commonly associated with compromised hepatic integrity from various insults. In sickle cell disease, aspartate transaminase (AST is also released via intravascular hemolysis. This study was done to determine the pattern of changes in AST and alanine transaminase (ALT, in particular the AST:ALT ratio, and to relate these to the hemolytic state, which we consider to be more important than hepatic and cardiac dysfunction in some individuals with sickle cell disease. Methods Serum aminotransferase levels were measured in 330 subjects with sickle cell disease, as well as hemoglobin, reticulocytes, and lactate dehydrogenase. The AST:ALT ratio was designated as a hemolytic marker, and simple and multivariate regression analyses were carried out between this ratio and other hemolytic markers. Results Mean AST and ALT levels were 48.24 % 27.78 and 26.48 % 22.73 U/L, respectively. However, for 49 subjects without sickle cell disease, mean AST and ALT levels were the same, ie, 23.0 U/L. In the subjects with sickle cell disease, the increases in AST levels were far higher than for ALT, supporting its release via intravascular hemolysis. In 95.8% of the subjects with sickle cell disease, the AST:ALT ratio was > 1, but our results did not suggest overt malfunctioning of the liver and heart in the majority of subjects. Conclusion Regression analyses support the use of the AST:ALT ratio as a hemolytic marker, because it has an inverse association with the hemoglobin level. Whether in steady state or in crisis, provided hepatic and cardiac integrity has not been compromised, subjects with sickle cell disease would have higher AST levels due to the hemolytic nature of the condition. This is the first report highlighting the AST:ALT ratio in sickle cell disease.

  11. CD41 T cell recovery during suppression of HIV replication: an international comparison of the immunological efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in North America, Asia and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Elvin H; Neilands, Torsten B; Thièbaut, Rodolphe; Bwana, Mwebesa Bosco; Nash, Denis; Moore, Richard D; Wood, Robin; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Althoff, Keri N; Lim, Poh Lian; Nachega, Jean B; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Kambugu, Andrew; Little, Francesca; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Nakanjako, Damalie; Kiggundu, Valerian; Ki Li, Patrick Chung; Bangsberg, David R; Fox, Matthew P; Prozesky, HansW; Hunt, Peter W; Davies, Mary-Ann; Reynolds, Steven J; Egger, Matthias; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Vittinghoff, Eric V; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N

    2015-02-01

    Even among HIV-infected patients who fully suppress plasma HIV RNA replication on antiretroviral therapy, genetic (e.g. CCL3L1 copy number), viral (e.g. tropism) and environmental (e.g. chronic exposure to microbial antigens) factors influence CD4 recovery. These factors differ markedly around the world and therefore the expected CD4 recovery during HIV RNA suppression may differ globally. We evaluated HIV-infected adults from North America, West Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa and Asia starting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitorbased regimens containing efavirenz or nevirapine, who achieved at least one HIV RNA level Africa showed diminished CD4 recovery as compared with other regions. Three years after antiretroviral therapy initiation, the mean CD4 count for a prototypical patient with a pre-therapy CD4 count of 150/ml was 529/ml [95% confidence interval (CI): 517–541] in North America, 494/ml (95% CI: 429–559) in West Africa, 515/ml (95% CI: 508–522) in Southern Africa, 503/ml (95% CI: 478–528) in Asia and 437/ml (95% CI: 425–449) in East Africa. CD4 recovery during HIV RNA suppression is diminished in East Africa as compared with other regions of the world, and observed differences are large enough to potentially influence clinical outcomes. Epidemiological analyses on a global scale can identify macroscopic effects unobservable at the clinical, national or individual regional level.

  12. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses may cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  15. The Genetic Architecture of Liver Enzyme Levels: GGT, ALT and AST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, J.H.D.A.; de Moor, M.H.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Lubke, G.H.; Vink, J.M.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    High levels of liver enzymes GGT, ALT and AST are predictive of disease and all-cause mortality and can reflect liver injury, fatty liver and/or oxidative stress. Variation in GGT, ALT and AST levels is heritable. Moderation of the heritability of these liver enzymes by age and sex has not often

  16. Progressive liver functional impairment is associated with an increase in AST/ALT ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, E; Botta, F; Fasoli, A; Ceppa, P; Risso, D; Lantieri, P B; Celle, G; Testa, R

    1999-06-01

    The ratio of serum aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT ratio) has been proposed as a noninvasive method of assessing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Our aims were to confirm the usefulness of the AST/ALT ratio in diagnosing cirrhosis noninvasively as well as to verify the existence of a relationship between the ratio and liver functional impairment. In all, 348 patients (177 with chronic hepatitis, 171 with cirrhosis) were retrospectively evaluated and the AST/ALT ratio was related to monoethyl glycine xylidide (MEGX) formation. Moreover, in a subgroup of 54 patients we analyzed the relationships among the AST/ALT ratio and indocyanine green clearance and half-life. The AST/ALT ratio was able to separate patients with mild fibrosis from those with severe fibrosis and cirrhosis. The AST/ALT ratio, MEGX, prothrombin activity, and platelet count were selected by multivariate analysis as variables associated with cirrhosis. The AST/ALT ratio showed significant correlations both with MEGX formation and with indocyanine green clearance and half-life. The alterations of indocyanine green kinetics, which depend upon liver blood flow and uptake, were likely due to progressive fibrosis. These findings might partially explain the increase in the AST/ALT ratio as disease progresses.

  17. The genetic architecture of liver enzyme levels: GGT, ALT and AST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J.H.D.H. van; Moor, M.H.M. de; Geus, E.J.C. de; Lubke, G.H.; Vink, J.M.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    %High levels of liver enzymes GGT, ALT and AST are predictive of disease and all-cause mortality and can reflect liver injury, fatty liver and/or oxidative stress. Variation in GGT, ALT and AST levels is heritable. Moderation of the heritability of these liver enzymes by age and sex has not often

  18. The effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on the cognitive function of elderly patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Soyeon; Seo, Jiyeong; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Kim, Ki Woong; Jang, Hak Chul

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have evidenced the association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, the effect of long-term TSH suppressive therapy on the cognitive function in elderly patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the effect of long-term TSH suppression on the cognitive function of elderly patients with DTC. A cross-sectional case-control study including 50 DTC patients aged 65 years or older (mean age 70.9 ± 5.0 y) who have received a TSH-suppressive therapy for at least 5 years and 90 control subjects matched for age, sex, education period, and depressive mood was conducted. Major Outcome Measure: Comprehensive cognitive domains were compared between the patient and control groups. The association between serum thyroid hormone concentration and cognitive function was investigated. The patient group had higher serum free T4 levels and suppressed TSH levels compared with the control group. Age, sex, education period, the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale scores, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale scores were not different between the 2 groups. All assessed neuropsychiatric tests were comparable in both groups. In the patient group, those with higher serum free T4 levels performed better on Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Test A. The association between serum free T4 and Trail Making Test A was maintained after adjusting for age, education period, the Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. In the control group, serum free T4 and TSH levels were not associated with any of the assessed cognitive domains. Our results demonstrated the safety of long-term TSH suppression on the cognitive function in elderly DTC patients. Furthermore, the positive correlations between serum free T4 levels and some cognitive domains suggest the potential beneficial effects of exogenous levothyroxine on the

  19. Increased AST/ALT ratio in azotaemic dogs infected with Babesia canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygner, W; Gójska-Zygner, O; Norbury, L J; Wedrychowicz, H

    2012-01-01

    The AST/ALT ratio was estimated in 182 dogs infected with Babesia canis. Among these dogs 65 had anaemia and 68 were azotaemic. Student's t test was used to compare means of the AST/ALT ratio in anaemic and non-anaemic dogs, and in azotaemic and non-azotaemic dogs (p < 0.05). The differences in AST/ALT ratio between anaemic (1.52 +/- 1.15) and non-anaemic (1.76 +/- 1.34) dogs were statistically insignificant (p = 0.23), however, the comparison of AST/ALT ratio between azotaemic (2.68 +/- 1.52) and non-azotaemic (1.08 +/- 0.53) dogs revealed a significantly higher value of this index in azotaemic dogs (p = 0.00). The present results suggest that kidney injury contributed to increased AST activity in these dogs.

  20. AzTEC on ASTE Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, K.; Tamura, Y.; Hatsukade, B.; Nakanishi, K.; Iono, D.; Takata, T.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Perera, T.; Austermann, J. E.; Scott, K. S.; Hughes, H.; Aretxaga, I.; Tanaka, K.; Oshima, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Matsuo, H.; Ezawa, H.; Kawabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have conducted an unprecedented survey of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) using the 144 pixel bolometer camera AzTEC mounted on the ASTE 10-m dish in Chile. We have already obtained many (>20) wide (typically 12' × 12' or wider) and deep (1 σ sensitivity of 0.5-1.0 mJy) 1.1 mm continuum images of known blank fields and over-density regions/protoclusters across a wide range of redshifts with a spatial resolution of ˜ 30''. It has resulted in the numerous (˜ a few 100, almost equivalent to the total number of the previously known SMGs) new and secure detections of SMGs. In this paper, we present initial results of two selected fields, SSA 22 and AKARI Deep Field South (ADF-S). A significnat clustering of bright SMGs toward the density peak of LAEs is found in SSA 22. We derived the differential and cumulative number counts from the detected sources in ADF-S, which probe the faintest flux densities (down to ˜1 mJy) among 1-mm blank field surveys to date.

  1. Persistence of Activated and Adaptive-Like NK Cells in HIV+ Individuals despite 2 Years of Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Hearps

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune dysfunction persists in HIV+ individuals despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. We recently demonstrated that an adaptive-like CD56dim NK cell population lacking the signal transducing protein FcRγ is expanded in HIV+ individuals. Here, we analyzed a cohort of HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM, n = 20 at baseline and following 6, 12, and 24 months of cART and compared them with uninfected MSM (n = 15 to investigate the impact of cART on NK cell dysfunction. Proportions of NK cells expressing markers of early (CD69+ and late (HLA-DR+/CD38+ activation were elevated in cART-naïve HIV+ MSM (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively, as were FcRγ− NK cells (p = 0.003. Using latent growth curve modeling, we show that cART did not reduce levels of FcRγ− NK cells (p = 0.115 or activated HLA-DR+/CD38+ NK cells (p = 0.129 but did reduce T cell and monocyte activation (p < 0.001 for all. Proportions of FcRγ− NK cells were not associated with NK cell, T cell, or monocyte activation, suggesting different factors drive CD56dim FcRγ− NK cell expansion and immune activation in HIV+ individuals. While proportions of activated CD69+ NK cells declined significantly on cART (p = 0.003, the rate was significantly slower than the decline of T cell and monocyte activation, indicating a reduced potency of cART against NK cell activation. Our findings indicate that 2 years of suppressive cART have no impact on CD56dim FcRγ− NK cell expansion and that NK cell activation persists after normalization of other immune parameters. This may have implications for the development of malignancies and co-morbidities in HIV+ individuals on cART.

  2. Measurements of free and total PSA, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS), and CYFRA 21-1 in prostate cancer patients under intermittent androgen suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theyer, G; Dürer, A; Theyer, U; Haberl, I; Ulsperger, E; Baumgartner, G; Hamilton, G

    1999-10-01

    The present study evaluated monthly measurements of free and total prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and the tumor proliferation markers tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in patients with advanced prostate cancer receiving intermittent androgen suppression therapy (IAS). Thirty-four men received alternating cycles of 8 month androgen suppression and treatment cessation (mean duration, 10.3 months) until PSA increased to >20 microg/l. Measurements of testosterone, percentage of free PSA, TPS, and CYFRA 21-1 were performed using ELISA and RIA assays. Periods of androgen suppression resulted in reversible reductions of testosterone (from 6 +/- 0.8 to IAS cycle. TPS showed a decrease of 50% after 3 months, and CYFRA 21-1 a 25% decrease after 7 months of androgen suppression treatment. During treatment cessation, TPS exceeded the normal cutoff value of 90 U/l late in tumor regrowth (9-11 months), whereas CYFRA 21-1 remained below the normal cutoff value of 3.3 ng/ml. PSA is the best and most sensitive marker of prostate cancer regression and regrowth during IAS cycles of the markers tested in this study. Free PSA constitutes approximately 15% of total PSA (range, 5-32%), and its percentage showed no significant change during IAS cycles. The TPS and CYFRA 21-1 proliferation marker changes in IAS seem to be related mainly to effects on normal androgen-dependent tissues. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Outcomes following detection of low level plasma HIV RNA in HIV-infected patients previously virologically suppressed on antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Annabelle M; Cheng, Allen C; Watson, Kerrie; Lewin, Sharon R; Hoy, Jennifer F

    2017-06-01

    Progressively sensitive assays for plasma HIV RNA have led to increased detection of plasma HIV RNA between 20 and 200 copies/ml, known as low level viremia (LLV) when recurrent or persistent, in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The aim of this study was to determine outcomes following initial detection of LLV in an Australian cohort. A retrospective study using the HIV Service Database (Alfred Hospital) included all patients on ART who recorded plasma HIV RNA 20-200 copies/mL following prior virological suppression (viral load (VL) HIV RNA 200 copies/mL. Factors associated with LLV included co-morbid type 2 diabetes, shorter prior virological suppression and lower nadir CD4 cell count. Clinician management of VL 20-200 copies/mL was generally conservative, with infrequent requests for genotypic analysis (3.3% cases) or change in ART (<1% cases). LLV following virological suppression is common, and occurred as an isolated viral blip in half the patients. Those patients with persistent or recurrent LLV had higher rates of type 2 diabetes, shorter prior virological suppression and lower nadir CD4 cell count.

  4. The AST/ALT (De-Ritis) ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Peter; Pichler, Martin; Raggam, Reinhard; Hafner, Franz; Gerger, Armin; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Gary, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aspartat aminotransferase (AST)/alanin aminotransferase (ALT) (De-Ritis) ratio (AAR) is an easily applicable blood test. An elevated AAR on the one hand has been associated with an increase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD on the other hand is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and diabetes. As the AAR is also elevated in case of muscular damage, we investigated AAR and its association with critical limb ischemia (CLI) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) patients. In our cross-sectional study, we included 1782 PAOD patients treated at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Patients with chronic alcohol consumption (>20 g/day) were excluded. AAR was calculated and the cohort was categorized into tertiles according to the AAR. An optimal cut-off value for the continuous AAR was calculated by applying a receiver operating curve analysis to discriminate between CLI and non-CLI. In our cohort, occurrence of CLI significantly increased with an elevation in AAR. As an optimal cut-off value, an AAR of 1.67 (sensitivity 34.1%, specificity 81.0%) was identified. Two groups were categorized, 1st group containing 1385 patients (AAR  1.67). CLI was more frequent in AAR > 1.67 patients (166 [41.9%]) compared to AAR  1.67 was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–2.3) for CLI even after adjustment for other well-established vascular risk factors. An increased AAR is significantly associated with patients at high risk for CLI and other cardiovascular endpoints. The AAR is a broadly available and cheap marker, which might be useful to highlight patients at high risk for vascular endpoints. PMID:27310963

  5. Macro-AST: misleading finding in an adolescent with MCAD-deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Anibh M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MCAD-deficiency is the most common inborn error of fatty acid oxidation now included in many newborn screening programms using MS/MS. During prolonged catabolic episodes, patients may suffer from metabolic decompensation with dysfunction of liver, skeletal- and heart muscle as well as brain. In anabolism, neither clinical symptoms nor biochemical signs of organ dysfunction occur. Case presentation We report a female patient with MCAD-deficiency in whom at the age of 11 years isolated AST-elevation was found without any clinical or biochemical signs of organ dysfunction. We showed by polyethylene glycol precipitation that macro-AST formation was responsible for this biochemical finding. AST was probably complexed with immunoglobulins possibly related to an allergic disposition. Macro-AST formation is not a special feature of MCAD-deficiency but rather a non-specific, coincidental finding which also occurs in healthy individuals. The general practitioner consulted by the patient before coming to our outpatient clinic for inborn errors of metabolism was worried that isolated AST-elevation indicated cell damage in MCAD-deficiency. He ordered further diagnostic tests like ultrasound, ECG and echocardiography without any pathology. Conclusion In isolated AST-elevation, macro-AST has to be considered in order to avoid unnecessary, costly and invasive evaluation. This is not only true for healthy persons but for patients with chronic diseases like MCAD as well.

  6. Effect of HSV-2 Suppressive Therapy on Genital Tract HIV-1 RNA Shedding among Women on HAART: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Nijhawan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The role of suppressive HSV therapy in women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is unclear. Methods. 60 women with HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection on HAART with plasma HIV-1 viral load (PVL ≤75 copies/mL were randomized to receive acyclovir (N=30 or no acyclovir (N=30. PVL, genital tract (GT HIV-1, and GT HSV were measured every 4 weeks for one year. Results. Detection of GT HIV-1 was not significantly different in the two arms (OR 1.23, P=0.67, although this pilot study was underpowered to detect this difference. When PVL was undetectable, the odds of detecting GT HIV were 0.4 times smaller in the acyclovir arm than in the control arm, though this was not statistically significant (P=0.07. The odds of detecting GT HSV DNA in women receiving acyclovir were significantly lower than in women in the control group, OR 0.38, P<0.05. Conclusions. Chronic suppressive therapy with acyclovir in HIV-1/HSV-2-positive women on HAART significantly reduces asymptomatic GT HSV shedding, though not GT HIV shedding or PVL. PVL was strongly associated with GT HIV shedding, reinforcing the importance of HAART in decreasing HIV sexual transmission.

  7. The Genetic Architecture of Liver Enzyme Levels: GGT, ALT and AST

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Jenny H. D. A.; de Moor, Marleen H. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Lubke, Gitta H.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2013-01-01

    High levels of liver enzymes GGT, ALT and AST are predictive of disease and all-cause mortality and can reflect liver injury, fatty liver and/or oxidative stress. Variation in GGT, ALT and AST levels is heritable. Moderation of the heritability of these liver enzymes by age and sex has not often been explored, and it is not clear to what extent non-additive genetic and shared environmental factors may play a role. To examine the genetic architecture of GGT, ALT and AST, plasma levels were ass...

  8. Trends and Disparities in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Virologic Suppression Among Newly Treatment-Eligible HIV-Infected Individuals in North America, 2001–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Crane, Heidi M.; Collier, Ann C.; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Gill, M. John; Klein, Marina B.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Gange, Stephen J.; Benson, A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Platt, Aaron; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2013-01-01

    Background. Since the mid-1990s, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have improved in potency, tolerability, ease of use, and class diversity. We sought to examine trends in treatment initiation and resulting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virologic suppression in North America between 2001 and 2009, and demographic and geographic disparities in these outcomes. Methods. We analyzed data on HIV-infected individuals newly clinically eligible for ART (ie, first reported CD4+ count <350 cells/µL or AIDS-defining illness, based on treatment guidelines during the study period) from 17 North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design cohorts. Outcomes included timely ART initiation (within 6 months of eligibility) and virologic suppression (≤500 copies/mL, within 1 year). We examined time trends and considered differences by geographic location, age, sex, transmission risk, race/ethnicity, CD4+ count, and viral load, and documented psychosocial barriers to ART initiation, including non–injection drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and mental illness. Results. Among 10 692 HIV-infected individuals, the cumulative incidence of 6-month ART initiation increased from 51% in 2001 to 72% in 2009 (Ptrend < .001). The cumulative incidence of 1-year virologic suppression increased from 55% to 81%, and among ART initiators, from 84% to 93% (both Ptrend < .001). A greater number of psychosocial barriers were associated with decreased ART initiation, but not virologic suppression once ART was initiated. We found significant heterogeneity by state or province of residence (P < .001). Conclusions. In the last decade, timely ART initiation and virologic suppression have greatly improved in North America concurrent with the development of better-tolerated and more potent regimens, but significant barriers to treatment uptake remain, both at the individual level and systemwide. PMID:23315317

  9. The effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on the gonadal steroid hormones of patients with thyroid carcinoma after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ying; Liang, Nan; Hong, Yang; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Sun, Hui

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the effect of long-term thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on the gonadal hormones and related symptoms in patients after surgery. From 2008 to 2011, totally 238 patients were recruited, who underwent thyroid surgery and subsequent TSH suppression treatment in Department of thyroid Surgery, China-Japan Union hospital, Jilin University. Then their postoperative follow-up data (3-8 years) were collected, including operational method, pathological diagnosis, whether processed radioiodine therapy and the period/dose of TSH suppression treatment. In addition, the menstrual cycle, menstruation quantity, whether accompanied with dysmenorrheal and menstrual disorder or not, date of last menstrual period, ages of menopause and so on were also collected. (I) Neither the level nor the duration of TSH treatment had any function on estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) in male patients; (II) in the subgroup of patients with TSH treatment for 3-5 years, patients who took high dose of TSH (TSH ≥0.5 U/L) obtained the lower T level compared with the group of medium dose (1.08±0.34 vs. 1.36±0.46 nmol/L, P=0.001); (III) in the medium dose (0.1 IU/L ≤ TSH hormone (FSH) did not show any change in terms of the dose and the duration of TSH treatment; (V) the menstrual volume, dysmenorrhea condition, menstrual cycle and menopause related indicators did not show any difference in terms of doses and duration of TSH treatment (P=0.701, 0.412 and 0.507 respectively). The long term of TSH repressive therapy after surgery did not affect T and E2 level in male patients. As for female patients, the impact was mainly reflected in the T and E2 levels especially in female sexual maturity but not FSH level. In addition, TSH treatment did not play any role on menstruation or menopause.

  10. ROSETTA-ORBITER LUTETIA RPCIES 2 AST2 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains EDITED RAW DATA of the RPCIES instrument taken during the asteroid Lutetia encounter (AST2). Included are the data taken between 10 Jul 2010...

  11. ROSETTA-ORBITER STEINS RPCIES 2 AST1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains EDITED RAW DATA of the RPCIES instrument taken during the asteroid Steins encounter (AST1). Included are the data taken between 11 Jul 2008 and...

  12. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) Detection Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xing-Jiu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Im, Hyung-Soon; Yarimaga, Oktay; Yoon, Euisik; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2006-01-01

    The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) in serum can help people diagnose body tissues especially the heart and the liver are injured or not. This article provides a comprehensive review of research activities that concentrate on AST/GOT and ALT/GPT detection techniques due to their clinical importance. The detection techniques include colorimetric, spectrophotometric, chemiluminescence, chromatography, fluorescence and UV absorbance, radioche...

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus Suppressive Therapy in Herpes Simplex Virus-2/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Coinfected Women Is Associated With Reduced Systemic CXCL10 But Not Genital Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Chang, Joanne T; Thomas, Katherine K; Adams, Devin; Celum, Connie; Sanchez, Jorge; Coombs, Robert W; McElrath, M Juliana; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) may heighten immune activation and increase human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication, resulting in greater infectivity and faster HIV-1 disease progression. An 18-week randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial of 500 mg valacyclovir twice daily in 20 antiretroviral-naive women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 was conducted and HSV-2 suppression was found to significantly reduce both HSV-2 and HIV-1 viral loads both systemically and the endocervical compartment. To determine the effect of HSV-2 suppression on systemic and genital mucosal inflammation, plasma specimens, and endocervical swabs were collected weekly from volunteers in the trial and cryopreserved. Plasma was assessed for concentrations of 31 cytokines and chemokines; endocervical fluid was eluted from swabs and assayed for 14 cytokines and chemokines. Valacyclovir significantly reduced plasma CXCL10 but did not significantly alter other cytokine concentrations in either compartment. These data suggest genital tract inflammation in women persists despite HSV-2 suppression, supporting the lack of effect on transmission seen in large scale efficacy trials. Alternative therapies are needed to reduce persistent mucosal inflammation that may enhance transmission of HSV-2 and HIV-1.

  14. Suppression Effect of Astaxanthin on Osteoclast Formation In Vitro and Bone Loss In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ho Hwang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is characterized by a reduction of the bone mineral density (BMD and microarchitectural deterioration of the bone, which lead to bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Astaxanthin (AST has a variety of biological activities, such as a protective effect against asthma or neuroinflammation, antioxidant effect, and decrease of the osteoclast number in the right mandibles in the periodontitis model. Although treatment with AST is known to have an effect on inflammation, no studies on the effect of AST exposure on bone loss have been performed. Thus, in the present study, we examined the antiosteoporotic effect of AST on bone mass in ovariectomized (OVX mice and its possible mechanism of action. The administration of AST (5, 10 mg/kg for 6 weeks suppressed the enhancement of serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP activity. The bone mineral density (BMD and bone microarchitecture of the trabecular bone in the tibia and femur were recovered by AST exposure. Moreover, in the in vitro experiment, we demonstrated that AST inhibits osteoclast formation through the expression of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT c1, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP, TRAP, and cathepsin K without any cytotoxic effects on bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs. Therefore, we suggest that AST may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  15. Association of Implementation of a Universal Testing and Treatment Intervention With HIV Diagnosis, Receipt of Antiretroviral Therapy, and Viral Suppression in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Maya; Balzer, Laura; Kwarsiima, Dalsone; Sang, Norton; Chamie, Gabriel; Ayieko, James; Kabami, Jane; Owaraganise, Asiphas; Liegler, Teri; Mwangwa, Florence; Kadede, Kevin; Jain, Vivek; Plenty, Albert; Brown, Lillian; Lavoy, Geoff; Schwab, Joshua; Black, Douglas; van der Laan, Mark; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Clark, Tamara D; Charlebois, Edwin; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane

    2017-06-06

    increase of 35.5 percentage points (95% CI, 34.4-36.6). After 2 years, 95.9% of HIV-positive individuals had been previously diagnosed (95% CI, 95.3%-96.5%; 6780 of 7068 residents); 93.4% of those previously diagnosed had received ART (95% CI, 92.8%-94.0%; 6334 of 6780 residents); and 89.5% of those treated had achieved HIV viral suppression (95% CI, 88.6%-90.3%; 5666 of 6334 residents). Among individuals with HIV in rural Kenya and Uganda, implementation of community-based testing and treatment was associated with an increased proportion of HIV-positive adults who achieved viral suppression, along with increased HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy. In these communities, the UNAIDS population-level viral suppression target was exceeded within 2 years after program implementation. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01864683.

  16. Attenuation of circadian variation by combined antianginal therapy with suppression of morning and evening increases in transient myocardial ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, K

    1991-01-01

    three 6-hour periods (p less than 0.01); a lesser peak was noted in the evening. The effects of metoprolol and combined therapy with metoprolol and nifedipine on the circadian variation of ischemic activity were studied in two subgroups of patients in a random, double-blind study design (31 patients...... receiving metoprolol and 42 receiving combined therapy). During therapy with metoprolol the morning increase in ischemic activity was attenuated, and the highest frequency of ischemia was then noted in the evening (6 AM to 12 noon compared with 6 PM to 12 midnight; p less than 0.05). Combined therapy...... abolished the morning peak as did metoprolol monotherapy, but even the evening increase in ischemic activity was attenuated (p less than 0.05). The diurnal distribution of the mean heart rate at the onset of ischemia, when patients were off therapy, showed a morning increase similar to the increase...

  17. A simple self-reported adherence tool as a predictor of viral rebound in people with viral suppression on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J L; Gardner, E M; Esser, S; Mannheimer, S B; Lifson, A R; Telzak, E E; Phillips, A N

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological outcomes in the multinational Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study. Eligible participants were from the continuous ART arm and had at least one viral load (VL) ≤ 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL and a subsequent VL value (VL pair). Self-reported adherence was measured at each visit using a five-point Likert scale which employed a 7-day recall. High adherence was defined as taking 'all pills every day' (level 1) for every regimen component; all others had suboptimal adherence (levels 2 - 5). In individuals with VL suppression (≤ 50 copies/mL), the association between adherence (at the time of VL suppression) and VL rebound (> 200 copies/mL at next visit) was assessed using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. A total of 10 761 sets of VL pairs from 1986 participants were included in the study. For 1220 (11%) VL pairs, adherence was suboptimal. For 507 VL pairs (5%), VL rebound occurred. The risk of rebound generally increased as adherence decreased: 4.2% for level 1, 7.7% for level 2, 16.3% for level 3, 9.4% for level 4 and 12.9% for level 5. In multivariable analysis, suboptimal adherence at the time of suppression was associated with a 50% increased odds of experiencing subsequent VL rebound [odds ratio (OR) 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.92; P = 0.0023], compared with high adherence. Self-reported suboptimal adherence in people with VL suppression is associated with an increased risk of VL rebound. Our findings highlight the importance of continued adherence counselling, even in people with VL suppression, and to ensure that people with HIV infection maintain excellent adherence in order to minimize the risk of VL rebound. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  18. High AST/ALT ratio may indicate advanced alcoholic liver disease rather than heavy drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyblom, H; Berggren, U; Balldin, J; Olsson, R

    2004-01-01

    To assess the place of AST/ALT ratio (the ratio of serum aspartate aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase) as a diagnostic marker in medical populations. Laboratory tests were viewed retrospectively in three groups of patients: 313 patients with alcohol dependence, consecutively admitted to an alcohol and drug treatment unit for treatment of withdrawal (W) symptoms, 78 patients with alcohol abuse or dependence consecutively admitted to surgical or medical wards with various primary somatic (S) diagnoses (e.g. respiratory, gastrointestinal and metabolic), and 48 consecutive patients with alcohol abuse or dependence admitted to surgical or medical wards for treatment of alcohol-related liver cirrhosis and its complications (C). Comparison between groups was made of the pattern of patients' AST/ALT ratios using, for Groups S and C, laboratory data from patients' first admission for their condition. There was a significant rise in the AST/ALT ratio from the W to the S patients, and from the S to the C patients. In the W group, the ratio was or = 2. In the C group, 69% had a ratio > or = 2, and 8% a ratio < or = 1.0. The mean ratio was midway in the S group. In the C group, there was a progressive decline in aspartate (AST/ALT) ratios after admission. Most patients with high alcohol consumption but without severe liver disease do not have an AST/ALT ratio above 1. High AST/ALT ratio suggests advanced alcoholic liver disease.

  19. AST/ASTS workshop on increasing organ donation in the United States: creating an "arc of change" from removing disincentives to testing incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, D R; Langnas, A N; Reed, A I; Bloom, R D; Magee, J C; Gaston, R S

    2015-05-01

    The American Society of Transplantation (AST) and American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) convened a workshop on June 2-3, 2014, to explore increasing both living and deceased organ donation in the United States. Recent articles in the lay press on illegal organ sales and transplant tourism highlight the impact of the current black market in kidneys that accompanies the growing global organ shortage. We believe it important not to conflate the illegal market for organs, which we reject in the strongest possible terms, with the potential in the United States for concerted action to remove all remaining financial disincentives for donors and critically consider testing the impact and acceptability of incentives to increase organ availability in the United States. However, we do not support any trials of direct payments or valuable considerations to donors or families based on a process of market-assigned values of organs. This White Paper represents a summary by the authors of the deliberations of the Incentives Workshop Group and has been approved by both AST and ASTS Boards. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Optimizing prevention of HIV mother to child transmission: Duration of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression at delivery among pregnant Malawian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagomerana, Maganizo B; Miller, William C; Tang, Jennifer H; Hoffman, Irving F; Mthiko, Bryan C; Phulusa, Jacob; John, Mathias; Jumbe, Allan; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2018-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy minimizes the risk of vertical HIV transmission. Some women present late in their pregnancy for first antenatal visit; whether these women achieve viral suppression by delivery and how suppression varies with time on ART is unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected pregnant women initiating antiretroviral therapy for the first time at Bwaila Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi from June 2015 to November 2016. Multivariable Poisson models with robust variance estimators were used to estimate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the association between duration of ART and both viral load (VL) ≥1000 copies/ml and VL ≥40 copies/ml at delivery. Of the 252 women who had viral load testing at delivery, 40 (16%) and 78 (31%) had VL ≥1000 copies/ml and VL ≥40 copies/ml, respectively. The proportion of women with poor adherence to ART was higher among women who were on ART for ≤12 weeks (9/50 = 18.0%) than among those who were on ART for 13-35 weeks (18/194 = 9.3%). Compared to women who were on ART for ≤12 weeks, women who were on ART for 13-20 weeks (RR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.36-0.74) or 21-35 weeks (RR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.14-0.48) had a lower risk of VL ≥40 copies/ml at delivery. Similar comparisons for VL ≥1000 copies/ml at delivery showed decrease in risk although not significant for those on ART 13-20 weeks. Longer duration of ART during pregnancy was associated with suppressed viral load at delivery. Early ANC attendance in pregnancy to facilitate prompt ART initiation for HIV-positive women is essential in the effort to eliminate HIV vertical transmission.

  1. ROS-induced nanotherapeutic approach for ovarian cancer treatment based on the combinatorial effect of photodynamic therapy and DJ-1 gene suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Canan; Taratula, Olena; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Palmer, Amy L; Cronk, Lauren M; Jones, Carson V; Escalante, Cesar A; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-11-01

    This study represents a novel approach for intraoperative ovarian cancer treatment based on the combinatorial effect of a targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) associated with suppression of the DJ-1 protein, one of the key players in the ROS defense of cancer cells. To assess the potential of the developed therapy, dendrimer-based nanoplatforms for cancer-targeted delivery of near-infrared photosensitizer, phthalocyanine, and DJ-1 siRNA have been constructed. In vitro studies revealed that therapeutic efficacy of the combinatorial approach was enhanced when compared to PDT alone and this enhancement was more pronounced in ovarian carcinoma cells, which are characterized by higher basal levels of DJ-1 protein. Moreover, the ovarian cancer tumors exposed to a single dose of combinatorial therapy were completely eradicated from the mice and the treated animals showed no evidence of cancer recurrence. Thus, the developed therapeutic approach can be potentially employed intraoperatively to eradicate unresactable cancer cells. The complete clearance of microscopic residual tumor cells during excision surgery is important to improve survival of the patient. In this interesting paper, the authors developed a novel approach using targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT), combining a photosensitizer, phthalocyanine, and DJ-1 siRNA for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The data showed that this approach increased cancer cell killing and may pave way for future clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved acylated ghrelin suppression at 2 years in obese patients with type 2 diabetes: effects of bariatric surgery vs standard medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, S K; Samat, A; Wolski, K; Abood, B; Pothier, C E; Bhatt, D L; Nissen, S; Brethauer, S A; Schauer, P R; Kirwan, J P; Kashyap, S R

    2014-03-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) produces more durable glycemic control than sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or intensive medical therapy (IMT). However, the contribution of acylated ghrelin (AG), a gluco-regulatory/appetite hormone, to improve glucose metabolism and body composition in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) following RYGB is unknown. STAMPEDE (Surgical Treatment and Medication Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently) was a prospective, randomized controlled trial. Fifty-three (body mass index: 36±3 kg m(-2), age: 49±9 years) poorly controlled patients with T2D (HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin): 9.7±2%) were randomized to IMT, IMT+RYGB or IMT+SG and underwent a mixed-meal tolerance test at baseline, 12, and 24 months for evaluation of AG suppression (postprandial minus fasting) and beta-cell function (oral disposition index; glucose-stimulated insulin secretion × Matsuda index). Total/android body fat (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) was also assessed. RYGB and SG reduced body fat comparably (15-23 kg) at 12 and 24 months, whereas IMT had no effect. Beta-cell function increased 5.8-fold in RYGB and was greater than IMT at 24 months (PRYGB or IMT at 24 months. AG suppression improved more following RYGB than SG or IMT at 24 months (P=0.01 vs SG, P=0.07 vs IMT). At 24 months, AG suppression was associated with increased postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (r=-0.32, PRYGB, and this effect is associated with decreased android obesity and improved insulin secretion. Together, these findings suggest that AG suppression is partly responsible for the improved glucose control after RYGB surgery.

  3. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  4. The clinical benefits of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients with and without complete viral suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression.......The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression....

  5. Reference Intervals of Total Bilirubin, ALT, AST, and Creatinine in Healthy Elderly Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-ming; Xia, Yong-jie; Guo, Xu-xiao; Zhu, Bao-lin; Zhang, Gao-ming; Ma, Xiao-bo; Yu, Hong; Wang, Hong-jian; Wang, Guang-sheng; Yang, Li; Zhou, Ye-ting

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of total bilirubin (TBIL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and creatinine (CREA) for apparently healthy elderly (Han ethnicity) in Shuyang, China. Material/Methods A total of 54 912 blood specimens from elderly residents age 65–104 years were collected by standard procedures in Shuyang county of Jiangsu province. TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for each participant were determined by automatic biochemical analyzer. Distribution and differences of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA were analyzed and compared between the elderly of the same age of different sexes and different ages of the same sex. RIs of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA were compared with the current RIs. The RIs and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using nonparametric method (2.5th–97.5th percentiles) according to the guideline of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results RIs established for the healthy elderly include: TBIL 7.8~30.6 μmol/L for males and 7.3~26.1 μmol/L for females; ALT 8.7~47.3 U/L for males and 8.4~45.2 U/L for females; AST 15.7~46.9 U/L for males and 15.1~46.2 U/L for females; and CREA 45.1~100.9 μmol/L for males and 38.7~85.0 μmol/L for females. Reference intervals of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for male elderly were higher than those of females, and values of CREA increased with increasing age. Conclusions We have established a panel of locally relevant RIs. It is necessary to establish scientific and reasonable RIs of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for the healthy elderly in our region, which will provide a reference for clinicians and inspection officers. PMID:25272068

  6. Reference intervals for total bilirubin, ALT, AST and creatinine in healthy Chinese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-ming; Xia, Yong-jie; Guo, Xu-xiao; Zhu, Bao-lin; Zhang, Gao-ming; Ma, Xiao-bo; Yu, Hong; Wang, Hong-jian; Wang, Guang-sheng; Yang, Li; Zhou, Ye-ting

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of total bilirubin (TBIL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and creatinine (CREA) for apparently healthy elderly (Han ethnicity) in Shuyang, China. A total of 54 912 blood specimens from elderly residents age 65-104 years were collected by standard procedures in Shuyang county of Jiangsu province. TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for each participant were determined by automatic biochemical analyzer. Distribution and differences of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA were analyzed and compared between the elderly of the same age of different sexes and different ages of the same sex. RIs of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA were compared with the current RIs. The RIs and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using nonparametric method (2.5th-97.5th percentiles) according to the guideline of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. RIs established for the healthy elderly include: TBIL 7.8~30.6 µmol/L for males and 7.3~26.1 µmol/L for females; ALT 8.7~47.3 U/L for males and 8.4~45.2 U/L for females; AST 15.7~46.9 U/L for males and 15.1~46.2 U/L for females; and CREA 45.1~100.9 µmol/L for males and 38.7~85.0 µmol/L for females. Reference intervals of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for male elderly were higher than those of females, and values of CREA increased with increasing age. We have established a panel of locally relevant RIs. It is necessary to establish scientific and reasonable RIs of TBIL, ALT, AST, and CREA for the healthy elderly in our region, which will provide a reference for clinicians and inspection officers.

  7. History of viral suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy as a predictor of virological failure after a treatment change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; Ledergerber, B

    2010-01-01

    . METHODS: A total of 1827 patients on cART starting at least one new antiretroviral from 1 January 2000 while maintaining a suppressed viral load were included in the analysis. Poisson regression analysis identified factors predictive of virological failure after baseline in addition to traditional...... demographic variables. Baseline was defined as the date of starting new antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Four hundred and fifty-one patients (24.7%) experienced virological failure, with an incidence rate (IR) of 7.3 per 100 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.7-8.0]. After adjustment...

  8. Linoleic acid therapy in severe experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in the guinea-pig: suppression by continuous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Keith, A B; Mertin, J; Caspary, E A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of oral linoleic acid (LA) treatment on experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in guinea-pigs in three trials of differing disease intensity has been investigated. The efficacy of LA treatment was linked to the severity of the disease being suppressed. The trial with the greatest disease severity showed no beneficial effect. The other two trials with less severe disease showed a marked therapeutic response to LA, but only when treatment was started before immunization and given continuously. This was apparent in both clinical and histopathological responses. These results support an immunoregulatory mechanism for LA treatment in EAE and by analogy in multiple sclerosis. PMID:7418264

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists versus standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Borgmann, Hendrik; Blümle, Anette; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Schmucker, Christine; Sikic, Danijel; Roelle, Catharina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Wahba, Amr; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-11-13

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. The international review team included methodologists of the German Cochrane Centre and clinical experts. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, trial registries and conference books for randomised controlled trials (RCT) for effectiveness data analysis, and randomised or non-randomised controlled studies (non-RCT) for safety data analysis (March 2015). Two authors independently screened identified articles, extracted data, evaluated risk of bias and rated quality of evidence according to GRADE. 13 studies (10 RCTs, 3 non-RCTs) were included. No study reported cancer-specific survival or clinical progression. There were no differences in overall mortality (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93), treatment failure (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.17) or prostate-specific antigen progression (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). While there was no difference in quality of life related to urinary symptoms, improved quality of life regarding prostate symptoms, measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), with the use of GnRH antagonists compared with the use of standard androgen suppression therapy (mean score difference -0.40, 95% CI -0.94 to 0.14, and -1.84, 95% CI -3.00 to -0.69, respectively) was found. Quality of evidence for all assessed outcomes was rated low according to GRADE. The risk for injection-site events was increased, but cardiovascular events may occur less often by using GnRH antagonist. Available evidence is hampered by risk of bias, selective reporting and limited follow-up. There is currently insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy of GnRH antagonist compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. There is need for further high-quality research on GnRH antagonists with long-term follow-up. CRD42012002751

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists versus standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Borgmann, Hendrik; Blümle, Anette; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Schmucker, Christine; Sikic, Danijel; Roelle, Catharina; Schmidt, Stefanie; Wahba, Amr; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Setting The international review team included methodologists of the German Cochrane Centre and clinical experts. Participants We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, trial registries and conference books for randomised controlled trials (RCT) for effectiveness data analysis, and randomised or non-randomised controlled studies (non-RCT) for safety data analysis (March 2015). Two authors independently screened identified articles, extracted data, evaluated risk of bias and rated quality of evidence according to GRADE. Results 13 studies (10 RCTs, 3 non-RCTs) were included. No study reported cancer-specific survival or clinical progression. There were no differences in overall mortality (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93), treatment failure (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.17) or prostate-specific antigen progression (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). While there was no difference in quality of life related to urinary symptoms, improved quality of life regarding prostate symptoms, measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), with the use of GnRH antagonists compared with the use of standard androgen suppression therapy (mean score difference −0.40, 95% CI −0.94 to 0.14, and −1.84, 95% CI −3.00 to −0.69, respectively) was found. Quality of evidence for all assessed outcomes was rated low according to GRADE. The risk for injection-site events was increased, but cardiovascular events may occur less often by using GnRH antagonist. Available evidence is hampered by risk of bias, selective reporting and limited follow-up. Conclusions There is currently insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy of GnRH antagonist compared to standard androgen suppression therapy for advanced prostate cancer. There is need for further high-quality research on

  11. Colchicine therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients acts on caspase-1 to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome monocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stacy; Martínez, Gonzalo J; Payet, Cloe A; Barraclough, Jennifer Y; Celermajer, David S; Bursill, Christina; Patel, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasome activation, with subsequent release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, has recently been implicated in atherosclerosis-associated inflammation. This study aims to assess in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients (1) inflammasome activation in circulating monocytes and (2) whether short-term oral colchicine, a recognized anti-inflammatory agent that has been shown to be cardio-protective in clinical studies, might acutely suppress inflammasome-dependent inflammation. ACS patients (n=21) were randomized to oral colchicine (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 h later) or no treatment, and compared with untreated healthy controls (n=9). Peripheral venous blood was sampled pre- (day 1) and 24 h post- (day 2) treatment. Monocytes were cultured and stimulated with ATP. Analysis of key inflammasome markers was performed by ELISA. IL-1β secretion increased by 580.4% (PColchicine treatment in ACS patients markedly reduced intracellular and secreted levels of IL-1β compared with pre-treatment levels (Pcolchicine acutely and markedly suppresses monocyte caspase-1 activity, thereby reducing monocyte secretion of IL-1β. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, María Begoña; Río, Isabel; Jerónimo, Adrián; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment.A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended a counseling program in the period 2002 to 2013 who opted for natural conception and met the following criteria: index case on ART with persistent plasma viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months, ART compliance over 95%, preserved immune status, undetectable HIV viral and proviral load in semen in male index cases, and absence of genitourinary infections and fertility problems in both members of the couple.Of the 161 HIV serodiscordant couples included, 133 with male index cases, 66% achieved at least 1 pregnancy, 18% a second one, and 5% a third pregnancy. A total of 144 natural pregnancies occurred and 107 babies were born. The pregnancy rate was 1.9 for each 100 acts of vaginal intercourse, and the mean time to conception was 6.1 months, both independently of the sex of the index case. No case of sexual or vertical HIV transmission occurred.In the absence of fertility problems and under controlled conditions, natural conception might be a safe and effective reproductive method for those HIV serodiscordant couples who choose this reproductive option.

  13. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  14. AST/ALT ratio predicts cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, S G; Flamm, S L; Gordon, F D; Chopra, S

    1998-01-01

    A liver biopsy is necessary to grade and stage chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In a previous study of patients with nonalcoholic liver disease, an aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio >1 suggested cirrhosis. We sought to examine the value of the AST/ALT ratio in distinguishing cirrhotic patients with chronic HCV infection from noncirrhotic patients and to correlate the ratio with the grade and stage of hepatitis and other biochemical indices. We retrospectively studied 139 patients with chronic HCV infection. Routine biochemical indices were determined, and the histological grade of necroinflammatory activity and the stage of fibrosis of the liver biopsy specimens were scored. The mean AST/ALT ratio in the cirrhotic patients (n = 47) was higher than in the noncirrhotic patients (n = 92) (1.06 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.09; p or =1 had 100% specificity and positive predictive value in distinguishing cirrhotic from noncirrhotic patients, with a 53.2% sensitivity and 80.7% negative predictive value. The ratio correlated positively with the stage of fibrosis but not with the grade of activity or other biochemical indices. Of the cirrhotic patients, 17% had no clinical or biochemical features suggestive of chronic liver disease except for an AST/ALT ratio > or =1. The AST/ALT ratio is a dependable marker of fibrosis stage and cirrhosis in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  15. The AST/ALT ratio as an indicator of cirrhosis in patients with PBC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyblom, Helena; Björnsson, Einar; Simrén, Magnus; Aldenborg, Frank; Almer, Sven; Olsson, Rolf

    2006-09-01

    A non-invasive, simple and non-expensive test to predict cirrhosis would be highly desirable. The aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio has been proven to be such an indicator of cirrhosis in alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis C. To test whether the AST/ALT ratio is a marker of cirrhosis also in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). The study consisted of 160 patients. In 126 patients, we had clinical and laboratory data at the time of diagnosis and follow-up with outcome: liver-related death, liver transplantation and survival. In 121 patients, we had laboratory data and liver histology. We found that the AST/ALT ratio was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in non-cirrhotic patients. A high AST/ALT ratio was significantly associated with esophageal varices and ascites. In a multivariate analysis, bilirubin and ALP were predictors of poor prognosis. The AST/ALT ratio seems to be of clinical value as a hint to the diagnosis of cirrhosis in patients with PBC but not as a prognostic factor.

  16. Effect of AST-120 in Chronic Kidney Disease Treatment: Still a Controversy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Junna; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Inagi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    AST-120 (kremezin; Kureha Chemical, Tokyo, Japan) is an oral spherical carbonaceous adsorbent, which was approved for clinical use in Japanese chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in 1991. It adsorbs indole, the precursor of indoxyl sulfate, in the intestines and prevents indoxyl sulfate production. Indoxyl sulfate, initially identified as a major uremic toxin that causes uremic symptoms, contributes to CKD progression. Since AST-120 decreases serum indoxyl sulfate in a dose-dependent manner, multicenter prospective trials have been conducted in Japan in the 1980s; these trials were mostly in favor of the efficacy of AST-120 in delaying the initiation of dialysis in patients with advanced stage CKD. Many animal studies support the effects of AST-120 on renal outcomes as well as on cardiovascular complications. However, there are yet no reports that unequivocally demonstrate the improvement of hard renal endpoints and/or cardiovascular endpoints. This commentary briefly reviews the major outcomes of the recent clinical trials on AST-120. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. High level of virological suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, Legese A.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Yalew, Alemayehu W.; Sprangers, Mirjam Ag; Prins, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma viral load (pVL) is a key indicator of therapeutic response in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but is often unavailable in routine clinical care in resource-limited settings. Previous model-based simulation studies have suggested that the benefits of

  18. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. CTLA-4+PD-1-Memory CD4+T Cells Critically Contribute to Viral Persistence in Antiretroviral Therapy-Suppressed, SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, Colleen S; Deleage, Claire; Harper, Justin; Micci, Luca; Ribeiro, Susan P; Paganini, Sara; Kuri-Cervantes, Leticia; Benne, Clarisse; Ryan, Emily S; Balderas, Robert; Jean, Sherrie; Easley, Kirk; Marconi, Vincent; Silvestri, Guido; Estes, Jacob D; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Paiardini, Mirko

    2017-10-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication in HIV-infected individuals but does not eliminate the reservoir of latently infected cells. Recent work identified PD-1 + follicular helper T (Tfh) cells as an important cellular compartment for viral persistence. Here, using ART-treated, SIV-infected rhesus macaques, we show that CTLA-4 + PD-1 - memory CD4 + T cells, which share phenotypic markers with regulatory T cells, were enriched in SIV DNA in blood, lymph nodes (LN), spleen, and gut, and contained replication-competent and infectious virus. In contrast to PD-1 + Tfh cells, SIV-enriched CTLA-4 + PD-1 - CD4 + T cells were found outside the B cell follicle of the LN, predicted the size of the persistent viral reservoir during ART, and significantly increased their contribution to the SIV reservoir with prolonged ART-mediated viral suppression. We have shown that CTLA-4 + PD-1 - memory CD4 + T cells are a previously unrecognized component of the SIV and HIV reservoir that should be therapeutically targeted for a functional HIV-1 cure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Topical thermal therapy with hot packs suppresses physical inactivity-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and up-regulation of NGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tatsuki; Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Mizumura, Kazue; Hori, Kiyomi; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Koeda, Tomoko

    2017-10-12

    We focused on the analgesic effect of hot packs for mechanical hyperalgesia in physically inactive rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, physical inactivity (PI), PI + sham treatment (PI + sham), and PI + hot pack treatment (PI + hot pack) groups. Physical inactivity rats wore casts on both hind limbs in full plantar flexed position for 4 weeks. Hot pack treatment was performed for 20 min a day, 5 days a week. Although mechanical hyperalgesia and the up-regulation of NGF in the plantar skin and gastrocnemius muscle were observed in the PI and the PI + sham groups, these changes were significantly suppressed in the PI + hot pack group. The present results clearly demonstrated that hot pack treatment was effective in reducing physical inactivity-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and up-regulation of NGF in plantar skin and gastrocnemius muscle.

  1. Progesterone therapy induces an M1 to M2 switch in microglia phenotype and suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome in a cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Roya; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Zibara, Kazem; Namjoo, Zeinab; Beigi Boroujeni, Fatemeh; Shahbeigi, Saeed; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Beyer, Cordian; Zendehdel, Adib

    2017-10-01

    Demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) has been associated to reactive microglia in neurodegenerative disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The M1 microglia phenotype plays a pro-inflammatory role while M2 is involved in anti-inflammatory processes in the brain. In this study, CPZ-induced demyelination mouse model was used to investigate the effect of progesterone (PRO) therapy on microglia activation and neuro-inflammation. Results showed that progesterone therapy (CPZ+PRO) decreased neurological behavioral deficits, as demonstrated by significantly decreased escape latencies, in comparison to CPZ mice. In addition, CPZ+PRO caused a significant reduction in the mRNA expression levels of M1-markers (iNOS, CD86, MHC-II and TNF-α) in the corpus callosum region, whereas the expression of M2-markers (Trem-2, CD206, Arg-1 and TGF-β) was significantly increased, in comparison to CPZ mice. Moreover, CPZ+PRO resulted in a significant decrease in the number of iNOS + and Iba-1 + /iNOS + cells (M1), whereas TREM-2 + and Iba-1 + /TREM-2 + cells (M2) significantly increased, in comparison to CPZ group. Furthermore, CPZ+PRO caused a significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 and IL-18 (~2-fold), in comparison to the CPZ group. Finally, CPZ+PRO therapy was accompanied with reduced levels of demyelination, compared to CPZ, as confirmed by immunofluorescence to myelin basic protein (MBP) and Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) staining, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. In summary, we reported for the first time that PRO therapy causes polarization of M2 microglia, attenuation of M1 phenotype, and suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome in a CPZ-induced demyelination model of MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Aguado Syntax Test (AST) into Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Gustavo Inheta; Hage, Simone Rocha de Vasconcellos

    2017-12-07

    To perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the Aguado Syntax Test (AST) into Brazilian Portuguese considering the linguistic and cultural reality of the language. The AST assesses the early morphosyntactic development in children aged 3 to 7 in terms of understanding and expression of various types of structures such as sentences, pronouns, verbal voices, comparisons, prepositions and verbal desinence as to number, mode and tense. The process of translation and cultural adaptation followed four steps: 1) preparation of two translations; 2) synthesis of consensual translations; 3) backtranslation; and 4) verification of equivalence between the initial translations and backtranslations that resulted in the final translated version. The whole process of translation and cultural adaptation revealed the presence of equivalence and reconciliation of the translated items and an almost complete semantic equivalence between the two translations and the absence of consistent translation difficulties. The AST was translated and culturally adapted into Brazilian Portuguese, constituting the first step towards validation and standardization of the test.

  3. Elevated Alt and Ast in an Asymptomatic Person: What the primary care doctor should do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Loh Keng; Tong, Kew Siang

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal liver function test with raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and raised aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are commonly seen in primary care setting.Chronic alcohol consumption, drugs, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and chronic viral hepatitis are common causes associated with raised ALT and AST.In chronic viral hepatitis, the elevation of liver enzyme may not correlate well with the degree of liver damage.Non-hepatic causes of raised ALT and AST include polymyositis, acute muscles injury, acute myocardial infarction and hypothyroidism.In the primary care setting, the doctor should obtain a complete history regarding the risk factors for viral hepatitis, substance abuse and request investigations accordingly.Suspected chronic viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis are best referred to hepatologist for further management.

  4. Ten-year estimated risk of bone fracture in women with differentiated thyroid cancer under TSH-suppressive levothyroxine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Lara; Gay, Stefano; Campomenosi, Claudia; Paolino, Sabrina; Pera, Giorgia; Monti, Eleonora; Mortara, Lorenzo; Seriolo, Bruno; Giusti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    After thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy, patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are indefinitely treated with levothyroxine (L-T4). Osteoporosis is a debated consequence of hypothyroxinaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk assessed by FRAX in a cohort of DTC women. Seventy-four women with DTC (aged 56.5 ± 9.9 years) treated at the mean age of 51.9 ± 12.0 years were studied. Baseline BMD and FRAX were evaluated after 3.0 years (median). BMD and FRAX were further evaluated 5.5 years (median) after the baseline evaluation. A cohort of 120 euthyroid women, matched for age, BMI, and menopausal status, were evaluated as controls. L-T4 dosages were 813.6 ± 208.8 μg/week and 782.1 ± 184.4 μg/week at the baseline and second evaluation, respectively. The risks of major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) and hip fracture (HF) were similar in DTC patients and in controls. In DTC women, significant changes in FRAX were found, with a higher increase in the probability of HF than of MOF. A similar change was found in controls. A significant inverse correlation (P < 0.001) between L-T4 dosage and HF/MOF probability on both first and second evaluations was found. A significant inverse correlation (P = 0.05) was found between fT4, TSH and duration of therapy and HF/MOF probability only on the second evaluation. FRAX increase is a multi-factorial, age-related phenomenon. The absence of correlations between L-T4 dosage, length of therapy or fT4 levels and FRAX does not enable us to attribute an increased fracture risk to DTC women with well-controlled disease on therapy. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 350-358).

  5. Research on scheduling of robotic transient survey for Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Wei, Peng; Shang, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3) are designed to be fully robotic telescopes at Dome A, Antarctica, which aim for highly efficient time-domain sky surveys as well as rapid response to special transient events (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, near-Earth asteroids, supernovae, etc.). Unlike traditional observations, a well-designed real-time survey scheduler is needed in order to implement an automatic survey in a very efficient, reliable and flexible way for the unattended telescopes. We present a study of the survey strategy for AST3 and implementation of its survey scheduler, which is also useful for other survey projects.

  6. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST/GOT and Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT/GPT Detection Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak-Sung Kim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT and alanineaminotransferase (ALT/GPT in serum can help people diagnose body tissues especially theheart and the liver are injured or not. This article provides a comprehensive review ofresearch activities that concentrate on AST/GOT and ALT/GPT detection techniques due totheir clinical importance. The detection techniques include colorimetric, spectrophotometric,chemiluminescence, chromatography, fluorescence and UV absorbance, radiochemical, andelectrochemical techniques. We devote the most attention on experimental principle. Insome methods a few representative devices and important conclusions are presented.

  7. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) Detection Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing-Jiu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Im, Hyung-Soon; Yarimaga, Oktay; Yoon, Euisik; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2006-01-01

    The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) in serum can help people diagnose body tissues especially the heart and the liver are injured or not. This article provides a comprehensive review of research activities that concentrate on AST/GOT and ALT/GPT detection techniques due to their clinical importance. The detection techniques include colorimetric, spectrophotometric, chemiluminescence, chromatography, fluorescence and UV absorbance, radiochemical, and electrochemical techniques. We devote the most attention on experimental principle. In some methods a few representative devices and important conclusions are presented.

  8. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNF-α therapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  9. Suppression of human breast tumors in NOD/SCID mice by CD44 shRNA gene therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham PV

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phuc Van Pham1, Ngoc Bich Vu1, Thuy Thanh Duong1, Tam Thanh Nguyen1, Nhung Hai Truong1, Nhan Lu Chinh Phan1, Tue Gia Vuong1, Viet Quoc Pham1, Hoang Minh Nguyen1, Kha The Nguyen1, Nhung Thi Nguyen1, Khue Gia Nguyen1, Lam Tan Khat1, Dong Van Le2, Kiet Dinh Truong1, Ngoc Kim Phan11Laboratory of Stem Cell Research and Application, University of Science, Vietnam National University, HCM City, 2Military Medical University, Ha Noi, VietnamBackground: Breast cancer stem cells with a CD44+CD24- phenotype are the origin of breast tumors. Strong CD44 expression in this population indicates its important role in maintaining the stem cell phenotype. Previous studies show that CD44 down-regulation causes CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells to differentiate into non-stem cells that are sensitive to antitumor drugs and lose many characteristics of the original cells. In this study, we determined tumor suppression in non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice using CD44 shRNA therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment.Methods: Tumor-bearing non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice were established by injection of CD44+CD24- cells. To track CD44+CD24- cells, green fluorescence protein was stably transduced using a lentiviral vector prior to injection into mice. The amount of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector used for transduction was based on CD44 down-regulation by in vitro CD44 shRNA transduction. Mice were treated with direct injection of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector into tumors followed by doxorubicin administration after 48 hours. The effect was evaluated by changes in the size and weight of tumors compared with that of the control.Results: The combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin strongly suppressed tumor growth with significant differences in tumor sizes and weights compared with that of CD44 down-regulation or doxorubicin treatment alone. In the combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin group, the tumor weight was

  10. In vitro capacity of various cyclooxygenase inhibitors to revert immune suppression caused by radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, H.; Rotstein, S.; Wasserman, J.; Petrini, B.; Hammarstroem, S.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation therapy triggers blood monocytes to an increased secretion of immunosuppressive prostaglandins (PGs), which in part can explain the post-irradiation impairment of lymphocyte blastogenesis. Since low mitogen responses of lymphocytes in irradiated breast cancer patients is linked to a poor prognosis a clinical trial is planned to examine if treatment with inhibitors of PG-synthesis during irradiation can counteract immunosuppression and increase survival. In the present investigation the authors have compared 9 different inhibitors of PG-synthesis for capacity to enhance phytohemagglutinin responses of blood lymphocytes before and after irradiation for breast cancer. 5 of the drugs (aspisol, indomethacin, meclofenamic acid, ketoprofen and diclofenac) enhanced the reactivity to more than 150 percent. In general, the strongest enhancements were observed in lymphocyte preparations obtained at completion of irradiation when reactivity was most depressed followed by those obtained at one month and before irradiation. (author). 28 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. A new method for synthesis of As-Te chalcogenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Leonid; Nezhdanov, Aleksey; Usanov, Dmitry; Markelov, Aleksey; Trushin, Vladimir; Chidichimo, Giuseppe; De Filpo, Giovanni; Gogova, Daniela; Mashin, Aleksandr

    2017-11-01

    A novel Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition method for synthesis of amorphous AsxTe100-x (31 ≤ x ≤ 49) films is demonstrated. The innovative process has been developed in a non-equilibrium low-temperature argon plasma under reduced pressure, employing for the first time volatile As and Te as precursors. Utilization of inorganic precursors, in contrast to the typically used in CVD metal-organic precursors, has given us the chance to achieve ≿halcogenide As-Te films of very high quality and purity. Phase and structural evolution of the As-Te system, based on equilibrium coexistence of two phases (AsTe and As2Te3) has been studied. The dependence of structure and optical bandgap of the chalcogenide materials on their composition was established. The newly developed process is cost-effective and enables deposition of As-Te films with a thickness ranging from 10 nm to 10 μm, the latter is highly desireable for one-mode planar waveguides applications and in other components of integral optics.

  12. [The effect of blood AST, ALT and lactate after short and middle distance exercise training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, C C; Chen, W C; Lee, S Y; Wang, K T

    1996-09-01

    Twenty-four nursing college students aged 16 and 17 years were selected as research subjects and divided into two groups. Group A comprised 12 individuals who were trained for short distance running (5km/day) over a four-week period, while group B was trained for middle distance running (7km/day) during the same period. Blood AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase) and lactate were performed at rest (before training) and after exercise every week. After both short and middle distance exercise training, the lactate values after 1-3 week(s) training period were persistently higher than those before training and the differences between then are significant. However, the lactate value after 4 weeks training period is lower than that after the third week training. There are significant differences between the AST values after 1-4 week(s) training period and those before exercise in short distance exercise training. There are no significant differences between the AST values after training and those before exercise in middle distance exercise training. The ALT values after 1-4 week(s) training period were lower than those before exercise in short and middle distance exercise training. In conclusion, after 4 weeks training, the lactate and AST values can't reduce to those before training in middle distance exercise training, and the lactate value in short distance exercise training is the same as former. Further investigation is needed.

  13. Measurement of $H{\\to}W^\\pm W^{\\mp\\ast}{\\to}\\ell^-\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00423318; Köneke, Karsten

    This thesis presents and discusses measurements of the coupling of the Higgs boson to vector bosons, using data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV by the ATLAS detector. A full analysis of the first $5.8$ fb${}^{-1}$ of LHC Run 2 data investigating the $H{\\to}W^\\pm W^{\\mp\\ast}{\\to}\\ell^-\\bar{\

  14. Kas Gaddafi tõesti põgenes Liibüast? / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2011-01-01

    Suur autokolonn Liibüa diktaatori Muammar Gaddafi lähikondlaste ja varandusega jõudis Liibüast Nigeri kaudu Burkina Fasosse. USA võimude andmeil Gaddafit kolonnis ei viibi. Burkina Faso valitsus väidab, et nad ei paku Gaddafile varjupaika. Kaart: Gaddafi võimalik põgenemistee

  15. High levels of adherence and viral suppression in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy for 6, 12 and 18 months in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Elul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalizable data are needed on the magnitude and determinants of adherence and virological suppression among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Africa. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with chart abstraction, patient interviews and site assessments in a nationally representative sample of adults on ART for 6, 12 and 18 months at 20 sites in Rwanda. Adherence was assessed using 3- and 30-day patient recall. A systematically selected sub-sample had viral load (VL measurements. Multivariable logistic regression examined predictors of non-perfect (40 copies/ml. RESULTS: Overall, 1,417 adults were interviewed and 837 had VL measures. Ninety-four percent and 78% reported perfect adherence for the last 3 and 30 days, respectively. Eighty-three percent had undetectable VL. In adjusted models, characteristics independently associated with higher odds of non-perfect 30-day adherence were: being on ART for 18 months (vs. 6 months; younger age; reporting severe (vs. no or few side effects in the prior 30 days; having no documentation of CD4 cell count at ART initiation (vs. having a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/µL; alcohol use; and attending sites which initiated ART services in 2003-2004 and 2005 (vs. 2006-2007; sites with ≥600 (vs. <600 patients on ART; or sites with peer educators. Participation in an association for people living with HIV/AIDS; and receiving care at sites which regularly conduct home-visits were independently associated with lower odds of non-adherence. Higher odds of having a detectable VL were observed among patients at sites with peer educators. Being female; participating in an association for PLWHA; and using a reminder tool were independently associated with lower odds of having detectable VL. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of adherence and viral suppression were observed in the Rwandan national ART program, and associated with potentially modifiable factors.

  16. A comparison of self-report and antiretroviral detection to inform estimates of antiretroviral therapy coverage, viral load suppression and HIV incidence in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerga, Helena; Shiferie, Fisseha; Grebe, Eduard; Giuliani, Ruggero; Farhat, Jihane Ben; Van-Cutsem, Gilles; Cohen, Karen

    2017-09-29

    Accurately identifying individuals who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important to determine ART coverage and proportion on ART who are virally suppressed. ART is also included in recent infection testing algorithms used to estimate incidence. We compared estimates of ART coverage, viral load suppression rates and HIV incidence using ART self-report and detection of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and we identified factors associated with discordance between the methods. Cross-sectional population-based survey in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Individuals 15-59 years were eligible. Interviews included questions about ARV use. Rapid HIV testing was performed at the participants' home. Blood specimens were collected for ARV detection, LAg-Avidity HIV incidence testing and viral load quantification in HIV-positive individuals. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify socio-demographic covariates associated with discordance between self-reported ART and ARV detection. Of the 5649 individuals surveyed, 1423 were HIV-positive. Median age was 34 years and 76.3% were women. ART coverage was estimated at 51.4% (95%CI:48.5-54.3), 53.1% (95%CI:50.2-55.9) and 56.1% (95%CI:53.5-58.8) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined (classified as ART exposed if ARV detected and/or ART reported) respectively. ART coverage estimates using the 3 methods were fairly similar within sex and age categories except in individuals aged 15-19 years: 33.3% (95%CI:23.3-45.2), 33.8% (95%CI:23.9-45.4%) and 44.3% (95%CI:39.3-46.7) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined. Viral suppression below 1000cp/mL in individuals on ART was estimated at 89.8% (95%CI:87.3-91.9), 93.1% (95%CI:91.0-94.8) and 88.7% (95%CI:86.2-90.7) using self-reported ART, ARV detection and both methods combined respectively. HIV incidence was estimated at 1.4 (95%CI:0.8-2.0) new cases/100 person-years when employing no measure of ARV use, 1.1/100PY (95%CI:0

  17. The genetic architecture of liver enzyme levels: GGT, ALT and AST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Jenny H D A; de Moor, Marleen H M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lubke, Gitta H; Vink, Jacqueline M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-07-01

    High levels of liver enzymes GGT, ALT and AST are predictive of disease and all-cause mortality and can reflect liver injury, fatty liver and/or oxidative stress. Variation in GGT, ALT and AST levels is heritable. Moderation of the heritability of these liver enzymes by age and sex has not often been explored, and it is not clear to what extent non-additive genetic and shared environmental factors may play a role. To examine the genetic architecture of GGT, ALT and AST, plasma levels were assessed in a large sample of twins, their siblings, parents and spouses (N = 8,371; age range 18-90). For GGT and ALT, but not for AST, genetic structural equation modeling showed evidence for quantitative sex differences in the genetic architecture. There was no evidence for qualitative sex differences, i.e. the same genes were expressed in males and females. Both additive and non-additive genetic factors were important for GGT in females (total heritability h(2) 60 %) and AST in both sexes (total h(2) 43 %). The heritability of GGT in males and ALT for both sexes was due to additive effects only (GGT males 30 %; ALT males 40 %, females 22 %). Evidence emerged for shared environmental factors influencing GGT in the male offspring generation (variance explained 28 %). Thus, the same genes influence liver enzyme levels across sex and age, but their relative contribution to the variation in GGT and ALT differs in males and females and for GGT across age. Given adequate sample sizes these results suggest that genome-wide association studies may result in the detection of new susceptibility loci for liver enzyme levels when pooling results over sex and age.

  18. Establishing reference intervals for ALT, AST, UR, Cr, and UA in apparently healthy Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Mussa, Ahmed Ebrahim; Tang, Aiguo; Xiang, Zhongyuan; Mo, Ximing

    2018-03-01

    The current child-specific reference intervals (RIs) are inadequate or even unavailable for many analyses in China. Many of the RIs used in Chinese laboratories were derived from Chinese adult standards or from foreign studies. The aim of this study was to establish specific RIs for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), urea (UR), creatinine (Cr) and uric acid (UA) for apparently healthy Chinese adolescents. Overall, 1682 apparently healthy adolescents were enrolled. Serum ALT, AST, UR, Cr and UA were measured by an ARCHITECT C-8000 automated chemistry analyzer. The 2.5th and 97.5th percentile RIs were determined using non-parametric methods. The established reference intervals for ALT, AST, UR, CR and UA were 7.5-42.8 U/L, 12.8-40.2 U/L, 3.12-6.38 mmol/L, 42.7-91.2 μmol/L, and 180.2-409.6 μmol/L in boys and 6.5-32.8 U/L, 10.4-32.5 U/L, 3.05-6.47 mmol/L, 40.2-88.8 μmol/L and 176.5-394.0 μmol/L in girls, respectively. The median and upper and lower limits for the RIs of ALT, AST, Cr and UA were higher in boys than they were in girls (P ALT, AST, UR, Cr and UA that are defined specifically for Chinese adolescents and are appropriate for universal use among Chinese laboratories. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence and plasma HIV RNA suppression among AIDS clinical trials group study participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Neilands, Torsten B; Vittinghoff, Eric; Johnson, Mallory O; Chesney, Margaret; Cohn, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a secondary data analysis of 11 AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) studies to examine longitudinal associations between 14 self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence barriers (at 12 weeks) and plasma HIV RNA (at 24 weeks) and to discern the relative importance of these barriers in explaining virologic detectability. Studies enrolled from 1997 to 2003 and concluded between 2002 and 2012. We included 1496 (54.2% of the original sample) with complete data. The most commonly selected barriers were "away from home" (21.9%), "simply forgot" (19.6%), "change in daily routine" (19.5%), and "fell asleep/slept through dosing time" (18.9%). In bivariate analyses, "too many pills to take" (OR=0.43, ppills at specified time" (OR=0.71, p=0.04) were associated with a lower odds of an undetectable HIV RNA. "Too many pills to take," "wanted to avoid side effects," "felt drug was toxic/harmful," "felt sick/ill,", and "felt depressed/overwhelmed" had the highest relative importance in explaining virologic detectability. "Simply forgot" was not associated with HIV RNA (OR=0.99, p=0.95) and was ninth in its relative importance. Adherence interventions should prioritize barriers with highest importance in explaining virologic outcomes rather than focusing on more commonly reported barriers.

  20. Suppression of Angiogenesis and Therapy of Human Colon Cancer Liver Metastasis by Systemic Administration of Interferon-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutaro Ozawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether systemic administration of interferon-alpha (IFN-α can inhibit liver metastasis produced in nude mice by human colon cancer cells. KM12L4 (IFN-α-sensitive or KM12L4 IFNR (IFN-α-resistant cells were injected into the spleen of nude mice. Seven days later, the mice were treated with subcutaneous (s.c. injections of IFN-α (70,000 units/week at different dosing schedules (1, 2, or 7 times/week. Significant inhibition of tumor growth, vascularization and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or matrix metal loproteinase9 (MMP-9 mRNA and protein occurred in mice given daily injections of IFN-α. Kinetic analysis of therapy showed that daily s.c. administrations of 10,000 units of IFN-α induced apoptosis in liver metastasis-associated endothelial cells, followed by inhibition of tumor cell division and apoptosis of tumor cells. These data suggest that the antiangiogenic activity of IFN-α-2a depends on frequent administration of the optimal biologic dose.

  1. Structural equation modelling of viral tropism reveals its impact on achieving viral suppression within 6 months in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients after combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Carlo; Andreis, Samantha; Scaggiante, Renzo; Cruciani, Mario; Bosco, Oliviero; Ferretto, Roberto; Leoni, Davide; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Basso, Monica; Torti, Carlo; Sarmati, Loredana; Andreoni, Massimo; Palù, Giorgio; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the role of pre-treatment co-receptor tropism of plasma HIV on the achievement of viral suppression (plasma HIV RNA 1.69 log 10 copies/mL) at the sixth month of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in a cohort of naive patients using, for the first time in this context, a path analysis (PA) approach. Adult patients with chronic infection by subtype B HIV-1 were consecutively enrolled from the start of first-line cART (T0). Genotypic analysis of viral tropism was performed on plasma and interpreted using the bioinformatic tool Geno2pheno, with a false positive rate of 10%. A Bayesian network starting from the viro-immunological data at T0 and at the sixth month of treatment (T1) was set up and this model was evaluated using a PA approach. A total of 262 patients (22.1% bearing an X4 virus) were included; 178 subjects (67.9%) achieved viral suppression. A significant positive indirect effect of bearing X4 virus in plasma at T0 on log 10 HIV RNA at T1 was detected (P = 0.009), the magnitude of this effect was, however, over 10-fold lower than the direct effect of log 10 HIV RNA at T0 on log 10 HIV RNA at T1 (P = 0.000). Moreover, a significant positive indirect effect of bearing an X4 virus on log 10 HIV RNA at T0 (P = 0.003) was apparent. PA overcame the limitations implicit in common multiple regression analysis and showed the possible role of pre-treatment viral tropism at the recommended threshold on the outcome of plasma viraemia in naive patients after 6 months of therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B; Gill, M John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here provide valuable insights into the

  3. A Phase 1/2 Trial of Brief Androgen Suppression and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FASTR) for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Glenn, E-mail: Glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Ferguson, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Centre, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Lock, Michael; Chen, Jeff; Ahmad, Belal; Venkatesan, V.M.; Sexton, Tracy; D' Souza, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Loblaw, Andrew [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Toronto and Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Warner, Andrew; Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To initiate a phase 1/2 trial to examine the tolerability of a condensed combined-modality protocol for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Men scoring ≥3 on the Vulnerable Elderly Scale (VES) or refusing conventionally fractionated treatment for high-risk prostate cancer were eligible to participate. Androgen suppression was delivered for 12 months, and radiation therapy was delivered using 25 Gy to pelvic nodes delivered synchronously with 40 Gy to the prostate given as 1 fraction per week over 5 weeks. The phase 1 component included predetermined stopping rules based on 6-month treatment-related toxicity, with trial suspension specified if there were ≥6 of 15 patients (40%) or ≥3 of 15 (20%) who experienced grade ≥2 or ≥3 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity, respectively. Results: Sixteen men were enrolled, with 7 men meeting the criteria of VES ≥3 and 9 men having a VES <3 but choosing the condensed treatment. One man was not treated owing to discovery of a synchronous primary rectal cancer. Four patients (26%) experienced grade ≥2 toxicity at 6 weeks after treatment. There were 9 of 15 (60%) who experienced grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and 4 of 15 (26%) grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity at 6 months, and 5 of 15 (30%) grade ≥2 GI and GU toxicity at 6 months. A review of the 15 cases did not identify any remedial changes, thus the phase 1 criteria were not met. Conclusion: This novel condensed treatment had higher than anticipated late toxicities and was terminated before phase 2 accrual. Treatment factors, such as inclusion of pelvic lymph node radiation therapy, planning constraints, and treatment margins, or patient factors related to the specific frail elderly population may be contributing.

  4. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  5. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Howard Huaihan; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival

  6. Radionuclide therapy using ¹³¹I-labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted nanoparticles suppresses cancer cell growth caused by EGFR overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Zhongyun; Li, Chengxia; Li, Ning; Fang, Lei; Chang, Jin; Tan, Jian

    2016-03-01

    compared with those of the control BSA-PCL. The EGFR-targeted radioactive nanoparticle (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL exhibited favorable intracellular retention of (131)I. Radionuclide therapy using (131)I-EGFR-BSA-PCL, which showed excellent targeted cell killing, suppressed cancer cell growth caused by EGFR overexpression.

  7. An AST-ELM Method for Eliminating the Influence of Charging Phenomenon on ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Hongli; Jia, Huiqin; Tang, Kaihao

    2017-12-09

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a promising imaging technology of permittivity distributions in multiphase flow. To reduce the effect of charging phenomenon on ECT measurement, an improved extreme learning machine method combined with adaptive soft-thresholding (AST-ELM) is presented and studied for image reconstruction. This method can provide a nonlinear mapping model between the capacitance values and medium distributions by using machine learning but not an electromagnetic-sensitive mechanism. Both simulation and experimental tests are carried out to validate the performance of the presented method, and reconstructed images are evaluated by relative error and correlation coefficient. The results have illustrated that the image reconstruction accuracy by the proposed AST-ELM method has greatly improved than that by the conventional methods under the condition with charging object.

  8. An AST-ELM Method for Eliminating the Influence of Charging Phenomenon on ECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxin Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT is a promising imaging technology of permittivity distributions in multiphase flow. To reduce the effect of charging phenomenon on ECT measurement, an improved extreme learning machine method combined with adaptive soft-thresholding (AST-ELM is presented and studied for image reconstruction. This method can provide a nonlinear mapping model between the capacitance values and medium distributions by using machine learning but not an electromagnetic-sensitive mechanism. Both simulation and experimental tests are carried out to validate the performance of the presented method, and reconstructed images are evaluated by relative error and correlation coefficient. The results have illustrated that the image reconstruction accuracy by the proposed AST-ELM method has greatly improved than that by the conventional methods under the condition with charging object.

  9. Oral activated charcoal adsorbent (AST-120) ameliorates chronic kidney disease-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yuan, Jun; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Masuda, Yuichi; Ichii, Hirohito; Liu, Shuman

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) impairs intestinal barrier function which by allowing influx of noxious products causes systemic inflammation. We have recently shown that intestinal barrier dysfunction in CKD is due to degradation of epithelial tight junction (TJ) which is, in part, mediated by influx of urea and its conversion to ammonia by microbial urease. We hypothesized that by adsorbing urea and urea-derived ammonia, oral activated charcoal (AST-120) may ameliorate CKD-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption and systemic inflammation. Rats were randomized to the CKD or control groups. The CKD group was fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks. They were then randomized to receive a chow with or without AST-120 (4 g/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Rats consuming regular diet served as controls. Animals were then euthanized, colons were removed and processed for Western blot and immunohistology, and plasma was used to measure endotoxin and oxidative and inflammatory markers. Compared with the controls, the untreated CKD rats showed elevated plasma endotoxin, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, CINC-3, L-selectin, ICAM-1, and malondialdehyde, and depletions of colonic epithelial TJ proteins, claudin-1, occludin, and ZO1. Administration of AST-120 resulted in partial restoration of the epithelial TJ proteins and reduction in plasma endotoxin and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. CKD animals exhibited depletion of the key protein constituents of the colonic epithelial TJ which was associated with systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and endotoxemia. Administration of AST-120 attenuated uremia-induced disruption of colonic epithelial TJ and the associated endotoxemia, oxidative stress and inflammation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Quantum-field theories as representations of a single $^\\ast$-algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Raab, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We show that many well-known quantum field theories emerge as representations of a single $^\\ast$-algebra. These include free quantum field theories in flat and curved space-times, lattice quantum field theories, Wightman quantum field theories, and string theories. We prove that such theories can be approximated on lattices, and we give a rigorous definition of the continuum limit of lattice quantum field theories.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin induces HIV expression in CD4 T cells from patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy at concentrations achieved by clinical dosing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsen George Wei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD, a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50 = 4.5 nM compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50 = 3,950 nM and other histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50 = 10 nM. The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART.

  12. Elevation of ALT to AST ratio in patients with enteroviral myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, T; Kobayashi, I; Suzuki, T; Murata, K; Radio, S J; McManus, B M

    1995-01-01

    Enteroviral myocarditis is often a relatively benign condition in adults. Physicians, therefore, may not always record detailed clinical and laboratory data in such patients. As such, they may not recognize viral involvement in organs beyond the heart. The purpose of this study was to examine the hepatic involvement of enteroviral peri-myocarditis and to compare the other diseases with congestive heart failure. We analyzed 18 patients (ages 15-64) who were diagnosed as having enteroviral myocarditis (n = 16) or pericarditis (n = 2). Serology was positive for coxsackie viruses in 11 patients and echoviruses in six patients. A diagnosis of hepatic involvement was made by the following laboratory data: rising levels of alanine amino transferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and exceeded serum ALT compared with AST levels. A ratio of ALT/AST more than 1.0 was greatly frequent in patients with peri-myocarditis (72%; 13/18) compared with acute myocardial infarction (0%; 0/10) and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (3%; 3/10). In summary, hepatic involvement in the setting of acute enteroviral peri-myocarditis may be considerably more common in adults than previously suspected. The recognition of hepatic involvement in association with enteroviral peri-myocarditis may allow improvement of diagnostic sensitivity and alter approaches to treatments of acute viral myocarditis.

  13. Detection of TTV in peripheral blood cells from patients with altered ALT and AST levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jaqueline Carvalho; Nasser, Thiago Franco; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Carneiro, Juliana Laino do Val; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2008-04-01

    This work analyzes the prevalence of TTV DNA in peripheral blood cells from patients with hepatic alterations and healthy blood donors and measures levels of sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in certain randomly selected patients. DNA samples from 111 individuals were evaluated. They were divided into two groups, "A" (study) and "B" (control), including 54 patients with liver enzyme alterations (ALT/AST) presenting non-B-non-C hepatitis and 57 blood donors, respectively. TTV DNA was determined by nested PCR. Certain products of the second-round PCR were sequenced. Serum biochemical assay was performed and disclosed TTV in 31.48% (17/54) of patients in group A and 5.26% (3/57) in the control group B. TTV prevalence was significantly higher in patients with liver disease than in healthy donors. In group A, sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were analyzed in certain randomly selected patients and no significant difference in biochemical levels (p>0.05) was found when TTV infected and noninfected individuals were compared. Knowledge related to TTV has rapidly increased, but many fundamental aspects remain unclear. This led us to question the role of TTV and doubt remains as to whether or not it is just a commensal virus. Further studies are necessary to confirm and extend these findings.

  14. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  15. Atividade sérica das enzimas AST, CK e GGT em cavalos Crioulos AST, CK and GGT enzymes serum activities in Crioulo horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Franciscato

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a influência da idade, sexo, manejo e estado gestacional sobre a atividade sérica das enzimas: aspartato aminotransferase (AST, creatina quinase (CK e gama-glutamiltransferase (GGT em cavalos da raça Crioula. Foram utilizados 142 eqüinos, divididos em seis grupos: potros até um ano de idade; cavalos adultos em regime de atividade livre; cavalos adultos em treinamento; machos adultos; fêmeas não gestantes; fêmeas gestantes. O valor da CK foi mais elevado em animais adultos do que em potros, o mesmo tendo ocorrido em animais em atividade livre, comparados a animais em treinamento. Fêmeas não gestantes apresentaram valores das enzimas CK e GGT maiores que os machos; o valor da CK em fêmeas gestantes foi mais elevado do que em fêmeas não gestantes. A idade, o sexo, o manejo e o estado gestacional influenciam a atividade sérica da CK, e o sexo influencia a atividade sérica da GGT.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of age, sex, management and pregnancy status on aspartate aminotransferase (AST, creatine kinase (CK and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT enzymes serum activities of Crioulo horses. One hundred and forty-two horses, divided into six group were analyzed: yearlings; free activity of adult horses; training adult horses; male adult horses; nonpregnant and pregnant females. The CK enzyme activity value was higher in adult horses than in yearlings, and the same result was found when comparing free activity and training horses. Nonpregnant females had higher values for CK and GGT comparing to male horses, and CK values were higher in pregnant comparing to nonpregnant females. Age, sex, management and pregnancy status influence on CK serum activity, and sex influences on GGT serum activity.

  16. Twelve-Month Antiretroviral Therapy Suppresses Plasma and Genital Viral Loads but Fails to Alter Genital Levels of Cytokines, in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Rwandan Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Ondoa

    Full Text Available Genital viral load (GVL is the main determinant of sexual transmission of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV. The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART on local cervico-vaginal immunological factors associated with GVL is poorly described. We aimed to identify the risk factors of detectable GVL, and the impact of ART on HIV genital shedding and its correlates in a cohort of HIV-infected women, attending HIV care in Kigali, Rwanda.All participants were evaluated for GVL, plasma viral load (PVL, CD4 count, various sexually-transmitted infections (STIs at baseline and at month 12. Genital concentration of 19 cytokines and mRNA expression of APOBEC3G and BST2, two host HIV restriction factors, were evaluated at baseline in all participants. Cytokine levels were re-assessed at month 12 only in participants eligible for ART at baseline. Risk factors of GVL ≥ 40 copies/mL at baseline and month 12 were assessed using logistic regression. Effect of 12-month ART on various local and systemic immunological parameters was examined using a paired t-test and McNemar as appropriate.96 of the 247 women enrolled in the study were eligible for ART. After 12 months of ART, PVL and GVL decreased to undetectable level in respectively 74 and 88% of treated participants. ART did not affect cytokine levels. HIV genital shedding occurred only when PVL was detectable. At baseline, GVL was independently associated with IL-1β after controlling for PVL, age and N. gonorrhea infection (95% CI 1.32-2.15 and at month 12 with MIP-1β (95% CI 0.96-21.32 after controlling for baseline GVL, PVL and month 12 IL-8.Suppressive ART does not necessarily reduce genital level of immune activation. Minimizing all conditions favoring genital inflammation, including active detection and treatment of STIs, might reduce the risk of HIV transmission as supplement to the provision of potent ART.

  17. Continuous renal replacement therapy with a polymethyl methacrylate membrane hemofilter suppresses inflammation in patients after open-heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaida, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Satoshi; Inotani, Takahiro; Nakamura, Atsushi; Amano, Atsushi

    2018-02-05

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces a complex inflammatory response involving an increase in inflammatory cytokines, called postperfusion syndrome. Previous studies demonstrated that adsorption of the serum cytokines can reduce acute inflammation and improve clinical outcomes. In this study, patients were placed on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) membrane hemofilter immediately after the start of an open-heart surgery with CPB and throughout the postoperative course to prevent postperfusion syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess whether continuous CRRT using a PMMA filter (PMMA-CRRT) could affect cytokine expression and improve perioperative outcomes. We designed a randomized controlled trial, which included 19 consecutive adult patients on maintenance dialysis and 7 consecutive adult patients who were not on maintenance dialysis (NHD group). Patients on maintenance dialysis were randomly divided into two groups: Ten patients who received CRRT with a polysulfone membrane hemofilter (PS group) and nine patients who received CRRT with a PMMA membrane (PMMA group). Blood samples were collected from the radial or brachial artery at five different time points. Comparisons between the PS, PMMA, and NHD groups revealed a significant main effect of time on changes in serum IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations (p < 0.01) and an interaction (p < 0.05) between time and group. Plasma IL-6 and IL-8 levels after surgery were significantly lower in the PMMA group than in the PS group, while other cytokines measured in this study were not significantly different. In addition, clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the groups. The continuous use of PMMA-CRRT throughout the perioperative period suppressed serum IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations, although there were no differences in clinical outcomes.

  18. Suppression of dark current radiation in step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy by the initial pulse-forming network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Das, Indra J.; Ndlovu, Alois M.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the initial pulse forming network (IPFN) on the suppression of dark current is investigated for a Siemens Primus accelerator. The dark current produces a spurious radiation, which is referred to as dark current radiation (DCR) in this study. In the step-and-shoot delivery of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the DCR could be of some concern for whole body dose along with leakage radiation through collimator jaws or multileaf collimator. By adjusting the IPFN-to-PFN ratio to >0.8, the DCR can be measured with an ion chamber during the 'PAUSE' state of the accelerator in the IMRT mode. For 15 MV x rays, the magnitude of the DCR is approximately equal to 0.7% of the dose at d max for a 10x10 cm 2 field. The DCR has a similar central axis depth dose as a 15 MV beam as determined from a water phantom scan. When the IPFN-to-PFN ratio is lowered to <0.8, no DCR is detected. For low energy x rays (6 MV), no DCR is detected regardless of the IPFN-to-PFN ratio. Although the DCR is studied only for the Siemens Primus model accelerator, the same precaution applies to other models of modern accelerators from other vendors. Due to the large number of field segments used in a step-and-shoot IMRT, it is imperative therefore, that dark current evaluation be part of machine commissioning and annual calibration for high-energy photon beams. Should DCR be detected, the medical physicist should work with a service engineer to rectify the problem. In view of DCR and whole body dose, low-energy photon beams are advisable for IMRT

  19. Prevalence of low bone mineral density among HIV patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy in resource limited setting of western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravid, Ameet; Kulkarni, Milind; Borkar, Amit; Dhande, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) assessment in HIV patients is sparsely done in resource limited settings. We conducted a cross-sectional study of BMD amongst HIV patients following up in our clinic from 1 June to 1 December 2013 by performing dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan (Lunar Prodigy Advanced DXA System, GE Healthcare) of lumbar spine and hip. Patients on long term (≥12 months), virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) were included. Patients who were ART naïve were included as control population. Virologic failures were excluded. Low BMD was defined by WHO T-score criteria (normal: T score ≥-1;osteopenia: T score between -1 and -2.5 SD; osteoporosis: T score ≤-2.5 SD). Baseline risk factors associated with low BMD like age, low BMI, lipoatrophy, diabetes mellitus, current smoking, current alcohol intake, steroid exposure and menopause were recorded. ART-related factors associated with low BMD like ART duration, exposure to tenofovir and exposure to protease inhibitors (PI) were studied. A total of 536 patients (66% males, 496 ART experienced and 40 ART naïve) were included in this analysis. Median age was 42 years, mean BMI 23.35 kg/m(2) and median CD4 count 146 cells/mm(3). All ART experienced patients had plasma viral loadpatients in our cohort is a matter of deep concern due to its association with pathological fractures. Bone mineral loss was seen irrespective of ART used. Association of low BMD with low baseline CD4 count strengthens the case for early ART.

  20. Exercise is associated with better quality of life in patients on TSH-suppressive therapy with levothyroxine for differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigário, Patrícia dos Santos; Chachamovitz, Dhiãnah Santini de Oliveira; Teixeira, Patrícia de Fátima dos Santos; Rocque, Maíra de La; Santos, Maryna Lobo dos; Vaisman, Mário

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate if a supervised exercise training program improves the quality of life (QoL) of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients on TSH-suppressive therapy with levothyroxine (L-T4). Initially, a cross-sectional study was performed to compare the QoL and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) patients (n = 33) and euthyroid subjects (EU; n = 49). In the prospective phase of the study, SCH patients were randomized in a non-blinded fashion to either participate (SCH-Tr = trained patients; n = 16) or not (SCH-Sed = untrained patients; n = 17) in a supervised exercise training program. The exercise program consisted of 60 minutes of aerobic and stretching exercises, twice a week, during twelve weeks. The QoL was assessed by the application of the WHOQOL-Bref, and the SF-36 was used to assess the HRQoL. SCH patients had statistically lower scores than EU on the "physical" domain of WHOQOL-Bref, besides "physical function", "role-physical", "bodily pain", "general health", "vitality", "role-emotional", and "mental-health" domains of SF-36. After three months, SCH-Tr patients showed improvement in the "physical" and "psychological" domains of WHOQOL-Bref (p after 3-months of an exercise training program. Exercise seems to play an important role in the follow-up of DTC patients, since it seems to minimize the adverse effects of the treatment on QoL and HRQoL.

  1. [Effects of acupoint-injection of Kaixilai on TG, TC, MDA, SOD, AST and ALT in the patient of non-alcoholic fatty liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian-jun; Xu, Ya-li; Zheng, Yu

    2006-02-01

    To observe therapeutic effect of acupoint-injection of Kaixilai on non-alcoholic fatty liver. One hundred cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver were randomly divided into a test group and a control group, 50 cases in each group. The test group were treated with injection of 2 mL Kaixilai injection into Zusanli (ST 36), thrice each week, for 3 months; and the control group were treated with intravenous drip of 200 mL Kaixilai injection, once each day, for 3 months. Changes of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), malondialhyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (AST), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT), and clinical symptoms were observed in the two groups. There were significant differences before and after treatment in the symptoms, TG, TC, MDA, SOD, AST and ALT in the two groups (P0.05). Acupoint-injection of Kaixilai is an effective therapy for non-alcoholic fatty liver, with convenience, economic and no adverse effect.

  2. Individual differences in plasma ALT, AST and GGT: contributions of genetic and environmental factors, including alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, J B; Martin, N G

    1985-01-01

    The causes of individuality of the plasma enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT; EC 2.6.1.2), aspartate aminotransferase (AST; EC 2.6.1.1) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT; EC 2.3.2.2) were investigated in a study of 206 pairs of twins. Between-person variance was greater in men than women, while within-person variation was similar in both sexes. Plasma ALT and AST levels were affected by genetic factors, while GGT was affected by some environmental factor shared by co-twins. In the men, alcohol intake had a significant but small effect on all three enzyme levels, and since alcohol consumption was highly heritable, this appeared as a genetic influence on enzyme activities. The major factors involved in the observed correlations between these enzymes were a non-shared environmental factor other than alcohol affecting ALT, AST and GGT, and a genetic factor affecting only ALT and AST.

  3. Incremental Predictive Value of Serum AST-to-ALT Ratio for Incident Metabolic Syndrome: The ARIRANG Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Yadav

    Full Text Available The ratio of aspartate aminotransferase (AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT is of great interest as a possible novel marker of metabolic syndrome. However, longitudinal studies emphasizing the incremental predictive value of the AST-to-ALT ratio in diagnosing individuals at higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome are very scarce. Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the AST-to-ALT ratio as an incremental predictor of new onset metabolic syndrome in a population-based cohort study.The population-based cohort study included 2276 adults (903 men and 1373 women aged 40-70 years, who participated from 2005-2008 (baseline without metabolic syndrome and were followed up from 2008-2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition of metabolic syndrome. Serum concentrations of AST and ALT were determined by enzymatic methods.During an average follow-up period of 2.6-years, 395 individuals (17.4% developed metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable adjusted model, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval for new onset of metabolic syndrome, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile of the AST-to-ALT ratio, was 0.598 (0.422-0.853. The AST-to-ALT ratio also improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC for predicting new cases of metabolic syndrome (0.715 vs. 0.732, P = 0.004. The net reclassification improvement of prediction models including the AST-to-ALT ratio was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.124-0.337, P<0.001, and the integrated discrimination improvement was 0.0094 (95% CI: 0.0046-0.0143, P<0.001.The AST-to-ALT ratio independently predicted the future development of metabolic syndrome and had incremental predictive value for incident metabolic syndrome.

  4. Correlation between Aminotransferase Ratio (AST/ALT and Other Biochemical Parameters in Chronic Liver Disease of Viral Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Md Fazlul Karim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years the ratio of aspartate aminotransferase (AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT in patients of chronic liver disease (CLD of various origins has gained much attention. This variable is readily available, easy to interpret, and inexpensive and the clinical utility of the AST/ALT ratio in the diagnostic workup of patients with CLD is quite promising. Objective: The present study was designed to find out the link between aminotransferase (AST/ALT ratio with commonly measured biochemical parameters of liver function tests in CLD of viral origin. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Forty four biopsy proven diagnosed subjects of chronic viral hepatitis without cirrhosis of both sex were selected purposively. With aseptic precaution 5 mL venous blood was collected from each subject and common liver function tests (serum AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, serum total protein, serum albumin, serum globulin, serum albumin/globulin ratio, prothrombin time and viral serology (HBsAg, Anti HDV antibody, Anti HCV antibody were performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 19 for Windows. Pearson’s correlation test was done to determine association between AST/ALT with other biochemical parameters. Results: Mean(±SD age of the study subjects was 32.55±10.55 years (range 20-50 years with 48 (77.7% male and 14 (22.6% female subjects. Pearson’s correlation test was done between AST to ALT ratio with other biochemical parameters and prothrombin time showed significant positive correlation (p <0.01. Conclusion: In our study we found significant positive correlation between AST/ALT with prothrombin time in CLD subjects without cirrhosis.

  5. Oral ADSORBENT AST-120 decreases carotid intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Kawagoe, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Takaharu; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Shimada, Noriaki; Ebihara, Isao; Koide, Hikaru

    2004-01-01

    Intima media thickness (IMT) and stiffness of the carotid arteries is related to coronary artery disease, and chronic renal failure patients are at high risk for such diseases. An oral adsorbent, AST-120 (Kremezin; Kureha Chemical Industry, Tokyo, Japan), can delay the progression of chronic renal failure in undialyzed uremic patients. The aim of the present study was to determine whether AST-120 affects carotid artery IMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients with chronic renal failure not undergoing dialysis. Fifty patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure were randomly divided into two groups: 30 patients (18 men and 12 women; mean age 53.5 years; mean serum creatinine 3.2 mg/dl) who were given AST-120 (6.0 g/day) and 20 patients (12 men and 8 women; mean age 52.0 years; mean serum creatinine 3.5 mg/dl) who were not given AST-120. Thirty healthy age-matched subjects (18 men and 12 women; mean age 51.5 years; mean serum creatinine 0.9 mg/dl) were also included. The treatment period was 24 months. IMT and arterial stiffness were measured before and after treatment. The slope of the reciprocal serum creatinine concentration over time became significantly less steep in the AST-120 group than in the non-AST-120 group (p < 0.001). Before treatment, carotid artery IMT differed little between the AST-120 group (0.90 +/- 0.22 mm) and the non-AST-120 group (0.88 +/- 0.20 mm). IMT in these two groups was significantly greater than IMT in the control group (0.64 +/- 0.14 mm) (p < 0.01). Carotid IMT in the AST-120 group decreased slightly but not significantly to 0.84 +/- 0.20 mm after 12 months and then significantly after 24 months to 0.78 +/- 0.18 mm (p < 0.05). Carotid IMT in the non-AST group showed little change throughout the experimental period. PWV differed little between the AST-120 group (1,980 +/- 330 cm/s) and the non-AST group (1,940 +/- 360 cm/s) before treatment. PWV values in these two groups were significantly greater than PWV in the control

  6. [Effects of polydatin on ALT, AST, TNF-alpha, and COX-2 in sepsis model mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Meng-Jiao; Zhang, Li-Na; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Li; Wan, Jing-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the protective effects of polydatin on sepsis-induced acute liver injury (ALI) in mice, and to preliminarily study its mechanisms. The sepsis model was established using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP).A sham-operation control group was also set up. Polydatin (50, 100, and 300 mg/kg, respectively) was administrated to mice 1 h before CLP. The survival and liver injury were evaluated subsequently per 6 h after CLP. The survived mice were scarified 24 h later. The serum and the liver tissue sample were collected. The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were detected by colorimetric method. The content of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was assayed by ELISA. The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the liver tissue was detected by Western blot. The pathological changes of the hepatic tissue were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin stain. The mortality of mice reached as high as 50% at 24 h after CLP. The biochemical indices and the pathological changes of the liver tissue showed obvious lesion. The success rate of modeling was 90%. Compared with the sham-operation control group, the serum ALT,AST activity, the TNF-alpha content, and the hepatic COX-2 protein expression markedly increased in the CLP group (P < 0.01). Polydatin improved the sepsis-induced mortality dose-dependently, inhibited increased ALT, AST activity and TNF-alpha, decreased the hepatic COX-2 protein expression, and attenuated the pathological injury of the liver (P < 0.05). Polydatin could effectively protect sepsis-induced ALI, which might be achieved possibly through inhibiting serum TNF-alpha production and hepatic COX-2 expression.

  7. Truth-telling contra perfectionist liberalism: Muslim parrhēsíastes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renders, Johannes

    In this paper, I first offer a general outline and reflection on the notion of parrhēsía (truth-telling), as popularized by Foucault. Secondly, I discuss Foucault’s history of problematizations, with comments on what he called “games of truth” and the Cartesian conception of truth-telling. Thirdly......, I sketch a trend in the current Danish public and political sphere, defining the notion of “perfectionist liberalism” and how it translates to the Danish context, including concrete examples and notes on “liberal intolerance arguments”. Lastly, I address the condition of Muslim parrhēsíastes (truth...

  8. Theoretical model for investigating the dynamic behaviour of the AST-500 type nuclear heating station reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Rohde, U.; Naumann, B.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on theoretical simulation of the dynamic behaviour of the AST-500 type reactor primary coolant system are summarized. The first version of a dynamic model in the form of the DYNAST code is described. The DYNAST code is based on a one-dimensional description of the primary coolant circuit including core, draught stack, and intermediate heat exchanger, a vapour dome model, and the point model of neutron kinetics. With the aid of the steady-state computational part of the DYNAST code, studies have been performed on different steady-state operating conditions. Furthermore, some methodological investigations on generalization and improvement of the dynamic model are considered and results presented. (author)

  9. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  10. Incremental Predictive Value of Serum AST-to-ALT Ratio for Incident Metabolic Syndrome: The ARIRANG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Baik, Soon Koo; Cho, Youn zoo; Koh, Sang Baek; Huh, Ji Hye; Chang, Yoosoo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kim, Jang Young

    2016-01-01

    Aims The ratio of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is of great interest as a possible novel marker of metabolic syndrome. However, longitudinal studies emphasizing the incremental predictive value of the AST-to-ALT ratio in diagnosing individuals at higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome are very scarce. Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the AST-to-ALT ratio as an incremental predictor of new onset metabolic syndrome in a population-based cohort study. Material and Methods The population-based cohort study included 2276 adults (903 men and 1373 women) aged 40–70 years, who participated from 2005–2008 (baseline) without metabolic syndrome and were followed up from 2008–2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition of metabolic syndrome. Serum concentrations of AST and ALT were determined by enzymatic methods. Results During an average follow-up period of 2.6-years, 395 individuals (17.4%) developed metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable adjusted model, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for new onset of metabolic syndrome, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile of the AST-to-ALT ratio, was 0.598 (0.422–0.853). The AST-to-ALT ratio also improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicting new cases of metabolic syndrome (0.715 vs. 0.732, P = 0.004). The net reclassification improvement of prediction models including the AST-to-ALT ratio was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.124–0.337, Pmetabolic syndrome and had incremental predictive value for incident metabolic syndrome. PMID:27560931

  11. Incremental Predictive Value of Serum AST-to-ALT Ratio for Incident Metabolic Syndrome: The ARIRANG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Choi, Eunhee; Ahn, Song Vogue; Baik, Soon Koo; Cho, Youn Zoo; Koh, Sang Baek; Huh, Ji Hye; Chang, Yoosoo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kim, Jang Young

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is of great interest as a possible novel marker of metabolic syndrome. However, longitudinal studies emphasizing the incremental predictive value of the AST-to-ALT ratio in diagnosing individuals at higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome are very scarce. Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the AST-to-ALT ratio as an incremental predictor of new onset metabolic syndrome in a population-based cohort study. The population-based cohort study included 2276 adults (903 men and 1373 women) aged 40-70 years, who participated from 2005-2008 (baseline) without metabolic syndrome and were followed up from 2008-2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition of metabolic syndrome. Serum concentrations of AST and ALT were determined by enzymatic methods. During an average follow-up period of 2.6-years, 395 individuals (17.4%) developed metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable adjusted model, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for new onset of metabolic syndrome, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile of the AST-to-ALT ratio, was 0.598 (0.422-0.853). The AST-to-ALT ratio also improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicting new cases of metabolic syndrome (0.715 vs. 0.732, P = 0.004). The net reclassification improvement of prediction models including the AST-to-ALT ratio was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.124-0.337, Pmetabolic syndrome and had incremental predictive value for incident metabolic syndrome.

  12. Variable Stars Observed in the Galactic Disk by AST3-1 from Dome A, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lingzhi; Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Qiang; Shang, Zhaohui [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Gang; Fu, Jianning [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875 (China); Wang, Lifan; Cui, Xiangqun; Du, Fujia; Gong, Xuefei; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhengyang; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhou, Jilin [Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ashley, Michael C. B. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Pennypacker, Carl R. [Center for Astrophysics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: wanglingzhi@bao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    AST3-1 is the second-generation wide-field optical photometric telescope dedicated to time-domain astronomy at Dome A, Antarctica. Here, we present the results of an i -band images survey from AST3-1 toward one Galactic disk field. Based on time-series photometry of 92,583 stars, 560 variable stars were detected with i magnitude ≤16.5 mag during eight days of observations; 339 of these are previously unknown variables. We tentatively classify the 560 variables as 285 eclipsing binaries (EW, EB, and EA), 27 pulsating variable stars ( δ Scuti, γ Doradus, δ Cephei variable, and RR Lyrae stars), and 248 other types of variables (unclassified periodic, multiperiodic, and aperiodic variable stars). Of the eclipsing binaries, 34 show O’Connell effects. One of the aperiodic variables shows a plateau light curve and another variable shows a secondary maximum after peak brightness. We also detected a complex binary system with an RS CVn-like light-curve morphology; this object is being followed-up spectroscopically using the Gemini South telescope.

  13. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  14. Dual Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Lamivudine vs Triple Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine or Abacavir and Lamivudine for Maintenance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Suppression: Randomized, Open-Label, Noninferiority DUAL-GESIDA 8014-RIS-EST45 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Lagarde, María; Pérez-Valero, Ignacio; Palacios, Rosario; Iribarren, José A; Payeras, Antoni; Domingo, Pere; Sanz, José; Cervero, Miguel; Curran, Adrián; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco J; Téllez, María J; Ryan, Pablo; Barrufet, Pilar; Knobel, Hernando; Rivero, Antonio; Alejos, Belén; Yllescas, María; Arribas, José R

    2017-11-29

    Our objective was to assess the therapeutic noninferiority of dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine compared to triple therapy with darunavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleos(t)ides for maintenance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suppression. This was a multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial (margin 12%). Patients with HIV-1 RNA dual- and triple-therapy arms was 88.9% (112/126) and 92.7% (114/123; difference, -3.8%; 95% confidence interval, -11.0 to 3.4), respectively. Four participants in the dual-therapy arm and 2 in the triple-therapy arm developed protocol-defined virological failure. Switching to dual therapy was associated with a significant increase in total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but not in the total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio. Serious adverse events and study drug discontinuations due to adverse events occurred in 4.8% vs 4.9%P = .97) and in 0.8% (1/126) vs 1.6% P = .55) in dual therapy vs triple therapy, respectively. Dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine demonstrated noninferior therapeutic efficacy and similar tolerability compared to triple therapy. NCT02159599. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Liver enzymes: interaction analysis of smoking with alcohol consumption or BMI, comparing AST and ALT to γ-GT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz P Breitling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A detrimental interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption with respect serum γ-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT has recently been described. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The present work aimed to provide further insights by examining similar interactions pertaining to aspartate and alanine transaminase (AST, ALT, routine liver markers less prone to enzyme induction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present cross-sectional analysis was based on records from routine occupational health examinations of 15,281 male employees predominantly of the construction industry, conducted from 1986 to 1992 in Southern Germany. Associations of smoking intensity with log-transformed activities of γ-GT, AST, and ALT were examined in regression models adjusted for potential confounders and including an interaction of smoking with alcohol consumption or body mass index (BMI. Statistically significant interactions of smoking were observed with both alcohol consumption (AST and ALT, each with P<0.0001 and BMI (AST only, P<0.0001. The interactions all were in the same directions as for γ-GT, i.e. synergistic with alcohol and opposite with BMI. CONCLUSION: The patterns of interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption or BMI with respect to AST and ALT resembled those observed for γ-GT. This renders enzyme induction a less probable mechanism for these associations, whereas it might implicate exacerbated hepatocellular vulnerability and injury.

  16. AKTIVITAS ASPARTAT AMINOTRANSFERASE (AST DAN ALANIN TRANSAMINASE (ALT PADA MONYET EKOR PANJANG (Macaca fascicularis OBESITAS DI PURA LUHUR ULUWATU, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Paramita Lestari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian obsevasional-deskriptif dengan pendekatan cross-sectional telah dilakukan untuk mengetahui aktivitas aspartat aminotransferase (AST dan alanin transaminase (ALT pada monyet ekor panjang (Macaca fascicularis obesitas yang hidup liar di kawasan Pura Luhur Uluwatu, Bali. Sebanyak 16 ekor monyet ekor panjang berhasil dibius menggunakan ketamine dosis 10 mg/kg berat badan dicampur dengan premedikasi xylasin dosis 1-2 mg/kg berat badan. Sampel yang digunakan adalah serum darah monyet obesitas yang diambil dari monyet dalam keadaan terbius. Dari 16 ekor monyet, 12 ekor tergolong obesitas berdasarkan Indeks Massa Tubuh dan Berat Badan. Aktivitas aspartat aminotransferase (AST dan alanin transaminase (ALT ditentukan menggunakan mesin automatic chemistry analyzer (Indiko-Thermo Scientific. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan nilai AST bervariasi dari 43-88 U/L dan ALT 26-77 U/L dengan rataan 69,4 ± 14,9 U/L. Dari hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa nilai AST dan ALT monyet obesitas cenderung lebih tinggi dari nilai AST dan ALT normal.

  17. [Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio in health surveillance of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer: preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, L; Corfiati, M; Bulfaro, D; Liuzzi, G; Zenzola, M; Soleo, L

    2003-01-01

    An AST/ALT ratio > 1 is predictive of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The aim of this case-control study is to assess AST/ALT ratio in 150 workers exposed to VCM (E) from the beginning of the 1960s to the end of the 1990s. The non-exposed group (NE) consists in 150 male workers employed in the production of a food industry. At least since 1983 exposed subjects worked at VCM environmental concentrations 1 significantly higher than non-exposed. The mean AST/ALT ratio results significantly higher in the exposed group, also after stratification for alcohol consumption. In exposed workers who consume alcoholic beverages and are operating since before 1983 AST/ALT ratio is significantly and positively influenced only by the working age until 1983. If these results will be confirmed, AST/ALT ratio could be proposed to be included in the periodic medical surveillance of VCM workers.

  18. Liver enzymes: interaction analysis of smoking with alcohol consumption or BMI, comparing AST and ALT to γ-GT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Lutz P; Arndt, Volker; Drath, Christoph; Brenner, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    A detrimental interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption with respect serum γ-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT) has recently been described. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The present work aimed to provide further insights by examining similar interactions pertaining to aspartate and alanine transaminase (AST, ALT), routine liver markers less prone to enzyme induction. The present cross-sectional analysis was based on records from routine occupational health examinations of 15,281 male employees predominantly of the construction industry, conducted from 1986 to 1992 in Southern Germany. Associations of smoking intensity with log-transformed activities of γ-GT, AST, and ALT were examined in regression models adjusted for potential confounders and including an interaction of smoking with alcohol consumption or body mass index (BMI). Statistically significant interactions of smoking were observed with both alcohol consumption (AST and ALT, each with P<0.0001) and BMI (AST only, P<0.0001). The interactions all were in the same directions as for γ-GT, i.e. synergistic with alcohol and opposite with BMI. The patterns of interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption or BMI with respect to AST and ALT resembled those observed for γ-GT. This renders enzyme induction a less probable mechanism for these associations, whereas it might implicate exacerbated hepatocellular vulnerability and injury.

  19. Association of genetic polymorphism -670A>G in the Fas gene and serum markers AST platelet ratio index, AST/ALT with significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghady, Akram; Abdou, Alaa; El-Neanaey, Wafaa Ahmed; Diab, Iman

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the association of genetic polymorphism -670A>G in the promoter of Fas gene as well as serum biomarkers aspartate aminotransferase (AST) platelet ratio index (APRI) and AST/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C patients. Seventy-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C in addition to 80 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for genetic polymorphism -670A>G of Fas gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and serum biomarkers APRI and AST/ALT in relation to significant fibrosis and cirrhosis diagnosed by liver biopsy. Genetic polymorphism -670A>G in Fas gene was associated with significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Heterozygous mutation was found in 11.4% of patients and 10% of controls, while homozygous mutation was found only in 7.6% of patients. Odds ratio (OR) was statistically not significant (OR=1.93, 95% confidence interval=0.76-4.92). Mean values of APRI and AST/ALT were significantly higher in patients with (F3-F4) compared with those with (F0-F2). (p-value G of Fas gene was associated with significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C patients. APRI and AST/ALT are independent predictors for significant fibrosis. APRI showed a better sensitivity than AST/ALT for prediction of significant fibrosis. Moreover, APRI can be used as an index to exclude liver cirrhosis without performing liver biopsy.

  20. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load: a longitudinal cohort study from COHERE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Young

    Full Text Available Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load.Using data from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (2010 merger, we assessed the risk of a new AIDS-defining event or death in successfully treated patients. We accumulated episodes of viral suppression for each patient while on cART, each episode beginning with the second of two consecutive plasma viral load measurements 500 copies/µl, the first of two consecutive measurements between 50-500 copies/µl, cART interruption or administrative censoring. We used stratified multivariate Cox models to estimate the association between time updated CD4 cell count and a new AIDS event or death or death alone. 75,336 patients contributed 104,265 suppression episodes and were suppressed while on cART for a median 2.7 years. The mortality rate was 4.8 per 1,000 years of viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was always associated with a reduced risk of a new AIDS event or death; with a hazard ratio per 100 cells/µl (95% CI of: 0.35 (0.30-0.40 for counts <200 cells/µl, 0.81 (0.71-0.92 for counts 200 to <350 cells/µl, 0.74 (0.66-0.83 for counts 350 to <500 cells/µl, and 0.96 (0.92-0.99 for counts ≥500 cells/µl. A higher CD4 cell count became even more beneficial over time for patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl.Despite the low mortality rate, the risk of a new AIDS event or death follows a CD4 cell count gradient in patients with viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was associated with the greatest benefit for patients with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µl but still some slight benefit for those with a CD4 cell count ≥500 cells/µl.

  1. Matching design and layout of the nuclear heating station AST-500 to the district heating network conditions in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzow, K.; Bordihn, S.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear heating stations provide one possibility of supplying nuclear heat. They are uniquely intended for heat supply. The well-known Soviet nuclear heating station AST-500 with an output temperature of 150 0 C in the network pipes is below the value designed for some heat supply systems in the GDR. On the basis of a general method applicable to the choice of optimum parameters, proposals are placed for optimally matching design and layout of the AST-500 station to higher output temperatures. Minimization of the difference in expenses between the modified version and the well-known basic version of the AST-500 station has been used as the objective function of optimization. (author)

  2. Highly sensitive determination of TSH in the follow-up of TSH-suppressive therapy of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, K.; Saller, B.; Mehl, U.; Hoermann, R.; Moser, E.

    1988-02-01

    Basal and TRH-stimulated TSH levels were determined in 72 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer on hormonal treatment, using a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay (IRMAclon, Henning). 43 patients were under treatment with levothyroxine (T/sub 4/), 29 patients with triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/). In 33/43 patients (77%) under T/sub 4/- and in 18/29 patients (62%) under T/sub 3/-treatment basal TSH levels were below 0.1 mU/l. 3 patients showed a significant response (to above 0.5 mU/l) in the TRH test despite basal values of less than 0.1 mU/l. In 2 patients with elevated basal TSH levels (0.23 and 0.60 mU/l, resp.) in the IRMAclon, total suppression of TSH secretion was suggested by a failure of TSH to rise after TRH. By retesting these samples in an own TSH IRMA, basal and stimulated TSH values were below 0.1 mU/l. In conclusion, basal and TRH-stimulated TSH levels are well correlated in most patients with thyroid cancer under hormonal treatment. However, in some cases (5/72) determination of basal TSH could not clearly define the degree of thyrotropic suppression. Thus, TRH testing is still necessary to establish definitely complete TSH suppression in patients with thyroid carcinoma under suppressive treatment.

  3. Retention in care, viral suppression, treatment adherence and quality of life in a public antiretroviral therapy program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    In his thesis, Legese A. Mekuria presents the results of a PhD study which was undertaken in 10 health-care facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The overall aim was to estimate retention in HIV care, viral suppression, medication adherence and patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL). An

  4. Angular analysis of $B^0 \\to K^\\ast(892)^0 \\ell^+ \\ell^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Arita, Y.; Asner, D.M.; Aso, T.; Atmacan, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A.M.; Bala, A.; Ban, Y.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Barrett, M.; Bartel, W.; Bay, A.; Bedny, I.; Behera, P.; Belhorn, M.; Belous, K.; Besson, D.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bloomfield, T.; Blyth, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bookwalter, C.; Boulahouache, C.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Breibeck, F.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T.E.; Waheed, E.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, M. -C.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, K. -F.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B.G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S. -K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Crnkovic, J.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Dossett, D.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dubey, S.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Esen, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, B.G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y.M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Greenwald, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grygier, J.; Grzymkowska, O.; Guo, H.; Haba, J.; Hamer, P.; Han, Y.L.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.H.; Heck, M.; Hedges, M.T.; Heffernan, D.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Higuchi, T.; Himori, S.; Hirose, S.; Horiguchi, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hoshina, K.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Hsu, C. -L.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.J.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Imamura, M.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itagaki, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwata, S.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H.B.; Joffe, D.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Julius, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kang, J.H.; Kang, K.H.; Kapusta, P.; Kataoka, S.U.; Kato, E.; Kato, Y.; Katrenko, P.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, B.H.; Kim, D.Y.; Kim, H.J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, J.B.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.T.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, S.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kleinwort, C.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B.R.; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Koga, Y.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kouzes, R.T.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kurihara, E.; Kuroki, Y.; Kuzmin, A.; Kvasnička, P.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lai, Y. -T.; Lange, J.S.; Lee, D.H.; Lee, I.S.; Lee, S. -H.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, R.; Levit, D.; Lewis, P.; Li, C.H.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Limosani, A.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.Q.; Liventsev, D.; Loos, A.; Louvot, R.; Lubej, M.; Lukin, P.; Luo, T.; MacNaughton, J.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Mikami, Y.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G.B.; Mohanty, S.; Mohapatra, D.; Moll, A.; Moon, H.K.; Mori, T.; Morii, T.; Moser, H. -G.; Müller, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nagamine, T.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Nakamura, K.R.; Nakano, E.; Nakano, H.; Nakano, T.; Nakao, M.; Nakayama, H.; Nakazawa, H.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K.J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Negishi, K.; Neichi, K.; Ng, C.; Niebuhr, C.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N.K.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, A.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.L.; Ono, Y.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Palka, H.; Panzenböck, E.; Park, C. -S.; Park, C.W.; Park, H.; Park, K.S.; Paul, S.; Peak, L.S.; Pedlar, T.K.; Peng, T.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Peters, M.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L.E.; Poluektov, A.; Prasanth, K.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Pulvermacher, C.; Purohit, M.V.; Rauch, J.; Reisert, B.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rorie, J.; Rostomyan, A.; Rozanska, M.; Rummel, S.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sasao, N.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schönmeier, P.; Schram, M.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A.J.; Schwenker, B.; Seidl, R.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I.S.; Sevior, M.E.; Shang, L.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shibuya, H.; Shinomiya, S.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Singh, J.B.; Sinha, R.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Strube, J.F.; Stypula, J.; Sugihara, S.; Sugiyama, A.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S.Y.; Suzuki, Z.; Takeichi, H.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Taylor, G.N.; Tenchini, F.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Tse, Y.F.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uchida, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Ushiroda, Y.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, S.E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.E.; Vervink, K.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M.N.; Wang, C.H.; Wang, J.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Wehle, S.; White, E.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, K.M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B.D.; Yamada, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, L.M.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, L.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Ziegler, M.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.; Zwahlen, N.; Zyukova, O.

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of angular observables, $P_4'$, $P_5'$, $P_6'$, $P_8'$, in the decay $B^0 \\to K^\\ast(892)^0 \\ell^+ \\ell^-$, where $\\ell^+\\ell^-$ is either $e^+e^-$ or $\\mu^+\\mu^-$. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $711~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ containing $772\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar B$ pairs, collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider KEKB. Four angular observables, $P_{4,5,6,8}'$ are extracted in five bins of the invariant mass squared of the lepton system, $q^2$. We compare our results for $P_{4,5,6,8}'$ with Standard Model predictions including the $q^2$ region in which the LHCb collaboration reported the so-called $P_5'$ anomaly.

  5. Measurement prospects for VBF $H{\\rightarrow\\,}WW^{(\\ast)}{\\rightarrow\\,}e\

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents the prospects for the ATLAS experiment to observe and measure Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) Higgs-boson production, with the Higgs boson decaying into two $W$ bosons in the High Luminosity LHC environment. The production of two forward jets in association with the Higgs boson, as well as the requirement that the $W$ bosons both decay to leptons, provides a distinctive detector signature. The VBF production process has the second largest Higgs-boson production cross-section at the LHC and can be computed with small theoretical uncertainties. These properties allow for precision measurements in the High Luminosity LHC with 3 $\\textrm{ab}^{-1}$ of data. In addition, measurements of the VBF $H{\\rightarrow\\,}WW^{(\\ast)}{\\rightarrow\\,}e\

  6. High levels of viral suppression among East African HIV-infected women and men in serodiscordant partnerships initiating antiretroviral therapy with high CD4 counts and during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared; Kidoguchi, Lara; Haberer, Jessica; Celum, Connie; Donnell, Deborah; Ngure, Kenneth; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Mugo, Nelly; Asiimwe, Stephen; Odoyo, Josephine; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Bulya, Nulu; Katabira, Elly; Heffron, Renee

    2017-09-13

    People who are asymptomatic and feel healthy, including pregnant women, may be less motivated to initiate ART or achieve high adherence. We assessed whether ART initiation, and viral suppression 6, 12 and 24-months after ART initiation, were lower in HIV-infected members of serodiscordant couples who initiated during pregnancy or with higher CD4 counts. We used data from the Partners Demonstration Project, an open-label study of the delivery of integrated PrEP and ART (at any CD4 count) for HIV prevention among high-risk HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda. Differences in viral suppression (HIV RNA 500 cells/mm3) and during pregnancy were estimated using Poisson regression. Of 865 HIV-infected participants retained after becoming eligible for ART during study follow-up, 95% initiated ART. Viral suppression 24-months after ART initiation was high overall (97%), and comparable among those initiating ART at CD4 counts >500, 351-500 and ≤350 cells/mm3 (96% vs 97% vs 97%; relative risk [RR] 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1.03 for CD4 >500 vs <350 and RR 0.99; 95% CI: (0.93-1.06) for CD4 351-500 vs ≤350). Viral suppression was as likely among women initiating ART primarily to prevent perinatal transmission as ART initiation for other reasons (p=0.9 at 6 months and p=0.5 at 12 months). Nearly all HIV-infected partners initiating ART were virally suppressed by 24 months, irrespective of CD4 count or pregnancy status. These findings suggest that people initiating ART at high CD4 counts or due to pregnancy can adhere to ART as well as those starting treatment with symptomatic HIV disease or low CD4 counts.

  7. HIV-1 specific antibody titers and neutralization among chronically infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available The majority of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 have been isolated from untreated patients with acute or chronic infection. To assess the extent of HIV-1 specific antibody response and neutralization after many years of virologic suppression from potent combination ART, we examined antibody binding titers and neutralization of 51 patients with chronic HIV-1 infection on suppressive ART for at least three years. In this cross-sectional analysis, we found high antibody titers against gp120, gp41, and the membrane proximal external region (MPER in 59%, 43%, and 27% of patients, respectively. We observed significantly higher endpoint binding titers for gp120 and gp41 for patients with >10 compared to ≤ 10 years of detectable HIV RNA. Additionally, we observed higher median gp120 and gp41 antibody titers in patients with HIV RNA 10 years of detectable HIV RNA (8/20 [40.0%] versus 3/31 [9.7%] for ≤ 10 years, p = 0.02 and a trend toward greater neutralization in patients with ≤ 5 years of HIV RNA 5 years, p = 0.08. All patients with neutralizing activity mediated successful phagocytosis of VLPs by THP-1 cells after antibody opsonization. Our findings of highly specific antibodies to several structural epitopes of HIV-1 with antibody effector functions and neutralizing activity after long-term suppressive ART, suggest continuous antigenic stimulation and evolution of HIV-specific antibody response occurs before and after suppression with ART. These patients, particularly those with slower HIV progression and more time with detectable viremia prior to initiation of suppressive ART, are a promising population to identify and further study functional antibodies against HIV-1.

  8. Influence of gender on the ratio of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in patients with and without hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Jorge R; Dickson, Beverly; Feldman, Mark

    2008-03-01

    The serum asparate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio is widely used in the differential diagnosis of icteric and non-icteric hepatic disorders. Our objective was to determine whether there are gender related-differences in the serum AST/ALT ratio. We used sera from 3,618 unselected patients sent to our laboratory for an automated chemistry panel, which included measurements of AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin. Effects of gender on serum AST, ALT, and AST/ALT were examined in different age groups. Among patients with normal total serum bilirubin concentrations, serum AST and ALT concentrations were significantly lower in the females than in the males (P < 0.0001). However, the serum AST/ALT ratio was higher in the females than the males (median values of 0.90 and 0.81, respectively; P < 0.0001). AST and ALT were also lower in the 54 hyperbilirubinemic females than in the 102 hyperbilirubinemic males. Serum AST/ALT ratios were considerably higher in these 156 hyperbilirubinemic patients than in the normobilirubinemic group, with median ratios of 1.09 in females and 0.92 in males (P = 0.02). Significantly higher serum AST/ALT ratios in females were first evident in the 3rd age decade and remained significantly higher than ratios in males through the 8th decade. We conclude that serum AST/ALT ratios are higher in women than men. When clinicians utilize serum AST/ALT ratios to assess the etiology or chronicity of liver disease, the patient's gender also should be taken into consideration.

  9. Effects of a subdermal levonorgestrel contraceptive implant (Norplant) on serum cholesterol, triglycerides, ALT and AST in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Mohsen; Rahimi, Majid; Naderi, Mohammad; Ghavami, Saied; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Rashidi, Homaira; Hashemi, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Norplant (36 mg of levonorgestrel, six capsules) on serum cholesterol, triglycerides, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transminase (AST), we enrolled 465 healthy women from Zahedan, Iran, into a longitudinal study. Blood samples were collected after an overnight fast before implant insertion and after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of use. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not significantly change during Norplant use. Although there were statistically significant increases in ALT and AST levels during Norplant use, the values were within the reference range.

  10. LHCb: Measurement of the polarization amplitudes of the decay $B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^\\ast$

    CERN Multimedia

    Linn, C

    2011-01-01

    Using the data sample recorded with the LHCb detector in 2010 we perform a combined angular and lifetime analysis of the decay $B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^\\ast$. The data corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 36 pb$^{-1}$ and was taken at the LHC at an centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$= 7 TeV. A total of 3909 $J/\\psi K^*$ candidates are found and are used to extract the polarisation amplitudes and the corresponding strong phases for the decays $B_d \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^\\ast$.

  11. Combinatorial therapy with adenoviral-mediated PTEN and a PI3K inhibitor suppresses malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Guo, Liyun; Song, Yunpeng; Wang, Le; Yu, Kai; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly invasive and challenging tumor of the central nervous system. The mutation/deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is the main genetic change identified in glioblastomas. PTEN plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and has been shown to be an important therapeutic target. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 is commonly used to inhibit glioma cell growth via regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effects of a combinatorial therapy of adenoviral-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) and LY294002 on LN229 and U251 glioma cells in vitro and on tumor xenografts in vivo. In vitro, LN229 and U251 glioma cells were treated by combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002. The growth ability was determined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell invasive ability was analyzed by transwell invasion assay and cell apoptosis analysis via FITC-Annexin V analysis. In vivo, U251 subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft was used to assay anti-tumor effect of combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002 by mean volume of tumors, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL method. The combinatorial treatment clearly suppressed cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, reduced cell invasion and promoted cell apoptosis compared with the Ad-PTEN or LY294002 treatment alone. The treatment worked by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway. In addition, the growth of U251 glioma xenografts treated with the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 was significantly inhibited compared with those treated with Ad-PTEN or LY294002 alone. Our data indicated that the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 effectively suppressed the malignant growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts, suggesting a promising new approach for glioma gene therapy that warrants further investigation.

  12. Emotion suppression, not reappraisal, predicts psychotherapy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Anne; Boecker, Maren; Pawelzik, Markus; Gauggel, Siegfried; Forkmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify whether trait emotion regulation strategies predict successful or unsuccessful psychotherapy outcomes in cognitive behaviour therapy. Three emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal, suppression, and externalizing behaviour) were assessed in 358 in- and outpatients. Patients were then grouped by therapy outcome. Emotion regulation strategies and confounding variables were entered as predictors in multinomial logistic regression analyses. Emotion suppression, but not reappraisal, was found to predict therapy outcomes for in- and outpatients, with patients high in suppression experiencing worse outcomes. Externalizing behaviour was only relevant in inpatient treatment. High suppression might be detrimental to psychotherapy outcome and should be assessed early on. Further research should investigate the influence of suppression on the mechanisms that facilitate change in psychotherapy.

  13. A combination of raised serum AST:ALT ratio and erythrocyte mean cell volume level detects excessive alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, I; Robinson, G M; Stace, N H

    1990-04-11

    The usefulness of the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST): serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio as a guide to the presence of alcoholism was evaluated in four groups of patients. In alcoholics with elevated transaminases the mean AST:ALT ratio was found to be 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.49-1.51), in hepatitis B infection 0.51 (95% CI: 0.50-0.52), in liver cancer 1.25 (95% CI: 1.20-1.29), and in nonmalignant obstructive jaundice 0.59 (95% CI: 0.57-0.61). In alcoholics with normal transaminases the AST:ALT ratio was 1.64 (95% CI: 1.61-1.67). The combination of an AST:ALT ratio of greater than 1.00 with an erythrocyte mean cell volume (MCV) above 90.0 fL resulted in a sensitivity of 97.3% and a specificity of 88.9% for detecting alcoholism in these four groups of patients.

  14. Effects of magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate on AST, ALT, and serum levels of Th1 cytokines in patients with allo-HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinglong; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Yongping; Fan, Xuegong; Liu, Xin; Liu, Fen; Luo, Guoping; Zhang, Bangshuo; Wang, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate (MGL) on aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and serum levels of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines in patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The study included 42 patients prepared for allo-HSCT, who were divided equally into MGL and reduced glutathione groups. The ALT and AST levels were detected 1day before pretreatment and transplantation, and 7, 14, and 21days after transplantation. The total days and times of fever, treatment time of patients in the laminar flow room, white blood cell (WBC) count, platelet (PTL) implantation time, and success rate of transplantation were recorded. The serum levels of Th1/Th2 cytokines were detected. MGL had a significant protective effect on AST 1day before transplantation and 7, 14, and 21days after transplantation, while ALT had a statistical difference only 7days after transplantation. MGL could shorten the duration of fever during transplantation and advance the WBC and PTL implantation time. Significant differences in Th1-like cytokines (P0.05) were found in the MGL group compared with the control group. MGL had significant protective effects on AST after transplantation. MGL could reduce the duration of fever during transplantation, help the reconstruction and recovery of WBCs and PTLs, and regulate Th1 cytokines, revealing its protective effects on hepatic transaminases and graft versus host disease in allo-HSCT patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High level of viral suppression and low switch rate to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adult patients followed over five years: retrospective analysis of the DART trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cissy Kityo

    Full Text Available In contrast to resource-rich countries, most HIV-infected patients in resource-limited countries receive treatment without virological monitoring. There are few long-term data, in this setting, on rates of viral suppression or switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy. The DART trial compared clinically driven monitoring (CDM versus routine laboratory (CD4/haematology/biochemistry and clinical monitoring (LCM in HIV-infected adults initiating therapy. There was no virological monitoring in either study group during follow-up, but viral load was measured in Ugandan participants at trial closure. Two thousand three hundred and seventeen (2317 participants from this country initiated antiretroviral therapy with zidovudine/lamivudine plus tenofovir (n = 1717, abacavir (n = 300, or nevirapine (n = 300. Of 1896 (81.8% participants who were alive and in follow-up at trial closure (median 5.1 years after therapy initiation, 1507 (79.5% were on first-line and 389 (20.5% on second-line antiretroviral therapy. The overall switch rate after the first year was 5.6 per 100 person-years; the rate was substantially higher in participants with low baseline CD4 counts (<50 cells/mm3. Among 1207 (80.1% first-line participants with viral load measured, HIV RNA was <400 copies/ml in 963 (79.8%, 400-999 copies/ml in 37 (3.1%, 1,000-9,999 copies/ml in 110 (9.1%, and ≥10,000 copies/ml in 97 (8.0%. The proportion with HIV RNA <400 copies/ml was slightly lower (difference 7.1%, 95% CI 2.5 to 11.5% in CDM (76.3% than in LCM (83.4%. Among 252 (64.8% second-line participants with viral load measured (median 2.3 years after switch, HIV RNA was <400 copies/ml in 226 (89.7%, with no difference between monitoring strategies. Low switch rates and high, sustained levels of viral suppression are achievable without viral load or CD4 count monitoring in the context of high-quality clinical care.ISRCTN13968779.

  16. Far infra-red therapy promotes ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice and restores high glucose-suppressed endothelial progenitor cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Po-Hsun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Far infra-red (IFR therapy was shown to exert beneficial effects in cardiovascular system, but effects of IFR on endothelial progenitor cell (EPC and EPC-related vasculogenesis remain unclear. We hypothesized that IFR radiation can restore blood flow recovery in ischemic hindlimb in diabetic mice by enhancement of EPCs functions and homing process. Materials and methods Starting at 4 weeks after the onset of diabetes, unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced in streptozotocine (STZ-induced diabetic mice, which were divided into control and IFR therapy groups (n = 6 per group. The latter mice were placed in an IFR dry sauna at 34°C for 30 min once per day for 5 weeks. Results Doppler perfusion imaging demonstrated that the ischemic limb/normal side blood perfusion ratio in the thermal therapy group was significantly increased beyond that in controls, and significantly greater capillary density was seen in the IFR therapy group. Flow cytometry analysis showed impaired EPCs (Sca-1+/Flk-1+ mobilization after ischemia surgery in diabetic mice with or without IFR therapy (n = 6 per group. However, as compared to those in the control group, bone marrow-derived EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells defined as GFP+/CD31+ double-positive cells were significantly increased in ischemic tissue around the vessels in diabetic mice that received IFR radiation. In in-vitro studies, cultured EPCs treated with IFR radiation markedly augmented high glucose-impaired EPC functions, inhibited high glucose-induced EPC senescence and reduced H2O2 production. Nude mice received human EPCs treated with IFR in high glucose medium showed a significant improvement in blood flow recovery in ischemic limb compared to those without IFR therapy. IFR therapy promoted blood flow recovery and new vessel formation in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Conclusions Administration of IFR therapy promoted collateral flow recovery and new vessel formation in STZ

  17. Observation and measurement of Higgs boson decays to $WW^\\ast$ with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; 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Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; 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Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; 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Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; 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Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; 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Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smith, Matthew; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-07-16

    We report the observation of Higgs boson decays to $WW^{\\ast}$ based on an excess over background of 6.1 standard deviations in the dilepton final state, where the Standard Model expectation is 5.8 standard deviations. Evidence for the vector-boson fusion (VBF) production process is obtained with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. The results are obtained from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $25~\\textrm{pb}^{-1}$ from $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and 8 TeV $pp$ collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. For a Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV, the ratio of the measured value to the expected value of the total production cross section times branching fraction is $1.09^{+0.16}_{-0.15}~\\textrm{(stat.)}^{+0.17}_{-0.14}~\\textrm{(syst.)}$. The corresponding ratios for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production mechanisms are $1.02\\pm 0.19~\\textrm{(stat.)}^{+0.22}_{-0.18}~\\textrm{(syst.)}$ and $1.27^{+0.44}_{-0.40}~\\textrm{(stat.)}^{+0.30}_{-0.21}~\\textrm{(syst.)}$, respectively. ...

  18. A European Roadmap for Research in Astrobiology - The AstRoMap Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, F.; Walter, N.; Horneck, G.; Muller, C.; Rettberg, P.; Capria, M.; Palomba, E.

    2015-10-01

    AstRoMap (Astrobiology Road Mapping activity-www.astromap-eu.org) is a collaborative project which will provide the European Planetary Science Community with a road map in astrobiology. The goals of the project have been: (i) to pose big questions related to astrobiology; and (ii) the identification of experiments, new technology and/or those space missions to be developed in future programs and which could answer those big questions. This collaborative infrastructure includes the organization of expert panels and international workshops in order to discuss about those big questions and the science objectives by the community to be addressed. The main deliverable will be a Roadmap document. The project is steered by a consortium of six European and national research institutes and associations: -­- Centro de Astrobiologica (INTACSIC), Spain -­- European Science Foundation, France -­- Association pour un Réseau Européen d'Exo/Astrobiology (EANA), France -­- B-USOC, Belgium -­- Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Germany -­- National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), ItalyOrigin and evolution of planetary systems -­- Origin of organic compounds in space -­- Rock-water-carbon interactions, organic synthesis, and steps to life -­- Life and habitability on Earth and in Space -­- -­- Biosignatures as facilitating life detection The key topics will focus on a limited number of strategic scientific objectives to be addressed in the next 20 years by European astrobiologists, and suggest research activities for future development.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid oxytocin correlated with peripheral ALT and AST in Chinese female subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Kang, Yimin; Qiu, Guoshi; Lin, Hong; Xu, Jinzhong; Wang, Xiaofang; Xie, Longteng; Jiang, Yongsheng; Jia, Baofu; Wang, Pengxiang; Wang, Geng; Li, Qiujun; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zuo, Wei; Li, Cunbao

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is primarily synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus in the central nervous system and exhibits a wide spectrum of central and peripheral activities. OT is involved in lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis and plays a protective role against liver damage. In this study, we investigated whether CSF OT levels correlates with peripheral glucose, lipid profiles, and/or liver enzymes in Chinese subjects. Sixty-nine subjects (n=36 males; n=33 females) who were recruited from Beijing Jishuitan Hospital participated in the study. Their levels of CSF OT and peripheral parameters were assayed by radioimmunoassay and continuous monitoring assay, respectively. There was no significant difference in CSF OT levels between males (53.09±6.88 nmol/mL) and females (52.34±6.87 nmol/mL), and no correlation found between CSF OT levels and peripheral glucose and lipid profiles. Significant negative correlation was observed between CSF OT levels and peripheral ALT and AST concentration in females but not in males. Our results support the physiological role of neuropeptides acting on brain sites to regulate liver enzymes, and shed new light on the brain-liver interaction.

  20. Test and Commissioning of the AST3-1 Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Wang, Daxing

    2013-01-01

    The first of three Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3-1), a 50/68cm Schmidt-like equatorial-mount telescope, is the first trackable Chinese telescope operating on the Antarctic plateau. It was installed at Dome A (80°22', 77°21'E, 4,093m), the highest place on the Antarctic plateau, in 2012. The telescope is unmanned during night-time operations through the Austral winter. The telescope optics and mechanics, as well as the motors and position sensors, are exposed to a harsh environment. The mechanics is enclosed with a foldable tent-like dome to prevent snow, diamond dust and ice. While the control cabinet containing drive boxes, circuit board boxes, power converters and the Telescope Control Computer (TCC) is located inside the warm instrumental module. In about 15 weeks remote testing and commissioning, from January 24 when the expedition team left there to May 8, when the communication failed, we obtained images with the best FWHM of less than 2''. We also recorded the telescope movement performance and fine-tuned the dynamic properties of the telescope control system. Some experiences and lessons will be disscussed in this paper.

  1. Twelve-Month Antiretroviral Therapy Suppresses Plasma and Genital Viral Loads but Fails to Alter Genital Levels of Cytokines, in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Rwandan Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondoa, Pascale; Gautam, Raju; Rusine, John; Lutter, Rene; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Kootstra, Neeltje; Karita, Etienne; van de Wijgert, Janneke

    2015-01-01

    Genital viral load (GVL) is the main determinant of sexual transmission of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV). The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on local cervico-vaginal immunological factors associated with GVL is poorly described. We aimed to identify the risk factors of detectable GVL,

  2. Relevance of Interleukin-6 and D-Dimer for Serious Non-AIDS Morbidity and Death among HIV-Positive Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Grund

    Full Text Available Despite effective antiretroviral treatment (ART, HIV-positive individuals are at increased risk of serious non-AIDS conditions (cardiovascular, liver and renal disease, and cancers, perhaps due in part to ongoing inflammation and/or coagulation. To estimate the potential risk reduction in serious non-AIDS conditions or death from any cause that might be achieved with treatments that reduce inflammation and/or coagulation, we examined associations of interleukin-6 (IL-6, D-dimer, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP levels with serious non-AIDS conditions or death in 3 large cohorts.In HIV-positive adults on suppressive ART, associations of IL-6, D-dimer, and hsCRP levels at study entry with serious non-AIDS conditions or death were studied using Cox regression. Hazard ratios (HR adjusted for age, gender, study, and regression dilution bias (due to within-person biomarker variability were used to predict risk reductions in serious non-AIDS conditions or death associated with lower "usual" levels of IL-6 and D-dimer.Over 4.9 years of mean follow-up, 260 of the 3766 participants experienced serious non-AIDS conditions or death. IL-6, D-dimer and hsCRP were each individually associated with risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death, HR = 1.45 (95% CI: 1.30 to 1.63, 1.28 (95% CI: 1.14 to 1.44, and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.09 to 1.26 per 2x higher biomarker levels, respectively. In joint models, IL-6 and D-dimer were independently associated with serious non-AIDS conditions or death, with consistent results across the 3 cohorts and across serious non-AIDS event types. The association of IL-6 and D-dimer with serious non-AIDS conditions or death was graded and persisted throughout follow-up. For 25% lower "usual" IL-6 and D-dimer levels, the joint biomarker model estimates a 37% reduction (95% CI: 28 to 46% in the risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death if the relationship is causal.Both IL-6 and D-dimer are independently associated with

  3. Sexual Activity Without Condoms and Risk of HIV Transmission in Serodifferent Couples When the HIV-Positive Partner Is Using Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodger, Alison J; Cambiano, Valentina; Bruun, Tina

    2016-01-01

    of within-couple HIV transmission (heterosexual and men who have sex with men [MSM]) during periods of sex without condoms and when the HIV-positive partner had HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The prospective, observational PARTNER (Partners of People on ART-A New...... Evaluation of the Risks) study was conducted at 75 clinical sites in 14 European countries and enrolled 1166 HIV serodifferent couples (HIV-positive partner taking suppressive ART) who reported condomless sex (September 2010 to May 2014). Eligibility criteria for inclusion of couple-years of follow-up were...... condomless sex and HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL. Anonymized phylogenetic analysis compared couples' HIV-1 polymerase and envelope sequences if an HIV-negative partner became infected to determine phylogenetically linked transmissions. EXPOSURES: Condomless sexual activity with an HIV...

  4. Follicular bronchiolitis in an HIV-infected individual on combination antiretroviral therapy with low CD4+ cell count but sustained viral suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Pedersen, Court; Madsen, Helle D

    2017-01-01

    A 36-year-old Danish man, living in Asia, was diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and HIV in 2013 (CD4+ count: 6 cells/µL; viral load: 518 000 copies/mL). He initiated combination antiretroviral therapy. Later that year, he was also diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis and was ......A 36-year-old Danish man, living in Asia, was diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and HIV in 2013 (CD4+ count: 6 cells/µL; viral load: 518 000 copies/mL). He initiated combination antiretroviral therapy. Later that year, he was also diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis...... tests demonstrated severely reduced lung capacity with an obstructive pattern and a moderately reduced diffusion capacity. High resolution computer tomography revealed minor areas with tree-in-bud pattern and no signs of air trapping on expiratory views. Lung biopsy showed lymphocytic infiltration...

  5. Combination Therapy with c-Met and Src Inhibitors Induces Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis of Merlin-Deficient Schwann Cells and Suppresses Growth of Schwannoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Marisa A; Plati, Stephani Klingeman; Burns, Sarah S; Dinh, Christine T; Bracho, Olena; Yan, Denise; Mittal, Rahul; Shen, Rulong; Soulakova, Julia N; Copik, Alicja J; Liu, Xue Zhong; Telischi, Fred F; Chang, Long-Sheng; Franco, Maria Clara; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina

    2017-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a nervous system tumor disorder caused by inactivation of the merlin tumor suppressor encoded by the NF2 gene. Bilateral vestibular schwannomas are a diagnostic hallmark of NF2. Mainstream treatment options for NF2-associated tumors have been limited to surgery and radiotherapy; however, off-label uses of targeted molecular therapies are becoming increasingly common. Here, we investigated drugs targeting two kinases activated in NF2-associated schwannomas, c-Met and Src. We demonstrated that merlin-deficient mouse Schwann cells (MD-MSC) treated with the c-Met inhibitor, cabozantinib, or the Src kinase inhibitors, dasatinib and saracatinib, underwent a G 1 cell-cycle arrest. However, when MD-MSCs were treated with a combination of cabozantinib and saracatinib, they exhibited caspase-dependent apoptosis. The combination therapy also significantly reduced growth of MD-MSCs in an orthotopic allograft mouse model by greater than 80% of vehicle. Moreover, human vestibular schwannoma cells with NF2 mutations had a 40% decrease in cell viability when treated with cabozantinib and saracatinib together compared with the vehicle control. This study demonstrates that simultaneous inhibition of c-Met and Src signaling in MD-MSCs triggers apoptosis and reveals vulnerable pathways that could be exploited to develop NF2 therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(11); 2387-98. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. New pediatric percentiles of liver enzyme serum levels (ALT, AST, GGT): Effects of age, sex, BMI and pubertal stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussler, Sarah; Vogel, Mandy; Pietzner, Diana; Harms, Kristian; Buzek, Theresa; Penke, Melanie; Händel, Norman; Körner, Antje; Baumann, Ulrich; Kiess, Wieland; Flemming, Gunter

    2017-09-19

    The present study aims to clarify the effects of sex, age, BMI and puberty on transaminase serum levels in children and adolescents and to provide new age- and sex-related percentiles for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Venous blood and anthropometric data were collected from 4,126 cases. Excluded were cases of participants with potential hepatotoxic medication, with evidence of potential illness at the time of blood sampling and non-normal BMI (BMI  90 th ). The resulting data (N = 3,131 cases) were used for the calculations of ALT, AST, and GGT percentiles. Age- and sex-related reference intervals were established by using an LMSP-type method. Serum levels of transaminases follow age-specific patterns and relate to the onset of puberty. This observation is more pronounced in girls than in boys. The ALT percentiles showed similar shaped patterns in both sexes. Multivariate regression confirmed significant effects of puberty and BMI-SDS (β = 2.21) on ALT. Surprisingly, AST serum levels were negatively influenced by age (β = -1.42) and BMI-SDS (β = -0.15). The GGT percentiles revealed significant sex-specific differences, correlated positively with age (β = 0.37) and showed significant association with BMI-SDS (β = 1.16). Current reference values of ALT, AST and GGT serum levels were calculated for children between 11 months and 16.0 years, using modern analytical and statistical methods. This study extends the current knowledge about transaminases by revealing influences of age, sex, BMI, and puberty on the serum concentrations of all three parameters and has for these parameters one of the largest sample sizes published so far. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  7. ZnO nanoparticles augment ALT, AST, ALP and LDH expressions in C2C12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ZnO nanoparticles on alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme expressions in C2C12 cells. ZnO nanoparticles are widely used in the several cosmetic lotions and other biomedical products. Several studies report on ZnO nanoparticle mediated cytotoxicity. However, there are no reports on the effect of ZnO nanoparticles on ALT, AST, ALP and LDH enzyme expressions in C2C12 cells. A cytotoxicity assay was carried out to determine the effect of ZnO nanoparticles (1-5 mg/ml) on C2C12 cell viability at 48 and 72 h. ZnO nanoparticles increased ALT, AST, ALP and LDH enzyme mRNA expression and their activities in C2C12 cells. In conclusion, the present study showed that ZnO nanoparticles increased these enzyme activities and its mRNA expression in C2C12 cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  8. Differences in levels of albumin, ALT, AST, γ-GT and creatinine in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Maria; Sund-Levander, Märtha; Milberg, Anna; Wressle, Ewa; Marcusson, Jan; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    2018-02-23

    Reference intervals are widely used as decision tools, providing the physician with information about whether the analyte values indicate ongoing disease process. Reference intervals are generally based on individuals without diagnosed diseases or use of medication, which often excludes elderly. The aim of the study was to assess levels of albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly indivuduals. Blood samples were collected from individuals >80 years old, nursing home residents, in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment and Nordic Reference Interval Project, a total of 569 individuals. They were divided into three cohorts: frail, moderately healthy and healthy, depending on cognitive and physical function. Albumin, ALT, AST, creatinine and γ-GT were analyzed using routine methods. Linear regression predicted factors for 34% of the variance in albumin were activities of daily living (ADL), gender, stroke and cancer. ADLs, gender and weight explained 15% of changes in ALT. For AST levels, ADLs, cancer and analgesics explained 5% of changes. Kidney disease, gender, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease explained 25% of the variation in creatinine levels and MMSE explained three per cent of γ-GT variation. Because a group of people are at the same age, they should not be assessed the same way. To interpret results of laboratory tests in elderly is a complex task, where reference intervals are one part, but far from the only one, to take into consideration.

  9. ACTIVITIES OF ALT, AST, ALP AND LDH ENZYMES IN CATTLE BLOOD PLASMA DEPENDING ON REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE AND SEASONAL CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejra Hadžimusić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at determining levels of alanin aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the plasma of 229 dairy Holstein-Friesian breed cows in different stages of the re¬production cycle and regarding the seasonal changes (diet conditions. Cows were divided into the groups: lactation (Group A, postpartal period within 15 days from calving (Group B and dry period (Group C. Seasonal variations affected AST activity within Groups A and B, while Group C showed no seasonal influence. Differences between Groups A and B were determined during winter, as well as among Groups A and C during the same season. The highest activity of ALT was measured in cows from Group A during the winter season. ALP activity showed no statistical difference among groups, though statistical significance was noted within seasonal changes. The activity of LDH showed no statistical significance within Group C with regard to the seasonal changes. Statistically significant difference was found between cows of Group A and C during the winter season. Differences were considered statistically significant when p<0,05.Research results showed a significant influence of milk production and dry period on the activities of measured enzymes in the blood plasma so we can conclude that there is a need for constant monitoring of the described parameters during the production period.Key words: dairy cows, ALT, AST, ALT, LDH

  10. AST/ALT ratio is not an index of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C when aminotransferase activities are determinate according to the international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéchot, Jérôme; Boisson, Renée Claude; Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Sturm, Nathalie; Calès, Paul; Lasnier, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    The aspartate aminotransferase activity (AST)/alanine aminotransferase activity (ALT) ratio is used as liver fibrosis index whereas the reported data are conflicting. In chronic hepatitis C (CHC), reported diagnostic accuracies range from none to good for significant fibrosis and to excellent for cirrhosis. Assuming that AST/ALT increases are mainly due to vitamin B6 defects since pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), active form of B6, acts as coenzyme in transamination reactions, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio using standardized methods for AST and ALT activities, with PLP addition as recommended, in a prospective multicenter cohort of CHC patients. ALT and AST activities were measured using the recommended IFCC methods with addition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. We evaluated the AST/ALT ratio for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis in a cohort of CHC patients included in a multicenter prospective study. A liver biopsy was performed in each patient and reviewed by two independent pathologists in order to determine the fibrosis stage according to Metavir classification which was the reference standard. AST/ALT ratio significantly increased with histological stage of liver fibrosis and there was a significant correlation between Metavir fibrosis stage and AST/ALT ratio (r=0.129, PALT ratio does not discriminate significant fibrosis (F≥2) (AUROC=0.531) and had only very poor diagnostic accuracies for severe fibrosis (F≥3) (AUROC=0.584) or cirrhosis (F4) (AUROC=0.626). AST/ALT ratio is not a good and discriminative index of liver fibrosis in CHC when aminotransferase activities are determinate according to the international recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. De Ritis Ratio (AST/ALT) as a Significant Prognostic Factor in Patients With Upper Tract Urothelial Cancer Treated With Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakmin; Choi, Young Hyo; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Han, Deok Hyun; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Chang Jeong, Byong; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the clinical prognostic value of preoperative De Ritis ratio (aspartate aminotransferase [AST]/alanine aminotransferase [ALT]) on postsurgical survival outcomes in patients with upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC). We retrospectively analyzed the data of 623 patients who underwent radical nephrouretectomy for UTUC. Multivariate regression tests were performed to identify possible associations between adverse pathologic events and AST/ALT. The risk of postoperative progression and survival were tested using Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox proportional hazards models. According to the receiver operator characteristic curve of AST/ALT for cancer-specific mortality, patients with AST/ALT value ≥1.5 were regarded as the high AST/ALT group, and the remaining patients formed the low AST/ALT group. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the high AST/ALT group showed worse progression-free survival (PFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (all P ALT was associated with higher T stage (hazard ratio [HR], 1.577; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.077-2.311; P = .033) and higher cellular grade (HR, 1.538; 95% CI, 1.034-2.287; P = .041) in multivariate regression tests. In multivariate Cox analyses, high AST/ALT was revealed as an independent predictor of PFS (HR, 2.335; 95% CI, 1.633-3.340; P ALT was a significant predictor of worse postoperative survival in patients surgically treated for UTUC. Further large prospective studies are needed for better understanding of the prognostic value of preoperative AST/ALT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Switch to maraviroc with darunavir/r, both QD, in patients with suppressed HIV-1 was well tolerated but virologically inferior to standard antiretroviral therapy: 48-week results of a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rossetti

    Full Text Available Primary study outcome was absence of treatment failure (virological failure, VF, or treatment interruption per protocol at week 48.Patients on 3-drug ART with stable HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL and CCR5-tropic virus were randomized 1:1 to maraviroc with darunavir/ritonavir qd (study arm or continue current ART (continuation arm.In June 2015, 115 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome (56 study, 59 continuation arm. The study was discontinued due to excess of VF in the study arm (7 cases, 12.5%, vs 0 in the continuation arm, p = 0.005. The proportion free of treatment failure was 73.2% in the study and 59.3% in the continuation arm. Two participants in the study and 10 in the continuation arm discontinued therapy due to adverse events (p = 0.030. At VF, no emergent drug resistance was detected. Co-receptor tropism switched to non-R5 in one patient. Patients with VF reported lower adherence and had lower plasma drug levels. Femoral bone mineral density was significantly improved in the study arm.Switching to maraviroc with darunavir/ritonavir qd in virologically suppressed patients was associated with improved tolerability but was virologically inferior to 3-drug therapy.

  13. Amyloid β-Exposed Human Astrocytes Overproduce Phospho-Tau and Overrelease It within Exosomes, Effects Suppressed by Calcilytic NPS 2143—Further Implications for Alzheimer's Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chiarini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The two main drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD, amyloid-β (Aβ and hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau oligomers, cooperatively accelerate AD progression, but a hot debate is still ongoing about which of the two appears first. Here we present preliminary evidence showing that Tau and p-Tau are expressed by untransformed cortical adult human astrocytes in culture and that exposure of such cells to an Aβ42 proxy, Aβ25−35, which binds the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR and activates its signaling, significantly increases intracellular p-Tau levels, an effect CaSR antagonist (calcilytic NPS 2143 wholly hinders. The astrocytes also release both Tau and p-Tau by means of exosomes into the extracellular medium, an activity that could mediate p-Tau diffusion within the brain. Preliminary data also indicate that exosomal levels of p-Tau increase after Aβ25−35 exposure, but remain unchanged in cells pre-treated for 30-min with NPS 2143 before adding Aβ25−35. Thus, our previous and present findings raise the unifying prospect that Aβ•CaSR signaling plays a crucial role in AD development and progression by simultaneously activating (i the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor holoprotein, whose upshot is a surplus production and secretion of Aβ42 oligomers, and (ii the GSK-3β-mediated increased production of p-Tau oligomers which are next released extracellularly inside exosomes. Therefore, as calcilytics suppress both effects on Aβ42 and p-Tau metabolic handling, these highly selective antagonists of pathological Aβ•CaSR signaling would effectively halt AD's progressive spread preserving patients' cognition and life quality.

  14. Albuminuria is associated with elevated acute phase reactants and proinflammatory markers in HIV-infected patients receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O-charoen, Pichaya; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Ng, Roland C K; Mitchell, Brooks I; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2014-12-01

    Albuminuria among HIV-infected individuals has been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Inflammation has been associated with albuminuria. The pathophysiology of albuminuria in HIV-infected individuals is poorly understood. We investigated the association of albuminuria with inflammatory biomarkers among HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This is a cross-sectional analysis of participants enrolled in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular Cohort. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers were assessed using the Milliplex Human Cardiovascular disease multiplex assays. A random urine sample was collected for albumin measurement. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio of ≥30 mg/g. Framingham risk score was calculated and divided into three classes. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to assess the correlation between plasma inflammatory biomarkers and albuminuria and were adjusted for Framingham risk category. Among 111 HIV-infected patients [median (IQR) age of 52 (46-57) years, 86% male, median (IQR) CD4 count of 489 (341-638) cells/mm(3), 85% with HIV RNA <50 copies/ml], 18 subjects (16.2%) had moderately increased albuminuria (albuminuria range between 30 and 300 mg/g) and 2 subjects (1.8%) had severely increased albuminuria (albuminuria more than 300 mg/g). In multivariable logistic models, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, CRP, SAA, and SAP remained significantly associated with albuminuria after adjustment of CVD risk factors. This study showed an association between inflammation and albuminuria independent of previously reported risk factors for albuminuria in HIV-infected subjects who were on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Chronic inflammation despite potent antiretroviral treatment may contribute to higher rates of albuminuria among HIV-infected patients.

  15. Albuminuria Is Associated with Elevated Acute Phase Reactants and Proinflammatory Markers in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O-charoen, Pichaya; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A.; Keating, Sheila M.; Norris, Philip J.; Ng, Roland C.K.; Mitchell, Brooks I.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Albuminuria among HIV-infected individuals has been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Inflammation has been associated with albuminuria. The pathophysiology of albuminuria in HIV-infected individuals is poorly understood. We investigated the association of albuminuria with inflammatory biomarkers among HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This is a cross-sectional analysis of participants enrolled in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular Cohort. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers were assessed using the Milliplex Human Cardiovascular disease multiplex assays. A random urine sample was collected for albumin measurement. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio of ≥30 mg/g. Framingham risk score was calculated and divided into three classes. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to assess the correlation between plasma inflammatory biomarkers and albuminuria and were adjusted for Framingham risk category. Among 111 HIV-infected patients [median (IQR) age of 52 (46–57) years, 86% male, median (IQR) CD4 count of 489 (341–638) cells/mm3, 85% with HIV RNA albuminuria (albuminuria range between 30 and 300 mg/g) and 2 subjects (1.8%) had severely increased albuminuria (albuminuria more than 300 mg/g). In multivariable logistic models, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, CRP, SAA, and SAP remained significantly associated with albuminuria after adjustment of CVD risk factors. This study showed an association between inflammation and albuminuria independent of previously reported risk factors for albuminuria in HIV-infected subjects who were on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Chronic inflammation despite potent antiretroviral treatment may contribute to higher rates of albuminuria among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25205472

  16. Responsiveness of T cells to interleukin-7 is associated with higher CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-1-positive individuals with highly active antiretroviral therapy-induced viral load suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Jose F; Kulkarni, Hemant; Agan, Brian K; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Beachy, Lisa A; Srinivas, Sowmya; He, Weijing; Anderson, Stephanie; Marconi, Vincent C; Dolan, Matthew J; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2009-06-15

    Despite suppression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), recovery of CD4+ T cell counts can be impaired. We investigated whether this impairment may be associated with hyporesponsiveness of T cells to gamma-chain (gammac) cytokines known to influence T cell homeostasis. The responsiveness of T cells to interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, and IL-15 was determined by assessing cytokine-induced phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in peripheral T cells obtained from 118 HIV-positive subjects and 13 HIV-negative subjects. The responsiveness of T cells to interleukin (IL)-7 but not to IL-2 or IL-15 was lower among HIV-positive subjects than among HIV-negative subjects. Among subjects with viral load suppression, the degree of IL-7 responsiveness (1) correlated with naive CD4+ T cell counts and was a better immune correlate of the prevailing CD4+ T cell count than were levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR1 or programmed death-1, which are predictors of T cell homeostasis during HIV infection; and (2) was greater in subjects with complete (i.e., attainment of >or=500 CD4+ T cells/mm3>or=5 years after initiation of HAART) versus incomplete immunologic responses. The correlation between plasma levels of IL-7 and CD4+ T cell counts during HAART was maximal in subjects with increased IL-7 responsiveness. Responsiveness of T cells to IL-7 is associated with higher CD4+ T cell counts during HAART and thus may be a determinant of the extent of immune reconstitution.

  17. 9-Hydroxypheophorbide α-mediated photodynamic therapy induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 down-regulation in Hep-2 cells via ROS-mediated suppression of the ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huankang; Shen, Bo; Swinarska, Joanna T; Li, Wen; Xiao, Kuanlin; He, Peijie

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant diseases through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we assessed the change of migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells after sublethal doses of 9-hydroxypheophorbide α (9-HPbD)-mediated PDT in vitro, and explored the role of ROS in 9-HPbD-PDT-induced anti-metastatic effects in HEp-2 cells. Following PDT, ROS were measured by a fluorescence microscope in both the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH) pretreatment. Wound healing assay, cell migration assay, and matrigel invasion assay were used to evaluate the cellular migration and invasion. Western blot was performed to investigate the signaling pathways that may have been involved. ROS were rapidly generated in 9-HPbD-loaded HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells by the activation of a diode laser and were significantly inhibited by a 6-h GSH pretreatment. Wound healing assay, cell migration assay, and matrigel invasion assay showed that sublethal PDT significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells. GSH decreased the ability of PDT to inhibit the invasion of HEp-2 cells. Western blot analysis showed that PDT significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2, and significantly suppressed the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 after 24h following the implementation of sublethal PDT, and these efficacies of PDT could be abrogated by GSH pretreatment. 9-HPbD-PDT attenuated the migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells in vitro, which may be related to the down-regulated expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via ROS-mediated-inhibition of phosphorylation in the ERK/MEK signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Maraviroc is associated with latent HIV-1 reactivation through NF-κB activation in resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid-Elena, Nadia; García-Bermejo, María Laura; Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Díaz-de Santiago, Alberto; Sastre, Beatriz; Gutiérrez, Carolina; Dronda, Fernando; Coronel Díaz, María; Domínguez, Ester; López-Huertas, María Rosa; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; Moreno, Santiago

    2018-02-14

    Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We and others have suggested that maraviroc could reactivate latent HIV-1. To test the latency reversing potential of maraviroc and the mechanisms involved, we performed a phase-II, single-center, open-label study in which maraviroc was administered for 10 days to 20 HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (Eudra CT: 2012-003215-66). All patients completed full maraviroc dosing and follow up. The primary endpoint was to study whether maraviroc may reactivate HIV-1 latency, eliciting signalling pathways involved in the viral reactivation. An increase in HIV-1 transcription in resting CD4 + T-cells, estimated by HIV-1 unspliced RNA, was observed. Moreover, activation of the NF-κB transcription factor was observed in these cells. In contrast, AP-1 and NFAT activity was not detected. To elucidate the mechanism of NF-κB activation by maraviroc, we have evaluated in HeLa P4 C5 cells, which stably express CCR5, if maraviroc could be acting as a partial CCR5-agonist, with no other mechanisms or pathways involved. Our results show that maraviroc can induce NF-κB activity and NF-κB target genes expression by CCR5 binding, since the use of TAK779, a CCR5 inhibitor, blocked NF-κB activation and functionality. Taken together, we show that maraviroc may have a role in the activation of latent virus transcription through the activation of NF-κB as a result of binding CCR5. Our results strongly support a novel use of maraviroc as a potential latency reversal agent in HIV-1-infected patients. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 persistence in a small pool of long-lived latently infected resting CD4 + T-cells is a major barrier to viral eradication in HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. A potential strategy to cure HIV-1-infection is the use of latency reversing agents to eliminate the reservoirs established in resting CD4 + T-cells. As no drug has been shown to be completely

  19. Integrated Variable-Fidelity Tool Set For Modeling and Simulation of Aeroservothermoelasticity -Propulsion (ASTE-P) Effects For Aerospace Vehicles Ranging From Subsonic to Hypersonic Flight, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program aims at developing a variable-fidelity software tool set for aeroservothermoelastic-propulsive (ASTE-P) modeling that can be routinely...

  20. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Level 1 Precision Terrain Corrected Registered At-Sensor Radiance (AST_L1T) Product, algorithm theoretical basis document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David; Siemonsma, Dawn; Brooks, Barbara; Johnson, Lowell

    2015-09-15

    This document provides an overview of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) supplemental algorithms in conjunction with the reuse of Landsat geometric algorithms modified by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) to create an ASTER Level 1 Precision Terrain Corrected Registered At-Sensor Radiance (AST_L1T) product. Implementation of these algorithms occurs within the AST_L1T product generation executable (PGE) as part of the open source Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor for Missions (S4PM) processing software subsystem. The AST_L1T algorithms include the following: Generation of the AST_L1A input product via supplemental algorithms

  1. Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for latent-virus reactivation in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy: a phase 1/2, single group, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas A; Tolstrup, Martin; Brinkmann, Christel R; Olesen, Rikke; Erikstrup, Christian; Solomon, Ajantha; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah; Dinarello, Charles; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Lewin, Sharon R; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-10-01

    Activating the expression of latent virus is an approach that might form part of an HIV cure. We assessed the ability of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat to disrupt HIV-1 latency and the safety of this strategy. In this phase 1/2 clinical trial, we included aviraemic adults with HIV treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Participants received oral panobinostat (20 mg) three times per week every other week for 8 weeks while maintaining combination antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome was change from baseline of cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA. Secondary endpoints were safety, plasma HIV RNA, total and integrated HIV DNA, infectious units per million CD4 T cells, and time to viral rebound during an optional analytical treatment interruption of antiretroviral therapy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov, number NCT01680094. We enrolled 15 patients. The level of cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA increased significantly at all timepoints when patients were taking panobinostat (p HIV RNA during panobinostat treatment was 3·5-fold (range 2·1-14·4). Panobinostat induced plasma viraemia with an odds ratio of 10·5 (95% CI 2·2-50·3; p = 0·0002) compared with baseline. We recorded a transient decrease in total HIV DNA, but no cohort-wide reduction in total HIV DNA, integrated HIV DNA, or infectious units per million. Nine patients participated in the analytical treatment interruption, median time to viral rebound was 17 days (range 14-56). Panobinostat was well tolerated. 45 adverse events were reported, but only 16 (all grade 1) were presumed related to panobinostat. Panobinostat effectively disrupts HIV latency in vivo and is a promising candidate for future combination clinical trials aimed at HIV eradication. However, panobinostat did not reduce the number of latently infected cells and this approach may need to be combined with others to significantly affect the latent HIV reservoir. The Danish Council for Strategic

  2. Non-amidated and amidated members of the C-type allatostatin (AST-C) family are differentially distributed in the stomatogastric nervous system of the American lobster, Homarus americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Miller, Alexandra; Fernandez, Rebecca; Dickinson, Evyn S; Jordan, Audrey; Kohn, Jessica; Youn, Mina C; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2018-01-13

    The crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) is a well-known model for investigating neuropeptidergic control of rhythmic behavior. Among the peptides known to modulate the STNS are the C-type allatostatins (AST-Cs). In the lobster, Homarus americanus, three AST-Cs are known. Two of these, pQIRYHQCYFNPISCF (AST-C I) and GNGDGRLYWRCYFNAVSCF (AST-C III), have non-amidated C-termini, while the third, SYWKQCAFNAVSCFamide (AST-C II), is C-terminally amidated. Here, antibodies were generated against one of the non-amidated peptides (AST-C I) and against the amidated isoform (AST-C II). Specificity tests show that the AST-C I antibody cross-reacts with both AST-C I and AST-C III, but not AST-C II; the AST-C II antibody does not cross-react with either non-amidated peptide. Wholemount immunohistochemistry shows that both subclasses (non-amidated and amidated) of AST-C are distributed throughout the lobster STNS. Specifically, the antibody that cross-reacts with the two non-amidated peptides labels neuropil in the CoGs and the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), axons in the superior esophageal (son) and stomatogastric (stn) nerves, and ~ 14 somata in each commissural ganglion (CoG). The AST-C II-specific antibody labels neuropil in the CoGs, STG and at the junction of the sons and stn, axons in the sons and stn, ~ 42 somata in each CoG, and two somata in the STG. Double immunolabeling shows that, except for one soma in each CoG, the non-amidated and amidated peptides are present in distinct sets of neuronal profiles. The differential distributions of the two AST-C subclasses suggest that the two peptide groups are likely to serve different modulatory roles in the lobster STNS.

  3. Cytokines and Bone Loss in a 5-Year Longitudinal Study—Hormone Replacement Therapy Suppresses Serum Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor and Increases Interleukin-1-Receptor Antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B.; Bonnevie-Nielsen, V.; Ebbesen, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and IL-6 may play a central role in the acceleration of postmenopausal bone loss, but observational studies have led to contradictory results. Estrogen-dependent changes in the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and the sol......The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and IL-6 may play a central role in the acceleration of postmenopausal bone loss, but observational studies have led to contradictory results. Estrogen-dependent changes in the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra......) and the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) potentially modify cytokine bioactivity. We therefore assessed the impact of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on cytokines and activity modifiers in serum within a 5-year longitudinal study. One hundred sixty perimenopausal women (age 50.1 +/- 2.8 years) were...... randomized to HRT or no treatment. Serum IL-6 increased with age (r = 0.16; p change in IL-1 beta. No changes were...

  4. Genetically-barcoded SIV facilitates enumeration of rebound variants and estimation of reactivation rates in nonhuman primates following interruption of suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Fennessey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV and SIV infection dynamics are commonly investigated by measuring plasma viral loads. However, this total viral load value represents the sum of many individual infection events, which are difficult to independently track using conventional sequencing approaches. To overcome this challenge, we generated a genetically tagged virus stock (SIVmac239M with a 34-base genetic barcode inserted between the vpx and vpr accessory genes of the infectious molecular clone SIVmac239. Next-generation sequencing of the virus stock identified at least 9,336 individual barcodes, or clonotypes, with an average genetic distance of 7 bases between any two barcodes. In vitro infection of rhesus CD4+ T cells and in vivo infection of rhesus macaques revealed levels of viral replication of SIVmac239M comparable to parental SIVmac239. After intravenous inoculation of 2.2x105 infectious units of SIVmac239M, an average of 1,247 barcodes were identified during acute infection in 26 infected rhesus macaques. Of the barcodes identified in the stock, at least 85.6% actively replicated in at least one animal, and on average each barcode was found in 5 monkeys. Four infected animals were treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for 82 days starting on day 6 post-infection (study 1. Plasma viremia was reduced from >106 to <15 vRNA copies/mL by the time treatment was interrupted. Virus rapidly rebounded following treatment interruption and between 87 and 136 distinct clonotypes were detected in plasma at peak rebound viremia. This study confirmed that SIVmac239M viremia could be successfully curtailed with cART, and that upon cART discontinuation, rebounding viral variants could be identified and quantified. An additional 6 animals infected with SIVmac239M were treated with cART beginning on day 4 post-infection for 305, 374, or 482 days (study 2. Upon treatment interruption, between 4 and 8 distinct viral clonotypes were detected in each animal at peak rebound

  5. Optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence as evaluated by CASE index score tool is associated with virological suppression in HIV-infected adults in Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabene, A K; Fortes-Déguénonvo, L; Niang, K; Manga, M N; Bulabula, A N H; Nachega, J B; Seydi, M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological failure (VLF) among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the national ART programme at the teaching hospital of Fann, Dakar, Senegal. Cross-sectional study from 1 September 2013 to 30 January 2014. (1) optimal ART adherence by the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) Index Score (>10) and (2) VLF (HIV RNA > 1000 copies/ml). Diagnostic accuracy of CASE Index Score assessed using sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with optimal adherence and VLF. Of 98 HIV-infected patients on ART, 68% were female. The median (IQR) age was 42 (20-50) years. A total of 57 of 98 (60%) were on ART more than 3 years, and majority (88%) were on NNRTI-based first-line ART regimen. A total of 79 of 98 (80%) patients reported optimal ART adherence, and only five of 84 (5.9%) had documented VLF. Patients with VLF were significantly more likely to have suboptimal ART adherence (17.7% vs. 2.9%; P = 0.02). CASE Index Score showed the best trade-off in Se (78.9%, 95% CI: 54.4-93.9%), Sp (20.0%, 95% CI: 11.1-31.7), PPV (22.4, 95% CI: 13.1-34.2%) and NPV (76.5%, 95% CI: 50.1-93.2), when used VLF threshold of HIV RNA >50 copies/ml. Factors independently associated with VLF were CASE Index Score <10 ([aOR] = 13.0, 95% CI: 1.1-147.9; P = 0.04) and being a boosted PI-based ART regimen ([aOR] = 27.0, 95% CI: 2.4-309.4; P = 0.008). Optimal ART adherence is achievable in a high proportion of HIV-infected adults in this study population. CASE Index Score was independently associated with virological outcomes, supporting usefulness of this low-cost ART adherence monitoring tool in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. ¿Se puede motivar a los alumnos de ciencias sociales uniendo enigmas, Astérix y las Tic?

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Verdú, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Esta es una propuesta de actividades para mejorar la motivación de los alumnos universitarios de Geografía e Historia, mediante el empleo de viñetas de comics de Astérix. Estas actividades se inician con una viñeta que desencadena un enigma que los alumnos deben resolver. El proceso de la actividad se desarrollaría mediante búsquedas orientadas a través de webs propuestas por el profesora través de la red social Edmodo. En ella los alumnos podrían realizar consultas al profesor, plantear duda...

  7. Effects of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Root Extract On Some Serum Liver Marker Enzymes (AST, ALT In Gentamicin Intoxicated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayma Sultana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver is an essential metabolic organ. It can be damaged due to prolonged use and higher doses of drugs, exposure to some chemicals, toxins, or infectious agents. Herbal plants as ashwagandha (Withania somnifera may have free radical scavenging activity thereby can be used for the prevention and treatment of liver damage.Objective: To observe the effect of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera root extract on gentamicin induced changes of some liver marker enzymes e,g serum aspartate amino transferase (AST and alanine amino transferase (ALT in Wistar albino rats.Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College (SSMC, Dhaka from 1st July 2010 to 30th June 2011. A total number of 35 Wistar albino rats, aged 90 to 120 days, weighing between 150 to 200 grams were selected for the study. After acclimatization for 14 days, they were divided into control group (Group A and experimental group (Group B. Control group was again subdivided into group A1 (baseline control, consisted of 10 rats and group A2 (gentamicin treated control group, consisted of 10 rats. Again, experimental group (Group B-ashwagandha pretreated and gentamicin treated group consisted of 15 rats. All groups of animals received basal diet for 22 consecutive days. In addition to this, group A2 also received gentamicin subcutaneously (100mg /kg body weight/day for the last eight (15th to 22nd day consecutive days. Again, group B received ashwagandha root extract (500mg/kg body weight/day, orally for 22 consecutive days and gentamicin subcutaneously (100mg/kg body weight /day for last eight (15th to 22nd day days. All the animals were sacrificed on 23rd day. Then blood and liver samples were collected. For assessment of liver function, serum AST, ALT and bilirubin levels were estimated. All these tests were done by standard Laboratory technique. The statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA and Bonferroni test as

  8. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  9. Predicted performance of a PG-SPECT system using CZT primary detectors and secondary Compton-suppression anti-coincidence detectors under near-clinical settings for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Brian; Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki; Terada, Kazushi; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2017-12-01

    A test version of a prompt-gamma single photon emission computed tomography (PG-SPECT) system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a CdZnTe (CZT) semiconductor detector with a secondary BGO anti-Compton suppression detector has been designed. A phantom with healthy tissue region of pure water, and 2 tumor regions of 5 wt% borated polyethylene was irradiated to a fluence of 1.3 × 109 n/cm2. The number of 478 keV foreground, background, and net counts were measured for each detector position and angle. Using only experimentally measured net counts, an image of the 478 keV production from the 10B(n , α) 7Li* reaction was reconstructed. Using Monte Carlo simulation and the experimentally measured background counts, the reliability of the system under clinically accurate parameters was extrapolated. After extrapolation, it was found that the value of the maximum-value pixel in the reconstructed 478 keV γ-ray production image overestimates the simulated production by an average of 9.2%, and that the standard deviation associated with the same value is 11.4%.

  10. Rangelia vitalii: changes in the enzymes ALT, CK and AST during the acute phase of experimental infection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Márcio Machado; França, Raqueli Teresinha; Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Paim, Carlos Breno; Paim, Francine; do Amaral, Carlos Henrique; Dornelles, Guilherme Lopes; da Cunha, João Paulo Monteiro Carvalho Mori; Soares, João Fabio; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; Mazzanti, Cinthia Melazzo Andrade; Monteiro, Silvia Gonzalez; Lopes, Sonia Terezinha Dos Anjos

    2012-01-01

    Rangelia vitalii is a protozoon that causes diseases in dogs, and anemia is the most common laboratory finding. However, few studies on the biochemical changes in dogs infected with this protozoon exist. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the biochemical changes in dogs experimentally infected with R. vitalii, during the acute phase of the infection. For this study, 12 female dogs (aged 6-12 months and weighing between 4 and 7 kg) were used, divided in two groups. Group A was composed of healthy dogs (n = 5); and group B consisted of infected animals (n = 7). Blood samples were collected on days 0, 10, 20 and 30 after infection, using tubes without anticoagulant to obtain serum and analyze the biochemical parameters. An increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) on day 20 (P < 0.05) was observed. Also, increased creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were observed throughout the experimental period (P < 0.05). No changes in the serum gamma-glutamyltransferase, urea and creatinine levels were observed. Thus, is possible to conclude that experimental infection with R. vitalii in dogs causes changes to the biochemical profile, with increased ALT, AST and CK enzyme levels.

  11. Elevated AST-to-platelet ratio index is associated with increased all-cause mortality among HIV-infected adults in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinikoor, Michael J; Sinkala, Edford; Mweemba, Aggrey; Zanolini, Arianna; Mulenga, Lloyd; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Fried, Michael W; Eron, Joseph J; Wandeler, Gilles; Chi, Benjamin H

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the association between significant liver fibrosis, determined by AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and all-cause mortality among HIV-infected patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia. Among HIV-infected adults who initiated ART, we categorized baseline APRI scores according to established thresholds for significant hepatic fibrosis (APRI ≥1.5) and cirrhosis (APRI ≥2.0). Using multivariable logistic regression we identified risk factors for elevated APRI including demographic characteristics, body mass index (BMI), HIV clinical and immunological status, and tuberculosis. In the subset tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), we investigated the association of hepatitis B virus co-infection with APRI score. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression we determined the association of elevated APRI with death during ART. Among 20 308 adults in the analysis cohort, 1027 (5.1%) had significant liver fibrosis at ART initiation including 616 (3.0%) with cirrhosis. Risk factors for significant fibrosis or cirrhosis included male sex, BMI <18, WHO clinical stage 3 or 4, CD4(+) count <200 cells/mm(3) , and tuberculosis. Among the 237 (1.2%) who were tested, HBsAg-positive patients had four times the odds (adjusted odds ratio, 4.15; 95% CI, 1.71-10.04) of significant fibrosis compared HBsAg-negatives. Both significant fibrosis (adjusted hazard ratio 1.41, 95% CI, 1.21-1.64) and cirrhosis (adjusted hazard ratio 1.57, 95% CI, 1.31-1.89) were associated with increased all-cause mortality. Liver fibrosis may be a risk factor for mortality during ART among HIV-infected individuals in Africa. APRI is an inexpensive and potentially useful test for liver fibrosis in resource-constrained settings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A importância do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica The importance of AST/ALT rate in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Idilio ZAMIN Jr.; Angelo Alves de MATTOS; Christiano PERIN; Gabriel Zatti RAMOS

    2002-01-01

    Racional - A esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e a doença hepática alcoólica apresentam similaridade histológica e em algumas situações, o diagnóstico diferencial das mesmas pode ser difícil, pois alguns pacientes não revelam o consumo abusivo de álcool. Objetivo- Avaliar a utilidade da determinação do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico diferencial da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e da doença hepática alcoólica. Pacientes e Métodos -Foram estudados 29 pacientes obesos com esteatohepatite não-alcoólica...

  13. Expressão do Mg+2, CK, AST e LDH em equinos finalistas de provas de enduro Endurance horses finalists: expression of Mg+2, CK, AST and LDH in horse finalists of endurance race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana V.F. Sales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, o equino atleta vem sendo cada vez mais requerido. Dessa forma, as exigências por alto desempenho têm fomentado o interesse pelo estudo das afecções relacionadas com a fisiopatologia de diversas enfermidades dos equinos. A relação entre o íon magnésio e o exercício físico tem recebido atenção significativa visto que este íon está intimamente relacionado ao tecido muscular estriado esquelético. Além disso, dentre as principais estratégias para a detecção e acompanhamento clínico de lesões musculares, destacam-se a avaliação das atividades das enzimas creatino quinase (CK, lactato desidrogenase (LDH e aspartato aminotransferase (AST. A busca pelo estabelecimento de parâmetros que se relacionam entre si é um fator determinante na compreensão de alterações fisiológicas encontradas diante do esforço em equinos atletas. Desta forma, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo determinar como as concentrações sanguíneas do íon magnésio e as atividades enzimáticas das enzimas CK, LDH e AST comportaram-se em equinos Puro Sangue Árabe finalistas de provas de enduro de 90km e relacionar as possíveis alterações com o tipo de esforço físico desempenhado pelos animais. Foram avaliadas a atividade enzimática das enzimas CK, LDH, AST e a concentração do íon magnésio no exercício em relação ao repouso de 14 equinos clinicamente hígidos da raça Puro Sangue Árabe, sendo 9 machos e 5 fêmeas, com idades variando entre 6 a 12 anos, submetidos a treinamento para enduro e participantes de provas de 90 km. Pode-se observar que as variáveis acima mencionadas sofreram aumento com diferença estatística em relação ao repouso. O exercício físico de enduro determinou a ocorrência de alterações nas atividades enzimáticas das enzimas CK (p≤0,001, LDH (p=0,0001, AST (p=0,0007 e na concentração do íon magnésio (p=0,0004, no exercício em relação ao repouso (p≤0,05. Fato que determinou altera

  14. Therapy with radio-attenuated vaccine in experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis showed enhanced T cell and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels, suppressed tumor growth factor-beta production with higher expression of some signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanchita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or Kala-Azar (KA) is one of the most deadly forms of disease among all neglected tropical diseases. There are no satisfactory drugs or vaccine candidates available for this dreaded disease. Our previous studies showed promising therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of the live, radio-attenuated parasites through intramuscular (I.M.) and intraperitoneal (I.P.) route in BALB/c mice model. The T-cell proliferation level, the mRNA expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-β) genes and finally the phosphorylation levels of phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) molecules were checked in BALB/c mice model immunized with radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites through I.M. route. Higher T-cell proliferation, increased iNOS level, and suppressed TGF-β level were found in treated infected animal groups (100 and 150Gy) in relation to untreated infected animals. Likewise, phosphorylation levels of PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK of these two groups were increased when compared to untreated infected controls. The clearance of the parasites from treated infected groups of animals may be mediated by the restoration of T-cell due to therapy with radio-attenuated L. donovani parasites. The killing of parasites was mediated by increase in nitric oxide release through PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK signaling pathways. A lower TGF-β expression has augmented the restored Th1 ambience in the 100 and 150Gy treated animal groups proving further the efficacy of the candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  15. A Counterregulatory Mechanism Impacting Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    adenoma SertolieLeydig cell tumorMCE Special Edition : Animal Models of Endocrine Neo * Corresponding author. Washington University Sc 660 S. Euclid Ave...1994). This transcription factor has also been implicated in the regulation of the GnRH receptor gene (Schang et al., 2013). Analyses of transgenic and...regulate the hu- man gonadotropin alpha-subunit gene in the placenta and pituitary gland. Mol. Cell. Biol 14, 5592e5602. Tevosian, S., 2014. Transgenic

  16. Topotactic conversion of β-helix-layered silicate into AST-type zeolite through successive interlayer modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yusuke; Takayama, Ryosuke; Shibue, Toshimichi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-02-10

    AST-type zeolite with a plate morphology can be synthesized by topotactic conversion of a layered silicate (β-helix-layered silicate; HLS) by using N,N-dimethylpropionamide (DPA) to control the layer stacking of silicate layers and the subsequent interlayer condensation. Treatment of HLS twice with 1) hydrochloric acid/ethanol and 2) dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) are needed to remove interlayer hydrated Na ions and tetramethylammonium (TMA) ions in intralayer cup-like cavities (intracavity TMA ions), both of which are introduced during the preparation of HLS. The utilization of an amide molecule is effective for the control of the stacking sequence of silicate layers. This method could be applicable to various layered silicates that cannot be topotactically converted into three-dimensional networks by simple interlayer condensation by judicious choice of amide molecules. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. [Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) more than alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels predict the progression of liver fibrosis in chronic HCV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stránský, J; Ryzlová, M; Striteský, J; Horák, J

    2002-10-01

    The development and severity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic HCV infection can be evaluated best according to the staging of fibrosis in blind liver biopsy. So far there is however no biochemical indicator suggesting advanced fibrosis or progression of fibrosis in chronic HCV infection. In 1997 - 1999 60 adult out-patients (32 women) with chronic HCV infection were examined by blind liver biopsy. The grading of hepatitis was scored according to Knodell and staging of fibrosis according to Desmet. All patients were anti-HCV positive, assessed by the ELISA-3 method and 48/60 had positive HCV RNA in serum. The main risk factor of HCV infection was blood transfusion (67%). Of 27 examined patients 20 (74%) had serotype HCV 1. Staging of fibrosis: histologically confirmed fibrosis was not recorded in 11 patients (18.3%), mild and medium fibrosis was recorded in 25 (42%), severe fibrosis in 14 (23%) and cirrhosis in 10 (17%). With confirmed fibrosis correlated more closely AST serum activity (p < 0.002) than ALT activity (p < 0.03). Steatosis of the liver was found in 25 (42%) patients. The mean age of patients with steatosis was significantly higher than that of patients without steatosis (p < 0.0008). Steatosis was more frequent in patients with fibrosis (p < 0.04), in particularin the age group above 60 years. The development of fibrosis in patients with chronic HCV infection is suggested by permanently elevated activity of both transaminases whereby AST has a higher predictive value than ALT activity. A total of 40% histologically tested patients had the highest staging of fibrosis (3 - 4). Steatosis is in chronic HCV infection a very frequent finding (42%), in particular in patients above 60 years and those with serious fibrosis. The finding of fibrosis should stimulate the initiation of antiviral treatment which can lead to regression of fibrosis and improvement of the histological finding.

  18. AST to ALT Ratio is elevated in disseminated histoplasmosis as compared to localized pulmonary disease and other endemic mycoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spec, Andrej; Barrios, Christopher R; Ahmad, Usama; Proia, Laurie A

    2017-07-01

    Severe pulmonary or disseminated histoplasmosis often necessitates presumptive antifungal treatment while awaiting definitive diagnosis. Histoplasma antigen assays have improved sensitivity but results may lag up to 7 days. In order to increase diagnostic certainty, "soft clues" may be looked for in laboratory and radiologic data, such as elevated alkaline phosphatase or ferritin levels and findings of mediastinal adenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. To determine if elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio is specific to histoplasmosis or a non-specific marker for disseminated fungal infection or sepsis in general, we retrospectively examined records of all patients diagnosed with an endemic fungal infection (EFI) at Rush University Medical Center from January of 1997 to October of 2012, and a cohort of septic patients with elevated liver enzymes. We identified 90 cases of EFIs during the study period that met all inclusion criteria (Histoplasma 21, Blastomyces 56, Coccidioides 12, Paracoccidioides 1). We also evaluated 10 control patients with bacterial sepsis. The mean ratio of AST to ALT in patients with disseminated histoplasmosis was 2.69 (95% CI:1.22, 4.16) while for other EFIs, the mean ratio ranged from 0.38 to 1.14 with disseminated coccidioidomycosis and blastomycosis respectively (P histoplasmosis in the appropriate host, and to possibly distinguish cross reactivity of the Histoplasma antigen assay with other EFIs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. C/EBPα Short-Activating RNA Suppresses Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Inhibiting EGFR/β-Catenin Signaling Mediated EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Huan

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with high mortality, and tumor metastasis is an important reason for poor prognosis. However, metastasis has not been effectively prevented in clinical therapy and the mechanisms underlying metastasis have not been fully characterized. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα is a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in tumor metastasis. We used short-activating RNAs (saRNA to enhance expression of C/EBPα. Intravenous injection of C/EBPα-saRNA in a nude mouse liver orthotopic xenograft tumor model inhibited intrahepatic and distant metastasis. C/EBPα-saRNA-treated mice showed increased serum levels of albumin and decreased alanine aminotransferase (ALT, glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (AST, indicating a role of C/EBPα in improving liver function. Migration and invasion were inhibited in hepatoma cell lines transfected with C/EBPα-saRNA. We also observed an inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, EGFR phosphorylation, and β-catenin in C/EBPa-saRNA-transfected cells. Our results suggested that C/EBPα-saRNA successfully inhibited HCC metastasis by inhibiting EGFR/β-catenin signaling pathway mediated EMT in vitro and in vivo.

  20. The ratio of aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT): the correlation of value with underlying severity of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, R B; Purbe, B; Gyawali, P; Risal, P

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most frequently diagnosed liver problems in the hospitalized patients in most tertiary care hospitals all over the world .The diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease is most of the time clinical. The AST/ALT ratio is a useful and reliable biochemical marker of liver injury due to alcohol. Whether the value of AST/ALT ratio correlates with clinical severity has not been studied. To study values of AST/ALT ratio in correlation with clinical severity of illness due to alcoholic liver disease using Child-Pugh's grading. This is a retrospective study. Inpatient records of all the patients admitted with diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease from July 2009 to 2011 June were analyzed. Data from 174 patients with the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease-alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis were retrieved; out of 174 patients, 138 were eligible for the study. The AST/ALT ratio and Child's grading of all the patients were calculated from the documented biochemical and clinical parameters on admission. Demographic profiles of all the patients were also recorded and analyzed. The data was analyzed using software SPPSS 16 version. A total of 138 patients diagnosed as alcoholic liver disease since July 2009 to June 2011 were analyzed. The male-female ratio was found to be 5.34: 1.The mean age of the patients at diagnosis was found to be 47.58 ± 12.83 years. Among 138 patients, Mongolians were found to have the highest prevalence of alcoholic liver disease (38.8%), followed by Newars ( 33.6%), Brahmin and Chhetri (19.1%) and Dalit (7.2%). With respect to AST/ALT ratio and Child's grading of ALD, the mean AST/ALT ratio was found to be 3.03 ± 2.24 in those patients who had Chlild's grade C; likewise the mean AST/ALT ratio was 2.28 ± 1.14, and 1.68 ± 0.83 in patients with Child B and Child A respectively. The higher value of AST/ALT ratio is indicative of more severe liver damage due to alcohol.

  1. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. The Preoperative AST/ALT (De Ritis) Ratio Represents a Poor Prognostic Factor in a Cohort of Patients with Nonmetastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezan, Angelika; Mrsic, Edvin; Krieger, Daniel; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Pummer, Karl; Zigeuner, Richard; Hutterer, Georg C; Pichler, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Aminotransaminases, which are strongly involved in cellular metabolism and cancer cell turnover, represent easily measureable, potential blood based biomarkers. We evaluated the prognostic value of the preoperatively assessed AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on clinically meaningful end points in a large European cohort of patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated clinicopathological data on 698 patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma operated on between 2005 and 2013 at a single tertiary academic center. The potential prognostic value of the AST/ALT ratio was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional regression models. The impact of the ratio on the predictive accuracy of the Leibovich prognosis score was determined by the Harrell c-index. An increased (1.26 or greater) preoperative AST/ALT ratio was statistically significantly associated with several well established prognostic factors, including pathological T stage, as well as with histological tumor necrosis (p ALT ratio was an independent prognostic factor for metastasis-free survival (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.25-2.07, p ALT was added. In our study cohort with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma the preoperatively assessed AST/ALT ratio represented an independent prognostic factor. This ratio might further improve the predictive accuracy of well established prognosis scores. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Secretoneurin suppresses cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Li; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Yuan, Guo-Lin; Zhao, Yi-Lin; Yu, Chao

    2018-03-05

    The neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN) plays protective roles in myocardial ischemia. In the present study, the effect of SN in cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. We observed that, in isoproterenol (ISO) treatment induced cardiac or cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, a marked increase in the expression of endogenous SN in mouse plasma, myocardium and primary-cultured cardiomyocytes occurs. In hypertrophic mice, the heart size, heart weight/body weight (HW/BW) ratio, cardiomyocyte size, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) expression were significantly higher than those in controls but were effectively suppressed by SN gene therapy. Similarly, the protective effects of SN were also observed in cultured cardiomyocytes following ISO treatment. SN significantly increased the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in parallel with the decrease in reactive oxygen species levels in cardiomyocytes. We observed that SN evoked the activation of all of the AMPK, P38/MAPK and ERK/MAPK pathways in cardiomyocytes, but pretreatment with only AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and ERK1/2/MAPK inhibitor (PD98059) counteracted the protective effects of SN against cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the suppressive effects of SN on oxidant stress in cardiomyocytes. These results indicated that endogenous SN is induced in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, and may play a protective role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that exogenous SN supplementation protects the cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO treatment through the activation of AMPK and ERK/MAPK pathways, thus upregulating antioxidants and suppressing oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  5. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  6. Expressão do Mg+2, CK, AST e LDH em equinos finalistas de provas de enduro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana V.F. Sales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, o equino atleta vem sendo cada vez mais requerido. Dessa forma, as exigências por alto desempenho têm fomentado o interesse pelo estudo das afecções relacionadas com a fisiopatologia de diversas enfermidades dos equinos. A relação entre o íon magnésio e o exercício físico tem recebido atenção significativa visto que este íon está intimamente relacionado ao tecido muscular estriado esquelético. Além disso, dentre as principais estratégias para a detecção e acompanhamento clínico de lesões musculares, destacam-se a avaliação das atividades das enzimas creatino quinase (CK, lactato desidrogenase (LDH e aspartato aminotransferase (AST. A busca pelo estabelecimento de parâmetros que se relacionam entre si é um fator determinante na compreensão de alterações fisiológicas encontradas diante do esforço em equinos atletas. Desta forma, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo determinar como as concentrações sanguíneas do íon magnésio e as atividades enzimáticas das enzimas CK, LDH e AST comportaram-se em equinos Puro Sangue Árabe finalistas de provas de enduro de 90km e relacionar as possíveis alterações com o tipo de esforço físico desempenhado pelos animais. Foram avaliadas a atividade enzimática das enzimas CK, LDH, AST e a concentração do íon magnésio no exercício em relação ao repouso de 14 equinos clinicamente hígidos da raça Puro Sangue Árabe, sendo 9 machos e 5 fêmeas, com idades variando entre 6 a 12 anos, submetidos a treinamento para enduro e participantes de provas de 90 km. Pode-se observar que as variáveis acima mencionadas sofreram aumento com diferença estatística em relação ao repouso. O exercício físico de enduro determinou a ocorrência de alterações nas atividades enzimáticas das enzimas CK (p≤0,001, LDH (p=0,0001, AST (p=0,0007 e na concentração do íon magnésio (p=0,0004, no exercício em relação ao repouso (p≤0,05. Fato que determinou altera

  7. Trans/figurations of modern times? Disputes over the works of Maria Komornicka (pen name Piotr Odmieniec Włast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Chmurski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is a reflection of how the work by Maria Komornicka (pen name Piotr Odmieniec Włast was perceived in the past two decades on the basis of an analysis of a monograph by Edward Boniecki (1996, Izabela Filipiak (2006 and Brigitta Helbig-Mischewski (2010 in the context of changes in the interpretation of modern Polish literature. In the article, attention is drawn to three groups of issues which can only be identified on the basis of contemporary perception, incomplete as it is, due to the fact that all the works of Komornicka have not been published. The forms and meaning of broadly defined autobiographical writing has been re-defined, while Polish and regional literary modernism has been revised together with the involvement of literary researchers in the subject of their analyses. The author of the article suggests a schematic differentiation between updating, prospective and retrospective strategies in Komornicka’s work and a reflection on the indirect involvement in social and cultural discourses and discussions developed by contemporary researchers into Komornicka’s work.

  8. Brief Report: Prolonged Viral Suppression Over a 12-Year Follow-up of HIV-Infected Patients: The Persistent Impact of Adherence at 4 Months After Initiation of Combined Antiretroviral Therapy in the ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Maria P; Raffi, François; Picard, Odile; Hardel, Lucile; Piroth, Lionel; Jadand, Corinne; Pierret, Janine; Spire, Bruno; Leport, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    The effect of early adherence on long-term viral suppression was assessed among 1281 patients with HIV starting a protease inhibitor-containing regimen in 1997-1999, followed up to 12 years. Association between 4-month adherence (3-level score) and prolonged viral suppression was evaluated using a multivariate mixed logistic model in 891 eligible patients. High 4-months adherence [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 3.72 (1.98 to 6.98)] was associated with long-term prolonged viral suppression, irrespective of maintenance adherence. This unexpected long-term virological impact of early adherence reinforces the message that, when starting antiretrovirals, all means should be mobilized to ensure optimum early adherence to achieve prolonged antiretroviral success.

  9. A importância do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAMIN Jr. Idilio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Racional - A esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e a doença hepática alcoólica apresentam similaridade histológica e em algumas situações, o diagnóstico diferencial das mesmas pode ser difícil, pois alguns pacientes não revelam o consumo abusivo de álcool. Objetivo- Avaliar a utilidade da determinação do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico diferencial da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e da doença hepática alcoólica. Pacientes e Métodos -Foram estudados 29 pacientes obesos com esteatohepatite não-alcoólica, cujo o diagnóstico foi realizado após exclusão de outras causas de doença hepática e que na biopsia apresentasse, no mínimo, esteatose macrovesicular associada a infiltrado inflamatório lobular e injúria hepatocelular. Como grupo controle, foram estudados 28 pacientes com doença hepática alcoólica. Resultados - Nos pacientes com esteatohepatite não-alcoólica, a média de AST foi de 52,3 ± 21,2 U/L e a de ALT de 90,1 ± 37,9 U/L, sendo o índice AST/ALT menor que 1 em todos os casos. No grupo controle, a média de AST foi de 140 ± 82,5 U/L e a de ALT foi de 50,6 ± 40,3 U/L. O índice AST/ALT foi superior a 1 em todos os pacientes e a 2 em 24 (85,7%, o que foi estatisticamente significativo quando comparado aos pacientes com esteatohepatite não-alcoólica. Conclusão- O índice AST/ALT parece ser útil no diagnóstico diferencial das hepatopatias, sendo que valores inferiores a 1 sugerem fortemente a hipótese de esteatohepatite não-alcoólica.

  10. Rule of changes in serum GGT levels and GGT/ALT and AST/ALT ratios in primary hepatic carcinoma patients with different AFP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Gong; He, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Bing; Zhang, Hui-Ai; He, Yong-Kang

    2017-12-22

    This study aims to explore the rule of changes in serum GGT activity, as well as GGT/ALT and AST/ALT ratios, in primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) patients with different alpha-fetal protein (AFP) levels. GGT, AST and ALT were detected in 370 PHC patients with positive HBs-Ag using a automatic biochemical analyzer, and AFP was detected using a Roche E170 modular analytics immunoassay analyzer. GGT level, as well as AST/ALT and GGT/ALT, ratios were compared among PHC patients with different AFP levels. As shown in Table 1, GGT levels were 109.59 ± 111.06, 151.13 ± 190.43, 135.86 ± 107.62, 151.36 ± 176.59 and 172.58 ± 188.84, respectively, in the groups of primary PHC patients with AFP levels of ⩽ 10, 10-100, 100-200, 200-400 and ⩾ 400 ng/ml; and the differences among these groups were not statistically significant (P> 0.05). AST/ALT ratios were 1.55 ± 1.02, 1.30 ± 0.81, 2.02 ± 1.89, 2.12 ± 1.11 and 1.73 ± 1.25, respectively; and the differences among these groups were not statistically significant (P> 0.05). GGT/ALT ratios were 3.43 ± 3.12, 3.57 ± 5.70, 3.57 ± 2.94, 3.89 ± 4.58 and 3.43 ± 3.61, respectively; and the differences among these groups were not statistically significant (P> 0.05). For patients with chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis after hepatitis B, no matter how AFP level is, when liver function report reveals increased GGT, AST/ALT > 1 and GGT/ALT > 1 (that is, AST > ALT and GGT > ALT), even if AFP is negative, we should also be alert to the existence of PHC.

  11. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  12. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Toompea / Karl Ast Rumor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ast Rumor, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Artikkel Eesti Vabariigi parlamendi hoone avamise puhul. Toompea erilisest osast eestlaste ajaloos. Mälestusi vangistusest Toompeal 1910. a. kevadtalvel, vanglakaaslastest. Mälestuskilde Maapäeva saadikutest. Varem ilmunud : "Päevaleht" 11.-12. september 1922, nr. 222-223

  14. Automated Scheduling Tool - (AST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Managing Employee Performance, Managing Employee Compensation and Benefits, Administering Health and Safety Activities, Managing Employee Personnel File, Providing...

  15. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  16. The prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on survival in patients underwent radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Kose, Osman; Koc, Esra Meltem; Ates, Erhan; Akin, Yigit; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed aspartate aminotransaminase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (De Ritis) ratio on survival in bladder cancer (BC) patients underwent radical cystectomy (RC). We, respectively, analysed clinical and pathological data of 153 patients who underwent RC for BC between February 2006 and December 2016 at a tertiary level hospital. The potential prognostic value of De Ritis ratio was assessed by using ROC curve analysis. The effect of the De Ritis ratio was analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression hazard models for patients' disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OAS). We had 149 BC patients, in total. Mean age was 61.65 ± 9.13 years. One hundred and thirty-nine (93.3%) of the patients were men. According to ROC analysis, optimal threshold of De Ritis ratio for DSS was 1.30. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the high De Ritis ratio group showed worse progression in DSS and OAS (all parameters, p < 0.001). On Cox regression models of clinical and pathological parameters to predict DSS, De Ritis ratio (HR 5.79, 95% CI 2.25-15.13), pathological T stage (HR 15.89, 95% CI 3.92-64.33, in all p < 0.001); and to predict OAS, De Ritis ratio (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.49-4.56; p < 0.001), pathological T stage (HR 5.42, 95% CI 2.63-11.64; p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08; p = 0.001) were determined as independent prognostic factors. Preoperative elevated De Ritis ratio could be an independent prognostic factor in BC patients underwent RC. Our results should be confirmed by large and properly designed prospective, randomized trials.

  17. Arctigenin protects against liver injury from acute hepatitis by suppressing immune cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Huafeng; Yang, Jinlai; Cheng, Yingnan; Wang, Dan; Yang, Fengrui; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Yanxia; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Luhong; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2018-03-23

    As a phenylpropanoid and dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan present in medical plants, such as those used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine, including Arctium lappa (Niubang), arctigenin exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the protective role of arctigenin in Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatitis in mice. Arctigenin remarkably reduced the congestion and necroinflammation of livers, and improved hepatic function (ALT and AST) in ConA-induced acute hepatitis in vivo. The infiltration of CD4 T, NKT and macrophages into the livers was found to be reduced with arctigenin treatment. Arctigenin suppressed ConA-induced T lymphocyte proliferations that might have resulted from enhanced IL-10 production by macrophages and CD4 T cells. These results suggested that arctigenin could be a powerful drug candidate for acute hepatitis through immune suppression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Aflatoksin Bı in tavşan eritrosit, karaciğer, böbrek arginaz aktiviteleri ile serum ALP, AST, ALT düzeylerine etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    TEMEL, Yrd.Doç.Dr. İsmail; İLHAN, Yrd.Doç.Dr.Necip; EMRE, Yrd.Doç.Dr. Hanifi; ÇIĞLI, Yrd.Doç.Dr. Ahmet; YOLOGLU, Yrd.Doç.Dr. Saim; KARAKAŞ, Yrd.Doç.Dr.Sacide

    2015-01-01

    Otuz tavşan A.B.C ve kontrol olmak üzere dört gruba ayrıldı. A,li,(' gruplarına üç ay süreyle farklı dozlarda aflatoksin B/ (AFBt ) verildi. Diğer taraftan kontrol grubu normal besinlerle beslendi. Serum ALP.AST.ALTdüzeyleri AFBj uygulamasından fince ve sonra tesj>it edildi. Eritrosit, karaciğer, ve böbrek arginaz aktiviteleri yalnızca AFBt uygulamasından sonra ölçüldü. AST ve ALT nin ilk ve son değerleri arasındaki fark istatiksel olarak önemliydi fakat ALP düzeyleri ö...

  19. Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Inhibition Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Increases Gene Transcription via Ire1α/cJun to Enhance Plasma ALT/AST*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josekutty, Joby; Iqbal, Jahangir; Iwawaki, Takao; Kohno, Kenji; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a target to reduce plasma lipids because of its indispensable role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein biosynthesis. MTP inhibition in Western diet fed mice decreased plasma triglycerides/cholesterol, whereas increasing plasma alanine/aspartate aminotransferases (ALT/AST) and hepatic triglycerides/free cholesterol. Free cholesterol accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria resulting in ER and oxidative stresses. Mechanistic studies revealed that MTP inhibition increased transcription of the GPT/GOT1 genes through up-regulation of the IRE1α/cJun pathway leading to increased synthesis and release of ALT1/AST1. Thus, transcriptional up-regulation of GPT/GOT1 genes is a major mechanism, in response to ER stress, elevating plasma transaminases. Increases in plasma and tissue transaminases might represent a normal response to stress for survival. PMID:23532846

  20. Effect of single and three months treatment with Ukrain on aminotransferases (ALT and AST) and on the serum protein level in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagiełło-Wójtowicz, E; Kleinrok, Z; Surmaczyńska, B; Baran, E; Feldo, M; Nowicky, J W

    1992-01-01

    The influence of Ukrain on the activity of aminotransferases (ALT and AST) and on the serum total protein content was estimated in mice and rats of both sexes receiving single or repeated doses of the drug. It was found that one hour after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of Ukrain no characteristic changes were recorded in the activity of the investigated enzymes, or in the serum protein content of animals of either sex. Similar effects were observed after three months treatment with Ukrain in rats of either sex. Only in mice receiving Ukrain for three months was a rise in ALT and AST activity found. No particular changes were observed in the total serum protein level, except for a small decreases in the sera of male mice.

  1. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibition induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and increases gene transcription via Ire1α/cJun to enhance plasma ALT/AST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josekutty, Joby; Iqbal, Jahangir; Iwawaki, Takao; Kohno, Kenji; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2013-05-17

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a target to reduce plasma lipids because of its indispensable role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein biosynthesis. MTP inhibition in Western diet fed mice decreased plasma triglycerides/cholesterol, whereas increasing plasma alanine/aspartate aminotransferases (ALT/AST) and hepatic triglycerides/free cholesterol. Free cholesterol accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria resulting in ER and oxidative stresses. Mechanistic studies revealed that MTP inhibition increased transcription of the GPT/GOT1 genes through up-regulation of the IRE1α/cJun pathway leading to increased synthesis and release of ALT1/AST1. Thus, transcriptional up-regulation of GPT/GOT1 genes is a major mechanism, in response to ER stress, elevating plasma transaminases. Increases in plasma and tissue transaminases might represent a normal response to stress for survival.

  2. Effect of two kinds of porcelain crown on AST, ALP, TNF-α, IL-8, GP-x and MDA levels in gingival crevicular fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of two kinds of porcelain crown on AST, ALP, TNF-α, IL-8, GP-x and MDA levels in gingival crevicular fluid. Methods: A total of 80 patients with dental porcelain crowns at front teeth during February 2013 to February 2016 were randomly divided into cobalt-chromium alloy PFM group (n=40 and gold alloy PFM group (n=40. After 6 months, the amount of gingival crevicular fluid, GI, PD, AST, ALP, TNF-α, IL-8, GP-x and MDA levels in gingival crevicular fluid were recorded and analyzed. Results: There were no differences in amount of gingival crevicular fluid, GI and PD before treatment of the two groups (P>0.05. After treatment, the amount of gingival crevicular fluid, GI and PD of the two groups were significantly higher than before treatment (P0.05. After treatment, the AST, ALP, TNF-α, IL-8 and MDA levels in gingival crevicular fluid of the two groups were significantly higher than before treatment (P<0.05, but that of the gold alloy PFM group were significantly lower than cobalt-chromium alloy PFM group (P<0.05. After treatment, the GP-x level in gingival crevicular fluid of the two groups were significantly lower than before treatment (P<0.05, but that of the gold alloy PFM group were significantly higher than cobalt-chromium alloy PFM group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Gold alloy PFM can significantly reduce the AST, ALP, TNF-α, IL-8 and MDA levels in gingival crevicular fluid, improve the GP-x level in gingival crevicular fluid, shows better biocompatibility and clinical outcomes than cobalt-chromium alloy PFM.

  3. Relation of ALT and AST levels to the histopathological changes in liver biopsies of patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Hany; Fouad, Ahmed; Hamza, Maya; Mohey, Mohammad A; El-Akel, Wafaa; Ghoneim, Hossam; Abul-Fotouh, Amr; Esmat, Gamal

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, Egypt has a high prevalence of adult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity is most commonly measured to assess hepatic disease. The revision of the definition of the normal limits for the ALT level is advisable. The aim of this work was to compare the histopathological changes in the liver tissue biopsies of HCV-infected patients, clinically presenting with ALT levels below normal, based on the conventional, previously used upper limit of normal (ULN) of ALT (40U/L for men and 30U/L for women) with the proposed new ULN (30U/L for men, and 19U/L for women). This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 668 cases of chronic hepatitis C genotype 4 were included. Patients were classified according to grades of histological activity and fibrosis stages (by the Metavir scoring system). They were also classified into normal and high groups according to the old and new cutoffs of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and ALT levels. The results of our study showed that the serum AST level in our study showed a better correlation with the histopathological changes in liver biopsy rather than ALT, especially when using the old cutoff of the ULN for AST. The serum ALT level in our study (both the old and the new cutoffs) did not show a significant correlation with the histopathological status in the liver biopsies of our patients. This study concluded that the old cutoff of the ULN AST is a better predictor of fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on survival and its relation to tumor histopathological variables in patients with localized renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canat, Lütfi; Ataly, Hasan Anil; Agalarov, Samir; Alkan, Ilter; Alturende, Fatih

    2017-12-07

    To assess the relationship between De Ritis (aspartate aminotransaminase [AST]/Alanine aminotransaminase [ALT]) ratio and pathological variables and whether it is an independent prognostic factor. We analyzed 298 consecutive patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for non-metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) between 2006 and 2015. The association between De Ritis ratio and pathological variables including tumor size, presence of renal vein invasion, vena cava invasion, renal capsule infiltration, Gerota fascia invasion, renal sinus involvement, renal pelvic invasion, angiolymphatic invasion, adrenal gland involvement, lymph node involvement, tumor necrosis, and Fuhrman's grade was tested. Multivariable Cox analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of this ratio on overall survival and cancer-specific survival. An increased preoperative De Ritis ratio was significantly associated with renal vein invasion, renal capsule infiltration and renal pelvis involvement (p<0.05) in non-metastatic RCC. On multivariate analysis we found that tumor size, Fuhrman grade and lymph node involvement were independent prognostic factors for cancerspecific survival. AST/ALT ratio had no influence on the risk of overall and cancerspecific survival. An increased preoperative AST/ALT ratio had a significant association with renal vein invasion, renal capsule infiltration and renal pelvis involvement in patients with non-metastatic RCC. However, it does not appear to be an independent prognostic marker in non-metastatic RCC. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  5. Analysis of copy number variation in 8,842 Korean individuals reveals 39 genes associated with hepatic biomarkers AST and ALT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Young; Cho, Seoae; Yu, Jeongmi; Sung, Samsun; Kim, Heebal

    2010-08-01

    Biochemical tests such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are useful for diagnosing patients with liver disease. In this study, we tested the association between copy number variation and the hepatic biomarkers AST and ALT based on 8,842 samples from population-based cohorts in Korea. We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 5.0 arrays and identified 10,534 CNVs using HelixTree software. Of the CNVs tested using univariate linear regression, 100 CNVs were significant for AST and 16 were significant for ALT (P < 0.05). We identified 39 genes located within the CNV regions. DKK1 and HS3ST3B1 were shown to play roles in heparan sulfate biosynthesis and the Wnt signaling pathway, respectively. NAF1 and NPY1R were associated with glycoprotein processes and neuropeptide Y receptor activity based on GO categories. PTER, SOX14 and TM7SF4 were expressed in liver. DPYS and CTSC were found to be associated with dihydropyrimidinuria and Papillon-Lefevre syndrome phenotypes using OMIM. NPY5R was found to be associated with dyslipidemia using the Genetic Association Database.

  6. Retrospective evaluation of serum markers APRI and AST/ALT for assessing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis B and C patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Sheng; Chang, Chi-Sen; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio, platelet count, AST, albumin, bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase were retrospectively evaluated for the prediction of advanced liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with resectable hepatocellular carcinoma in this study. In total, the 97 selected patients consisted of 9 (9.3%) patients with non-B, non-C chronic hepatitis, 48 (49.5%) patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 40 (41.2%) patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). The APRI, but not AST/ALT or other serum markers, showed a significant correlation with advanced liver fibrosis and cirrhosis (p<0.05). The area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for predicting advanced fibrosis was 0.69 in CHB patients and 0.87 in CHC patients, whereas AUROC for predicting cirrhosis was 0.75 in CHB patients and 0.84 in CHC patients. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of APRI were greater than 80% for predicting advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis in the CHC patients. APRI is a simple and non-invasive biochemical marker of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, particularly in CHC patients. APRI potentially could be used to decrease the number of liver biopsies.

  7. [Clinical efficacy of AST/ALT ratio and platelet counts as predictors of degree of fibrosis in HBV infected patients without clinically evident liver cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Young; Kang, Kyung Hee; Park, Jee Hyun; Lee, Jong Hyup; Cho, Chang Min; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Hwan

    2004-04-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is an important prognostic factor in chronic hepatitis B. Liver biopsy is a gold standard diagnostic tool but an invasive procedure, so it cannot be done on all patients. We evaluated the clinical efficacy of AST/ALT ratio and platelet counts as predictors of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B. We reviewed retrospectively clinical records of 323 patients, who visited Kyungpook National University Hospital for chronic hepatitis B and underwent liver biopsy from September 1998 to May 2002. Correlation with laboratory parameters with hepatic fibrosis stage was identified. Of 323 patients, there were 278 male patients with mean age 27 (9~59). Platelet counts showed a significant correlation (r=-0.343, p=0.000), and AST/ALT ratio showed a weak but significant correlation (r=0.137, p=0.013) with fibrosis stage. Patients with severe fibrosis or cirrhosis (stage 3 and 4) can be identified to have AST/ALT ratio > 1 and platelet counts 1 in combination with platelet counts. However, its sensitivity is too low to replace liver biopsy.

  8. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  9. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  10. The 1-year and 3-month prognostic utility of the AST/ALT ratio and model for end-stage liver disease score in patients with viral liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Edoardo; Botta, Federica; Testa, Emanuela; Romagnoli, Paola; Polegato, Simone; Malfatti, Federica; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Chiarbonello, Bruno; Risso, Domenico; Testa, Roberto

    2002-11-01

    The AST/ALT ratio has shown good diagnostic accuracy in patients with chronic viral liver disease. However, its prognostic utility has never been tested. Recently, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been proposed as a simple and effective tool to predict survival in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aims of this study were to assess the 3-month and 1-yr prognostic ability of the AST/ALT ratio in a series of patients with virus-related liver cirrhosis, and to evaluate the relationship between the AST/ALT ratio and the MELD score and to compare their prognostic ability. The AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores of 99 patients with liver cirrhosis of viral etiology (73 patients with hepatitis C virus and 26 with hepatitis B virus) who had been followed-up for at least 1 yr were retrospectively calculated and correlated with the patients' 3-month and 1-yr prognosis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the AST/ALT ratio and the MELD score cut-offs with the best sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) in discriminating between patients who survived and those who died. Univariate survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method using the cut-offs identified by means of receiver operating characteristic curves. AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores showed a significant correlation (r(s) = 0.503, p = 0.0001). In all, 8% and 30% of the patients had died after 3 months and 1 yr of follow-up, respectively. AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores were significantly higher among the patients who died during both 3-month and 1-yr follow-up. An AST/ALT ratio cut-off of 1.17 had 87% SS and 52% SP, whereas a MELD cut-off of 9 had 57% SS and 74% SP in discriminating between patients who survived and those who died after I yr. The combined assessment of the AST/ALT ratio and/or MELD score had 90% SS and 78% SP. Survival curves of the patients showed that both parameters clearly discriminated between patients who survived and those who died in the short term

  11. Fibroscan Compared to FIB-4, APRI, and AST/ALT Ratio for Assessment of Liver Fibrosis in Saudi Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallatah, Hind I; Akbar, Hisham O; Fallatah, Alyaa M

    2016-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic liver disease. It has also been associated with devastating outcomes such as decompensated liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This study was conducted in order to assess liver fibrosis using Fibroscan, and to compare these results to the use of Fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) scores, AST platelet ratio index (APRI scores), and the AST/ALT ratios on NAFLD patients. A cross sectional study was conducted on NAFLD patients who underwent Fibroscan examinations between September 1, 2011 and June 30, 2014. Demographic data was collected, including sex, age, and nationality; serum alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT, 30 - 65 U/L), serum aspartate aminotransferase levels (AST, 15 - 37 U/L), and platelet counts (150 - 400 k/μL) were also determined. The stages of fibrosis (F0 1 - 6, F1 6.1 - 7, F2 7 - 9, F3 9.1 - 10.3, and F4 ≥ 10.4) were defined in kPa. For each patient, the AST/ALT ratio was also measured. The results of APRI and FIB-4 were compared with the Fibroscan fibrosis scores. The results of 122 patients were analyzed, including 65 (53.3%) males with a mean age of 50.2 years (SD: 13.7; range: 18 - 86). The males were significantly younger than the females (48.7 years (SD: 16.03) versus 51.8 years (SD: 10.3 P = 0.05), respectively). The mean stiffness score was 12.02 (SD: 12.7) kPa. Forty-four patients (36%) had advanced fibrosis. The mean platelet and serum ALT levels were normal. There was a significant positive correlation between the Fibroscan results and the AST/ALT ratios, the APRI scores, and the FIB-4 results. Similarly, there was a significant positive correlation between age and fibrosis score, and a significant negative correlation between platelet count and stiffness score. The data showed that more than one-third of the cohort exhibited advanced fibrosis, demonstrating the need for the early diagnosis and

  12. J/Ψ suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capony, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkaninan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Mac Cormick, M.; Macciotta, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Sartori, S.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Temnikov, P.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.; Vale, C.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for J/Ψ production in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 GeV per nucleon is measured at the CERN SPS by the NA50 experiment. The final results from the 1995 run are presented here together with preliminary ones from the high-statistics 1996 run. An anomalous J/Ψ suppression is observed in Pb-Pb collisions as compared to extrapolations of the previous results obtained by the NA38 experiment with proton and lighter ion beams. The results of the two runs are in good agreement. The results from the 1996 run allow the study of the onset of the anomalous suppression within the same set of data, showing evidence of a sharp change of behaviour around a value of neutral transverse energy, as measured by our electromagnetic calorimeter, of about 50 GeV

  13. Integrated Variable-Fidelity Tool Set for Modeling and Simulation of Aeroservothermoelasticity-Propulsion (ASTE-P) Effects for Aerospace Vehicles Ranging From Subsonic to Hypersonic Flight, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program aims at developing a variable-fidelity software tool set for aeroservothermoelastic-propulsive (ASTE-P) modeling that can be routinely...

  14. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Suppression of Hepatocarcinorigenesis in Rats: Possible Role of Wnt Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Dina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to evaluate the tumor suppressive effects of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in an experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC model in rats and to investigate the possible role of Wnt signaling in hepato-carcinogenesis. Methods Ninety rats were included in the study and were divided equally into: Control group, rats which received MSCs only, rats which received MSCs vehicle only, HCC group induced by diethylnitroseamine (DENA and CCl4, rats which received MSCs after HCC induction, rats which received MSCs before HCC induction. Histopathological examination and gene expression of Wnt signaling target genes by real time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in rat liver tissue, in addition to serum levels of ALT, AST and alpha fetoprotein were performed in all groups. Results Histopathological examination of liver tissue from animals which received DENA-CCl4 only, revealed the presence of anaplastic carcinoma cells and macro-regenerative nodules type II with foci of large and small cell dysplasia. Administration of MSCs into rats after induction of experimental HCC improved the histopathological picture which showed minimal liver cell damage, reversible changes, areas of cell drop out filled with stem cells. Gene expression in rat liver tissue demonstrated that MSCs downregulated β-catenin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D and survivin genes expression in liver tissues after HCC induction. Amelioration of the liver status after administration of MSCs has been inferred by the significant decrease of ALT, AST and Alpha fetoprotein serum levels. Administration of MSCs before HCC induction did not show any tumor suppressive or protective effect. Conclusions Administration of MSCs in chemically induced HCC has tumor suppressive effects as evidenced by down regulation of Wnt signaling target genes concerned with antiapoptosis, mitogenesis, cell

  15. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Suppression of Hepatocarcinorigenesis in Rats: Possible Role of Wnt Signaling

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdel Aziz, Mohamed T

    2011-05-05

    Abstract Background The present study was conducted to evaluate the tumor suppressive effects of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in rats and to investigate the possible role of Wnt signaling in hepato-carcinogenesis. Methods Ninety rats were included in the study and were divided equally into: Control group, rats which received MSCs only, rats which received MSCs vehicle only, HCC group induced by diethylnitroseamine (DENA) and CCl 4 , rats which received MSCs after HCC induction, rats which received MSCs before HCC induction. Histopathological examination and gene expression of Wnt signaling target genes by real time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in rat liver tissue, in addition to serum levels of ALT, AST and alpha fetoprotein were performed in all groups. Results Histopathological examination of liver tissue from animals which received DENA-CCl4 only, revealed the presence of anaplastic carcinoma cells and macro-regenerative nodules type II with foci of large and small cell dysplasia. Administration of MSCs into rats after induction of experimental HCC improved the histopathological picture which showed minimal liver cell damage, reversible changes, areas of cell drop out filled with stem cells. Gene expression in rat liver tissue demonstrated that MSCs downregulated β-catenin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D and survivin genes expression in liver tissues after HCC induction. Amelioration of the liver status after administration of MSCs has been inferred by the significant decrease of ALT, AST and Alpha fetoprotein serum levels. Administration of MSCs before HCC induction did not show any tumor suppressive or protective effect. Conclusions Administration of MSCs in chemically induced HCC has tumor suppressive effects as evidenced by down regulation of Wnt signaling target genes concerned with antiapoptosis, mitogenesis, cell proliferation

  16. AST/ALT ratio is not useful in predicting the degree of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminler, Ahmet Tarik; Ayyildiz, Talat; Irak, Kader; Kiyici, Murat; Gurel, Selim; Dolar, Enver; Gulten, Macit; Nak, Selim G

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive tests are primarily used for staging hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. In clinical practice, serum aminotransferase levels, coagulation parameters, and platelet count have been used to predict whether or not a patient has cirrhosis. In addition, several studies have evaluated the accuracy of combinations (or ratios) of these measures. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between five noninvasive models [AST/ALT ratio (AAR), aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), Bonacini cirrhosis discriminant score (CDS), age-platelet index (APind), and King's score] and the degree of hepatic fibrosis as determined by biopsy in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. A total of 380 patients with viral hepatitis (237 with chronic hepatitis B and 143 with chronic hepatitis C) who were seen at our clinic between January 2005 and January 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The degree of fibrosis was determined using the Ishak score. Patients with a fibrosis score of 0-2 were considered to have low fibrosis and those with a score between 3 and 6 were considered to have high fibrosis. Five noninvasive models were compared between the groups with low and high fibrosis. There were statistically significant differences between the hepatitis B and C patients with high and low fibrosis with respect to APind (4.49±2.35 vs. 2.41±1.84; P<0.001 in hepatitis B and 4.83±2.25 vs. 2.92±1.88; P<0.001 in hepatitis C), APRI (1.00±1.17 vs. 0.47±0.39; P<0.001 in hepatitis B and 1.01±1.01 vs. 0.41±0.29; P<0.001 in hepatitis C), CDS (4.53±1.90 vs. 3.58±1.30; P<0.001 in hepatitis B and 4.71±2.03 vs. 3.42±1.49; P<0.05 in hepatitis C), and King's score (24.31±3.14 vs. 7.65±6.70; P<0.001 in hepatitis B and 24.82±2.55 vs. 8.33±7.29; P<0.001 in hepatitis C). There were no significant differences in the AAR between the hepatitis B and C patients with high and low fibrosis (0.78±0.31 vs. 0.74±0.34; P=0.082 in hepatitis B

  17. Caspase-3 Expression and ALT, AST, and GGT Activity After 24 Hours of Porcine Liver Cold Storage, Depending on the Type of Transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, P; Budziński, G; Suszka-Świtek, A; Caban, A; Oczkowicz, G; Czech, E; Ryszka, F; Wiaderkiewicz, R; Smorąg, Z; Cierpka, L

    2016-06-01

    Because of an insufficient number of human organs for transplantation, xenotransplantation may become an effective alternative. We aimed to analyze if the type of transgenesis has an influence on the hepatic caspase-3 expression, the enzyme that executes apoptosis as well as ALT, AST, and GGT activity after 24 hours of cold storage. The experiment was carried out on the 24 livers of Polish White Landrace pigs carrying human α1,2-fucosyltransferase and/or α-galactosidase (GAL) genes and livers without this genetic modification (control). Livers were perfused, stored for 24 hours in solution, and subsequently re-flushed. Hepatic concentration of the caspase-3 protein and its mRNA expression were measured just after the animal was killed as well as after 30 minutes of perfusion and after 24 hours of cold storage followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Caspase-3 mRNA level was detected with the RT-PCR method. Protein concentration (capsase-3 active and inactive) was assessed with the Western blotting technique. Kinetic methods were applied for the analysis of the ALT, AST, and GGT activity. The highest increase of the ALT activity after cold storage was observed in the group with GAL transgenesis, whereas the GGT activity was highest in the unmodified livers. There was no difference in the caspase-3 expression and AST activity after cold storage as compared with the respective initial results (P = .57 and P = .97, respectively). It appears that transgenesis does not aggravate ischemic injury of the liver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of drug interaction between oral adsorbent AST-120 and concomitant drugs based on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption behavior of the drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Yohei; Uchida, Shinya; Machi, Yoshiki; Shobu, Yuko; Namiki, Noriyuki; Kotegawa, Tsutomu

    2016-11-01

    AST-120 is used to decrease the abundance of serum uremic toxins in treatment of chronic kidney disease; however, it could also adsorb concomitantly administered drugs. This study aimed to develop a prediction method for drug interaction between AST-120 and concomitantly administered drugs based on in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption behavior. Sixty-eight drugs were selected for the analysis. For each drug, theoretical dissolution (R d ) and absorption (R a ) rates at estimated dosing intervals (1, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 240 min) were calculated using the Noyes-Whitney formula and compartment analysis, respectively. The optimal thresholds for R d and R a (R dth and R ath ) were estimated by comparing the results with those of previous drug interaction studies for six drugs. Four drug interaction risk categories for 68 drugs at each dose interval were defined according to the indices of dissolution and absorption against their thresholds. The in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption behavior of the selected drugs were well fitted to the Noyes-Whitney formula and one- or two-compartment models. The optimal R dth and R ath that gave the highest value of consistency with the equivalence of drug interaction studies were 90 and 30 %, respectively. As the dosing intervals were lengthened, the number of drugs classified into the low-risk categories increased. A new drug interaction prediction method based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs was developed. The new model is useful for estimating the risk of drug interaction in clinical practice when AST-120 is used in combination with other drugs.

  19. Acute Effects of on Javdar Supplementation on Asparate Aminotransferase(AST and Alanine Aminotransferase(ALT after Exhaustive Incremental Exercise in Men’s Handball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Khansooz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effect of supplementation Jadvar on aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT enzymes after exhaustive incremental exercise in men's handball. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental double blinded study 12 handball players with at least 2 years record in league (with average age=21.42, height=186cm, weight=83.25, and body mass index=24.09kg/m2 divided into 2 groups (n=6 accidentally. Both groups performed maximum Bruce protocol until exhausting level. Before (fasting and after performing protocol ,blood samples were taken from middle forearm vein and transferred to lab then supplementation group consumed three 500 mg jadvar capsules and control group consumed three 500 mg maltodextrin for 7 days daily. 24 hours after eating last capsule ,they performed maximum Bruce protocol up to exhausting level and the samples were collected like primary protocol blood samples before (fastingand after performing protocol and were transferred to the laboratory. Results: The results of dependent and independent t-test showed that consuming jadvar supplements for 7days did not have significant effect on aspartate aminotransferase(AST and alanine aminotransferase(ALT(p≥0.05.But alanine aminotransferase in supplementation group (16.83 mg.dl-1 decreased in comparison to placebo group (20.5 mg.dl-1. Also, aspartate aminotransferase was increased from 28 mg.dl-1 to 35.17 mg.dl-1 , but neither decrease nor increase was not meaningful (p≥0.05. Conclusion: It seems that acute consuming of jadvar supplement and one session incremental exercise does not have meaningful effect on AST and ALT in man handball players.

  20. Need for validation of clinical decision aids: use of the AST/ALT ratio in predicting cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, T F; Said, A T; Cummings, O W; Born, L J

    2000-09-01

    A value of > or = 1 for the ratio of aspartate amino-transferase to alanine aminotransferase (the AST/ALT ratio or AAR) has been shown to have a positive predictive value of 100% for the diagnosis of cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. If validated on separate cohorts, an AAR > or = 1 might obviate the need for liver biopsy in some patients with hepatitis C. We attempted to validate the AAR by abstracting demographic and clinical data from a database of consecutive patients with hepatitis C who had a liver biopsy between 1993 and 1998. We used definitions, methods of data collection, and analyses comparable to those of the published study. A hepatopathologist blindly reviewed 49 liver biopsies for histological grade and stage. The current cohort of 177 patients and the previous cohort of 139 patients were comparable in mean age (42.3 vs 43.8 yr), percentage of men (63 vs 67), percentage with an AAR > or =1 (20 vs 17), and Child-Pugh distribution, but differed in substantial use of ethanol (11% vs 3.6%; p = 0.01) and in the prevalence of cirrhosis (23% vs 34%, p = 0.06). Respective sensitivities of the AAR were 56% and 53%. An AAR > or =1 had a positive predictive value of 64% (95% confidence interval 48-78%) for the current cohort. Thirteen of 36 patients (36%) with an AAR > or =1 were incorrectly identified as having cirrhosis. Of these 13 patients, 6 had a normal AST and ALT, 5 had a minimally elevated AST or ALT, and 1 had advanced fibrosis without cirrhosis. These results suggest that an AAR > or =1 may not be as useful for predicting cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis C as previously thought, and emphasizes the need for validation of clinical decision aids on independent patient cohorts.

  1. Differences in circulating MMP-9 levels with regard to viral load and AST:ALT ratio between chronic hepatitis B and C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaly, G F

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the two major causes of chronic liver inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis. They have the ability to cause persistent infection in susceptible hosts and severely damage liver function. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is one of the gelatinases that may be important in liver fibrosis. This study aims to evaluate whether or not MMP-9 in relation to viral load is involved in the development of liver dysfunction in HBV and HCV Blood samples from 20 patients chronically infected with HBV and 30 with HCV, along with 15 healthy individuals as controls, were investigated. Viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum MMP-9 levels were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT and AST) activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Levels of MMP-9 were significantly higher in HCV than in HBV patients (P < 0.01), and positively correlated with HBV viral load (r = 0.842, P < 0.01) and AST:ALT ratio (r = 0.614, P < 0.05). Conversely, MMP-9 levels did not correlate with HCV viral load but did correlate with AST:ALT ratio (r = 0.652, P < 0.01). Therefore, MMP-9 levels could reflect progressive liver damage in HBV and HCV infection. However, a distinction between the pathological mechanism of HCV and HBV is suggested, as HCV probably promotes hepatocyte damage and fibrosis through mechanisms other than replication. Continuous expression of the HBV genome through replication and secretion of viral antigens may contribute to the transcriptional regulation of MMP-9, thus promoting liver damage and fibrosis.

  2. How to suppress obsessive thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Diepstraten, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Thought suppression (i.e. consciously trying to avoid certain thoughts from entering consciousness) has been argued to be an inadequate strategy in case of unwanted intrusions. That is, thought suppression seems to result in more rather than less intrusions. Although this experimental finding has been explained in terms of failing attempts to distract oneself from the target thought, the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI; a scale that measures chronic thought suppression tendencies) does not address the means by which respondents try to suppress unwanted thoughts. To examine which strategies of mental control people use to suppress unwanted thoughts, obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (N=47) completed the WBSI, the Thought Control Questionnaire, and two measures of psychopathology. Results suggest that the crucial mechanism in thought suppression may not be distraction, but self-punishment.

  3. Common reference intervals for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in serum: results from an IFCC multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Henny, Joseph; Queraltó, Josep; Ziyu, Shen; Özarda, Yeşim; Chen, Baorong; Boyd, James C; Panteghini, Mauro

    2010-11-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) measurements are important for the assessment of liver damage. The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) for these enzymes in adults, paying attention to standardization of the methods used and careful selection of the reference population. AST, ALT and GGT were measured with commercial analytical systems standardized to the IFCC-recommended reference measurement systems. Three centers (two in Italy and one in China) measured their own freshly collected samples; one of these centers also measured frozen samples from the Nordic Countries RI Project and from a Turkish center. RIs were generated using non-parametric techniques from the results of 765 individuals (411 females and 354 males, 18-85 years old) selected on the basis of the results of other laboratory tests and a specific questionnaire. AST results from the four regions (Milan, Beijing, Bursa and Nordic Countries) were statistically different, but these differences were too small to be clinically relevant. Likewise, differences between the upper reference limits for genders was only 1.7 U/L (0.03 μkat/L), allowing a single RI of 11-34 U/L (0.18-0.57 μkat/L) to be defined. Interregional differences were not statistically significant for ALT, but partitioning was required due to significant gender differences. RIs for ALT were 8-41 U/L (0.13-0.68 μkat/L) for females and 9-59 U/L (0.15-0.99 μkat/L) for males, respectively. The upper reference limits for GGT from the Nordic Country population were higher than those from the other three regions and results from this group were excluded from final calculations. The GGT RIs were 6-40 U/L (0.11-0.66 μkat/L) for females and 12-68 U/L (0.20- 1.13 μkat/L) for males, respectively. For AST and ALT, the implementation of common RIs appears to be possible, because no differences between regions were observed. However, a common RI for GGT that is

  4. Central high-$p_T$ jet production during low pile-up, high $\\beta^{\\ast}$ run at $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\;{\\rm TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Events consistent with central high-$p_T$ jet production with two leading protons are presented. The Forward Shower Counter (FSC) detectors, covering the very forward pseudo-rapidity range $6 <\\;\\mid\\!\\eta\\!\\mid\\;< 8$, were required to be empty. The FSC are a set of 10 scintillation counters designed to detect showers produced by particles hitting the beam pipes and surrounding material. The leading protons were detected as tracks in the TOTEM Roman Pot (RP) stations around the CMS interaction point. The data were collected during low pile-up runs at 8~TeV and $\\beta^{\\ast}=90\\;{\\rm m}$, in July 2012.

  5. Genetic exchange versus genetic differentiation in a medium-sized inversion of Drosophila: the A2/Ast arrangements of Drosophila subobscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Khadem, Mahnaz; Aguadé, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen

    2008-08-01

    Chromosomal inversion polymorphism affects nucleotide variation at loci associated with inversions. In Drosophila subobscura, a species with a rich chromosomal inversion polymorphism and the largest recombinational map so far reported in the Drosophila genus, extensive genetic structure of nucleotide variation was detected in the segment affected by the O(3) inversion, a moderately sized inversion at Muller's element E. Indeed, a strong genetic differentiation all over O(3) and no evidence of a higher genetic exchange in the center of the inversion than at breakpoints were detected. In order to ascertain, whether other polymorphic and differently sized inversions of D. subobscura also exhibited a strong genetic structure, nucleotide variation in 5 gene regions (P236, P275, P150, Sxl, and P125) located along the A(2) inversion was analyzed in A(st) and A(2) chromosomes of D. subobscura. A(2) is a medium-sized inversion at Muller's element A and forms a single inversion loop in heterokaryotypes. The lower level of variation in A(2) relative to A(st) and the significant excess of low-frequency variants at polymorphic sites indicate that nucleotide variation at A(2) is not at mutation-drift equilibrium. The closest region to an inversion breakpoint, P236, exhibits the highest level of genetic differentiation (F(ST)) and of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between arrangements and variants at nucleotide polymorphic sites. The remaining 4 regions show a higher level of genetic exchange between A(2) and A(st) chromosomes than P236, as revealed by F(ST) and LD estimates. However, significant genetic differentiation between the A(st) and A(2) arrangements was detected not only at P236 but also in the other 4 regions separated from the nearest breakpoint by 1.2-2.9 Mb. Therefore, the extent of genetic exchange between arrangements has not been high enough to homogenize nucleotide variation in the center of the A(2) inversion. A(2) can be considered a typical successful inversion

  6. Zingerone suppresses liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia through down regulating hepatic mRNA expression of inflammatory markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokender Kumar

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-induced endotoxin release is associated with high mortality rate even when appropriate antibiotics are used for the treatment of severe infections in intensive care units. Since liver is involved in systemic clearance and detoxification of endotoxin hence it becomes a primary target organ for endotoxin mediated inflammation. Currently available anti-inflammatory drugs give rise to serious side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need for safe and effective anti-inflammatory therapy. It is likely that anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and neutraceutical agents may have the potential to reduce the endotoxin mediated inflammation and complications associated with endotoxin release. Keeping this in mind, the present study was planned to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of zingerone (active compound of zingiber officinale against liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia. The selected antibiotics capable of releasing high content of endotoxin were employed for their in vivo efficacy in P.aeruginosa peritonitis model. Released endotoxin induced inflammation and zingerone as co-anti-inflammatory therapy significantly reduced inflammatory response. Improved liver histology and reduced inflammatory markers MDA, RNI, MPO, tissue damage markers (AST, ALT, ALP and inflammatory cytokines (MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α were indicative of therapeutic potential of zingerone. The mechanism of action of zingerone may be related to significant inhibition of the mRNA expression of inflammatory markers (TLR4, RelA, NF-kB2, TNF- α, iNOS, COX-2 indicating that zingerone interferes with cell signalling pathway and suppresses hyper expression of cell signaling molecules of inflammatory pathway. Zingerone therapy significantly protected liver from endotoxin induced inflammatory damage by down regulating biochemical as well as molecular markers of inflammation. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that zingerone is a potent anti

  7. Zingerone Suppresses Liver Inflammation Induced by Antibiotic Mediated Endotoxemia through Down Regulating Hepatic mRNA Expression of Inflammatory Markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Peritonitis Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-induced endotoxin release is associated with high mortality rate even when appropriate antibiotics are used for the treatment of severe infections in intensive care units. Since liver is involved in systemic clearance and detoxification of endotoxin hence it becomes a primary target organ for endotoxin mediated inflammation. Currently available anti-inflammatory drugs give rise to serious side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need for safe and effective anti-inflammatory therapy. It is likely that anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and neutraceutical agents may have the potential to reduce the endotoxin mediated inflammation and complications associated with endotoxin release. Keeping this in mind, the present study was planned to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of zingerone (active compound of zingiber officinale) against liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia. The selected antibiotics capable of releasing high content of endotoxin were employed for their in vivo efficacy in P.aeruginosa peritonitis model. Released endotoxin induced inflammation and zingerone as co-anti-inflammatory therapy significantly reduced inflammatory response. Improved liver histology and reduced inflammatory markers MDA, RNI, MPO, tissue damage markers (AST, ALT, ALP) and inflammatory cytokines (MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α) were indicative of therapeutic potential of zingerone. The mechanism of action of zingerone may be related to significant inhibition of the mRNA expression of inflammatory markers (TLR4, RelA, NF-kB2, TNF- α, iNOS, COX-2) indicating that zingerone interferes with cell signalling pathway and suppresses hyper expression of cell signaling molecules of inflammatory pathway. Zingerone therapy significantly protected liver from endotoxin induced inflammatory damage by down regulating biochemical as well as molecular markers of inflammation. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that zingerone is a potent anti

  8. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND BIOCHEMICAL PROFILE IN PRE AND POST ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Narasimha Rao Babji; Santhisree

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an important treatment for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. The invasiveness of the procedure and major adverse effects of memory loss and confusion are limiting variables in the use of ECT. Free radical molecules are released during a shock seizure. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy on lipid peroxidation and on enzymes is not well studied. In the present study Malondialdehyde (MDA), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alan...

  9. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  10. B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma associated with Epstein-Barr virus-reactivation and T-cell suppression following antithymocyte globulin therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Hanaoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab.

  11. Dupuytren’s and Ledderhose Diseases in a Family with LMNA-Related Cardiomyopathy and a Novel Variant in the ASTE1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V. Zaragoza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s disease (palmar fibromatosis involves nodules in fascia of the hand that leads to flexion contractures. Ledderhose disease (plantar fibromatosis is similar with nodules of the foot. While clinical aspects are well-described, genetic mechanisms are unknown. We report a family with cardiac disease due to a heterozygous LMNA mutation (c.736C>T, p.Gln246Stop with palmar/plantar fibromatosis and investigate the hypothesis that a second rare DNA variant increases the risk for fibrotic disease in LMNA mutation carriers. The proband and six family members were evaluated for the cardiac and hand/feet phenotypes and tested for the LMNA mutation. Fibroblast RNA studies revealed monoallelic expression of the normal LMNA allele and reduced lamin A/C mRNAs consistent with LMNA haploinsufficiency. A novel, heterozygous missense variant (c.230T>C, p.Val77Ala in the Asteroid Homolog 1 (ASTE1 gene was identified as a potential risk factor in fibrotic disease using exome sequencing and family studies of five family members: four LMNA mutation carriers with fibromatosis and one individual without the LMNA mutation and no fibromatosis. With a possible role in epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, ASTE1 may contribute to the increased risk for palmar/plantar fibromatosis in patients with Lamin A/C haploinsufficiency.

  12. Elevated Preoperative Serum Alanine Aminotransferase/Aspartate Aminotransferase (ALT/AST) Ratio Is Associated with Better Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Curative Treatment for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Lin; Li, Jian-Pei; Li, Lin-Fang; Zeng, Tao; He, Xia

    2016-06-09

    The level of anine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio in the serum was often used to assess liver injury. Whether the ALT/AST ratio (LSR) was associated with prognosis for gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) has not been reported in the literature. Our aim was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative LSR in patients with GA. A retrospective study was performed in 231 patients with GA undergoing curative resection. The medical records collected include clinical information and laboratory results. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative LSR and overall survival (OS). Survival analysis was conducted with the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine significant independent prognostic factors for predicting survival. A p value of 0.80. The LSR was independently associated with OS in patients with GA (hazard ratio: 0.610; 95% confidence interval: 0.388-0.958; p = 0.032), along with tumor stages (hazard ratio: 3.118; 95% confidence interval: 2.044-4.756; p < 0.001) and distant metastases (hazard ratio: 1.957; 95% confidence interval: 1.119-3.422; p = 0.019). Our study first established a connection between the preoperative LSR and patients undergoing curative resection for GA, suggesting that LSR was a simple, inexpensive, and easily measurable marker as a prognostic factor, and may help to identify high-risk patients for treatment decisions.

  13. Elevation of the AST to ALT ratio in association with the severity of esophageal varices in patients with HCV-related compensated liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yoshinori; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Yuri, Yukihisa; Iwata, Kazunari; Saito, Masaki; Imanishi, Hiroyasu; lijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The development of esophageal varices depends on the progression of liver fibrosis. However, it has not yet been sufficiently clarified whether biomarkers of liver fibrosis can be used to predict the incidence of varices in cirrhotic patients with a well-maintained liver function (Child-Pugh class A). Three established markers of liver fibrosis, including AST-to-ALT ratios (AAR), FIB-4 and AST-to-platelet ratio indices (APRI), were analyzed in HCV-positive cirrhotic patients with Child-Pugh class A status, and the relationships between these markers and the risk of variceal bleeding were investigated. The values of AAR and FIB-4 in the patient with varices with a high risk of hemorrhage were significantly higher than those in the patients without high-risk varices, whereas the value of APRI was not found to be related to the risk of variceal bleeding. Of all the parameters examined, the values of AAR were the most significantly different between the two (with or without high-risk varices) groups. In addition, the values of AAR increased in line with variceal severity. The value of AAR is related to the severity and risk of variceal bleeding in patients with HCV-related compensated cirrhosis.

  14. Evidence for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the WW$^{\\ast}$ decay mode using the data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jovicevic, Jelena; Strandberg, Jonas

    2015-11-20

    The $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ channel was one of the three search channels contributing in the observation of the Higgs boson at the ATLAS experiment in July 2012. Nowadays, this channel represents an important ingredient in the determination of the couplings and properties of the newly discovered particle. This thesis reports the search for and observation of the Higgs boson in the $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decay mode using the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis of events in which the Higgs boson is produced in the gluon-gluon fusion process and is associated with no more than one jet, is outlined in detail. The datasets used are the proton-proton collisions collected with the ATLAS detector at a centre of mass energy of 8 TeV during 2012 and 7 TeV during 2011, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 25 fb$^{-1}$. An excess over the predicted number of background events is observed in the data. The significance of the excess is estimated to be 6.1 standard deviations, ...

  15. Suppression of sympathetic detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C., Jr.; Gunger, M. E.; Craig, B. G.; Parsons, G. H.

    1984-08-01

    There are two basic approaches to suppression of sympathetic detonation. Minimizing the shock sensitivity of the explosive to long duration pressure will obviously reduce interround separation distances. However, given that the explosive sensitivity is fixed, then much can be gained through the use of simple barriers placed between the rounds. Researchers devised calculational methods for predicting shock transmission; experimental methods have been developed to characterize explosive shock sensitivity and observe the response of acceptors to barriers. It was shown that both EAK and tritonal can be initiated to detonation with relatively low pressure shocks of long durations. It was also shown that to be an effective barrier between the donor and acceptor, the material must attenuate shock and defect fragments. Future actions will concentrate on refining the design of barriers to minimize weight, volume, and cost.

  16. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression.

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    Hiroki Murakami

    Full Text Available Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on "here and now" experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one's own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed.

  17. Antimetastatic Therapies of the Polysulfide Diallyl Trisulfide against Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC via Suppressing MMP2/9 by Blocking NF-κB and ERK/MAPK Signaling Pathways.

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    Yuping Liu

    Full Text Available Migration and invasion are two crucial steps of tumor metastasis. Blockage of these steps may be an effective strategy to reduce the risk. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS, a natural organosulfuric compound with most sulfur atoms found in garlic, on migration and invasion in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC cells. Molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of DATS were further investigated.MDA-MB-231 cells and HS 578t breast cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of DATS. DATS obviously suppressed the migration and invasion of two cell lines and changed the morphological. Moreover, DATS inhibited the mRNA/protein/ enzymes activities of MMP2/9 via attenuating the NF-κB pathway. DATS also inhibited ERK/MAPK rather than p38 and JNK.DATS inhibits MMP2/9 activity and the metastasis of TNBC cells, and emerges as a potential anti-cancer agent. The inhibitory effects are associated with down-regulation of the transcriptional activities of NF-κB and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways.

  18. Antimetastatic Therapies of the Polysulfide Diallyl Trisulfide against Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) via Suppressing MMP2/9 by Blocking NF-κB and ERK/MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuping; Zhu, Pingting; Wang, Yingyu; Wei, Zhonghong; Tao, Li; Zhu, Zhijie; Sheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Siliang; Ruan, Junshan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Cao, Yuzhu; Shan, Yunlong; Sun, Lihua; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Lu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Migration and invasion are two crucial steps of tumor metastasis. Blockage of these steps may be an effective strategy to reduce the risk. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a natural organosulfuric compound with most sulfur atoms found in garlic, on migration and invasion in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of DATS were further investigated. MDA-MB-231 cells and HS 578t breast cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of DATS. DATS obviously suppressed the migration and invasion of two cell lines and changed the morphological. Moreover, DATS inhibited the mRNA/protein/ enzymes activities of MMP2/9 via attenuating the NF-κB pathway. DATS also inhibited ERK/MAPK rather than p38 and JNK. DATS inhibits MMP2/9 activity and the metastasis of TNBC cells, and emerges as a potential anti-cancer agent. The inhibitory effects are associated with down-regulation of the transcriptional activities of NF-κB and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways.

  19. A reappraisal of the concept of suppressive versus remittive psoriasis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Lucas, Jennifer; Pearce, Daniel J

    2005-08-01

    Among the ways to characterize the many treatments for psoriasis is to distinguish suppressive from remittive therapies. Remittive therapies are thought to be treatments that result in a prolonged period of disease remission even after stopping the drug, while suppressive treatments are thought to work only during the treatment period. However, apparent differences in remittive and suppressive properties may be due to the remitting and relapsing nature of psoriasis and the order in which treatments are used in patients. Few clinical trials have compared the suppressive versus remittive properties of different treatments. Given the adverse events and expense associated with many psoriasis therapies, a major implication is that psoriasis patients who have cleared on therapy should probably be tested at intervals to see if they can be tapered off their medication without loss of control of their disease.

  20. Autologous serum therapy in chronic urticaria: A promising complement to antihistamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchami Debbarman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic urticaria (CU is a vexing problem and patients of CU suffer from the morbidity that arise from irritable itch and weals and are also subjected to a huge antihistamine pill burden. The symptoms are more in autoreactive urticaria (AU where auto-antibodies in blood flares-up the condition. Search for newer effective modalities which can reduce pill burden is a felt need. Aims: This study evaluates the effectiveness of autologous serum therapy (AST in CU and also determines its usefulness in AU. Materials and Methods: Double blind, parallel group, randomized, controlled study. Fifty four patients were given AST and 57 patients were given injection normal saline (placebo, along with cetirizine in an on-demand basis in both groups. AST/Placebo was given weekly for nine weeks and followed-up for a total period of 24 weeks. AU was diagnosed by autologous serum skin test. Urticaria total severity score (TSS, Urticaria activity score (UAS, Dermatologic life quality index (DLQI was used as primary effectiveness variables. Safety parameters assessed were the spontaneously reported adverse events and laboratory parameters. Results: TSS showed significant improvement from baseline, 7 th week and 8 th week onwards in AST group and placebo group respectively. Group comparison showed significant improvement 4 th week onwards. UAS showed similar results. DLQI showed significant improvement in AST group compared to placebo at the end of study. Both AU and non-AU patients showed comparable improvement of TSS. Conclusion: AST shows promise in treatment of urticaria regardless of the autoreactive nature.

  1. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  2. Activity of Catalase (CAT, ALT and AST in Different Organs of Swiss Albino Mice Treated with Lead Acetate, Vitamin C and Magnesium-L-Threonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Nazmi Mazreku

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lead is a natural element with toxic properties and is widespread in the environment. Lead toxicity is associated with generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and consumption of antioxidants elements (vitamin E and C, glutathione, thioredoxin and lipoic acid, melatonin, carotenoids and natural flavonoids in the cell, and unbalancing oxidantsantioxidants levels. Aim: To evaluate the effects of different chemical combinations (lead acetate, Vitamin C and Magnesium-L-threonate on antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase-CAT of liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas and brain, and serum transaminases [Serum Alanine Transaminase (ALT and Serum Aspartate Transaminase (AST]. Materials and Methods: Experimental animals (49 male Mus musculus-swiss albino mice were separated into five different groups. The first group was used as a control, hence the other four groups were treated with sub-lethal doses (90 mg/kg of lead acetate (group 2, lead acetate (90 mg/kg and Vitamin C dose 40mg/kg (group 3, lead acetate (90 mg/kg and Magnesium-Lthreonate dose 100 mg/kg (group 4 and only with MagnesiumL-threonate dose 100 mg/kg (group 5, during the treatment period (40 days. Blood samples were taken from the facial vein and used for transaminase analysis. Organ tissue was collected after euthanizing anaesthetized animals with neck dislocation technique. Results: The results showed that lead acetate treatment has caused significant elevation in the activity of AST (group 2 and 3 and ALT (group 3. Also, CAT activity was significantly (p<0.05 increased in groups treated with lead acetate (liver, pancreas, kidney and brain but not in spleen. Treatment of lead intoxicated groups with Vitamin C and Magnesium L-threonate increased significantly CAT activity in brain. Conclusion: Lead effects by interacting with different molecular systems and increasing enzyme activity (CAT, ALT and AST. Effects on CAT activity of Magnesium-L-threonate and Vitamin C treatment

  3. Suppression of facilitative glucose transporter 1 mRNA can suppress tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Y; Saito, A; Miyagi, Y; Yamanaka, S; Marat, D; Doi, C; Yoshikawa, T; Tsuburaya, A; Ito, T; Satoh, S

    2000-06-30

    We attempted to suppress glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression by transfecting MKN45 cells with cDNA for antisense GLUT1. Glucose transport was significantly decreased in cells with antisense GLUT1 compared with wild-type cells or cells with vector alone. Suppression of GLUT1 mRNA resulted in a decreased number of cells in the S phase. This was accompanied by overexpression of p21 protein. Tumorigenicity in the nude mice injected with antisense GLUT1 expressing cells was significantly slower than in those with wild-type MKN45 cells. These results suggest that antisense GLUT1 mRNA inhibits tumor growth through a G(1) arrest and that expression of antisense GLUT1 mRNA via gene therapy can be used as a tool in the treatment of cancer.

  4. [Reestimation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio based on JSCC consensus method--changes of criteria for a differential diagnosis of hepatic disorders following the alteration from Karmen method to JSCC method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, K; Maekawa, M; Kanno, T

    1994-02-01

    We estimated clinical criteria of aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio that is measured by the consensus method of JSCC (Japan Society of Clinical Chemistry) for serum AST and ALT. The JSCC consensus method is closely correlated with both IFCC (International Federation of Clinical Chemistry) recommended method without pyridoxal phosphate and Karmen method recommended by the expert panel of liver function tests in Japanese Society of Gastroenterology. The slopes of the regression line is estimated to be 1.00 and 0.87 respectively. We propose that the decision making value of AST/ALT ratio to differentiate several types of liver diseases should be set to 0.87 measured by JSCC consensus method, instead of 1.0 measured by Karmen method.

  5. Stresin Ratlarda Bazı Karaciğer Enzimleri (AST, ALT, ALP) Üzerine Etkilerinin Araştırılması

    OpenAIRE

    GENCER, Yıldırım Gökhan; ÇINAR, Dursun Ali; COMBA, Bahat

    2015-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, stresin ratlarda karaciğer enzimlerinden AST, ALT ve ALP değerleri üzerine etkileri araştırılmıştır. Araştırmada yaklaşık 200-250 g ağırlığında 12 adet yetişkin Sprague Dawley ırkı erkek rat, kontrol (n=6) ve deneme (n=6) olarak 2 gruba ayrıldı. Çalışmada kontrol grubuna 1.0 ml izotonik serum, deneme grubuna ise 4 mg/kg (1 ml=50 IU) /birey dozunda ACTH (Synacthen Depot) intraperitoneal (i.p.) uygulandı. Bu uygulamadan 3 saat sonra, tüm hayvanlardan ksilazol ve ketasol anestezisi...

  6. A importância do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica

    OpenAIRE

    ZAMIN Jr.,Idilio; MATTOS,Angelo Alves de; PERIN,Christiano; RAMOS,Gabriel Zatti

    2002-01-01

    Racional - A esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e a doença hepática alcoólica apresentam similaridade histológica e em algumas situações, o diagnóstico diferencial das mesmas pode ser difícil, pois alguns pacientes não revelam o consumo abusivo de álcool. Objetivo- Avaliar a utilidade da determinação do índice AST/ALT no diagnóstico diferencial da esteatohepatite não-alcoólica e da doença hepática alcoólica. Pacientes e Métodos -Foram estudados 29 pacientes obesos com esteatohepatite não-alcoólica...

  7. [Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGP) in intestinal diseases of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodurka, T; Kraft, W

    1995-07-01

    331 dogs, suffering from different intestinal diseases with diarrhea, were classified into the groups of "acute noninfectious", "infectious", "chronic" and "secondary enteropathies". The serum enzymes ALT, AST, GLDH, AP and GGT were determined. In all groups increases of enzyme activities were to be found. The highest and most frequent increases have been observed in acute noninfectious and in secondary enteropathies. The enzyme pattern in acute noninfectious enteropathies indicate a secondary liver disturbance in consequence of the intestinal disease, whereas the liver participation in secondary enteropathies is the effect of the primary disease other than intestinal disturbances. In comparison to this the height and number of increases of liver enzyme activities were low in acute infectious and in chronic enteropathies.

  8. The effect of endurance training with cinnamon supplementation on plasma concentrations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST in women with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Torabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is associated with many pathological changes and one of the most important consequences of the diabetes is hepatic injury. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of eight weeks endurance training with consumption of cinnamon supplementation on plasma concentrations of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST in women with type II diabetes. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 36 female volunteers with type II diabetes (age 52.72±2.64 years and body mass index 29.28±2.94 Kg/m2 were participated. The subjects were homogenized regarding their body mass index and then were divided randomly into four groups (each group=9 patients: Training, training-cinnamon, cinnamon, and Control. Endurance training was performed for eight weeks (three sessions per week at the intensity of 60-75% of maximum heart rate for 40-60 minutes. The consumption of cinnamon supplementation was 1.5 gr per day. Plasma concentrations of ALT and AST were measured following 12 hours fasting, 48 hours before and after performing the experiment, by the enzymatic method. Data were analyzed by paired t-test and factorial ANOVA, using SPSS version 21 (Chicago, IL, USA and at the significant level of P0.05. There was no significant difference between groups in pre and posttests. Conclusion: The results confirm that cinnamon supplementation may be effective in improving the plasma levels of ALT but the intensity and duration of an effective exercise training especially with consumption of cinnamon supplementation simultaneously need more study in diabetic patients.

  9. Elevated Preoperative Serum Alanine Aminotransferase/Aspartate Aminotransferase (ALT/AST Ratio Is Associated with Better Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Curative Treatment for Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The level of anine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST ratio in the serum was often used to assess liver injury. Whether the ALT/AST ratio (LSR was associated with prognosis for gastric adenocarcinoma (GA has not been reported in the literature. Our aim was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative LSR in patients with GA. A retrospective study was performed in 231 patients with GA undergoing curative resection. The medical records collected include clinical information and laboratory results. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative LSR and overall survival (OS. Survival analysis was conducted with the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine significant independent prognostic factors for predicting survival. A p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 231 patients were finally enrolled. The median overall survival was 47 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that preoperative LSR was an independent prognostic factor in GA. Patients with LSR ≤ 0.80 had a greater risk of death than those with LSR > 0.80. The LSR was independently associated with OS in patients with GA (hazard ratio: 0.610; 95% confidence interval: 0.388–0.958; p = 0.032, along with tumor stages (hazard ratio: 3.118; 95% confidence interval: 2.044–4.756; p < 0.001 and distant metastases (hazard ratio: 1.957; 95% confidence interval: 1.119–3.422; p = 0.019. Our study first established a connection between the preoperative LSR and patients undergoing curative resection for GA, suggesting that LSR was a simple, inexpensive, and easily measurable marker as a prognostic factor, and may help to identify high-risk patients for treatment decisions.

  10. Association between Plasmatic Ceramides Profile and AST/ALT Ratio: C14:0 Ceramide as Predictor of Hepatic Steatosis in Adolescents Independently of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Maldonado-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the association between plasma ceramides and hepatic steatosis (HS in adolescents, independently of obesity. Materials and Methods. Ninety-four adolescents from two previous studies conducted and published by our crew were included. Study subjects were stratified in three groups: normal weight (n=18, obesity (n=34, and obesity + HS (n=42. The presence of HS was defined when ALT/AST ratio was <1. Ceramides subspecies (C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C24:0, and C24:1 were determined by LC/MS. Results. All ceramides correlated directly with ALT levels and inversely with ALT/AST ratio; the strongest correlation was observed among C14:0 ceramide (r=0.41 and r=-0.54, resp.; P<0.001. Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between cholesterol and all ceramides except for C24:1 ceramide. Interestingly ceramides C14:0, C18:0, and C24:1 correlated directly with both fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index. For assessing HS, a cut-off point of 10.3 nmol/L for C14:0 ceramide reported a sensitivity of 92.7% and a specificity of 73.5% when normal weight and obesity groups (n=52 were compared against obesity + HS group (n=42. Positive and negative predictive values were 77.5% and 90.2%, respectively. Conclusions. Plasma ceramides are closely associated with hepatic steatosis in adolescents. C14:0 ceramide could be a novel biomarker of HS independently of obesity.

  11. Association between Plasmatic Ceramides Profile and AST/ALT Ratio: C14:0 Ceramide as Predictor of Hepatic Steatosis in Adolescents Independently of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Hernández, Jorge; Saldaña-Dávila, Gabriela E; Piña-Aguero, Mónica I; Núñez-García, Benjamín A; López-Alarcón, Mardia G

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between plasma ceramides and hepatic steatosis (HS) in adolescents, independently of obesity. Ninety-four adolescents from two previous studies conducted and published by our crew were included. Study subjects were stratified in three groups: normal weight ( n = 18), obesity ( n = 34), and obesity + HS ( n = 42). The presence of HS was defined when ALT/AST ratio was <1. Ceramides subspecies (C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C24:0, and C24:1) were determined by LC/MS. All ceramides correlated directly with ALT levels and inversely with ALT/AST ratio; the strongest correlation was observed among C14:0 ceramide ( r = 0.41 and r = -0.54, resp.; P < 0.001). Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between cholesterol and all ceramides except for C24:1 ceramide. Interestingly ceramides C14:0, C18:0, and C24:1 correlated directly with both fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index. For assessing HS, a cut-off point of 10.3 nmol/L for C14:0 ceramide reported a sensitivity of 92.7% and a specificity of 73.5% when normal weight and obesity groups ( n = 52) were compared against obesity + HS group ( n = 42). Positive and negative predictive values were 77.5% and 90.2%, respectively. Plasma ceramides are closely associated with hepatic steatosis in adolescents. C14:0 ceramide could be a novel biomarker of HS independently of obesity.

  12. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Wang, Xue-Ping; Li, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Lin, Jian-Hua; Kang, Ting; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Pei-Song

    2017-08-14

    The levels of liver function tests (LFTs) are often used to assess liver injury and non-liver disease-related mortality. In our study, the relationship between pretreatment serum LFTs and overall survival (OS) was evaluated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Our purpose was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) in ESCC patients. A retrospective study was performed in 447 patients with ESCC, and follow-up period was at least 60 months until death. The prognostic significance of serum LFTs were determined by univariate and multivariate Cox hazard models. LFTs including ALT, AST, LSR, GGT, TBA and LDH were analyzed. Serum LSR (HR: 0.592, 95% CI = 0.457-0.768, p < 0.001 and GGT (HR: 1.507, 95% CI = 1.163-1.953, p = 0.002) levels were indicated as significant predictors of OS. The 5-year OS among patients with higher LSR levels was longer compared with those patients with decreased LSR levels, not only in the whole cohort but also in the subgroups stratified by pathological stage (T1-T2 subgroup, T3-T4 subgroup, N0 subgroup and M0 subgroup). We also found that patients with a higher GGT might predict worse OS than patients with a normal GGT, not only in the whole cohort but also in the subgroups stratified by pathological stage (T3-T4 subgroup and N1-N2 subgroup). Both increased levels of LSR and decreased levels of GGT might predict shorter overall survival in ESCC patients. Our findings suggest that serum LSR and GGT levels could be used as a key predictor of survival in patients with ESCC.

  13. Beyond the Immune Suppression: The Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ida; Cattarino, Susanna; Aglianò, Anna Maria; Collalti, Giulia; Sciarra, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cancer in men. As well in many other human cancers, inflammation and immune suppression have an important role in their development. We briefly describe the host components that interact with the tumor to generate an immune suppressive environment involved in PCa promotion and progression. Different tools provide to overcome the mechanisms of immunosuppression including vaccines and immune checkpoint blockades. With regard to this, we report results of most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in metastatic PCa (Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, tasquinimod, Prostvac-VF, and GVAX) and provide possible future perspectives combining the immunotherapy to the traditional therapies. PMID:26161414

  14. Patient adherence to generic versus brand statin therapy after acute myocardial infarction: Insights from the Can Rapid Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes with Early Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Emily C; McCoy, Lisa A; Thomas, Laine; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Tracy Y

    2015-07-01

    Statins reduce mortality after acute myocardial infarction, but up to half of patients discontinue statin use within 1 year of therapy initiation. Although cost may influence medication adherence, it is unknown whether use of generic versus brand statins influences adherence. We linked detailed inhospital clinical data for 1421 non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients discharged on a statin in 2006 to Medicare Part D medication claims records to examine postdischarge medication use. One-year statin adherence was defined using the proportion of days covered with optimal adherence ≥80%. We examined the association of brand versus generic statin prescription and 1-year adherence after adjusting for demographics, clinical factors, predischarge lipid values, prior statin use, and socioeconomic status. Overall, 65.5% of statin fills were for brand-name statins. There were few baseline differences in demographics and clinical factors among generic versus brand users. Patient copay amounts were higher for brand versus generic statins (median = $25 vs $5, P brand statins (55.9%; P = .93). Statin adherence rates remained similar between generic and brand users after adjusting for demographics, clinical risk factors, lipid value, prior statin use, and socioeconomic status. In a cohort of older non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, we found no evidence that use of generic versus brand drug was associated with higher adherence to statins at 1 year after hospital discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adjuvant exemestane with ovarian suppression in premenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Olivia; Regan, Meredith M; Walley, Barbara A; Fleming, Gini F; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gomez, Henry L; Tondini, Carlo; Burstein, Harold J; Perez, Edith A; Ciruelos, Eva; Stearns, Vered; Bonnefoi, Hervé R; Martino, Silvana; Geyer, Charles E; Pinotti, Graziella; Puglisi, Fabio; Crivellari, Diana; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Winer, Eric P; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Bernhard, Jürg; Luo, Weixiu; Ribi, Karin; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Goldhirsch, Aron; Francis, Prudence A

    2014-07-10

    Adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor improves outcomes, as compared with tamoxifen, in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. In two phase 3 trials, we randomly assigned premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer to the aromatase inhibitor exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 years. Suppression of ovarian estrogen production was achieved with the use of the gonadotropin-releasing-hormone agonist triptorelin, oophorectomy, or ovarian irradiation. The primary analysis combined data from 4690 patients in the two trials. After a median follow-up of 68 months, disease-free survival at 5 years was 91.1% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.85; P<0.001). The rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 92.8% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, as compared with 88.8% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.80; P<0.001). With 194 deaths (4.1% of the patients), overall survival did not differ significantly between the two groups (hazard ratio for death in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.51; P=0.37). Selected adverse events of grade 3 or 4 were reported for 30.6% of the patients in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 29.4% of those in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group, with profiles similar to those for postmenopausal women. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. (Funded by Pfizer and others; TEXT and SOFT ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00066703 and NCT00066690, respectively.).

  17. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  18. Therapeutic effect of antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YING Ruosu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo retrospectively analyze the therapeutic effect of antiviral therapy in the chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and to investigate whether hepatocyte steatosis affects the response to antiviral therapy in CHB patients. MethodsA total of 110 CHB patients and 99 CHB patients with NAFLD were enrolled in the study. Serum HBV DNA levels were measured by fluorescence quantitative PCR; serum HBsAg, HBsAb, HBeAg, HBeAb, and HBcAb were quantified by chemiluminescence; biochemical indices were determined by automatic biochemical analyzer to evaluate the liver function. Results(1 When receiving antiviral therapy with interferon, the CHB patients had a significantly higher rate of alanine aminotransferase (ALT/aspartate aminotransferase (AST normalization after 24 weeks of treatment (χ2=4.069, P=0.044 and a significantly higher rate of HBV DNA clearance after 48 weeks of treatment (χ2=17.327, P=0.000, as compared with the CHB patients with NAFLD; in all HBeAg-positive patients, those with only CHB had a significantly higher rate of ALT/AST normalization after 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.05 and significantly higher rates of HBV DNA clearance and HBeAg clearance after 24 and 48 weeks of treatment (P<0.05, as compared with those with CHB and NAFLD, but there was no significant difference in the rate of ALT/AST normalization between them after 48 weeks of treatment (P>0.05. (2 When receiving antiviral therapy with nucleos(tide analogues, the CHB patients had a significantly higher rate of ALT/AST normalization than the CHB patients with NAFLD after 48 weeks of treatment (χ2=7.620, P=0.006, but there was no significant difference in the rate of HBV DNA clearance between them after 24 and 48 weeks of treatment (P>0.05; in all HBeAg-positive patients, those with CHB and NAFLD had a significantly higher rate of HBeAg clearance after 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.05 and a significantly lower rate of ALT/AST

  19. A combined modality of carboplatin and photodynamic therapy suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 expression in HEp-2 human laryngeal cancer cells via ROS-mediated inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenjing; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Huankang; Cao, Luhong; Wang, Jiajia; He, Peijie

    2016-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as a promising treatment modality for laryngeal cancer. 9-Hydroxypheophorbide α (9-HPbD), a novel chlorophyll-derived photosensitizer, has a longer absorption wavelength, which increases the penetration of light to malignant tissues. Carboplatin (CBDCA), a second-generation platinum derivative, also has gained more popularity for the treatment of laryngeal cancer. Our previous studies have elucidated that 9-HPbD-PDT could inhibit the migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the change of migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells induced by a combined modality of CBDCA and 9-HPbD-PDT in vitro. A wound healing assay, cell migration assay and Matrigel invasion assay were used to evaluate the cellular migration and invasion. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Western blots for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers (E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin), MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MEK/ERK signalling pathway were performed to investigate the possible mechanisms that may be involved. We observed that CBDCA and 9-HPbD-PDT administration synergistically inhibited the migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells. Moreover, the combined modality cooperatively repressed the EMT process and down-regulated expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via ROS-mediated inhibition of phosphorylation in the MEK/ERK signalling pathway. Our results suggested that the combination of CBDCA and 9-HPbD-PDT might be a promising therapeutic strategy for laryngeal cancer metastasis.

  20. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie; Heath, Sonya L; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S; Kwa, Suefen; Robinson, Harriet L

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  1. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  2. Thyroid suppression test with dextrothyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Fridman, J.; Ribeiro, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    The classic thyroid suppression test with triiodothyronine (l-T 3 ) has been shown to be efficient as an auxiliary method in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases, but should not be performed on elderly patients or on those with heart disease or a tendency to tachycardia. Since these subjects seem able to support a short period of dextro-thyronine (d-T 4 ) feeding, we compared the effect of d-T 4 and l-T 3 on the 24 hours thyroid uptake in euthyroid and hyperthyroid subjects. After basal radio-iodine uptake determination, 99 patients without hyperthyroidism and 27 with Graves' disease were randomly divided in 2 groups; one received 100μg of l-T 3 per day and the other 4 mg of d-T 4 per day, both groups being treated for a period of 10 days. At the end of this suppression period the 24 hours radio-iodine uptake was measured again and the percentual suppression index (S.I.) calculated. Since the comparison of the two groups showed no difference between the suppressive effect of l-T 3 and d-T 4 in euthyroid subjects, while dextro-thyronine, as levo-triiodothyronine, did not suppress the 24 hours uptake of hyperthyroid patients, l-T 3 or d-T 4 can be used interchangeably to test thyroid suppressibility. In the euthyroid subjects the normal range for the post-suppression uptake was 0-17.1% and for the suppression index 54,7.100% [pt

  3. In vivo Treg suppression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Creg J; Collison, Lauren W; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R; Rehg, Jerold E; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of T(regs) upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model including resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  4. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  5. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Thompson

    Full Text Available GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA boost vaccine (GOVX-B11, was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI. Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  6. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  7. Evaluation of Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing by the New Vitek 2 AST-YS06 Yeast Card Using a Unique Collection of FKS Wild-Type and Hot Spot Mutant Isolates, Including the Five Most Common Candida Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K

    2013-01-01

    FKS mutant isolates associated with breakthrough or failure cases are emerging in clinical settings. Discrimination of these from wild-type (wt) isolates in a routine laboratory setting is complicated. We evaluated the ability of caspofungin MIC determination using the new Vitek 2 AST-Y06 yeast...

  8. One-week acid suppression trial in uninvestigated dyspepsia patients with epigastric pain or burning to predict response to 8 weeks' treatment with esomeprazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zanten, S V; Flook, N; Talley, N J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While empiric acid-suppressive therapy for uninvestigated dyspepsia patients with symptoms of epigastric pain or burning is standard practice, it is unknown whether an early response to therapy predicts outcome. AIM: To evaluate whether a 1-w acid suppression trial is effective for pr...

  9. Rituximab selectively suppresses specific islet antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Herold, Kevan; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; McGee, Paula L; Bundy, Brian; Pugliese, Alberto; Krischer, Jeff; Eisenbarth, George S

    2011-10-01

    The TrialNet Study Group evaluated rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, for its effect in new-onset patients with type 1A diabetes. Rituximab decreased the loss of C-peptide over the first year of follow-up and markedly depleted B lymphocytes for 6 months after administration. This article analyzes the specific effect of rituximab on multiple islet autoantibodies. A total of 87 patients between the ages of 8 and 40 years received either rituximab or a placebo infusion weekly for four doses close to the onset of diabetes. Autoantibodies to insulin (IAAs), GAD65 (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA2As), and ZnT8 (ZnT8As) were measured with radioimmunoassays. The primary outcome for this autoantibody analysis was the mean level of autoantibodies during follow-up. Rituximab markedly suppressed IAAs compared with the placebo injection but had a much smaller effect on GADAs, IA2As, and ZnT8As. A total of 40% (19 of 48) of rituximab-treated patients who were IAA positive became IAA negative versus 0 of 29 placebo-treated patients (P IAAs were markedly suppressed by rituximab in all patients for 1 year and for four patients as long as 3 years despite continuing insulin therapy. Independent of rituximab treatment, the mean level of IAAs at study entry was markedly lower (P = 0.035) for patients who maintained C-peptide levels during the first year of follow-up in both rituximab-treated and placebo groups. A single course of rituximab differentially suppresses IAAs, clearly blocking IAAs for >1 year in insulin-treated patients. For the patients receiving insulin for >2 weeks prior to rituximab administration, we cannot assess whether rituximab not only blocks the acquisition of insulin antibodies induced by insulin administration and/or also suppresses preformed insulin autoantibodies. Studies in prediabetic non-insulin-treated patients will likely be needed to evaluate the specific effects of rituximab on levels of IAAs.

  10. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  11. Resonance suppression from color reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, R.; Chinellato, D. D.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Takahashi, J.; Torrieri, G.; Markert, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present studies that show how multi-parton interaction and color reconnection affect the hadro-chemistry in proton-proton (pp) collisions with special focus on the production of resonances using the pythia8 event generator. We find that color reconnection suppresses the relative production of meson resonances such as ρ0 and K* , providing an alternative explanation for the K*/K decrease observed in proton-proton collisions as a function of multiplicity by the ALICE collaboration. Detailed studies of the underlying mechanism causing meson resonance suppression indicate that color reconnection leads to shorter, less energetic strings whose fragmentation is less likely to produce more massive hadrons for a given quark content, therefore reducing ratios such as K*/K and ρ0/π in high-multiplicity pp collisions. In addition, we have also studied the effects of allowing string junctions to form and found that these may also contribute to resonance suppression.

  12. Doppiaggio in italiano del film 'Astérix et Obélix - Au service de Sa Majesté'. Trasposizione degli elementi culturali e umoristici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rollo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – At present, audiovisual translation is one of the most interesting and stimulating domains within the field of Translation Studies. Resting on a rich semiotic apparatus, marked by the interplay of a double channel of communication – audio/visual – with different types of signs – verbal/non-verbal codes, the audiovisual text is a complex one, whose transfer from one language into another represents a challenging task for every professional in this field. Especially in dubbing, the translator/adapter has to work on the interlinguistic level as well as on the intersemiotic level (iconic, paralinguistic elements, etc.: as many codes having great semantic potential and transmitting useful cultural information, as we shall see in the film which we have taken as the object of our analyses: Astérix et Obélix: Au Service de Sa Majesté (2012. This fourth film adaptation (except cartoons of Astérix’s adventures offers a series of gags playing on the parody of typical traditions, symbols, linguistic clichés and cultural stereotypes associated with British culture. Italian dubbing resorts to different translation strategies, some of which come under a foreignizing approach, aiming at preserving the original’s colour and mood, whereas others are in line with a domesticating approach, in order to bring the product closer to the final audience. Indeed, instead of stressing the idea of a polarization or a dichotomy between two contrasting perspectives, we find it advisable to envisage a gradation between two instances which occur at the same time and coexist in a complementary way during the translation process.   Keywords: audiovisual translation; dubbing; cultural elements; humorous elements; foreignization/domestication.     Résumé – La traduction audiovisuelle se configure à l’heure actuelle comme l’un des domaines les plus intéressants et les plus stimulants dans le panorama des etudes traductologiques. Reposant sur

  13. AST Critical Propulsion and Noise Reduction Technologies for Future Commercial Subsonic Engines Area of Interest 1.0: Reliable and Affordable Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William; Winter, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The General Electric Reliable and Affordable Controls effort under the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program has designed, fabricated, and tested advanced controls hardware and software to reduce emissions and improve engine safety and reliability. The original effort consisted of four elements: 1) a Hydraulic Multiplexer; 2) Active Combustor Control; 3) a Variable Displacement Vane Pump (VDVP); and 4) Intelligent Engine Control. The VDVP and Intelligent Engine Control elements were cancelled due to funding constraints and are reported here only to the state they progressed. The Hydraulic Multiplexing element developed and tested a prototype which improves reliability by combining the functionality of up to 16 solenoids and servo-valves into one component with a single electrically powered force motor. The Active Combustor Control element developed intelligent staging and control strategies for low emission combustors. This included development and tests of a Controlled Pressure Fuel Nozzle for fuel sequencing, a Fuel Multiplexer for individual fuel cup metering, and model-based control logic. Both the Hydraulic Multiplexer and Controlled Pressure Fuel Nozzle system were cleared for engine test. The Fuel Multiplexer was cleared for combustor rig test which must be followed by an engine test to achieve full maturation.

  14. The independent living donor advocate: a guidance document from the American Society of Transplantation's Living Donor Community of Practice (AST LDCOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, R E; LaPointe Rudow, D; Dew, M A; Taler, S J; Spicer, H; Mandelbrot, D A

    2015-02-01

    The independent living donor advocate (ILDA) serves a mandated and supportive role in the care of the living organ donor, yet qualifications and role requirements are not clearly defined. Guidance comes from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Conditions for Transplant Center Participation and interpretive guidelines, Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) Policy and CMS and OPTN site surveys, yet interpretation of regulations varies. Herein, the AST Living Donor Community of Practice (LDCOP) offers seven recommendations to clarify and optimize the ILDA role: (a) the ILDA must have a certain skill set rather than a specific profession, (b) the ILDA must be educated and demonstrate competence in core knowledge components, (c) the ILDA's primary role is to assess components of informed consent, (d) centers must develop a transparent system to define ILDA independence, (e) the ILDA should have a reporting structure outside the transplant center, (f) the ILDA's role should be integrated throughout the donor care continuum, (g) the ILDA role should include a narrow "veto power." We address controversies in ILDA implementation, and offer pathways to maximize benefits and minimize limitations of approaches that may each meet regulatory requirements but confer different practice benefits. We propose a research agenda to explore the impact of the ILDA. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. Study of $(W/Z)H$ production and Higgs boson couplings using $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decays with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

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Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-08-27

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson, in the $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two-lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the $ZH$ production mode. The observed significance, for the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ produc...

  16. Teaching to suppress Polglish processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dziubalska-Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Balas, Anna; Schwartz, Geoffrey; Rojczyk, Arkadiusz; Wrembel, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Advanced second language (henceforth L2) learners in a formal setting can suppress many first language (henceforth L1) processes in L2 pronunciation when provided with sufficient exposure to L2 and meta competence (see Sect. 4 for a definition of this term). This paper shows how imitation in L2 teaching can be enhanced on the basis of current phonetic research and how complex allophonic processes such as nasal vocalization and glottal stop insertion can be suppressed using “repair”—a method o...

  17. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  18. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  19. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung: Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Translating Cough Mechanisms Into Better Cough Suppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jennifer A; McGovern, Alice E; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2017-10-01

    Chronic cough is a significant problem, and in many patients cough remains refractive to both disease-specific therapies and current cough-suppressing medicines, creating a need for improved antitussive therapies. Most patients with chronic cough also display heightened sensitivity so that they experience a persistent sense of the need to cough, and often innocuous stimuli can trigger their coughing. This hypersensitivity underpins the newly described concept of cough hypersensitivity syndrome (CHS), a term that encapsulates the notion of common underlying mechanisms producing neuronal activation, sensitization and/or dysfunction, which are at the core of excessive coughing. Understanding these mechanisms has been a focus of recent research efforts in the field in the hope that new therapies can be developed to selectively target sensitized unproductive cough while maintaining the reflexive cough essential for airway protection. However, efforts to achieve this have been slower than expected, in part because of some significant challenges and limitations translating current cough models. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the sensory circuits innervating the respiratory system that are important for cough, how cough sensory pathways become hypersensitive, and some of the recently described neural targets under development for treating chronic cough. We present the case that better use of current cough models or the development of new models, or both, is ultimately needed to advance our efforts to translate the discovery of basic cough mechanisms into effective medicines for treating patients with chronic cough. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels in patients with suppressed pituitary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasavada, P.; Chen, I.; Maxon, H.; Barnes, E.; Sperling, M.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of borderline hyperthyroidism is difficult. A sensitive radioimmunoassay capable of detecting subnormal levels of serum TSH may be of value in confirming this diagnosis because of the suppressed pituitary function in this disease state. This sensitive assay may also be useful in monitoring the suppression of pituitary function in thyroid cancer patients receiving thyroid hormone therapy. A sensitive radioimmunoassay capable of detecting serum TSH levels as low as 0.25 μU/m1 with coefficients of variation less than 17.2% was used to measure serum TSH levels in 80 healthy subjects, 44 hyperthyroid patients, and 25 athyrotic thyroid cancer patients on daily suppressive doses of thyroxine. All healthy subjects had detectable TSH levels with a mean value of 1.17 and two standard deviation ranges of 0.41 - 2.70 μU/m1 (lognormal distribution). Although the mean +-1 SEM value of 0.63 +- 0.003 μUm1 for hyperthyroid patients and 0.76 +- 0.08 μU/ml for thyroid cancer patients were significantly lower than that of healthy subjects (t-test, p<0.05), subnormal levels of serum TSH were found in only 28.6% (12/42) and 24% (6/25) of hyperthyroid and thyroid cancer patients, respectively. TSH stimulation tests performed in 6 of the cancer patients all gave suppressed responses. Because of considerable overlap, serum TSH levels alone cannot distinguish hyperthyroidsm from euthyroidism. However, a sensitive TSH radioimmunoassay such as the one described here may be of value in evaluating the extent of pituitary suppression in thyroid cancer therapy

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Guided by the Single-Chain Fv of a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Specifically and Effectively Eradicate Virus Reactivated from Latency in CD4+ T Lymphocytes Isolated from HIV-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Suppressive Combined Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfeng; Zou, Fan; Lu, Lijuan; Chen, Cancan; He, Dalian; Zhang, Xu; Tang, Xiaoping; Liu, Chao; Li, Linghua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Despite the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), the persistence of viral reservoirs remains a major barrier to curing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Recently, the shock and kill strategy, by which such reservoirs are eradicated following reactivation of latent HIV-1 by latency-reversing agents (LRAs), has been extensively practiced. It is important to reestablish virus-specific and reliable immune surveillance to eradicate the reactivated virus-harboring cells. In this report, we attempted to reach this goal by using newly developed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell technology. To generate anti-HIV-1 CAR-T cells, we connected the single-chain variable fragment of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibody VRC01 to a third-generation CAR moiety as the extracellular and intracellular domains and subsequently transduced this into primary CD8 + T lymphocytes. We demonstrated that the resulting VC-CAR-T cells induced T cell-mediated cytolysis of cells expressing HIV-1 Env proteins and significantly inhibited HIV-1 rebound after removal of antiviral inhibitors in a viral infectivity model in cell culture that mimics the termination of the cART in the clinic. Importantly, the VC-CAR-T cells also effectively induced the cytolysis of LRA-reactivated HIV-1-infected CD4 + T lymphocytes isolated from infected individuals receiving suppressive cART. Our data demonstrate that the special features of genetically engineered CAR-T cells make them a particularly suitable candidate for therapeutic application in efforts to reach a functional HIV cure. The presence of latently infected cells remains a key obstacle to the development of a functional HIV-1 cure. Reactivation of dormant viruses is possible with latency-reversing agents, but the effectiveness of these compounds and the subsequent immune response require optimization if the eradication of HIV-1-infected cells is to be achieved. Here, we describe the use of a chimeric antigen

  3. Growth Suppression and Therapy Sensitization of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    of Ad-p53 or Ad- Igal -infected cells, 48 hours post-infection, for the presence of oligonucleosomal fragments (Figure 4). These fragments are released...T98G parental 1-10-10(mutant) 1-10-6(mutant) T98GjJun i9gal p53 IRgal p53 Igal p53 Rgal p53 Figure 5. Western blot analysis of bax and bcl 2 protein...p n3easnse ta ine d usctionpof tolive takn fro mor i ce kileoa the nt telrination of thed-expeimentxpdesbdinTbl 1.or Nsectin cespohnd adtoite folloing

  4. Improving Precision of Generated ASTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Johnni

    The parser-generator is an essential tool in grammarware and its output, the parse tree in form of the concrete or abstract syntax tree, often forms the basis for the whole structure of the grammarware application. Several tools for Java encode the parse tree in a class hierarchy generated to model...

  5. India vabadusliikumine / Karl Ast Rumor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ast Rumor, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Vastuhakkamisest Inglise võimudele 1857. ja 1930. aastal. Liikumine, mille eesotsas seisab Gandhi, põlvneb igivanast hindu enesetundest, selle eesmärgiks on enesemääramine, mitte ainult poliitiliset, vaid ka kultuuriliselt, usuliselt ja lõpuks ka majanduslikult, rippumatus mitte ainult Inglismaast, vaid Euroopast ning Läänest üldse. Varem ilmunud : "Nool" 31. mai, 7., 14., 21. juuni 1930, nr. 27-30

  6. Tartu rahuleping / Karl Ast Rumor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ast Rumor, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Kõne asutava Kogu III istungjärgul 10. veebruaril 1920. Rahu sõlmimise järel peab autor sõjaväe reorganiseerimise asemel tähtsaks piiri sulgemist Eesti ja Venemaa vahel. Ettepanek Asutavale Kogule algatada amnestiaküsimus poliitiliste süüaluste ja sõjaväedistsipliini rikkujate kohta

  7. The AST/ALT (De-Ritis) ratio: A novel marker for critical limb ischemia in peripheral arterial occlusive disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Peter; Pichler, Martin; Raggam, Reinhard; Hafner, Franz; Gerger, Armin; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Gary, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The aspartat aminotransferase (AST)/alanin aminotransferase (ALT) (De-Ritis) ratio (AAR) is an easily applicable blood test. An elevated AAR on the one hand has been associated with an increase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD on the other hand is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and diabetes. As the AAR is also elevated in case of muscular damage, we investigated AAR and its association with critical limb ischemia (CLI) in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) patients.In our cross-sectional study, we included 1782 PAOD patients treated at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Patients with chronic alcohol consumption (>20 g/day) were excluded. AAR was calculated and the cohort was categorized into tertiles according to the AAR. An optimal cut-off value for the continuous AAR was calculated by applying a receiver operating curve analysis to discriminate between CLI and non-CLI.In our cohort, occurrence of CLI significantly increased with an elevation in AAR. As an optimal cut-off value, an AAR of 1.67 (sensitivity 34.1%, specificity 81.0%) was identified. Two groups were categorized, 1st group containing 1385 patients (AAR  1.67). CLI was more frequent in AAR > 1.67 patients (166 [41.9%]) compared to AAR  1.67 was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-2.3) for CLI even after adjustment for other well-established vascular risk factors.An increased AAR is significantly associated with patients at high risk for CLI and other cardiovascular endpoints. The AAR is a broadly available and cheap marker, which might be useful to highlight patients at high risk for vascular endpoints.

  8. Subcutaneous autologous serum therapy in chronic spontaneous urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Vasant Godse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a felt need for trying newer therapeutic modalities in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria, especially in the subset of patients classified as non-responders to antihistamines. Autologous serum therapy is an upcoming modality of treatment, and we decided to study its efficacy by subcutaneous route. Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of subcutaneous autologous serum therapy (AST in CSU. Methods: This was a single blind, placebo-controlled parallel group, randomized, controlled study. Twenty-four patients with CSU (11M: 13 F were given subcutaneous AST and seventeen patients (7 M: 10F patients were given subcutaneous injection normal saline (placebo, along with levocetirizine in an on-demand basis in both groups. Results: Urticaria activity score (UAS came down from 35.74 to 7 at the end of 9 weeks and the patients' requirement of antihistamines also reduced remarkably from 5.8 to 1.7 per week in the serum group. Sub-cutaneous saline group did not show statistically significant fall in UAS. Saline group showed UAS 32.8 at zero week to 22.1 at the end of 9 weeks. DLQI showed significant fall in serum group, from 14.26 to 4 at the end of 9 weeks. Conclusion: Subcutaneous autoserum therapy is effective in treatment of CSU.

  9. Strangeness Suppression and Color Deconfinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satz, Helmut

    2018-02-01

    The relative multiplicities for hadron production in different high energy collisions are in general well described by an ideal gas of all hadronic resonances, except that under certain conditions, strange particle rates are systematically reduced. We show that the suppression factor γs, accounting for reduced strange particle rates in pp, pA and AA collisions at different collision energies, becomes a universal function when expressed in terms of the initial entropy density s0 or the initial temperature T of the produced thermal medium. It is found that γs increases from about 0.5 to 1.0 in a narrow temperature range around the quark-hadron transition temperature Tc ≃ 160 MeV. Strangeness suppression thus disappears with the onset of color deconfinement; subsequently, full equilibrium resonance gas behavior is attained.

  10. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  11. Suppressing Quantum Fluctuations in Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Vikman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We study vacuum quantum fluctuations of simple Nambu-Goldstone bosons - derivatively coupled single scalar-field theories possessing shift-symmetry in field space. We argue that quantum fluctuations of the interacting field can be drastically suppressed with respect to the free-field case. Moreover, the power-spectrum of these fluctuations can soften to become red for sufficiently small scales. In quasiclassical approximation, we demonstrate that this suppression can only occur for those theories that admit such classical static backgrounds around which small perturbations propagate faster than light. Thus a quasiclassical softening of quantum fluctuations is only possible for theories which classicalize instead of having a usual Lorentz invariant and local Wilsonian UV- completion. We illustrate our analysis by estimating the quantum fluctuations for the DBI-like theories.

  12. Avaliação hematológica e dosagem bioquímica de ALT, AST e creatinina em elefante-marinho-do-sul, Mirounga leonina (linnaeus, 1758, encontrado no litoral de Salvador, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes Bastos

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999 the Aquatic Mammals Rescue Center - AMRC has been working in the rescue and rehabilitation of stranded cetaceans and pinnipeds on the coast of Bahia, Brazil. This paper presents and analyses the blood cells count and clinical chemistry of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and creatinine of a southern elephant seal, Mirounga leonina (LINNAEUS, 1758, found on February the 11th at Barra Beach, Salvador, BA. The specimen was an orphan male calf, with 137cm of length and estimated weight of 49kg. It presented bad nutritional conditions and a shark bite on the right shoulder area. Clinical management was performed for 56 days, anthelmintic Febendazole was utilized, and the bite was treated with iodined alcohol, Nitrofurazone solution and Kethanserin, simultaneously with Enrofloxacin 10%, Potenay®, Vitamin B Complex and Benerva®. On the 16th the animal presented a right unilateral conjuntivitis, treated with Cloranphenicol oftalmic pomade until the end of its stay in the captive. During this period a total of six blood samples were collected, three for total blood counts and the others for the biochemistry determination of ALT, AST and creatinine. According to the haematological analysis the seal developed an anaemia which was classified as microcytic and normochromic. Lymphopenia, eosinopenia and monocytopenia were also observed, possibly due to its handling and stress conditions. The clinical chemistry presented low values for AST and creatinine, although this did not represent the existence of any pathologic context or disease with clinical significance.

  13. PARÁMETROS BIOQUÍMICOS ENZIMÁTICOS (ALT, AST, ALP, Γ-GT, LDH EN NIÑOS CON LEUCEMIA LINFOBLÁSTICA AGUDA ANTES DEL TRATAMIENTO ANTINEOPLÁSICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeél Moya S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the enzymatic biochemical parameters (glutamic pyruvic transaminase (ALT, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, gamma glutamyltransferase (γ-GT, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL before cancer treatment. Material and Methods: A prospective experimental, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted in 30 children between 2 and 15 years old, from several Neoplastic Centers in Lima. Blood collection was performed in BD red cap Vacutainer tubes, processed in the semi-automated analyzer BIOTEC® EMP-168, with Wiener Lab Group enzyme reagents under the modified method Szaaz and UV-Optimized by IFCC, SSCC and SFBC. Finally, coding and tabulation was performed. Results: 60% were boys and 46.7% are between the ages of 2-6 years. Serum levels of AST were increased by 33.3% in boys and 50% in girls. Serum ALT values were increased in 33.3% of boys and 41.7% of girls; only 25% of girls showed increased levels of γ-GT values; ALP was increased in 44.4% of boys and 66.7% of girls. Moreover LDH levels were increased in 55.6% of boys and 41.7% of girls. Conclusions: The enzymatic tests LDH, AST, ALT and ALP are increased in children with ALL compared to normal values due to tumor lysis syndrome characterized by electrolyte abnormalities, and as a result of the massive destruction of tumor cells and rapid release of large amounts of intracellular elements.

  14. Ovarian ablation in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer: GnRH-analogues, ovarectomy or radiocastration - 'The philosopher's stone' instead of 'Chamber of secrets'?; Ovarielle Suppression in der adjuvanten Therapie des Mammakarzinoms: GnRH-Analoga, Ovarektomie oder Radiomenolyse - 'Stein der Weisen' statt 'Kammer des Schreckens'?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, W.; Schiebe, M. [Staedtisches Klinikum Braunschweig (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, H. [Alfried-Krupp-Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Background: Ovarian suppression in the adjuvant treatment of perimenopausal women with breast cancer is an important option. The therapeutic goal can be accomplished by administration of GnRH-analogues, ovarectomy or radiocastration. Patients and methods: We describe the advantages and the therapy related side effects and compare the different treatment modalities with each other. Results: Because of its reversibility and patients' compliance GnRH-analogues seem to be advantageous especially in younger premenopausal women. When longer term side effects of artificially induced menopause are less important, therapeutic alternatives such as radiocastration or ovarectomy are effective without obvious superiority between these options. Conclusion: Even in the background of the increasing use of GnRH-analogues radiocastration remains still a therapeutic alternative because of its cost-effectiveness and feasibility. This accounts especially for peri- or premenopausal women above the age of 45. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei praemenopausalen Patienten mit rezeptorpositiven Mammakarzinomen stellt die ovarielle Suppression einen wichtigen Schritt in der adjuvanten Therapie dar. Neben den GnRH-Analoga kommen hierfuer die Ovarektomie oder die Radiomenolyse infrage. Patienten und Methode: Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt die Vorteile der einzelnen Therapieoptionen den therapiebedingten Nebenwirkungen gegenueber und vergleicht die Methoden untereinander. Ergebnisse: Wegen der Reversibilitaet und der Patientenakzeptanz sollten GnRH-Analoga besonders bei juengeren praemenopausalen Patientinnen angewendet werden. In der Differentialtherapie von Patientinnen, bei denen die Langzeitnebenwirkungen einer iatrogen induzierten Menopause weniger zu befuerchten sind, kommen auch die anderen Verfahren in Betracht. Hierbei stehen Radiomenolyse und Ovarektomie gleichwertig nebeneinander. Schlussfolgerung: Die differentialtherapeutische Entscheidung zu einer der Methoden sollte

  15. Comparison of Effectiveness of Adeli Suit Therapy and Bobath Approach on Gross Motor Function Improvement in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Khayat-Zadeh-Mahani; Masood Karimlou

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Adeli Suit Therapy (AST) and Bobath approach on improvement of gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy aged 4 to 11 years of old. Materials & Methods: In this experimental and randomized clinical trial study, 24 children with cerebral palsy were selected simply according to inclusive and exclusive criteria from patients referred to ValieAsr rehabilitation center and then assigned into two Adeli Suit Thrapy...

  16. Selective suppression of alimentary tract microbial flora as prophylaxis during granulocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, M T; Young, V M; Schimpff, S C; Wade, J C; Minah, G E

    1981-11-01

    Oral nonabsorbable antibiotics have been used to suppress the rectal flora in granulocytopenic patients. Problems with these therapies, i.e., compliance, acquisition of undesirable flora, and cost, motivated the search for an alternative therapy which would increase compliance and effectively reduce the Enterobacteriaceae without creating a microbiol vacuum. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was found to be easily taken, to suppress the Enterobacteriaceae, and to maintain the anaerobic rectal flora for biological stability of the rectal ecosystem. However, concurrent use of parenteral antibiotics profoundly influenced rectal flora and temporarily destroyed the colonization resistance afforded by the anaerobes.

  17. In the suppression of regge cut contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, S.P.

    1975-07-01

    It is shown that contributions of reggeon-pomeron cuts are suppressed in amplitudes with opposite natural to the reggeon. This suppression grows logarithmically with energy. The suppression in the πP cut is, however, found to be weak. Consequence on conspiracy is discussed

  18. Novel "Elements" of Immune Suppression within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Devikala; Clever, David; Eil, Robert; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive evolution has prompted immune cells to use a wide variety of inhibitory signals, many of which are usurped by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Although tumor immunologists often focus on genes and proteins as mediators of immune function, here we highlight two elements from the periodic table-oxygen and potassium-that suppress the immune system in previously unappreciated ways. While both are key to the maintenance of T-cell function and tissue homeostasis, they are exploited by tumors to suppress immuno-surveillance and promote metastatic spread. We discuss the temporal and spatial roles of these elements within the tumor microenvironment and explore possible therapeutic interventions for effective and promising anticancer therapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(6); 426-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. How to Handle Anxiety: The Effects of Reappraisal, Acceptance, and Suppression Strategies on Anxious Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Heering, Sanna; Sawyer, Alice T.; Asnaani, Anu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that reappraisal strategies are more effective than suppression strategies for regulating emotions. Recently, proponents of the acceptance-based behavior therapy movement have further emphasized the importance of acceptance-based emotion regulation techniques. In order to directly compare these different emotion regulation strategies, 202 volunteers were asked to give an impromptu speech in front of a video camera. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. The Reappraisal group was instructed to regulate their anxious arousal by reappraising the situation; the Suppression group was asked to suppress their anxious behaviors; and the Acceptance group was instructed to accept their anxiety. As expected, the Suppression group showed a greater increase in heart rate from baseline than the Reappraisal and Acceptance groups. Moreover, the Suppression group reported more anxiety than the Reappraisal group. However, the Acceptance and Suppression groups did not differ in their subjective anxiety response. These results suggest that both reappraising and accepting anxiety is more effective for moderating the physiological arousal than suppressing anxiety. However, reappraising is more effective for moderating the subjective feeling of anxiety than attempts to suppress or accept it. PMID:19281966

  20. Rangelia vitalii: changes in the enzymes ALT, CK and AST during the acute phase of experimental infection in dogs Rangelia vitalii: mudanças nas enzimas ALT, CK e AST na fase aguda da infecção experimental em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Machado Costa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rangelia vitalii is a protozoon that causes diseases in dogs, and anemia is the most common laboratory finding. However, few studies on the biochemical changes in dogs infected with this protozoon exist. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the biochemical changes in dogs experimentally infected with R. vitalii, during the acute phase of the infection. For this study, 12 female dogs (aged 6-12 months and weighing between 4 and 7 kg were used, divided in two groups. Group A was composed of healthy dogs (n = 5; and group B consisted of infected animals (n = 7. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 10, 20 and 30 after infection, using tubes without anticoagulant to obtain serum and analyze the biochemical parameters. An increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT on day 20 (P Rangelia vitalii é um protozoário que causa doença em cães, sendo a anemia o achado laboratorial mais frequente. No entanto, existem poucos estudos sobre as alterações bioquímicas em cães infectados com o protozoário. Assim, este estudo tem como objetivo investigar as alterações bioquímicas de cães experimentalmente infectados com R. vitalii na fase aguda da infecção. Para o estudo, foram utilizados 12 cães fêmeas (com idade entre 6 a 12 meses e peso entre 4 a 7 kg, divididos em dois grupos. O grupo A (n = 5 foi composto de animais saudáveis e o grupo B (n = 7 de animais infectados. Amostras de sangue foram coletadas nos dias zero, dez, vinte e trinta PI, utilizando tubos sem anticoagulante para obtenção de soro e análise dos parâmetros bioquímicos. Foi observado um aumento na alanino aminotransferase (ALT no dia 20 PI (P < 0,05 e aumento na creatinoquinase (CK e aspartato aminotransferase (AST em todo o período experimental (P < 0,05. Não foram observadas alterações séricas na gama-glutamiltransferase, uréia e creatinina. Portanto, é possível concluir que a infecção experimental por R. vitalii causa alterações no perfil bioquímico, com

  1. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  2. Catenovulum maritimus sp. nov., a novel agarolytic gammaproteobacterium isolated from the marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (AST58-103), and emended description of the genus Catenovulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Qi; Zhou, Yan-Xia; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-08-01

    A novel agarolytic, Gram-stain negative, heterotrophic, facultatively anaerobic and pale-white pigmented bacterial strain, designated Q1(T), was isolated from the marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (AST58-103) collected from the coastal area of Weihai, China. The cells are motile by means of peritrichous flagella. The isolate requires NaCl for growth, while seawater is not necessary, and growth occurs optimally at about 30-33 °C, in 1-3 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7-7.5. Strain Q1(T) shows oxidase-positive and catalase-negative activities, and possesses the ability to hydrolyse starch and alginate, but not cellulose, gelatin, urea or Tween-80. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Q1(T) is affiliated with the family Alteromonadaceae within the class Gammaproteobacteria. The isolate, strain Q1(T), is most closely related to Catenovulum agarivorans YM01(T) (94.85 %), with less than 91.2 % sequence similarity to other close relatives with validly published names. The draft genome sequence of strain Q1(T) consists of 62 contigs (>200 bp) of 4,548,270 bp. The genomes of Q1(T) and YM01(T) have an ANI value of 70.7 %, and the POCP value between the two genomes is 64.4 %. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Q1(T) is 37.9 mol% as calculated from the draft genome sequence. The main isoprenoid quinone is ubiquinone-8. The predominant cellular fatty acids are summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c. The major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. Based on data from a polyphasic chemotaxonomic, physiological and biochemical study, strain Q1(T) should be classified as a novel species of the genus Catenovulum, for which the name Catenovulum maritimus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Q1(T) (=CICC 10836(T)=DSM 28813(T)).

  3. Probiotics-mediated suppression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Stephanie S Y; Wan, Murphy L Y; El-Nezami, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer prevention or/and treatment through their abilities to modulate intestinal microbiota and host immune response. Although most of the recent reviews have focused on the potential role of probiotics against colon cancer, only few of them include the probiotic effect on extraintestinal cancers. The present review covers the most important findings from the literature published during the past 20 months (from January 2015 to August 2016) regarding the probiotics-mediated suppression of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers and the underlying mechanisms. A comprehensive literature search in Pubmed, Science direct and Google scholar databases was conducted to locate all relevant articles that investigated the effect of probiotics on prevention/treatment of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers. Different mechanisms for the beneficial effects of probiotics against cancer were also discussed, mainly via modulation of gut microbiota which thereby influences host metabolism and immunity. Despite laboratory-based studies having demonstrated encouraging outcomes that probiotics possess antitumor effects, the benefits should not be exaggerated before we get more results from human clinical trials. These are very important before the medical community can accept the use of probiotics as an alternative therapy for cancer control.

  4. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  5. Nuclear reactor scram suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Hisamitsu.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention suppresses reactor scram due to increase of neutrons caused by pressure elevation in the reactor even when a portion of main steam pipes is closed by some or other causes such as closure of a main steam isolation valve in a BWR type power plant. That is, when a flow channel is closed, such as upon closure of a main steam isolation valve, a flow rate signal sent from each of main steam flow rate detection means is inputted to a selective circuit of a pressure control device, from which a normal value is obtained. A deviation value for each of the main steam flow rate values is determined from the value described above and a flow rate average value obtained in an averaging circuit. Abnormality in the main steam pipelines is judged if a level for each of the deviation values is greater than a predetermined value. Further, the insertion of selective control rods and trip and run back instructions for recycling pumps are controlled by output signals of the deviation value detection circuit, to decrease the reactor power and prevent elevation in the reactor. As a result, reactor scram due to increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed. (I.S.)

  6. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  7. Risk of community-acquired pneumonia and use of gastric acid-suppressive drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R.J.F.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Hassing, R.J.; Dieleman, J.P.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Reduction of gastric acid secretion by acid-suppressive therapy allows pathogen colonization from the upper gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria and viruses in the contaminated stomach have been identified as species from the oral cavity. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the

  8. White matter structure alterations in HIV-1-infected men with sustained suppression of viraemia on treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Tanja; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Schouten, Judith; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Cole, James H.; Sharp, David J.; Vos, Frans M.; Prins, Maria; Portegies, Peter; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-1-infected (HIV+) patients, despite adequate suppression of viral replication by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Cerebral white matter structure alterations are often associated with cognitive impairment and have commonly been reported in

  9. Safety system for pressure suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.E.; Ludwig, G.J.; Tulsa, O.

    1975-01-01

    The rupture disk with rated breaking points is constrained by two supporting elements and has a convex-concave shape. For pressure suppression, it is reversable inversely to its bulging. Its surface has notches which are the rated breaking points and respond to higher pressures. The centre of the rupture disk contains an area of relatively smaller thickness that will burst at lower pressure and thus makes it applicable for lower pressures. For the response of the rupture disk centre, a thrust ring with a central opening may also be used. Its edge is formed into a convex-concave section supported on the edge of the rupture disk on the exit side. The free centre of the rupture disk is then the area of relative weakness. (RW/AK) [de

  10. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Osaka Hospital, 4-2-78 Fukushima, Fukushima Ward, Osaka City, Osaka 553-0003 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  11. USE OF SACCHROMYCES CERVISIAE TO SUPPRESS THE EFFECTS OF FUMONISIN MYCOTOXICOSIS IN JAPANESE QUAIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABU TALEB, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 400 unsexed Japanese quail chicks (1 day old) were used. The quail chicks were randomly assigned into four groups of 100 birds in each. The first group was served as control. The other experimental groups were fed on a basal diet supplemented with 0.5% yeast/kg diet (G2), 0.5% yeast/kg diet ± 200 mg fumonicin-B1/kg diet (G3) and 200 mg fumonicin-B1/kg diet (G4). The results showed significant increases in mortality rate, GPT (ALT), GOT (AST), cholesterol, uric acid, creatinine and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and decreases in body weight, hatchability, fertility and hatching weight, serum total proteins, globulin and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in group of quails received fumonisin (G4) in comparison with the control group (G1) and all treatments. Yeast led to partial improvement in the parameters in group two (G2). Also, yeast suppressed the toxic effect of fumonisin B-1 (G3)

  12. [The diagnostic value of serum hyaluronic acid, 7S domain of type IV collagen and AST/ALT ratio as markers of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hyung; Park, Chang Kun; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Soo Young; Jo, Chang Min; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Whan

    2003-06-01

    The prognosis of chronic liver disease is closely related to the development of hepatic fibrosis. Liver biopsy is the gold standard method to assess inflammatory activity and fibrosis stage, but this is associated with morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum hyaluronic acid, 7S domain of type IV collagen and AST/ALT ratio as markers of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis. This study included 100 patients with chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis. Liver biopsy and histopathologic classification were done. Serum hyaluronic acid and 7S domain of type IV collagen were measured by one step sandwich binding protein assay and radioimmunoassay using polyclonal antibody to 7S domain of type IV collagen, respectively. The serum concentrations of hyaluronic acid, 7S domain of type IV collagen and AST/ALT ratio in the cirrhosis group (139 +/- 98.4 ng/mL, 6.9 +/- 3.5 ng/mL, 1.6 +/- 1.5) were significantly higher (p<0.01) than those in the normal and fatty liver group (20.2 +/- 12.5 ng/mL, 3.5 +/- 0.5 ng/mL, 0.7 +/- 0.3), mild hepatitis group (32.3 +/- 52.7 ng/mL, 3.9 +/- 1.4 ng/mL, 0.7 +/- 0.4), and moderate to severe hepatitis group (68.2 +/- 72.3 ng/mL, 5.3 +/- 2.4 ng/mL, 0.8 +/- 0.4). At the cutoff value of 77 ng/mL for hyaluronic acid and 6.3 ng/mL for 7S domain of type IV collagen and 0.62 for AST/ALT ratio, the sensitivities were 81.8%, 63.6%, 90.9% and specificities were 87.3%, 88.6%, 53.1% for discriminating cirrhosis (fibrosis score: 4) from the mild to severe fibrosis (fibrosis score: 0-3). Serum hyaluronic acid, 7S domain of type IV collagen and AST/ALT ratio measurement may be clinically useful as markers of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B and cirrhosis.

  13. Efeitos da farinha de folhas de mandioca sobre a atividade das enzimas AST, ALT, FA e lipídios hepáticos de ratos Wistar Effects of cassava leaves flour on the AST, ALT, ALP enzymes activity and hepatic lipids of Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Séfora de Melo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Folhas de mandioca possuem substâncias como ligninas e saponinas que podem apresentar efeito hipolipidêmico. Todavia, um estudo recente relatou aumento no peso do fígado de ratos alimentados com dietas contendo farinha de folhas de mandioca (FFM - Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. Cacao, tornando-se necessário um estudo mais aprofundado dos efeitos desta farinha sobre os parâmetros hepáticos. Para este estudo, um ensaio biológico com 32 ratos machos Wistar foi conduzido por um período de 7 semanas, sendo os tratamentos: dieta controle e dietas contendo 5, 10 e 15% de FFM. As dietas contendo FFM não apresentaram efeitos sobre as atividades das enzimas Aspartato Aminotransferase (AST e Fosfatase Alcalina (FA, mas aumentaram significativamente a atividade da enzima alanina aminotransferase (ALT. O estudo histopatológico revelou vacuolização do citoplasma dos hepatócitos para todos os grupos. No entanto, a freqüência de animais com vacuolização acentuada foi superior nos grupos que receberam dietas com FFM, apresentando também maiores teores de lipídios e colesterol total hepáticos e maior relação peso fígado/peso corporal. Estes resultados indicam que os antinutrientes presentes nas folhas de mandioca, como taninos, cianeto e saponinas, podem ser responsáveis pela redução da função hepática nos animais alimentados com FFM.Cassava leaves contain substances such as lignins and saponins that can present the hypolipidemic effect. However, a recent study has reported an increase in liver weight of rats fed diet containing cassava leaves flour (CLF - Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. Cacao. Thus, a further study of the effect of this flour on the hepatic parameters is necessary. For the development of this study, a biological assay with 32 male Wistar rats was conducted for a period of 7 weeks with the following treatments: control diet and diets containing 5, 10, and 15% of CLF. The diets containing CLF showed no effects on the

  14. Changes in hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation saturation in the brain and skeletal muscle induced by speech therapy - a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, U; Scholkmann, F; Rosenberger, R; Wolf, M; Nelle, M

    2011-01-01

    Arts speech therapy (AST) is a therapeutic method within complementary medicine and has been practiced for decades for various medical conditions. It comprises listening and the recitation of different forms of speech exercises under the guidance of a licensed speech therapist. The aim of our study was to noninvasively investigate whether different types of recitation influence hemodynamics and oxygenation in the brain and skeletal leg muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Seventeen...

  15. The effects of nifekalant hydrochloride on the spatial dispersion of repolarization after direct current defibrillation in patients with oral amiodarone and β-blocker therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Maeda

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: NIF suppressed the deterioration of the SDR after ICD shock. This might be one of the mechanisms by which NIF suppresses recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmia just after ICD shock in patients with oral amiodarone and β-blocker therapy.

  16. Arrest of chronic acid suppressant drug use after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with peptic ulcer disease: a six-month follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurenkamp, G. J.; Grundmeijer, H. G.; van der Ende, A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Assendelft, W. J.; van der Hulst, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It remains controversial whether successful H. pylori eradication leads to relief of dyspepsia and the subsequent arrest or tapering of acid-suppressant drug therapy, or to an aggravation of acid-related dyspepsia requiring more acid-suppressant drug intake. AIM: To evaluate

  17. Oral cyclosporine therapy for refractory severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the success of oral cyclosporine therapy in a patient with severe vision-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis. A child presented with severe allergy which was not controlled with topical steroids, cyclosporine and mast cell stabilizers. Oral steroids were required repeatedly to suppress inflammation. Child showed a dramatic improvement and stabilization with oral cyclosporine therapy. Oral cyclosporine therapy can be tried in severe vision-threatening allergy refractory to conventional therapy.

  18. Photoperiodic suppression of drug reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, B A; Stark, G; Sergeeva, A; Jansen, H T

    2011-03-10

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12 h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  19. Menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasi, I; Spitzer, R F; Allen, L M; Ornstein, M P

    2009-06-01

    The approach to menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities has evolved considerably over the years due to changing philosophies and evolving treatment options. We review the medical management options available for menstrual suppression with a focus on the needs and treatment of adolescents with developmental disabilities.

  20. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    and clinical options are available for the suppression of fertility in adult cats and the decision as to which should be chosen - independent of the legal registration of any state - depends on different facts: (i) feral or privately owned animal? (ii) temporary or permanent suppression of fertility wanted...

  1. Simulation analysis of a wildfire suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abílio Pereira Pacheco; João Claro; Tiago. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Rekindles and false alarms are unusually high in the Portuguese wildfire management system, representing a high burden on suppression resources in particular, and fire management resources in general. In 20,049 occurrences that the suppression system handled in the summer of 2010, 12.5% were false alarms and 15.0% were rekindles. We present a discreteevent simulation...

  2. Study of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{\\ast 0}e^+ e^-$ decay with the LHCb detector and development of a novel concept of PID detector: the Focusing DIRC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088184; Arnaud, Nicolas

    Flavour-changing neutral current processes of the type $b \\to s\\gamma$ are forbidden at the tree level in the Standard Model (SM) and occur at leading order through radiative loop diagrams. Therefore, they are sensitive to new physics (NP), which may contribute with competing diagrams. Furthermore, the chirality of the weak interaction in the SM implies that the photon emitted has left-handed polarisation. However, a whole class of NP theories do not share this SM feature and may manifest unambiguously as a right-handed contribution to the polarisation. This thesis presents the first study of the ${b}{s\\gamma}$ photon polarisation through an angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{\\ast 0}e^+ e^-$ channel. Even though $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{\\ast 0}e^+ e^-$ is not a radiative $b\\to s$ transition, the contribution from a virtual photon coupling to the lepton pair dominates in the low-$q^2$ region. Furthermore, the channel with electrons rather than muons allows to better isolate the virtual photon contribution ...

  3. Measurements of the S-wave fraction in $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays and the $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{\\ast}(892)^{0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ differential branching fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, An