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Sample records for suppressing homologous recombination

  1. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay Covo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand break (DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  2. The RecBCD and SbcCD DNases suppress homology-facilitated illegitimate recombination during natural transformation of Acinetobacter baylyi.

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    Harms, Klaus; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    2008-08-01

    During natural transformation of Acinetobacter baylyi, the genomic integration of foreign (non-homologous) DNA is possible when the DNA contains a single segment homologous to the recipient genome (anchor) through homologous recombination in the anchor facilitating illegitimate recombination in the neighbouring foreign DNA (homology-facilitated illegitimate recombination; HFIR). DNA integration by HFIR occurs about 10 000 times less frequently than fully homologous recombination, but at least 100 000-fold more frequently than integration in the absence of any homology. We investigated the influence of the RecBCD enzyme (DNase/helicase) and SbcCD DNase (DNA-structure-specific single-strand endonuclease and exonuclease) on HFIR. In a recBCD null mutant the acquisition of foreign DNA was elevated 11-fold relative to wild-type cells by a 6.9-fold increased HFIR frequency and by the integration of longer stretches of foreign DNA in each event. In an sbcCD null mutant, the foreign DNA acquisition was 4.5-fold higher than in the wild-type, while homologous transformation with large DNA molecules was unaffected and increased 3.2-fold with small DNA fragments. The sbcCD mutation partially suppressed the high UV sensitivity and low viability of the recBCD mutant and also decreased its foreign DNA acquisition by HFIR to the lower level of the sbcCD mutant. We propose that suppression of HFIR results from the elimination of double-stranded intermediates of the HFIR process during transformation by RecBCD, and by SbcCD interfering with branched molecules. Our results provide evidence that the homologous recombination enzymes RecBCD and SbcCD control the level of foreign DNA acquisition by HFIR.

  3. NER enzymes maintain genome integrity and suppress homologous recombination in the absence of exogenously induced DNA damage in Pseudomonas putida.

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    Sidorenko, Julia; Ukkivi, Kärt; Kivisaar, Maia

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its prominence in producing genetic diversity in bacterial species, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in DNA repair and damage tolerance. The frequency of HR depends on several factors, including the efficiency of DNA repair systems as HR is involved in recovery of replication forks perturbed by DNA damage. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the major DNA repair pathways involved in repair of a broad range of DNA lesions generally induced by exogenous chemicals or UV-irradiation and its functions in the cells not exposed to DNA-damaging agents have attracted less attention. In this study we have developed an assay that enables to investigate HR between chromosomal loci of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida both in growing and stationary-phase cells. The present assay detects HR events between two non-functional alleles of phenol degrading genes that produce a functional allele and allow the growth of bacteria on phenol as a sole carbon source. Our results indicate that HR between chromosomal loci takes place mainly in the growing cells and the frequency of HR is reduced during the following starvation in NER-proficient P. putida but not in the case when bacteria lack UvrA or UvrB enzymes. The absence of UvrA or UvrB resulted in a hyper-recombination phenotype in P. putida, the cells were filamented and their growth was impaired even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. However, NER-deficient derivatives that overcame growth defects emerged rapidly. Such adaptation resulted in the decline of the frequency of HR. Although HR in actively replicating P. putida was still elevated in the adapted variants of the UvrA- and UvrB-deficient strains, the dynamics of emergence of the recombinants in these strains turned similar to NER-proficient bacteria. Additionally, we observed that HR was enhanced in the absence of the transcription repair coupling factor Mfd in growing cells but not during starvation. The frequency of HR was not

  4. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  5. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

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    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  6. Suppression of Homologous Recombination by insulin-like growth factor-1 inhibition sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Oreekha; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Nader, Paul Abou; Laskov, Ido; Iqbal, Sanaa; Philip, Charles-André; Yasmeen, Amber; Gotlieb, Walter H.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of homologous recombination (HR) is found in close to 50 % of ovarian and breast cancer. Tumors with BRCA1 mutations show increased expression of the Insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R). We previously have shown that inhibition of IGF-1R results in growth inhibition and apoptosis of ovarian tumor cells. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between HR and sensitivity to IGF-1R inhibition. Further, we hypothesized that IGF-1R inhibition might sensitize HR proficient cancers to Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Using ovarian and breast cancer cellular models with known BRCA1 status, we evaluated their HR functionality by RAD51 foci formation assay. The 50 % lethal concentration (LC50) of Insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor kinase inhibitor (IGF-1Rki) in these cells was assessed, and western immunoblotting was performed to determine the expression of proteins involved in the IGF-1R pathway. Moreover, IGF-1R inhibitors were added on HR proficient cell lines to assess mRNA and protein expression of RAD51 by qPCR and western blot. Also, we explored the interaction between RAD51 and Insulin receptor substance 1 (IRS-1) by immunoprecipitation. Next, combination effect of IGF-1R and PARP inhibitors was evaluated by clonogenic assay. Cells with mutated/methylated BRCA1 showed an impaired HR function, and had an overactivation of the IGF-1R pathway. These cells were more sensitive to IGF-1R inhibition compared to HR proficient cells. In addition, the IGF-IR inhibitor reduced RAD51 expression at mRNA and protein levels in HR proficient cells, and sensitized these cells to PARP inhibitor. Targeting IGF-1R might lead to improved personalized therapeutic approaches in cancer patients with HR deficiency. Targeting both PARP and IGF-1R might increase the clinical efficacy in HR deficient patients and increase the population of patients who may benefit from PARP inhibitors

  7. Sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG suppress homologous recombination DNA repair and enhance sensitivity to carboplatin and olaparib in HR proficient ovarian cancer cells.

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    Choi, Young Eun; Battelli, Chiara; Watson, Jacqueline; Liu, Joyce; Curtis, Jennifer; Morse, Alexander N; Matulonis, Ursula A; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A

    2014-05-15

    The promise of PARP-inhibitors(PARPis) in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer(EOC) is tempered by the fact that approximately 50% of patients with homologous recombination (HR)-proficient tumors do not respond well to these agents. Combination of PARPis with agents that inhibit HR may represent an effective strategy to enhance their activity in HR-proficient tumors. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified that heat shock protein 90 inhibitors(HSP90i) may suppress HR and thus revert HR-proficient to HR-deficient tumors. Analysis of publicly available gene expression data showed that exposure of HR-proficient breast cancer cell lines to HSP90i 17-AAG(17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) downregulated HR, ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways. In HR-proficient EOC cells, 17-AAG suppressed HR as assessed using the RAD51 foci formation assay and this was further confirmed using the Direct Repeat-GFP reporter assay. Furthermore, 17-AAG downregulated BRCA1 and/or RAD51 protein levels, and induced significantly more γH2AX activation in combination with olaparib compared to olaparib alone. Finally, sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG sensitized HR-proficient EOC lines to olaparib and carboplatin but did not affect sensitivity of the HR-deficient OVCAR8 line arguing that the 17-AAG mediated sensitization is dependent on suppression of HR. These results provide a preclinical rationale for using a combination of olaparib/17-AAG in HR-proficient EOC.

  8. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

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    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  9. mTOR inhibitors suppress homologous recombination repair and synergize with PARP inhibitors via regulating SUV39H1 in BRCA-proficient triple-negative breast cancer

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    Mo, Wei; Liu, Qingxin; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Dai, Hui; Peng, Yang; Liang, Yulong; Peng, Guang; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mills, Gordon B.; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly heterogeneous disease and has the worst outcome among all subtypes of breast cancers. Although PARP inhibitors represent a promising treatment in TNBC with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, there is great interest in identifying drug combinations that can extend the utility of PARP inhibitors to a majority of TNBC patients with wild-type BRCA1/BRCA2. Here we explored whether mTOR inhibitors, through modulating homologous recombination (HR) repair, would provide therapeutic benefit in combination with PARP inhibitors in preclinical models of BRCA-proficient TNBC. Experimental Design We have studies the effects of mTOR inhibitors on HR repair following DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We further demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo activities of combined treatment of mTOR inhibitors with PARP inhibitors in BRCA-proficient TNBC. Moreover, microarray analysis and rescue experiments were employed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of action. Results We found that mTOR inhibitors significantly suppressed HR repair in two BRCA-proficient TNBC cell lines. mTOR inhibitors and PARP inhibitors in combination exhibited strong synergism against these TNBC cell lines. In TNBC xenografts, we observed enhanced efficacy of everolimus in combination with talazoparib (BMN673) compared with either drug alone. We further identified through microarray analysis and by rescue assays that mTOR inhibitors suppressed HR repair and synergized with PARP inhibitors through regulating the expression of SUV39H1 in BRCA-proficient TNBCs. Conclusions Collectively, these findings strongly suggest that combining mTOR inhibitors and PARP inhibitors would be an effective therapeutic approach to treat BRCA-proficient TNBC patients. PMID:26546619

  10. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

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    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  11. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    , deletions, and genome rearrangements that can lead to cell death or cancer in humans. The post-translational modification by SUMO (small ubiquitinlike modifier) has proven to be an important regulator of HR and genome integrity, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these roles are still unclear......Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repair...... factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations...

  12. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  13. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress

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    Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  14. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

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    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  15. Function of Rad51 paralogs in eukaryotic homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Skowronek, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) is an important mechanism for maintaining genetic integrity and cancer prevention by accurately repair of DNA double strand breaks induced by environmental insults or occurred in DNA replication. A critical step in HRR is the polymerization of Rad51 on single stranded DNA to form nuclear protein filaments, the later conduct DNA strand paring and exchange between homologous strands. A number of proteins, including replication protein A (RPA), Rad52 and Rad51 paralogs, are suggested to modulate or facilitate the process of Rad51 filament formation. Five Rad51 paralogs, namely XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D have been identified in eucaryotic cells. These proteins show distant protein sequence identity to Rad51, to yeast Rad51 paralogs (Rad55 and Rad57) and to each other. Hamster or chicken mutants of Rad51 paralogs exhibit hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, especially cross-linking agents, and are defective in assembly of Rad51 onto HRR site after DNA damage. Recent data from our and other labs showed that Rad51 paralogs constitute two distinct complexes in cell extracts, one contains XRCC2, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D, and the other contains Rad51C and XRCC3. Rad51C is involved in both complexes. Our results also showed that XRCC3-Rad51C complex interacts with Rad51 in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of Rad52 can partially suppress the hypersensitivity of XRCC2 mutant irs1 to ionizing radiation and corrected the defects in Rad51 focus formation. These results suggest that XRCC2 and other Rad51 paralogs play a mediator function to Rad51 in the early stage of HRR

  16. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of the bacterial homologous recombination systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a housekeeping process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and generation of genetic variability. Although detailed biochemical studies have described the mechanism of action of its components in model organisms, there is no recent extensive assessment of this knowledge, using comparative genomics and taking advantage of available experimental data on recombination. Using comparative genomics, we assessed the diversity of recombination processes among bacteria, and simulations suggest that we missed very few homologs. The work included the identification of orthologs and the analysis of their evolutionary history and genomic context. Some genes, for proteins such as RecA, the resolvases, and RecR, were found to be nearly ubiquitous, suggesting that the large majority of bacterial genomes are capable of homologous recombination. Yet many genomes show incomplete sets of presynaptic systems, with RecFOR being more frequent than RecBCD/AddAB. There is a significant pattern of co-occurrence between these systems and antirecombinant proteins such as the ones of mismatch repair and SbcB, but no significant association with nonhomologous end joining, which seems rare in bacteria. Surprisingly, a large number of genomes in which homologous recombination has been reported lack many of the enzymes involved in the presynaptic systems. The lack of obvious correlation between the presence of characterized presynaptic genes and experimental data on the frequency of recombination suggests the existence of still-unknown presynaptic mechanisms in bacteria. It also indicates that, at the moment, the assessment of the intrinsic stability or recombination isolation of bacteria in most cases cannot be inferred from the identification of known recombination proteins in the genomes.

  17. Homologous plasmid recombination is elevated in immortally transformed cells.

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    Finn, G K; Kurz, B W; Cheng, R Z; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1989-01-01

    The levels of intramolecular plasmid recombination, following transfection of a plasmid substrate for homologous recombination into normal and immortally transformed cells, have been examined by two independent assays. In the first assay, recovered plasmid was tested for DNA rearrangements which regenerate a functional neomycin resistance gene from two overlapping fragments. Following transformation of bacteria, frequencies of recombinationlike events were determined from the ratio of neomyci...

  18. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine

    2011-01-01

    . Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability...

  19. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic recombination is an important mechanism for increasing diversity of RNA viruses, and constitutes a viral escape mechanism to host immune responses and to treatment with antiviral compounds. Although rare, epidemiologically important hepatitis C virus (HCV) recombinants have been reported......) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6...

  20. Homologous plasmid recombination is elevated in immortally transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G K; Kurz, B W; Cheng, R Z; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1989-09-01

    The levels of intramolecular plasmid recombination, following transfection of a plasmid substrate for homologous recombination into normal and immortally transformed cells, have been examined by two independent assays. In the first assay, recovered plasmid was tested for DNA rearrangements which regenerate a functional neomycin resistance gene from two overlapping fragments. Following transformation of bacteria, frequencies of recombinationlike events were determined from the ratio of neomycin-resistant (recombinant) colonies to ampicillin-resistant colonies (indicating total plasmid recovery). Such events, yielding predominantly deletions between the directly repeated sequences, were substantially more frequent in five immortal cell lines than in any of three normal diploid cell strains tested. Effects of plasmid replication or interaction with T antigen and of bacterially mediated rejoining of linear molecules generated in mammalian cells were excluded by appropriate controls. The second assay used limited coamplification of a control segment of plasmid DNA, and of the predicted recombinant DNA region, primed by two sets of flanking oligonucleotides. Each amplified band was quantitated by reference to a near-linear standard curve generated concurrently, and recombination frequencies were determined from the ratio of recombinant/control DNA regions. The results confirmed that recombinant DNA structures were generated within human cells at direct repeats in the transfected plasmid and were markedly more abundant in an immortal cell line than in the diploid normal cells from which that line was derived.

  1. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

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    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  2. Shu proteins promote the formation of homologous recombination intermediates that are processed by Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    CSM2, PSY3, SHU1, and SHU2 (collectively referred to as the SHU genes) were identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as four genes in the same epistasis group that suppress various sgs1 and top3 mutant phenotypes when mutated. Although the SHU genes have been implicated in homologous recombination...

  3. [Gene fusion of egfp & kan and recombinant plasmid construction by red mediated in vivo homologous recombination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Li, Shan-Hu; Shi, Qing-Guo; Liu, Dang-Sheng; Zhou, Jian-Guang

    2007-07-01

    Recombineering, a new genetic engineering technology based on high efficiency in vivo homologous recombination, can be used in target DNA knock-in, knock-out and gene cloning. In the process of gene subcloning mediated by Recombineering technique, high-quality target DNA fragments were difficult to obtain using in vitro overlapping PCR,therefore the efficiency of in vivo homologous recombination was severely interrupted. To solve this problem, some technology improvements have been established based on the principle of Red recombinases. The PCR DNA fragments of egfp and kan genes with complementary sequences on the end of each fragment were co-introduced into a pcDNA3.1 vector and Red recombinases containing E. coli DY331 host cells by electroporation. A recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-egfp-kan was screened directly by antibiotic marker. The positive rates can reach to 45%. The EGFP gene expression of pcDNA3.1-egfp-kan can be observed by transient transfection of 293 eukaryotic cells.

  4. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

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    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  5. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rousseau (Laure); O. Etienne (Olivier); T. Roque (Telma); C. Desmaze (Chantal); C. Haton (Céline); M.-A. Mouthon (Marc-André.); J. Bernardino-Sgherri (Jacqueline); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); F.D. Boussin (François)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical

  6. PCR artifact in testing for homologous recombination in genomic editing in zebrafish.

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    Minho Won

    Full Text Available We report a PCR-induced artifact in testing for homologous recombination in zebrafish. We attempted to replace the lnx2a gene with a donor cassette, mediated by a TALEN induced double stranded cut. The donor construct was flanked with homology arms of about 1 kb at the 5' and 3' ends. Injected embryos (G0 were raised and outcrossed to wild type fish. A fraction of the progeny appeared to have undergone the desired homologous recombination, as tested by PCR using primer pairs extending from genomic DNA outside the homology region to a site within the donor cassette. However, Southern blots revealed that no recombination had taken place. We conclude that recombination happened during PCR in vitro between the donor integrated elsewhere in the genome and the lnx2a locus. We conclude that PCR alone may be insufficient to verify homologous recombination in genome editing experiments in zebrafish.

  7. Detection of homologous recombination between yeast artificial chromosomes with overlapping inserts.

    OpenAIRE

    Cellini, A; Lacatena, R M; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system which facilitates the detection of recombination between Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YAC's) carrying homologous inserts. The system consists of a classical YAC vector, a new YAC vector and two appropriately labelled yeast strains of opposite mating type. The new YAC vector differs in markers from the canonical YAC vector. To test whether homologous recombination takes place, phage lambda DNA was cloned in the two vectors to provide a region of homology. The two co...

  8. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Keyamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ, and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability.

  9. Genetic interactions among homologous recombination mutants in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Alberto; Andaluz, Encarnación; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Larriba, Germán

    2015-01-01

    rad52-ΔΔ and, to a lesser extent, rad51-ΔΔ deletants of Candidaalbicans displayed slow growth and aberrant filamentous morphology whereas rad59-ΔΔ mutants, both by growth rate and morphology resembled wild type. In this study, we have constructed pair-wise double deletants to analyze genetic interactions among these homologous recombination (HR) proteins that affect growth and morphology traits. When grown in liquid YPD medium, double mutant rad51-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ exhibited growth rates, cell and colony morphologies, and plating efficiencies that were not significantly different from those observed for rad51-ΔΔ. The same was true for rad52-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ compared to rad52-ΔΔ. Slow growth and decreased plating efficiency were caused, at least in part, by a decreased viability, as deduced from FUN1 staining. Flow cytometry and microscopic studies of filamentous mutant populations revealed major changes in cell ploidy, size and morphology, whereas DAPI staining identified complex nuclear rearrangements in yeast and filamentous cells. These phenotypes were not observed in the rad59-ΔΔ mutant populations. Our results show that abolishing Rad51 functions induces the appearance of a subpopulation of aberrant yeast and filamentous forms with increased cell size and ploidy. The size of this complex subpopulation was exacerbated in rad52-ΔΔ mutants. The combination of filamentous cell morphology and viability phenotypes was reflected on the colony morphology of the respective mutants. We conclude that the rad52 mutation is epistatic to rad51 for all the morphological traits analyzed. We discuss these results in the light of the several functions of these recombination genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Better understanding of homologous recombination through a 12-week laboratory course for undergraduates majoring in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Shen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Xiaomei; Hu, Fuquan; Rao, Xiancai

    2017-07-08

    Homologous recombination, a central concept in biology, is defined as the exchange of DNA strands between two similar or identical nucleotide sequences. Unfortunately, undergraduate students majoring in biotechnology often experience difficulties in understanding the molecular basis of homologous recombination. In this study, we developed and implemented a 12-week laboratory course for biotechnology undergraduates in which gene targeting in Streptococcus suis was used to facilitate their understanding of the basic concept and process of homologous recombination. Students worked in teams of two to select a gene of interest to create a knockout mutant using methods that relied on homologous recombination. By integrating abstract knowledge and practice in the process of scientific research, students gained hands-on experience in molecular biology techniques while learning about the principle and process of homologous recombination. The learning outcomes and survey-based assessment demonstrated that students substantially enhanced their understanding of how homologous recombination could be used to study gene function. Overall, the course was very effective for helping biotechnology undergraduates learn the theory and application of homologous recombination, while also yielding positive effects in developing confidence and scientific skills for future work in research. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):329-335, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Homologous recombination-mediated cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA regions using Gateway and recombineering systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowski, Kevin; Yang, Wen; Kagale, Sateesh

    2008-11-17

    Employing genomic DNA clones to characterise gene attributes has several advantages over the use of cDNA clones, including the presence of native transcription and translation regulatory sequences as well as a representation of the complete repertoire of potential splice variants encoded by the gene. However, working with genomic DNA clones has traditionally been tedious due to their large size relative to cDNA clones and the presence, absence or position of particular restriction enzyme sites that may complicate conventional in vitro cloning procedures. To enable efficient cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA fragments for the purposes of gene expression and reporter-gene studies we have combined aspects of the Gateway system and a bacteriophage-based homologous recombination (i.e. recombineering) system. To apply the method for characterising plant genes we developed novel Gateway and plant transformation vectors that are of small size and incorporate selectable markers which enable efficient identification of recombinant clones. We demonstrate that the genomic coding region of a gene can be directly cloned into a Gateway Entry vector by recombineering enabling its subsequent transfer to Gateway Expression vectors. We also demonstrate how the coding and regulatory regions of a gene can be directly cloned into a plant transformation vector by recombineering. This construct was then rapidly converted into a novel Gateway Expression vector incorporating cognate 5' and 3' regulatory regions by using recombineering to replace the intervening coding region with the Gateway Destination cassette. Such expression vectors can be applied to characterise gene regulatory regions through development of reporter-gene fusions, using the Gateway Entry clones of GUS and GFP described here, or for ectopic expression of a coding region cloned into a Gateway Entry vector. We exemplify the utility of this approach with the Arabidopsis PAP85 gene and demonstrate that the expression

  12. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrical Scott W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homologous recombination (HR, a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR. T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  13. Integration of vectors by homologous recombination in the plant pathogen Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikkerink, E H; Solon, S L; Crowhurst, R N; Templeton, M D

    1994-03-01

    An homologous transformation system has been developed for the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides). A transformation vector containing the G. cingulata gpdA promoter fused to the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene was constructed. Southern analyses indicated that this vector integrated at single sites in most transformants. A novel method of PCR amplification across the recombination junction point indicated that the integration event occurred by homologous recombination in more than 95% of the transformants. Deletion studies demonstrated that 505 bp (the minimum length of homologous promoter DNA analysed which was still capable of promoter function) was sufficient to target integration events. Homologous integration of the vector resulted in duplication of the gdpA promoter region. When transformants were grown without selective pressure, a high incidence of vector excision by recombination between the duplicated regions was evident. The significance of these recombination characteristics is discussed with reference to the feasibility of performing gene disruption experiments.

  14. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  15. CTCF facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by enhancing homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Khalid; Jangal, Maïka; Marques, Maud; Zhao, Tiejun; Saad, Amine; Zhang, Chenxi; Luo, Vincent M; Syme, Alasdair; Rejon, Carlis; Yu, Zhenbao; Krum, Asiev; Fabian, Marc R; Richard, Stéphane; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay; Orthwein, Alexander; McCaffrey, Luke; Witcher, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is mediated via two major pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) repair. DSB repair is vital for cell survival, genome stability, and tumor suppression. In contrast to NHEJ, HR relies on extensive homology and templated DNA synthesis to restore the sequence surrounding the break site. We report a new role for the multifunctional protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) in facilitating HR-mediated DSB repair. CTCF is recruited to DSB through its zinc finger domain independently of poly(ADP-ribose) polymers, known as PARylation, catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). CTCF ensures proper DSB repair kinetics in response to γ-irradiation, and the loss of CTCF compromises HR-mediated repair. Consistent with its role in HR, loss of CTCF results in hypersensitivity to DNA damage, inducing agents and inhibitors of PARP. Mechanistically, CTCF acts downstream of BRCA1 in the HR pathway and associates with BRCA2 in a PARylation-dependent manner, enhancing BRCA2 recruitment to DSB. In contrast, CTCF does not influence the recruitment of the NHEJ protein 53BP1 or LIGIV to DSB. Together, our findings establish for the first time that CTCF is an important regulator of the HR pathway.

  16. Charge Recombination Suppressed by Destructive Quantum Interference in Heterojunction Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelaar, Roel; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2016-01-01

    We show that charge recombination in ordered heterojunctions depends sensitively on the degree of coherent delocalization of charges at the donor acceptor interface. Depending on the relative sign of the electron and hole transfer integrals, such delocalization can dramatically suppress

  17. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation); Edlarov, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center of Bioengineering, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  18. Rad51 inhibits translocation formation by non-conservative homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn M Manthey

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are a primary biological response to ionizing radiation (IR exposure, and are likely to result from the inappropriate repair of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that are created. An abundance of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes provides ample opportunity for such breaks to be repaired by homologous recombination (HR between non-allelic repeats. Interestingly, in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae the central strand exchange protein, Rad51 that is required for DSB repair by gene conversion between unlinked repeats that conserves genomic structure also suppresses translocation formation by several HR mechanisms. In particular, Rad51 suppresses translocation formation by single-strand annealing (SSA, perhaps the most efficient mechanism for translocation formation by HR in both yeast and mammalian cells. Further, the enhanced translocation formation that emerges in the absence of Rad51 displays a distinct pattern of genetic control, suggesting that this occurs by a separate mechanism. Since hypomorphic mutations in RAD51 in mammalian cells also reduce DSB repair by conservative gene conversion and stimulate non-conservative repair by SSA, this mechanism may also operate in humans and, perhaps contribute to the genome instability that propels the development of cancer.

  19. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Mostowy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  20. COM-1 promotes homologous recombination during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis by antagonizing Ku-mediated non-homologous end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennie B L G Lemmens

    Full Text Available Successful completion of meiosis requires the induction and faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. DSBs can be repaired via homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, yet only repair via HR can generate the interhomolog crossovers (COs needed for meiotic chromosome segregation. Here we identify COM-1, the homolog of CtIP/Sae2/Ctp1, as a crucial regulator of DSB repair pathway choice during Caenorhabditis elegans gametogenesis. COM-1-deficient germ cells repair meiotic DSBs via the error-prone pathway NHEJ, resulting in a lack of COs, extensive chromosomal aggregation, and near-complete embryonic lethality. In contrast to its yeast counterparts, COM-1 is not required for Spo11 removal and initiation of meiotic DSB repair, but instead promotes meiotic recombination by counteracting the NHEJ complex Ku. In fact, animals defective for both COM-1 and Ku are viable and proficient in CO formation. Further genetic dissection revealed that COM-1 acts parallel to the nuclease EXO-1 to promote interhomolog HR at early pachytene stage of meiotic prophase and thereby safeguards timely CO formation. Both of these nucleases, however, are dispensable for RAD-51 recruitment at late pachytene stage, when homolog-independent repair pathways predominate, suggesting further redundancy and/or temporal regulation of DNA end resection during meiotic prophase. Collectively, our results uncover the potentially lethal properties of NHEJ during meiosis and identify a critical role for COM-1 in NHEJ inhibition and CO assurance in germ cells.

  1. A recurrent translocation is mediated by homologous recombination between HERV-H elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermetz Karen E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome rearrangements are caused by many mutational mechanisms; of these, recurrent rearrangements can be particularly informative for teasing apart DNA sequence-specific factors. Some recurrent translocations are mediated by homologous recombination between large blocks of segmental duplications on different chromosomes. Here we describe a recurrent unbalanced translocation casued by recombination between shorter homologous regions on chromosomes 4 and 18 in two unrelated children with intellectual disability. Results Array CGH resolved the breakpoints of the 6.97-Megabase (Mb loss of 18q and the 7.30-Mb gain of 4q. Sequencing across the translocation breakpoints revealed that both translocations occurred between 92%-identical human endogenous retrovirus (HERV elements in the same orientation on chromosomes 4 and 18. In addition, we find sequence variation in the chromosome 4 HERV that makes one allele more like the chromosome 18 HERV. Conclusions Homologous recombination between HERVs on the same chromosome is known to cause chromosome deletions, but this is the first report of interchromosomal HERV-HERV recombination leading to a translocation. It is possible that normal sequence variation in substrates of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR affects the alignment of recombining segments and influences the propensity to chromosome rearrangement.

  2. Detection of homologous recombination between yeast artificial chromosomes with overlapping inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, A; Lacatena, R M; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1991-03-11

    We have developed a system which facilitates the detection of recombination between Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YAC's) carrying homologous inserts. The system consists of a classical YAC vector, a new YAC vector and two appropriately labelled yeast strains of opposite mating type. The new YAC vector differs in markers from the canonical YAC vector. To test whether homologous recombination takes place, phage lambda DNA was cloned in the two vectors to provide a region of homology. The two constructs were then introduced into yeast strains of opposite mating type in which the endogenous genes for the selective markers present in the vectors are not expressed. Artificial chromosomes obtained by meiotic recombination are detected in the spores resulting from the mating.

  3. P53 Suppression of Homologous Recombination and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    401]. The more aggressive p53R172H point mutation is a dominant allele that results in a p53 protein product with a substantially misfolded DNA...MRE11 and NBS1 proteins to multiple DNA damage sites, J. Biol. Chem. 283 (2008) 1197–1208. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18025084 [34] J.-F...15,16], have an increased risk of developing MDS. CREB binding protein (CREBBP) interacts with DNA damage response/repair proteins , such as TP53 [17,18

  4. Evidence of Extensive Homologous Recombination in the Core Genome of Rickettsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyu Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The important role of homologous recombination has been extensively demonstrated to be fundamental for genetic variation in bacterial genomes. In contrast to extracellular or facultative intracellular bacteria, obligate intracellular bacteria are considered to be less prone to recombination, especially for their core genomes. In Rickettsia, only antigen-related genes were identified to have experienced homologous recombination. In this study, we employed evolutionary genomic approaches to investigate the impact of recombination on the core genome of Rickettsia. Phylogenetic network and phylogenetic compatibility matrix analyses are clearly consistent with the hypothesis that recombination has occurred frequently during Rickettsia evolution. 28% of Rickettsia core genes (194 out of 690 are found to present the evidence of recombination under four independent statistical methods. Further functional classification shows that these recombination events occur across all functional categories, with a significant overrepresentation in the cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, which may provide a molecular basis for the parasite adaptation to host immunity. This evolutionary genomic analysis provides insight into the substantial role of recombination in the evolution of the intracellular pathogenic bacteria Rickettsia.

  5. Suppression of experimental "allergic" encephalomyelitis in guinea pigs by encephalitogenic proteins extracted from homologous brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHAW, C M; FAHLBERG, W J; KIES, M W; ALVORD, E C

    1960-02-01

    The intradermal injection of aqueous solutions of certain homologous neural proteins will suppress the encephalomyelitis which is induced in guinea pigs by the previous injection of whole homologous brain with Freund's adjuvants. These neural proteins extracted by dilute acid from defatted guinea pig brain are themselves highly encephalitogenic when injected with adjuvants, but the specificity of this suppression for encephalitogenic as compared to non-encephalitogenic extracts remains to be proven. Suppression is probably not due to a non-specific stress reaction, as indicated by the absence of suppression by intradermal injections of alcohol and by statistically insignificant and inconstant effects of similar injections of tuberculin.

  6. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    DEK is a highly conserved chromatin-bound protein whose upregulation across cancer types correlates with genotoxic therapy resistance. Loss of DEK induces genome instability and sensitizes cells to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), suggesting defects in DNA repair. While these DEK......-deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout......-deficient cells. To define responsible mechanisms, we tested the role of DEK in the HR repair cascade. DEK-deficient cells were impaired for γH2AX phosphorylation and attenuated for RAD51 filament formation. Additionally, DEK formed a complex with RAD51, but not BRCA1, suggesting a potential role regarding RAD51...

  7. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  8. Identification of the MMS22L-TONSL complex that promotes homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duro, Eris; Lundin, Cecilia; Ask, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    Budding yeast Mms22 is required for homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair of stalled or broken DNA replication forks. Here we identify a human Mms22-like protein (MMS22L) and an MMS22L-interacting protein, NF¿BIL2/TONSL. Depletion of MMS22L or TONSL from human cells causes a high level...

  9. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Rousseau

    Full Text Available We characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical development without exogenous stress, but it dramatically enhanced the radiation sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cells. This resulted in the death of all cells irradiated during S or G2, whereas the viability of cells irradiated in G1 or G0 was not affected by Rad54 disruption. Apoptosis occurred after long arrests at intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. This concerned every type of neural stem and progenitor cells, showing that the importance of Rad54 for radiation response was linked to the cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation and not to the differentiation state. In the developing brain, RAD54-dependent homologous recombination appeared absolutely required for the repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation during S and G2 phases, but not for the repair of endogenous damages in normal conditions. Altogether our data support the existence of RAD54-dependent and -independent homologous recombination pathways.

  10. Progression through mitosis promotes PARP inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in homologous recombination-deficient cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, Pepijn M.; Talens, Francien; Stok, Colin; Gogola, Ewa; Heijink, Anne Margriet; Bouwman, Peter; Foijer, Floris; Tarsounas, Madalena; Blatter, Sohvi; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to tumorigenesis. HR-deficient cancers are hypersensitive to Poly (ADP ribose)-polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, but can acquire resistance and relapse. Mechanistic understanding how PARP inhibition induces cytotoxicity in

  11. Nick-initiated homologous recombination: Protecting the genome, one strand at a time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an essential, widely conserved mechanism that utilizes a template for accurate repair of DNA breaks. Some early HR models, developed over five decades ago, anticipated single-strand breaks (nicks) as initiating lesions. Subsequent studies favored a more double-strand

  12. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, D.; Janssen, H.L.K.; Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic

  13. Regulation of Rad51-Mediated Homologous Recombination by BRCA2, DSS1 and RAD52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rants, Louise Olthaver Juhl

    Homologous recombination (HR) provides a mechanism to restore integrity and maintain stability of the genetic material. HR is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), recovery of broken replication forks and generation of meiotic crossovers. The defining step in HR is homolog......Homologous recombination (HR) provides a mechanism to restore integrity and maintain stability of the genetic material. HR is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), recovery of broken replication forks and generation of meiotic crossovers. The defining step in HR...... interaction is required for resistance to DNA damage. In avian DT40 cells, we show that endogenously tagged DSS1 redistributes into subnuclear foci in response to DNA damaging agents. However, DSS1 rarely colocalizes with BRCA2. Our data also indicate that both U. maydis Dss1 and avian DSS1 are involved...

  14. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yongfen [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  15. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2015-03-15

    Background: Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Results: Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Conclusion: Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification. © Huang et al.

  16. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  17. The population and evolutionary dynamics of homologous gene recombination in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Levin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, recombination is a rare event, not a part of the reproductive process. Nevertheless, recombination -- broadly defined to include the acquisition of genes from external sources, i.e., horizontal gene transfer (HGT -- plays a central role as a source of variation for adaptive evolution in many species of bacteria. Much of niche expansion, resistance to antibiotics and other environmental stresses, virulence, and other characteristics that make bacteria interesting and problematic, is achieved through the expression of genes and genetic elements obtained from other populations of bacteria of the same and different species, as well as from eukaryotes and archaea. While recombination of homologous genes among members of the same species has played a central role in the development of the genetics and molecular biology of bacteria, the contribution of homologous gene recombination (HGR to bacterial evolution is not at all clear. Also, not so clear are the selective pressures responsible for the evolution and maintenance of transformation, the only bacteria-encoded form of HGR. Using a semi-stochastic simulation of mutation, recombination, and selection within bacterial populations and competition between populations, we explore (1 the contribution of HGR to the rate of adaptive evolution in these populations and (2 the conditions under which HGR will provide a bacterial population a selective advantage over non-recombining or more slowly recombining populations. The results of our simulation indicate that, under broad conditions: (1 HGR occurring at rates in the range anticipated for bacteria like Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Bacillus subtilis will accelerate the rate at which a population adapts to environmental conditions; (2 once established in a population, selection for this capacity to increase rates of adaptive evolution can maintain bacteria-encoded mechanisms of recombination and prevent

  18. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eldarov, M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center for Bioengineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  19. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Goettel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to

  20. Somatic homologous recombination in plants is promoted by a geminivirus in a tissue-selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K S; Kleinow, T; Jeske, H

    2014-03-01

    Four transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines carrying different reporter gene constructs based on split glucuronidase genes were used to monitor the frequency of somatic homologous recombination after geminivirus infections. Euphorbia mosaic virus and Cleome leaf crumple virus were chosen as examples, because they induce only mild symptoms and are expected to induce less general stress responses than other geminiviruses. After comparing the different plant lines and viruses as well as optimizing the infection procedure, Euphorbia mosaic virus enhanced recombination rates significantly in the transgenic reporter line 1445. The effect was tissue-specific in cells of the leaf veins as expected for this phloem-limited virus. The advantage for geminiviruses to activate a general recombination pathway is discussed with reference to an increased fitness by generating virus recombinants which have been observed frequently as an epidemiologic driving force. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dual targeting of hypoxia and homologous recombination repair dysfunction in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Francis W; Hsu, Huai-Ling; Su, Jiechuang; Pullen, Susan M; Wilson, William R; Wang, Jingli

    2014-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor clinical outcome and few validated drug targets. Two prevalent features of TNBC, tumor hypoxia and derangement of homologous recombination (HR) repair, are potentially exploitable for therapy. This study investigated whether hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP) of DNA-damaging cytotoxins may inhibit growth of TNBC by simultaneously addressing these two targets. We measured in vitro activity of HAP of DNA breakers (tirapazamine, SN30000) and alkylators (TH-302, PR-104, SN30548) in TNBC cell lines and isogenic models, and related this to measures of HR repair and expression of prodrug-activating enzymes. Antitumor activity of HAP was examined in isogenic BRCA2-knockout xenograft models and compared with platinum chemotherapy. All five HAP selectively inhibited growth of TNBC cell lines under hypoxia. Sensitivity to HAP was not strongly associated with BRCA1 genotype. However, HAP sensitivity was enhanced by suppression of HR (assessed by radiation-induced RAD51 focus formation) when BRCA1 and PALB2 were knocked down in a common (MDA-MB-231) background. Furthermore, knockout of BRCA2 markedly sensitized DLD-1 cells to the clinical nitrogen mustard prodrugs TH-302 and PR-104 and significantly augmented sterilization of clonogens by these agents in xenografts, both as monotherapy and in combination with radiotherapy, but had less effect on activity of the benzotriazine di-N-oxide SN30000. PR-104 monotherapy was more effective than cisplatin at inhibiting growth of BRCA2-knockout tumors at equitoxic doses. This study demonstrates the potential for HAP of nitrogen mustards to simultaneously exploit hypoxia and HR defects in tumors, with translational implications for TNBC and other HR-deficient malignancies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Isolation of Specific Clones from Nonarrayed BAC Libraries through Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Nefedov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new approach to screen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries by recombination selection. To test this method, we constructed an orangutan BAC library using an E. coli strain (DY380 with temperature inducible homologous recombination (HR capability. We amplified one library segment, induced HR at 42∘C to make it recombination proficient, and prepared electrocompetent cells for transformation with a kanamycin cassette to target sequences in the orangutan genome through terminal recombineering homologies. Kanamycin-resistant colonies were tested for the presence of BACs containing the targeted genes by the use of a PCR-assay to confirm the presence of the kanamycin insertion. The results indicate that this is an effective approach for screening clones. The advantage of recombination screening is that it avoids the high costs associated with the preparation, screening, and archival storage of arrayed BAC libraries. In addition, the screening can be conceivably combined with genetic engineering to create knockout and reporter constructs for functional studies.

  3. Genetic probing of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining during meiotic prophase in irradiated mouse spermatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Emad A. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, 71516 Assiut (Egypt); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Kal, Henk B. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rooij, Dirk G. de, E-mail: d.g.derooij@uu.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boer, Peter de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to obtain a better insight into the relative contribution of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) to the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at first meiotic prophase. Early and late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes that had completed crossing over were sampled. We studied the kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX chromatin foci removal after irradiation of mice deficient for HR and mice deficient for NHEJ. Analyzing {gamma}-H2AX signals in unirradiated RAD54/RAD54B deficient spermatocytes indicated incomplete meiotic recombination repair due to the pronounced increase of {gamma}-H2AX foci in late prophase primary spermatocytes. In these mice, 8 h after irradiation, early pachytene spermatocytes showed a reduction of the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci by 52% compared to 82% in the wild type, the difference being significant. However, after crossing over (in late pachytene and early diplotene), no effect of RAD54/RAD54B deficiency on the reduction of irradiation-induced foci was observed. In NHEJ deficient SCID mice, repair kinetics in early spermatocytes were similar to those in wild type mice. However, 1 h after irradiation in late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes 1.7 times more foci were found than in wild type mice. This difference might be related to the absence of a DNA-PKcs dependent fast repair component in SCID mice. As subsequent repair is normal, HR likely is taking over. Taken together, the results obtained in RAD54/RAD54B deficient mice and in SCID mice indicate that DSB repair in early pachytene spermatocytes is mainly carried out through HR. In late spermatocytes (late pachytenes and early diplotenes) NHEJ is active. However, probably there is an interplay between these repair pathways and when in late spermatocytes the NHEJ pathway is compromised HR may take over.

  4. Genetic probing of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining during meiotic prophase in irradiated mouse spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Emad A; Philippens, Marielle E P; Kal, Henk B; de Rooij, Dirk G; de Boer, Peter

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to obtain a better insight into the relative contribution of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) to the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at first meiotic prophase. Early and late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes that had completed crossing over were sampled. We studied the kinetics of gamma-H2AX chromatin foci removal after irradiation of mice deficient for HR and mice deficient for NHEJ. Analyzing gamma-H2AX signals in unirradiated RAD54/RAD54B deficient spermatocytes indicated incomplete meiotic recombination repair due to the pronounced increase of gamma-H2AX foci in late prophase primary spermatocytes. In these mice, 8h after irradiation, early pachytene spermatocytes showed a reduction of the numbers of gamma-H2AX foci by 52% compared to 82% in the wild type, the difference being significant. However, after crossing over (in late pachytene and early diplotene), no effect of RAD54/RAD54B deficiency on the reduction of irradiation-induced foci was observed. In NHEJ deficient SCID mice, repair kinetics in early spermatocytes were similar to those in wild type mice. However, 1h after irradiation in late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes 1.7 times more foci were found than in wild type mice. This difference might be related to the absence of a DNA-PKcs dependent fast repair component in SCID mice. As subsequent repair is normal, HR likely is taking over. Taken together, the results obtained in RAD54/RAD54B deficient mice and in SCID mice indicate that DSB repair in early pachytene spermatocytes is mainly carried out through HR. In late spermatocytes (late pachytenes and early diplotenes) NHEJ is active. However, probably there is an interplay between these repair pathways and when in late spermatocytes the NHEJ pathway is compromised HR may take over. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  6. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogério; Oliveira, João Francisco de; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  7. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand cross-links requires the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, a potentially error-free process that utilizes a homologous sequence as a repair template. A key player in HR is RAD51, the eukaryotic ortholog of bacterial RecA protein. RAD....... Using a combination of molecular genetic, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical techniques, we provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of the FBH1 helicase as a regulator of RAD51-dependent HR in mammalian cells. We show that FBH1 binds directly to RAD51 and is able to disrupt RAD51...... filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  8. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S. E.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  9. An Improved Homologous Recombination Method for Rapid Cloning of the Antibody Heavy Chain Gene and Its Comparison with the Homologous Recombination and Traditional Cloning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hajirezaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The homologous recombination (HR is one of the conventional cloning methods for the production of recombinant DNA. It is a quick method for in vivo DNA cloning without using the high cost restriction enzymes. A few modifications in the cloning procedure can increase the efficiency of this method.Materials and Methods: In this study, effect of heating on the rate of the IgG1 heavy chain gene cloning was investigated in the HR method and then it was compared with HR method without heating and traditional cloning method. For doing this comparison, three cloning methods including HR, HR with the heat treatment, and traditional cloning were used to clone the human IgG1 heavy chain into the pcDNA3.1(+ plasmid.Results: The results showed that adding heat in the HR method converts insert and vector from the double strand DNA to the single strand DNA. This allows them to copulate with each other better and faster than the two other methods. The heat addition also helps the cell enzyme system for a faster and easier recombination and moreover it increases the cloning efficiency of the HR method in case of in vitro processing.Conclusion: The results showed that giving heat in the HR method increases cloning rate 7.5% and this increase reaches 10% in comparison with the traditional method. 

  10. ZNF830 mediates cancer chemoresistance through promoting homologous-recombination repair

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo; Chen, Jianxiang; Qiao, Yiting; Shi, Yaru; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qi; Xie, Hui; Shi, Xiaorui; Sun, Youwei; Liu, Xu; Li, Tongyu; Zhou, Liqian; Wan, Jianqin; Xie, Tian; Wang, Hangxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Homologous recombination (HR), which mediates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), is crucial for maintaining genomic integrity and enhancing survival in response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in human cancers. However, the mechanisms of HR repair in treatment resistance for the improvement of cancer therapy remains unclear. Here, we report that the zinc finger protein 830 (ZNF830) promotes HR repair and the survival of cancer cells in response to DNA damage. Mechanistica...

  11. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Sergey G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction.

  12. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for directed enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence.

  13. Homologous recombination occurs in Entamoeba and is enhanced during growth stress and stage conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) has not been demonstrated in the parasitic protists Entamoeba histolytica or Entamoeba invadens, as no convenient method is available to measure it. However, HR must exist to ensure genome integrity, and possible genetic exchange, especially during stage conversion from trophozoite to cyst. Here we show the up regulation of mitotic and meiotic HR genes in Entamoeba during serum starvation, and encystation. To directly demonstrate HR we use a simple PCR-based method involving inverted repeats, which gives a reliable read out, as the recombination junctions can be determined by sequencing the amplicons. Using this read out, we demonstrate enhanced HR under growth stress in E. histolytica, and during encystation in E. invadens. We also demonstrate recombination between chromosomal inverted repeats. This is the first experimental demonstration of HR in Entamoeba and will help future investigations into this process, and to explore the possibility of meiosis in Entamoeba.

  14. Homologous recombination is a force in the evolution of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chaowen; Liu, Wenxin; Wang, Yingbo; Hou, Jinlong; Zhang, Liguo; Wang, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the causative agent of canine distemper (CD) that is a highly contagious, lethal, multisystemic viral disease of receptive carnivores. The prevalence of CDV is a major concern in susceptible animals. Presently, it is unclear whether intragenic recombination can contribute to gene mutations and segment reassortment in the virus. In this study, 25 full-length CDV genome sequences were subjected to phylogenetic and recombinational analyses. The results of phylogenetic analysis, intragenic recombination, and nucleotide selection pressure indicated that mutation and recombination occurred in the six individual genes segment (H, F, P, N, L, M) of the CDV genome. The analysis also revealed pronounced genetic diversity in the CDV genome according to the geographically distinct lineages (genotypes), namely Asia-1, Asia-2, Asia-3, Europe, America-1, and America-2. The six recombination events were detected using SimPlot and RDP programs. The analysis of selection pressure demonstrated that a majority of the nucleotides in the CDV individual gene were under negative selection. Collectively, these data suggested that homologous recombination acts as a key force driving the genetic diversity and evolution of canine distemper virus.

  15. Optimal cloning of PCR fragments by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Ana Paula; Gross, Jeferson

    2015-01-01

    PCR fragments and linear vectors containing overlapping ends are easily assembled into a propagative plasmid by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Although this gap-repair cloning approach is straightforward, its existence is virtually unknown to most molecular biologists. To popularize this method, we tested critical parameters influencing the efficiency of PCR fragments cloning into PCR-amplified vectors by homologous recombination in the widely used E. coli strain DH5α. We found that the number of positive colonies after transformation increases with the length of overlap between the PCR fragment and linear vector. For most practical purposes, a 20 bp identity already ensures high-cloning yields. With an insert to vector ratio of 2:1, higher colony forming numbers are obtained when the amount of vector is in the range of 100 to 250 ng. An undesirable cloning background of empty vectors can be minimized during vector PCR amplification by applying a reduced amount of plasmid template or by using primers in which the 5' termini are separated by a large gap. DpnI digestion of the plasmid template after PCR is also effective to decrease the background of negative colonies. We tested these optimized cloning parameters during the assembly of five independent DNA constructs and obtained 94% positive clones out of 100 colonies probed. We further demonstrated the efficient and simultaneous cloning of two PCR fragments into a vector. These results support the idea that homologous recombination in E. coli might be one of the most effective methods for cloning one or two PCR fragments. For its simplicity and high efficiency, we believe that recombinational cloning in E. coli has a great potential to become a routine procedure in most molecular biology-oriented laboratories.

  16. Induction of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in human cells by raltitrexed, an inhibitor of thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Wang, Yibin; Kilaru, Kasturi; Yang, Zhengguan; Bhasin, Alaukik; Wyatt, Michael D; Waldman, Alan S

    2008-10-01

    Thymidylate deprivation brings about "thymineless death" in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although the precise mechanism for thymineless death has remained elusive, inhibition of the enzyme thymidylate synthase (TS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of TMP, has served for many years as a basis for chemotherapeutic strategies. Numerous studies have identified a variety of cellular responses to thymidylate deprivation, including disruption of DNA replication and induction of DNA breaks. Since stalled or collapsed replication forks and strand breaks are generally viewed as being recombinogenic, it is not surprising that a link has been demonstrated between recombination induction and thymidylate deprivation in bacteria and lower eukaryotes. A similar connection between recombination and TS inhibition has been suggested by studies done in mammalian cells, but the relationship between recombination and TS inhibition in mammalian cells had not been demonstrated rigorously. To gain insight into the mechanism of thymineless death in mammalian cells, in this work we undertook a direct investigation of recombination in human cells treated with raltitrexed (RTX), a folate analog that is a specific inhibitor of TS. Using a model system to study intrachromosomal homologous recombination in cultured fibroblasts, we provide definitive evidence that treatment with RTX can stimulate accurate recombination events in human cells. Gene conversions not associated with crossovers were specifically enhanced several-fold by RTX. Additional experiments demonstrated that recombination events provoked by a double-strand break (DSB) were not impacted by treatment with RTX, nor was error-prone DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining. Our work provides evidence that thymineless death in human cells is not mediated by corruption of DSB repair processes and suggests that an increase in chromosomal recombination may be an important element of cellular responses leading to thymineless death.

  17. Unveiling novel RecO distant orthologues involved in homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Marsin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a RecA filament on single-stranded DNA is a critical step in homologous recombination. Two main pathways leading to the formation of the nucleofilament have been identified in bacteria, based on the protein complexes mediating RecA loading: RecBCD (AddAB and RecFOR. Many bacterial species seem to lack some of the components involved in these complexes. The current annotation of the Helicobacter pylori genome suggests that this highly diverse bacterial pathogen has a reduced set of recombination mediator proteins. While it is now clear that homologous recombination plays a critical role in generating H. pylori diversity by allowing genomic DNA rearrangements and integration through transformation of exogenous DNA into the chromosome, no complete mediator complex is deduced from the sequence of its genome. Here we show by bioinformatics analysis the presence of a RecO remote orthologue that allowed the identification of a new set of RecO proteins present in all bacterial species where a RecR but not RecO was previously identified. HpRecO shares less than 15% identity with previously characterized homologues. Genetic dissection of recombination pathways shows that this novel RecO and the remote RecB homologue present in H. pylori are functional in repair and in RecA-dependent intrachromosomal recombination, defining two initiation pathways with little overlap. We found, however, that neither RecOR nor RecB contributes to transformation, suggesting the presence of a third, specialized, RecA-dependent pathway responsible for the integration of transforming DNA into the chromosome of this naturally competent bacteria. These results provide insight into the mechanisms that this successful pathogen uses to generate genetic diversity and adapt to changing environments and new hosts.

  18. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  19. Suppressing Nonradiative Recombination in Crown-Shaped Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwangwook [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ju, Gunwu [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Na, Byung Hoon [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Jho, Young-Dahl [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Myoung, NoSoung [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Yim, Sang-Youp [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Kim, Hyung-jun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Lee, Yong Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

    2018-02-06

    We examined the structural and optical properties of a crown-shaped quantum well (CSQW) to suppress nonradiative recombination. To reduce carrier loss in defect traps at the well/barrier interface, the CSQW was designed to concentrate carriers in the central region by tailoring the bandgap energy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements showed that the CSQW had a high activation energy and low potential fluctuation. In addition, the long carrier lifetime of the CSQW at high temperatures can be interpreted as indicating a decrease in carrier loss at defect traps.

  20. Homologous Recombination and Human Health: The Roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. PMID:25833843

  1. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Nagy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR, a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1 is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose Polymerases (PARPs TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation.

  2. DNA End Resection: Nucleases Team Up with the Right Partners to Initiate Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejka, Petr

    2015-09-18

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination commences by nucleolytic degradation of the 5'-terminated strand of the DNA break. This leads to the formation of 3'-tailed DNA, which serves as a substrate for the strand exchange protein Rad51. The nucleoprotein filament then invades homologous DNA to drive template-directed repair. In this review, I discuss mainly the mechanisms of DNA end resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which includes short-range resection by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2, as well as processive long-range resection by Sgs1-Dna2 or Exo1 pathways. Resection mechanisms are highly conserved between yeast and humans, and analogous machineries are found in prokaryotes as well. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  4. Homologous Recombination and Xylella fastidiosa Host-Pathogen Associations in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Francisco, Carolina S; Lopes, João R S; Muller, Christiane; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2017-03-01

    Homologous recombination affects the evolution of bacteria such as Xylella fastidiosa, a naturally competent plant pathogen that requires insect vectors for dispersal. This bacterial species is taxonomically divided into subspecies, with phylogenetic clusters within subspecies that are host specific. One subspecies, pauca, is primarily limited to South America, with the exception of recently reported strains in Europe and Costa Rica. Despite the economic importance of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in South America, little is known about its genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has previously identified six sequence types (ST) among plant samples collected in Brazil (both subsp. pauca and multiplex). Here, we report on a survey of X. fastidiosa genetic diversity (MLST based) performed in six regions in Brazil and two in Argentina, by sampling five different plant species. In addition to the six previously reported ST, seven new subsp. pauca and two new subsp. multiplex ST were identified. The presence of subsp. multiplex in South America is considered to be the consequence of a single introduction from its native range in North America more than 80 years ago. Different phylogenetic approaches clustered the South American ST into four groups, with strains infecting citrus (subsp. pauca); coffee and olive (subsp. pauca); coffee, hibiscus, and plum (subsp. pauca); and plum (subsp. multiplex). In areas where these different genetic clusters occurred sympatrically, we found evidence of homologous recombination in the form of bidirectional allelic exchange between subspp. pauca and multiplex. In fact, the only strain of subsp. pauca isolated from a plum host had an allele that originated from subsp. multiplex. These signatures of bidirectional homologous recombination between endemic and introduced ST indicate that gene flow occurs in short evolutionary time frames in X. fastidiosa, despite the ecological isolation (i.e., host plant species) of genotypes.

  5. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  6. BLM has early and late functions in homologous recombination repair in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, W K; Hanada, K; Kanaar, R

    2010-01-01

    function of BLM remains unclear. Multiple roles have been proposed for BLM in the homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway, including 'early' functions, such as the stimulation of resection of DNA double-strand break ends or displacement of the invading strand of DNA displacement loops, and 'late...... in Rad54(-/-) cells rescued their mitomycin C (MMC) sensitivity, and decreased both the level of DNA damage and cell cycle perturbation induced by MMC, suggesting an early role for Blm. Our data are consistent with Blm having at least two roles in HR repair in mammalian cells....

  7. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O. [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Augsburger, Marc [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sartori, Alessandro A. [Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pruschy, Martin, E-mail: martin.pruschy@usz.ch [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  8. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  9. Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells: The future for behavior genetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eGerlai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  10. TopBP1 associates with NBS1 and is involved in homologous recombination repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Junya; Izumi, Hideki; Suda, Tetsuji; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    TopBP1 is involved in DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoint. Recent studies have demonstrated that TopBP1 is a direct positive effecter of ATR. However, it is not known how TopBP1 recognizes damaged DNA. Here, we show that TopBP1 formed nuclear foci after exposure to ionizing radiation, but such TopBP1 foci were abolished in Nijmegen breakage syndrome cells. We also show that TopBP1 physically associated with NBS1 in vivo. These results suggested that NBS1 might regulate TopBP1 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage. TopBP1-depleted cells showed hypersensitivity to Mitomycin C and ionizing radiation, an increased frequency of sister-chromatid exchange level, and a reduced frequency of DNA double-strand break induced homologous recombination repair. Together, these results suggested that TopBP1 might be a mediator of DNA damage signaling from NBS1 to ATR and promote homologous recombination repair

  11. Emergence of pathogenic coronaviruses in cats by homologous recombination between feline and canine coronaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Terada

    Full Text Available Type II feline coronavirus (FCoV emerged via double recombination between type I FCoV and type II canine coronavirus (CCoV. In this study, two type I FCoVs, three type II FCoVs and ten type II CCoVs were genetically compared. The results showed that three Japanese type II FCoVs, M91-267, KUK-H/L and Tokyo/cat/130627, also emerged by homologous recombination between type I FCoV and type II CCoV and their parent viruses were genetically different from one another. In addition, the 3'-terminal recombination sites of M91-267, KUK-H/L and Tokyo/cat/130627 were different from one another within the genes encoding membrane and spike proteins, and the 5'-terminal recombination sites were also located at different regions of ORF1. These results indicate that at least three Japanese type II FCoVs emerged independently. Sera from a cat experimentally infected with type I FCoV was unable to neutralize type II CCoV infection, indicating that cats persistently infected with type I FCoV may be superinfected with type II CCoV. Our previous study reported that few Japanese cats have antibody against type II FCoV. All of these observations suggest that type II FCoV emerged inside the cat body and is unable to readily spread among cats, indicating that these recombination events for emergence of pathogenic coronaviruses occur frequently.

  12. The cohesion protein SOLO associates with SMC1 and is required for synapsis, recombination, homolog bias and cohesion and pairing of centromeres in Drosophila Meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihui Yan

    Full Text Available Cohesion between sister chromatids is mediated by cohesin and is essential for proper meiotic segregation of both sister chromatids and homologs. solo encodes a Drosophila meiosis-specific cohesion protein with no apparent sequence homology to cohesins that is required in male meiosis for centromere cohesion, proper orientation of sister centromeres and centromere enrichment of the cohesin subunit SMC1. In this study, we show that solo is involved in multiple aspects of meiosis in female Drosophila. Null mutations in solo caused the following phenotypes: 1 high frequencies of homolog and sister chromatid nondisjunction (NDJ and sharply reduced frequencies of homolog exchange; 2 reduced transmission of a ring-X chromosome, an indicator of elevated frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE; 3 premature loss of centromere pairing and cohesion during prophase I, as indicated by elevated foci counts of the centromere protein CID; 4 instability of the lateral elements (LEs and central regions of synaptonemal complexes (SCs, as indicated by fragmented and spotty staining of the chromosome core/LE component SMC1 and the transverse filament protein C(3G, respectively, at all stages of pachytene. SOLO and SMC1 are both enriched on centromeres throughout prophase I, co-align along the lateral elements of SCs and reciprocally co-immunoprecipitate from ovarian protein extracts. Our studies demonstrate that SOLO is closely associated with meiotic cohesin and required both for enrichment of cohesin on centromeres and stable assembly of cohesin into chromosome cores. These events underlie and are required for stable cohesion of centromeres, synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and a recombination mechanism that suppresses SCE to preferentially generate homolog crossovers (homolog bias. We propose that SOLO is a subunit of a specialized meiotic cohesin complex that mediates both centromeric and axial arm cohesion and promotes homolog bias as a component of

  13. A Dominant Mutation in Human RAD51 Reveals Its Function in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Independent of Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anderson T; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E; Conti, Brooke A; Lach, Francis P; Huang, Athena L; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-08-06

    Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity, and a co-dominant-negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wild-type RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathways for Holliday Junction Processing during Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Thomas M; Mankouri, Hocine W; Heidenblut, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rmi1 protein is a component of the highly conserved Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 complex. Deletion of SGS1, TOP3, or RMI1 is synthetically lethal when combined with the loss of the Mus81-Mms4 or Slx1-Slx4 endonucleases, which have been implicated in Holliday junction (HJ) resolution....... To investigate the causes of this synthetic lethality, we isolated a temperature-sensitive mutant of the RMI1 strain, referred to as the rmi1-1 mutant. At the restrictive temperature, this mutant phenocopies an rmi1¿ strain but behaves like the wild type at the permissive temperature. Following a transient...... exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, rmi1-1 mutants accumulate unprocessed homologous recombination repair (HRR) intermediates. These intermediates are slowly resolved at the restrictive temperature, revealing a redundant resolution activity when Rmi1 is impaired. This resolution depends on Mus81-Mms4...

  15. A rapid method for recombination and site-specific mutagenesis by placing homologous ends on DNA using polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D H; Howard, B H

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that permits the rapid generation of site-specific mutants and recombinant DNA constructs with a minimum number of steps and primers. DNA segments are modified by using amplifying primers that add homologous ends to the polymerase chain reaction product(s). These homologous ends undergo recombination in vivo following transformation of recA-E. coli strains used routinely in cloning. In vivo circularization of PCR products containing plasmid sequences with a selective marker permits the rapid cloning of the desired mutant or recombinant. In the mutagenesis protocol, 7 of the 12 clones contained the product of interest, and 6 of these clones had no detected error (50% of the clones without detected errors). In each of several recombination protocols, at least 50% of the clones tested contained the insert of interest without detected errors.

  16. p53 gene targeting by homologous recombination in fish ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting (GT provides a powerful tool for the generation of precise genetic alterations in embryonic stem (ES cells to elucidate gene function and create animal models for human diseases. This technology has, however, been limited to mouse and rat. We have previously established ES cell lines and procedures for gene transfer and selection for homologous recombination (HR events in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report HR-mediated GT in this organism. We designed a GT vector to disrupt the tumor suppressor gene p53 (also known as tp53. We show that all the three medaka ES cell lines, MES1∼MES3, are highly proficient for HR, as they produced detectable HR without drug selection. Furthermore, the positive-negative selection (PNS procedure enhanced HR by ∼12 folds. Out of 39 PNS-resistant colonies analyzed, 19 (48.7% were positive for GT by PCR genotyping. When 11 of the PCR-positive colonies were further analyzed, 6 (54.5% were found to be bona fide homologous recombinants by Southern blot analysis, sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization. This produces a high efficiency of up to 26.6% for p53 GT under PNS conditions. We show that p53 disruption and long-term propagation under drug selection conditions do not compromise the pluripotency, as p53-targeted ES cells retained stable growth, undifferentiated phenotype, pluripotency gene expression profile and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that medaka ES cells are proficient for HR-mediated GT, offering a first model organism of lower vertebrates towards the development of full ES cell-based GT technology.

  17. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  18. Homology-Directed Recombination for Enhanced Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Hale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing by homology-directed recombination (HDR can be used to couple delivery of a therapeutic gene cassette with targeted genomic modifications to generate engineered human T cells with clinically useful profiles. Here, we explore the functionality of therapeutic cassettes delivered by these means and test the flexibility of this approach to clinically relevant alleles. Because CCR5-negative T cells are resistant to HIV-1 infection, CCR5-negative anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells could be used to treat patients with HIV-associated B cell malignancies. We show that targeted delivery of an anti-CD19 CAR cassette to the CCR5 locus using a recombinant AAV homology template and an engineered megaTAL nuclease results in T cells that are functionally equivalent, in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models, to CAR T cells generated by random integration using lentiviral delivery. With the goal of developing off-the-shelf CAR T cell therapies, we next targeted CARs to the T cell receptor alpha constant (TRAC locus by HDR, producing TCR-negative anti-CD19 CAR and anti-B cell maturation antigen (BCMA CAR T cells. These novel cell products exhibited in vitro cytolytic activity against both tumor cell lines and primary cell targets. Our combined results indicate that high-efficiency HDR delivery of therapeutic genes may provide a flexible and robust method that can extend the clinical utility of cell therapeutics.

  19. CDK targets Sae2 to control DNA-end resection and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Pablo; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Sartori, Alessandro A; Aguilera, Andrés; Jackson, Stephen P

    2008-10-02

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two principal mechanisms: non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). HR is the most accurate DSB repair mechanism but is generally restricted to the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, when DNA has been replicated and a sister chromatid is available as a repair template. By contrast, NHEJ operates throughout the cell cycle but assumes most importance in G1 (refs 4, 6). The choice between repair pathways is governed by cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs), with a major site of control being at the level of DSB resection, an event that is necessary for HR but not NHEJ, and which takes place most effectively in S and G2 (refs 2, 5). Here we establish that cell-cycle control of DSB resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results from the phosphorylation by CDK of an evolutionarily conserved motif in the Sae2 protein. We show that mutating Ser 267 of Sae2 to a non-phosphorylatable residue causes phenotypes comparable to those of a sae2Delta null mutant, including hypersensitivity to camptothecin, defective sporulation, reduced hairpin-induced recombination, severely impaired DNA-end processing and faulty assembly and disassembly of HR factors. Furthermore, a Sae2 mutation that mimics constitutive Ser 267 phosphorylation complements these phenotypes and overcomes the necessity of CDK activity for DSB resection. The Sae2 mutations also cause cell-cycle-stage specific hypersensitivity to DNA damage and affect the balance between HR and NHEJ. These findings therefore provide a mechanistic basis for cell-cycle control of DSB repair and highlight the importance of regulating DSB resection.

  20. The homologous recombination machinery modulates the formation of RNA–DNA hybrids and associated chromosome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Lamia; Gore, Steven K; Koshland, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Genome instability in yeast and mammals is caused by RNA–DNA hybrids that form as a result of defects in different aspects of RNA biogenesis. We report that in yeast mutants defective for transcription repression and RNA degradation, hybrid formation requires Rad51p and Rad52p. These proteins normally promote DNA–DNA strand exchange in homologous recombination. We suggest they also directly promote the DNA–RNA strand exchange necessary for hybrid formation since we observed accumulation of Rad51p at a model hybrid-forming locus. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Rad51p mediates hybridization of transcripts to homologous chromosomal loci distinct from their site of synthesis. This hybrid formation in trans amplifies the genome-destabilizing potential of RNA and broadens the exclusive co-transcriptional models that pervade the field. The deleterious hybrid-forming activity of Rad51p is counteracted by Srs2p, a known Rad51p antagonist. Thus Srs2p serves as a novel anti-hybrid mechanism in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00505.001 PMID:23795288

  1. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR ((nick)HR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided

  2. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  3. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  4. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Caligo, Maria Adelaide [Section of Genetic Oncology, University Hospital and University of Pisa, via Roma 57, 56125 Pisa (Italy); Galli, Alvaro, E-mail: alvaro.galli@ifc.cnr.it [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene affects growth and UV-induced homologous recombination in yeast. • PARP-1 chemical inhibition impacts yeast growth and UV-induced recombination. • A genome-wide screen identifies 99 yeast genes that suppress the growth defect inferred by PARP-1. • Bioinformatics analysis identifies 41 human orthologues that may have a role in PARP-1 intracellular localization. • The findings suggest that PARP-1 nuclear localization may affect the response to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. - Abstract: The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the

  5. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Isobe, Masaharu

    2011-04-13

    Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR), in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector) with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique. © 2011 Kurosawa et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  7. Homologous Recombination Defective Arabidopsis Mutants Exhibit Enhanced Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Roy

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA acts as an important plant hormone in regulating various aspects of plant growth and developmental processes particularly under abiotic stress conditions. An increased ABA level in plant cells inhibits DNA replication and cell division, causing plant growth retardation. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ABA on the growth responses of some major loss-of-function mutants of DNA double-stand break (DSB repair genes in Arabidopsis during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth for understanding the role of ABA in the induction of genome instability in plants. A comparative analysis of ABA sensitivity of wild-type Arabidopsis and the knockout mutant lines related to DSB sensors, including atatm, atatr, the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ pathway genes, and mutants related to homologous recombination (HR pathway genes showed relatively enhanced sensitivity of atatr and HR-related mutants to ABA treatment. The expression levels of HR-related genes were increased in wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0 during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth. Immunoblotting experiments detected phosphorylation of histone H2AX in wild-type (Col-0 and DSB repair gene mutants after ABA treatment, indicating the activation of DNA damage response due to ABA treatment. Analyses of DSB repair kinetics using comet assay under neutral condition have revealed comparatively slower DSB repair activity in HR mutants. Overall, our results have provided comprehensive information on the possible effect of ABA on DNA repair machinery in plants and also indicated potential functional involvement of HR pathway in repairing ABA induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis.

  8. Heteroduplex formation, mismatch resolution, and genetic sectoring during homologous recombination in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis W. Grogan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic archaea exhibit certain molecular-genetic features not seen in bacteria or eukaryotes, and their systems of homologous recombination (HR remain largely unexplored in vivo. We transformed a Sulfolobus acidocaldarius pyrE mutant with short DNAs that contained multiple non-selected genetic markers within the pyrE gene. From 20 to 40% of the resulting colonies were found to contain two Pyr+ clones with distinct sets of the non-selected markers. The dual-genotype colonies could not be attributed to multiple DNAs entering the cells or conjugation between transformed and non-transformed cells. These colonies thus appear to represent genetic sectoring in which stretches of heteroduplex DNA formed during HR and segregated without complete resolution of inter-strand differences. Surprisingly, sectoring was also frequent in transformation with single-stranded DNAs. Oligonucleotides, for example, produced somewhat more sectored transformants when electroporated as single strands than as a duplex, although all forms (positive-strand, negative-strand, and duplex produced a diversity of genotypes from the limited number of markers. The marker patterns in the recombinants indicate that S. acidocaldarius resolves individual mismatches through un-coordinated short-patch excision followed by re-filling of the resulting gap. These gene-conversion events exhibit little strand bias, and can occur in pre-formed heteroduplex. These properties suggest that this process does not play a central role in the fidelity of genome replication, but may generate 3’ single-strand tails, and thereby initiate the incorporation of duplex DNA into the recipient chromosome. Regardless of the molecular details of its mechanism, HR between the S. acidocaldarius chromosome and a multiply-marked DNA produces a strikingly high level of genetic diversity in a very short chromosomal interval, and suggests that HR in Sulfolobus has significant mutagenic potential if not

  9. Homologous recombination in mammalian cells: effect of p53 and Bcl-2 proteins, replication inhibition and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saintigny, Yannick

    1999-01-01

    The control of cell cycle, associated with the mechanisms of replication, DNA repair/recombination allows the cells to maintain their genetic integrity. The p53 protein ensures the control of G1/S transition. Its inactivation would allow to initial replication on damaged matrix and lead to the block of replication forks followed by DNA strand breaks, good substrates for recombination. This work shows that the expression of mutant p53 protein stimulates both spontaneous and radio-induced homologous recombination, independently of the control of cell cycle. Moreover, the use of a set of replication inhibitors show that inhibition of the replication elongation stimulates recombination more strongly than the initiation inhibition. Replication arrest by these inhibitors also significantly increases the number of DNA strand breaks. These results highlighted a point of action of p53 protein on the ultimate stages of the homologous recombination mechanism. Lastly, the expression of Bcl-2 protein inhibits apoptosis and increases survival, but specifically inhibits conservative recombination, after radiation as well as in absence of apoptotic stress. The extinction of this mechanism of DNA repair is associated with an increase of mutagenesis. Taken together, these results allow ta consider the maintenance of the genetic stability as a cellular network involving different pathways. A multiple stages model for tumoral progression can be deduced. (author) [fr

  10. Progressive recombination suppression and differentiation in recently evolved neo-sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, Heini M; Shikano, Takahito; Merilä, Juha

    2013-05-01

    Recombination suppression leads to the structural and functional differentiation of sex chromosomes and is thus a crucial step in the process of sex chromosome evolution. Despite extensive theoretical work, the exact processes and mechanisms of recombination suppression and differentiation are not well understood. In threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a different sex chromosome system has recently evolved by a fusion between the Y chromosome and an autosome in the Japan Sea lineage, which diverged from the ancestor of other lineages approximately 2 Ma. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics and differentiation processes of sex chromosomes based on comparative analyses of these divergent lineages using 63 microsatellite loci. Both chromosome-wide differentiation patterns and phylogenetic inferences with X and Y alleles indicated that the ancestral sex chromosomes were extensively differentiated before the divergence of these lineages. In contrast, genetic differentiation appeared to have proceeded only in a small region of the neo-sex chromosomes. The recombination maps constructed for the Japan Sea lineage indicated that recombination has been suppressed or reduced over a large region spanning the ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes. Chromosomal regions exhibiting genetic differentiation and suppressed or reduced recombination were detected continuously and sequentially in the neo-sex chromosomes, suggesting that differentiation has gradually spread from the fusion point following the extension of recombination suppression. Our study illustrates an ongoing process of sex chromosome differentiation, providing empirical support for the theoretical model postulating that recombination suppression and differentiation proceed in a gradual manner in the very early stage of sex chromosome evolution.

  11. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Q.; Mayolo, A.A. de

    2006-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature of me...... mutants, supporting the view that DNA nicks and single-stranded gaps, rather than DSBs, are major sources of spontaneous HR in mitotic yeast cells....... of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most...... spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses...

  12. Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes Play a Critical Role in Reprogramming to a Pluripotent State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico González

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs hold great promise for personalized regenerative medicine. However, recent studies show that iPSC lines carry genetic abnormalities, suggesting that reprogramming may be mutagenic. Here, we show that the ectopic expression of reprogramming factors increases the level of phosphorylated histone H2AX, one of the earliest cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Additional mechanistic studies uncover a direct role of the homologous recombination (HR pathway, a pathway essential for error-free repair of DNA DSBs, in reprogramming. This role is independent of the use of integrative or nonintegrative methods in introducing reprogramming factors, despite the latter being considered a safer approach that circumvents genetic modifications. Finally, deletion of the tumor suppressor p53 rescues the reprogramming phenotype in HR-deficient cells primarily through the restoration of reprogramming-dependent defects in cell proliferation and apoptosis. These mechanistic insights have important implications for the design of safer approaches to creating iPSCs.

  13. ZNF830 mediates cancer chemoresistance through promoting homologous-recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Chen, Jianxiang; Qiao, Yiting; Shi, Yaru; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qi; Xie, Hui; Shi, Xiaorui; Sun, Youwei; Liu, Xu; Li, Tongyu; Zhou, Liqian; Wan, Jianqin; Xie, Tian; Wang, Hangxiang; Wang, Fu

    2018-02-16

    Homologous recombination (HR), which mediates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), is crucial for maintaining genomic integrity and enhancing survival in response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in human cancers. However, the mechanisms of HR repair in treatment resistance for the improvement of cancer therapy remains unclear. Here, we report that the zinc finger protein 830 (ZNF830) promotes HR repair and the survival of cancer cells in response to DNA damage. Mechanistically, ZNF830 directly participates in DNA end resection via interacting with CtIP and regulating CtIP recruitment to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the recruitment of ZNF830 at DNA damage sites is dependent on its phosphorylation at serine 362 by ATR. ZNF830 directly and preferentially binds to double-strand DNA with its 3' or 5' overhang through the Zinc finger (Znf) domain, facilitating HR repair and maintaining genome stability. Thus, our study identified a novel function of ZNF830 as a HR repair regulator in DNA end resection, conferring the chemoresistance to genotoxic therapy for cancers those that overexpress ZNF830.

  14. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  15. Multi-Homologous Recombination-Based Gene Manipulation in the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sun Hwang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene disruption by homologous recombination is widely used to investigate and analyze the function of genes in Fusarium fujikuroi, a fungus that causes bakanae disease and root rot symptoms in rice. To generate gene deletion constructs, the use of conventional cloning methods, which rely on restriction enzymes and ligases, has had limited success due to a lack of unique restriction enzyme sites. Although strategies that avoid the use of restriction enzymes have been employed to overcome this issue, these methods require complicated PCR steps or are frequently inefficient. Here, we introduce a cloning system that utilizes multi-fragment assembly by In-Fusion to generate a gene disruption construct. This method utilizes DNA fragment fusion and requires only one PCR step and one reaction for construction. Using this strategy, a gene disruption construct for Fusarium cyclin C1 (FCC1 , which is associated with fumonisin B1 biosynthesis, was successfully created and used for fungal transformation. In vivo and in vitro experiments using confirmed fcc1 mutants suggest that fumonisin production is closely related to disease symptoms exhibited by F. fujikuroi strain B14. Taken together, this multi-fragment assembly method represents a simpler and a more convenient process for targeted gene disruption in fungi.

  16. BRCA1 Directs the Repair Pathway to Homologous Recombination by Promoting 53BP1 Dephosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Isono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 promotes homologous recombination (HR by activating DNA-end resection. By contrast, 53BP1 forms a barrier that inhibits DNA-end resection. Here, we show that BRCA1 promotes DNA-end resection by relieving the 53BP1-dependent barrier. We show that 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM in S/G2 phase, promoting RIF1 recruitment, which inhibits resection. 53BP1 is promptly dephosphorylated and RIF1 released, despite remaining unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. When resection is impaired by CtIP/MRE11 endonuclease inhibition, 53BP1 phosphorylation and RIF1 are sustained due to ongoing ATM signaling. BRCA1 depletion also sustains 53BP1 phosphorylation and RIF1 recruitment. We identify the phosphatase PP4C as having a major role in 53BP1 dephosphorylation and RIF1 release. BRCA1 or PP4C depletion impairs 53BP1 repositioning, EXO1 recruitment, and HR progression. 53BP1 or RIF1 depletion restores resection, RAD51 loading, and HR in PP4C-depleted cells. Our findings suggest that BRCA1 promotes PP4C-dependent 53BP1 dephosphorylation and RIF1 release, directing repair toward HR.

  17. SAMHD1 Promotes DNA End Resection to Facilitate DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waaqo Daddacha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand break (DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR is initiated by CtIP/MRN-mediated DNA end resection to maintain genome integrity. SAMHD1 is a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, which restricts HIV-1 infection, and mutations are associated with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and cancer. We show that SAMHD1 has a dNTPase-independent function in promoting DNA end resection to facilitate DSB repair by HR. SAMHD1 deficiency or Vpx-mediated degradation causes hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents, and SAMHD1 is recruited to DSBs. SAMHD1 complexes with CtIP via a conserved C-terminal domain and recruits CtIP to DSBs to facilitate end resection and HR. Significantly, a cancer-associated mutant with impaired CtIP interaction, but not dNTPase-inactive SAMHD1, fails to rescue the end resection impairment of SAMHD1 depletion. Our findings define a dNTPase-independent function for SAMHD1 in HR-mediated DSB repair by facilitating CtIP accrual to promote DNA end resection, providing insight into how SAMHD1 promotes genome integrity.

  18. Phylogenetic incongruence in E. coli O104: understanding the evolutionary relationships of emerging pathogens in the face of homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilong Hao

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O104:H4 was identified as an emerging pathogen during the spring and summer of 2011 and was responsible for a widespread outbreak that resulted in the deaths of 50 people and sickened over 4075. Traditional phenotypic and genotypic assays, such as serotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, permit identification and classification of bacterial pathogens, but cannot accurately resolve relationships among genotypically similar but pathotypically different isolates. To understand the evolutionary origins of E. coli O104:H4, we sequenced two strains isolated in Ontario, Canada. One was epidemiologically linked to the 2011 outbreak, and the second, unrelated isolate, was obtained in 2010. MLST analysis indicated that both isolates are of the same sequence type (ST678, but whole-genome sequencing revealed differences in chromosomal and plasmid content. Through comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of five O104:H4 ST678 genomes, we identified 167 genes in three gene clusters that have undergone homologous recombination with distantly related E. coli strains. These recombination events have resulted in unexpectedly high sequence diversity within the same sequence type. Failure to recognize or adjust for homologous recombination can result in phylogenetic incongruence. Understanding the extent of homologous recombination among different strains of the same sequence type may explain the pathotypic differences between the ON2010 and ON2011 strains and help shed new light on the emergence of this new pathogen.

  19. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  20. Radio-sensitization of WRN helicase deficient cancer cells by targeting homologous recombination pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pooja; Saha, Bhaskar; Patro, Birija Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are primarily repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, it is well established that a subset DSBs which are accumulated in IR-induced G2 phase are dependent on homologous recombination (HR). DNA repair deficient tumor cells have been shown to accumulate high levels of DNA damage. Consequently, these cells become hyperdependent on DNA damage response pathways, including the CHK1-kinase-mediated HR-repair. These observations suggest that DNA repair deficient tumors should exhibit increased radio-sensitivity under HR inhibition. Genetic defects leading to functional loss of werner (WRN) protein is associated with genomic instability and increased cancer incidence. WRN function is known to be abrogated in several human cancer cells due to hypermethylation of CpGisland-promoter and transcriptional silencing of WRN gene. In the current investigation, using isogenic pairs of cell lines differing only in the WRN function, we showed that WRN-deficient cell lines were hyper-radiosensitive to CHK1 pharmacologic inhibition. Here, we found that unrepaired DSB was drastically increased in WRN-deficient cells vis-à-vis WRN-proficient cells in response to IR and CHK1 inhibitor (CHK1i). Our results revealed a marginal role of NHEJ pathway accountable for the radio-sensitivity of WRN-deficient cells. Interestingly, silencing CTIP, a HR protein required for RAD51 loading, significantly abrogated the CHK1i-mediated radiosensitivity in WRN-deficient cells. Silencing of WRN or CTIP individually led to no significant difference in the extent of DNA end resection, as required during HR pathway. Imperatively, our results revealed that WRN and CTIP together play a complementary role in executing DNA end resection during HR-mediated repair of IR induced DSBs. Altogether, our data indicated that inhibition of IR-induced HR pathway at RAD51 loading, but not at DSB end resection, make the WRN-deficient cancer cells

  1. Role of teh Rad52 Amino-terminal DNA Binding Activity in DNA Strand Capture in Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Idina; Hallwyl, Swee Chuang Lim; Seong, Changhyun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein promotes homologous recombination by nucleating the Rad51 recombinase onto replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA strands and also by directly annealing such strands. We show that the purified rad52-R70A mutant protein, with a compromised amino......-terminal DNA binding domain, is capable of Rad51 delivery to DNA but is deficient in DNA annealing. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments find that rad52-R70A associates with DNA double-strand breaks and promotes recruitment of Rad51 as efficiently as wild-type Rad52. Analysis of gene...... conversion intermediates reveals that rad52-R70A cells can mediate DNA strand invasion but are unable to complete the recombination event. These results provide evidence that DNA binding by the evolutionarily conserved amino terminus of Rad52 is needed for the capture of the second DNA end during homologous...

  2. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ting; Li Fanghua; Liu Qingfang; Bian Po; Wang Jufang; Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun; Li Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and γ-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  3. Natural product β-thujaplicin inhibits homologous recombination repair and sensitizes cancer cells to radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihong; Peng, Yang; Uray, Ivan P; Shen, Jianfeng; Wang, Lulu; Peng, Xiangdong; Brown, Powel H; Tu, Wei; Peng, Guang

    2017-12-01

    Investigation of natural products is an attractive strategy to identify novel compounds for cancer prevention and treatment. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of natural products, and they have been widely used as alternative treatments for a wide range of illnesses, including cancers. However, it remains unknown whether natural products affect homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair and whether these compounds can be used as sensitizers with minimal toxicity to improve patients' responses to radiation therapy, a mainstay of treatment for many human cancers. In this study, in order to systematically identify natural products with an inhibitory effect on HR repair, we developed a high-throughput image-based HR repair screening assay and screened a chemical library containing natural products. Among the most interesting of the candidate compounds identified from the screen was β-thujaplicin, a bioactive compound isolated from the heart wood of plants in the Cupressaceae family, can significantly inhibit HR repair. We further demonstrated that β-thujaplicin inhibits HR repair by reducing the recruitment of a key HR repair protein, Rad51, to DNA double-strand breaks. More importantly, our results showed that β-thujaplicin can radiosensitize cancer cells. Additionally, β-thujaplicin sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibitor in different cancer cell lines. Collectively, our findings for the first time identify natural compound β-thujaplicin, which has a good biosafety profile, as a novel HR repair inhibitor with great potential to be translated into clinical applications as a sensitizer to DNA-damage-inducing treatment such as radiation and PARP inhibitor. In addition, our study provides proof of the principle that our robust high-throughput functional HR repair assay can be used for a large-scale screening system to identify novel natural products that regulate DNA repair and cellular responses to DNA damage-inducing treatments such as

  4. Generating in vivo cloning vectors for parallel cloning of large gene clusters by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Lee

    Full Text Available A robust method for the in vivo cloning of large gene clusters was developed based on homologous recombination (HR, requiring only the transformation of PCR products into Escherichia coli cells harboring a receiver plasmid. Positive clones were selected by an acquired antibiotic resistance, which was activated by the recruitment of a short ribosome-binding site plus start codon sequence from the PCR products to the upstream position of a silent antibiotic resistance gene in receiver plasmids. This selection was highly stringent and thus the cloning efficiency of the GFPuv gene (size: 0.7 kb was comparable to that of the conventional restriction-ligation method, reaching up to 4.3 × 10(4 positive clones per μg of DNA. When we attempted parallel cloning of GFPuv fusion genes (size: 2.0 kb and carotenoid biosynthesis pathway clusters (sizes: 4 kb, 6 kb, and 10 kb, the cloning efficiency was similarly high regardless of the DNA size, demonstrating that this would be useful for the cloning of large DNA sequences carrying multiple open reading frames. However, restriction analyses of the obtained plasmids showed that the selected cells may contain significant amounts of receiver plasmids without the inserts. To minimize the amount of empty plasmid in the positive selections, the sacB gene encoding a levansucrase was introduced as a counter selection marker in receiver plasmid as it converts sucrose to a toxic levan in the E. coli cells. Consequently, this method yielded completely homogeneous plasmids containing the inserts via the direct transformation of PCR products into E. coli cells.

  5. The chloroplast triggers developmental reprogramming when mutS HOMOLOG1 is suppressed in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying-Zhi; Santamaria, Roberto de la Rosa; Virdi, Kamaldeep S; Arrieta-Montiel, Maria P; Razvi, Fareha; Li, Shaoqing; Ren, Guodong; Yu, Bin; Alexander, Danny; Guo, Lining; Feng, Xuehui; Dweikat, Ismail M; Clemente, Tom E; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2012-06-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes demonstrate nongenetic, heritable phenotypic versatility in their adaptation to environmental changes. This inclusive inheritance is composed of interacting epigenetic, maternal, and environmental factors. Yet-unidentified maternal effects can have a pronounced influence on plant phenotypic adaptation to changing environmental conditions. To explore the control of phenotypy in higher plants, we examined the effect of a single plant nuclear gene on the expression and transmission of phenotypic variability in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). MutS HOMOLOG1 (MSH1) is a plant-specific nuclear gene product that functions in both mitochondria and plastids to maintain genome stability. RNA interference suppression of the gene elicits strikingly similar programmed changes in plant growth pattern in six different plant species, changes subsequently heritable independent of the RNA interference transgene. The altered phenotypes reflect multiple pathways that are known to participate in adaptation, including altered phytohormone effects for dwarfed growth and reduced internode elongation, enhanced branching, reduced stomatal density, altered leaf morphology, delayed flowering, and extended juvenility, with conversion to perennial growth pattern in short days. Some of these effects are partially reversed with the application of gibberellic acid. Genetic hemicomplementation experiments show that this phenotypic plasticity derives from changes in chloroplast state. Our results suggest that suppression of MSH1, which occurs under several forms of abiotic stress, triggers a plastidial response process that involves nongenetic inheritance.

  6. Rosa26-GFP direct repeat (RaDR-GFP mice reveal tissue- and age-dependence of homologous recombination in mammals in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Sukup-Jackson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is critical for the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks. Although HR is mostly error free, inherent or environmental conditions that either suppress or induce HR cause genomic instability. Despite its importance in carcinogenesis, due to limitations in our ability to detect HR in vivo, little is known about HR in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a mouse model in which a direct repeat HR substrate is targeted to the ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 locus. In the Rosa26 Direct Repeat-GFP (RaDR-GFP mice, HR between two truncated EGFP expression cassettes can yield a fluorescent signal. In-house image analysis software provides a rapid method for quantifying recombination events within intact tissues, and the frequency of recombinant cells can be evaluated by flow cytometry. A comparison among 11 tissues shows that the frequency of recombinant cells varies by more than two orders of magnitude among tissues, wherein HR in the brain is the lowest. Additionally, de novo recombination events accumulate with age in the colon, showing that this mouse model can be used to study the impact of chronic exposures on genomic stability. Exposure to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, an alkylating agent similar to the cancer chemotherapeutic temozolomide, shows that the colon, liver and pancreas are susceptible to DNA damage-induced HR. Finally, histological analysis of the underlying cell types reveals that pancreatic acinar cells and liver hepatocytes undergo HR and also that HR can be specifically detected in colonic somatic stem cells. Taken together, the RaDR-GFP mouse model provides new understanding of how tissue and age impact susceptibility to HR, and enables future studies of genetic, environmental and physiological factors that modulate HR in mammals.

  7. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  8. Gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma displays abnormalities in homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewalt RI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Robin I Dewalt,1 Kenneth A Kesler,2 Zane T Hammoud,3 LeeAnn Baldridge,4 Eyas M Hattab,4 Shadia I Jalal1,5 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Cardiothoracic Division, Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continues to be a disease associated with high mortality. Among the factors leading to poor outcomes are innate resistance to currently available therapies, advanced stage at diagnosis, and complex biology. Platinum and ionizing radiation form the backbone of treatment for the majority of patients with EAC. Of the multiple processes involved in response to platinum chemotherapy or ionizing radiation, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA repair has been a major player in cancer sensitivity to these agents. DNA repair defects have been described in various malignancies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alterations in DNA repair are present in EAC compared with normal gastroesophageal tissues. Methods: We analyzed the expression of genes involved in homologous recombination (HR, nonhomologous end-joining, and nucleotide excision repair (NER pathways in 12 EAC tumor samples with their matched normal counterparts. These pathways were chosen because they are the main pathways involved in the repair of platinum- or ionizing-radiation-induced damage. In addition, abnormalities in these pathways have not been well characterized in EAC. Results: We identified increased expression of at least one HR gene in eight of the EAC tumor samples. Alterations in the expression of EME1, a structure-specific endonuclease involved in HR, were the most prevalent, with messenger (mRNA overexpression in six of the EAC samples

  9. Loss of Ubr2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leads to chromosome fragility and impaired homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Yan; Kwon, Yong Tae; An, Jee Young; Eller, Danny; Tsai, S.-C.; Diaz-Perez, Silvia; Troke, Joshua J.; Teitell, Michael A.; Marahrens, York

    2006-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway of protein degradation targets proteins with destabilizing N-terminal residues. Ubr2 is one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the mouse N-end rule pathway. We have previously shown that Ubr2 -/- male mice are infertile, owing to the arrest of spermatocytes between the leptotene/zygotene and pachytene of meiosis I, the failure of chromosome pairing, and subsequent apoptosis. Here, we report that mouse fibroblast cells derived from Ubr2 -/- embryos display genome instability. The frequency of chromosomal bridges and micronuclei were much higher in Ubr2 -/- fibroblasts than in +/+ controls. Metaphase chromosome spreads from Ubr2 -/- cells revealed a high incidence of spontaneous chromosomal gaps, indicating chromosomal fragility. These fragile sites were generally replicated late in S phase. Ubr2 -/- cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, a DNA cross-linking agent, but displayed normal sensitivity to gamma-irradiation. A reporter assay showed that Ubr2 -/- cells are significantly impaired in the homologous recombination repair of a double strand break. In contrast, Ubr2 -/- cells appeared normal in an assay for non-homologous end joining. Our results therefore unveil the role of the ubiquitin ligase Ubr2 in maintaining genome integrity and in homologous recombination repair

  10. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Anna; Szulc, Izabela; Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  11. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  12. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baker, C.L.; Petkova, P.; Walker, M.; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondřej; Trachtulec, Zdeněk; Petkov, P.M.; Paigen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 9 (2015), e1005512-e1005512 ISSN 1553-7390 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/1931; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20728S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : recombination * PRDM9 * allelic competition Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.528, year: 2014

  13. Structural organization of glycophorin A and B genes: Glycophorin B gene evolved by homologous recombination at Alu repeat sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Shinichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Glycophorins A (GPA) and B (GPB) are two major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. Here the authors present a comparison of the genomic structures of GPA and GPB developed by analyzing DNA clones isolated from a K562 genomic library. Nucleotide sequences of exon-intron junctions and 5' and 3' flanking sequences revealed that the GPA and GPB genes consist of 7 and 5 exons, respectively, and both genes have >95% identical sequence from the 5' flanking region to the region ∼ 1 kilobase downstream from the exon encoding the transmembrane regions. In this homologous part of the genes, GPB lacks one exon due to a point mutation at the 5' splicing site of the third intron, which inactivates the 5' cleavage event of splicing and leads to ligation of the second to the fourth exon. Following these very homologous sequences, the genomic sequences for GPA and GPB diverge significantly and no homology can be detected in their 3' end sequences. The analysis of the Alu sequences and their flanking direct repeat sequences suggest that an ancestral genomic structure has been maintained in the GPA gene, whereas the GPB gene has arisen from the acquisition of 3' sequences different from those of the GPA gene by homologous recombination at the Alu repeats during or after gene duplication

  14. [Construction and characterization of a recombinant mutant homolog of the CheW protein from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, D V; Zhdanov, D D; Gladilina, Ju A; Pokrovsky, V S; Podobed, O V; Pokrovskaya, M V; Aleksandrova, S S; Milyushkina, A L; Vigovskiy, M A; Sokolov, N N

    2018-01-01

    In the work a recombinant chemotaxis protein CheW from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 (TpeCheW) and its mutant homolog (TpeCheW-mut) were created. It was shown that, despite the low homology with CheW prototypes from intestinal bacteria, these proteins didn't cause metabolic overload and were well expressed by cells of E. coli laboratory strains. We have discovered a broad spectrum of industrial valuable properties of the TpeCheW-mut protein such as stability in a wide range of temperatures and pH, high expression level, solubility and possibility of the application of a simple low-stage purification methodology with the use of preliminary heat treatment. Possible directions of the scientific and industrial application of this protein were claimed.

  15. Suppressing recombination in polymer photovoltaic devices via energy-level cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Johnson, Kerr; Vaynzof, Yana; Bakulin, Artem A; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K H; Friend, Richard H

    2013-08-14

    An energy cascading structure is designed in a polymer photovoltaic device to suppress recombination and improve quantum yields. By the insertion of a thin polymer interlayer with intermediate energy levels, electrons and holes can effectively shuttle away from each other while being spatially separated from recombination. An increase in open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current are observed in modified devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Isodicentric Y Chromosomes and Sex Disorders as Byproducts of Homologous Recombination that Maintains Palindromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Julian; Skaletsky, Helen; van Daalen, Saskia K. M.; Embry, Stephanie L.; Korver, Cindy M.; Brown, Laura G.; Oates, Robert D.; Silber, Sherman; Repping, Sjoerd; Page, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Massive palindromes in the human Y chromosome harbor mirror-image gene pairs essential for spermatogenesis. During evolution, these gene pairs have been maintained by intrapalindrome, arm-to-arm recombination. The mechanism of intrapalindrome recombination and risk of harmful effects are unknown. We

  17. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. We identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability...... to overcome replication fork stalling,and replication stress. XPG directly interacts withBRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatin binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper...

  18. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites: Implications for development of recombinant vaccines produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts.

  20. Identification of translationally controlled tumor protein in promotion of DNA homologous recombination repair in cancer cells by affinity proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Sun, H; Zhang, C; Liu, J; Zhang, H; Fan, F; Everley, R A; Ning, X; Sun, Y; Hu, J; Liu, J; Zhang, J; Ye, W; Qiu, X; Dai, S; Liu, B; Xu, H; Fu, S; Gygi, S P; Zhou, C

    2017-12-14

    Translationally controlled tumor protein(TCTP) has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, DNA repair and drug resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TCTP involved in cellular processes, we performed an affinity purification-based proteomic profiling to identify proteins interacting with TCTP in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. We found that a group of proteins involved in DNA repair are enriched in the potential TCTP interactome. Silencing TCTP by short hairpin RNA in breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells leads to the declined repair efficiency for DNA double-strand breaks on the GFP-Pem1 reporter gene by homologous recombination, the persistent activation and the prolonged retention of γH2AX and Rad51 foci following ionizing radiation. Reciprocal immunoprecipitations indicated that TCTP forms complexes with Rad51 in vivo, and the stability maintenance of Rad51 requires TCTP in MCF-7 cells under normal cell culture conditions. Moreover, inactivation of TCTP by sertraline treatment enhances UVC irradiation-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, and causes sensitization to DNA-damaging drug etoposide and DNA repair inhibitor olaparib. Thus, we have identified an important role of TCTP in promoting DNA double-stand break repair via facilitating DNA homologous recombination processes and highlighted the great potential of TCTP as a drug target to enhance conventional chemotherapy for cancer patients with high levels of TCTP expression.

  1. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Blomme, Jonas

    2017-04-19

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gainand loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development.

  2. Topoisomerase 3alpha and RMI1 suppress somatic crossovers and are essential for resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hartung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are enzymes with crucial functions in DNA metabolism. They are ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and modify the steady-state level of DNA supercoiling. Biochemical analyses indicate that Topoisomerase 3alpha (TOP3alpha functions together with a RecQ DNA helicase and a third partner, RMI1/BLAP75, in the resolution step of homologous recombination in a process called Holliday Junction dissolution in eukaryotes. Apart from that, little is known about the role of TOP3alpha in higher eukaryotes, as knockout mutants show early lethality or strong developmental defects. Using a hypomorphic insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (top3alpha-2, which is viable but completely sterile, we were able to define three different functions of the protein in mitosis and meiosis. The top3alpha-2 line exhibits fragmented chromosomes during mitosis and sensitivity to camptothecin, suggesting an important role in chromosome segregation partly overlapping with that of type IB topoisomerases. Furthermore, AtTOP3alpha, together with AtRECQ4A and AtRMI1, is involved in the suppression of crossover recombination in somatic cells as well as DNA repair in both mammals and A. thaliana. Surprisingly, AtTOP3alpha is also essential for meiosis. The phenotype of chromosome fragmentation, bridges, and telophase I arrest can be suppressed by AtSPO11 and AtRAD51 mutations, indicating that the protein is required for the resolution of recombination intermediates. As Atrmi1 mutants have a similar meiotic phenotype to Attop3alpha mutants, both proteins seem to be involved in a mechanism safeguarding the entangling of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The requirement of AtTOP3alpha and AtRMI1 in a late step of meiotic recombination strongly hints at the possibility that the dissolution of double Holliday Junctions via a hemicatenane intermediate is indeed an indispensable step of meiotic recombination.

  3. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  4. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Youli, E-mail: youli.yao@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada); Kovalchuk, Igor, E-mail: igor.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada)

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated {beta}-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted {beta}-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the {beta}-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  5. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B

  6. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  7. FBH1 Helicase Disrupts RAD51 Filaments in Vitro and Modulates Homologous Recombination in Mammalian Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimandlová, Jitka; Zagelbaum, J.; Payne, M.J.; Chu, W.K.; Shevelev, Igor; Hanada, K.; Chatterjee, S.; Reid, D.A.; Liu, Y.; Janščák, Pavel; Rothenberg, E.; Hickson, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 47 (2013), s. 34168-34180 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0281 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA helicase * DNA recombination * DNA repair * DNA replication Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.600, year: 2013

  8. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mms1 channels repair of perturbed replication into Rhp51 independent homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejrup-Hansen, Rasmus; Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Miyabe, Izumi

    2011-01-01

    -specific replication fork barrier and that, in a ¿mms1 strain, Rad22(Rad52) and RPA recruitment to blocked forks are reduced, whereas Rhp51 recruitment is unaffected. In addition, Mms1 appears to specifically promote chromosomal rearrangements in a recombination assay. These observations suggest that Mms1 acts...

  9. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H.; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J.; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and cl...

  10. Role of the DNA Mismatch Repair Gene MutS4 in Driving the Evolution of Mycobacterium yongonense Type I via Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2017-01-01

    We recently showed that Mycobacterium yongonense could be divided into two genotypes: Type I, in which the rpoB gene has been transferred from Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum , and Type II, in which the rpoB gene has not been transferred. Comparative genome analysis of three M. yongonense Type I, two M. yongonense Type II and M. parascrofulaceum type strains were performed in this study to gain insight into gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum into M. yongonense Type I strains. We found two genome regions transferred from M. parascrofulaceum : one contained 3 consecutive genes, including the rpoBC operon, and the other contained 57 consecutive genes that had been transferred into M. yongonense Type I genomes via homologous recombination. Further comparison between the M. yongonense Type I and II genomes revealed that Type I, but not Type II has a distinct DNA mismatch repair gene ( MutS4 subfamily) that was possibly transferred via non-homologous recombination from other actinomycetes. We hypothesized that it could facilitate homologous recombination from the M. parascrofulaceum to the M. yongonense Type I genomes. We therefore generated recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis containing a MutS4 operon of M. yongonense . We found that the M. tuberculosis rpoB fragment with a rifampin resistance-conferring mutation was more frequently inserted into recombinant M. smegmatis than the wild type, suggesting that MutS4 is a driving force in the gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum to M. yongonense Type I strains via homologous recombination. In conclusion, our data indicated that MutS4 in M. yongonense Type I genomes may drive gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum via homologous recombination, resulting in division of M. yongonense into two genotypes, Type I and II.

  11. Role of the DNA Mismatch Repair Gene MutS4 in Driving the Evolution of Mycobacterium yongonense Type I via Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Jun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that Mycobacterium yongonense could be divided into two genotypes: Type I, in which the rpoB gene has been transferred from Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum, and Type II, in which the rpoB gene has not been transferred. Comparative genome analysis of three M. yongonense Type I, two M. yongonense Type II and M. parascrofulaceum type strains were performed in this study to gain insight into gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum into M. yongonense Type I strains. We found two genome regions transferred from M. parascrofulaceum: one contained 3 consecutive genes, including the rpoBC operon, and the other contained 57 consecutive genes that had been transferred into M. yongonense Type I genomes via homologous recombination. Further comparison between the M. yongonense Type I and II genomes revealed that Type I, but not Type II has a distinct DNA mismatch repair gene (MutS4 subfamily that was possibly transferred via non-homologous recombination from other actinomycetes. We hypothesized that it could facilitate homologous recombination from the M. parascrofulaceum to the M. yongonense Type I genomes. We therefore generated recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis containing a MutS4 operon of M. yongonense. We found that the M. tuberculosis rpoB fragment with a rifampin resistance-conferring mutation was more frequently inserted into recombinant M. smegmatis than the wild type, suggesting that MutS4 is a driving force in the gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum to M. yongonense Type I strains via homologous recombination. In conclusion, our data indicated that MutS4 in M. yongonense Type I genomes may drive gene transfer from M. parascrofulaceum via homologous recombination, resulting in division of M. yongonense into two genotypes, Type I and II.

  12. A pan-cancer analysis of inferred homologous recombination deficiency identifies potential platinum benefit in novel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquard, Andrea Marion; Eklund, Aron Charles; Wang, Zhigang C.

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine in cancer aims to improve treatment outcome, by exploiting the molecular alterations of the individual tumor to inform therapeutic decisions. Ovarian and triple-negative breast cancers with defects in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair are highly sensitive to treatment...... with platinum-based DNA-damaging agents. Reliable biomarkers to identify HR-deficient cancers prior to the initial treatment may be used to stratify patients for platinum chemotherapy. Extensive genome damage caused by deficient HR is readily observed as high frequencies of allelic imbalance and loss...... of heterozygosity in cancers with loss of either of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, but is also common in ovarian and triple-negative breast cancers with no BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating HR loss due to alternative mechanisms. Recently, three independent methods were published that each quantitate...

  13. The response of mammalian cells to UV-light reveals Rad54-dependent and independent pathways of homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eppink, Berina; Tafel, Agnieszka A; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    with lesions in replicating DNA. The core HR protein in mammalian cells is the strand exchange protein RAD51, which is aided by numerous proteins, including RAD54. We used RAD54 as a cellular marker for HR to study the response of mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells to UV irradiation. In contrast to yeast, ES......Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced DNA lesions can be efficiently repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, NER is less effective during replication of UV-damaged chromosomes. In contrast, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) are capable of dealing....... We demonstrate using chromosome fiber analysis at the individual replication fork level, that HR activity is important for the restart of DNA replication after induction of DNA damage by UV-light in NER-deficient cells. Furthermore, our data reveal RAD54-dependent and -independent contributions of HR...

  14. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    for DSB repair, homologous recombination repair (HRR) and Non-homologous end joint (NHEJ). HR repairs DSBs using a homologous DNA molecule as a template resulting in error free DNA repair, whereas NHEJ promotes direct re-ligation of the broken DNA ends in an error-prone manner. In eukaryotes DSBs occurred...... of HerA-NurA in the cell. Further, using protein-specfic antibodies and immunofluorescence microscopy, we examined foci formation of HRR proteins in S. islandicus cells. Under the physiological growth conditions, a majority of cells harbored one or two HerA foci. The number of cells with more than two...

  15. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent or Embryonic Stem Cells Decreases the DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Mujoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO-cyclic GMP pathway contributes to human stem cell differentiation, but NO free radical production can also damage DNA, necessitating a robust DNA damage response (DDR to ensure cell survival. How the DDR is affected by differentiation is unclear. Differentiation of stem cells, either inducible pluripotent or embryonic derived, increased residual DNA damage as determined by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, with increased S-phase-specific chromosomal aberration after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting reduced homologous recombination (HR repair as supported by the observation of decreased HR-related repair factor foci formation (RAD51 and BRCA1. Differentiated cells also had relatively increased fork stalling and R-loop formation after DNA replication stress. Treatment with NO donor (NOC-18, which causes stem cell differentiation has no effect on double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining but reduced DSB repair by HR. Present studies suggest that DNA repair by HR is impaired in differentiated cells.

  16. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Camarillo César

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2 irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding

  17. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds.

  18. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Dimitrov

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds.

  19. Full-length RecE enhances linear-linear homologous recombination and facilitates direct cloning for bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jun; Bian, Xiaoying; Hu, Shengbaio; Wang, Hailong; Huang, Fan; Seibert, Philipp M; Plaza, Alberto; Xia, Liqiu; Müller, Rolf; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2012-05-01

    Functional analysis of genome sequences requires methods for cloning DNA of interest. However, existing methods, such as library cloning and screening, are too demanding or inefficient for high-throughput application to the wealth of genomic data being delivered by massively parallel sequencing. Here we describe direct DNA cloning based on the discovery that the full-length Rac prophage protein RecE and its partner RecT mediate highly efficient linear-linear homologous recombination mechanistically distinct from conventional recombineering mediated by Redαβ from lambda phage or truncated versions of RecET. We directly cloned all ten megasynthetase gene clusters (each 10–52 kb in length) from Photorhabdus luminescens into expression vectors and expressed two of them in a heterologous host to identify the metabolites luminmycin A and luminmide A/B. We also directly cloned cDNAs and exactly defined segments from bacterial artificial chromosomes. Direct cloning with full-length RecE expands the DNA engineering toolbox and will facilitate bioprospecting for natural products.

  20. ATR-p53 restricts homologous recombination in response to replicative stress but does not limit DNA interstrand crosslink repair in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M Sirbu

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is required for the restart of collapsed DNA replication forks and error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, unscheduled or hyperactive HR may lead to genomic instability and promote cancer development. The cellular factors that restrict HR processes in mammalian cells are only beginning to be elucidated. The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the suppression of HR though it has remained unclear why p53, as the guardian of the genome, would impair an error-free repair process. Here, we show for the first time that p53 downregulates foci formation of the RAD51 recombinase in response to replicative stress in H1299 lung cancer cells in a manner that is independent of its role as a transcription factor. We find that this downregulation of HR is not only completely dependent on the binding site of p53 with replication protein A but also the ATR/ATM serine 15 phosphorylation site. Genetic analysis suggests that ATR but not ATM kinase modulates p53's function in HR. The suppression of HR by p53 can be bypassed under experimental conditions that cause DSB either directly or indirectly, in line with p53's role as a guardian of the genome. As a result, transactivation-inactive p53 does not compromise the resistance of H1299 cells to the interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Altogether, our data support a model in which p53 plays an anti-recombinogenic role in the ATR-dependent mammalian replication checkpoint but does not impair a cell's ability to use HR for the removal of DSB induced by cytotoxic agents.

  1. GMI1, a structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes-hinge domain-containing protein, is involved in somatic homologous recombination in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bohmdorfer, G.; Schleiffer, A.; Brunmeir, R.; Ferscha, S.; Nizhynska, V.; Kozák, Jaroslav; Angelis, Karel; Kreil, D. P.; Schweizer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 3 (2011), s. 420-433 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : structural maintenance of chromosomes * DNA repair * somatic homologous recombination Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 6.160, year: 2011

  2. Break-induced ATR and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent nucleotide synthesis promotes homologous recombination repair in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, Jennifer; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Walker, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide synthesis is a universal response to DNA damage, but how this response facilitates DNA repair and cell survival is unclear. Here we establish a role for DNA damage-induced nucleotide synthesis in homologous recombination (HR) repair in fission yeast. Using a genetic screen, we found th...

  3. Transformation of tobacco cpDNA with fusion E7GGG/GUS gene and homologous recombination mediated elimination of the marker gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, Jindřich; Vlasák, Josef; Ryba, Š.; Ludvíková, V.; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2013), s. 3644-3648 ISSN 1310-2818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960903 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : E7GGG oncogene * chloroplast transformation * marker-free plant * homologous recombination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.379, year: 2013

  4. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2015-12-28

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana using the related homologous recombination reporter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiao; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Li, Huasheng

    Usually, phenotype changes of plants were used to analayze the responding genetic damages. However, this method is time-consuming, laborious and needs a long period. Here, we developed an Arabidopsis thaliana homologous recombination reporter system, in which HR frequency and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level were used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated. In this study, an Arabidopsis thaliana-line transgenic for GUS recombination substrates (R3L66, AtRAD54promoter:: GFP + GUS) was used to study the mutagenicity of space-flight, and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat (generally called a random positioning machine or RPM, an effective simulator of microgravity) controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level compared with ground 1g controls. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of simulated microgravity on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the simulated microgravity mutagenic effects in plants. In order to understand the combined effects of radiation and microgravity (the main factors in space environment) on DNA damage, we further investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) n vivo in A. thaliana plants using the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. The results showed that the modeled microgravity significantly inhibited the up-regulated expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander aerial plants after root irradiation, suggesting a repressive effect of microgravity on RIBE.

  6. Roles of Rad51 protein in homologous recombination in mammalian cells: relation with repair, replication and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.

    2001-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental process, allowing a faithful repair. In mammalian, MmRAD51, which is the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScRAD51 key protein for HR, is an essential gene. This work is based on the characterisation of viable hyper and hypo-recombinant cell lines specifically affected in the Rad51 pathway. By expressing wild type and dominant negative forms of MmRad51, we demonstrated that Rad51 pathway participates to the repair by HR to induced DNA damages. However, inhibition of the Rad 51 pathway does not affect cell viability, spontaneously or after irradiation, whereas, radiation induced HR is inhibited. In the presence of DNA damages during late S and G2/M phase, inhibition of Rad51 pathway induced chromosomal aberrations, leading to a transient arrest in mitosis. This arrest is associated with an increased of cell death. However, a fraction of cells can escape from this transient arrest by forming tetraploid cells, associated with an absence of chromalid separation. Thus, in response to impaired Rad51 pathway, mitotic checkpoints seems to play an essential role. In line with this, we showed that the essential function of Rad51 is p53-dependent, which is in agreement with the role of p53 in tetraploidy inhibition. Our results suggest that the Rad51 protein could participate to the control of mitotic checkpoints and thus to the maintenance of genetic stability. This function could involve other Rad51 partners such as the tumour suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53. (author) [fr

  7. Diminished levels of allelic losses by homologous recombination in radiation-hypersensitive cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, K.; Abe, M.; Hoki, Y.; Kubo, E.; Muto, M.; Araki, R.; Sato, K.

    2003-01-01

    Mitotic recombination (MR) due to somatic crossing-over is a predominant mechanism for allelic losses in mammalian cells either spontaneous or radiation-induced. A selectable mutation assay accompanying real-time detection PCR was developed to analyze the second step in loss-of-function mutations employing a human lympho-blastoid cell line derived from an obligate heterozygote of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency with a nonsense mutation at exon 3 of the gene. 68 % of spontaneously arising 2,6-diaminopurine resistance (DAP r ) mutant clones were associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), while 92 % of 2 Gy gamma-ray induced mutant clones were so associated. Investigation of gene dosage revealed that about one half of the spontaneously arising mutant clones and two-thirds of those induced by gamma-rays showed reduction to homozygosity of the constitutionally inactivated APRT allele. In an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cell subline in which a new inactivation mutation had been introduced into one APRT allele by ICR-191, MR rarely occurred and exclusively deletions predominated in both spontaneous and X-ray induced DAP r mutants with LOH. A similar assay system was also developed with C3H mouse FM3A mammary tumor cells, SR-1, carrying a C .T transition at exon 5 of an APRT allele. In an XRCC7 (DNA-PKcs) deficient subline of SR-1, SX9 , spontaneous mutation frequencies for the Aprt locus (8AA r ) was 10 -3 , which was about 10 times higher than that in parental SR-1 cells. Mutation frequencies induced by X-rays comparably increased in a dose-dependent manner for the Aprt locus in both cell lines. Against our expectation, the lack of an NHEJ pathway of DNA double strand break repair resulted in a lower proportion (11.1 %) of MR with deletions (77.8 %) as the molecular cause for 8AA r mutations following X-irradiation, while virtually all of X-ray induced 8AA r mutant clones were MR in the control SR-1 cells. Factors

  8. Excess Polθ functions in response to replicative stress in homologous recombination-proficient cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Goullet de Rugy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase theta (Polθ is a specialized A-family DNA polymerase that functions in processes such as translesion synthesis (TLS, DNA double-strand break repair and DNA replication timing. Overexpression of POLQ, the gene encoding Polθ, is a prognostic marker for an adverse outcome in a wide range of human cancers. While increased Polθ dosage was recently suggested to promote survival of homologous recombination (HR-deficient cancer cells, it remains unclear whether POLQ overexpression could be also beneficial to HR-proficient cancer cells. By performing a short interfering (siRNA screen in which genes encoding druggable proteins were knocked down in Polθ-overexpressing cells as a means to uncover genetic vulnerabilities associated with POLQ overexpression, we could not identify genes that were essential for viability in Polθ-overexpressing cells in normal growth conditions. We also showed that, upon external DNA replication stress, Polθ expression promotes cell survival and limits genetic instability. Finally, we report that POLQ expression correlates with the expression of a set of HR genes in breast, lung and colorectal cancers. Collectively, our data suggest that Polθ upregulation, besides its importance for survival of HR-deficient cancer cells, may be crucial also for HR-proficient cells to better tolerate DNA replication stress, as part of a global gene deregulation response, including HR genes.

  9. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  10. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  11. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-08-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. When two is not enough: a CtIP tetramer is required for DNA repair by Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forment, Josep V; Jackson, Stephen P; Pellegrini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is central to the repair of double-strand DNA breaks that occur in S/G2 phases of the cell cycle. HR relies on the CtIP protein (Ctp1 in fission yeast, Sae2 in budding yeast) for resection of DNA ends, a key step in generating the 3'-DNA overhangs that are required for the HR strand-exchange reaction. Although much has been learned about the biological importance of CtIP in DNA repair, our mechanistic insight into its molecular functions remains incomplete. It has been recently discovered that CtIP and Ctp1 share a conserved tetrameric architecture that is mediated by their N-terminal domains and is critical for their function in HR. The specific arrangement of protein chains in the CtIP/Ctp1 tetramer indicates that an ability to bridge DNA ends might be an important feature of CtIP/Ctp1 function, establishing an intriguing similarity with the known ability of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex to link DNA ends. Although the exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated, the remarkable evolutionary conservation of CtIP/Ctp1 tetramerisation clearly points to its crucial role in HR.

  13. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  14. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair in irradiated tumor cells pretreated with Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Miho; Yu, Dong; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Sekine, Emiko; Kubota, Nobuo; Ando, Koichi; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of radio-sensitization by an Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), we studied repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in irradiated human cells pre-treated with 17-AAG. DSBs are thought to be the critical target for radiation-induced cell death. Two human tumor cell lines DU145 and SQ-5 which showed clear radio-sensitization by 17-AAG revealed a significant inhibition of DSB repair, while normal human cells which did not show radio-sensitization by the drug indicated no change in the DSB repair kinetics with 17-AAG. We further demonstrated that BRCA2 was a novel client protein for Hsp90, and 17-AAG caused the degradation of BRCA2 and in turn altered the behavior of Rad51, a critical protein for homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DSB repair. Our data demonstrate for the first time that 17-AAG inhibits the HR repair process and could provide a new therapeutic strategy to selectively result in higher tumor cell killing

  15. Histone dosage regulates DNA damage sensitivity in a checkpoint-independent manner by the homologous recombination pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dun; Burkhart, Sarah Lyn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple genes encode histone proteins that package genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and regulate its accessibility. Because of their positive charge, ‘free’ (non-chromatin associated) histones can bind non-specifically to the negatively charged DNA and affect its metabolism, including DNA repair. We have investigated the effect of altering histone dosage on DNA repair in budding yeast. An increase in histone gene dosage resulted in enhanced DNA damage sensitivity, whereas deletion of a H3–H4 gene pair resulted in reduced levels of free H3 and H4 concomitant with resistance to DNA damaging agents, even in mutants defective in the DNA damage checkpoint. Studies involving the repair of a HO endonuclease-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) at the MAT locus show enhanced repair efficiency by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway on a reduction in histone dosage. Cells with reduced histone dosage experience greater histone loss around a DSB, whereas the recruitment of HR factors is concomitantly enhanced. Further, free histones compete with the HR machinery for binding to DNA and associate with certain HR factors, potentially interfering with HR-mediated repair. Our findings may have important implications for DNA repair, genomic stability, carcinogenesis and aging in human cells that have dozens of histone genes. PMID:22850743

  16. Combination of FACS and homologous recombination for the generation of stable and high-expression engineered cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shi

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cell line generation requires several months and involves screening of over several hundred cell clones for high productivity before dozens are selected as candidate cell lines. Here, we have designed a new strategy for the generation of stable and high-expression cell lines by combining homologous recombination (HR and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. High expression was indicated by the expression of secreted green fluorescent protein (SEGFP. Parental cell lines with the highest expression of SEGFP were then selected by FACS and identified by stability analysis. Consequently, HR vectors were constructed using the cassette for SEGFP as the HR region. After transfecting the HR vector, the cells with negative SEGFP expression were enriched by FACS. The complete exchange between SEGFP and target gene (TNFR-Fc cassettes was demonstrated by DNA analysis. Compared with the traditional method, by integrating the cassette containing the gene of interest into the pre-selected site, the highest producing cells secreted a more than 8-fold higher titer of target protein. Hence, this new strategy can be applied to isolated stable cell lines with desirable expression of any gene of interest. The stable cell lines can rapidly produce proteins for researching protein structure and function and are even applicable in drug discovery.

  17. Recombinant vaccines against T. gondii: comparison between homologous and heterologous vaccination protocols using two viral vectors expressing SAG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Araújo Mendes

    Full Text Available The use of recombinant viral vectors expressing T. gondii antigens is a safe and efficient approach to induce immune response against the parasite and a valuable tool for vaccine development. We have previously protected mice from toxoplasmosis by immunizing the animals with an adenovirus expressing the protein SAG1 (AdSAG1 of T. gondii. We are now looking for ways to improve the vaccination strategy and enhance protection. One limitation of homologous vaccinations (sequential doses of the same vector is induction of anti-vector immune response that blocks cell transduction, restricts transgene expression and, consequently, compromises the overall outcome of vaccination. One way to avert the effects of anti-vector response is to use different viruses in prime and boost (heterologous vaccination. Bearing this in mind, we generated a modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara encoding SAG1 (MVASAG1, to be tested as boost agent after prime with AdSAG1. Although minor differences were observed in the magnitude of the anti-SAG1 immune response induced by each vaccination protocol, the heterologous immunization with AdSAG1 followed by MVASAG1 resulted in improved capacity to control brain cyst formation in a model of chronic toxoplasmosis in C57BL/6 mice.

  18. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  19. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  20. Suppression of liver receptor homolog-1 by microRNA-451 represses the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wu, Shuwen; Lv, Shouzheng; Wang, Huili; Wang, Yong; Guo, Qiang, E-mail: qiangguo_gq@163.com

    2015-06-05

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) plays an important role in the onset and progression of many cancer types. However, the role of LRH-1 in osteosarcoma has not been well investigated. In this study, the critical role of LRH-1 in osteosarcoma cells was described. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis results revealed that LRH-1 was highly overexpressed in osteosarcoma cells. LRH-1 was knocked down by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and this phenomenon significantly inhibited osteosarcoma cell proliferation. Bioinformatics analysis results showed that LRH-1 contained putative binding sites of microRNA-451 (miR-451); this result was further validated through a dual-luciferase activity reporter assay. miR-451 was overexpressed in osteosarcoma cells through transfection of miR-451 mimics; miR-451 overexpression then significantly inhibited LRH-1 expression and cell proliferation. The loss of LRH-1 by siRNA or miR-451 mimics significantly impaired Wnt/β-catenin activity, leading to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Results showed that LRH-1 is implicated in osteosarcoma. Therefore, miR-451-induced suppression of LRH-1 can be a novel therapy to treat osteosarcoma. - Highlights: • LRH-1 was highly overexpressed in osteosarcoma cells. • Knockdown of LRH-1 inhibited osteosarcoma cell proliferation. • miR-451 directly targeted and regulated LRH-1 expression. • Overexpression of miR-451 suppressed Wnt activity.

  1. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  2. JMJD-5/KDM8 regulates H3K36me2 and is required for late steps of homologous recombination and genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amendola, Pier Giorgio; Zaghet, Nico; Ramalho, João J

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized in a three-dimensional structure called chromatin, constituted by DNA and associated proteins, the majority of which are histones. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins greatly influence chromatin structure and regulate many DNA-based biological p...... a novel role for H3K36me2 regulation during late steps of homologous recombination critical to preserve genome integrity....

  3. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  4. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  5. The rate of nonallelic homologous recombination in males is highly variable, correlated between monozygotic twins and independent of age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline A L MacArthur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between highly similar duplicated sequences generates chromosomal deletions, duplications and inversions, which can cause diverse genetic disorders. Little is known about interindividual variation in NAHR rates and the factors that influence this. We estimated the rate of deletion at the CMT1A-REP NAHR hotspot in sperm DNA from 34 male donors, including 16 monozygotic (MZ co-twins (8 twin pairs aged 24 to 67 years old. The average NAHR rate was 3.5 × 10(-5 with a seven-fold variation across individuals. Despite good statistical power to detect even a subtle correlation, we observed no relationship between age of unrelated individuals and the rate of NAHR in their sperm, likely reflecting the meiotic-specific origin of these events. We then estimated the heritability of deletion rate by calculating the intraclass correlation (ICC within MZ co-twins, revealing a significant correlation between MZ co-twins (ICC = 0.784, p = 0.0039, with MZ co-twins being significantly more correlated than unrelated pairs. We showed that this heritability cannot be explained by variation in PRDM9, a known regulator of NAHR, or variation within the NAHR hotspot itself. We also did not detect any correlation between Body Mass Index (BMI, smoking status or alcohol intake and rate of NAHR. Our results suggest that other, as yet unidentified, genetic or environmental factors play a significant role in the regulation of NAHR and are responsible for the extensive variation in the population for the probability of fathering a child with a genomic disorder resulting from a pathogenic deletion.

  6. Differential contributory roles of nucleotide excision and homologous recombination repair for enhancing cisplatin sensitivity in human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background While platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents are widely used to treat various solid tumors, the acquired platinum resistance is a major impediment in their successful treatment. Since enhanced DNA repair capacity is a major factor in conferring cisplatin resistance, targeting of DNA repair pathways is an effective stratagem for overcoming cisplatin resistance. This study was designed to delineate the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER), the principal mechanism for the removal of cisplatin-induced DNA intrastrand crosslinks, in cisplatin resistance and reveal the impact of DNA repair interference on cisplatin sensitivity in human ovarian cancer cells. Results We assessed the inherent NER efficiency of multiple matched pairs of cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cell lines and their expression of NER-related factors at mRNA and protein levels. Our results showed that only the cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line PEO4 possessed an increased NER capacity compared to its inherently NER-inefficient parental line PEO1. Several other cisplatin-resistant cell lines, including CP70, CDDP and 2008C13, exhibited a normal and parental cell-comparable NER capacity for removing cisplatin-induced DNA intrastrand cross-links (Pt-GG). Concomitant gene expression analysis revealed discordance in mRNA and protein levels of NER factors in various ovarian cancer cell lines and NER proteins level were unrelated to the cisplatin sensitivity of these cell lines. Although knockdown of NER factors was able to compromise the NER efficiency, it only caused a minimal effect on cisplatin sensitivity. On the contrary, downregulation of BRCA2, a critical protein for homologous recombination repair (HRR), significantly enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin in killing ovarian cancer cell line PEO4. Conclusion Our studies indicate that the level of NER factors in ovarian cancer cell lines is neither a determinant of their NER capacity nor of the sensitivity to

  7. Barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells: tuning acceptor energetics to suppress geminate recombination losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ching-Hong; Gorman, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, Andrew; Holliday, Sarah; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Jenekhe, Samson A; Baran, Derya; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R

    2018-01-26

    We report the synthesis of two barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors and demonstrate their efficient function in high voltage output organic solar cells. The acceptor with the lower LUMO level is shown to exhibit suppressed geminate recombination losses, resulting in enhanced photocurrent generation and higher overall device efficiency.

  8. Barbiturate End-Capped Non-Fullerene Acceptors for Organic Solar Cells: Tuning Acceptor Energetics to Suppress Geminate Recombination Losses

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Ching-Hong

    2018-01-10

    We report the synthesis of two barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors and demonstrate their efficient function in high voltage output organic solar cells. The acceptor with the lower LUMO level is shown to exhibit suppressed geminate recombination losses, resulting in enhanced photocurrent generation and higher overall device efficiency.

  9. The meiotic recombination checkpoint suppresses NHK-1 kinase to prevent reorganisation of the oocyte nucleus in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M Lancaster

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The meiotic recombination checkpoint is a signalling pathway that blocks meiotic progression when the repair of DNA breaks formed during recombination is delayed. In comparison to the signalling pathway itself, however, the molecular targets of the checkpoint that control meiotic progression are not well understood in metazoans. In Drosophila, activation of the meiotic checkpoint is known to prevent formation of the karyosome, a meiosis-specific organisation of chromosomes, but the molecular pathway by which this occurs remains to be identified. Here we show that the conserved kinase NHK-1 (Drosophila Vrk-1 is a crucial meiotic regulator controlled by the meiotic checkpoint. An nhk-1 mutation, whilst resulting in karyosome defects, does so independent of meiotic checkpoint activation. Rather, we find unrepaired DNA breaks formed during recombination suppress NHK-1 activity (inferred from the phosphorylation level of one of its substrates through the meiotic checkpoint. Additionally DNA breaks induced by X-rays in cultured cells also suppress NHK-1 kinase activity. Unrepaired DNA breaks in oocytes also delay other NHK-1 dependent nuclear events, such as synaptonemal complex disassembly and condensin loading onto chromosomes. Therefore we propose that NHK-1 is a crucial regulator of meiosis and that the meiotic checkpoint suppresses NHK-1 activity to prevent oocyte nuclear reorganisation until DNA breaks are repaired.

  10. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Falank, Carolyne [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The role of homologous recombination repair in DU-induced toxicity was examined. • Loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. • XRCC3 protects cell from DU-induced chromosome breaks and fusions. • XRCC3 plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation of the X chromosome. - Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  11. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C; Pinas, Johan E; Lindhout, Beatrice I; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2013-12-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU construct led to a 200- to 300-fold increase in the frequency of somatic intrachromosomal homologous recombination (iHR). Because the expression of each ZF-ATF leads to a large number of transcriptional changes, we designed a strategy employing a collection of structurally similar ZF-ATFs to filter out the transcriptional changes relevant to the phenotype by deep sequencing. In that manner, 30 transcripts were found to be consistently induced in plants with enhanced homologous recombination (HR). For 25 of the cognate genes, their effect on the HR process was assessed using cDNA/gDNA expression constructs. For three genes, ectopic expression indeed led to enhanced iHR frequencies, albeit much lower than the frequency observed when a HR-inducing ZF-ATF was present. Altogether, our data demonstrate that despite the large number of transcriptional changes brought about by individual ZF-ATFs, causal changes can be identified. In our case, the picture emerged that a natural regulatory switch for iHR does not exist but that ZF-ATFs-like VP16-HRU act as an ectopic master switch, orchestrating the timely expression of a set of plant genes that each by themselves only have modest effects, but when acting together support an extremely high iHR frequency. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair with Pentoxifylline targets G2 cells generated by radiotherapy and induces major enhancements of the toxicity of cisplatin and melphalan given after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    The presentation reviews the modus operandi of the dose modifying drug Pentoxifylline and the dose enhancement factors which can be achieved in different cell types. Preclinical and clinical data show that Pentoxifylline improves the oxygenation of hypoxic tumours and enhances tumour control by irradiation. In vitro experiments demonstrate that Pentoxifylline also operates when oxygen is not limiting and produces dose modifying factors in the region of 1.2 – 2.0. This oxygen independent effect is poorly understood. In p53 mutant cells irradiation induces a G2 block which is abrogated by Pentoxifylline. The enhancement of cell kill observed when Pentoxifylline and irradiation are given together could arise from rapid entry of damaged tumour cells into mitosis and propagation of DNA lesions as the result of curtailment of repair time. Recovery ratios and repair experiments using CFGE after high dose irradiation demonstrate that Pentoxifylline inhibits repair directly and that curtailment of repair time is not the explanation. Use of the repair defective xrs1 and the parental repair competent CHO-K1 cell line shows that Pentoxifylline inhibits homologous recombination repair which operates predominantly in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. When irradiated cells residing in G2 phase are exposed to very low doses of cisplatin at a toxic dose of 5 %. (TC: 0.05) massive toxicity enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed in melanoma, squamous carcinoma and prostate tumour cell lines. Enhancements of radiotoxicity seen when Pentoxifylline and radiation are applied together are small and do not exceed a factor of 2.0. The capacity of Pentoxifyline to inhibit homologous recombination repair has not as yet been clinically utilized. A suitable application could be in the treatment of cervical carcinoma where irradiation and cisplatin are standard modality. In vitro data also strongly suggest that regimes where irradiation is used in combination with alkylating drugs may

  13. Production of R,R-2,3-butanediol of ultra-high optical purity from Paenibacillus polymyxa ZJ-9 using homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Cao, Can; Jiang, Ruifan; Xu, Hong; Xue, Feng; Huang, Weiwei; Ni, Hao; Gao, Jian

    2018-04-11

    The present study describes the use of metabolic engineering to achieve the production of R,R-2,3-butanediol (R,R-2,3-BD) of ultra-high optical purity (>99.99%). To this end, the diacetyl reductase (DAR) gene (dud A) of Paenibacillus polymyxa ZJ-9 was knocked out via homologous recombination between the genome and the previously constructed targeting vector pRN5101-L'C in a process based on homologous single-crossover. PCR verification confirmed the successful isolation of the dud A gene disruption mutant P. polymyxa ZJ-9-△dud A. Moreover, fermentation results indicated that the optical purity of R,R-2,3-BD increased from about 98% to over 99.99%, with a titer of 21.62 g/L in Erlenmeyer flasks. The latter was further increased to 25.88 g/L by fed-batch fermentation in a 5-L bioreactor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A detailed physical map of the 6p reading disability locus, including new markers and confirmation of recombination suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung; Won, Tae-Woong; Kaplan, Deborah E; Londin, Eric R; Kuzmic, Petr; Gelernter, Joel; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2002-10-01

    Loci for several complex disorders have been genetically linked to markers located telomeric of the HLA class I region of the major histocompatibility complex on 6p21.3-22. However, this same region has been characterized by a large interval of recombination suppression with the potential to greatly complicate precise localization of these risk loci. Furthermore, a paucity of markers and physical mapping data has confounded precise localization of the boundaries of linkage and recombination suppression. In order to create a more detailed marker map of this region and define these boundaries we generated a minimal tiling pathway of BACs, PACs, and cosmids and a multiplexed panel of 29 short tandem repeat markers spanning 10 Mb. In addition to providing precise marker order and distances, the pathway and marker panel frame an inversion of recombination frequency that has distorted the resolution of linkage studies for 6p loci such as reading disability and others, and that should be accounted for in the design of future studies.

  15. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  16. Recombinant Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein suppresses toll-like receptor stimulation in response to multiple bacterial ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Benítez, Marcos J; Ruiz-Jiménez, Caleb; Aguayo, Vasti; Espino, Ana M

    2017-07-14

    Recently, we reported that a native Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein (FABP) termed Fh12 is a powerful anti-inflammatory protein capable of suppressing the LPS-induced expression of inflammatory markers in vivo and in vitro. Because the purification of a protein in native form is, in many situations not cost-beneficial and unsuitable for industrial grade scale-up, this study accomplished the task of optimizing the expression and purification of a recombinant form of FABP (Fh15). Additionally, we ascertained whether this molecule could exhibit a similar suppressive effect on TLR-stimulation and inflammatory cytokine expression from macrophages than those previously demonstrated for the native molecule. Results demonstrated that Fh15 suppresses the expression of IL-1β and TNFα in murine macrophages and THP1 Blue CD14 cells. Additionally, Fh15 suppress the LPS-induced TLR4 stimulation. This effect was not impaired by a thermal denaturing process or blocked by the presence of anti-Fh12 antibodies. Fh15 also suppressed the stimulation of various TLRs in response to whole bacteria extracts, suggesting that Fh15 could have a broad spectrum of action. These results support the possibility of using Fh15 as an excellent alternative for an anti-inflammatory drug in preclinical studies in the near future.

  17. Immunization of Mastomys coucha with Brugia malayi recombinant trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase results in significant protection against homologous challenge infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheela Kushwaha

    Full Text Available Development of a vaccine to prevent or reduce parasite development in lymphatic filariasis would be a complementary approach to existing chemotherapeutic tools. Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase of Brugia malayi (Bm-TPP represents an attractive vaccine target due to its absence in mammals, prevalence in the major life stages of the parasite and immunoreactivity with human bancroftian antibodies, especially from endemic normal subjects. We have recently reported on the cloning, expression, purification and biochemical characterization of this vital enzyme of B. malayi. In the present study, immunoprophylactic evaluation of Bm-TPP was carried out against B. malayi larval challenge in a susceptible host Mastomys coucha and the protective ability of the recombinant protein was evaluated by observing the adverse effects on microfilarial density and adult worm establishment. Immunization caused 78.4% decrease in microfilaremia and 71.04% reduction in the adult worm establishment along with sterilization of 70.06% of the recovered live females. The recombinant protein elicited a mixed Th1/Th2 type of protective immune response as evidenced by the generation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and an increased production of antibody isotypes IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgA. Thus immunization with Bm-TPP conferred considerable protection against B. malayi establishment by engendering a long-lasting effective immune response and therefore emerges as a potential vaccine candidate against lymphatic filariasis (LF.

  18. Immunization of dogs with recombinant GnRH-1 suppresses the development of reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xijie; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Fubao; Zhang, Yunhai; Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Yunsheng; Zhou, Jie; Fang, Fugui

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of active immunization using recombinant GnRH-I protein on reproductive function in dogs. Six male and six female dogs were randomly assigned to either a control group or an immunization group (n = 3 males or 3 females/group). Dogs (aged 16 weeks) were immunized against GnRH-I with a maltose-binding protein-gonadotropin-releasing hormone I hexamer generated by recombinant DNA technology. Blood samples were taken at 4-week intervals after immunization. The serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol and anti-GnRH-I antibodies were determined by RIA and ELISA, respectively. The results showed that active immunization with recombinant GnRH-I increased the serum levels of anti-GnRH antibodies (P dogs and a significant reduction (P dogs. Microscopically, spermatogonia were visible, but no spermatids and spermatozoa were detected in the seminiferous tubules. Neither early antral nor antral follicles were found in the immunized group. These results demonstrate that recombinant GnRH-I is an effective immunogen in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synergistic recombination suppression by an inorganic layer and organic dye molecules in highly photostable quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Heping; Li, Jianbao; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Shanshan; Wang, Wenli; Oron, Dan; Lin, Hong

    2014-04-07

    An inorganic layer and dye molecules have synergistically suppressed the recombination in a quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC), by the design of a structure featured TiO2-CdS-ZnS-N3 (N3: RuL2(NCS)2 (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)) hybrid photoanode. When fabricated into solar cells, a cobalt complex-based electrolyte rather than an iodine-based one was employed to obtain an impressive photostability for the devices. Raman and Photoluminescence (PL) measurements revealed that not only the CdS QDs were passivated by both the inorganic layer of ZnS and dye molecule of N3, but also N3 served as an efficient hole scavenger for the CdS QDs due to a type-II energetic alignment between the two sensitizers. This role of N3 as an intermediary in hole extraction from CdS QDs to the electrolyte was further proven by the significant photovoltaic performance improvement of the CdS sensitized solar cell after ZnS deposition and N3 co-sensitization. The overall efficiency of the solar cell incorporated with TiO2-CdS-ZnS-N3 film exceeded the sum of the single CdS QDs and N3 dye sensitized solar cells. This enhancement is ascribed mainly to the synergistic recombination suppression by the inorganic layer ZnS and N3 co-sensitization, leading to inhibited recombination and increased electron lifetime, as illustrated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis.

  20. Rapid one-step construction of a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) infectious clone system by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Aidan M; Leung, Anders; Cook, Bradley W M; Court, Deborah A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Theriault, Steven S

    2016-10-01

    Viral Infectious clone systems serve as robust platforms to study viral gene or replicative function by reverse genetics, formulate vaccines and adapt a wild type-virus to an animal host. Since the development of the first viral infectious clone system for the poliovirus, novel strategies of viral genome construction have allowed for the assembly of viral genomes across the identified viral families. However, the molecular profiles of some viruses make their genome more difficult to construct than others. Two factors that affect the difficulty of infectious clone construction are genome length and genome complexity. This work examines the available strategies for overcoming the obstacles of assembling the long and complex RNA genomes of coronaviruses and reports one-step construction of an infectious clone system for the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) by homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae. Future use of this methodology will shorten the time between emergence of a novel viral pathogen and construction of an infectious clone system. Completion of a viral infectious clone system facilitates further study of a virus's biology, improvement of diagnostic tests, vaccine production and the screening of antiviral compounds. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. NuMA promotes homologous recombination repair by regulating the accumulation of the ISWI ATPase SNF2h at DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Liu, Jing; Salles, Daniela; Jayaraman, Swaathi; Dorfman, George; Gray, Matthew; Abad, Patricia; Moghe, Prabhas V; Irudayaraj, Joseph M; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2014-06-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors play an active role in the DNA damage response by shaping chromatin to facilitate the repair process. The spatiotemporal regulation of these factors is key to their function, yet poorly understood. We report that the structural nuclear protein NuMA accumulates at sites of DNA damage in a poly[ADP-ribose]ylation-dependent manner and functionally interacts with the ISWI ATPase SNF2h/SMARCA5, a chromatin remodeler that facilitates DNA repair. NuMA coimmunoprecipitates with SNF2h, regulates its diffusion in the nucleoplasm and controls its accumulation at DNA breaks. Consistent with NuMA enabling SNF2h function, cells with silenced NuMA exhibit reduced chromatin decompaction after DNA cleavage, lesser focal recruitment of homologous recombination repair factors, impaired DNA double-strand break repair in chromosomal (but not in episomal) contexts and increased sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. These findings reveal a structural basis for the orchestration of chromatin remodeling whereby a scaffold protein promotes genome maintenance by directing a remodeler to DNA breaks. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Gene targeting by TALEN-induced homologous recombination in goats directs production of β-lactoglobulin-free, high-human lactoferrin milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Liu, Jun; Ge, Hengtao; Li, Qian; Huang, Hui; Hu, Linyong; Zhu, Hongmei; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2015-05-21

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major goat's milk allergen that is absent in human milk. Engineered endonucleases, including transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and zinc-finger nucleases, enable targeted genetic modification in livestock. In this study, TALEN-mediated gene knockout followed by gene knock-in were used to generate BLG knockout goats as mammary gland bioreactors for large-scale production of human lactoferrin (hLF). We introduced precise genetic modifications in the goat genome at frequencies of approximately 13.6% and 6.09% for the first and second sequential targeting, respectively, by using targeting vectors that underwent TALEN-induced homologous recombination (HR). Analysis of milk from the cloned goats revealed large-scale hLF expression or/and decreased BLG levels in milk from heterozygous goats as well as the absence of BLG in milk from homozygous goats. Furthermore, the TALEN-mediated targeting events in somatic cells can be transmitted through the germline after SCNT. Our result suggests that gene targeting via TALEN-induced HR may expedite the production of genetically engineered livestock for agriculture and biomedicine.

  3. Berberine induces oxidative DNA damage and impairs homologous recombination repair in ovarian cancer cells to confer increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong; Xu, Guangwei; Zhang, Caibo; Li, Boxuan; Qin, Junchao; Hao, Xiaohe; Liu, Qiao; Zhang, Xiyu; Liu, Jinsong; Wei, Jianjun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Zhaojian; Shao, Changshun

    2017-10-05

    Many cancer drugs exert their therapeutic effect by inducing oxidative stress in the cancer cells. Oxidative stress compromises cell survival by inflicting lesions in macromolecules like DNA. Cancer cells rely on enhanced antioxidant metabolism and increased DNA repair function to survive oxidative assault. PARP1, a protein that senses DNA-strand breaks and orchestrates their repair, has an important role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Berberine, an alkaloid compound present in many herbal plants, is capable of inducing oxidative DNA damage and downregulating homologous recombination repair (HRR) in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that berberine and PARP inhibitor niraparib have a synthetic lethal effect on ovarian cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage was greatly induced by berberine in ovarian cancer cells. In addition, the level of RAD51 and the capacity of HRR were also reduced by berberine. Correspondingly, PARP became hyperactivated in response to berberine treatment. Cancer cells treated with berberine and niraparib in combination exhibited greatly increased apoptosis and remarkably reduced tumor growth in vivo. Together, the results indicate that by inducing oxidative DNA damage and downregulating HRR in cancer cells berberine is able to further sensitize cancer cells to PARP inhibition. Our findings demonstrate a potential therapeutic value of combined application of berberine and PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer treatment.

  4. Suppression of Auger recombination in long-wavelength quantum well W-structure lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Findlay, P. C.; Wells, J. P. R.; Bradley, I. V.; Crowder, J. G.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Murdin, B. N.; Yang, M. J.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Using picosecond pulses from a free-electron laser, we have carried out a pump-probe determination of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) and Auger free-carrier recombination lifetimes in two long-wave (6-7 mum) W-structure laser with InAs/Ga1-xInxSb/InAs/AlSb active regions. The SRH coefficient is nearly

  5. The HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 radiosensitizes by abrogation of homologous recombination resulting in mitotic entry with unresolved DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Zaidi

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 is a molecular chaperone responsible for the conformational maintenance of a number of client proteins that play key roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair and apoptosis following radiation. HSP90 inhibitors exhibit antitumor activity by modulating the stabilisation and activation of HSP90 client proteins. We sought to evaluate NVP-AUY922, the most potent HSP90 inhibitor yet reported, in preclinical radiosensitization studies.NVP-AUY922 potently radiosensitized cells in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations with a concurrent depletion of radioresistance-linked client proteins. Radiosensitization by NVP-AUY922 was verified for the first time in vivo in a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model in athymic mice, as measured by delayed tumor growth and increased surrogate end-point survival (p = <0.0001. NVP-AUY922 was shown to ubiquitously inhibit resolution of dsDNA damage repair correlating to delayed Rad51 foci formation in all cell lines tested. Additionally, NVP-AUY922 induced a stalled mitotic phenotype, in a cell line-dependent manner, in HeLa and HN5 cell lines irrespective of radiation exposure. Cell cycle analysis indicated that NVP-AUY922 induced aberrant mitotic entry in all cell lines tested in the presence of radiation-induced DNA damage due to ubiquitous CHK1 depletion, but resultant downstream cell cycle effects were cell line dependent.These results identify NVP-AUY922 as the most potent HSP90-mediated radiosensitizer yet reported in vitro, and for the first time validate it in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Mechanistic analysis at clinically achievable concentrations demonstrated that radiosensitization is mediated by the combinatorial inhibition of cell growth and survival pathways, ubiquitous delay in Rad51-mediated homologous recombination and CHK1-mediated G(2/M arrest, but that the contribution of cell cycle perturbation to radiosensitization may be cell line

  6. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gladyshev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP. Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes

  7. Recombinant VP1, an Akt inhibitor, suppresses progression of hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing apoptosis and modulation of CCL2 production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-An Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The application of viral elements in tumor therapy is one facet of cancer research. Recombinant capsid protein VP1 (rVP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Here, we aim to further investigate its apoptotic mechanism and possible anti-metastatic effect in murine models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, one of the most common human cancers worldwide. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with rVP1 inhibited cell proliferation in two murine HCC cell lines, BNL and Hepa1-6, with IC₅₀ values in the range of 0.1-0.2 µM. rVP1 also induced apoptosis in these cells, which was mediated by Akt deactivation and dissociation of Ku70-Bax, and resulted in conformational changes and mitochondrial translocation of Bax, leading to the activation of caspases-9, -3 and -7. Treatment with 0.025 µM rVP1, which did not affect the viability of normal hepatocytes, suppressed cell migration and invasion via attenuating CCL2 production. The production of CCL2 was modulated by Akt-dependent NF-κB activation that was decreased after rVP1 treatment. The in vivo antitumor effects of rVP1 were assessed in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of HCC in immune-competent BALB/c mice. Intratumoral delivery of rVP1 inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth as a result of increased apoptosis. Intravenous administration of rVP1 in an orthotopic HCC model suppressed tumor growth, inhibited intra-hepatic metastasis, and prolonged survival. Furthermore, a decrease in the serum level of CCL2 was observed in rVP1-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented herein suggest that, via inhibiting Akt phosphorylation, rVP1 suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of murine HCC cells by inducing apoptosis and attenuating CCL2 production both in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant protein VP1 thus has the potential to be developed as a new therapeutic agent for HCC.

  8. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 3 (PHLDA3 deficiency improves islets engraftment through the suppression of hypoxic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoaki Sakata

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation is a useful cell replacement therapy that can restore the glycometabolic function of severe diabetic patients. It is known that many transplanted islets failed to engraft, and thus, new approaches for overcoming graft loss that may improve the outcome of future clinical islet transplantations are necessary. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 3 (PHLDA3 is a known suppressor of neuroendocrine tumorigenicity, yet deficiency of this gene increases islet proliferation, prevents islet apoptosis, and improves their insulin-releasing function without causing tumors. In this study, we examined the potential use of PHLDA3-deficient islets in transplantation. We observed that: 1 transplanting PHLDA3-deficient islets into diabetic mice significantly improved their glycometabolic condition, 2 the improved engraftment of PHLDA3-deficient islets resulted from increased cell survival during early transplantation, and 3 Akt activity was elevated in PHLDA3-deficient islets, especially under hypoxic conditions. Thus, we determined that PHLDA3-deficient islets are more resistant against stresses induced by islet isolation and transplantation. We conclude that use of islets with suppressed PHLDA3 expression could be a novel and promising treatment for improving engraftment and consequent glycemic control in islet transplantation.

  9. Genetic evidence for single-strand lesions initiating Nbs1-dependent homologous recombination in diversification of Ig v in chicken B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nakahara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, it remains unclear whether single-strand lesions also initiate HR in genomic DNA. Chicken B lymphocytes diversify their Immunoglobulin (Ig V genes through HR (Ig gene conversion and non-templated hypermutation. Both types of Ig V diversification are initiated by AID-dependent abasic-site formation. Abasic sites stall replication, resulting in the formation of single-stranded gaps. These gaps can be filled by error-prone DNA polymerases, resulting in hypermutation. However, it is unclear whether these single-strand gaps can also initiate Ig gene conversion without being first converted to DSBs. The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN complex, which produces 3' single-strand overhangs, promotes the initiation of DSB-induced HR in yeast. We show that a DT40 line expressing only a truncated form of Nbs1 (Nbs1(p70 exhibits defective HR-dependent DSB repair, and a significant reduction in the rate--though not the fidelity--of Ig gene conversion. Interestingly, this defective gene conversion was restored to wild type levels by overproduction of Escherichia coli SbcB, a 3' to 5' single-strand-specific exonuclease, without affecting DSB repair. Conversely, overexpression of chicken Exo1 increased the efficiency of DSB-induced gene-targeting more than 10-fold, with no effect on Ig gene conversion. These results suggest that Ig gene conversion may be initiated by single-strand gaps rather than by DSBs, and, like SbcB, the MRN complex in DT40 may convert AID-induced lesions into single-strand gaps suitable for triggering HR. In summary, Ig gene conversion and hypermutation may share a common substrate-single-stranded gaps. Genetic analysis of the two types of Ig V diversification in DT40 provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the filling of gaps that arise as a consequence of replication blocks at abasic sites, by HR and error

  10. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urushihara, Yusuke [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kobayashi, Junya [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshihisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi, E-mail: mitani@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan)

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after {gamma}-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci after {gamma}-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after {gamma}-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the

  11. Reassessment of the role of Mut S homolog 5 in Ig class switch recombination shows lack of involvement in cis- and trans-switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Schrader, Carol E.; Leus, Niek G. J.; Ucher, Anna; Linehan, Erin K.; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried; Stavnezer, Janet

    2008-01-01

    When B cells are activated after immunization or infection, they exchange the gene encoding the Ig H chain C region by class switch recombination (CSR). CSR generally occurs by an intrachromosomal deletional recombination within switch (S) region sequences. However, approximately 10% of CSR events

  12. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Carl O; Hauser, Lorenz; Pritchard, Victoria L; Garza, John C; Naish, Kerry A

    2013-08-22

    Introgressive hybridization is an important evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of novel genome structures and thus potentially new genetic variation for selection to act upon. On the other hand, hybridization with introduced species can threaten native species, such as cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) following the introduction of rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Neither the evolutionary consequences nor conservation implications of rainbow trout introgression in cutthroat trout is well understood. Therefore, we generated a genetic linkage map for rainbow-Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri) hybrids to evaluate genome processes that may help explain how introgression affects hybrid genome evolution. The hybrid map closely aligned with the rainbow trout map (a cutthroat trout map does not exist), sharing all but one linkage group. This linkage group (RYHyb20) represented a fusion between an acrocentric (Omy28) and a metacentric chromosome (Omy20) in rainbow trout. Additional mapping in Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicated the two rainbow trout homologues were fused in the Yellowstone genome. Variation in the number of hybrid linkage groups (28 or 29) likely depended on a Robertsonian rearrangement polymorphism within the rainbow trout stock. Comparison between the female-merged F₁ map and a female consensus rainbow trout map revealed that introgression suppressed recombination across large genomic regions in 5 hybrid linkage groups. Two of these linkage groups (RYHyb20 and RYHyb25_29) contained confirmed chromosome rearrangements between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicating that rearrangements may suppress recombination. The frequency of allelic and genotypic segregation distortion varied among parents and families, suggesting few incompatibilities exist between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes. Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result supports several previous

  13. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Introgressive hybridization is an important evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of novel genome structures and thus potentially new genetic variation for selection to act upon. On the other hand, hybridization with introduced species can threaten native species, such as cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) following the introduction of rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Neither the evolutionary consequences nor conservation implications of rainbow trout introgression in cutthroat trout is well understood. Therefore, we generated a genetic linkage map for rainbow-Yellowstone cutthroat trout (O. clarkii bouvieri) hybrids to evaluate genome processes that may help explain how introgression affects hybrid genome evolution. Results The hybrid map closely aligned with the rainbow trout map (a cutthroat trout map does not exist), sharing all but one linkage group. This linkage group (RYHyb20) represented a fusion between an acrocentric (Omy28) and a metacentric chromosome (Omy20) in rainbow trout. Additional mapping in Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicated the two rainbow trout homologues were fused in the Yellowstone genome. Variation in the number of hybrid linkage groups (28 or 29) likely depended on a Robertsonian rearrangement polymorphism within the rainbow trout stock. Comparison between the female-merged F1 map and a female consensus rainbow trout map revealed that introgression suppressed recombination across large genomic regions in 5 hybrid linkage groups. Two of these linkage groups (RYHyb20 and RYHyb25_29) contained confirmed chromosome rearrangements between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicating that rearrangements may suppress recombination. The frequency of allelic and genotypic segregation distortion varied among parents and families, suggesting few incompatibilities exist between rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes. Conclusions Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result

  14. Homologous chromosome pairing and recombination during meiosis in wild type and synaptic mutants of tomato = Homologe chomosoomparing en recombinatie tijdens de meiose van wild type en synaptische mutanten van de tomaat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, F.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a cytogenetic investigation of meiotic prophase I stages in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The aim of this study was to analyse the relationships between chromosome pairing, and formation of recombination nudules and chiasmata. Tomato was chosen as

  15. DNA apoptosis and stability in B-cell chronic lymphoid leukaemia: implication of the DNA double-strand breaks repair system by non homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deriano, L.

    2005-01-01

    After an introduction presenting the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lymphoid leukaemia, its molecular and genetic characteristics, and its cellular origin and clonal evolution, this research thesis describes the apoptosis (definition and characteristics, cancer and chemotherapy, apoptotic ways induced by gamma irradiation), the genotoxic stresses, the different repair mechanisms for different damages, and the DNA repair processes. It reports how human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B cells can escape DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, and presents non-homologous end-joining DNA repair as a potent mutagenic process in human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B cells

  16. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  17. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  18. CRISPR Technology Reveals RAD(51)-ical Mechanisms of Repair in Roundworms: An Educational Primer for Use with "Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Carolyn A; Andrews, Nicolas P; Sloat, Solomon A; Checchi, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    The mechanisms cells use to maintain genetic fidelity via DNA repair and the accuracy of these processes have garnered interest from scientists engaged in basic research to clinicians seeking improved treatment for cancer patients. Despite the continued advances, many details of DNA repair are still incompletely understood. In addition, the inherent complexity of DNA repair processes, even at the most fundamental level, makes it a challenging topic. This primer is meant to assist both educators and students in using a recent paper, "Promotion of homologous recombination by SWS-1 in complex with RAD-51 paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans," to understand mechanisms of DNA repair. The goals of this primer are to highlight and clarify several key techniques utilized, with special emphasis on the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats technique and the ways in which it has revolutionized genetics research, as well as to provide questions for deeper in-class discussion. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. AtMND1 is required for homologous pairing during meiosis in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu Mohan PA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairing of homologous chromosomes at meiosis is an important requirement for recombination and balanced chromosome segregation among the products of meiotic division. Recombination is initiated by double strand breaks (DSBs made by Spo11 followed by interaction of DSB sites with a homologous chromosome. This interaction requires the strand exchange proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 that bind to single stranded regions created by resection of ends at the site of DSBs and promote interactions with uncut DNA on the homologous partner. Recombination is also considered to be dependent on factors that stabilize interactions between homologous chromosomes. In budding yeast Hop2 and Mnd1 act as a complex to promote homologous pairing and recombination in conjunction with Rad51 and Dmc1. Results We have analyzed the function of the Arabidopsis orthologue of the budding yeast MND1 gene (AtMND1. Loss of AtMND1 did not affect normal vegetative development but caused fragmentation and missegregation of chromosomes in male and female meiosis, formation of inviable gametes, and sterility. Analysis of the Atmnd1 Atspo11-1 double mutant indicated that chromosome fragmentation in Atmnd1 was suppressed by loss of Atspo11-1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis showed that homologous pairing failed to occur and homologues remained apart throughout meiosis. AtMND1 showed strong expression in meiocytes as revealed by RNA in situs. Conclusion We conclude that AtMND1 is required for homologous pairing and is likely to play a role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks during meiosis in Arabidopsis, thus showing conservation of function with that of MND1 during meiosis in yeast.

  20. AtMND1 is required for homologous pairing during meiosis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoli, Aneesh P; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Sebastian, Jose; Nishal, Bindu; Reddy, Thamalampudi V; Marimuthu, Mohan PA; Subbiah, Veeraputhiran; Vijaybhaskar, Virupapuram; Siddiqi, Imran

    2006-01-01

    Background Pairing of homologous chromosomes at meiosis is an important requirement for recombination and balanced chromosome segregation among the products of meiotic division. Recombination is initiated by double strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11 followed by interaction of DSB sites with a homologous chromosome. This interaction requires the strand exchange proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 that bind to single stranded regions created by resection of ends at the site of DSBs and promote interactions with uncut DNA on the homologous partner. Recombination is also considered to be dependent on factors that stabilize interactions between homologous chromosomes. In budding yeast Hop2 and Mnd1 act as a complex to promote homologous pairing and recombination in conjunction with Rad51 and Dmc1. Results We have analyzed the function of the Arabidopsis orthologue of the budding yeast MND1 gene (AtMND1). Loss of AtMND1 did not affect normal vegetative development but caused fragmentation and missegregation of chromosomes in male and female meiosis, formation of inviable gametes, and sterility. Analysis of the Atmnd1 Atspo11-1 double mutant indicated that chromosome fragmentation in Atmnd1 was suppressed by loss of Atspo11-1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed that homologous pairing failed to occur and homologues remained apart throughout meiosis. AtMND1 showed strong expression in meiocytes as revealed by RNA in situs. Conclusion We conclude that AtMND1 is required for homologous pairing and is likely to play a role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks during meiosis in Arabidopsis, thus showing conservation of function with that of MND1 during meiosis in yeast. PMID:16872528

  1. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    live in harsh conditions, such as high temperature, high pressure, extreme pH, or strong radiation, which introduce more DNA damages in genomes than normal environments. But the stability of archaeal genomes is comparable with that in other two domains of life, suggesting that archaea could harbor more...... in eukaryotes. As a third domain of life, archaea is considered as a chimaera between bacteria and eukaryotes. Its metabolic pathways and cell structures resemble those of bacteria, whereas the information processing is of the eukaryal type or more similar to their eukaryal counterparts. A number of archaea...... efficient DNA repair systems. Study on archaeal DNA repair will provide important clues for that on eukaryotes. The archaeal homologs of Mre11/SbcD-Rad50/SbcC, but not RecBCD or RecFOR, have been identified, indicating the existence of a Mre11-Rad50-mediated HRR pathway in archaea. Eukaryotic Mre11-Rad50...

  2. A Sabin 2-related poliovirus recombinant contains a homologous sequence of human enterovirus species C in the viral polymerase coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Shuangli; Chen, Li; Yan, Dongmei; Wang, Dongyan; Tang, Ruiyan; Zhu, Hui; Hou, Xiaohui; An, Hongqiu; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Wenbo

    2010-02-01

    A type 2 vaccine-related poliovirus (strain CHN3024), differing from the Sabin 2 strain by 0.44% in the VP1 coding region was isolated from a patient with vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis. Sequences downstream of nucleotide position 6735 (3D(pol) coding region) were derived from an unidentified sequence; no close match for a potential parent was found, but it could be classified into a non-polio human enteroviruses species C (HEV-C) phylogeny. The virus differed antigenically from the parental Sabin strain, having an amino acid substitution in the neutralizing antigenic site 1. The similarity between CHN3024 and Sabin 2 sequences suggests that the recombination was recent; this is supported by the estimation that the initiating OPV dose was given only 36-75 days before sampling. The patient's clinical manifestations, intratypic differentiation examination, and whole-genome sequencing showed that this recombinant exhibited characteristics of neurovirulent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV), which may, thus, pose a potential threat to a polio-free world.

  3. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules...... as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics...

  4. [Polymorphism among RFL-PPR homologs in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) lines with varying ability for the suppression of the cytoplasmic male sterility phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, I N; Alpatieva, N V; Rozhkova, V T; Kuznetsova, E B; Pinaev, A G; Gavrilova, V A

    2014-07-01

    A complex comparative genetic approach was used for the investigation of the structural and functional diversity of genes for the restoration of sunflower pollen fertility. It includes (i) hybridological analysis; (ii) analysis of polymorphism among EST fragments.homologous to the known Rf genes that contain repeated motives of 35 amino acids (RFL-PPR); (iii) the development of molecular markers. Monogenic segregation in three interline cross combinations and the results of molecular marker analysis confirmed the allelic differences of parental lines in the Mendelian locus for CMS PET1 pollen fertility restoration. Introns were found in two RFL-PPR fragments. Two allelic variants of the QHL12D20 fragment were detected among the sixty lines of the sunflower genetic collection. An intron of QHL12D20 fragment was homologous to an intron of the AHBP-1B gene; the product of this gene-has a similarity with the transcription factor of the bZIP-family of Arabidopsis. A relationship between the QHL12D20 polymorphism and the functional state of the Rfl locus was revealed.

  5. Gene editing a constitutively active OsRac1 by homologous recombination-based gene targeting induces immune responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thu Thi; Shimatani, Zenpei; Kawano, Yoji; Terada, Rie; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-12-01

    OsRac1 is a member of the plant small GTPase Rac/Rop family and plays a key role in rice immunity. The constitutively active (CA) G19V mutation of OsRac1 was previously shown to induce reactive oxygen species production, phytoalexin synthesis and defense gene activation, leading to resistance to rice blast infection. To study further the effect of the G19V mutation in disease resistance, we introduced a single base substitution by gene targeting and removed the selectable marker using Cre-loxP site-specific recombination. The CA-OsRac1 gene generated by gene targeting was termed CA-gOsRac1. The G19V mutation was transferred from a targeting vector to the OsRac1 locus and stably transmitted to the next generation. In the leaf blade of homozygous CA-gOsRac1 plants, mutant transcript levels were much lower than in those of wild-type plants. In contrast, mutant transcripts in roots, leaf sheaths and panicles were more abundant than those in leaf blades. However, upon chitin treatment, the expression of defense-related genes PAL1 and PBZ1 in the cell culture was greater in the mutants compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, induction of hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death was observed in the leaf sheaths of mutant plants infected with a compatible race of rice blast fungus. In the CA-gOsRac1 plants, a number of genes previously shown to be induced by Magnaporthe oryzae and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) infection were induced in the leaf sheath without pathogen infection. These results suggest that gene targeting will provide mutations useful for gene function studies and crop improvement.

  6. A novel recombinant peptide containing only two T-cell tolerance epitopes of chicken type II collagen that suppresses collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Caixia; Tan, Liuxin; Sun, Yeping; Liang, Fei; Liu, Nan; Xue, Hong; Luo, Yuan; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Yuying; Xi, Yongzhi

    2009-02-01

    Immunotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using oral-dosed native chicken or bovine type II collagen (nCII) to induce specific immune tolerance is an attractive strategy. However, the majority of clinical trials of oral tolerance in human diseases including RA in recent years have been disappointing. Here, we describe a novel recombinant peptide rcCTE1-2 which contains only two tolerogenic epitopes (CTE1 and CTE2) of chicken type II collagen (cCII). These are the critical T-cell determinants for suppression of RA that were first developed and used to compare its suppressive effects with ncCII on the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The rcCTE1-2 was produced using the prokaryotic pET expression system and purified by Ni-NTA His affinity chromatography. Strikingly, our results showed clearly that rcCTE1-2 was as efficacious as ncCII at the dose of 50 microg/kg/d. This dose significantly reduced footpad swelling, arthritic incidence and scores, and deferred the onset of disease. Furthermore, rcCTE1-2 of 50 microg/kg/d could lower the level of anti-nCII antibody in the serum of CIA animals, decrease Th1-cytokine INF-gamma level, and increase Th3-cytokine TGF-beta(1) produced level by spleen cells from CIA mice after in vivo stimulation with ncCII. Importantly, rcCTE1-2 was even more potent than native cCII, which was used in the clinic for RA. Equally importantly, the findings that the major T-cell determinants of cCII that are also recognized by H-2(b) MHC-restricted T cells have not previously been reported. Taken together, these results suggest that we have successfully developed a novel recombinant peptide rcCTE1-2 that can induce a potent tolerogenic response in CIA.

  7. Recombinant adenovirus expressing ICP47 gene suppresses the ability of dendritic cells by restricting specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Kan, Quancheng; Yu, Zujiang; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Pan, Xue; Feng, Ting

    2013-04-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to be one of the most effective vehicles to deliver foreign DNA into dendritic cells (DCs). However, the response of host immune systems against foreign gene products is a major obstacle to successful gene therapy. Infected cell protein 47 (ICP47) inhibits MHC Ⅰ antigen presentation pathway by binding to host transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP), and thereby attenuates of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) responses and evades the host immune clearance. This subject was designed to construct a recombinant adenovirus expressing His-tag-ICP47 fusion protein to investigate further the role of ICP47 in the elimination of transgene expression. Consequently, a recombinant adenovirus expressing the His-tag-ICP47 fusion protein was successfully constructed and it had the abilities of attenuating the stimulatory capacity of DCs by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and cytokine production of perforin compared with those of the r-track group and the control group. Our observations provide the first evidence of the regulation mechanism of ICP47 on DC-based immunotherapy for long-term persistence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In Vivo Modelling of ATP1A3 G316S-Induced Ataxia in C. elegans Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Reveals Dominant Loss of Function Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altar Sorkaç

    Full Text Available The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program admitted a male patient with unclassifiable late-onset ataxia-like symptoms. Exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous de novo mutation converting glycine 316 to serine in ATP1A3, which might cause disease. ATP1A3 encodes the Na+/K+ ATPase pump α3-subunit. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination for genome editing, we modelled this putative disease-causing allele in Caenorhabditis elegans, recreating the patient amino acid change in eat-6, the orthologue of ATP1A3. The impact of the mutation on eat-6 function at the neuromuscular junction was examined using two behavioural assays: rate of pharyngeal pumping and sensitivity to aldicarb, a drug that causes paralysis over time via the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. The patient allele decreased pumping rates and caused hypersensitivity to aldicarb. Animals heterozygous for the allele exhibited similar defects, whereas loss of function mutations in eat-6 were recessive. These results indicate that the mutation is dominant and impairs the neuromuscular function. Thus, we conclude that the de novo G316S mutation in ATP1A3 likely causes or contributes to patient symptoms. More broadly, we conclude that, for conserved genes, it is possible to rapidly and easily model human diseases in C. elegans using CRIPSR/Cas9 genome editing.

  9. Recombination Suppression in PbS Quantum Dot Heterojunction Solar Cells by Energy-Level Alignment in the Quantum Dot Active Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chao; Zhang, Yaohong; Liu, Feng; Nakazawa, Naoki; Huang, Qingxun; Hayase, Shuzi; Ogomi, Yuhei; Toyoda, Taro; Wang, Ruixiang; Shen, Qing

    2017-09-22

    Using spatial energy-level gradient engineering with quantum dots (QDs) of different sizes to increase the generated carrier collection at the junction of a QD heterojunction solar cell (QDHSC) is a hopeful route for improving the energy-conversion efficiency. However, the results of current related research have shown that a variable band-gap structure in a QDHSC will create an appreciable increase, not in the illumination current density, but rather in the fill factor. In addition, there are a lack of studies on the mechanism of the effect of these graded structures on the photovoltaic performance of QDHSCs. This study presents the development of air atmosphere solution-processed TiO 2 /PbS QDs/Au QDHSCs by engineering the energy-level alignment (ELA) of the active layer via the use of a sorted order of differently sized QD layers (four QD sizes). In comparison to the ungraded device (without the ELA), the optimized graded architecture (containing the ELA) solar cells exhibited a great increase (21.4%) in short-circuit current density (J sc ). As a result, a J sc value greater than 30 mA/cm 2 has been realized in planar, thinner absorption layer (∼300 nm) PbS QDHSCs, and the open-circuit voltage (V oc ) and power-conversion efficiency (PCE) were also improved. Through characterization by the light intensity dependences of the J sc and V oc and transient photovoltage decay, we find that (i) the ELA structure, serving as an electron-blocking layer, reduces the interfacial recombination at the PbS/anode interface, and (ii) the ELA structure can drive more carriers toward the desirable collection electrode, and the additional carriers can fill the trap states, reducing the trap-assisted recombination in the PbS QDHSCs. This work has clearly elucidated the mechanism of the recombination suppression in the graded QDHSCs and demonstrated the effects of ELA structure on the improvement of J sc . The charge recombination mechanisms characterized in this work would be

  10. Carbamoylcholine homologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Mikkelsen, Ivan Bisgaard; Frølund, Bente

    2004-01-01

    In a recent study, racemic 3-(N,N-dimethylamino)butyl-N,N-dimethylcarbamate (1) was shown to be a potent agonist at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with a high selectivity for nicotinic over muscarinic acetylcholine receptors [Mol. Pharmacol. 64 (2003) 865-875]. Here we present......, the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of have been separated, and X-ray crystallography has revealed that (-)-1 possesses (S)-configuration. The compounds have been characterized pharmacologically at recombinant nicotinic receptor subtypes. The structure-activity relationship study has provided valuable insight into the mode...... of interactions of and its analogs with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors....

  11. MicroRNA-26a suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human hepatocellular carcinoma by repressing enhancer of zeste homolog 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Ning Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study reported that microRNA-26a (miR-26a inhibited tumor progression by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and intratumoral macrophage infiltration in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The direct roles of miR-26a on tumor cell invasion remain poorly understood. In this study, we aim to explore the mechanism of miR-26a in modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in HCC. Methods In vitro cell morphology and cell migration were compared between the hepatoma cell lines HCCLM3 and HepG2, which were established in the previous study. Overexpression and down-regulation of miR-26a were induced in these cell lines, and Western blot and immunofluorescence assays were used to detect the expression of EMT markers. Xenograft nude mouse models were used to observe tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Immunohistochemical assays were conducted to study the relationships between miR-26a expression and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 and E-cadherin expression in human HCC samples. Results Down-regulation of miR-26a in HCCLM3 and HepG2 cells resulted in an EMT-like cell morphology and high motility in vitro and increased in tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Through down-regulation of EZH2 expression and up-regulation of E-cadherin expression, miR-26a inhibited the EMT process in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-26a directly interacted with EZH2 messenger RNA (mRNA. Furthermore, the expression of miR-26a was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression and inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in human HCC tissue. Conclusions miR-26a inhibited the EMT process in HCC by down-regulating EZH2 expression.

  12. Recombinant Human Endostatin Suppresses Mouse Osteoclast Formation by Inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPKs Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Non eChen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive joint destruction. As reported previously, recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin is associated with inhibition of joint bone destruction present in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis; however, the effect of rhEndostatin on bone destruction is not known. This study was designed to assess the inhibitory effect and mechanisms of rhEndostatin on formation and function of osteoclasts in vitro, and to gain insight into the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of bone destruction. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from BALB/c mice were stimulated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor to establish osteoclast formation. Osteoclast formation was determined by TRAP staining. Cell viability of BMMs affected by rhEndostatin was determined using a MTT assay. Bone resorption was examined with a bone resorption pits assay. The expression of osteoclast-specific markers was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. The related signaling pathways were examined using a Luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis. Indeed, rhEndostatin showed a significant reduction in the number of osteoclast-like cells and early-stage bone resorption. Moreover, molecular analysis demonstrated that rhEndostatin attenuated RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, rhEndostatin significantly inhibited the activation of RANKL-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Hence, we demonstrated for the first time that preventing the formation and function of osteoclasts is an important anti-bone destruction mechanism of rhEndostatin, which might be useful in the prevention and treatment of bone destruction in RA.

  13. Blockade of recombinant human IL-6 by tocilizumab suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in the C28/I2 immortalized human chondrocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Evan C; Dahoud, Wissam; Mesiano, Sam; Malemud, Charles J

    Two immortalized human juvenile chondrocyte cell lines, T/C28a2 and C28/I2, were employed to determine the extent to which recombinant human (rh) IL-6 or rh-TNF-α increased the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The effect of rhIL-6 on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) was also assessed. Although C28/I2 chondrocytes incubated with rhIL-6 (50 ng/ml) increased MMP-9 production which could not be mimicked by the T/C28a2 chondrocyte line, the effect of rhTNF-α on MMP-9 was more robust than with rhIL-6. The combinations of rhIL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor-α (sIL-6Rα) or rhIL-6 and tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully-humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the interaction between IL-6 and IL-6R significantly reduced MMP-9 production by C28/I2 chondrocytes. However, TCZ had no effect on rhTNF-α-induced MMP-9 production. By contrast, rhIL-6 did not increase the production of NGAL by C28/I2 chondrocytes although the number of NGAL-positive cells was significantly reduced by sIL-6R compared to its control group, but not by the combination of rhIL-6 plus TCZ compared to rhIL-6. In summary, these results showed that rhIL-6 stimulated the production of MMP-9, but not NGAL, in the C28/I2 chondrocyte line. TCZ or sIL-6Rα suppressed rhIL-6-induced MMP-9 production.

  14. Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes encoding products homologous to cysteine cluster proteins or plant lipid transfer proteins are identified in Astragalus sinicus L. by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Min-Xia; Wei, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Da-Song; Zhou, Jun-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen nodule-specific or nodule-enhanced genes have been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of infected and uninfected control roots of Astragalus sinicus. Eleven of them encode small polypeptides showing homology to cysteine cluster proteins (CCPs) that contain a putative signal peptide and conserved cysteine residues. Among these CCP-like genes, AsG257 codes for a homologue of the defensin 2 family and AsD255 contains a scorpion toxin-like domain at the C-terminus. Sequence analysis of a genomic AsD255 fragment which was isolated revealed that one intron separates the first exon encoding the signal peptide from the second exon encoding the cysteine cluster domain of this nodulin. Another two genes, AsE246 and AsIB259, encode two different products similar to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Virtual northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the other genes except AsIB259 and AsC2411 were expressed exclusively in inoculated roots and that their expression was 2-4 d later than that of the leghaemoglobin (Lb) gene during nodule development. Transcription of AsIB259 was also detected in uninfected control roots but with a significant decline in expression and a temporal expression similar to Lb. AsC2411 had a basal expression in control roots identified by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment showed that the putative proteins AsE246 and AsIB259 show lower homology with LTPs from legumes than with those from other plants.

  15. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repai...... Mte1, a novel protein involved in DDR that associates with the helicase Mph1 and Rad52. Moreover, I find that Mte1 associates with dysfunctional single-stranded telomeric DNA, constituting a novel factor in telomere homeostasis, potentially associated with replication-stress relief....

  16. Macrophage Immune Response Suppression by Recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens, the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Hemmati, Mina; Ebadat, Saeedeh; Movahedi, Bahram; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Macrophage immune responses are affected by the secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This study aimed to examine the immune responses of macrophages to Mtb secretory antigens, namely ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10. Methods: THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line) were cultured and differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The cytotoxicity of the recombinant Mtb proteins was assessed using the MTT assay. Two important immune responses of macrophages, namely NO and ROS production, were measured in response to the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigens. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with SPSS, version 16, and considered significant at Pproteins markedly reduced macrophage immune response. The treatment of the THP-1-differentiated cells with ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 reduced NO and ROS production. The treated THP-1-differentiated cells exhibited less inducible NO synthase activity than did the untreated cells. No toxic effect on macrophage viability was observed for the applied proteins at the different concentrations. Conclusion: It seems that the decline in macrophage immune response is due to the suppression of NO and ROS production pathways without any effect on cell viability. PMID:27365551

  17. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  18. Chromosome sites play dual roles to establish homologous synapsisduring meiosis in C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Amy J.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Bhalla, Needhi; Weiser,Pinky; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    required for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomesduring meiosisin C. elegans. We find that these sites play two distinctroles that contribute to proper segregation. Chromosomes lacking PCsusually fail to synapse and also lack a synapsis-independentstabilization activity. The presence of a PC on justone copy of achromosome pair promotes synapsis but does not supportsynapsis-independent pairing stabilization, indicating that thesefunctions are separable. Once initiated, synapsis is highly processive,even between non homologous chromosomes of disparate lengths, elucidatinghow translocations suppress meiotic recombination in C. elegans. Thesefindings suggest a multistep pathway for chromosome synapsis in which PCsimpart selectivity and efficiency through a kinetic proofreadingmechanism. We speculate that concentration of these activities at oneregion per chromosome may have co-evolved with the loss of a pointcentromere to safeguard karyotype stability.

  19. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun

    2015-01-01

    cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism......Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement...... in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ...

  20. Long G2 accumulates recombination intermediates and disturbs chromosome segregation at dysfunction telomere in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Ahmed G.K.; Masuda, Kenta; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Ueno, Masaru, E-mail: scmueno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Research Center for the Mathematics on Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Protection of telomere (Pot1) is a single-stranded telomere binding protein which is essential for chromosome ends protection. Fission yeast Rqh1 is a member of RecQ helicases family which has essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of homologous recombination. Double mutant between fission yeast pot1Δ and rqh1 helicase dead (rqh1-hd) maintains telomere by homologous recombination. In pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant, recombination intermediates accumulate near telomere which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to microtubule inhibitors thiabendazole (TBZ). Deletion of chk1{sup +} or mutation of its kinase domain shortens the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant and suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of that double mutant. In this study, we asked whether the long G2 is the reason for the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. We found that shortening the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant by additional mutations of wee1 and mik1 or gain of function mutation of Cdc2 suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. Our results suggest that long G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant may allow time for the accumulation of recombination intermediates which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to TBZ. - Ηighlights: • We show link between long G2 and accumulation of toxic recombination intermediates. • Accumulation of recombination intermediates at telomere results in TBZ sensitivity. • Activation of DNA damage checkpoint worsens cells' viability in presence of TBZ.

  1. Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes: Navigating Meiosis without a Homologous Partner

    OpenAIRE

    Checchi, Paula M.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have ...

  2. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA : Correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristic, D.; Modesti, M.; Van der Heijden, T.; Van Noort, J.; Dekker, C.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.

    Recombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity of

  3. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    The main topics of this thesis are real topological Hochschild homology and real topological cyclic homology. If a ring or a ring spectrum is equipped with an anti-involution, then it induces additional structure on the topological Hochschild homology spectrum. The group O(2) acts on the spectrum......, where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  4. Building up and breaking down: mechanisms controlling recombination during replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2017-08-01

    The complete and faithful duplication of the genome is an essential prerequisite for proliferating cells to maintain genome integrity. This objective is greatly challenged by DNA damage encountered during replication, which causes fork stalling and in certain cases, fork breakage. DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways mitigate the effects on fork stability induced by replication fork stalling by mediating damage-bypass and replication fork restart. These DDT mechanisms, largely relying on homologous recombination (HR) and specialized polymerases, can however contribute to genome rearrangements and mutagenesis. There is a profound connection between replication and recombination: recombination proteins protect replication forks from nuclease-mediated degradation of the nascent DNA strands and facilitate replication completion in cells challenged by DNA damage. Moreover, in case of fork collapse and formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), the recombination factors present or recruited to the fork facilitate HR-mediated DSB repair, which is primarily error-free. Disruption of HR is inexorably linked to genome instability, but the premature activation of HR during replication often leads to genome rearrangements. Faithful replication necessitates the downregulation of HR and disruption of active RAD51 filaments at replication forks, but upon persistent fork stalling, building up of HR is critical for the reorganization of the replication fork and for filling-in of the gaps associated with discontinuous replication induced by DNA lesions. Here we summarize and reflect on our understanding of the mechanisms that either suppress recombination or locally enhance it during replication, and the principles that underlie this regulation.

  5. Huge suppression of charge recombination in P3HT-ZnO organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells by locating dyes at the ZnO/P3HT interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qing; Ogomi, Yuhei; Das, Sandeep K; Pandey, Shyam S; Yoshino, Kenji; Katayama, Kenji; Momose, Hisayo; Toyoda, Taro; Hayase, Shuzi

    2013-09-14

    The charge separation and charge recombination dynamics in P3HT-ZnO and P3HT-dye-ZnO bulk heterojunction organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells (OIHSCs) prepared by a one-pot method were studied using a transient absorption (TA) method, both for optical absorption of P3HT in the visible region and for optical absorption of SQ36 in the NIR region. In the case of P3HT-ZnO, the charge separation was very fast, occurring within 1 ps. On the other hand, high charge recombination between electrons in the surface states and/or the conduction band of ZnO and holes in P3HT was observed. In the case of P3HT-dye-ZnO, we found that the charge recombination could be greatly suppressed by locating the dye at the P3HT/ZnO interfaces while maintaining a fast charge separation rate (a few ps to 10 ps). Our findings provide one methodology for the design of OIHSCs for improving their conversion efficiency, which is to position the dye at the appropriate BHJ interfaces.

  6. The recombinant fusion protein of cholera toxin B and neutrophil-activating protein expressed on Bacillus subtilis spore surface suppresses allergic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Huang, Yanmei; Yao, Shuwen; Liang, Bingshao; Long, Yan; Xie, Yongqiang; Mai, Jialiang; Gong, Sitang; Zhou, Zhenwen

    2017-07-01

    The neutrophil-activating protein of Helicobacter pylori (HP-NAP) has been identified as a modulator with anti-Th2 inflammation activity, and cholera toxin B (CTB) is a mucosal adjuvant that can also induce antigen tolerance. In this study, we constructed a CTB-NAP fusion protein on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore and evaluate the efficiency of oral administration of the recombinant CTB-NAP spores in preventing asthma in mice. Oral administration of recombinant CTB or CTB-NAP spores significantly decreased serum ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE (p recombinant spores. Oral administration of recombinant CTB or CTB-NAP spores induced IL-10 and IFN-γ expression and reduced IL-4 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, CTB and CTB-NAP spores reduced the eosinophils in BALF and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lungs. Furthermore, CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs in splenocytes were significantly increased in mice treated with recombinant CTB or CTB-NAP spores. The number of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs caused by CTB-NAP was higher than that by CTB alone. Our study indicated that B. subtilis spores with surface expression of subunit CTB or CTB-NAP could inhibit OVA-induced allergic inflammation in mice. The attenuated inflammation was attributed to the induction of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs and IgA. Moreover, the fusion protein CTB-NAP demonstrated a better efficiency than CTB alone in inhibiting the inflammation.

  7. Site directed recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  8. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  9. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  10. Immunity duration of a recombinant adenovirus type-5 vector-based Ebola vaccine and a homologous prime-boost immunisation in healthy adults in China: final report of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Xin; Hou, Li-Hua; Meng, Fan-Yue; Wu, Shi-Po; Hu, Yue-Mei; Liang, Qi; Chu, Kai; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Jun-Jie; Tang, Rong; Wang, Wen-Juan; Liu, Pei; Hu, Jia-Lei; Luo, Li; Jiang, Rong; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The 2013-15 Ebola virus disease epidemic in west Africa greatly accelerated the development of Ebola vaccine. We aimed to analyse the immune persistence induced by one shot of an adenovirus type-5 vector-based Ebola virus vaccine up to 6 months and the effect of boosting with a homologous vector in healthy adults in China. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 clinical trial in one site in Jiangsu Province, China, 120 healthy adults aged 18-60 years received an initial dose of intramuscular adenovirus type-5 Ebola virus vaccine of 4·0 × 10 10 viral particles, 1·6 × 10 11 viral particles, or placebo, and were followed up to day 168. Participants were subsequently re-recruited to receive a booster dose of the same vaccine or placebo, in the same dose, at month 6. Women who were pregnant, breastfeeding, or planned to become pregnant during the next month were excluded. Randomisation was conducted by computer-generated block randomisation. Randomisation data were unmasked for interim analysis of the data obtained between days 0-28 but not disclosed to participants or site staff. Safety and immunogenicity analysis were done on the intention-to-treat population. We aimed to assess the safety profile of the experimental vaccine and the immunity responses to a single-dose immunisation or a homologous prime-boost regimen. Primary outcomes were Ebola glycoprotein-specific ELISA antibody responses 28 days post-boost and the occurrences of adverse reactions post-boost. The original trial and the extended booster study were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT02326194 and NCT02533791, respectively. Between Dec 28, 2014, and Jan 9, 2015, we enrolled 210 volunteers. 90 participants were not randomised due to not meeting inclusion criteria (61), meeting exclusion criteria (4), or withdrawal of consent (25). 120 people were randomly assigned to receive intramuscular Ebola vaccine at 4·0 × 10 10 viral particles (low dose, n=40

  11. Suppression of Remodeling Behaviors with Arachidonic Acid Modification for Enhanced in vivo Antiatherogenic Efficacies of Lovastatin-loaded Discoidal Recombinant High Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Zhang, Mengyuan; Liu, Lisha; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Wenli

    2015-10-01

    A series of in vitro evaluation in our previous studies had proved that arachidonic acid (AA) modification could suppress the remodeling behaviors of lovastatin-loaded discoidal reconstituted high density lipoprotein (LT-d-rHDL) by restraining the reactivity with lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) for reducing undesired drug leakage. This study focuses on the investigation of AA-modified LT-d-rHDL (AA-LT-d-rHDL) in atherosclerotic New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit models to explore whether AA modification could enhance drug targeting delivery and improve antiatherogenic efficacies in vivo. After pharmacokinetics of AA-LT-d-rHDL modified with different AA amount were investigated in atherosclerotic NZW rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions targeting property was assessed by ex vivo imaging of aortic tree and drug distribution. Furthermore, their antiatherogenic efficacies were elaborately evaluated and compared by typical biochemical indices. With AA modification amount augmenting, circulation time of AA-LT-d-rHDL was prolonged, and drug accumulation in the target locus was increased, eventually the significant appreciation in antiatherogenic efficacies were further supported by lower level of bad cholesterol, decreased atherosclerotic lesions areas and mean intima-media thickness (MIT), markedly attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein expression and macrophage infiltration. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that AA-LT-d-rHDL could enhance drug accumulation in atherosclerotic lesion and impede atherosclerosis progression more effectively.

  12. Oligomeric recombinant H5 HA1 vaccine produced in bacteria protects ferrets from homologous and heterologous wild-type H5N1 influenza challenge and controls viral loads better than subunit H5N1 vaccine by eliciting high-affinity antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Swati; Dimitrova, Milena; Munjal, Ashok; Fontana, Juan; Crevar, Corey J; Carter, Donald M; Ross, Ted M; Khurana, Surender; Golding, Hana

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant hemagglutinin from influenza viruses with pandemic potential can be produced rapidly in various cell substrates. In this study, we compared the functionality and immunogenicity of bacterially produced oligomeric or monomeric HA1 proteins from H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04) with those of the egg-based licensed subunit H5N1 (SU-H5N1) vaccine in ferrets challenged with homologous or heterologous H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza strains. Ferrets were vaccinated twice with the oligomeric or monomeric rHA1 or with SU-H5N1 (Sanofi Pasteur) emulsified with Titermax adjuvant and were challenged with wild-type homologous (A/Vietnam/1203/04; clade 1) or heterologous (A/Whooperswan/Mongolia/244/2005; clade 2.2) virus. Only the oligomeric rHA1 (not the monomeric rHA1) immunogen and the SU-H5N1 vaccine provided protection against the lethality and morbidity of homologous and heterologous highly pathogenic H5N1. Oligomeric rHA1 generated more cross-neutralizing antibodies and higher levels of serum antibody binding to HA1, with stronger avidity and a better IgG/IgM ratio, than monomeric HA1 and SU-H5N1 vaccines, as determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Importantly, viral loads after heterologous H5N1 challenge were more efficiently controlled in ferrets vaccinated with the oligomeric rHA1 immunogen than in SU-H5N1-vaccinated ferrets. The reduction of viral loads in the nasal washes correlated strongly with higher-avidity antibodies to oligomeric rHA1 derived from H5N1 clade 1 and clade 2.2 viruses, as measured by SPR. This is the first study to show the role of antibody avidity for the HA1 globular head domain in reduction of viral loads in the upper respiratory tract, which could significantly reduce viral transmission.

  13. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...... dimensions over special commutative noetherian rings; very often local Cohen–Macaulay rings with a dualizing module. These results are done by Avramov, Christensen, Enochs, Foxby, Jenda, Martsinkovsky and Xu among others. The aim of this paper is to generalize these results, and to give homological...... descriptions of the Gorenstein dimensions over arbitrary associative rings....

  14. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. AtMND1 is required for homologous pairing during meiosis in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Panoli, Aneesh P; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Sebastian, Jose; Nishal, Bindu; Reddy, Thamalampudi V; Marimuthu, Mohan PA; Subbiah, Veeraputhiran; Vijaybhaskar, Virupapuram; Siddiqi, Imran

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Pairing of homologous chromosomes at meiosis is an important requirement for recombination and balanced chromosome segregation among the products of meiotic division. Recombination is initiated by double strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11 followed by interaction of DSB sites with a homologous chromosome. This interaction requires the strand exchange proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 that bind to single stranded regions created by resection of ends at the site of DSBs and promote int...

  16. A Recombinant Fragment of Human Surfactant Protein D Suppresses Basophil Activation and T-Helper Type 2 and B-Cell Responses in Grass Pollen-induced Allergic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Asif S; Singh, Iesha; Pathan, Ansar A; Layhadi, Janice A; Parkin, Rebecca; Alexandra, Fedina; Durham, Stephen R; Kishore, Uday; Shamji, Mohamed H

    2017-12-15

    Recombinant fragment of human surfactant protein D (rfhSP-D) has been shown to suppress house dust mite- and Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic inflammation in murine models. We sought to elucidate the effect of rfhSP-D on high-affinity IgE receptor- and CD23-mediated, grass pollen-induced allergic inflammatory responses. rfhSP-D, containing homotrimeric neck and lectin domains, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(λDE3)pLysS cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and sera were obtained from individuals with grass pollen allergy (n = 27). The effect of rfhSP-D on basophil activation and histamine release was measured by flow cytometry. IgE-facilitated allergen binding and presentation were assessed by flow cytometry. T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokines were measured in cell culture supernatants. The effect of rfhSP-D on IgE production by B cells when stimulated with CD40L, IL-4, and IL-21 was also determined. rfhSP-D bound to Phleum pratense in a dose- and calcium-dependent manner. Allergen-induced basophil responsiveness and histamine release were inhibited in the presence of rfhSP-D, as measured by CD63, CD203c (P = 0.0086, P = 0.04205), and intracellularly labeled diamine oxidase (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0148). The binding of allergen-IgE complexes to B cells was reduced by 51% (P = 0.002) in the presence of rfhSP-D. This decrease was concomitant with reduction in CD23 expression on B cells (P D suppressed allergen-driven CD27 - CD4 + CRTh2 + T-cell proliferation (P P D inhibited CD40L/IL-4- and IL-21-mediated IgE production (77.12%; P = 0.02) by B cells. For the first time, to our knowledge, we show that rfhSP-D inhibited allergen-induced basophil responses at a single-cell level and suppressed CD23-mediated facilitated allergen presentation and Th2 cytokine production. In addition, rfhSP-D inhibited IgE synthesis by B cells, which is also a novel observation.

  17. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 49, Recombination at the DNA level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains full papers prepared by the participants to the 1984 Cold Springs Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. This year's theme is entitled Recombination at the DNA level. The volume consists of 93 articles grouped into subject areas entitled chromosome mechanics, yeast systems, mammalian homologous recombination, transposons, mu, plant transposons/T4 recombination, topoisomerase, resolvase and gyrase, Escherichia coli general recombination, RecA, repair, leukaryotic enzymes, integration and excision of bacteriophage, site-specific recombination, and recombination in vitro

  18. Genetic Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  19. Equivariant elliptic homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    In a previous paper we studied the modular properties of indices of elliptic operators on twisted loop spaces of manifolds with finite group actions. This motivates the introduction of the universal twisted elliptic genus. This genus can be interpreted as a ring homomorphism from the equivariant bordism ring MU * G to a ring Ell * G . It is shown that the functor X→Ell * G =MU * G (X)x MU * G Ell * G defines an equivariant homology theory, and that the associated cohomology theory satisfies a conjecture of Atiyah and Segal about generalized Lefchetz formulas. (author). 24 refs

  20. Recombinant human endostatin reduces hypertrophic scar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recombinant human endostatin (Endostar) has been widely used to suppress angiogenesis in carcinoma patients. ... Cite as: Wang P, Jiang L-Z, Xue B. Recombinant human endostatin reduces hypertrophic scar formation in rabbit ear model through ... wounds on the tail of each ear were discarded because.

  1. Evolution of Efficient Modular Polyketide Synthases by Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemler, Joseph A; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Hansen, Douglas A; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Williams, Russell B; Starks, Courtney; Park, Sung Ryeol; Sherman, David H

    2015-08-26

    The structural scaffolds of many complex natural products are produced by multifunctional type I polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymes that operate as biosynthetic assembly lines. The modular nature of these mega-enzymes presents an opportunity to construct custom biocatalysts built in a lego-like fashion by inserting, deleting, or exchanging native or foreign domains to produce targeted variants of natural polyketides. However, previously engineered PKS enzymes are often impaired resulting in limited production compared to native systems. Here, we show a versatile method for generating and identifying functional chimeric PKS enzymes for synthesizing custom macrolactones and macrolides. PKS genes from the pikromycin and erythromycin pathways were hybridized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate hybrid libraries. We used a 96-well plate format for plasmid purification, transformations, sequencing, protein expression, in vitro reactions and analysis of metabolite formation. Active chimeric enzymes were identified with new functionality. Streptomyces venezuelae strains that expressed these PKS chimeras were capable of producing engineered macrolactones. Furthermore, a macrolactone generated from selected PKS chimeras was fully functionalized into a novel macrolide analogue. This method permits the engineering of PKS pathways as modular building blocks for the production of new antibiotic-like molecules.

  2. The Cell Biology of Rad54: Implications for homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Agarwal (Sheba)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe survival of species is guaranteed by maintenance of genome stability, specifically the protection of DNA integrity. DNA is a chemically reactive molecule, which is continuously threatened by DNA-damaging agents, both exogenous (environmental, including ionizing radiation and

  3. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Vink (Cornelis); L. Rudenko (Larisa); H.S. Seifert (H. Steven)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a

  4. Roles of Homologous Recombination in Processing DNA Lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Tafel (Agnieszka)

    2007-01-01

    textabstract8 9 Scope of the Thesis Scope of the Thesis The abundance of DNA damaging agents poses a constant threat for genome stability. Therefore, cells have evolved multiple mechanisms to repair their DNA. The variety in possible DNA lesions that can occur require specified repair mechanism with

  5. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability

  6. Homologous and non-homologous recombination differentially affect DNA damage repair in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); H. van Steeg (Harry); J. de Wit (Jan); M. Vermeij (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIonizing radiation and interstrand DNA crosslinking compounds provide important treatments against cancer due to their extreme genotoxicity for proliferating cells. Both the efficacies of such treatments and the mutagenic potential of these agents are modulated by

  7. Mitochondrial recombination increases with age in Podospora anserina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Goedbloed, Daniël J; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Koopmanschap, A Bertha; Maas, Marc F P M; Hoekstra, Rolf F; Debets, Alfons J M

    With uniparental inheritance of mitochondria, there seems little reason for homologous recombination in mitochondria, but the machinery for mitochondrial recombination is quite well-conserved in many eukaryote species. In fungi and yeasts heteroplasmons may be formed when strains fuse and transfer

  8. Genetic evidence for a role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 in recombinational DNA repair under replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Evandro Rocco; Ede, Christopher; Schildmann, Michael; Schürer, Kirsten Anke; Kramer, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    In yeast as in human, DNA helicases play critical roles in assisting replication fork progression. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPH1 gene, homologue of human FANCM, has been involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair. We describe a synthetic growth defect of an mph1 deletion if combined with an srs2 deletion that can result-depending on the genetic background-in synthetic lethality. The lethality is suppressed by mutations in homologous recombination (rad51, rad52, rad55, rad57) and in the DNA damage checkpoint (rad9, rad24, rad17). Importantly, rad54 and mph1, epistatic for damage sensitivity, are subadditive for spontaneous mutator phenotype. Therefore, Mph1 could be placed at the Rad51-mediated strand invasion process, with a function distinct from Rad54. Moreover, siz1 mutation is viable with mph1 and additive for DNA damage sensitivity. mph1 srs2 double mutants, isolated in a background where they are viable, are synergistically sensitive to DNA damage. Moderate overexpression of SGS1 partially suppresses this sensitivity. Finally, we observe an epistatic relationship in terms of sensitivity to camptothecin of mms4 or mus81 to mph1. Overall, our results support a role of Mph1 in assisting replication progression. We propose two models for the resumption of DNA synthesis under replicative stress where Mph1 is placed at the sister chromatid interaction step.

  9. Grid diagrams and Khovanov homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droz, Jean-Marie; Wagner, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We explain how to compute the Jones polynomial of a link from one of its grid diagrams and we observe a connection between Bigelow’s homological definition of the Jones polynomial and Kauffman’s definition of the Jones polynomial. Consequently, we prove that the Maslov grading on the Seidel–Smith...... symplectic link invariant coincides with the difference between the homological grading on Khovanov homology and the Jones grading on Khovanov homology. We give some evidence for the truth of the Seidel–Smith conjecture....

  10. The endless tale of non-homologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in cells by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species. In addition, they are commonly generated during V(D)J recombination, an essential aspect of the developing immune system. Failure to effectively repair these DSBs can result in chromosome breakage, cell death, onset of cancer, and defects in the immune system of higher vertebrates. Fortunately, all mammalian cells possess two enzymatic pathways that mediate the repair of DSBs: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The NHEJ process utilizes enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA molecule, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and finally repair the DNA break. In this review, all the known enzymes that play a role in the NHEJ process are discussed and a working model for the co-operation of these enzymes during DSB repair is presented.

  11. Effects of UV radiation on genetic recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahovic, K.; Zahradka, D.; Petranovic, M.; Petranovic, D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the model consisting of Escherichia coli cells and l phage to study the effects of UV radiation on genetic recombination. We found two radiation induced processes that reduce or inhibit genetic recombination. One such process leads to the inability of prophage to excise itself from the irradiated bacterial chromosome by the site-specific recombination. The other process was shown to inhibit a type of general recombination by which the prophage transfers one of its genetic markers to the infecting homologous phage. Loss of the prophage ability to take part in both site-specific and general recombination was shown to develop in recB + but not in recB cells. From this we infer that the loss of prophage recombinogenicity in irradiated cells is a consequence of one process in which RecBCD enzyme (the product of recB, recC and recD genes) plays an essential role. (author)

  12. On S3-equivariant homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elhamdadi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that the group S3 (norm 1 quaternions cannot be a geometric realization of a crossed simplicial group and construct an exact sequence connecting S3-equivariant homology of an S3-space with its Pin(2-equivariant homology.

  13. The Red Queen theory of recombination hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, F; Wilkins, J F

    2011-03-01

    Recombination hotspots are small chromosomal regions, where meiotic crossover events happen with high frequency. Recombination is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) that requires the intervention of the molecular repair mechanism. The DSB repair mechanism may result in the exchange of homologous chromosomes (crossover) and the conversion of the allelic sequence that breaks into the one that does not break (biased gene conversion). Biased gene conversion results in a transmission advantage for the allele that does not break, thus preventing recombination and rendering recombination hotspots transient. How is it possible that recombination hotspots persist over evolutionary time (maintaining the average chromosomal crossover rate) when they are self-destructive? This fundamental question is known as the recombination hotspot paradox and has attracted much attention in recent years. Yet, that attention has not translated into a fully satisfactory answer. No existing model adequately explains all aspects of the recombination hotspot paradox. Here, we formulate an intragenomic conflict model resulting in Red Queen dynamics that fully accounts for all empirical observations regarding the molecular mechanisms of recombination hotspots, the nonrandom targeting of the recombination machinery to hotspots and the evolutionary dynamics of hotspot turnover. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Human Rad51 filaments on double- and single-stranded DNA: correlating regular and irregular forms with recombination function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Ristic (Dejan); M. Modesti (Mauro); T. van der Heijden (Thijn); J. Noort (John); C. Dekker (Cees); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecombinase proteins assembled into helical filaments on DNA are believed to be the catalytic core of homologous recombination. The assembly, disassembly and dynamic rearrangements of this structure must drive the DNA strand exchange reactions of homologous recombination. The sensitivity

  15. Homology theory on algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Andrew H

    1958-01-01

    Homology Theory on Algebraic Varieties, Volume 6 deals with the principles of homology theory in algebraic geometry and includes the main theorems first formulated by Lefschetz, one of which is interpreted in terms of relative homology and another concerns the Poincaré formula. The actual details of the proofs of these theorems are introduced by geometrical descriptions, sometimes aided with diagrams. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with a discussion on linear sections of an algebraic variety, with emphasis on the fibring of a variety defined over the complex numbers. The n

  16. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  17. Combining Evidence from Homologous Datasets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Ao; Allan, James

    2006-01-01

    .... We argue that combining evidence from these "homologous" datasets can give us better representation of the original data, and our experiments show that a model combining all sources outperforms each...

  18. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukov, Sergei; Putrov, Pavel; Vafa, Cumrun

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[ M 3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  19. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miné-Hattab, Judith; Fleury, Geneviève; Prevost, Chantal; Dutreix, Marie; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-05

    Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA) polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases) in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  20. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miné-Hattab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  1. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  2. Recombinant production of the therapeutic peptide lunasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Stuart

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lunasin is a chemopreventive peptide produced in a number of plant species. It comprises a helical region with homology to a region of chromatin binding proteins, an Arg-Gly-Asp cell adhesion motif and eight aspartic acid residues. In vitro studies indicate that lunasin suppresses chemical and oncogene driven transformation of mammalian cells. We have explored efficient recombinant production of lunasin by exploiting the Clostridium thermocellum CipB cellulose binding domain (CBD as a fusion partner protein. Results We used a pET28 vector to express a CBD-lunasin fusion with a hexahistidine tag and Tobacco Etch Virus protease site, to allow protease-mediated release of native lunasin. Autoinduction in E. coli BL21 (DE3 Star cells achieved expression of 3.35 g/L of CBD-lunasin fusion protein. The final yield of lunasin was 210 mg/L corresponding to 32% of the theoretical yield. Purification by cellulose binding and nickel affinity chromatography were tested with the latter proving more satisfactory. The effects of CBD-lunasin expression on growth and morphology of the E. coli cells were examined by light and electron microscopy revealing an altered morphology in a proportion of cells. Cell division appeared to be inhibited in these cells resulting in elongated, non-septated cells. Conclusions The use of CBD as a fusion partner gave high protein yields by autoinduction, with lunasin release by TEV protease cleavage. With some optimisation this approach could provide a potentially valuable route for production of this therapeutic peptide. Over-expression in the host cells manifest as a cell division defect in a population of the cells, presumably mimicking some aspect of the chemopreventive function observed in mammalian cells.

  3. Allergen homologs in the Euroglyphus maynei draft genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dean Rider

    Full Text Available Euroglyphus maynei is a house dust mite commonly found in homes worldwide and is the source of allergens that sensitize and induce allergic reactions in humans. It is the source of species-specific allergens as well as allergens that are cross-reactive with the allergens from house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus, and the ectoparasitic scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The genomics, proteomics and molecular biology of E. maynei and its allergens have not been as extensively investigated as those of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and S. scabiei where natural and recombinant allergens from these species have been characterized. Until now, little was known about the genome of E. maynei and it allergens but this information will be important for producing recombinant allergens for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and for understanding the allergic response mechanism by immune effector cells that mediate the allergic reaction. We sequenced and assembled the 59 Mb E. maynei genome to aid the identification of homologs for known allergenic proteins. The predicted proteome shared orthologs with D. farinae and S. scabiei, and included proteins with homology to more than 30 different groups of allergens. However, the majority of allergen candidates could not be assigned as clear orthologs to known mite allergens. The genomic sequence data, predicted proteome, and allergen homologs identified from E. maynei provide insight into the relationships among astigmatid mites and their allergens, which should allow for the development of improved diagnostics and immunotherapy.

  4. Persistent homology of complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, Danijela; Maletić, Slobodan; Rajković, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Long-lived topological features are distinguished from short-lived ones (considered as topological noise) in simplicial complexes constructed from complex networks. A new topological invariant, persistent homology, is determined and presented as a parameterized version of a Betti number. Complex networks with distinct degree distributions exhibit distinct persistent topological features. Persistent topological attributes, shown to be related to the robust quality of networks, also reflect the deficiency in certain connectivity properties of networks. Random networks, networks with exponential connectivity distribution and scale-free networks were considered for homological persistency analysis

  5. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  6. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudova, O.; Hoefer, M.; Portele, A.; Vacata, V.; Rink, H.; Lubec, G.

    1997-01-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer the question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the inserts of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9. (author)

  7. Cyclic homology and group actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponge, Raphaël

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present the construction of explicit quasi-isomorphisms that compute the cyclic homology and periodic cyclic homology of crossed-product algebras associated with (discrete) group actions. In the first part we deal with algebraic crossed-products associated with group actions on unital algebras over any ring k ⊃ Q. In the second part, we extend the results to actions on locally convex algebras. We then deal with crossed-products associated with group actions on manifolds and smooth varieties. For the finite order components, the results are expressed in terms of what we call "mixed equivariant cohomology". This "mixed" theory mediates between group homology and de Rham cohomology. It is naturally related to equivariant cohomology, and so we obtain explicit constructions of cyclic cycles out of equivariant characteristic classes. For the infinite order components, we simplify and correct the misidentification of Crainic (1999). An important new homological tool is the notion of "triangular S-module". This is a natural generalization of the cylindrical complexes of Getzler-Jones. It combines the mixed complexes of Burghelea-Kassel and parachain complexes of Getzler-Jones with the S-modules of Kassel-Jones. There are spectral sequences naturally associated with triangular S-modules. In particular, this allows us to recover spectral sequences of Feigin-Tsygan and Getzler-Jones and leads us to a new spectral sequence.

  8. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  9. A dominant, recombination-defective allele of Dmc1 causing male-specific sterility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannister, Laura A.; Pezza, Roberto J.; Donaldson, Janet R.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Schimenti, Kerry J.; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Schimenti, John C.

    2007-01-01

    DMC1 is a meiosis-specific homolog of bacterial RecA and eukaryotic RAD51 that can catalyze homologous DNA strand invasion and D-loop formation in vitro. DMC1-deficient mice and yeast are sterile due to defective meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis. The authors identified a male dominant

  10. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ∼70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  11. The role of RecQ helicases in non-homologous end-joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Shamanna, Raghavendra A

    2014-01-01

    -strand break repair. Double-strand breaks can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) using sister chromatids as templates to facilitate precise DNA repair, or by an HR-independent mechanism known as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) (error-prone). NHEJ is a non-templated DNA repair process, in which DNA...... termini are directly ligated. Canonical NHEJ requires DNA-PKcs and Ku70/80, while alternative NHEJ pathways are DNA-PKcs and Ku70/80 independent. This review discusses the role of RecQ helicases in NHEJ, alternative (or back-up) NHEJ (B-NHEJ) and microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) in V(D)J...... recombination, class switch recombination and telomere maintenance....

  12. Genetic sequences derived from suppression subtractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... Genomic DNA from X. albilineans and Xanthomonas hyacinthi were analyzed by suppression subtractive ... Clone X. albilineans 12 showed 92% homology to the acetate repressor proteins and clone. X. albilineans 18 .... stranded DNA will be enriched for tester-specific DNA, as DNA fragments that are not ...

  13. Homologous radioimmunoassay for human prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, A.M.; Kennes, F.; Gevaert, Y.; Franchimont, P.

    1976-01-01

    Although thee are descriptions of a range of radioimmunoassays for human prolactin in various biological fluids, only one of these is an homologous assay using human prolactin as the reference standard and tracer as well and an anti-human prolactin antiserum (Sinha, Y.N., Selby, F.W.; Lewis, U.; and Vanderlaan, W.P., 1973, J. Clin. Endocr., Vol. 36, 509). A homologous radioimmunoassay using human putuitary prolactin has been developed. The separation method is based on the double antibody solid phase system. Cross reactivity with human growth hormone (GH), placental lactogen (HPL), the pituitary protein hormones and prolactins of various species were studied as were values found in normal subjects in basal conditions and after a TRH injection. (author)

  14. Persistent Homology of Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carstens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, network science has introduced several statistical measures to determine the topological structure of large networks. Initially, the focus was on binary networks, where edges are either present or not. Thus, many of the earlier measures can only be applied to binary networks and not to weighted networks. More recently, it has been shown that weighted networks have a rich structure, and several generalized measures have been introduced. We use persistent homology, a recent technique from computational topology, to analyse four weighted collaboration networks. We include the first and second Betti numbers for the first time for this type of analysis. We show that persistent homology corresponds to tangible features of the networks. Furthermore, we use it to distinguish the collaboration networks from similar random networks.

  15. Homological algebra in -abelian categories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deren Luo

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Homological algebra, as a connected system of notions and results, was first developed ..... monomorphism. Thus di−1. C( fg) is a weak kernel of di. C( fg) for i = 0,..., n −1 (we consider. X. −1, Y−1, Y−1, Xn+1, Yn+1, Yn+1 as 0 objects). Indeed, let. ( ui+1 vi. ) ..... Theorem 3.5 ((n + 2) × (n + 2)-lemma). Let A be a ...

  16. Subcloning Plus Insertion (SPI) - A Novel Recombineering Method for the Rapid Construction of Gene Targeting Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R.; Kelsall, Emma J.; Fevat, Léna M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a ‘targeting’ vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors. PMID:25590226

  17. Female site-specific transposase-induced recombination: a high-efficiency method for fine mapping mutations on the X chromosome in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Jeffrey M

    2003-01-01

    P-element transposons in the Drosophila germline mobilize only in the presence of the appropriate transposase enzyme. Sometimes, instead of mobilizing completely, P elements will undergo site-specific recombination with the homologous chromosome. Site-specific recombination is the basis for male recombination mapping, since the male germline does not normally undergo recombination. Site-specific recombination also takes place in females, but this has been difficult to study because of the obs...

  18. Meiotic sister chromatid cohesion and recombination in two filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemst, van D.

    2000-01-01

    Homologous recombination and sister chromatid cohesion play important roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Within the living cell, the integrity of the DNA is threatened by various factors that cause DNA-lesions, of

  19. Recombination hotspots and host susceptibility modulate the adaptive value of recombination during maize streak virus evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monjane Adérito L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maize streak virus -strain A (MSV-A; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae, the maize-adapted strain of MSV that causes maize streak disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa, probably arose between 100 and 200 years ago via homologous recombination between two MSV strains adapted to wild grasses. MSV recombination experiments and analyses of natural MSV recombination patterns have revealed that this recombination event entailed the exchange of the movement protein - coat protein gene cassette, bounded by the two genomic regions most prone to recombination in mastrevirus genomes; the first surrounding the virion-strand origin of replication, and the second around the interface between the coat protein gene and the short intergenic region. Therefore, aside from the likely adaptive advantages presented by a modular exchange of this cassette, these specific breakpoints may have been largely predetermined by the underlying mechanisms of mastrevirus recombination. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed artificial, low-fitness, reciprocal chimaeric MSV genomes using alternating genomic segments from two MSV strains; a grass-adapted MSV-B, and a maize-adapted MSV-A. Between them, each pair of reciprocal chimaeric genomes represented all of the genetic material required to reconstruct - via recombination - the highly maize-adapted MSV-A genotype, MSV-MatA. We then co-infected a selection of differentially MSV-resistant maize genotypes with pairs of reciprocal chimaeras to determine the efficiency with which recombination would give rise to high-fitness progeny genomes resembling MSV-MatA. Results Recombinants resembling MSV-MatA invariably arose in all of our experiments. However, the accuracy and efficiency with which the MSV-MatA genotype was recovered across all replicates of each experiment depended on the MSV susceptibility of the maize genotypes used and the precise positions - in relation to known recombination hotspots

  20. Recombination hotspots and host susceptibility modulate the adaptive value of recombination during maize streak virus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjane, Adérito L; van der Walt, Eric; Varsani, Arvind; Rybicki, Edward P; Martin, Darren P

    2011-12-02

    Maize streak virus -strain A (MSV-A; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae), the maize-adapted strain of MSV that causes maize streak disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa, probably arose between 100 and 200 years ago via homologous recombination between two MSV strains adapted to wild grasses. MSV recombination experiments and analyses of natural MSV recombination patterns have revealed that this recombination event entailed the exchange of the movement protein - coat protein gene cassette, bounded by the two genomic regions most prone to recombination in mastrevirus genomes; the first surrounding the virion-strand origin of replication, and the second around the interface between the coat protein gene and the short intergenic region. Therefore, aside from the likely adaptive advantages presented by a modular exchange of this cassette, these specific breakpoints may have been largely predetermined by the underlying mechanisms of mastrevirus recombination. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed artificial, low-fitness, reciprocal chimaeric MSV genomes using alternating genomic segments from two MSV strains; a grass-adapted MSV-B, and a maize-adapted MSV-A. Between them, each pair of reciprocal chimaeric genomes represented all of the genetic material required to reconstruct - via recombination - the highly maize-adapted MSV-A genotype, MSV-MatA. We then co-infected a selection of differentially MSV-resistant maize genotypes with pairs of reciprocal chimaeras to determine the efficiency with which recombination would give rise to high-fitness progeny genomes resembling MSV-MatA. Recombinants resembling MSV-MatA invariably arose in all of our experiments. However, the accuracy and efficiency with which the MSV-MatA genotype was recovered across all replicates of each experiment depended on the MSV susceptibility of the maize genotypes used and the precise positions - in relation to known recombination hotspots - of the breakpoints required to re-create MSV

  1. ReCombine: a suite of programs for detection and analysis of meiotic recombination in whole-genome datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Anderson

    Full Text Available In meiosis, the exchange of DNA between chromosomes by homologous recombination is a critical step that ensures proper chromosome segregation and increases genetic diversity. Products of recombination include reciprocal exchanges, known as crossovers, and non-reciprocal gene conversions or non-crossovers. The mechanisms underlying meiotic recombination remain elusive, largely because of the difficulty of analyzing large numbers of recombination events by traditional genetic methods. These traditional methods are increasingly being superseded by high-throughput techniques capable of surveying meiotic recombination on a genome-wide basis. Next-generation sequencing or microarray hybridization is used to genotype thousands of polymorphic markers in the progeny of hybrid yeast strains. New computational tools are needed to perform this genotyping and to find and analyze recombination events. We have developed a suite of programs, ReCombine, for using short sequence reads from next-generation sequencing experiments to genotype yeast meiotic progeny. Upon genotyping, the program CrossOver, a component of ReCombine, then detects recombination products and classifies them into categories based on the features found at each location and their distribution among the various chromatids. CrossOver is also capable of analyzing segregation data from microarray experiments or other sources. This package of programs is designed to allow even researchers without computational expertise to use high-throughput, whole-genome methods to study the molecular mechanisms of meiotic recombination.

  2. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and...

  3. Catching homologies by geometric entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Domenico; Franzosi, Roberto; Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2018-02-01

    A geometric entropy is defined in terms of the Riemannian volume of the parameter space of a statistical manifold associated with a given network. As such it can be a good candidate for measuring networks complexity. Here we investigate its ability to single out topological features of networks proceeding in a bottom-up manner: first we consider small size networks by analytical methods and then large size networks by numerical techniques. Two different classes of networks, the random graphs and the scale-free networks, are investigated computing their Betti numbers and then showing the capability of geometric entropy of detecting homologies.

  4. Kuranishi homology and Kuranishi cohomology

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    A Kuranishi space is a topological space with a Kuranishi structure, defined by Fukaya and Ono. Kuranishi structures occur naturally on moduli spaces of J-holomorphic curves in symplectic geometry. Let Y be an orbifold and R a commutative ring or Q-algebra. We define two kinds of Kuranishi homology KH_*(Y;R). The chain complex KC_*(Y;R) defining KH_*(Y;R) is spanned over R by [X,f,G], for X a compact oriented Kuranishi space with corners, f : X --> Y smooth, and G "gauge-fixing data" which ma...

  5. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  6. Recombinant protein production technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  7. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. RNA recombination in Hepatitis delta virus: Identification of a novel naturally occurring recombinant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chi Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Hepatitis delta virus (HDV is the only animal RNA virus that has an unbranched rod-like genome with ribozyme activity. It replicates in the nucleus by host RNA polymerase via a rolling circle mechanism. Similar to many RNA viruses encoding their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, homologous recombination of HDV occurs in mixed-genotype infections and in cultured cells cotransfected with two HDV sequences, as demonstrated by molecular analyses. Methods: Among 237 published complete genomic sequences, 34 sequences were reported from the small and isolated Miyako Island, Japan, and belonged to the Asia-specific genotypes, HDV-2 and HDV-4 (the majority of them belonged to the known Miyako Island-specific subgroup, HDV-4M. We investigated the presence of naturally occurring HDV recombinant in Miyako Island using phylogenetic and recombination analyses. Results: We identified a two-switch HDV-4/4M intersubtype recombinant with an unbranched rod-like RNA genome. Conclusion: Our data suggest that RNA recombination plays an important role in the rapid evolution of HDV, allowing the production of new HDV strains with correct genomic structures. Keywords: hepatitis delta virus, RNA recombination

  9. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  10. Which way up? Recognition of homologous DNA segments in parallel and antiparallel alignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lee, Dominic J.; Wynveen, Aaron; Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous gene shuffling between DNA molecules promotes genetic diversity and is an important pathway for DNA repair. For this to occur, homologous genes need to find and recognize each other. However, despite its central role in homologous recombination, the mechanism of homology recognition has remained an unsolved puzzle of molecular biology. While specific proteins are known to play a role at later stages of recombination, an initial coarse grained recognition step has, however, been proposed. This relies on the sequence dependence of the DNA structural parameters, such as twist and rise, mediated by intermolecular interactions, in particular, electrostatic ones. In this proposed mechanism, sequences that have the same base pair text, or are homologous, have lower interaction energy than those sequences with uncorrelated base pair texts. The difference between the two energies is termed the "recognition energy." Here, we probe how the recognition energy changes when one DNA fragment slides past another, and consider, for the first time, homologous sequences in antiparallel alignment. This dependence on sliding is termed the "recognition well." We find there is a recognition well for anti-parallel, homologous DNA tracts, but only a very shallow one, so that their interaction will differ little from the interaction between two nonhomologous tracts. This fact may be utilized in single molecule experiments specially targeted to test the theory. As well as this, we test previous theoretical approximations in calculating the recognition well for parallel molecules against MC simulations and consider more rigorously the optimization of the orientations of the fragments about their long axes upon calculating these recognition energies. The more rigorous treatment affects the recognition energy a little, when the molecules are considered rigid. When torsional flexibility of the DNA molecules is introduced, we find excellent agreement between the analytical

  11. Persistent homology and string vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirafici, Michele [Center for Mathematical Analysis, Geometry and Dynamical Systems,Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques,Le Bois-Marie, 35 route de Chartres, F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze N=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  12. Equivariant ordinary homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Costenoble, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Filling a gap in the literature, this book takes the reader to the frontiers of equivariant topology, the study of objects with specified symmetries. The discussion is motivated by reference to a list of instructive “toy” examples and calculations in what is a relatively unexplored field. The authors also provide a reading path for the first-time reader less interested in working through sophisticated machinery but still desiring a rigorous understanding of the main concepts. The subject’s classical counterparts, ordinary homology and cohomology, dating back to the work of Henri Poincaré in topology, are calculational and theoretical tools which are important in many parts of mathematics and theoretical physics, particularly in the study of manifolds. Similarly powerful tools have been lacking, however, in the context of equivariant topology. Aimed at advanced graduate students and researchers in algebraic topology and related fields, the book assumes knowledge of basic algebraic topology and group act...

  13. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Pellikka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  14. Analysis of intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination by rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Sandra D.; Tzeng, W.-P.; Chen, M.-H.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether rubella virus (RUB) undergoes intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination, cells were cotransfected with pairs of in vitro transcripts from genomic cDNA plasmid vectors engineered to contain nonoverlapping deletions: the replicative transcript maintained the 5'-proximal nonstructural (NS) ORF (which contained the replicase, making it RNA replication competent), had a deletion in the 3'-proximal structural protein (SP) ORF, and maintained the 3' end of the genome, including the putative 3' cis-acting elements (CSE), while the nonreplicative transcript consisted of the 3' half of the genome including the SP-ORF and 3' CSE. Cotransfection yielded plaque-forming virus that synthesized the standard genomic and subgenomic RNAs and thus was generated by RNA-RNA recombination. Using transcripts tagged with a 3'-terminal deletion, it was found that recombinants contained the 3' end derived from the replicative strand, indicating a cis-preference for initiation of negative-strand synthesis. In cotransfections in which the replicative transcript lacked the 3' CSE, recombination occurred, albeit at lower efficiency, indicating that initiation in trans from the NS-ORF can occur. The 3' CSE was sufficient as a nonreplicative transcript, showing that it can serve as a promoter for negative-strand RNA synthesis. While deletion mutagenesis showed that the presence of the junction untranslated region (J-UTR) between the ORFs appeared to be necessary on both transcripts for recombination in this region of the genome, analysis with transcripts tagged with restriction sites showed that the J-UTR was not a hot spot for recombination compared to neighboring regions in both ORFs. Sequence analysis of recombinants revealed that both precise (homologous) and imprecise recombination (aberrant, homologous resulting in duplications) occurred; however, imprecise recombination only involved the J-UTR or the 3' end of the NS-ORF and the J-UTR (maintaining the NS-ORF), indicating

  15. A highly efficient targeted recombination system for engineering linear chromosomes of industrial bacteria Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hung-Yin; Chen, Carton W; Huang, Chih-Hung

    2018-04-17

    Soil bacteria Streptomyces are the most important producers of secondary metabolites, including most known antibiotics. These bacteria and their close relatives are unique in possessing linear chromosomes, which typically harbor 20 to 30 biosynthetic gene clusters of tens to hundreds of kb in length. Many Streptomyces chromosomes are accompanied by linear plasmids with sizes ranging from several to several hundred kb. The large linear plasmids also often contain biosynthetic gene clusters. We have developed a targeted recombination procedure for arm exchanges between a linear plasmid and a linear chromosome. A chromosomal segment inserted in an artificially constructed plasmid allows homologous recombination between the two replicons at the homology. Depending on the design, the recombination may result in two recombinant replicons or a single recombinant chromosome with the loss of the recombinant plasmid that lacks a replication origin. The efficiency of such targeted recombination ranges from 9 to 83% depending on the locations of the homology (and thus the size of the chromosomal arm exchanged), essentially eliminating the necessity of selection. The targeted recombination is useful for the efficient engineering of the Streptomyces genome for large-scale deletion, addition, and shuffling.

  16. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vanoli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different

  18. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

    2011-03-29

    We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker

  19. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  20. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...

  1. Chk1 suppresses bypass of mitosis and tetraploidization in p53-deficient cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsker, Deborah; Chung, Jon H; Bunz, Fred

    2012-04-15

    Many cancer cells are unable to maintain a numerically stable chromosome complement. It is well established that aberrant cell division can generate progeny with increased ploidy, but the genetic factors required for maintenance of diploidy are not well understood. Using an isogenic model system derived by gene targeting, we examined the role of Chk1 in p53-proficient and -deficient cancer cells. Targeted inactivation of a single CHK1 allele in stably diploid cells caused an elevated frequency of mitotic bypass if p53 was naturally mutated or experimentally disrupted by homologous recombination. CHK1-haploinsufficient, p53-deficient cells frequently underwent sequential rounds of DNA synthesis without an intervening mitosis. These aberrant cell cycles resulted in whole-genome endoreduplication and tetraploidization. The unscheduled bypass of mitosis could be suppressed by targeted reversion of a p53 mutation or by exogenous expression of Cdk1. In contrast, the number of tetraploid cells was not increased in isogenic cell populations that harbor hypomorphic ATR mutations, suggesting that suppression of unscheduled mitotic bypass is a distinct function of Chk1. These results are consistent with a recently described role for Chk1 in promoting the expression of genes that promote cell cycle transitions and demonstrate how Chk1 might prevent tetraploidization during the cancer cell cycle.

  2. HTP-3 links DSB formation with homolog pairing and crossing over during C. elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyer, William; Kaitna, Susanne; Couteau, Florence; Ward, Jordan D; Boulton, Simon J; Zetka, Monique

    2008-02-01

    Repair of the programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate recombination must be coordinated with homolog pairing to generate crossovers capable of directing chromosome segregation. Chromosome pairing and synapsis proceed independently of recombination in worms and flies, suggesting a paradoxical lack of coregulation. Here, we find that the meiotic axis component HTP-3 links DSB formation with homolog pairing and synapsis. HTP-3 forms complexes with the DSB repair components MRE-11/RAD-50 and the meiosis-specific axis component HIM-3. Loss of htp-3 or mre-11 recapitulates meiotic phenotypes consistent with a failure to generate DSBs, suggesting that HTP-3 associates with MRE-11/RAD-50 in a complex required for meiotic DSB formation. Loss of HTP-3 eliminates HIM-3 localization to axes and HIM-3-dependent homolog alignment, synapsis, and crossing over. Our study reveals a mechanism for coupling meiotic DSB formation with homolog pairing through the essential participation of an axis component with complexes mediating both processes.

  3. Lectures on homology with internal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyov, Yu.

    1993-09-01

    Homology with internal symmetries is a natural generalization of cyclic homology introduced, independently, by Connes and Tsygan, which has turned out to be a very useful tool in a number of problems of algebra, geometry topology, analysis and mathematical physics. It suffices to say cycling homology and cohomology are successfully applied in the index theory of elliptic operators on foliations, in the description of the homotopy type of pseudoisotopy spaces, in the theory of characteristic classes in algebraic K-theory. They are also applied in noncommutative differential geometry and in the cohomology of Lie algebras, the branches of mathematics which brought them to life in the first place. Essentially, we consider dihedral homology, which was successfully applied for the description of the homology type of groups of homeomorphisms and diffeomorphisms of simply connected manifolds. (author). 27 refs

  4. Homology Groups of a Pipeline Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Husainov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petri net is said to be elementary if every place can contain no more than one token. In this paper, it is studied topological properties of the elementary Petri net for a pipeline consisting of n functional devices. If the work of the functional devices is considered continuous, we can come to some topological space of “intermediate” states. In the paper, it is calculated the homology groups of this topological space. By induction on n, using the Addition Sequence for homology groups of semicubical sets, it is proved that in dimension 0 and 1 the integer homology groups of these nets are equal to the group of integers, and in the remaining dimensions are zero. Directed homology groups are studied. A connection of these groups with deadlocks and newsletters is found. This helps to prove that all directed homology groups of the pipeline elementary Petri nets are zeroth.

  5. Subcloning plus insertion (SPI)--a novel recombineering method for the rapid construction of gene targeting vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-08

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a 'targeting' vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4 kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors.

  6. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  7. Evidence of recombination in intrapatient populations of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentandreu, Vicente; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Bracho, María Alma; Valero, Ana; Gosalbes, María José; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-09-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in the future. HCV is characterized by a high level of genetic heterogeneity. Although homologous recombination has been demonstrated in many members of the family Flaviviridae, to which HCV belongs, there are only a few studies reporting recombination on natural populations of HCV, suggesting that these events are rare in vivo. Furthermore, these few studies have focused on recombination between different HCV genotypes/subtypes but there are no reports on the extent of intra-genotype or intra-subtype recombination between viral strains infecting the same patient. Given the important implications of recombination for RNA virus evolution, our aim in this study has been to assess the existence and eventually the frequency of intragenic recombination on HCV. For this, we retrospectively have analyzed two regions of the HCV genome (NS5A and E1-E2) in samples from two different groups: (i) patients infected only with HCV (either treated with interferon plus ribavirin or treatment naïve), and (ii) HCV-HIV co-infected patients (with and without treatment against HIV). The complete data set comprised 17712 sequences from 136 serum samples derived from 111 patients. Recombination analyses were performed using 6 different methods implemented in the program RDP3. Recombination events were considered when detected by at least 3 of the 6 methods used and were identified in 10.7% of the amplified samples, distributed throughout all the groups described and the two genomic regions studied. The resulting recombination events were further verified by detailed phylogenetic analyses. The complete experimental procedure was applied to an artificial mixture of relatively closely viral populations and the ensuing analyses failed to reveal artifactual recombination. From these results we conclude that recombination should be considered as a potentially

  8. Recombinant clotting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, Steven W

    2008-05-01

    The recombinant era for haemophilia began in the early 1980s with the cloning and subsequent expression of functional proteins for both factors VIII and IX. Efficient production of recombinant clotting factors in mammalian cell culture systems required overcoming significant challenges due to the complex post-translational modifications that were integral to their pro-coagulant function. The quick development and commercialization of recombinant clotting factors was, in part, facilitated by the catastrophic impact of viral contamination of plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates at the time. Since their transition into the clinic, the recombinant versions of both factor VIII and IX have proven to be remarkable facsimiles of their plasma-derived counterparts. The broad adoption of recombinant therapy throughout the developed world has significantly increased the supply of clotting factor concentrates and helped advance aggressive therapeutic interventions such as prophylaxis. The development of recombinant VIIa was a further advance bringing a recombinant option to haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Recombinant DNA technology remains the platform to address ongoing challenges in haemophilia care such as reducing the costs of therapy, increasing the availability to the developing world, and improving the functional properties of these proteins. In turn, the ongoing development of new recombinant clotting factor concentrates is providing alternatives for patients with other inherited bleeding disorders.

  9. The PIKE homolog Centaurin gamma regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Gündner

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to

  10. Isolation and identification of a novel rabies virus lineage in China with natural recombinant nucleoprotein gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Qiang He

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV causes severe neurological disease and death. As an important mechanism for generating genetic diversity in viruses, homologous recombination can lead to the emergence of novel virus strains with increased virulence and changed host tropism. However, it is still unclear whether recombination plays a role in the evolution of RABV. In this study, we isolated and sequenced four circulating RABV strains in China. Phylogenetic analyses identified a novel lineage of hybrid origin that comprises two different strains, J and CQ92. Analyses revealed that the virus 3' untranslated region (UTR and part of the N gene (approximate 500 nt in length were likely derived from Chinese lineage I while the other part of the genomic sequence was homologous to Chinese lineage II. Our findings reveal that homologous recombination can occur naturally in the field and shape the genetic structure of RABV populations.

  11. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  12. Recombination Rate Evolution and the Origin of Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Engelstädter, Jan; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-03-01

    A recipe for dissolving incipient species into a continuum of phenotypes is to recombine their genetic material. Therefore, students of speciation have become increasingly interested in the mechanisms by which recombination between locally adapted lineages is reduced. Evidence abounds that chromosomal rearrangements, via their suppression of recombination during meiosis in hybrids, play a major role in adaptation and speciation. By contrast, genic modifiers of recombination rates have been largely ignored in studies of speciation. We show how both types of reduction in recombination rates facilitate divergence in the face of gene flow, including the early stages of adaptive divergence, the persistence of species after secondary contact, and reinforcement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Recombinant gene expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan, Rocky S

    1997-01-01

    .... A fundamental requirement for successful recombinant gene expression is the design of the cloning vector and the choice of the host organism for expression. Recombinant Gene Expression Protocols grows out of the need for a laboratory manual that provides the reader the background and rationale, as well as the practical protocols for the preparation of...

  14. Localization of recombination proteins and Srs2 reveals anti-recombinase function in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Lisby, Michael; Altmannova, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), although an important DNA repair mechanism, is dangerous to the cell if improperly regulated. The Srs2 "anti-recombinase" restricts HR by disassembling the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament, an intermediate preceding the exchange of homologous DNA strands. Here, we...... removes Rad51 indiscriminately from DNA, while the Rad52 protein coordinates appropriate filament reformation. This constant breakdown and rebuilding of filaments may act as a stringent quality control mechanism during HR....

  15. Cis- and trans-acting elements regulate the mouse Psmb9 meiotic recombination hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Baudat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes, the prophase of the first meiotic division is characterized by a high level of homologous recombination between homologous chromosomes. Recombination events are not distributed evenly within the genome, but vary both locally and at large scale. Locally, most recombination events are clustered in short intervals (a few kilobases called hotspots, separated by large intervening regions with no or very little recombination. Despite the importance of regulating both the frequency and the distribution of recombination events, the genetic factors controlling the activity of the recombination hotspots in mammals are still poorly understood. We previously characterized a recombination hotspot located close to the Psmb9 gene in the mouse major histocompatibility complex by sperm typing, demonstrating that it is a site of recombination initiation. With the goal of uncovering some of the genetic factors controlling the activity of this initiation site, we analyzed this hotspot in both male and female germ lines and compared the level of recombination in different hybrid mice. We show that a haplotype-specific element acts at distance and in trans to activate about 2,000-fold the recombination activity at Psmb9. Another haplotype-specific element acts in cis to repress initiation of recombination, and we propose this control to be due to polymorphisms located within the initiation zone. In addition, we describe subtle variations in the frequency and distribution of recombination events related to strain and sex differences. These findings show that most regulations observed act at the level of initiation and provide the first analysis of the control of the activity of a meiotic recombination hotspot in the mouse genome that reveals the interactions of elements located both in and outside the hotspot.

  16. Interactions Among BRCA1, BRCA2, and Components of the Recombination Machinery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    .... In mammals, the efficiency of recombinational DNA repair is modulated by the tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, providing compelling evidence that this DNA repair pathway functions to suppress cancer formation...

  17. Interactions Among Brac1, Brac2, and Components of the Recombination Machinery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    .... In mammals, the efficiency of recombinational DNA repair is modulated by the tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, providing compelling evidence that this DNA repair pathway functions to suppress cancer formation...

  18. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  19. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  20. The adiponectin receptor homologs in C. elegans promote energy utilization and homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Emma; Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Mörck, Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising actions in vertebrates. Its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, are PAQR-type proteins with 7-transmembrane domains and topologies reversed that of GPCR's, i.e. their C-termini are extracellular. We identified three adiponectin receptor homologs...... when combined with the paqr-1 mutation. paqr-2 mutants are also synthetic lethal with mutations in nhr-49, sbp-1 and fat-6, which are C. elegans homologs of nuclear hormone receptors, SREBP and FAT-6 (a Δ9 desaturase), respectively. Like paqr-2, paqr-1 is also synthetic lethal with sbp-1. Mutations...... in aak-2, the C. elegans homolog of AMPK, or nhr-80, another nuclear hormone receptor gene, suppress the growth phenotype of paqr-2 mutants, probably because they restore the balance between energy expenditure and storage. We conclude that paqr-1 and paqr-2 are receptors that regulate fatty acid...

  1. Isolation and Identification of a Novel Rabies Virus Lineage in China with Natural Recombinant Nucleoprotein Gene

    OpenAIRE

    He, Cheng-Qiang; Meng, Sheng-Li; Yan, Hong-Yan; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Hong-Bin; Yan, Jia-Xin; Xu, Ge-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes severe neurological disease and death. As an important mechanism for generating genetic diversity in viruses, homologous recombination can lead to the emergence of novel virus strains with increased virulence and changed host tropism. However, it is still unclear whether recombination plays a role in the evolution of RABV. In this study, we isolated and sequenced four circulating RABV strains in China. Phylogenetic analyses identified a novel lineage of hybrid origi...

  2. Lambda Red-mediated Recombineering in the Attaching and Effacing Pathogen Escherichia albertii

    OpenAIRE

    Egan, Marisa; Ramirez, Jasmine; Xander, Christian; Upreti, Chirag; Bhatt, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to introduce site-specific mutations in bacterial pathogens is essential towards understanding their molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity. This has been greatly facilitated by the genetic engineering technique of recombineering. In recombineering, linear double- or single-stranded DNA molecules with two terminal homology arms are electroporated into hyperrecombinogenic bacteria that express a phage-encoded recombinase. The recombinase catalyzes the replacement of the e...

  3. Dynamics of rye chromosome 1R regions with high or low crossover frequency in homology search and synapsis development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohelia T Valenzuela

    Full Text Available In many organisms, homologous pairing and synapsis depend on the meiotic recombination machinery that repairs double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs produced at the onset of meiosis. The culmination of recombination via crossover gives rise to chiasmata, which locate distally in many plant species such as rye, Secale cereale. Although, synapsis initiates close to the chromosome ends, a direct effect of regions with high crossover frequency on partner identification and synapsis initiation has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the dynamics of distal and proximal regions of a rye chromosome introgressed into wheat to define their role on meiotic homology search and synapsis. We have used lines with a pair of two-armed chromosome 1R of rye, or a pair of telocentrics of its long arm (1RL, which were homozygous for the standard 1RL structure, homozygous for an inversion of 1RL that changes chiasma location from distal to proximal, or heterozygous for the inversion. Physical mapping of recombination produced in the ditelocentric heterozygote (1RL/1RL(inv showed that 70% of crossovers in the arm were confined to a terminal segment representing 10% of the 1RL length. The dynamics of the arms 1RL and 1RL(inv during zygotene demonstrates that crossover-rich regions are more active in recognizing the homologous partner and developing synapsis than crossover-poor regions. When the crossover-rich regions are positioned in the vicinity of chromosome ends, their association is facilitated by telomere clustering; when they are positioned centrally in one of the two-armed chromosomes and distally in the homolog, their association is probably derived from chromosome elongation. On the other hand, chromosome movements that disassemble the bouquet may facilitate chromosome pairing correction by dissolution of improper chromosome associations. Taken together, these data support that repair of DSBs via crossover is essential in both the search of the homologous partner

  4. BRIT1/MCPH1 is essential for mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair and maintaining genomic stability in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BRIT1 protein (also known as MCPH1 contains 3 BRCT domains which are conserved in BRCA1, BRCA2, and other important molecules involved in DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, and tumor suppression. BRIT1 mutations or aberrant expression are found in primary microcephaly patients as well as in cancer patients. Recent in vitro studies suggest that BRIT1/MCPH1 functions as a novel key regulator in the DNA damage response pathways. To investigate its physiological role and dissect the underlying mechanisms, we generated BRIT1(-/- mice and identified its essential roles in mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Both BRIT1(-/- mice and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were hypersensitive to gamma-irradiation. BRIT1(-/- MEFs and T lymphocytes exhibited severe chromatid breaks and reduced RAD51 foci formation after irradiation. Notably, BRIT1(-/- mice were infertile and meiotic homologous recombination was impaired. BRIT1-deficient spermatocytes exhibited a failure of chromosomal synapsis, and meiosis was arrested at late zygotene of prophase I accompanied by apoptosis. In mutant spermatocytes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs were formed, but localization of RAD51 or BRCA2 to meiotic chromosomes was severely impaired. In addition, we found that BRIT1 could bind to RAD51/BRCA2 complexes and that, in the absence of BRIT1, recruitment of RAD51 and BRCA2 to chromatin was reduced while their protein levels were not altered, indicating that BRIT1 is involved in mediating recruitment of RAD51/BRCA2 to the damage site. Collectively, our BRIT1-null mouse model demonstrates that BRIT1 is essential for maintaining genomic stability in vivo to protect the hosts from both programmed and irradiation-induced DNA damages, and its depletion causes a failure in both mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair via impairing RAD51/BRCA2's function and as a result leads to infertility and genomic instability in mice.

  5. Molecular Evolution at a Meiosis Gene Mediates Species Differences in the Rate and Patterning of Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Cara L; Cattani, M Victoria; Kingan, Sarah B; Landeen, Emily L; Presgraves, Daven C

    2018-04-23

    Crossing over between homologous chromosomes during meiosis repairs programmed DNA double-strand breaks, ensures proper segregation at meiosis I [1], shapes the genomic distribution of nucleotide variability in populations, and enhances the efficacy of natural selection among genetically linked sites [2]. Between closely related Drosophila species, large differences exist in the rate and chromosomal distribution of crossing over. Little, however, is known about the molecular genetic changes or population genetic forces that mediate evolved differences in recombination between species [3, 4]. Here, we show that a meiosis gene with a history of rapid evolution acts as a trans-acting modifier of species differences in crossing over. In transgenic flies, the dicistronic gene, mei-217/mei-218, recapitulates a large part of the species differences in the rate and chromosomal distribution of crossing over. These phenotypic differences appear to result from changes in protein sequence not gene expression. Our population genetics analyses show that the protein-coding sequence of mei-218, but not mei-217, has a history of recurrent positive natural selection. By modulating the intensity of centromeric and telomeric suppression of crossing over, evolution at mei-217/-218 has incidentally shaped gross differences in the chromosomal distribution of nucleotide variability between species. We speculate that recurrent bouts of adaptive evolution at mei-217/-218 might reflect a history of coevolution with selfish genetic elements. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hadron correlations from recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Quark recombination is a successful model to describe the hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma. Jet-like dihadron correlations measured at RHIC provide a challenge for this picture. We discuss how correlations between hadrons can arise from correlations between partons before hadronization. An enhancement of correlations through the recombination process, similar to the enhancement of elliptic flow is found. Hot spots from completely or partially quenched jets are a likely source of such parton correlations.

  7. HTP-1 coordinates synaptonemal complex assembly with homolog alignment during meiosis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couteau, Florence; Zetka, Monique

    2005-11-15

    During meiosis, the mechanisms responsible for homolog alignment, synapsis, and recombination are precisely coordinated to culminate in the formation of crossovers capable of directing accurate chromosome segregation. An outstanding question is how the cell ensures that the structural hallmark of meiosis, the synaptonemal complex (SC), forms only between aligned pairs of homologous chromosomes. In the present study, we find that two closely related members of the him-3 gene family in Caenorhabditis elegans function as regulators of synapsis. HTP-1 functionally couples homolog alignment to its stabilization by synapsis by preventing the association of SC components with unaligned and immature chromosome axes; in the absence of the protein, nonhomologous contacts between chromosomes are inappropriately stabilized, resulting in extensive nonhomologous synapsis and a drastic decline in chiasma formation. In the absence of both HTP-1 and HTP-2, synapsis is abrogated per se and the early association of SC components with chromosomes observed in htp-1 mutants does not occur, suggesting a function for the proteins in licensing SC assembly. Furthermore, our results suggest that early steps of recombination occur in a narrow window of opportunity in early prophase that ends with SC assembly, resulting in a mechanistic coupling of the two processes to promote crossing over.

  8. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena eFaunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Owen’s pre-evolutionary definition of a homologue as the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function and its redefinition after Darwin as the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish sameness. Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  9. Recombinant DNA technologies for construction of precisely designed transgene constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Masato; Kimura, Minoru; Tanaka, Masafumi; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    Genetically modified animals have been used as models in broad range of studies including pharmaceutical biology. Designing and construction of transgene constructs are the first indispensable task in generating model animals. In addition to the classical restriction enzyme-based method, still holds some advantages in generating precise constructs, site-specific recombinase-based and homologous recombination-based DNA engineering strategies (e.g. Gateway and Red/ET recombineering, respectively) have been developed and widely used for vector construction or BAC modification. In this review, the three construction methods are described and their applications are discussed such as tandem assemblies of multiple components and modification of large DNA molecules. Combinational use of these E. coli-based recombinant DNA technologies enables the generation of precisely designed vectors useful for desired genome modification for future analyses.

  10. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L. Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J Sola-Campoy

    Full Text Available This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.. The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176-178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30 could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree.

  11. Homological methods, representation theory, and cluster algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Trepode, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    This text presents six mini-courses, all devoted to interactions between representation theory of algebras, homological algebra, and the new ever-expanding theory of cluster algebras. The interplay between the topics discussed in this text will continue to grow and this collection of courses stands as a partial testimony to this new development. The courses are useful for any mathematician who would like to learn more about this rapidly developing field; the primary aim is to engage graduate students and young researchers. Prerequisites include knowledge of some noncommutative algebra or homological algebra. Homological algebra has always been considered as one of the main tools in the study of finite-dimensional algebras. The strong relationship with cluster algebras is more recent and has quickly established itself as one of the important highlights of today’s mathematical landscape. This connection has been fruitful to both areas—representation theory provides a categorification of cluster algebras, wh...

  12. Parallelism, deep homology, and evo-devo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian K

    2012-01-01

    Parallelism has been the subject of a number of recent studies that have resulted in reassessment of the term and the process. Parallelism has been aligned with homology leaving convergence as the only case of homoplasy, regarded as a transition between homologous and convergent characters, and defined as the independent evolution of genetic traits. Another study advocates abolishing the term parallelism and treating all cases of the independent evolution of characters as convergence. With the sophistication of modern genomics and genetic analysis, parallelism of characters of the phenotype is being discovered to reflect parallel genetic evolution. Approaching parallelism from developmental and genetic perspectives enables us to tease out the degree to which the reuse of pathways represent deep homology and is a major task for evolutionary developmental biology in the coming decades. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A New Metazoan Recombination Rate Record and Consistently High Recombination Rates in the Honey Bee Genus Apis Accompanied by Frequent Inversions but Not Translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Ryan; Miller, Katelyn; Fouks, Bertrand; Rubio Correa, Sara; Collazo, Juan; Phaincharoen, Mananya; Tingek, Salim; Koeniger, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Western honey bees (Apis mellifera) far exceed the commonly observed 1–2 meiotic recombination events per chromosome and exhibit the highest Metazoan recombination rate (20 cM/Mb) described thus far. However, the reasons for this exceptional rate of recombination are not sufficiently understood. In a comparative study, we report on the newly constructed genomic linkage maps of Apis florea and Apis dorsata that represent the two honey bee lineages without recombination rate estimates so far. Each linkage map was generated de novo, based on SNP genotypes of haploid male offspring of a single female. The A. florea map spans 4,782 cM with 1,279 markers in 16 linkage groups. The A. dorsata map is 5,762 cM long and contains 1,189 markers in 16 linkage groups. Respectively, these map sizes result in average recombination rate estimates of 20.8 and 25.1 cM/Mb. Synteny analyses indicate that frequent intra-chromosomal rearrangements but no translocations among chromosomes accompany the high rates of recombination during the independent evolution of the three major honey bee lineages. Our results imply a common cause for the evolution of very high recombination rates in Apis. Our findings also suggest that frequent homologous recombination during meiosis might increase ectopic recombination and rearrangements within but not between chromosomes. It remains to be investigated whether the resulting inversions may have been important in the evolutionary differentiation between honey bee species. PMID:28173114

  14. Hepatic receptors for homologous growth hormone in the eel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, T.

    1991-01-01

    The specific binding of 125I-labeled eel growth hormone (eGH) to liver membranes of the eel was examined. The specific binding to the 10,000g pellet was greater than that to the 600g pellet. The specific binding was linear up to about 100 mg fresh tissue, and was saturable with increasing amounts of membrane. The specific binding was pH-, temperature-, and time-dependent, with the optimum pH at 7.4, and greater specific binding was obtained at 15 and 25 degrees than at 35 degrees. Scatchard analysis of liver binding gave an association constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 and a capacity of 105 fmol/mg protein. The receptor preparation was highly specific for GHs. Natural and recombinant eel GHs as well as recombinant salmon GH competed equally with 125I-eGH for the receptor sites of the 10,000g liver membrane. Ovine GH was more potent in displacing the labeled eGH than the homologous eel hormone. Tilapia GH and ovine prolactin (PRL) were needed in greater amounts (40 times) than eGH to displace the labeled eGH. Salmon and tilapia PRLs were still less potent (500 times) than eGH. There was no displacement with eel PRL. No significant change in the specific binding was seen 1 week after hypophysectomy, whereas injection of eGH into the hypophysectomized eel caused a significant reduction after 24 hr. The binding to the membrane fractions from gills, kidney, muscle, intestine, and brain was low and exclusively nonspecific, indicating the presence of specific GH receptors predominantly in the liver

  15. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brh2-Dss1 interplay enables properly controlled recombination in Ustilago maydis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojic, Milorad; Zhou, Qingwen; Lisby, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Brh2, the BRCA2 homolog in Ustilago maydis, functions in recombinational repair of DNA damage by regulating Rad51 and is, in turn, regulated by Dss1. Dss1 is not required for Brh2 stability in vivo, nor for Brh2 to associate with Rad51, but is required for formation of green fluorescent protein...

  17. Chromosomal transformation in Bacillus subtilis is a non-polar recombination reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Carrasco (Begoña); E. Serrano (Ester); H. Sanchez (Humberto); C. Wyman (Claire); J.C. Alonso (Juan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNatural chromosomal transformation is one of the primary driving forces of bacterial evolution. This reaction involves the recombination of the internalized linear single-stranded (ss) DNA with the homologous resident duplex via RecA-mediated integration in concert with SsbA and DprA or

  18. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  19. Initiation of Meiotic Recombination in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is initiated by the induction of programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. DSB repair promotes homologous interactions and pairing and leads to the formation of crossovers (COs, which are required for the proper reductional segregation at the first meiotic division. In mammals, several hundred DSBs are generated at the beginning of meiotic prophase by the catalytic activity of SPO11. Currently it is not well understood how the frequency and timing of DSB formation and their localization are regulated. Several approaches in humans and mice have provided an extensive description of the localization of initiation events based on CO mapping, leading to the identification and characterization of preferred sites (hotspots of initiation. This review presents the current knowledge about the proteins known to be involved in this process, the sites where initiation takes place, and the factors that control hotspot localization.

  20. Scarless and sequential gene modification in Pseudomonas using PCR product flanked by short homology regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Rubing

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lambda Red recombination system has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in various bacteria and fungi. The procedure consists of electroporating a polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragment containing antibiotic cassette flanked by homology regions to the target locus into a strain that can express the lambda Red proteins (Gam, Bet, Exo. Results Here a scarless gene modification strategy based on the Red recombination system has been developed to modify Pseudomonas genome DNA via sequential deletion of multiple targets. This process was mediated by plasmid pRKaraRed encoding the Red proteins regulated by PBAD promoter, which was functional in P. aeruginosa as well as in other bacteria. First the target gene was substituted for the sacB-bla cassette flanked by short homology regions (50 bp, and then this marker gene cassette could be replaced by the PCR fragment flanking itself, generating target-deleted genome without any remnants and no change happened to the surrounding region. Twenty genes involved in the synthesis and regulation pathways of the phenazine derivate, pyocyanin, were modified, including one single-point mutation and deletion of two large operons. The recombination efficiencies ranged from 88% to 98%. Multiple-gene modification was also achieved, generating a triple-gene deletion strain PCA (PAO1, ΔphzHΔphzMΔphzS, which could produce another phenazine derivate, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA, efficiently and exclusively. Conclusions This lambda Red-based technique can be used to generate scarless and sequential gene modification mutants of P. aeruginosa efficiently, using one-step PCR product flanked by short homology regions. Single-point mutation, scarless deletion of genes can be achieved easily in less than three days. This method may give a new way to construct genetically modified P. aeruginosa strains more efficiently and advance the regulatory network study of this organism.

  1. GPCR Homology Model Generation for Lead Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautermann, Christofer S

    2018-01-01

    The vast increase of recently solved GPCR X-ray structures forms the basis for GPCR homology modeling to atomistic accuracy. Nowadays, homology models can be employed for GPCR-ligand optimization and have been reported as invaluable tools for drug design in the last few years. Elucidation of the complex GPCR pharmacology and the associated GPCR conformations made clear that different homology models have to be constructed for different activation states of the GPCRs. Therefore, templates have to be chosen accordingly to their sequence homology as well as to their activation state. The subsequent ligand placement is nontrivial, as some recent X-ray structures show very unusual ligand binding sites and solvent involvement, expanding the space of the putative ligand binding site from the generic retinal binding pocket to the whole receptor. In the present study, a workflow is presented starting from the selection of the target sequence, guiding through the GPCR modeling process, and finishing with ligand placement and pose validation.

  2. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them.

  3. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...

  4. Homology modeling of γ-aminobutyrateaminotransferase, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    γ-Aminobutyrate aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal phosphate dependent homodimeric enzyme of 50-kD subunits. It is a potential drug target against epilepsy. The three-dimensional structure of GABA-AT is not experimentally known, and we thus resorted to homology modelling to build a model based on x-ray ...

  5. On the homology length spectrum of surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Massart, Daniel; Parlier, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    On a surface with a Finsler metric, we investigate the asymptotic growth of the number of closed geodesics of length less than L which minimize length among all geodesic multicurves in the same homology class. An important class of surfaces which are of interest to us are hyperbolic surfaces.

  6. Homology and cohomology of Rees semigroup algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Niels; Gourdeau, Frédéric; White, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra....

  7. Nash equilibria via duality and homological selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Given a multifunction from to the -fold symmetric product Symk(X), we use the Dold–Thom theorem to establish a homological selection theorem. ... The domain part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, ...

  8. Analysis of the role of the gene bipA, encoding the major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein in the secretion of homologous and heterologous proteins in black Aspergilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Gemeren, I.A. van; Drint-Kuijvenhoven, J.; Hessing, J.G.M.; Muijlwijk van - Harteveld, G.M.; Beijersbergen, A.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    1998-01-01

    The function of the endoplasmic-reticulum-localized chaperone binding protein (BiP) in relation to protein secretion in filamentous fungi was studied. It was shown that the overproduction of several homologous and heterologous recombinant proteins by Aspergillus strains induces the expression of

  9. Gateway Recombinational Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    The Gateway recombinatorial cloning system was developed for cloning multiple DNA fragments in parallel (e.g., in 96-well formats) in a standardized manner using the same enzymes. Gateway cloning is based on the highly specific integration and excision reactions of bacteriophage λ into and out of the Escherichia coli genome. Because the sites of recombination (" att " sites) are much longer (25-242 bp) than restriction sites, they are extremely unlikely to occur by chance in DNA fragments. Therefore, the same recombination enzyme can be used to robustly clone many different fragments of variable size in parallel reactions. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de

    2015-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  11. Polar representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2008-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic parameters: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. Any one of these quantities can be expressed as a function of any two others. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves, also referred to as four-quadrant curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, the four-quadrant configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the polar form appears as the simplest way to represent the homologous curves. In the polar method, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a

  12. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de, E-mail: velosom@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  13. Substrate and target sequence length influence RecTE(Psy recombineering efficiency in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmeng Bao

    Full Text Available We are developing a new recombineering system to assist experimental manipulation of the Pseudomonas syringae genome. P. syringae is a globally dispersed plant pathogen and an important model species used to study the molecular biology of bacteria-plant interactions. We previously identified orthologs of the lambda Red bet/exo and Rac recET genes in P. syringae and confirmed that they function in recombineering using ssDNA and dsDNA substrates. Here we investigate the properties of dsDNA substrates more closely to determine how they influence recombineering efficiency. We find that the length of flanking homologies and length of the sequences being inserted or deleted have a large effect on RecTE(Psy mediated recombination efficiency. These results provide information about the design elements that should be considered when using recombineering.

  14. A Mixture Model and a Hidden Markov Model to Simultaneously Detect Recombination Breakpoints and Reconstruct Phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Boussau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a pervasive biological process that affects sequences in all living organisms and viruses. In the presence of recombination, the evolutionary history of an alignment of homologous sequences cannot be properly depicted by a single bifurcating tree: some sites have evolved along a specific phylogenetic tree, others have followed another path. Methods available to analyse recombination in sequences usually involve an analysis of the alignment through sliding-windows, or are particularly demanding in computational resources, and are often limited to nucleotide sequences. In this article, we propose and implement a Mixture Model on trees and a phylogenetic Hidden Markov Model to reveal recombination breakpoints while searching for the various evolutionary histories that are present in an alignment known to have undergone homologous recombination. These models are sufficiently efficient to be applied to dozens of sequences on a single desktop computer, and can handle equivalently nucleotide or protein sequences. We estimate their accuracy on simulated sequences and test them on real data.

  15. A Mixture Model and a Hidden Markov Model to Simultaneously Detect Recombination Breakpoints and Reconstruct Phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Boussau

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a pervasive biological process that affects sequences in all living organisms and viruses. In the presence of recombination, the evolutionary history of an alignment of homologous sequences cannot be properly depicted by a single bifurcating tree: some sites have evolved along a specific phylogenetic tree, others have followed another path. Methods available to analyse recombination in sequences usually involve an analysis of the alignment through sliding-windows, or are particularly demanding in computational resources, and are often limited to nucleotide sequences. In this article, we propose and implement a Mixture Model on trees and a phylogenetic Hidden Markov Model to reveal recombination breakpoints while searching for the various evolutionary histories that are present in an alignment known to have undergone homologous recombination. These models are sufficiently efficient to be applied to dozens of sequences on a single desktop computer, and can handle equivalently nucleotide or protein sequences. We estimate their accuracy on simulated sequences and test them on real data.

  16. Recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Emilia; Alvarez, Pedro J.J.

    2014-01-01

    No molecular cloning technique is considered universally reliable, and many suffer from being too laborious, complex, or expensive. Restriction-free cloning is among the simplest, most rapid, and cost-effective methods, but does not always provide successful results. We modified this method to enhance its success rate through the use of exponential amplification coupled with homologous end-joining. This new method, recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning, significantly extends the application of restriction-free cloning, and allows efficient vector construction with much less time and effort when restriction-free cloning fails to provide satisfactory results. The following modifications were made to the protocol:•Limited number of PCR cycles for both megaprimer synthesis and the cloning reaction to reduce error propagation.•Elimination of phosphorylation and ligation steps previously reported for cloning methods that used exponential amplification, through the inclusion of a reverse primer in the cloning reaction with a 20 base pair region of homology to the forward primer.•The inclusion of 1 M betaine to enhance both reaction specificity and yield. PMID:26150930

  17. Failure of homologous synapsis and sex-specific reproduction problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eKurahashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The prophase of meiosis I ensures the correct segregation of chromosomes to each daughter cell. This includes the pairing, synapsis and recombination of homologous chromosomes. A subset of chromosomal abnormalities, including translocation and inversion, disturbs these processes, resulting in the failure to complete synapsis. This activates the meiotic pachytene checkpoint, and the gametes are fated to undergo cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Spermatogenic cells appear to be more vulnerable to the pachytene checkpoint, and male carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are more susceptible to infertility. In contrast, oocytes tend to bypass the checkpoint and instead generate other problems, such as chromosome imbalance that often leads to recurrent pregnancy loss in female carriers. Recent advances in genetic manipulation technologies have increased our knowledge about the pachytene checkpoint and surveillance systems that detect chromosomal synapsis. This review focuses on the consequences of synapsis failure in humans and provides an overview of the mechanisms involved. We also discuss the sexual dimorphism of the involved pathways that leads to the differences in reproductive outcomes between males and females.

  18. A somatic origin of homologous Robertsonian translocations and isochromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A. (Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)); Basaran, S.; Yueksel-Apak, M. (Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey)); Neri, G. (Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)); Serville, F. (Hopital d' Enfants Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)); Balicek, P.; Haluza, R. (Univ. Hospital of Hradeck Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)); Farah, L.M.S. (Escuola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil)) (and others)

    1994-02-01

    One t(14q 14q), three t(15q 15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. 75 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Thomason

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion.

  20. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo (Jose); L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human

  1. Germline Chromothripsis Driven by L1-Mediated Retrotransposition and Alu/Alu Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Bak, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Chromothripsis (CTH) is a phenomenon where multiple localized double-stranded DNA breaks result in complex genomic rearrangements. Although the DNA-repair mechanisms involved in CTH have been described, the mechanisms driving the localized "shattering" process remain unclear. High-throughput sequ...

  2. The epistatic relationship between BRCA2 and the other RAD51 mediators in homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Qing

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available RAD51 recombinase polymerizes at the site of double-strand breaks (DSBs where it performs DSB repair. The loss of RAD51 causes extensive chromosomal breaks, leading to apoptosis. The polymerization of RAD51 is regulated by a number of RAD51 mediators, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD52, SFR1, SWS1, and the five RAD51 paralogs, including XRCC3. We here show that brca2-null mutant cells were able to proliferate, indicating that RAD51 can perform DSB repair in the absence of BRCA2. We disrupted the BRCA1, RAD52, SFR1, SWS1, and XRCC3 genes in the brca2-null cells. All the resulting double-mutant cells displayed a phenotype that was very similar to that of the brca2-null cells. We suggest that BRCA2 might thus serve as a platform to recruit various RAD51 mediators at the appropriate position at the DNA-damage site.

  3. Genetic analysis of the ADGF multigene family by homologous recombination and gene conversion in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Tomáš; Gaži, Michal; Žurovec, Michal; Bryant, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 165, - (2003), s. 653-666 ISSN 0016-6731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007107; GA ČR GA204/01/1022; GA MŠk ME 549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Growth-factor-melanogaster-adenosine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.276, year: 2003

  4. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids

  5. Polymorphisms of the Homologous Recombination Gene RAD51 in Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Synowiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We investigated the association between genotypes and haplotypes of the c.-61G>T (rs 1801320 and c.-98G>C (rs 1801321 polymorphisms of the RAD51 gene and the occurrence of keratoconus (KC and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD in dependence on some environmental factors. Methods. The polymorphisms were genotyped in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 100 KC and 100 FECD patients as well as 150 controls with PCR-RFLP. Results. The G/T genotype of the c.-61G>T polymorphism was associated with significantly increased frequency occurrence of KC (crude OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.75–5.13. On the other hand, the G/G genotype of this polymorphism was positively correlated with a decreased occurrence of this disease (crude OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31–0.88. We did not find any correlation between genotypes/alleles of the c.-98G>C polymorphism and the occurrence of KC. We also found that the G/G genotype and G allele of the c.-98G>C polymorphism had a protective effect against FECD (crude OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28–0.92; crude OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30–0.92, resp., while the G/C genotype and the C allele increased FECD occurrence (crude OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.01–3.36; crude OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09–3.29, resp.. Conclusions. The c.-61T/T and c.-98G>C polymorphisms of the RAD51 gene may have a role in the KC and FECD pathogenesis and can be considered as markers in these diseases.

  6. Genetic analysis of the ADGF multigene family by homologous recombination and gene conversion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Tomas; Gazi, Michal; Zurovec, Michal; Bryant, Peter J

    2003-10-01

    Many Drosophila genes exist as members of multigene families and within each family the members can be functionally redundant, making it difficult to identify them by classical mutagenesis techniques based on phenotypic screening. We have addressed this problem in a genetic analysis of a novel family of six adenosine deaminase-related growth factors (ADGFs). We used ends-in targeting to introduce mutations into five of the six ADGF genes, taking advantage of the fact that five of the family members are encoded by a three-gene cluster and a two-gene cluster. We used two targeting constructs to introduce loss-of-function mutations into all five genes, as well as to isolate different combinations of multiple mutations, independent of phenotypic consequences. The results show that (1) it is possible to use ends-in targeting to disrupt gene clusters; (2) gene conversion, which is usually considered a complication in gene targeting, can be used to help recover different mutant combinations in a single screening procedure; (3) the reduction of duplication to a single copy by induction of a double-strand break is better explained by the single-strand annealing mechanism than by simple crossing over between repeats; and (4) loss of function of the most abundantly expressed family member (ADGF-A) leads to disintegration of the fat body and the development of melanotic tumors in mutant larvae.

  7. Genetic analysis of the ADGF multigene family by homologous recombination and gene conversion in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Tomáš; Gaži, Michal; Žurovec, Michal; Bryant, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 165, - (2003), s. 653-666 ISSN 0016-6731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007107; GA ČR GA204/01/1022; GA MŠk ME 549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Growth-factor- melanogaster -adenosine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.276, year: 2003

  8. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...

  9. Homologous recombination control by the anti-apoptotic onco-protein Bcl-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumay, A.

    2003-12-01

    This research thesis deals with the different biological mechanisms, notably the repair and apoptosis mechanisms induced by irradiation in cells. After a presentation of the genotoxic stress and DNA repair mechanisms, the author discusses the cellular response to a DNA double-strand break, and the regulation of these response mechanisms (how a cellular response emerges: life or death). The next part deals with the apoptosis (cell death by necrosis or apoptosis), and presents the BCL-2 protein family. Results are then reported on laboratory studies of the effect of this protein family

  10. Homologous recombination, sister chromatid cohesion, and chromosome condensation in mammalian meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijpe, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the life cycle of sexually reproducing eukaryotes, haploid and diploid generations of cells alternate. Two types of cell division occur in such a life cycle: mitosis and meiosis. They are compared in chapter 1 . Haploid and

  11. In Vitro Study of the Independent and Combined Effects of Recombinant Human GM-CSF and G-CSF on Normal Bone Marrow Granulocytes : GM-CSF Enhances the Growth Effect but Suppresses the Terminal Maturation-inducing Effect of G-CSF

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Jinnai, Itsuro; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Yoshida, Yoshiharu; Ichimaru, Michito; Golde, Davidw.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the independent and combined effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony- stimularting factor (rhG-CSF) and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the growth and maturation of neutrophilic granulocytes. Absolute granulocyte numbers, cellular composition, and neutrophil alkailne phosphatase (NAP) activity were examined after normal nonphagocytic bone marrow cells were cultured for seven days with rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and a combination of b...

  12. Linker-mediated recombinational subcloning of large DNA fragments using yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Christopher K; Sims, Elizabeth H; Olson, Maynard V

    2002-01-01

    The homologous recombination pathway in yeast is an ideal tool for the sequence-specific assembly of plasmids. Complementary 80-nucleotide oligonucleotides that overlap a vector and a target fragment were found to serve as efficient recombination linkers for fragment subcloning. Using electroporation, single-stranded 80-mers were adequate for routine plasmid construction. A cycloheximide-based counterselection was introduced to increase the specificity of cloning by homologous recombination relative to nonspecific vector background. Reconstruction experiments suggest this counterselection increased cloning specificity by 100-fold. Cycloheximide counterselection was used in conjunction with 80-bp linkers to subclone targeted regions from bacterial artificial chromosomes. This technology may find broad application in the final stages of completing the Human Genome Sequencing Project and in applications of BAC clones to the functional analysis of complex genomes.

  13. Rad52 forms DMA repair and recombination centers during S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Rothstein, R.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2001-01-01

    cerevisiae, homologous recombination is the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. The key role played by Rad52 in this pathway has been attributed to its ability to seek out and mediate annealing of homologous DNA strands. In this study, we find that S. cerevisiae Rad52 fused to green...... fluorescent protein (GFP) is fully functional in DNA repair and recombination. After induction of DNA double-strand breaks by gamma -irradiation, meiosis, or the HO endonuclease, Rad52-GFP relocalizes from a diffuse nuclear distribution to distinct foci. Interestingly, Rad52 foci are formed almost exclusively...... during the 5 phase of mitotic cells, consistent with coordination between recombinational repair and DNA replication. This notion is further strengthened by the dramatic increase in the frequency of Rad52 focus formation observed in a pol12-100 replication mutant and a mec1 DNA damage checkpoint mutant...

  14. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  15. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  16. Recombination Phenotypes of Escherichia coli greA Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elongation factor GreA binds to RNA polymerase and modulates transcriptional pausing. Some recent research suggests that the primary role of GreA may not be to regulate gene expression, but rather, to promote the progression of replication forks which collide with RNA polymerase, and which might otherwise collapse. Replication fork collapse is known to generate dsDNA breaks, which can be recombinogenic. It follows that GreA malfunction could have consequences affecting homologous recombination. Results Escherichia coli mutants bearing substitutions of the active site acidic residues of the transcription elongation factor GreA, D41N and E44K, were isolated as suppressors of growth inhibition by a toxic variant of the bacteriophage lambda Red-beta recombination protein. These mutants, as well as a D41A greA mutant and a greA deletion, were tested for proficiency in recombination events. The mutations were found to increase the efficiency of RecA-RecBCD-mediated and RecA-Red-mediated recombination, which are replication-independent, and to decrease the efficiency of replication-dependent Red-mediated recombination. Conclusion These observations provide new evidence for a role of GreA in resolving conflicts between replication and transcription.

  17. Cyclin-dependent protein kinase and cyclin homologs SSN3 and SSN8 contribute to transcriptional control in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchin, S; Yeghiayan, P; Carlson, M

    1995-01-01

    The SSN3 and SSN8 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by mutations that suppress a defect in SNF1, a protein kinase required for release from glucose repression. Mutations in SSN3 and SSN8 also act synergistically with a mutation of the MIG1 repressor protein to relieve glucose repression. We have cloned the SSN3 and SSN8 genes. SSN3 encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase (cdk) homolog and is identical to UME5. SSN8 encodes a cyclin homolog 35% identical to human cyclin C. SS...

  18. A simple and robust statistical test for detecting the presence of recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruen, Trevor C; Philippe, Hervé; Bryant, David

    2006-04-01

    Recombination is a powerful evolutionary force that merges historically distinct genotypes. But the extent of recombination within many organisms is unknown, and even determining its presence within a set of homologous sequences is a difficult question. Here we develop a new statistic, phi(w), that can be used to test for recombination. We show through simulation that our test can discriminate effectively between the presence and absence of recombination, even in diverse situations such as exponential growth (star-like topologies) and patterns of substitution rate correlation. A number of other tests, Max chi2, NSS, a coalescent-based likelihood permutation test (from LDHat), and correlation of linkage disequilibrium (both r2 and /D'/) with distance, all tend to underestimate the presence of recombination under strong population growth. Moreover, both Max chi2 and NSS falsely infer the presence of recombination under a simple model of mutation rate correlation. Results on empirical data show that our test can be used to detect recombination between closely as well as distantly related samples, regardless of the suspected rate of recombination. The results suggest that phi(w) is one of the best approaches to distinguish recurrent mutation from recombination in a wide variety of circumstances.

  19. Bacterial phylogenetic reconstruction from whole genomes is robust to recombination but demographic inference is not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedge, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J

    2014-11-25

    Phylogenetic inference in bacterial genomics is fundamental to understanding problems such as population history, antimicrobial resistance, and transmission dynamics. The field has been plagued by an apparent state of contradiction since the distorting effects of recombination on phylogeny were discovered more than a decade ago. Researchers persist with detailed phylogenetic analyses while simultaneously acknowledging that recombination seriously misleads inference of population dynamics and selection. Here we resolve this paradox by showing that phylogenetic tree topologies based on whole genomes robustly reconstruct the clonal frame topology but that branch lengths are badly skewed. Surprisingly, removing recombining sites can exacerbate branch length distortion caused by recombination. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is a popular approach for understanding the relatedness of bacteria in a population from differences in their genome sequences. However, bacteria frequently exchange regions of their genomes by a process called homologous recombination, which violates a fundamental assumption of phylogenetic methods. Since many researchers continue to use phylogenetics for recombining bacteria, it is important to understand how recombination affects the conclusions drawn from these analyses. We find that whole-genome sequences afford great accuracy in reconstructing evolutionary relationships despite concerns surrounding the presence of recombination, but the branch lengths of the phylogenetic tree are indeed badly distorted. Surprisingly, methods to reduce the impact of recombination on branch lengths can exacerbate the problem. Copyright © 2014 Hedge and Wilson.

  20. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-06-16

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  1. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  2. Co-infection with two strains of Brome mosaic bromovirus reveals common RNA recombination sites in different hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolondam, Beivy; Rao, Parth; Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Weber, Philipp H; Dzianott, Aleksandra; Johns, Mitrick A; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported intra-segmental crossovers in Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. In this work, we studied the homologous recombination of BMV RNA in three different hosts: barley ( Hordeum vulgare) , Chenopodium quinoa , and Nicotiana benthamiana that were co-infected with two strains of BMV: Russian (R) and Fescue (F). Our work aimed at (1) establishing the frequency of recombination, (2) mapping the recombination hot spots, and (3) addressing host effects. The F and R nucleotide sequences differ from each other at many translationally silent nucleotide substitutions. We exploited this natural variability to track the crossover sites. Sequencing of a large number of cDNA clones revealed multiple homologous crossovers in each BMV RNA segment, in both the whole plants and protoplasts. Some recombination hot spots mapped at similar locations in different hosts, suggesting a role for viral factors, but other sites depended on the host. Our results demonstrate the chimeric ('mosaic') nature of the BMV RNA genome.

  3. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this "historical" approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of 'my closest relative looks and behaves like I do', often referred to as 'guilt by association'. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated 'phylogenomics pipelines' have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  4. Creating Porcine Biomedical Models Through Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B. Schook

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genomics provide genetic information from humans and other mammals (mouse, rat, dog and primates traditionally used as models as well as new candidates (pigs and cattle. In addition, linked enabling technologies, such as transgenesis and animal cloning, provide innovative ways to design and perform experiments to dissect complex biological systems. Exploitation of genomic information overcomes the traditional need to choose naturally occurring models. Thus, investigators can utilize emerging genomic knowledge and tools to create relevant animal models. This approach is referred to as reverse genetics. In contrast to ‘forward genetics’, in which gene(s responsible for a particular phenotype are identified by positional cloning (phenotype to genotype, the ‘reverse genetics’ approach determines the function of a gene and predicts the phenotype of a cell, tissue, or organism (genotype to phenotype. The convergence of classical and reverse genetics, along with genomics, provides a working definition of a ‘genetic model’ organism (3. The recent construction of phenotypic maps defining quantitative trait loci (QTL in various domesticated species provides insights into how allelic variations contribute to phenotypic diversity. Targeted chromosomal regions are characterized by the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC contigs to isolate and characterize genes contributing towards phenotypic variation. Recombineering provides a powerful methodology to harvest genetic information responsible for phenotype. Linking recombineering with gene-targeted homologous recombination, coupled with nuclear transfer (NT technology can provide ‘clones’ of genetically modified animals.

  5. Language evolution: neural homologies and neuroinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael; Bota, Mihail

    2003-11-01

    This paper contributes to neurolinguistics by grounding an evolutionary account of the readiness of the human brain for language in the search for homologies between different cortical areas in macaque and human. We consider two hypotheses for this grounding, that of Aboitiz and Garci;a [Brain Res. Rev. 25 (1997) 381] and the Mirror System Hypothesis of Rizzolatti and Arbib [Trends Neurosci. 21 (1998) 188] and note the promise of computational modeling of neural circuitry of the macaque and its linkage to analysis of human brain imaging data. In addition to the functional differences between the two hypotheses, problems arise because they are grounded in different cortical maps of the macaque brain. In order to address these divergences, we have developed several neuroinformatics tools included in an on-line knowledge management system, the NeuroHomology Database, which is equipped with inference engines both to relate and translate information across equivalent cortical maps and to evaluate degrees of homology for brain regions of interest in different species.

  6. Homology among divergent Paleozoic tetrapod clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R L

    1999-01-01

    A stringent definition of homology is necessary to establish phylogenetic relationships among Paleozoic amphibians. Many derived characters exhibited by divergent clades of Carboniferous lepospondyls resemble those achieved convergently among Cenozoic squamates that have elongate bodies and reduced limbs, and by lineages of modern amphibians that have undergone miniaturization. Incongruent character distribution, poorly resolved cladograms and functionally improbable character transformations determined by phylogenetic analysis suggest that convergence was also common among Paleozoic amphibians with a skull length under 3 cm, including lepospondyls, early amniotes and the putative ancestors of modern amphibians. For this reason, it is injudicious to equate apparent synapomorphy (perceived common presence of a particular derived character in two putative sister-taxa) with strict homology of phylogenetic origin. Identification of homology by the similarity of structure, anatomical position and pattern of development is insufficient to establish the synapomorphy of bone and limb loss or precocial ossification of vertebral centra, which are common among small Paleozoic amphibians. The only way in which synapomorphies can be established definitively is through the discovery and recognition of the trait in question in basal members of each of the clades under study, and in their immediate common ancestors.

  7. Several aspects of some techniques avoiding homologous blood transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.S.M. van Woerkens (Liesbeth)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe use of homologous blood products during anesthesia and surgery is not without risks. Complications due to homologous blood transfusions include transfusion reactions, isosensitization, transmission of infections (including HIV, hepatitis, CMV) and immunosuppression (resuiting in

  8. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  9. Recombination and the origin of sequence diversity in the DRB MHC class II locus in chamois (Rupicapra spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaschl, Helmut; Suchentrunk, Franz; Hammer, Sabine; Goodman, Simon J

    2005-04-01

    We examined the evolutionary processes contributing to genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DRB locus in chamois (Rupicapra spp., subfamily Caprinae). We characterised the pattern of intragenic recombination (or homologous gene conversion) and quantified the amount of recombination in the genealogical history of the two chamois species, Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) and Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). We found evidence for intragenic recombination, and the estimated amount of population recombination suggests that recombination has been a significant process in generating DRB allelic diversity in the genealogical history of the genus Rupicapra. Moreover, positive selection appears to act on the same peptide-binding residues in both analysed chamois species, but not in identical intensity. Recombination coupled with positive selection drives the rapid evolution at the peptide-binding sites in the MHC class II DRB gene. Many chamois MHC class II DRB alleles are thus much younger than previously assumed.

  10. Computing Homology Group Generators of Images Using Irregular Graph Pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    Peltier , Samuel; Ion , Adrian; Haxhimusa , Yll; Kropatsch , Walter; Damiand , Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a method for computing homology groups and their generators of a 2D image, using a hierarchical structure i.e. irregular graph pyramid. Starting from an image, a hierarchy of the image is built, by two operations that preserve homology of each region. Instead of computing homology generators in the base where the number of entities (cells) is large, we first reduce the number of cells by a graph pyramid. Then homology generators are computed efficiently on...

  11. Exploring optimization parameters to increase ssDNA recombineering in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Neoh, Kar Mun; Sirias, Denise; Findley, Anthony S; Britton, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a technology which is used to make subtle changes in the chromosome of several bacterial genera. Cells which express a single-stranded DNA binding protein (RecT or Bet) are transformed with an oligonucleotide which is incorporated via an annealing and replication-dependent mechanism. By in silico analysis we identified ssDNA binding protein homologs in the genus Lactobacillus and Lactococcus lactis. To assess whether we could further improve the recombineering efficiency in Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 we expressed several RecT homologs in this strain. RecT derived from Enterococcus faecalis CRMEN 19 yielded comparable efficiencies compared with a native RecT protein, but none of the other proteins further increased the recombineering efficiency. We successfully improved recombineering efficiency 10-fold in L. lactis by increasing oligonucleotide concentration combined with the use of oligonucleotides containing phosphorothioate-linkages (PTOs). Surprisingly, neither increased oligonucleotide concentration nor PTO linkages enhanced recombineering in L. reuteri 6475. To emphasize the utility of this technology in improving probiotic features we modified six bases in a transcriptional regulatory element region of the pdu-operon of L. reuteri 6475, yielding a 3-fold increase in the production of the antimicrobial compound reuterin. Directed genetic modification of lactic acid bacteria through ssDNA recombineering will simplify strain improvement in a way that, when mutating a single base, is genetically indistinguishable from strains obtained through directed evolution.

  12. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  13. Phenotypic changes in Cyprinus carpiovar var. Jian introduced by sperm-mediated transgenesis of rearranged homologous DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheming; Ding, Weidong; Ren, Hongtao

    2013-09-01

    Common carp, specifically the Jian variety (Cyprinus carpiovar var. Jian), is an important Chinese and global aquatic stock for commercial foodstuff. Homologous recombination of carp gene sequences has been widely used in population genetics to broadly screen for beneficial phenotypical variations, thus optimizing artificially engineered carp stocks with Jian variety and native stock varieties. Random rearrangement of homologous DNA fragments from parent specimens of C. carpiovar var. Jian were attained by digestion of genomic DNA with MspI followed by religation and redigestion with EcoR I to specifically rearrange homologous DNA fragments of myostatin and microsatellite genes. Based on known characteristics of myostatin gene function, growth pattern changes in resultant carp mutant varieties was expected. DNA fragments were introduced into metaphase-II oocytes, resulting in one to several dozen insertions of homologous fragments into the host genome by sperm-mediated transgenesis. Introduction of rearranged homologous DNA fragments often resulted in phenotypic changes in C. carpiovar var. Jian, including significant phenotypic changes linked to growth rate at 4 months.

  14. Homology directed repair is unaffected by the absence of siRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Ines; Böttcher, Romy; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-09-30

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) defend the organism against harmful transcripts from exogenous (e.g. viral) or endogenous (e.g. transposons) sources. Recent publications describe the production of siRNAs induced by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and human cells, which suggests a conserved function. A current hypothesis is that break-induced small RNAs ensure efficient homologous recombination (HR). However, biogenesis of siRNAs is often intertwined with other small RNA species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which complicates interpretation of experimental results. In Drosophila, siRNAs are produced by Dcr-2 while miRNAs are processed by Dcr-1. Thus, it is possible to probe siRNA function without miRNA deregulation. We therefore examined DNA double-strand break repair after perturbation of siRNA biogenesis in cultured Drosophila cells as well as mutant flies. Our assays comprised reporters for the single-strand annealing pathway, homologous recombination and sensitivity to the DSB-inducing drug camptothecin. We could not detect any repair defects caused by the lack of siRNAs derived from the broken DNA locus. Since production of these siRNAs depends on local transcription, they may thus participate in RNA metabolism-an established function of siRNAs-rather than DNA repair. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. The relationship of recombination rate, genome structure, and patterns of molecular evolution across angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, George P; Burleigh, J Gordon; Burleigh, Gordon

    2015-09-16

    Although homologous recombination affects the efficacy of selection in populations, the pattern of recombination rate evolution and its effects on genome evolution across plants are largely unknown. Recombination can reduce genome size by enabling the removal of LTR retrotransposons, alter codon usage by GC biased gene conversion, contribute to complex histories of gene duplication and loss through tandem duplication, and enhance purifying selection on genes. Therefore, variation in recombination rate across species may explain some of the variation in genomic architecture as well as rates of molecular evolution. We used phylogenetic comparative methods to investigate the evolution of global meiotic recombination rate in angiosperms and its effects on genome architecture and selection at the molecular level using genetic maps and genome sequences from thirty angiosperm species. Recombination rate is negatively correlated with genome size, which is likely caused by the removal of LTR retrotransposons. After correcting recombination rates for euchromatin content, we also found an association between global recombination rate and average gene family size. This suggests a role for recombination in the preservation of duplicate genes or expansion of gene families. An analysis of the correlation between the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) and recombination rate in 3748 genes indicates that higher recombination rates are associated with an increased efficacy of purifying selection, suggesting that global recombination rates affect variation in rates of molecular evolution across distantly related angiosperm species, not just between populations. We also identified shifts in dN/dS for recombination proteins that are associated with shifts in global recombination rate across our sample of angiosperms. Although our analyses only reveal correlations, not mechanisms, and do not include potential covariates of recombination rate, like effective

  16. Germline progenitors escape the widespread phenomenon of homolog pairing during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Joyce

    Full Text Available Homolog pairing, which plays a critical role in meiosis, poses a potential risk if it occurs in inappropriate tissues or between nonallelic sites, as it can lead to changes in gene expression, chromosome entanglements, and loss-of-heterozygosity due to mitotic recombination. This is particularly true in Drosophila, which supports organismal-wide pairing throughout development. Discovered over a century ago, such extensive pairing has led to the perception that germline pairing in the adult gonad is an extension of the pairing established during embryogenesis and, therefore, differs from the mechanism utilized in most species to initiate pairing specifically in the germline. Here, we show that, contrary to long-standing assumptions, Drosophila meiotic pairing in the gonad is not an extension of pairing established during embryogenesis. Instead, we find that homologous chromosomes are unpaired in primordial germ cells from the moment the germline can be distinguished from the soma in the embryo and remain unpaired even in the germline stem cells of the adult gonad. We further establish that pairing originates immediately after the stem cell stage. This pairing occurs well before the initiation of meiosis and, strikingly, continues through the several mitotic divisions preceding meiosis. These discoveries indicate that the spatial organization of the Drosophila genome differs between the germline and the soma from the earliest moments of development and thus argue that homolog pairing in the germline is an active process as versus a passive continuation of pairing established during embryogenesis.

  17. Multiple evolutionary events involved in maintaining homologs of Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 (RPW8 locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are four Homologous to RPW8s (BrHRs in Brassica rapa and three in B. oleracea (BoHRs. B. napus (Bn is derived from diploidization of a hybrid between B. rapa and B. oleracea, thus should have seven homologs of RPW8 (BnHRs. It is unclear whether these genes are still maintained or lost in B. napus after diploidization and how they might have been evolved. Here we reported the identification and sequence polymorphisms of BnHRs from a set of B. napus accessions. Our data indicated that while the BoHR copy from B. oleracea is highly conserved, the BrHR copy from B. rapa is relatively variable in the B. napus genome owing to multiple evolutionary events, such as gene loss, point mutation, insertion, deletion and intragenic recombination. Given the overall high sequence homology of BnHR genes, it is not surprising that both intragenic recombination between two orthologs and two paralogs were detected in B. napus, which may explain the loss of BoHR genes in some B. napus accessions. When ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis, a C-terminally truncated version of BnHRa and BnHRb, as well as the full length BnHRd fused with YFP at their C-termini could trigger cell death in the absence of pathogens and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew disease. Moreover, subcellular localization analysis showed that both BnHRa-YFP and BnHRb-YFP were mainly localized to the extra-haustorial membrane (EHM encasing the haustorium of powdery mildew. Taken together, our data suggest that the duplicated BnHR genes might have been subjected to differential selection and at least some may play a role in defense and could serve as resistance resource in engineering disease-resistant plants.

  18. Homological Perturbation Theory for Nonperturbative Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2015-11-01

    We use the homological perturbation lemma to produce explicit formulas computing the class in the twisted de Rham complex represented by an arbitrary polynomial. This is a non-asymptotic version of the method of Feynman diagrams. In particular, we explain that phenomena usually thought of as particular to asymptotic integrals in fact also occur exactly: integrals of the type appearing in quantum field theory can be reduced in a totally algebraic fashion to integrals over an Euler-Lagrange locus, provided this locus is understood in the scheme-theoretic sense, so that imaginary critical points and multiplicities of degenerate critical points contribute.

  19. Homologous RXLR effectors from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Phytophthora sojae suppress immunity in distantly related plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse pathogens secrete effector proteins into plant cells to manipulate host cellular processes. Oomycete pathogens contain very large complements of predicted effector genes defined by an RXLR host cell entry motif. The genome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, downy mildew of Arabidopsis) ...

  20. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  1. REV7/MAD2L2: the multitasking maestro emerges as a barrier to recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Julian E

    2015-01-01

    REV7/MAD2L2 plays important roles in translesion DNA synthesis and mitotic control. Two new papers extend its gamut by revealing its unexpected participation in pathway choice during DNA double-strand break repair. By inhibiting 5′ DNA end resection downstream of 53BP1 and RIF1, REV7/MAD2L2 promotes non-homologous end joining at the expense of homologous recombination. Importantly, loss of REV7/MAD2L2 renders PARP inhibitors ineffective in BRCA1-deficient tumours, suggesting another possible mechanism for the acquisition of resistance to this important new class of drug. PMID:25896508

  2. REV7/MAD2L2: the multitasking maestro emerges as a barrier to recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Sale, Julian E

    2015-01-01

    REV7/MAD2L2 plays important roles in translesion DNA synthesis and mitotic control. Two new papers extend its gamut by revealing its unexpected participation in pathway choice during DNA double-strand break repair. By inhibiting 5′ DNA end resection downstream of 53BP1 and RIF1, REV7/MAD2L2 promotes non-homologous end joining at the expense of homologous recombination. Importantly, loss of REV7/MAD2L2 renders PARP inhibitors ineffective in BRCA1-deficient tumours, suggesting another possible ...

  3. Punctuated Distribution of Recombination Hotspots and Demarcation of Pericentromeric Regions in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Mehul S.; Jones, Valerie A.; Vallejos, C. Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High density genetic maps are a reliable tool for genetic dissection of complex plant traits. Mapping resolution is often hampered by the variable crossover and non-crossover events occurring across the genome, with pericentromeric regions (pCENR) showing highly suppressed recombination rates. The efficiency of linkage mapping can further be improved by characterizing and understanding the distribution of recombinational activity along individual chromosomes. In order to evaluate the genome wide recombination rate in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) we developed a SNP-based linkage map using the genotype-by-sequencing approach with a 188 recombinant inbred line family generated from an inter gene pool cross (Andean x Mesoamerican). We identified 1,112 SNPs that were subsequently used to construct a robust linkage map with 11 groups, comprising 513 recombinationally unique marker loci spanning 943 cM (LOD 3.0). Comparative analysis showed that the linkage map spanned >95% of the physical map, indicating that the map is almost saturated. Evaluation of genome-wide recombination rate indicated that at least 45% of the genome is highly recombinationally suppressed, and allowed us to estimate locations of pCENRs. We observed an average recombination rate of 0.25 cM/Mb in pCENRs as compared to the rest of genome that showed 3.72 cM/Mb. However, several hot spots of recombination were also detected with recombination rates reaching as high as 34 cM/Mb. Hotspots were mostly found towards the end of chromosomes, which also happened to be gene-rich regions. Analyzing relationships between linkage and physical map indicated a punctuated distribution of recombinational hot spots across the genome. PMID:25629314

  4. Designed construction of recombinant DNA at the ura3Δ0 locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Tomoaki; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Hirakawa, Yuki; Sakai, Ryota; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Nonklang, Sanom; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant DNAs are traditionally constructed using Escherichia coli plasmids. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomal gene targeting is a common technique, implying that the yeast homologous recombination system could be applied for recombinant DNA construction. In an attempt to use a S. cerevisiae chromosome for recombinant DNA construction, we selected the single ura3Δ0 locus as a gene targeting site. By selecting this single locus, repeated recombination using the surrounding URA3 sequences can be performed. The recombination system described here has several advantages over the conventional plasmid system, as it provides a method to confirm the selection of correct recombinants because transformation of the same locus replaces the pre-existing selection marker, resulting in the loss of the marker in successful recombinations. In addition, the constructed strains can serve as both PCR templates and hosts for preparing subsequent recombinant strains. Using this method, several yeast strains that contained selection markers, promoters, terminators and target genes at the ura3Δ0 locus were successfully generated. The system described here can potentially be applied for the construction of any recombinant DNA without the requirement for manipulations in E. coli. Interestingly, we unexpectedly found that several G/C-rich sequences used for fusion PCR lowered gene expression when located adjacent to the start codon. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of multicomponent recombinant vaccines against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in mice

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    Shao Meili

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine contagious pleuropneumonia (PCP is a highly contagious disease that is caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP and characterized by severe fibrinous necrotizing hemorrhagic pleuropneumonia, which is a severe threat to the swine industry. In addition to APP RTX-toxins I (ApxI, APP RTX-toxin II (ApxII, APP RTX-toxin III (ApxIII and Outer membrane protein (OMP, there may be other useful antigens that can contribute to protection. In the development of an efficacious vaccine against APP, the immunogenicities of multicomponent recombinant subunit vaccines were evaluated. Methods Six major virulent factor genes of APP, i.e., apxI, apxII, apxIII, APP RTX-toxins IV (apxIV, omp and type 4 fimbrial structural (apfa were expressed. BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant ApxI ( rApxI, recombinant ApxII (rApxII, recombinant ApxIII (rApxIII and recombinant OMP (rOMP (Group I; rApxI, rApxII, rApxIII, recombinant ApxIV (rApxIV, recombinant Apfa (rApfa and rOMP (Group II; APP serotype 1 (APP1 inactivated vaccine (Group III; or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (Control group, respectively. After the first immunization, mice were subjected to two booster immunizations at 2-week intervals, followed by challenge with APP1 Shope 4074 and APP2 S1536. Results The efficacy of the multicomponent recombinant subunit vaccines was evaluated on the basis of antibody titers, survival rates, lung lesions and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF detection of APP. The antibody level of Group I was significantly higher than those of the other three groups (P P P Conclusion The result indicates that the multicomponent recombinant subunit vaccine composed of rApxI, rApxII, rApxIII and rOMP can provide effective cross-protection against homologous and heterologous APP challenge.

  6. A trans-Complementing Recombination Trap Demonstrates a Low Propensity of Flaviviruses for Intermolecular Recombination▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher, Christian; Berger, Angelika; Mandl, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular recombination between the genomes of closely related RNA viruses can result in the emergence of novel strains with altered pathogenic potential and antigenicity. Although recombination between flavivirus genomes has never been demonstrated experimentally, the potential risk of generating undesirable recombinants has nevertheless been a matter of concern and controversy with respect to the development of live flavivirus vaccines. As an experimental system for investigating the ability of flavivirus genomes to recombine, we developed a “recombination trap,” which was designed to allow the products of rare recombination events to be selected and amplified. To do this, we established reciprocal packaging systems consisting of pairs of self-replicating subgenomic RNAs (replicons) derived from tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that could complement each other in trans and thus be propagated together in cell culture over multiple passages. Any infectious viruses with intact, full-length genomes that were generated by recombination of the two replicons would be selected and enriched by end point dilution passage, as was demonstrated in a spiking experiment in which a small amount of wild-type virus was mixed with the packaged replicons. Using the recombination trap and the JEV system, we detected two aberrant recombination events, both of which yielded unnatural genomes containing duplications. Infectious clones of both of these genomes yielded viruses with impaired growth properties. Despite the fact that the replicon pairs shared approximately 600 nucleotides of identical sequence where a precise homologous crossover event would have yielded a wild-type genome, this was not observed in any of these systems, and the TBEV and WNV systems did not yield any viable recombinant genomes at all. Our results show that intergenomic recombination can occur in the structural region of flaviviruses

  7. Homologous Basal Ganglia Network Models in Physiological and Parkinsonian Conditions

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    Jyotika Bahuguna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The classical model of basal ganglia has been refined in recent years with discoveries of subpopulations within a nucleus and previously unknown projections. One such discovery is the presence of subpopulations of arkypallidal and prototypical neurons in external globus pallidus, which was previously considered to be a primarily homogeneous nucleus. Developing a computational model of these multiple interconnected nuclei is challenging, because the strengths of the connections are largely unknown. We therefore use a genetic algorithm to search for the unknown connectivity parameters in a firing rate model. We apply a binary cost function derived from empirical firing rate and phase relationship data for the physiological and Parkinsonian conditions. Our approach generates ensembles of over 1,000 configurations, or homologies, for each condition, with broad distributions for many of the parameter values and overlap between the two conditions. However, the resulting effective weights of connections from or to prototypical and arkypallidal neurons are consistent with the experimental data. We investigate the significance of the weight variability by manipulating the parameters individually and cumulatively, and conclude that the correlation observed between the parameters is necessary for generating the dynamics of the two conditions. We then investigate the response of the networks to a transient cortical stimulus, and demonstrate that networks classified as physiological effectively suppress activity in the internal globus pallidus, and are not susceptible to oscillations, whereas parkinsonian networks show the opposite tendency. Thus, we conclude that the rates and phase relationships observed in the globus pallidus are predictive of experimentally observed higher level dynamical features of the physiological and parkinsonian basal ganglia, and that the multiplicity of solutions generated by our method may well be indicative of a natural

  8. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  9. Genome-Wide Patterns of Recombination in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettman, Jeremy R.; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant cause of acute nosocomial infections as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent reports of the intercontinental spread of a CF-specific epidemic strain, combined with high intrinsic levels of antibiotic resistance, have made this opportunistic pathogen an important public health concern. Strain-specific differences correlate with variation in clinical outcomes of infected CF patients, increasing the urgency to understand the evolutionary origin of genetic factors conferring important phenotypes that enable infection, virulence, or resistance. Here, we describe the genome-wide patterns of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in P. aeruginosa, and the extent to which the genomes are affected by these diversity-generating processes. Based on whole-genome sequence data from 32 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, we examined the rate and distribution of recombination along the genome, and its effect on the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Multiple lines of evidence suggested that recombination was common and usually involves short stretches of DNA (200–300 bp). Although mutation was the main source of nucleotide diversity, the import of polymorphisms by homologous recombination contributed nearly as much. We also identified the genomic regions with frequent recombination, and the specific sequences of recombinant origin within epidemic strains. The functional characteristics of the genes contained therein were examined for potential associations with a pathogenic lifestyle or adaptation to the CF lung environment. A common link between many of the high-recombination genes was their functional affiliation with the cell wall, suggesting that the products of recombination may be maintained by selection for variation in cell-surface molecules that allows for evasion of the host immune system. PMID:25480685

  10. HTP-1-dependent constraints coordinate homolog pairing and synapsis and promote chiasma formation during C. elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2005-11-15

    Synaptonemal complex (SC) assembly must occur between correctly paired homologous chromosomes to promote formation of chiasmata. Here, we identify the Caenorhabditis elegans HORMA-domain protein HTP-1 as a key player in coordinating establishment of homolog pairing and synapsis in C. elegans and provide evidence that checkpoint-like mechanisms couple these early meiotic prophase events. htp-1 mutants are defective in the establishment of pairing, but in contrast with the pairing-defective chk-2 mutant, SC assembly is not inhibited and generalized nonhomologous synapsis occurs. Extensive nonhomologous synapsis in htp-1; chk-2 double mutants indicates that HTP-1 is required for the inhibition of SC assembly observed in chk-2 gonads. htp-1 mutants show a decreased abundance of nuclei exhibiting a polarized organization that normally accompanies establishment of pairing; analysis of htp-1; syp-2 double mutants suggests that HTP-1 is needed to prevent premature exit from this polarized nuclear organization and that this exit stops homology search. Further, based on experiments monitoring the formation of recombination intermediates and crossover products, we suggest that htp-1 mutants are defective in preventing the use of sister chromatids as recombination partners. We propose a model in which HTP-1 functions to establish or maintain multiple constraints that operate to ensure coordination of events leading to chiasma formation.

  11. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, E B; Malone Link, E; Liu, L X; Johnson, C D; Lees, J A

    1999-03-16

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3'K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or the age-1 encoded PI3'K catalytic subunit homolog cause constitutive dauer formation and also affect the life span, brood size, and metabolism of nondauer animals. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations in the age-1 PI3'K and daf-2 IRL genes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN homolog. We establish that the PTEN homolog is encoded by daf-18, a previously uncloned gene that has been shown to interact genetically with the DAF-2 IRL AGE-1 PI3'K signaling pathway. This interaction provides clear genetic evidence that PTEN acts to antagonize PI3'K function in vivo. Given the conservation of the PI3'K signaling pathway between C. elegans and mammals, the analysis of daf-18 PTEN mutant nematodes should shed light on the role of human PTEN in the etiology of metabolic disease, aging, and cancer.

  13. Nonhomologous Recombination between Defective Poliovirus and Coxsackievirus Genomes Suggests a New Model of Genetic Plasticity for Picornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3′ end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. PMID:25096874

  14. A novel computational method identifies intra- and inter-species recombination events in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sanguinetti

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have determined an explosion in the number of sequenced bacterial genomes. Comparative sequence analysis frequently reveals evidences of homologous recombination occurring with different mechanisms and rates in different species, but the large-scale use of computational methods to identify recombination events is hampered by their high computational costs. Here, we propose a new method to identify recombination events in large datasets of whole genome sequences. Using a filtering procedure of the gene conservation profiles of a test genome against a panel of strains, this algorithm identifies sets of contiguous genes acquired by homologous recombination. The locations of the recombination breakpoints are determined using a statistical test that is able to account for the differences in the natural rate of evolution between different genes. The algorithm was tested on a dataset of 75 genomes of Staphylococcus aureus and 50 genomes comprising different streptococcal species, and was able to detect intra-species recombination events in S. aureus and in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Furthermore, we found evidences of an inter-species exchange of genetic material between S. pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis, a closely related commensal species that colonizes the same ecological niche. The method has been implemented in an R package, Reco, which is freely available from supplementary material, and provides a rapid screening tool to investigate recombination on a genome-wide scale from sequence data.

  15. Autologous antibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 specifically increases in the sera of patients with low-grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsutani Tomoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adult, and is usually not curable in spite of various therapeutic approaches. Clarification of the oncogenic process in its early stage is important for the diagnosis and effective therapy. Methods In the present study, we used the serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX to explore the subtle changes of the protein expression in low-grade glioma. The levels of serum autoantibodies to the SEREX-identified glioma-related antigens were analyzed by ELISA, and the epitope site was identified using deletion mutants and overlap peptide array. Changes in the serum autoantibody levels were examined in the rat glioma model using C6 and 9 L glioma cell lines. Results We identified 31 glioma-related antigens by SEREX. Among them, the serum level of autoantibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 (SH3GL1 was significantly higher in patients with low-grade glioma than healthy volunteers or high-grade gliomas. The 10 amino-acids at the C-terminal were identified as the epitope site by the overlap peptide array and the ELISA using deletion mutants. The tissue expression of SH3GL1 protein increased in proportion to glioma progression. The rat glioma models confirmed the increase of anti-SH3GL1 autoantibody level in the early stage and the suppression in the late stage. Conclusion SH3GL1 may be involved in the oncogenic process of gliomas and effectively elicit an autologous antibody response in low-grade gliomas. The immunological reaction to SH3GL1 would contribute to the establishment of a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for gliomas.

  16. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejith J.; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S.; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Jin, Victor X.; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development. PMID:26941120

  17. [Construction of subtractive cDNA libraries of the sporogony stage of Eimeria tenella by suppression subtractive hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hong-Yu; Lin, Jiao-Jiao; Zhao, Qi-Ping; Dong, Hui; Jiang, Lian-Lian; Wang, Xin; Han, Jing-Fang; Huang, Bing

    2007-11-01

    In order to clone and identify differentially expressed genes in the sporogony stage of Eimeria tenella, the cDNAs from unsporulated oocysts and sporulated oocysts of E. tenella were used as driver, respectively, the cDNAs from sporozoites of E. tenella was used tester, Two subtractive cDNA libraries of sporozoites were constructed by using the technique of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). the cDNAs from unsporulated oocysts was used driver, the cDNAs from sporulated ooceysts was used tester, one subtractive cDNA library of sporulated oocysts was constructed. PCR amplification revealed that the two subtractive cDNA libraries of sporozoites and one subtractive cDNA library of sporulated oocysts contained approximated 96%, 96% and 98% recombinant clones, respectively. Fifty positive clones were sequenced and analyzed in GenBank with Blast search from three subtractive cDNA libraries, respectively, thirteen unique sequences were found from the subtractive cDNA library of sporulated oocysts, eight ESTs shared significant identity with previously described. A total of forty unique sequences were obtained from the two subtractive cDNA libraries, nine ESTs shared significant identity with previously described, the other sequences represent novel genes of E. tenella with no significant homology to the proteins in Genbank. These results have provided the foundation for cloning new genes of E. tenella and further studying new approaches to control coccidiosis.

  18. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  19. Clustering evolving proteins into homologous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Mahbob, Maisarah; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-04-08

    Clustering sequences into groups of putative homologs (families) is a critical first step in many areas of comparative biology and bioinformatics. The performance of clustering approaches in delineating biologically meaningful families depends strongly on characteristics of the data, including content bias and degree of divergence. New, highly scalable methods have recently been introduced to cluster the very large datasets being generated by next-generation sequencing technologies. However, there has been little systematic investigation of how characteristics of the data impact the performance of these approaches. Using clusters from a manually curated dataset as reference, we examined the performance of a widely used graph-based Markov clustering algorithm (MCL) and a greedy heuristic approach (UCLUST) in delineating protein families coded by three sets of bacterial genomes of different G+C content. Both MCL and UCLUST generated clusters that are comparable to the reference sets at specific parameter settings, although UCLUST tends to under-cluster compositionally biased sequences (G+C content 33% and 66%). Using simulated data, we sought to assess the individual effects of sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity, and underlying G+C content. Performance decreased with increasing sequence divergence, decreasing among-site rate variation, and increasing G+C bias. Two MCL-based methods recovered the simulated families more accurately than did UCLUST. MCL using local alignment distances is more robust across the investigated range of sequence features than are greedy heuristics using distances based on global alignment. Our results demonstrate that sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity and content bias can individually and in combination affect the accuracy with which MCL and UCLUST can recover homologous protein families. For application to data that are more divergent, and exhibit higher among-site rate variation and/or content bias, MCL may often be the better

  20. More on homological supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behtash, Alireza

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we first solve complex Morse flow equations for the simplest case of a bosonic harmonic oscillator to discuss localization in the context of Picard-Lefschetz theory. We briefly touch on the exact non-BPS solutions of the bosonized supersymmetric quantum mechanics on algebraic geometric grounds and report that their complex phases can be accessed through the cohomology of WKB 1-form of the underlying singular spectral curve subject to necessary cohomological corrections for nonzero genus. Motivated by Picard-Lefschetz theory, we write down a general formula for the index of N =4 quantum mechanics with background R -symmetry gauge fields. We conjecture that certain symmetries of the refined Witten index and singularities of the moduli space may be used to determine the correct intersection coefficients. A few examples, where this conjecture holds, are shown in both linear and closed quivers with rank-one quiver gauge groups. The R -anomaly removal along the "Morsified" relative homology cycles also called "Lefschetz thimbles" is shown to lead to the appearance of Stokes lines. We show that the Fayet-Iliopoulos parameters appear in the intersection coefficients for the relative homology of the quiver quantum mechanics resulting from dimensional reduction of 2 d N =(2 ,2 ) gauge theory on a circle and explicitly calculate integrals along the Lefschetz thimbles in N =4 C Pk -1 model. The Stokes jumping of coefficients and its relation to wall crossing phenomena is briefly discussed. We also find that the notion of "on-the-wall" index is related to the invariant Lefschetz thimbles under Stokes phenomena. An implication of the Lefschetz thimbles in constructing knots from quiver quantum mechanics is indicated.

  1. A local homology theory for linearly compact modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tu Cuong; Tran Tuan Nam

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a local homology theory for linearly modules which is in some sense dual to the local cohomology theory of A. Grothendieck. Some basic properties of local homology modules are shown such as: the vanishing and non-vanishing, the noetherianness of local homology modules. By using duality, we extend some well-known results in theory of local cohomology of A. Grothendieck. (author)

  2. MutT Homolog 1 (MTH1) maintains multiple KRAS-driven pro-malignant pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A; Burton, D G A; Halvorsen, K; Balkan, W; Reiner, T; Perez-Stable, C; Cohen, A; Munoz, A; Giribaldi, M G; Singh, S; Robbins, D J; Nguyen, D M; Rai, P

    2015-05-14

    Oncogenic RAS promotes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which mediate pro-malignant signaling but can also trigger DNA damage-induced tumor suppression. Thus RAS-driven tumor cells require redox-protective mechanisms to mitigate the damaging aspects of ROS. Here, we show that MutT Homolog 1 (MTH1), the mammalian 8-oxodGTPase that sanitizes oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool, is important for maintaining several KRAS-driven pro-malignant traits in a nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) model. MTH1 suppression in KRAS-mutant NSCLC cells impairs proliferation and xenograft tumor formation. Furthermore, MTH1 levels modulate KRAS-induced transformation of immortalized lung epithelial cells. MTH1 expression is upregulated by oncogenic KRAS and correlates positively with high KRAS levels in NSCLC human tumors. At a molecular level, in p53-competent KRAS-mutant cells, MTH1 loss provokes DNA damage and induction of oncogene-induced senescence. In p53-nonfunctional KRAS-mutant cells, MTH1 suppression does not produce DNA damage but reduces proliferation and leads to an adaptive decrease in KRAS expression levels. Thus, MTH1 not only enables evasion of oxidative DNA damage and its consequences, but can also function as a molecular rheostat for maintaining oncogene expression at optimal levels. Accordingly, our results indicate MTH1 is a novel and critical component of oncogenic KRAS-associated malignancy and its inhibition is likely to yield significant tumor-suppressive outcomes in KRAS-driven tumors.

  3. Hadron Correlations and Parton Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, R.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: rjfries@comp.tamu.edu

    2007-02-15

    Parton recombination has been found to be an extremely useful model to understand hadron production at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. It is particularly important to explore its connections with hard processes. This article reviews some of the aspects of the quark recombination model and places particular emphasis on hadron correlations.

  4. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role...

  5. Colored Kauffman homology and super-A-polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawata, Satoshi; Ramadevi, P.; Zodinmawia

    2014-01-01

    We study the structural properties of colored Kauffman homologies of knots. Quadruple-gradings play an essential role in revealing the differential structure of colored Kauffman homology. Using the differential structure, the Kauffman homologies carrying the symmetric tensor products of the vector representation for the trefoil and the figure-eight are determined. In addition, making use of relations from representation theory, we also obtain the HOMFLY homologies colored by rectangular Young tableaux with two rows for these knots. Furthermore, the notion of super-A-polynomials is extended in order to encompass two-parameter deformations of PSL(2,ℂ) character varieties

  6. Recombination in Streptococcus pneumoniae Lineages Increase with Carriage Duration and Size of the Polysaccharide Capsule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrispin Chaguza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a high burden of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD globally, especially in children from resource-poor settings. Like many bacteria, the pneumococcus can import DNA from other strains or even species by transformation and homologous recombination, which has allowed the pneumococcus to evade clinical interventions such as antibiotics and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs. Pneumococci are enclosed in a complex polysaccharide capsule that determines the serotype; the capsule varies in size and is associated with properties including carriage prevalence and virulence. We determined and quantified the association between capsule and recombination events using genomic data from a diverse collection of serotypes sampled in Malawi. We determined both the amount of variation introduced by recombination relative to mutation (the relative rate and how many individual recombination events occur per isolate (the frequency. Using univariate analyses, we found an association between both recombination measures and multiple factors associated with the capsule, including duration and prevalence of carriage. Because many capsular factors are correlated, we used multivariate analysis to correct for collinearity. Capsule size and carriage duration remained positively associated with recombination, although with a reduced P value, and this effect may be mediated through some unassayed additional property associated with larger capsules. This work describes an important impact of serotype on recombination that has been previously overlooked. While the details of how this effect is achieved remain to be determined, it may have important consequences for the serotype-specific response to vaccines and other interventions.

  7. Thermus thermophilis dnaX homolog encoding gamma- and tau-like proteins of the chromosomal replicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurieva, O; Skangalis, M; Kuriyan, J; O'Donnell, M

    1997-10-24

    This report identifies the dnaX homolog from Thermus thermophilis. Replicases from bacteria to humans contain subunits that are homologous to one another. These homologs are subunits of a clamp loading apparatus that loads sliding clamps onto DNA, which in turn act as mobile tethers for the replication machinery. In Escherichia coli, two of these subunits (gamma and tau) are encoded by one gene (dnaX) in nearly equal amounts by way of an efficient translational frameshift. The gamma and tau subunits form the central touchpoint that holds together two DNA polymerases with one clamp loading apparatus to form the E. coli chromosomal replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. The E. coli holoenzyme is an efficient replication machine that simultaneously replicates both strands of duplex DNA. The T. thermophilis dnaX homolog also contains a frameshift signature and produces both tau- and gamma-like proteins. Recombinant T. thermophilis tau- and gamma-like proteins, expressed in E. coli, have an oligomeric state similar to that of their E. coli counterparts and display ATPase activity that is stimulated by DNA. These results imply that T. thermophilis utilizes a DNA polymerase III holoenzyme replication machinery similar to that of E. coli.

  8. Genomic lineages of Rhizobium etli revealed by the extent of nucleotide polymorphisms and low recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Víctor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the DNA variations found in bacterial species are in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, but there is some debate regarding how much of this variation comes from mutation versus recombination. The nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacteria Rhizobium etli is highly variable in both genomic structure and gene content. However, no previous report has provided a detailed genomic analysis of this variation at nucleotide level or the role of recombination in generating diversity in this bacterium. Here, we compared draft genomic sequences versus complete genomic sequences to obtain reliable measures of genetic diversity and then estimated the role of recombination in the generation of genomic diversity among Rhizobium etli. Results We identified high levels of DNA polymorphism in R. etli, and found that there was an average divergence of 4% to 6% among the tested strain pairs. DNA recombination events were estimated to affect 3% to 10% of the genomic sample analyzed. In most instances, the nucleotide diversity (π was greater in DNA segments with recombinant events than in non-recombinant segments. However, this degree of recombination was not sufficiently large to disrupt the congruence of the phylogenetic trees, and further evaluation of recombination in strains quartets indicated that the recombination levels in this species are proportionally low. Conclusion Our data suggest that R. etli is a species composed of separated lineages with low homologous recombination among the strains. Horizontal gene transfer, particularly via the symbiotic plasmid characteristic of this species, seems to play an important role in diversity but the lineages maintain their evolutionary cohesiveness.

  9. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  10. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  11. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali G Hinch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The pseudoautosomal region (PAR is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome.

  12. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  13. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS

  14. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  15. The Causes of Quasi-homologous CMEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Quanhao [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Temmer, M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A. M., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: ljliu@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we identified the magnetic source locations of 142 quasi-homologous (QH) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), of which 121 are from solar cycle (SC) 23 and 21 from SC 24. Among those CMEs, 63% originated from the same source location as their predecessor (defined as S-type), while 37% originated from a different location within the same active region as their predecessor (defined as D-type). Their distinctly different waiting time distributions, peaking around 7.5 and 1.5 hr for S- and D-type CMEs, suggest that they might involve different physical mechanisms with different characteristic timescales. Through detailed analysis based on nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field modeling of two exemplary cases, we propose that the S-type QH CMES might involve a recurring energy release process from the same source location (by magnetic free energy replenishment), whereas the D-type QH CMEs can happen when a flux tube system is disturbed by a nearby CME.

  16. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys66 is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys13, Lys80, and Lys289) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys66 in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN. PMID:27405757

  17. High speed homology search with FPGAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Maruyama, Tsutomu; Konagaya, Akihiko

    2002-01-01

    We will introduce a way how we can achieve high speed homology search by only adding one off-the-shelf PCI board with one Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to a Pentium based computer system in use. FPGA is a reconfigurable device, and any kind of circuits, such as pattern matching program, can be realized in a moment. The performance is almost proportional to the size of FPGA which is used in the system, and FPGAs are becoming larger and larger following Moore's law. We can easily obtain latest/larger FPGAs in the form off-the-shelf PCI boards with FPGAs, at low costs. The result which we obtained is as follows. The performance is most comparable with small to middle class dedicated hardware systems when we use a board with one of the latest FPGAs and the performance can be furthermore accelerated by using more number of FPGA boards. The time for comparing a query sequence of 2,048 elements with a database sequence of 64 million elements by the Smith-Waterman algorithm is about 34 sec, which is about 330 times faster than a desktop computer with a 1 GHz Pentium III. We can also accelerate the performance of a laptop computer using a PC card with one smaller FPGA. The time for comparing a query sequence (1,024) with the database sequence (64 million) is about 185 sec, which is about 30 times faster than the desktop computer.

  18. Induction of osteogenesis by demineralized homologous and xenograft bone matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Agnol Rosiris

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteogenesis induction by demineralized bone matrix grafts remains as a challenge in the reconstructions of the mandible through homologous and xenografts or in implants in abdominal muscle. PURPOSE: Observed the behaviour of implants of demineralized bone matrix at the mandible (right side with homologous graft and left side with xenograft of pig. METHODS: Experimental study with homologous and heterologous implants of demineralized bone matrix at the mandible and in ectopic muscle at the Center of Experimental Surgery of Heliopolis Hospital, Hosphel, São Paulo, Brazil. In 6 white New Zeland rabbits, 46 grafts were performed being 23 with homologous (rabbit and 23 with xenograft (pig. 12 homologous implants (6 at the right side of the mandible and 6 at abdominal muscle of the rabbit and 12 heterologous implants of pigs (6 at the left side of the mandible and 6 at abdominal muscle rabbit were performed with demineralized bone matrix. RESULTS: Osteogenesis was assessed through histologic features after 30 and 60 days. After 1 rabbit dead, osteogenesis (mandible were detected in 9 of 11 (82% rabbits that received homologous matrix, in spite of heterologous implants showed osteogenesis in 6 out of 11 (54% (p=0,18. The abdominal muscle showed induced osteogenesis in 3 out of 11(27% animals with homologous and 0% with heterologous implants (p=0,10. CONCLUSIONS: Osteogenesis induction through homologous grafts in rabbit mandible and abdominal muscle were more effective than xenografts.

  19. Statistical Inference for Porous Materials using Persistent Homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chul [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We propose a porous materials analysis pipeline using persistent homology. We rst compute persistent homology of binarized 3D images of sampled material subvolumes. For each image we compute sets of homology intervals, which are represented as summary graphics called persistence diagrams. We convert persistence diagrams into image vectors in order to analyze the similarity of the homology of the material images using the mature tools for image analysis. Each image is treated as a vector and we compute its principal components to extract features. We t a statistical model using the loadings of principal components to estimate material porosity, permeability, anisotropy, and tortuosity. We also propose an adaptive version of the structural similarity index (SSIM), a similarity metric for images, as a measure to determine the statistical representative elementary volumes (sREV) for persistence homology. Thus we provide a capability for making a statistical inference of the uid ow and transport properties of porous materials based on their geometry and connectivity.

  20. T3SS-Independent Uptake of the Short-Trip Toxin-Related Recombinant NleC Effector of EnteropathogenicEscherichia coliLeads to NF-κB p65 Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Anne-Sophie; Norkowski, Stefanie; Körner, Britta; Schmitz, Jürgen; Lüken, Lena; Frankenberg, Maj; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Effector proteins secreted by the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of pathogenic bacteria have been shown to precisely modulate important signaling cascades of the host for the benefit of the pathogens. Among others, the non-LEE encoded T3SS effector protein NleC of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a Zn-dependent metalloprotease and suppresses innate immune responses by directly targeting the NF-κB signaling pathway. Many pathogenic bacteria release potent bacterial toxins of the A-B type, which-in contrast to the direct cytoplasmic injection of T3SS effector proteins-are released first into the environment. In this study, we found that NleC displays characteristics of bacterial A-B toxins, when applied to eukaryotic cells as a recombinant protein. Although lacking a B subunit, that typically mediates the uptake of toxins, recombinant NleC (rNleC) induces endocytosis via lipid rafts and follows the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. The conformation of rNleC is altered by low pH to facilitate its escape from acidified endosomes. This is reminiscent of the homologous A-B toxin AIP56 of the fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae piscicida ( Phdp ). The recombinant protease NleC is functional inside eukaryotic cells and cleaves p65 of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we describe the endocytic uptake mechanism of rNleC, characterize its intracellular trafficking and demonstrate that its specific activity of cleaving p65 requires activation of host cells e.g., by IL1β. Further, we propose an evolutionary link between some T3SS effector proteins and bacterial toxins from apparently unrelated bacteria. In summary, these properties might suggest rNleC as an interesting candidate for future applications as a potential therapeutic against immune disorders.

  1. T3SS-Independent Uptake of the Short-Trip Toxin-Related Recombinant NleC Effector of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Leads to NF-κB p65 Cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Anne-Sophie; Norkowski, Stefanie; Körner, Britta; Schmitz, Jürgen; Lüken, Lena; Frankenberg, Maj; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Effector proteins secreted by the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of pathogenic bacteria have been shown to precisely modulate important signaling cascades of the host for the benefit of the pathogens. Among others, the non-LEE encoded T3SS effector protein NleC of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a Zn-dependent metalloprotease and suppresses innate immune responses by directly targeting the NF-κB signaling pathway. Many pathogenic bacteria release potent bacterial toxins of the A-B type, which—in contrast to the direct cytoplasmic injection of T3SS effector proteins—are released first into the environment. In this study, we found that NleC displays characteristics of bacterial A-B toxins, when applied to eukaryotic cells as a recombinant protein. Although lacking a B subunit, that typically mediates the uptake of toxins, recombinant NleC (rNleC) induces endocytosis via lipid rafts and follows the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. The conformation of rNleC is altered by low pH to facilitate its escape from acidified endosomes. This is reminiscent of the homologous A-B toxin AIP56 of the fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae piscicida (Phdp). The recombinant protease NleC is functional inside eukaryotic cells and cleaves p65 of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we describe the endocytic uptake mechanism of rNleC, characterize its intracellular trafficking and demonstrate that its specific activity of cleaving p65 requires activation of host cells e.g., by IL1β. Further, we propose an evolutionary link between some T3SS effector proteins and bacterial toxins from apparently unrelated bacteria. In summary, these properties might suggest rNleC as an interesting candidate for future applications as a potential therapeutic against immune disorders. PMID:28451521

  2. Immunocytological analysis of meiotic recombination in two anole lizards (Squamata, Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisachov, Artem P; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Giovannotti, Massimo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Borodin, Pavel M

    2017-01-01

    Although the evolutionary importance of meiotic recombination is not disputed, the significance of interspecies differences in the recombination rates and recombination landscapes remains under-appreciated. Recombination rates and distribution of chiasmata have been examined cytologically in many mammalian species, whereas data on other vertebrates are scarce. Immunolocalization of the protein of the synaptonemal complex (SYCP3), centromere proteins and the mismatch-repair protein MLH1 was used, which is associated with the most common type of recombination nodules, to analyze the pattern of meiotic recombination in the male of two species of iguanian lizards, Anolis carolinensis Voigt, 1832 and Deiroptyx coelestinus (Cope, 1862). These species are separated by a relatively long evolutionary history although they retain the ancestral iguanian karyotype. In both species similar and extremely uneven distributions of MLH1 foci along the macrochromosome bivalents were detected: approximately 90% of crossovers were located at the distal 20% of the chromosome arm length. Almost total suppression of recombination in the intermediate and proximal regions of the chromosome arms contradicts the hypothesis that "homogenous recombination" is responsible for the low variation in GC content across the anole genome. It also leads to strong linkage disequilibrium between the genes located in these regions, which may benefit conservation of co-adaptive gene arrays responsible for the ecological adaptations of the anoles.

  3. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  4. Homologous gene targeting of a carotenoids biosynthetic gene in Rhodosporidium toruloides by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyi; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xueying; Lin, Xinping; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Sufang; Luan, Yushi; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2017-07-01

    To target a carotenoid biosynthetic gene in the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) method. The RHTO_04602 locus of R. toruloides NP11, previously assigned to code the carotenoid biosynthetic gene CRTI, was amplified from genomic DNA and cloned into the binary plasmid pZPK-mcs, resulting in pZPK-CRT. A HYG-expression cassette was inserted into the CRTI sequence of pZPK-CRT by utilizing the restriction-free clone strategy. The resulted plasmid was used to transform R. toruloides cells according to the AMT method, leading to a few white transformants. Sequencing analysis of those transformants confirmed homologous recombination and insertional inactivation of CRTI. When the white variants were transformed with a CRTI-expression cassette, cells became red and produced carotenoids as did the wild-type strain NP11. Successful homologous targeting of the CrtI locus confirmed the function of RHTO_04602 in carotenoids biosynthesis in R. toruloides. It provided valuable information for metabolic engineering of this non-model yeast species.

  5. A macrophage inflammatory protein homolog encoded by guinea pig cytomegalovirus signals via CC chemokine receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, Mark; Miao Zhenhua; Wang Yu; Haggerty, Shannon; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of cellular immune effector proteins, including chemokines (CKs) and CK receptor-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome identified an open reading frame (ORF) which predicted a 101 amino acid (aa) protein with homology to the macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) subfamily of CC (β) CKs, designated GPCMV-MIP. To assess functionality of this CK, recombinant GPCMV-MIP was expressed in HEK293 cells and assayed for its ability to bind to and functionally interact with a variety of GPCRs. Specific signaling was observed with the hCCR1 receptor, which could be blocked with hMIP -1α in competition experiments. Migration assays revealed that GPCMV-MIP was able to induce chemotaxis in hCCR1-L1.2 cells. Antisera raised against a GST-MIP fusion protein immunoprecipitated species of ∼12 and 10 kDa from GPCMV-inoculated tissue culture lysates, and convalescent antiserum from GPCMV-infected animals was immunoreactive with GST-MIP by ELISA assay. These results represent the first substantive in vitro characterization of a functional CC CK encoded by a cytomegalovirus

  6. Hydrogen recombiner development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewit, W.A.; Koroll, G.W.; Loesel Sitar, J.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners have been developed at AECL for the purpose of hydrogen removal in post-accident nuclear containment buildings. The recombiners are based on a particular catalyst designed by AECL which has extraordinary resistance to fouling from water and water vapour and a large thermodynamic range of operation. The catalysts were developed, originally, for the purpose of heavy water manufacturing by way of a catalytic exchange process. Application of these catalyst materials in recombiners for containment applications began in the late 1980's. The first application was a passive recombiner, qualified for use in control of radiolytic hydrogen in the headspace of a pool-type experimental reactor of AECL design in 1988. The passive, or natural convection recombiner concept has continued development to commercial stage for application in power reactor containments. This paper reviews the AECL recombiner development, describes the current model and shows results from tests of full-scale recombiners in the Large Scale Vented Combustion Test Facility at AECL-WL. The AECL recombiner is designed for compactness and ease of engineering into containment. The design is a simple, open-ended rectangular enclosure with catalyst elements arranged inside to promote optimum convective flow driven by heat of recombination at the catalyst surface. Self start, as evidenced by catalyst heating and initiation of flow, is achieved in less than 1% hydrogen, with available oxygen, at room temperature and 100% relative humidity. This low temperature start-up in condensing atmospheres is viewed as the most challenging condition for wet-proofing effectiveness. Cold start-up is a vital performance requirement in containments, such as CANDU, where engineered air-cooling systems are operating and where long-term hydrogen control is required, after containment atmospheres have cooled. Once started, the removal capacity scales linearly with the inlet cross-section area and the partial

  7. PXA1, a putative S. cerevisiae homolog of the human adrenoleukyodystrophy gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shani, N.; Watkins, P.A.; Valle, D. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) and the 70 kD peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) are ATP-binding cassette transporters in the peroxisome membrane. The former is defective in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder with defective peroxisome oxidation of very long chain fatty acids; the latter is implicated in Zellweger syndrome, a defect in peroxisome biogenesis. The functions and interactions of ALDP and PMP70 in the peroxisomal membrane are not known. To develop a system in which these questions could be addressed, we sought to clone their yeast homologs. Using RT/PCR with degenerate primers and oleic acid (C18:1) induced yeast RNA as template, we amplified a cDNA segment corresponding to a conserved region of ALDP and PMP70. By sequencing amplified products, we found one with homology to both proteins and used it to clone the corresponding full length yeast gene (PXA1). PXA1 encodes a 758 amino acid protein with 28% and 21% overall identity to ALDP and PMP70, respectively which increases to 47% and 39% in a C terminal region of 178 amino acids. The PXA1 protein precipitates with peroxisomes as shown by immunoblot analysis of cell fractionation gradients. Disruption of PXA1 by homologous recombination results in impaired growth on oleic acid and reduced ability to oxidize oleate. The growth phenotype can be corrected by expression of the wild type PXA1 in the mutant strain. Peroxisomes in the PXA1 mutant yeast strain are intact as judged by catalase distribution and electron microscopy. Given the amino acid similarity, fatty acid oxidation defect and lack of an effect on peroxisomal integrity, we hypothesize that PXA1 may be the yeast ortholog of ALDP. Complementation studies to examine this hypothesis are in progress.

  8. Review of Parton Recombination Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, Steffen A

    2006-01-01

    Parton recombination models have been very successful in explaining data taken at RHIC on hadron spectra and emission patterns in Au+Au collisions at transverse momenta above 2 GeV/c, which have exhibited features which could not be understood in the framework of basic perturbative QCD. In this article I will review the current status on recombination models and outline which future challenges need to be addressed by this class of models

  9. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators

    OpenAIRE

    L?vgren, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need ...

  10. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Balcova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd, it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2 genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  11. Experimental evidence that RNA recombination occurs in the Japanese encephalitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, C.-K.; Chen, W.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the lack of a proofreading function and error-repairing ability of genomic RNA, accumulated mutations are known to be a force driving viral evolution in the genus Flavivirus, including the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. Based on sequencing data, RNA recombination was recently postulated to be another factor associated with genomic variations in these viruses. We herein provide experimental evidence to demonstrate the occurrence of RNA recombination in the JE virus using two local pure clones (T1P1-S1 and CJN-S1) respectively derived from the local strains, T1P1 and CJN. Based on results from a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay on the C/preM junction comprising a fragment of 868 nucleotides (nt 10-877), the recombinant progeny virus was primarily formed in BHK-21 cells that had been co-infected with the two clones used in this study. Nine of 20 recombinant forms of the JE virus had a crossover in the nt 123-323 region. Sequencing data derived from these recombinants revealed that no nucleotide deletion or insertion occurred in this region favoring crossovers, indicating that precisely, not aberrantly, homologous recombination was involved. With site-directed mutagenesis, three stem-loop secondary structures were destabilized and re-stabilized in sequence, leading to changes in the frequency of recombination. This suggests that the conformation, not the free energy, of the secondary structure is important in modulating RNA recombination of the virus. It was concluded that because RNA recombination generates genetic diversity in the JE virus, this must be considered particularly in studies of viral evolution, epidemiology, and possible vaccine safety.

  12. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection. PMID:21679423

  13. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dishi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28 following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31. Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  14. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  15. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Unresolved recombination intermediates lead to ultra-fine anaphase bridges, chromosome breaks and aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying Wai; Fugger, Kasper; West, Stephen C

    2018-01-01

    The resolution of joint molecules that link recombining sister chromatids is essential for chromosome segregation. Here, we determine the fate of unresolved recombination intermediates arising in cells lacking two nucleases required for resolution (GEN1 -/- knockout cells depleted of MUS81). We find that intermediates persist until mitosis and form a distinct class of anaphase bridges, which we term homologous recombination ultra-fine bridges (HR-UFBs). HR-UFBs are distinct from replication stress-associated UFBs, which arise at common fragile sites, and from centromeric UFBs. HR-UFBs are processed by BLM helicase to generate single-stranded RPA-coated bridges that are broken during mitosis. In the next cell cycle, DNA breaks activate the DNA damage checkpoint response, and chromosome fusions arise by non-homologous end joining. Consequently, the cells undergo cell cycle delay and massive cell death. These results lead us to present a model detailing how unresolved recombination intermediates can promote DNA damage and chromosomal instability.

  17. Ion current prediction model considering columnar recombination in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Susumu; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Aoyama, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    We present a reinforced ion current prediction model in alpha radioactivity measurement using ionized air transportation. Although our previous model explained the qualitative trend of the measured ion current values, the absolute values of the theoretical curves were about two times as large as the measured values. In order to accurately predict the measured values, we reinforced our model by considering columnar recombination and turbulent diffusion, which affects columnar recombination. Our new model explained the considerable ion loss in the early stage of ion diffusion and narrowed the gap between the theoretical and measured values. The model also predicted suppression of ion loss due to columnar recombination by spraying a high-speed air flow near a contaminated surface. This suppression was experimentally investigated and confirmed. In conclusion, we quantitatively clarified the theoretical relation between alpha radioactivity and ion current in laminar flow and turbulent pipe flow. (author)

  18. Gene doctoring: a method for recombineering in laboratory and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Homologous recombination mediated by the λ-Red genes is a common method for making chromosomal modifications in Escherichia coli. Several protocols have been developed that differ in the mechanisms by which DNA, carrying regions homologous to the chromosome, are delivered into the cell. A common technique is to electroporate linear DNA fragments into cells. Alternatively, DNA fragments are generated in vivo by digestion of a donor plasmid with a nuclease that does not cleave the host genome. In both cases the λ-Red gene products recombine homologous regions carried on the linear DNA fragments with the chromosome. We have successfully used both techniques to generate chromosomal mutations in E. coli K-12 strains. However, we have had limited success with these λ-Red based recombination techniques in pathogenic E. coli strains, which has led us to develop an enhanced protocol for recombineering in such strains. Results Our goal was to develop a high-throughput recombineering system, primarily for the coupling of genes to epitope tags, which could also be used for deletion of genes in both pathogenic and K-12 E. coli strains. To that end we have designed a series of donor plasmids for use with the λ-Red recombination system, which when cleaved in vivo by the I-SceI meganuclease generate a discrete linear DNA fragment, allowing for C-terminal tagging of chromosomal genes with a 6 × His, 3 × FLAG, 4 × ProteinA or GFP tag or for the deletion of chromosomal regions. We have enhanced existing protocols and technologies by inclusion of a cassette conferring kanamycin resistance and, crucially, by including the sacB gene on the donor plasmid, so that all but true recombinants are counter-selected on kanamycin and sucrose containing media, thus eliminating the need for extensive screening. This method has the added advantage of limiting the exposure of cells to the potential damaging effects of the λ-Red system, which can lead to unwanted secondary

  19. Gene doctoring: a method for recombineering in laboratory and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn Charles W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homologous recombination mediated by the λ-Red genes is a common method for making chromosomal modifications in Escherichia coli. Several protocols have been developed that differ in the mechanisms by which DNA, carrying regions homologous to the chromosome, are delivered into the cell. A common technique is to electroporate linear DNA fragments into cells. Alternatively, DNA fragments are generated in vivo by digestion of a donor plasmid with a nuclease that does not cleave the host genome. In both cases the λ-Red gene products recombine homologous regions carried on the linear DNA fragments with the chromosome. We have successfully used both techniques to generate chromosomal mutations in E. coli K-12 strains. However, we have had limited success with these λ-Red based recombination techniques in pathogenic E. coli strains, which has led us to develop an enhanced protocol for recombineering in such strains. Results Our goal was to develop a high-throughput recombineering system, primarily for the coupling of genes to epitope tags, which could also be used for deletion of genes in both pathogenic and K-12 E. coli strains. To that end we have designed a series of donor plasmids for use with the λ-Red recombination system, which when cleaved in vivo by the I-SceI meganuclease generate a discrete linear DNA fragment, allowing for C-terminal tagging of chromosomal genes with a 6 × His, 3 × FLAG, 4 × ProteinA or GFP tag or for the deletion of chromosomal regions. We have enhanced existing protocols and technologies by inclusion of a cassette conferring kanamycin resistance and, crucially, by including the sacB gene on the donor plasmid, so that all but true recombinants are counter-selected on kanamycin and sucrose containing media, thus eliminating the need for extensive screening. This method has the added advantage of limiting the exposure of cells to the potential damaging effects of the λ-Red system, which can lead

  20. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  1. Somatic DNA recombination yielding circular DNA and deletion of a genomic region in embryonic brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Toyoki; Chijiiwa, Yoshiharu; Tsuji, Hideo; Sakoda, Saburo; Tani, Kenzaburo; Suzuki, Tomokazu

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a mouse genomic region is identified that undergoes DNA rearrangement and yields circular DNA in brain during embryogenesis. External region-directed inverse polymerase chain reaction on circular DNA extracted from late embryonic brain tissue repeatedly detected DNA of this region containing recombination joints. Wide-range genomic PCR and digestion-circularization PCR analysis showed this region underwent recombination accompanied with deletion of intervening sequences, including the circularized regions. This region was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to C1 on mouse chromosome 16, where no gene and no physiological DNA rearrangement had been identified. DNA sequence in the region has segmental homology to an orthologous region on human chromosome 3q.13. These observations demonstrated somatic DNA recombination yielding genomic deletions in brain during embryogenesis

  2. Infection and RNA recombination of Brome mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Bujarski, Jozef J.

    2004-01-01

    Ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana supported the replication and systemic spread of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. Infection was induced either by manual inoculation with viral RNA or by BMV virions, demonstrating that virus disassembly did not prevent infection. When in vitro-transcribed BMV RNAs 1-3 were used, production of subgenomic RNA4 was observed, showing that BMV RNA replication and transcription had occurred. Furthermore, inoculations of the transgenic Arabidopsis line that expressed a suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway markedly increased the BMV RNA concentrations. Inoculations with designed BMV RNA3 recombination vectors generated both homologous and nonhomologous BMV RNA-RNA recombinants. Thus, all cellular factors essential for BMV RNA replication, transcription, and RNA recombination were shown to be present in Arabidopsis. The current scope of understanding of the model Arabidopsis plant system should facilitate the identification of these factors governing the BMV life cycle

  3. Inhibition of telomere recombination by inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 promotes cell longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Peng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB is one of the major damages that cause genome instability and cellular aging. The homologous recombination (HR-mediated repair of DSBs plays an essential role in assurance of genome stability and cell longevity. Telomeres resemble DSBs and are competent for HR. Here we show that in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomere recombination elicits genome instability and accelerates cellular aging. Inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 specifically inhibits telomere recombination, and significantly extends cell longevity in both telomerase-positive and pre-senescing telomerase-negative cells. Deletion of CGI121 in the short-lived yku80(tel mutant restores lifespan to cgi121Δ level, supporting the function of Cgi121 in telomeric single-stranded DNA generation and thus in promotion of telomere recombination. Strikingly, inhibition of telomere recombination is able to further slow down the aging process in long-lived fob1Δ cells, in which rDNA recombination is restrained. Our study indicates that HR activity at telomeres interferes with telomerase to pose a negative impact on cellular longevity.

  4. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafrouni, Hanna.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values [fr

  5. The K-homology of nets of C∗-algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzi, Giuseppe; Vasselli, Ezio

    2014-12-01

    Let X be a space, intended as a possibly curved space-time, and A a precosheaf of C∗-algebras on X. Motivated by algebraic quantum field theory, we study the Kasparov and Θ-summable K-homology of A interpreting them in terms of the holonomy equivariant K-homology of the associated C∗-dynamical system. This yields a characteristic class for K-homology cycles of A with values in the odd cohomology of X, that we interpret as a generalized statistical dimension.

  6. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Desensitization of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice: suppressive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Katsura

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic injection of high doses of antigen into a preimmunized animal results in transient unresponsiveness of cell-mediated immune responses. This phenomenon is known as desensitization. Serum interleukin 2 (IL-2 activity was found transiently in desensitized mice at 3 h after the antigen challenge. These mice could not reveal antigen nonspecific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH 1 d after the challenge. Specific suppression of DTH was observed at later stages. Sera from 3 h desensitized mice showed suppressive effects on DTH in preo immunized mice. Administration of recombinant IL-2 into preimmunized mice led to the failure of development of DTH to antigens. These observations suggest that IL-2 plays an important role in the suppressive environment.

  8. Organization of DNA partners and strand exchange mechanisms during Flp site-specific recombination analyzed by difference topology, single molecule FRET and single molecule TPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yen-Ting; Savva, Christos G; Rowley, Paul A; Cannon, Brian; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Russell, Rick; Holzenburg, Andreas; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-02-20

    Flp site-specific recombination between two target sites (FRTs) harboring non-homology within the strand exchange region does not yield stable recombinant products. In negatively supercoiled plasmids containing head-to-tail sites, the reaction produces a series of knots with odd-numbered crossings. When the sites are in head-to-head orientation, the knot products contain even-numbered crossings. Both types of knots retain parental DNA configuration. By carrying out Flp recombination after first assembling the topologically well defined Tn3 resolvase synapse, it is possible to determine whether these knots arise by a processive or a dissociative mechanism. The nearly exclusive products from head-to-head and head-to-tail oriented "non-homologous" FRT partners are a 4-noded knot and a 5-noded knot, respectively. The corresponding products from a pair of native (homologous) FRT sites are a 3-noded knot and a 4-noded catenane, respectively. These results are consistent with non-homology-induced two rounds of dissociative recombination by Flp, the first to generate reciprocal recombinants containing non-complementary base pairs and the second to produce parental molecules with restored base pairing. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) analysis of geometrically restricted FRTs, together with single molecule tethered particle motion (smTPM) assays of unconstrained FRTs, suggests that the sites are preferentially synapsed in an anti-parallel fashion. This selectivity in synapse geometry occurs prior to the chemical steps of recombination, signifying early commitment to a productive reaction path. The cumulative topological, smFRET and smTPM results have implications for the relative orientation of DNA partners and the directionality of strand exchange during recombination mediated by tyrosine site-specific recombinases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Increasing the production yield of recombinant protein in transgenic seeds by expanding the deposition space within the intracellular compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Seeds must maintain a constant level of nitrogen in order to germinate. When recombinant proteins are produced while endogenous seed protein expression is suppressed, the production levels of the foreign proteins increase to compensate for the decreased synthesis of endogenous proteins. Thus, exchanging the production of endogenous seed proteins for that of foreign proteins is a promising approach to increase the yield of foreign recombinant proteins. Providing a space for the deposition of r...

  10. On the homology and the cohomology of certain polycyclic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1987-10-01

    The homology and the cohomology of infinite non-abelian split extensions of cyclic groups by cyclic groups have been computed through construction of nice free resolutions for these groups. (author). 16 refs

  11. Substrate and Cation Binding Mechanism of Glutamate Transporter Homologs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate transporters and their homologs are membrane proteins that transport glutamate and aspartate together with sodium ions and/or protons. Human glutamate transporters remove the neurotransmitter glutamate after signal transmission. Therefore, glutamate transporters play a great role in

  12. Homology of normal chains and cohomology of charges

    CERN Document Server

    Pauw, Th De; Pfeffer, W F

    2017-01-01

    The authors consider a category of pairs of compact metric spaces and Lipschitz maps where the pairs satisfy a linearly isoperimetric condition related to the solvability of the Plateau problem with partially free boundary. It includes properly all pairs of compact Lipschitz neighborhood retracts of a large class of Banach spaces. On this category the authors define homology and cohomology functors with real coefficients which satisfy the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, but reflect the metric properties of the underlying spaces. As an example they show that the zero-dimensional homology of a space in our category is trivial if and only if the space is path connected by arcs of finite length. The homology and cohomology of a pair are, respectively, locally convex and Banach spaces that are in duality. Ignoring the topological structures, the homology and cohomology extend to all pairs of compact metric spaces. For locally acyclic spaces, the authors establish a natural isomorphism between their cohomology and the �...

  13. Feline coronavirus type II strains 79-1683 and 79-1146 originate from a double recombination between feline coronavirus type I and canine coronavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Herrewegh, A.A.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Groot, R.J. de

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the type II feline coronavirus (FCoV) strains 79-1146 and 79-1683 have arisen from a homologous RNA recombination event between FCoV type I and canine coronavirus (CCV). In both cases, the template switch apparently took place between the S and M genes, giving rise to

  14. Suppression of different classes of somatic mutations in Arabidopsis by vir gene-expressing Agrobacterium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jasmine M; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Singh, Amit Kumar; Ramachandran, Subalakshmi; Unniyampurath, Unnikrishnan; Jayshankar, Ajitha; Balasundaram, Nithya; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Hyde, Geoff; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-08-26

    Agrobacterium infection, which is widely used to generate transgenic plants, is often accompanied by T-DNA-linked mutations and transpositions in flowering plants. It is not known if Agrobacterium infection also affects the rates of point mutations, somatic homologous recombinations (SHR) and frame-shift mutations (FSM). We examined the effects of Agrobacterium infection on five types of somatic mutations using a set of mutation detector lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. To verify the effect of secreted factors, we exposed the plants to different Agrobacterium strains, including wild type (Ach5), its derivatives lacking vir genes, oncogenes or T-DNA, and the heat-killed form for 48 h post-infection; also, for a smaller set of strains, we examined the rates of three types of mutations at multiple time-points. The mutation detector lines carried a non-functional β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) and a reversion of mutated GUS to it